Sir John Pole

Male 1341 - 1380  (~ 38 years)


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Generation: 1

  1. 1.  Sir John Pole was born ~1341, Newborough, Staffordshire, England (son of Margaret Peverel, Countess of Derby, son of William de la Pole and Margaret Peverel); died >9 Mar 1380, Chrishall, Essex, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: John de la Pole

    John married Joan Cobham 1362. Joan (daughter of John Cobham and Margaret Courtenay) was born ~1350; died 1388. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. Joan Pole was born ~1372; died ~13 Jan 1433.

Generation: 2

  1. 3.  Margaret Peverel, Countess of Derby was born ~ 1114, (Peveril Castle, Derbyshire) England (daughter of William Peverel, The Younger and Avicia de Lancaster); died 0___ 1154, (Tutbury Castle, Staffordshire, England); was buried Merevale Abbey.

    Notes:

    Margaret Peverell, Countess of Derby (b. circa 1114, Nottinghamshire, England), was an English noblewoman who lived at Tutbury Castle in Staffordshire, England.

    Family and marriage

    Margaret was the daughter of William Peverel the Younger of Peveril Castle in Derbyshire and his wife, Oddona (Sources:Hal Bradley:

    1. Cokayne, George Edward, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct, or Dormant (London: St. Catherine Press, 1910.), 4:311, Los Angeles Public Library, 929.721 C682.
    2. Keats-Rohan, K.S.B., Domesday People: A Prosopography of Persons Occurring in English Documents, 1066-1166 (Woodbridge: The Boydell Press, 1999.), pp. 361, 494, Los Angeles Public Library, Gen 942.02 K25.
    3. Sheppard, Walter Lee, F.A.S.G., "Royal Bye-Blows: The Illegitimate Children of the English Kings," NEHGR 119:2 (Apr 1965) (New England Historic, Genealogical Society.), p. 95, Los Angeles Public Library.. Her grandfather was William Peverel.
    She married Robert Ferrers and thus became Countess of Derby. She was the mother of William de Ferrers, 3rd Earl of Derby, Walkelin de Ferrers and a daughter, Petronella.[citation needed]

    She died in 1154 and was buried in Merevale Abbey.

    *

    Children:
    1. 1. John Pole was born ~1341, Newborough, Staffordshire, England; died >9 Mar 1380, Chrishall, Essex, England.


Generation: 3

  1. 6.  William Peverel, The Younger was born 0___ 1080, Normandy, France (son of William Peverel, Knight and Adeline LNU); died 1155.

    Notes:

    William "the Younger" Peverel (c. 1080–1155) was the son of William Peverel. He lived in Nottingham, England.[1]

    He married Avicia de Lancaster (1088 – c. 1150) in La Marche, Normandy, France. She was the daughter of William de Lancaster I and Countess Gundred de Warenne, daughter of William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey. In 1114, she bore a daughter, Margaret Peverel.[1] Another member of his family, Maude Peverel (a sister or daughter) was - by 1120 - the first wife of Robert fitz Martin.

    William inherited the Honour of Peverel.

    He was a principal supporter of King Stephen, and a commander in the Battle of the Standard. He was captured at The Battle of Lincoln.[2]

    King Henry II dispossessed William of the Honour in 1153, for conspiring to poison the Earl of Chester - though historians speculate that the King wished to punish him for his 'wickedness and treason' in supporting King Stephen. The Earl died before he took possession of the Honour, and it stayed in the Crown for about a half century.[2][3]

    References[edit]
    ^ Jump up to: a b "Peverel Family Genealogy". Our Folk. Retrieved 2008-05-13.
    ^ Jump up to: a b Cokayne, George E.; other authors (1887–98). The Complete Peerage (extant, extinct or dormant). Volume 4 (4th ed.). pp. 762–768. Retrieved 2008-05-13.
    Jump up ^ "Langar Hall ~ A Microcosm of English History". Baronage. Retrieved 2008-05-13.

    William married Avicia de Lancaster 1114, La Marche, Normandy, France. Avicia (daughter of William de Lancaster, I, Baron of Kendal and Gundred de Warenne) was born 0___ 1088, La Marche, Normandy, France; died ~ 1150. [Group Sheet]


  2. 7.  Avicia de Lancaster was born 0___ 1088, La Marche, Normandy, France (daughter of William de Lancaster, I, Baron of Kendal and Gundred de Warenne); died ~ 1150.
    Children:
    1. 3. Margaret Peverel, Countess of Derby was born ~ 1114, (Peveril Castle, Derbyshire) England; died 0___ 1154, (Tutbury Castle, Staffordshire, England); was buried Merevale Abbey.


Generation: 4

  1. 12.  William Peverel, Knight was born ~1040, Normandy, France; died ~1115.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Gulielmus Piperellus
    • Also Known As: William The Elder

    Notes:

    William Peverell (c. 1040 – c. 1115, Latinised to Gulielmus Piperellus), was a Norman knight granted lands in England following the Norman Conquest.

