Richard Tuitt

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Generation: 1

  1. 1.  Richard Tuitt was born County Westmeath, Ireland.

    Richard — unnamed spouse. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. 2. Avice Tuitt  Descendancy chart to this point was born County Westmeath, Ireland.


Generation: 2

  1. 2.  Avice Tuitt Descendancy chart to this point (1.Richard1) was born County Westmeath, Ireland.

    Avice — Nicholas de Carew. Nicholas was born (Carew Castle, Carew, Pembrokeshire, Wales); died 0___ 1297. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. 3. Nicholas Carew  Descendancy chart to this point was born (Carew Castle, Carew, Pembrokeshire, Wales); died 0___ 1311.


Generation: 3

  1. 3.  Nicholas CarewNicholas Carew Descendancy chart to this point (2.Avice2, 1.Richard1) was born (Carew Castle, Carew, Pembrokeshire, Wales); died 0___ 1311.

    Notes:

    Nicholas Carew (died 1311), feudal lord of Carew Castle in Pembrokeshire, feudal lord of Odrone[2] (mod. Idrone, County Carlow)[3] in Ireland and lord of the manor of Moulsford in Berkshire (since 1974 in Oxfordshire), was a soldier. He was the first of the Carew family to form a connection with the English county of Devon,[4] where his descendants became very prominent until modern times. His descendants obtained three Carew baronetcies and four peerage titles, namely Baron Carew (1605) in the Peerage of England (for Sir Sir George Carew (1555–1629), created in 1626 Earl of Totnes) and Baron Carew (1834) in the Peerage of Ireland and Baron Carew (1838) of Castle Boro in the County of Wexford, in the Peerage of the United Kingdom (both for Robert Shapland Carew (1787–1856)).

    Origins

    He was the eldest son and heir of Nicholas de Carew (died 1297), feudal lord of Carew Castle in Pembrokeshire, lord of the manor of Molesford in Berkshire and jure uxoris feudal lord of Odrone, by his wife Avice Tuitt, daughter and heiress of Richard Tuitt of Marston in County Westmeath, Ireland, whose family had acquired the Barony of Odrone by an earlier marriage to the heiress of Odrone.[5]

    Career

    As Nic(olae)us de Carru, D(omi)n(u)s de Mulesford ("Nicholas de Carew, lord of the manor of Moulsford") he was one of 103 signatories of the Barons' Letter of 1301 addressed to Pope Boniface VIII as a repudiation of his claim of feudal overlordship of Scotland and as a defence of the rights of King King Edward I of England as overlord of that kingdom.

    "Baron Carew"
    In 1300–1 he was summoned to Parliament by writ of King Edward I (1272–1307) as Dominus de Moulsford ("lord of the manor of Moulsford") by which he is deemed to have become Baron Carew.[6] He is called "Baron Carew" in various sources,[7] but a peerage title Baron Carew at this early date is not mentioned in the authoritative Complete Peerage (1887–98) by George Edward Cokayne. Pole however states that he was summoned to Parliament by writ of King Edward I (1272–1307), which would have made him a baron.[8] If so, there is no clear descent of such barony, and no explanation of why it had no clear ending.[9] According to Debrett's Peerage and Baronetage, 1968: "For several generations the heads of the family are described as Barons of Carew and Hidron, but none of them sat in Parliament with the exception of Nicholas de Carew who subscribed to the celebrated Barons' letter to the Pope in 1300".[10]

    Caerlaverock Roll

    He was present at the Siege of Caerlaverock Castle in Scotland in 1301, during which his armorials were amongst those blazoned in French verse by English heralds in the Caerlaverock Roll of Arms, as follows:[11]

    An vaillant home e de grant los
    O lui, Nichole de Karru,
    Dont meinte foiz orent paru
    Li fait en couvert e en lande
    Sur la felloune gent d'Irlande;
    Baniere ot jaune bien passable,
    O treis lyouns passans de sable.
    ("A valliant man ... Nicholas de Carew, who many times appeared ... a banner of gold ... three lions passant of sable")

    Marriage and children

    Arms of Peverell of Ermington: Or, an eagle displayed azure[12]
    He married Amicia (or Amy) Peverell,[13] daughter of Hugh Peverell lord of the manor of Ermington in Devon, and heiress of her brother Sir John Peverell of Ermington,[14] the last in the male line. By Amicia he had children including:

    John Carew (died 1324), eldest son and heir, who married twice:
    Firstly to Elinor de Mohun, daughter and heiress of Sir William de Mohun of Mohuns Ottery[15] in the parish of Luppit, Devon, by whom he had a son Nicholas Carew (died 1323) who married Elinor Talbot, daughter of Richard Lord Talbot,(sic, Vivian, 1895) (should be Sir Richard Talbot, who signed and sealed the Barons' Letter, 1301 and held the manor of Eccleswall in Herefordshire in right of his wife Sarah, sister of William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick) but died childless.[16] Sir William de Mohun of Mohuns Ottery was a younger son of Reginald de Mohun (1206–1258), feudal baron of Dunster (son), by his second wife Isabel de Ferrers, widow of Gilbert Basset (died 1241)[17] and daughter of William de Ferrers, 5th Earl of Derby (1193–1254) by his wife Sibyl Marshal, a daughter and co-heiress of William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke (1146/7-1219).[18] Reginald de Mohun gave the manor of Ottery to his younger son Sir William Mohun.[19]
    Secondly John Carew married Joan Talbot, daughter of Sir Gilbert Talbot, by whom he had a son John Carew (died 1363), the heir of his half-brother Nicholas Carew (died 1323),[20] from whom he inherited Mohuns Ottery, an important future seat of the Carew family. Joan Talbot survived him and remarried to John Dartmouth (alias Tuckett).[21]