    Origins

    Little is known of the origin of the William Peverell the Elder. Of his immediate family, only the name of a brother, Robert, is known.[1] J. R. Planchâe derives the surname from the Latin puerulus, the diminutive form of puer (a boy), thus "a small boy", or from the Latin noun piper, meaning "pepper".[2]

    Lands held in England

    William Peverel was a favourite of William the Conqueror. He was greatly honoured after the Norman Conquest, and received as his reward over a hundred manors in central England from the king. In 1086, the Domesday Book records William as holding the substantial number of 162 manors, forming collectively the Honour of Peverel, in Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire, including Nottingham Castle.[3] He also built Peveril Castle, Castleton, Derbyshire. William Peverel is amongst the people explicitly recorded in the Domesday Book as having built castles.[4]

    Marriage & progeny

    William married Adeline, who bore him four children: two sons both named William, one dying without issue, the other often called William Peverel the Younger, born circa 1080, and two daughters, Maud and Adeliza, who married Richard de Redvers.[1]

    References

    ^ Jump up to: a b The Complete Peerage, Vol IV, App. I, pp 761–770, "Peverel Family". This also dismisses the Tudor-era genealogical invention that made him illegitimate son of William the Conqueror
    Jump up ^ http://patp.us/genealogy/conq/peverel.aspx
    Jump up ^ A description of holdings in Derbyshire, from the Domesday Book (http://www.infokey.com/Domesday/Derbyshire.htm). A local history of Duston, Northampton (http://www.duston.org.uk/peverel.htm).
    Jump up ^ Harfield 1991, p. 391
    Bibliography
    Harfield, C. G. (1991), "A Hand-list of Castles Recorded in the Domesday Book", English Historical Review, 106: 371–392, doi:10.1093/ehr/CVI.CCCCXIX.371, JSTOR 573107

    William — Adeline LNU. [Group Sheet]


  2. 13.  Adeline LNU
    Children:
    1. 6. William Peverel, The Younger was born 0___ 1080, Normandy, France; died 1155.

  3. 14.  William de Lancaster, I, Baron of KendalWilliam de Lancaster, I, Baron of Kendal was born (France); died ~ 1170.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: William de Tailboys
    • Also Known As: William de Taillebois
    • Also Known As: William Fitz Gilbert

    Notes:

    William de Lancaster I, or William Fitz Gilbert, was a nobleman of the 12th century in Northwest England. According to a document some generations later, he was also referred to as William de Tailboys (de Taillebois) when younger, and then became "William de Lancaster, baron of Kendal", although there is some uncertainty amongst most commentators concerning the exact meaning of the term "baron" in this case. He is the first person of whom there is any record to bear the name of Lancaster and pass it on to his descendants as a family name. He died in about 1170.

    Titles and positions

    Earliest holdings

    Despite his surname, William and his relatives appear in contemporary documents relating mainly to what is now the modern county of Cumbria, not Lancashire, especially Copeland in western Cumberland, Furness in the Lake District, The Barony of Kendal, which became part of Westmorland, and various areas such as Barton between Kendal and Ullswater, also in Westmorland. Much of this area was not yet permanently part of England.

    Although only part of this area was within the later English county of Lancaster or Lancashire, this entity had not yet come to be clearly defined. So the title of "de Lancaster", by which William is remembered, could have referred not only to the church city of Lancaster, to the south of this area, but to an area under its control. In 1900, William Farrer claimed that "all of the southern half of Westmorland, not only the Kirkby Lonsdale Ward of Westmorland, but also the Kendal Ward, were linked with Northern Lancashire from a very early time" and formed a single district for fiscal administrative purposes.[1]

    The two apparently lost records which are said to have mentioned William's father Gilbert also apparently connected him to Cumbria, specifically to the area of Furness.[2]

    The following are areas associated with him, for example ...

    Muncaster in Cumberland. According to William Farrer, in his 1902 edition of Lancashire Pipe Rolls and early charters,wrote:

    It appears that he was possessed of the lordship of Mulcaster (now Muncaster), over the Penningtons of Pennington in Furness, and under Robert de Romille, lord of Egremont and Skipton, who held it in right of his wife, Cecilia, daughter and heiress of William de Meschines.[3]

    According to Farrer, this title would have been one of those granted by Roger de Mowbray, son of Nigel de Albini, having come into his hands after the decease without male heirs of Ivo de Taillebois. He also believed that this grant to William de Lancaster came to be annulled.

    Workington, Lamplugh and Middleton. The manors of Workington and Lamplugh in Cumberland were given by William de Lancaster, in exchange for Middleton in Westmorland, to an apparently close relative, Gospatric, son of Orme, brother-in-law of Waldeve, Lord of Allerdale.[4]

    Hensingham. The Register of St Bees shows that both William son of Gilbert de Lancastre, and William's son William had land in this area. William's was at a place called Swartof or Suarthow, "probably the rising ground between Whitehaven and Hensingham, known locally as Swartha Brow". The appears to have come from his father Gilbert. His brother Roger apparently held land at Walton, just outside modern Hensingham, and had a son named Robert. Roger and William also named a brother called Robert.[5]

    Ulverston. Farrer argued that this may have been held by William and perhaps his father Gilbert, before it was granted by Stephen, Count of Boulogne and Mortain, to Furness Abbey in 1127.[6] The possible connection of William's father Gilbert to Furness will be discussed further below.