    Thomas de Carew (died 1331).[22]

    William de Carew (died 1359), died childless.[23]

    David de Carew[24]

    Nicholas Carew (died 1390) of Beddington in Surrey, Keeper of the Privy Seal during the reign of King Edward III. He married Lucy de Willoughby, daughter and heiress of Sir Richard de Willoughby (c. 1290 – 1362), Chief Justice of the King's Bench, of Beddington, and widow of Sir Thomas

    Huscarle[25][26] (d. by 1352), MP, of Purley Magna, Berkshire and established a prominent and long-lived branch of the Carew family at Beddington.

    Landholdings

    Through his wife he inherited several manors including:

    Weston Peverell, near Plymouth;[27]
    Mamhead[28]
    Ashford[29]
    Galmeton[30]
    Further reading[edit]

    The Life of Sir Peter Carew, of Mohun Ottery, co. Devon., edited by Sir Thomas Phillipps, 1st Baronet (1792–1872), published 1840 in Archaeologia, the journal of the Society of Antiquaries of London. Concerning early history of the Carew family, source quoted by Vivian, 1895.
    Hamilton-Rogers, William Henry, Memorials of the West, Historical and Descriptive, Collected on the Borderland of Somerset, Dorset and Devon, Exeter, 1888, chapter The Nest of Carew (Ottery-Mohun), pp. 269–330, esp. pp. 286 et seq. [6]

    end

    Birth:
    Hey Cousiin Christine:

    Click on the following link and see images and read history about the old Carew Castle in Wales ... http://www.pembrokeshirecoast.org.uk/default.asp?PID=262

    Nicholas — Amicia Peverell. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. 4. John Carew  Descendancy chart to this point was born ~ 1277, Carew, Pembrokeshire, Wales; died 26 Jun 1324, Carew, Pembrokeshire, Wales.
    2. 5. Thomas Carew  Descendancy chart to this point was born Carew, Pembrokeshire, Wales; died 0___ 1331.
    3. 6. William de Carew  Descendancy chart to this point was born Carew, Pembrokeshire, Wales; died 0___ 1359.
    4. 7. David de Carew  Descendancy chart to this point was born Carew, Pembrokeshire, Wales.
    5. 8. Nicholas Carew  Descendancy chart to this point was born 0___ 1322, Sandford, Devon, England; died 17 Aug 1390, Mallerforde, Buckinghamshire, England.


Generation: 4

  1. 4.  John Carew Descendancy chart to this point (3.Nicholas3, 2.Avice2, 1.Richard1) was born ~ 1277, Carew, Pembrokeshire, Wales; died 26 Jun 1324, Carew, Pembrokeshire, Wales.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: John de Carew

    Notes:

    Sir John de CAREW formerly Carew
    Born about 1277 in Carew, Pembrokeshire, Walesmap
    Son of [father unknown] and [mother unknown]
    [sibling(s) unknown]
    Husband of Eleanor (Mohun) de Mohun — married about 1300 in Carew, Pembrokeshire, Walesmap
    Husband of Joanna Talbot — married 1309 in Carew, Pembrokeshire, Walesmap
    Father of Nicholas Carew and John Carew
    Died 26 Jun 1324 in Carew, Pembrokeshire, Walesmap

    Biography

    Sir John de Carew was the son of Sir Nicholas Carew and Amicia Peverell.[1]He married, firstly, Eleanor Mohun daughter of Sir William de Mohun in 1300 at Carew, Pembrokeshire, Wales. He married, secondly, Joan Talbot, daughter of Gilbert Talbot, 1st Lord Talbot in 1309 at Carew, Pembrokeshire, Wales. He died on the 26th of Jun 1324 in Carew, Pembrokeshire, Wales.

    Sources

    ? Mosley, Charles, editor. Burke's Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes. Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke's Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003. volume 1, page 682.
    Maxwell-Lyte, Henry Churchill, A History of Dunster and of the Families of Mohun & Luttrell (London: St. Catherine Press, 1909.), p. 33
    Cokayne, George Edward, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct, or Dormant (London: St. Catherine Press, 1910.), 4:199, 5:463
    Nicolas, Nicholas Harris, The Controversy between Sir Richard Scrope and Sir Robert Grosvenor in the Court of Chivalry (London: Bentley, 1832.), p. 245
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nicholas_Carew_(died_1311). see Marriage & progeny for son John

    end

    John — Eleanor de Mohun. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. 9. Nicholas Carew  Descendancy chart to this point was born ~ 1305.

    John married Joanna Talbot 0___ 1309, Carew, Pembrokeshire, Wales. (daughter of Gilbert Talbot, 1st Baron Talbot and Anne le Boteler) [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. 10. John Carew  Descendancy chart to this point was born 0___ 1310; died 22 May 1363, Castle Carew, Carew, Pembrokeshire, Wales.

  2. 5.  Thomas Carew Descendancy chart to this point (3.Nicholas3, 2.Avice2, 1.Richard1) was born Carew, Pembrokeshire, Wales; died 0___ 1331.

  3. 6.  William de Carew Descendancy chart to this point (3.Nicholas3, 2.Avice2, 1.Richard1) was born Carew, Pembrokeshire, Wales; died 0___ 1359.

  4. 7.  David de Carew Descendancy chart to this point (3.Nicholas3, 2.Avice2, 1.Richard1) was born Carew, Pembrokeshire, Wales.

  5. 8.  Nicholas Carew Descendancy chart to this point (3.Nicholas3, 2.Avice2, 1.Richard1) was born 0___ 1322, Sandford, Devon, England; died 17 Aug 1390, Mallerforde, Buckinghamshire, England.

    Notes:

    Nicholas Carew (died 1390) was Keeper of the Privy Seal during the reign of Edward III of England.
    Nicholas Carew was descended from the Carew family of Carew Castle in Pembrokeshire.[1] Sometime after 1352 he married Lucy, the daughter of Richard de Willoughby, and came into possession of the latter's manor at Beddington.[2] Carew was a man of ability,[1] holding the high office of Keeper of the Privy Seal from 1371 to 1377,[3] and was one of the executors of King Edward's will. He died in 1390, and was buried in the church of St. Mary's at Beddington.[2]
    From: )
    ____________________
    Sir Nicholas Carew, Keeper of the Privy Seal1,2
    M, #28102, d. 1390
    Father Sir Nicholas Carew
    Mother Avice Martin
    Sir Nicholas Carew, Keeper of the Privy Seal was born at of Beddington, Surrey, England. He married Lucy Willoughby, daughter of Sir Richard Willoughby and Elizabeth. Sir Nicholas Carew, Keeper of the Privy Seal died in 1390.
    Family Lucy Willoughby
    Child
    Nicholas Carew, Esq., Sheriff of Surrey & Sussex+ b. c 1345, d. 4 Sep 1432
    Citations
    1.[S8782] Unknown author, The Royal Descents of 500 Immigrants, by Gary Boyd Roberts, p. 431; The Ancestry of Dorothea Poyntz, by Ronny O. Bodine, p. 53.
    2.[S11572] The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, by Gerald Paget, Vol. II, p. 433.
    From: http://our-royal-titled-noble-and-commoner-ancestors.com/p936.htm#i28102
    ______________________
    Nicholas CAREW of Beddington
    Died: 17 Aug 1390
    Notes: He was Keeper of the Privy Seal, Edward III. The long association of the Carew family with Beddington and its Parish Church began about the middle of the 14th century and lasted, at least in name, almost to Victorian times. There are many memorials to members of the family and their dependents in the church at the present time, though according to Aubrey, the Surrey historian, there were many more at one time which have now disappeared. The first member of the family to reside at Beddington was Sir Nicholas Carew, who acquired the Lordship of this and other adjacent manors, by his marriage to the daughter of the former owner, Sir Richard Willoughby. He served in many important offices in the County and was succeeded in 1391 by his second son, also Nicholas by name. The Parish Church of St. Mary The Virgin, Beddington, Surrey: The History. Undated. Price One Shilling, p. 17.
    Father: Thomas CAREW
    Mother: Dau. MALEMAYNES
    Married: Lucy WILLOUGHBY AFT 1354
    Children:
    1. Nicholas CAREW
    2. Margaret CAREW
    3. Lucy CAREW
    4. Elizabeth CAREW
    5. John CAREW
    6. Margaret CAREW
    7. Guido CAREW
    8. William CAREW
    9. Eleanor CAREW
    10. Agnes CAREW
    11. Anne CAREW
    12. Susan CAREW
    13. Phillippa CAREW
    From: http://www.tudorplace.com.ar/CAREW2.htm#Nicholas CAREW of Beddington
    _________________
    CAREW, Nicholas (c.1356-1432), of Beddington, Surr.
    b.c.1356, s. and h. of Nicholas Carew† (d.1390) of Beddington, keeper of the privy seal, by his w. Lucy, da. and h. of Sir Richard Willoughby of Beddington, wid. of Sir Thomas Huscarle† (d. by 1352) of Purley Magna, Berks. m. (1) prob. by May 1374, Isabel, da. of Alice de la Mare of Delamers, Herts., at least 1s. Nicholas†; (2) prob. by July 1398, Mercy (d.1453), da. of Stephen Hayme† of Winchester by his w. Christine, at least 8s. 8da.1
    From:
    ______________________
    Notes: He was Keeper of the Privy Seal, Edward III. The long association of the Carew family with Beddington and its Parish Church began about the middle of the 14th century and lasted, at least in name, almost to Victorian times. There are many memorials to members of the family and their dependents in the church at the present time, though according to Aubrey, the Surrey historian, there were many more at one time which have now disappeared. The first member of the family to reside at Beddington was Sir Nicholas Carew, who acquired the Lordship of this and other adjacent manors, by his marriage to the daughter of the former owner, Sir Richard Willoughby. He served in many important offices in the County and was succeeded in 1391 by his second son, also Nicholas by name. The Parish Church of St. Mary The Virgin, Beddington, Surrey: The History. Undated. Price One Shilling, p. 17.
    1325B 17AUG1390D 13 CHILDREN BY LUCY-NICHOLAS,MARGARET,LUCY,ELIZABETH,JOHN,MARGARET,GUIDO,WILLIAM,ELEANOR,AGNES,ANNE,SUSAN,PHILLIPPA