    Enfeoffment from King Stephen

    King Stephen's reign in England lasted from 1135 to 1154, but only during a small part of this did he control this region. For the majority of his reign all or most of this area was under the rule of David I of Scotland.

    During the period when Stephen was in control "we possess distinct and clear evidence that Stephen, as king, enfeoffed a knight of the lands of Warton in Kentdale and the wide territory of Garstang, in Lancashire, to hold for the service of one knight. This was William de Lancaster, son of Gilbert by Godith his wife, described in the Inquest of service made in 1212 as "Willelmus filius Gilberti primus," that is, the first to be enfeoffed of that fee."[7]

    Enfeoffment from Roger de Mowbray

    At a similar time, during the period 1145-1154, a major enfeoffment by Roger de Mowbray put William in control, or perhaps just confirmed his control, of what would become the Barony of Kendal, plus Warton, Garstang, and Wyresdale in Lancashire, as well as Horton in Ribblesdale and "Londsdale". The latter two are sometimes apparently being interpreted as indicating possession for some time of at least part of what would become the Wapentake of Ewcross in the West Riding of Yorkshire.

    The Scottish period

    During the Scottish occupation, Hugh de Morville became the overlord of much of this area, a position he kept when the area later returned to English control. Farrer and Curwen remark:

    William de Lancaster no longer held anything in Kentdale of Roger de Mowbray; but he appears to have held his lands in Westmarieland and Kentdale of Morevill by rendering Noutgeld of ¹14 6s. 3d. per annum, and some 16 carucates of land in nine vills in Kentdale as farmer under Morevill. In 1166 William de Lancaster I held only two knight's fees, of the new feoffment of Roger de Mowbray in Sedbergh, Thornton, Burton in Lonsdale, and the other places in Yorkshire previously named, which his descendants held long after of the fee of Mowbray by the same service. The Mowbray connexion with Kentdale had come to an end upon the accession of Henry II, who placed Hugh de Morevill in possession of Westmarieland in return, possibly, for past services and in pursuance of the policy of planting his favourites in regions of great strategic importance. Probably the change of paramount lord had little, if any, effect on the position of William de Lancaster in Kentdale.[7]

    In Cumberland further west, according to several websites, William was castellan in the castle of Egremont under William fitz Duncan.[citation needed]

    The Barony of Kendal?

    William de Lancaster is often described as having been a Baron of Kendal. In fact this is not so clear what kind of lordship existed over Kendal, given the lack of clarity of records in this period. The word barony developed specific meanings during the Middle Ages, namely feudal baron and baron by writ. William Farrer wrote, in the Introduction to his Records of Kendal:

    After a careful review of the evidence which has been sketched above, the author is of opinion that no barony or reputed barony of Kentdale existed prior to the grants of 1189–90; and that neither William de Lancaster, son of Gilbert, nor William de Lancaster II, his son and successor, can be rightly described as "baron" of Kentdale.[7]

    Whether or not "Barony" is the clearest word, what became the Barony of Kendal is generally accepted as having come together under Ivo de Taillebois (d. 1094) in the time of William Rufus, some generations before William. And, as will be discussed below, at least in later generations William was depicted by his family as having been a Taillebois. A continuity is therefore often asserted between what Ivo held, and what William later held, despite the fact that William had no known hereditary claim on Kendal, and Ivo had no male heirs. (This is also the reason for the frequent assertion that William held the entire wapentake of Ewcross, even though it seems that the family of Roger de Mowbray kept hold of at least Burton in Kendal. William held two parts of it, mentioned above, while Ivo had held another, Clapham. The rest is speculation.)

    According to Farrer, the Barony of Kendal became a real barony only in the time of William's grand daughter Hawise, who married Gilbert son of Roger fitz Reinfrid. Both he and his son William de Lancaster III, both successors of William de Lancaster I (and possibly of Ivo de Taillebois) were certainly Barons of Kendal.

    Concerning other specific holdings and ranks

    Furness and the Royal forests. According to a later grant to Gilbert Fitz Reinfrid, William must have held some position over the whole forest of Westmarieland (the Northern or Appleby Barony of Westmorland), Kendal and Furness. His claims in Furness may have gone beyond just the forest, but this appears to have put him in conflict with the claims of the Furness Abbey, and this conflict continued over many generations. His family may have had links there before him. Some websites report that his father Gilbert was known as "Gilbert of Furness". (This apparently comes from a 17th-century note by Benjamin Ayloffe, mentioned below.)

    Lancaster Castle. According to Dugdale, the eminent English antiquarian, he was governor of Lancaster Castle in the reign of Henry II, about 1180. Little is known about how William came to hold the honour of Lancaster and use the surname, but it is sometimes suggested that it implies connections to royalty, perhaps coming from his apparent marriage to Gundred de Warrenne (or was this just yet another reward for some forgotten service, perhaps against the Scots?).