    Nicholas CAREW of Beddington
    Died: 17 Aug 1390
    Notes: He was Keeper of the Privy Seal, Edward III. The long association of the Carew family with Beddington and its Parish Church began about the middle of the 14th century and lasted, at least in name, almost to Victorian times. There are many memorials to members of the family and their dependents in the church at the present time, though according to Aubrey, the Surrey historian, there were many more at one time which have now disappeared. The first member of the family to reside at Beddington was Sir Nicholas Carew, who acquired the Lordship of this and other adjacent manors, by his marriage to the daughter of the former owner, Sir Richard Willoughby. He served in many important offices in the County and was succeeded in 1391 by his second son, also Nicholas by name. The Parish Church of St. Mary The Virgin, Beddington, Surrey: The History. Undated. Price One Shilling, p. 17.

    Nicholas married Lucy Willoughby Aft 1354. Lucy (daughter of Richard Willoughby and Joan Grey) was born 0___ 1349, Wollaton, Nottinghamshire, England; died 0___ 1390, (Mallerforde, Buckinghamshire, England). [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. 11. Nicholas Carew  Descendancy chart to this point was born 0May 1356, Beddington, Surrey, England; died 4 Sep 1432, Beddington, Surrey, England; was buried Beddington, Surrey, England.


Generation: 5

  1. 9.  Nicholas Carew Descendancy chart to this point (4.John4, 3.Nicholas3, 2.Avice2, 1.Richard1) was born ~ 1305.

  2. 10.  John Carew Descendancy chart to this point (4.John4, 3.Nicholas3, 2.Avice2, 1.Richard1) was born 0___ 1310; died 22 May 1363, Castle Carew, Carew, Pembrokeshire, Wales.

    John — Margaret Mohun. Margaret was born ~ 1322; died Dunster, Somerset, England. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. 12. Leonard Carew  Descendancy chart to this point was born 0___ 1342; died 4 Oct 1369, Castle Carew, Carew, Pembrokeshire, Wale.

  3. 11.  Nicholas Carew Descendancy chart to this point (8.Nicholas4, 3.Nicholas3, 2.Avice2, 1.Richard1) was born 0May 1356, Beddington, Surrey, England; died 4 Sep 1432, Beddington, Surrey, England; was buried Beddington, Surrey, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Member of Parliament
    • Also Known As: Carreu(e), Carrew(e), Carrou, Carru, Carue

    Notes:

    About Nicholas de Carew, MP of Beddington Surrey

    From The History of Parliament: the House of Commons 1386-1421, ed. J.S. Roskell, L. Clark, C. Rawcliffe., 1993:



    CAREW, Nicholas (c.1356-1432), of Beddington, Surr.

    ConstituencyDates

    SURREY 1394
    SURREY 1395
    SURREY Jan. 1397
    SURREY Sept. 1397
    SURREY 1417

    Family and Education

    b.c.1356, son and heir of Nicholas Carew† (d.1390) of Beddington, keeper of the privy seal, by his wife Lucy, daughter and heiress of Sir Richard Willoughby of Beddington, widow of Sir Thomas Huscarle† (d. by 1352) of Purley Magna, Berkshire
    marrried (1) prob. by May 1374, Isabel, daughter of Alice de la Mare of Delamers, Hertfordshire, at least 1 son Nicholas†;
    married (2) prob. by July 1398, Mercy (d.1453), daughter of Stephen Hayme† of Winchester by his wife Christine, at least 8 sons and 8 daughters [1]

    Offices Held

    Sheriff, Surrey and Sussex, 21 Oct. 1391-18 Oct. 1392, 24 Nov. 1400-8 Nov. 1401.
    Commissioner of array, Surr. Mar. 1392, Dec. 1399, Jan. 1400, July 1402, Aug., Sept. 1403, July 1419;
    Commissioner of inquiry, Surrey, Sussex Mar. 1392
    (concealments), Surr. Mar. 1395, Apr. 1400
    (escaped prisoner), June 1406
    (concealments), Dec. 1406
    (wastes), Suss. Aug. 1408
    (ownership of the manor of Heyshott) Surr. Feb. 1415
    (concealments),[2]
    Surr., Suss. Feb. 1419 (escapes and concealments);
    Commissioner of oyer and terminer Apr. 1392 (treasure trove),
    Surr. Oct. 1398 (thefts from Battle abbey estates),
    Suss. Feb. 1420 (treasons and felonies);
    Commissioner to survey highways, Surr. Dec. 1392, Mar. 1394 (Egham area);
    Commissioner of gaol delivery, Guildford Apr. 1394;
    Commissioner to seize the estates of the Lords Appellant of 1387-8, Surr., Suss. Oct. 1397; of kiddles, Mdx., Surr. June 1398, Surr. bef. July 1401, Surr., Kent Nov. 1403 London Bridge to Greenwich Nov. 1405;
    Commissioner to prevent the spread of treasonous rumours May 1402;
    Commissioner to seize the lands of Sir Thomas West, Suss. July 1405;
    Commissioner to raise a royal loan, Surr., Hants Sept. 1405, June 1406, Surr. Nov. 1419, Jan. 1420;
    Commissioner to restore the goods of Thomas, earl of Arundel Feb. 1411;
    Commissioner to assess a tax, Surr. Jan. 1412.
    Justice of the peace for Surr. 18 June 1394-Mar. 1413, 28 Oct. 1417-Dec. 1431, Suss. 27 July-Nov. 1397, 3 Feb. 1400-3.
    Escheator, Surr. and Suss. 12 Nov. 1403-24 Nov. 1404, 9 Nov. 1406-2 Nov. 1407.
    Tax collector, Surr. Sept. 1405.
    Keeper of the estates of Bermondsey abbey 11 May 1400-aft. 12 July 1410.

    Biography

    Carew belonged to an old and distinguished family of Norman descent with strong Irish as well as English connexions. He was a kinsman of the influential Devonshire Carews, although his immediate ancestors lived in Berkshire and it was only during his father’s lifetime that the extensive Surrey estates which made up over half his inheritance were acquired.

    Nicholas Carew the elder played a prominent part in county society, representing Surrey twice in Parliament and serving on many local commissions. His main interests lay, however, at Court. He rose to become keeper of the privy seal in 1371; and his last years were largely given over to his duties as a feoffee and executor of Edward III.[3]

    The subject of this biography was born in about 1356, and may well have married some 18 years later, when the Berkshire landowner, Sir Thomas de la Mare†, settled his manor of Aldermaston upon various members of the Carew family for life.
    Nicholas’s wife, Isabel, the daughter of Alice de la Mare of Delamers in Hertfordshire, was quite probably related to Sir Thomas; and it was certainly through her that Carew established a connexion with John Ludwick* who became her stepfather during the 1380s.

    Meanwhile, from 1377 onwards, the young Nicholas Carew was a party to the numerous enfeoffments of property made by and for his father, so that on the latter’s death, in 1390, he gained undisputed possession of a substantial inheritance, most of which came to him through his mother, Lucy Willoughby, whose first husband, Sir Thomas Huscarle, left her his Berkshire and Surrey estates. Thus, by the date of his first return to Parliament, our Member enjoyed a landed income of at least ¹91 a year (and probably far more), derived from the manors of Beddington, Huscarle, Norbury, Carshalton, Woodmansterne, Carews in Warlingham and Nutfield, together with land in Hoe, Chesham, Sanderstead, Horne, Burstow, Mitcham, Coulsdon and Bensham, Surrey; from property in Gravesend and the manors of Stoke in Hoo and Maytham, Kent (although revenues from Stoke had been set aside for the upkeep of a chantry); and from Great Purley, Fulscot and Charlton in Wantage, as well as tenements in Tullwick and other parts of Berkshire.[4]

    Carew appears to have consolidated his holdings in Surrey over the next few years, so that by 1412 this part of his estates alone was said to be worth ¹80 a year. His marriage to Mercy, the daughter of Stephen Hayme, which took place in, or before, July 1398, brought him the manors of Hyde and Sulham in Berkshire. On her death, over 50 years later, Mercy Carew held the manor of ‘Pery’ in Harmondsworth, Middlesex, together with property in the London parish of Holy Trinity Aldgate, although these estates do not appear to have come into Carew’s hands until the end of his life, if then. It was, however, through his second wife that he acquired land and rents in the Hampshire villages of Forton and Otterbourne, since the Haymes had strong connexions with this part of the country, and Mercy’s father had represented Winchester in Parliament. The tax returns of 1412 show our MP to have been in receipt of ¹158 6s.8d. a year from his various properties, over and above the estimated ¹80 p.a. which was made over to him as a trustee of the Tregoz estates in Sussex.[5]
    Carew became a feoffee-to-uses of John Tregoz in 1400, and administered his inheritance from 1404 until about 1428, fighting at least two protracted lawsuits to retain control of the three manors involved.[6]

    He showed great concern, meanwhile, for the future of his own estates, and made a series of settlements upon feoffees, the first of which, begun on his second marriage, was to safeguard the title of his son and heir Nicholas. Over the years 1420 and 1421, and again in 1430, he conveyed most of his possessions to trustees, including John Gaynesford†, thus creating an impressive jointure for his widow. Her interests were indeed considerable, for by 1428 the Carews had obtained seisin of the manor of Studham in Berkshire as well as further holdings near their home at Beddington. They are also known to have become landowners in Hertfordshire at some point before 1420, possibly acquiring the property in and around King’s Langley and King’s Walden which Nicholas Carew the younger held some 15 years later.7

    Unlike his father, Carew never played a prominent part in national affairs, although he was active as a crown servant in the south east for almost 30 years of his life. He was occasionally called upon to perform the duties of a mainpernor and feoffee-to-uses while his father was alive, but it was not until the latter’s death that he became really involved in the local community.

    His administrative career began with his appointment as sheriff of Surrey and Sussex, and from then onwards he served regularly on royal commissions as well as sitting on the bench. In January 1393 he was rewarded with a grant of the farm of the manor of Croham in Croydon, for which he paid 40s. a year.