    Seneschal. According to a note written by the 17th century antiquarian Benjamin Ayloffe, which is reproduced in the introduction of Walford Dakin Selby's collection of Lancashire and Cheshire Records, p.xxix, William was Seneschallus Hospitii Regis, or steward of the king's household. The same note also states that William's father was the kings "Receiver for the County of Lancaster".[8]

    Ancestry

    William's father was named Gilbert, and his mother was Godith. They are both mentioned clearly in a benefaction of William to St Mary de Prâe and William was often referred to as William the son of Gilbert (fitz Gilbert).

    William was also said to have descended from both Ivo de Taillebois and Eldred of Workington, who were contemporaries of William Rufus. But the exact nature of the relationship is unclear and indeed controversial. There may be a connection through daughters or illegitimate sons of these two men. A discussion of the main proposals follows:-

    Ivo de Taillebois and Eldred both in the male line. A once widespread understand was that Ivo was father of Eldred, who was father of Ketel who was father of Gilbert. This now seems to be wrong, or at least has gone out of favour and has been adapted in various ways (for example removing Ketel from this chain). The two authorities for a direct line of father-son descent from Ivo to Eldred to Ketel to Gilbert to William de Lancaster were records made much later in Cockersand Abbey and St Mary's Abbey in Yorkshire.[9] But monastic genealogies concerning their benefactors are generally considered difficult to rely upon.[10]

    One of the concerns with this account is chronological, because it requires too many generations in a short period, both in order to make Ivo father of his contemporary Eldred, and also to make Ketel the father of his contemporary, Gilbert. Other concerns arise from because of complexities that this gives for explaining inheritances. For example, it implies that William de Lancaster was heir to Ketel fitz Eldred, but Ketel is commonly thought to have had another heir. And there is also no record of Eldred being an heir to Ivo. Also, it is highly unusual that in this account, the descendants of a Norman noble (Ivo) all use Anglo Saxon names (Eldred, Ketel, etc.).

    Eldred in the male line, if not Taillebois. Nevertheless, concerning the connection to Eldred, in a Curia Regis Roll item dated 1212 (R., 55, m. 6), Helewise and her husband Gilbert Fitz Reinfrid make claims based upon the fact that "Ketel filius Eutret" was an "antecessor" of Helewise. This could mean he was an ancestor, but it could also perhaps merely mean he was a predecessor more generally.

    But evidence was found in the twentieth century which gave clear problems for this theory. One charter to St Leonard's York William refers to Ketel, the son of "Elred", as his avunculus, which would literally mean "maternal uncle" (but the word was not always used precisely, the more general meaning of "uncle" might have been intended). And a 1357 charter printed by Reverend F. W. Ragg in 1910 repeats the claim that Ketel son of "Aldred" was the avunculus of William son of Gilbert.[11] These records appear to make it impossible for Ketel to be the father of Gilbert.

    The possibility remains, and is for example proposed by Frederick Ragg who first noted this avunculus relationship, that Gilbert is the son of Eldred, and therefore a brother of Ketel, so still in the same male line. (Under this proposal, avunculus is being used to mean simply "uncle", and not in an exact way.)[12] So a male line ancestry from Eldred is not considered impossible, even if it retains difficulties, for example concerning how to explain the connection to the Taillebois family, and also the heirship of Eldred's family.

    Taillebois through his father, if not Eldred. According to the annalist Peter of Blois, Ivo's "only daughter, who had been nobly espoused, died before her father; for that evil shoots should not fix deep roots in the world, the accursed lineage of that wicked man perished by the axe of the Almighty, which cut off all his issue." The only known heiress of Ivo was a daughter named Beatrix. Her sons by her one definitely known husband, Ribald of Middleham, did however on occasions apparently use the surname Taillebois also.

    Apart from the above-mentioned monastic genealogies however, a connection to Ivo de Taillebois is partly proposed based upon a similarity of land holdings between William and Ivo de Taillebois, and a record in the Coucher Book of Furness Abbey, concord number CCVI, wherein Helewise, granddaughter and heir of William is party. In the genealogical notice it is claimed that William had been known as William de Tailboys, before receiving the right to be called "Willelmum de Lancastre, Baronem de Kendale".[13] This is the only relatively contemporary evidence for this assertion however, and other facts in this document are questioned by Farrer and Curwen, as discussed above, because they say that William was probably not Baron of Kendal, but rather an under-lord there.[7]

    Whether or not Ivo himself was in the male line of William's ancestry, there was a Tailboys family present in Westmorland during the 12th century, for example in Cliburn, and these were presumably relatives of William de Lancaster. This family used the personal name Ivo at least once, and may have been related to Ivo and Beatrix.[14]

    Eldred in the female line. Compatible with the above, though in contrast to the earlier proposal of Ragg (that Ketel is paternal uncle to William, and brother to Gilbert), it has been proposed by G. Washington and G. A. Moriarty that Ketel is maternal uncle to William, and brother to Gilbert's wife Godith. This proposal had the added attractions of making the use of Anglo-Saxon names more explicable, and of matching the most precise meaning of "avunculus". Washington wrote:

    William de Lancaster's father, Gilbert, was a Norman knight, as evidenced by the French Christian names given to all his recorded children; whilst William's mother, Godith, was clearly the sister of Ketel son of Eldred and thus of native English stock (it will be recalled that Ketel was called William de Lancaster's avunculus, a term which strictly speaking means 'maternal uncle'). It is even possible, as Mr. Moriarty surmises, that Ketel's wife, Christian or Christina, may have been a Taillebois by birth; for, according to Peter of Blois, Ivo himself 'had an only daughter, nobly espoused' (see the Duchess of Cleveland's Battle Abbey Roll, III, 345), and certainly William de Lancaster's granddaughter, Helewise, along with her husband Gilbert fitz Renfrid, later confirmed some of Ivo's grants to the abbey of St. Mary at York.[15]
    Taillebois in the female line. Keats-Rohan accepts this proposal of Moriarty and Washington that Godith and Ketel were siblings, but also maintains support for an older idea that their mother is of Ivo's one known daughter, Beatrix, through a marriage (of which no contemporary record exists) to Eldred. This would, as in the explanation of Moriarty and Washington, make Ketel maternal uncle to William, and Gilbert a French Taillebois, however Keats-Rohan offers no ancestry for him.[16]

    Descendants and relatives

    William married Gundreda, perhaps his second wife, who is sometimes said to be the daughter of William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey and Elizabeth of Vermandois. In this case she was the widow of Roger, the Earl of Warwick. But William Farrer believes that it is much more likely that this Gundreda was a daughter to the Roger and the elder Gundreda.[17] Note that King Stephen's son, William, married Gundred's niece, Isabel de Warenne, Countess of Surrey. This implies a very close relationship with the King's party.

    William had issue:

    Avicia, who married Richard de Morville, constable of Scotland (and had possibly married earlier to William de Peveral)
    William, who became William de Lancaster II, and whose legitimate heir Helewise de Lancaster married Gilbert son of Roger Fitz Reinfrid. Many modern Lancasters, especially in Cumbria, appear to descend from his two illegitimate sons, Gilbert and Jordan.
    Jordan, who died young, and is mentioned in a benefaction to St Mary de Prâe in Leicester. In the same benefaction, William II is also mentioned, apparently an adult.
    Agnes who married Alexander de Windsore[18]
    Sigrid, married to William the clerk of Garstang.[18]
    Perhaps Warine de Lancaster, royal falconer, and ancestor of a family known as "de Lea". The charters concerning Forton in the Cockersand Chartulary say, firstly that William de Lancaster II confirmed a grant made by his father to Warine, father of Henry de Lea, and secondly, in Hugh de Morville's confirmation that this William de Lancaster I was "his uncle" (awnculi sui). The record appears to allow that William might have been either Henry's uncle or Warine's. If he was Warine's uncle then the theory is that Warine was the son of an otherwise unknown brother of William de Lancaster I named Gilbert.
    Gilbert fitz Reinfrid and Helewise's son William also took up the name de Lancaster, becoming William de Lancaster III. He died without male heirs, heavily indebted, apparently due to payments demanded after he was captured at Rochester during the First Barons' War, and ransomed off by his father.

    William de Lancaster III's half brother Roger de Lancaster of Rydal inherited some of the Lancaster importance. It is thought that Roger was a son of Gilbert Fitz Reinfrid, but not of Helewise de Lancaster. Roger is widely thought to be the ancestor of the Lancasters of Howgill and Rydal in Westmorland. (In fact the line starts with one John de Lancaster of Howgill, whose connection to Roger de Lancaster and his son, John de Lancaster of Grisedale and Stanstead, is unclear except for the fact that he took over Rydal and Grasmere from the latter John.[19])

    The Lancasters of Sockbridge, Crake Trees, Brampton, Dacre, and several other manors in Westmorland and Cumberland, were apparently descended from William de Lancaster II's illegitimate son Gilbert de Lancaster.[11] Many or perhaps all of the old Lancaster families found throughout Cumbria seem to descend from Gilbert and his brother Jordan.[19]

    The de Lea family eventually lost power in the time of Thomas, 2nd Earl of Lancaster, a member of the Plantagenet royal family, with whom they had become allied during his rebellion.

    Another Lancaster family, in Rainhill in Lancashire, also seems to have claimed descent, given that they used the same coat of arms as Gilbert Fitz Reinfrid and his sons (argent, two bars gules, with a canton of the second, and a "lion of England", either white or gold, in the canton). However the exact nature of the link, if any, is unknown.[20]

    *

    William — Gundred de Warenne. [Group Sheet]


  4. 15.  Gundred de Warenne (daughter of William de Warenne, Knight, 2nd Earl of Surrey and Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester).

    Notes:

    Gundred de Warenne,[22] who married first Roger de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Warwick[23] and second William, lord of Kendal, and is most remembered for expelling king Stephen's garrison from Warwick Castle.

    *

    Children:
    1. 7. Avicia de Lancaster was born 0___ 1088, La Marche, Normandy, France; died ~ 1150.


Generation: 5

  1. 30.  William de Warenne, Knight, 2nd Earl of Surrey was born 0___ 1065, East Sussex, England (son of William de Warenne, Knight, 1st Earl of Surrey and Gundred of Flanders, Countess of Surrey); died 11 May 1138; was buried Lewes Priory, Sussex, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Earl of Warenne
    • Also Known As: Earl Warenne

    Notes:

    William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey (died 11 May 1138) was the son of William de Warenne, 1st Earl of Surrey and his first wife Gundred. He was more often referred to as Earl Warenne or Earl of Warenne than as Earl of Surrey.[1]

    Life

    His father, the 1st Earl, was one of the Conqueror's most trusted and most rewarded barons who, at his death in 1088, was the 3rd or 4th richest magnate in England.[2] In 1088 William II inherited his father's lands in England and his Norman estates including the castles of Mortemer and Bellencombre in Haute-Normandy. But William II was not as disposed to serve the king as his father was.[2] In January 1091, William assisted Hugh of Grantmesnil (d.1094) in his defense of Courcy against the forces of Robert de Belleme and Duke Robert of Normandy.[3] In 1093 he attempted to marry Matilda (or Edith), daughter of king Malcolm III of Scotland.[4] She instead married Henry I of England, and this may have been the cause of William's great dislike of Henry I, which motivated him in the following years.[5]

    When Robert Curthose, Duke of Normandy invaded England 1101 William joined him.[6] But when Curthose promptly surrendered to Henry I, William lost his English lands and titles and was exiled to Normandy.[6] There he complained to Curthose that he had expended great effort on the duke's behalf and in return lost all of his English possessions. Curthose's return to England in 1103 was apparently made to convince his brother, the king, to restore William's earldom. This was successful, though Curthose had to give up his 3000 mark annual pension he had received after the 1101 invasion, after which William's lands and titles were restored to him.[5]

    To further insure William's loyalty Henry considered marrying him to one of his many illegitimate daughters. Archbishop Anselm of Canterbury forbade the marriage based on the couple being related in the 4th generation on one side, and in the 6th generation on the other.[7] William was one of the commanders on Henry's side (against Robert Curthose) at the Battle of Tinchebray in 1106. Afterwards, with his loyalty thus proven, he became more prominent in Henry's court.[1]

    In 1110, Curthose's son William Clito escaped along with Helias of Saint-Saens, and afterwards Warenne received the forfeited Saint-Saens lands, which were very near his own in upper Normandy. In this way king Henry further assured his loyalty, for the successful return of Clito would mean at the very least Warenne's loss of this new territory.[1][8] He fought for Henry I at the Battle of Bremule in 1119.[1][9] William, the second Earl of Surrey was present at Henry's deathbed in 1135.[1][10] After the king's death disturbances broke out in Normandy and William was sent to guard Rouen and the Pays de Caux.[1][11]

    William's death is recorded as 11-May-1138 in the register of Lewes Priory and he was buried at his father's feet at the Chapter house there.[12] His wife, the countess Elizabeth, survived him, dying before July 1147.[12]

    Family

    In 1118 William finally acquired the royal-blooded bride he desired when he married Elizabeth de Vermandois.[13] She was a daughter of count Hugh of Vermandois, a granddaughter of Henry I, King of France, and was the widow of Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Leicester.[14]

    By Elizabeth his wife he had three sons and two daughters:

    William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey[15][16]
    Reginald de Warenne, who inherited his father's property in upper Normandy, including the castles of Bellencombre and Mortemer.[16] He married Adeline or Alice, daughter of William, lord of Wormgay in Norfolk, by whom he had a son William (founder of the priory of Wormegay),[16] whose daughter and sole heir, Beatrice married first Doun, lord Bardolf, and secondly Hubert de Burgh.[17][18] Reginald was one of the persecutors of Archbishop Thomas in 1170.
    Ralph de Warenne[19]
    Gundred de Warenne,[19] who married first Roger de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Warwick[20] and second William, lord of Kendal, and is most remembered for expelling king Stephen's garrison from Warwick Castle.
    Ada de Warenne, who married Henry of Scotland, 3rd Earl of Huntingdon, the mother of two Scottish kings,[21] she made many grants to the priory of Lewes.[22]
    Ancestry[edit]
    [show]Ancestors of William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey
    References[edit]
    ^ Jump up to: a b c d e f G. E. Cokayne, The Complete Peerage, Vol. XII/1 (The St. Catherine Press, London, 1953) p. 495
    ^ Jump up to: a b C. Warren Hollister, 'The Taming of a Turbulent Earl: Henry I and William of Warenne', Historical Reflections, Vol. 3 (1976), p. 87
    Jump up ^ The Ecclesiastical History of Orderic Vitalis, ed. Marjorie Chibnall, Vol. 2 (Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1990)p. 692
    Jump up ^ C. Warren Hollister, Henry I (Yale University Press, New Haven & London, 2003)p. 340
    ^ Jump up to: a b C. Warren Hollister, 'The Taming of a Turbulent Earl: Henry I and William of Warenne', Historical Reflections. Vol. 3 (1976) p. 87
    ^ Jump up to: a b The Ecclesiastical History of Orderic Vitalis, ed. Marjorie Chibnall, Vol. 2 (Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1990), p.785
    Jump up ^ Edmund Chester Waters, 'Gundrada de Warenne', Archaeological Journal, Vol. XLI (1884), p. 303
    Jump up ^ C. Warren Hollister, 'The Taming of a Turbulent Earl: Henry I and William of Warenne', Historical Reflections, Vol. 3 (1976) p. 89
    Jump up ^ Orderic Vitalis, The Ecclesiastical History of England and Normandy, trans. Thomas Forester, Vol. III (Henry G. Bohn, London, 1854) pp. 481-2
    Jump up ^ Orderic Vitalis, The Ecclesiastical History of England and Normandy, trans. Thomas Forester, Vol. IV (Henry G. Bohn, London, 1856) p. 150
    Jump up ^ C. Warren Hollister, Henry I (Yale University Press, New Haven & London, 2003)p. 375
    ^ Jump up to: a b G. E. Cokayne, The Complete Peerage, Vol. XII/1 (The St. Catherine Press, London, 1953) p. 496
    Jump up ^ C. Warren Hollister, 'The Taming of a Turbulent Earl: Henry I and William of Warenne', Historical Reflections, Vol. 3 (1976) p. 90 n. 36
    Jump up ^ Detlev Schwennicke, Europèaische Stammtafeln: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europèaischen Staaten, Neue Folge, Band III Teilband 1, Herzogs und Grafenhèauser des Heiligen Rèomischen Reiches Andere Europèaiche Fèurstenhèauser (Marburg, Germany: Verlag von J. A. Stargardt, 1984), Tafel 55
    Jump up ^ G. E. Cokayne, The Complete Peerage, Vol. XII/1 (The St. Catherine Press, London, 1953) p. 500
    ^ Jump up to: a b c Early Yorkshire Charters, Vol. VIII - The Honour of Warenne (The Yorkshire Archaeological Society, 1949) pp. 27-8
    Jump up ^ G.E.Cokayne, The Complete Peerage, Vol. VII (The St. Catherine Press, 1929), p. 142, footnote (a)
    Jump up ^ Early Yorkshire Charters, Vol. VIII - The Honour of Warenne (The Yorkshire Archaeological Society, 1949) pp. 33-4
    ^ Jump up to: a b Early Yorkshire Charters, Vol. VIII - The Honour of Warenne (The Yorkshire Archaeological Society, 1949) pp. 10-11
    Jump up ^ Elisabeth van Houts, 'The Warenne View of the Past 1066-1203', Anglo-Norman Studies XXVI, Proceedings of the Battle Conference 2003, ed. John Gillingham (Boydell Press, Woodbridge. 2004), p. 109 n. 49
    Jump up ^ The Scots Peerage, Founded on Wood's Edition of Sir Robert Douglas's Peerage of Scotland, ed. Sir James Balfour Paul, Lord Lyon King of Arms, Vol. I (Edinburgh: David Douglas, 1904, p. 4
    Jump up ^ Early Yorkshire Charters, ed: William Farrer, Charles Travis Clay, Volume VIII - The Honour of Warenne (The Yorkshire Archaeological Society, 1949), p. 11

    External links

    "Warenne, William de (d.1138)". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900.
    The Ecclesiastical History of Orderic Vitalis, ed. M. Chibnall, vol. 2, p. 264 (Oxford, 1990)

    William — Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester. Isabel (daughter of Hugues de France and Adelaide of Vermandois) was born 0___ 1081, Basse-Normandie, France; died 17 Feb 1131, France; was buried Lewes Priory, Southover, Sussex, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 31.  Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester was born 0___ 1081, Basse-Normandie, France (daughter of Hugues de France and Adelaide of Vermandois); died 17 Feb 1131, France; was buried Lewes Priory, Southover, Sussex, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Elizabeth de Vermandois

    Notes:

    Birth: 1081
    Basse-Normandie, France
    Death: Feb. 17, 1131, France

    Countess of Leicester, Countess of Surrey

    Third daughter of Hugh Magnus and Adelaide of Vermandois, granddaughter of King Henry I of France and Anne of Kiev, Herbert IV, Count of Vermandois, and Adele of Valois. She was the heiress of the county of Vermandois and descendant of Charlemagne.

    Wife of Sir Robert de Beaumont, Count of Meulan, the son of Roger de Beaumont and Adeline of Meulan; Isabel became the Countess of Leicester. They married about 1096 and had three sons and at least five daughters:
    * Emma b 1101, probably died young
    * Waleran IV de Beaumont, Count of Meulan, twin
    * Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester, twin
    * Hugh de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Bedford
    * Adeline, wife of Hugh Montfort & Richard de Granville
    * Aubree, wife of Hugh II of Chãateauneuf-en-Thimerais
    * Maud, wife of William Lovel
    * Isabel, mistress of King Henry I, wife of Gilbert de Clare and mother of Richard Strongbow & wife of Hervâe de Montmorency

    Secondly, the wife of William de Warenne, son of William de Warenne, 1st Earl of Surrey and his first wife Gundred; Isabel became the Countess of Surrey. They married in 1118 and had three sons and two daughters:
    * William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey
    Ralph de Warenne
    * Reginald de Warenne
    * Gundrada de Warenne, wife of Roger de Beaumont& William de Lancaster
    * Ada de Warenne, wife of Henry of Scotland, 3rd Earl of Huntingdon, mother King Malcolm IV and King William I 'the Lion'

    Sir Robert de Beaumont, described as being "the wisest man in his time between London and Jerusalem", and aged over fifty was determined to marry Isabel, aged about eleven. Bishop Ivo dismissed their request based on their being within a few degrees of kindred. Isabel's father was able to sway Bishop Ivo, and saw his daughter married by April of 1096 when he left on a crusade.