    We do not know why Carew and John Bonet* bound themselves to pay 200 marks to Thomas Ickham* and others in the following November, but the transaction may well have concerned Carew’s extensive dealings in the property market.[8]

    During the next two decades he was constantly preoccupied with litigation, for in addition to the cases fought by him as a trustee, he both brought and defended a number of personal actions at the local assizes. These concerned the ownership of property in Surrey, and one, over land in Mersham, resulted in his being awarded damages totalling 92 marks. He also appeared fairly regularly at Westminster as the plaintiff in suits for debt and trespass, although none of these seem to have reached a verdict. When, in November 1413, he quarrelled with the London mercer, John Lane, he agreed to accept the arbitration of four distinguished aldermen, offering securities of 1,000 marks as a guarantee of his readiness to abide by their decision.[9]

    Notwithstanding the fact that he sat in the two Parliaments of 1397 and was a commissioner for the confiscation of the lands of the Lords Appellant of 1388, Carew’s sympathies were sufficiently Lancastrian for him to find favour with the recently crowned Henry IV.

    He began a second term as sheriff in November 1400 - having already been re-appointed to the Sussex bench - and went on to become escheator of Surrey and Sussex. In October 1402 he was approached for a ‘benevolence’; and soon afterwards the Crown requested a personal contribution of 200 marks towards the cost of coastal defence. His support for the new regime also found practical expression in a loan of ¹100 which he advanced in July 1406, and recovered in the following year. No more money was borrowed from him by the government until June 1417, when he lent ¹40 towards Henry V’s second invasion of France.

    Carew was, meanwhile, chosen to represent Surrey at the great councils of 1401 and 1403, and it is clear that he was then regarded as one of the leading gentry of the shire. No doubt because of his social position, he was able to establish many influential connexions. He often acted as a mainpernor in Chancery and at the Exchequer, most notably for his fellow MPs, John Gravesend, the above-mentioned John Ludwick and the latter’s friend, John Durham* (in 1399), and Henry Beaufort, bishop of Winchester (in 1420).[10]

    As we have already seen, many people wished to make Carew their feoffee-to-uses. He performed this service for Thomas, earl of Arundel (d. 1415) and thus became involved in a dispute with John Wintershall* over the title to certain property in Surrey. Another quarrel with the widowed countess of Arundel dragged on for a while, but in February 1419 she surrendered bonds worth ¹1,000 to Carew and his co-feoffees in pledge of her acceptance of the dower settlement made upon her.

    One of the earl’s other associates was Ralph Cuddington*, who gave evidence on Carew’s behalf at this time and made him his executor shortly before he died in 1421.[11] It was evidently through their mutual attachment to Arundel that Carew struck up a friendship with Sir Thomas Sackville II* and Richard Wayville*. He and Sackville acted as each other’s trustees; and both men were named, along with Robert, Lord Poynings, as supervisors of Wayville’s last will, in which Carew received a bequest of a rosary. The latter was also on very close terms with Sir Thomas Lewknor†, his reputed son-in-law, whom he chose as a feoffee and as the supervisor of his own executors.[12]

    Although he remained on the Surrey bench until a few months before his death, Carew may otherwise be said to have retired from public life in about 1420. He and John Clipsham* helped settle a local property dispute at the beginning of the year, but apart from his attendance at the elections held in Guildford for the Parliament of May 1421, he had little else to do with government at any level. In April 1423 he was given custody of part of the manor of Burton Stacey in Hampshire, perhaps as a final reward for years of loyal service to the Crown.[13]

    Carew died on 4 Sept. 1432, ‘senex et plenus dierum’, and was buried at Beddington, next to his first wife, Isabel. In his will he made provision for bequests in excess of ¹183, several of which were to the churches and other religious bodies on his land.

    Only three of the 17 or more children of his two marriages appear to have survived him, the bulk of his estates having been settled previously upon Nicholas, his eldest son. The latter faced immediate problems over the administration of his father’s will, and also seems to have quarrelled with his stepmother, the widowed Mercy Carew, over the allocation of her dower.[14] She died in the spring of 1453, having taken Arthur Ormesby of London as her second husband. Carew’s descendants became involved in a bitter and protracted dispute with his feoffees over the custody of his property, which was eventually divided between his grand daughters.[15]
    Ref Volumes: 1386-1421 Author: C.R.

    Notes

    Variants: Carreu(e), Carrew(e), Carrou, Carru, Carue.

    Footnotes:
    1. C136/66/10; PCC 16 Luffenham; VCH Berks. iii. 418-19, 429; Herts. ii. 298; Surr. iv. 170; Surr. Arch. Colls. xxv. 55-57, 59-63; xliii. 53-55; CCR, 1369-74, pp. 341-2; CPR, 1370-4, p. 436; Lambeth Pal. Lib. Reg. Courtenay, f. 147.
    2.CIMisc. vii. 369.
    3.VCH Surr. iv. 73, 170; Bucks. iii. 505-6; T.F. Tout, Chapters, iii. 267, 330; v. 44-45; R. Wills ed. Nichols, 63; CPR, 1381-5, p. 306.
    4. C136/66/10; VCH Bucks. iii. 418-19, 502; iv. 324; Herts. ii. 298; Surr. iii. 223; iv. 239, 335; CCR, 1369-74, pp. 341-2; 1377-81, pp. 102, 344, 466, 471; 1389-92, p. 293; 1392-6, p. 251; CPR, 1370-4, p. 436; 1388-92, p. 5; CAD, v. A10681; CChR, v. 229; CIMisc. iv. 49; CFR, x. 329, 359; Add. Chs. 22707, 23141, 23148, 23155, 23157, 23332, 23398, 23401, 23627-9, 23631, 23784, 23446.
    5. CP25(1)/231/64/56, 58; VCH Berks. iii. 429; Add. Chs. 23157, 23785; CCR, 1402-5, p. 285; Feudal Aids, vi. 404, 453, 470, 516, 523; Lambeth Pal. Lib. Reg. Kempe, f. 298v.
    6.Suss. Arch. Colls. xciii. 53-56; Suss. Rec. Soc. xxiii. 211-12; CCR, 1399-1402, pp. 298, 303-5.
    7. C1/18/36, 19/258; CP25(1)/292/67; Feudal Aids, i. 43; CCR, 1419-22, pp. 139, 219, 221-6; 1429-35, p. 189; 1435-41, pp. 44-45; Add. Chs. 23176, 23178, 23632-3; CPR, 1422-9, p. 251.
    8.CCR, 1377-81, pp. 246, 340; 1385-9, p. 620; 1392-6, p. 233; CFR, xi. 68; xii. 20.
    9. JUST 1/1503 rot. 77, 78, 83v, 1521 rot. 47v, 1523 rot. 7-7v, 1528 rot. 26-26v; CCR, 1396-9, p. 234; 1399-1402, p. 483; CPR, 1405-8, p. 405; 1422-9, pp. 251, 313; Cal. P. and M. London, 1413-37, pp. 11-12.
    10. E401/619, 677; E403/571, 645; PPC, i. 161, 202; ii.73, 75, 87; CFR, xii. 10, 21; CCR, 1399-1402, p. 107; CPR, 1408-13, pp. 203-4; 1416-22, p. 310.
    11.Reg. Chichele, ii. 71, 229; Sel. Cases in Chancery (Selden Soc. x), 122; CCR, 1413-19, p. 520; 1419-22, p. 34; 1422-9, p. 105; CPR, 1416-22, pp. 62-63; 238-9; 1422-9, pp. 115-16, 282.
    12.CCR, 1413-19, p. 360; Surr. N. and Q. xii. 77-79; W. Berry, Surr. Gen. 3; PCC 16 Luffenham.
    13. C219/12/5; CFR, xv. 33; Add. Ch. 27759.
    14. PCC 16 Luffenham; C1/9/469; C139/57/1; Surr. Arch. Colls. xxv. 55-57, 59-65; Add. Chs. 23408, 23730.
    15. C1/12/126, 18/36, 19/258-9; CCR, 1435-41, pp. 126, 128-9, 260, 262-5, 269-70; CAD, iv. A9778; Surr. Arch. Colls. xliii. 53-55.
    ---
    Carew Manor
    Beddington Park is the location of Carew Manor which was the home of the Carew family. The Domesday Book mentions two Beddington estates and these were united by Nicholas Carew to form Carew Manor in 1381. The Manor, once a medieval moated house, was home to the Royal Female Orphanage from 1762 until 1968. It now contains council offices and Carew Manor School.
    In about 1591 Sir Walter Raleigh secretly, and without royal permission, married one of Queen Elizabeth I's maids of honour, Elizabeth Throckmorton of Carew Manor. Raleigh spent time in the Tower of London for this and Elizabeth was expelled from the court but the marriage appears to have been a genuine love-match and survived the imprisonment. A popular story is that when Raleigh was beheaded by James I in 1618, Elizabeth claimed his embalmed head and kept it in a bag for the rest of her life. His body was buried in St Margaret's, Westminster but many suspect his head remains in Beddington park. Some[who?] say his son inherited the embalmed head and that it was buried with him.
    The banqueting hall, which boasts a fine hammerbeam roof, survives from the original house along with part of the orangery built by Sir Francis Carew and claimed to be the first in England. In the grounds is an early 18th century dovecote.
    Queen Elizabeth's Walk is a short wooded trail that dates back to the first Elizabeth. Local legend has it that the Monarch and Sir Walter Raleigh used to stroll together there[citation needed]. However, this was actually land left unused for the proposed M23 motorway extension.
    Archaeologists have recently discovered a Tudor garden including a grotto at Carew Manor, believed to have been created by Sir Francis Carew in the 16th century. Its exact location is currently not being disclosed in order to protect it from looting.
    The 14th Century flint parish church of St Mary's is situated in the park next to the house. It contains an organ screen by William Morris.

    From the Sutton page on St. Mary's Church:

    St Mary's Church, Church Road, Beddington, Surrey
    Beddington church is first mentioned in the Domesday Book in 1086. It is possible that the church was then newly founded by either Azor the Saxon lord who owned Beddington before 1066, or Robert de Watteville who gained the manor after the Norman conquest. However, the church may be older. The bishop of Winchester owned a large estate at Beddington in the tenth century and Bishop Ethelwold (later a saint) died there in 984. It seems likely that the Bishop had a church here and it may well have been on the site of the present church. There is a remote possibility that the history of Beddington Church goes back much further. Two expensive Roman coffins have been found on the southern edge of the churchyard and this may mean that the site was regarded as sacred or a burial ground prior to the foundation of the church.
    The earliest surviving fragments of the existing church are a few pieces of Norman stonework which were found when the church was restored in the nineteenth century and are now on the window sill in the north aisle. The next oldest part of building is the font, which dates from the late twelfth or early thirteenth century.
    The next oldest fragment is the window at the east end of the inner north aisle which is in decorated Gothic style and probably dates to the first half of the fourteenth century.
    In the second half of the fourteenth century a wealthy courtier called Nicholas Carew built up a large estate centred on Beddington, and created a grand fortified manor house next to the church. When he died in 1390 he left money for the completion of the church tower and his son, another Nicholas, almost certainly gave money to the church. It is probably no coincidence that much of the existing building including the tower, the south aisle and the Carew chapel dates from around this time. The second Nicholas Carew died in 1432 and is buried in the chancel beneath a magnificent brass.
    The fourteenth century rebuild was followed by a long period of architectural inactivity which lasted into the nineteenth century.

    Nicholas — Isabella de la Mare. Isabella was born 0___ 1362, Little Hereford, Hertfordshire, England; died 0Jul 1398, Beddington, Surrey, England. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. 13. Thomas Carew  Descendancy chart to this point was born ~ 1398, Beddington, Surrey, England; died 0___ 1430.


Generation: 6

  1. 12.  Leonard Carew Descendancy chart to this point (10.John5, 4.John4, 3.Nicholas3, 2.Avice2, 1.Richard1) was born 0___ 1342; died 4 Oct 1369, Castle Carew, Carew, Pembrokeshire, Wale.

    Leonard — Elizabeth FitzAlan. Elizabeth (daughter of Edmund FitzAlan, Knight and Sybil Montacute) was born ~ 1349, (Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England); died ~ 1386, Arundel, Sussex, England. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. 14. Thomas Carew  Descendancy chart to this point was born ~ 1368; died 25 Jan 1431, Luppitt, Devonshire, England.

  2. 13.  Thomas Carew Descendancy chart to this point (11.Nicholas5, 8.Nicholas4, 3.Nicholas3, 2.Avice2, 1.Richard1) was born ~ 1398, Beddington, Surrey, England; died 0___ 1430.

    Other Events:

    • Military: Soldier & Navy Commander For Henry IV and Henry V

    Thomas married Agnes Heyton (Surrey, England). Agnes (daughter of Thomas Hayton and Beatrice LNU) was born ~ 1395, Surrey, England; died 0___ 1450. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. 15. Joan Carew  Descendancy chart to this point was born ~ 1420, Beddington, Surrey, England; died 0___ 1470, Wetzel, England; was buried Charlewood, Surrey, England.


Generation: 7

  1. 14.  Thomas Carew Descendancy chart to this point (12.Leonard6, 10.John5, 4.John4, 3.Nicholas3, 2.Avice2, 1.Richard1) was born ~ 1368; died 25 Jan 1431, Luppitt, Devonshire, England.

    Thomas — Elizabeth Bonville. Elizabeth was born ~ 1362; died 0___ 1451, Chewton, Devonshire, England. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. 16. Nicholas Carew  Descendancy chart to this point was born ~ 1409; died 3 May 1447, Moulsford, Berkshire, England.

  2. 15.  Joan Carew Descendancy chart to this point (13.Thomas6, 11.Nicholas5, 8.Nicholas4, 3.Nicholas3, 2.Avice2, 1.Richard1) was born ~ 1420, Beddington, Surrey, England; died 0___ 1470, Wetzel, England; was buried Charlewood, Surrey, England.

    Notes:



    Notes: Heiress. Owned the Manor of Batailles, Ewell. This William Saunders died on 10 Aug 1481, and his wife Joan in 1470, as appears by a brass formerly on a tombstone at Charlwood, bearing this inscription, which has fortunately been copied in the Harleian MS., No. 1397:- Orate pro animabus Will'i Saunder generos' qui ob' 10 die mensis Augusti A.D. Mill'o CCCCLXXXI et Joha' nx' ejus qu\'e6 ob' ... die mensis .... A. 1470, quor' a'iabus p'pl'cietur Deus. Amen'.

    Joan married William Saunders England. William (son of Thomas Saunders and Joan Pollard) was born (England). [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. 17. Robert Saunders  Descendancy chart to this point was born Abt 1445, Shangton, Leicester, England.


Generation: 8

  1. 16.  Nicholas Carew Descendancy chart to this point (14.Thomas7, 12.Leonard6, 10.John5, 4.John4, 3.Nicholas3, 2.Avice2, 1.Richard1) was born ~ 1409; died 3 May 1447, Moulsford, Berkshire, England.

    Nicholas — Joan Courtenay. Joan (daughter of Hugh Courtenay and Philippa L'Arcedekne) was born 0___ 1411, Haccombe, Devonshire, England; died Bef 3 Aug 1465; was buried St. Blaise's Church, Haccombe, Devonshire, England. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. 18. Thomas Carew  Descendancy chart to this point was born ~ 1427; died Bef 10 Nov 1461, Luppitt, Devonshire, England.

  2. 17.  Robert Saunders Descendancy chart to this point (15.Joan7, 13.Thomas6, 11.Nicholas5, 8.Nicholas4, 3.Nicholas3, 2.Avice2, 1.Richard1) was born Abt 1445, Shangton, Leicester, England.

    Robert married Agricola LNU ~ 1468, Harrington, Northampton, England. Agricola was born ~ 1450, Shangton, Leicester, England. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. 19. Edward Saunders  Descendancy chart to this point was born ~ 1468, Harrington, Northampton, England; died 0___ 1549, (East Haddon, Northamptonshire) England.