    In 1115, Isabel was either carried away or willingly abducted by William de Warrene, revealing they had been lovers for some time. They were unable to marry until the death of Sir Robert, which occurred in 1118.

    The Beaumont sons were on opposite sides of support for King Stephen and Queen Matilda, but were not enemies.

    Sources vary on her death, reported as 1131 to outliving William who died in 1138.

    Family links:
    Parents:
    Hugues de France (1057 - 1102)

    Spouses:
    Robert de Beaumont (1049 - 1118)
    William II de Warenne (1065 - 1138)

    Children:
    Waleran de Beaumont (1104 - 1166)*
    Robert de Beaumont (1104 - 1168)*
    Reginald de Warenne (1113 - 1179)*
    William de Warenne (1118 - 1148)*
    Ada De Warenne De Huntingdon (1120 - 1178)*

    Sibling:
    Isabel Of Vermandois Beaumont de Warenne (1081 - 1131)
    Raoul I de Vermandois (1094 - 1152)*

    *Calculated relationship

    Burial:
    Lewes Priory
    Lewes
    Lewes District
    East Sussex, England

    end

    Children:
    1. William de Warenne, Knight, 3rd Earl of Surrey was born 0Jun 1118, East Sussex, England; died 6 Jan 1148, Turkey.
    2. Ada de Warenne was born ~ 1120, Surry, England; died 0___ 1178, England.
    3. 15. Gundred de Warenne


Generation: 6

  1. 60.  William de Warenne, Knight, 1st Earl of SurreyWilliam de Warenne, Knight, 1st Earl of Surrey died 20 Jun 1088.

    Other Events:

    • Possessions: Lewes Castle, East Sussex, England
    • Also Known As: Seigneur de Varennes
    • Military: 0___ 1066; fought at the Battle of Hastings

    Notes:

    William de Warenne, 1st Earl of Surrey, Seigneur de Varennes (died 1088), was a Norman nobleman created Earl of Surrey under William II Rufus. He was one of the few who was documented to have been with William the Conqueror at the Battle of Hastings in 1066. At the time of the Domesday Survey, he held extensive lands in 13 counties including the Rape of Lewes in Sussex, now East Sussex.

    Early career[

    William was a younger son of Ranulf I de Warenne and his 1st wife Beatrice (whose mother was probably a sister of duchess Gunnor, wife of duke Richard I).[a] Likewise, Orderic Vitalis describes William as Roger's consanguineus, literally 'cousin', more generically a term of close kinship, but not typically used to describe brothers, and Roger de Mortimer appears to have been a generation older than William de Warenne, his purported brother.[2] Charters report several earlier men associated with Warenne. A Ranulf de Warenne appears in a charter dated between 1027 and 1035, and in one from about 1050 with a wife Beatrice, while in 1059, Ranulf and wife Emma appear along with their sons Ranulf and William. These occurrences have typically been taken to represent successive wives of a single Ranulf, with Beatrice being the mother of William and hence identical to the Gunnorid niece (Thomas Stapleton,[3] in spite of the 1059 charter explicitly naming Emma as his mother.[4] A reevaluation of the surviving charters led Katherine Keats-Rohan to suggest that, as he appears to have done elsewhere, Robert of Torigny has compressed two generations into one, with a Ranulf (I) and Beatrice being parents of Ranulf (II) de Warenne and of Roger de Mortimer (a Roger son of Ranulf de Warenne appears in a charter dated 1040/1053), and Ranulf (II) and Emma were then parents of Ranulf (III), the heir in Normandy, and William, as attested by the 1059 charter. Associations with Vascœuil led to identification of the Warenne progenitrix with a widow Beatrice, daughter of Tesselin, vicomte of Rouen, appearing there in 1054/60. As Robert of Torigny shows a vicomte of Rouen to have married a niece of Gunnor, this perhaps explains the tradition of a Gunnorid relationship.[5] On Robert's genealogies, see also Eleanor Searle,[6][7][8] William was from the hamlet of Varenne, near to Arques-la-Bataille, Duchy of Normandy, now in the canton of Bellencombre, Seine Maritime.[9][10][11] At the beginning of Duke William’s reign, Ranulf II was not a major landholder and, as a second son, William de Warenne did not stand to inherit the family’s small estates. During the rebellions of 1052-1054, the young William de Warenne proved himself a loyal adherent to the Duke and played a significant part in the Battle of Mortemer for which he was rewarded with lands confiscated from his uncle, Roger of Mortemer, including the Castle of Mortimer and most of the surrounding lands.[12] At about the same time he acquired lands at Bellencombre including the castle which became the center of William de Warenne’s holdings in Normandy[7]

    Conquest of England


    Coat of Arms of the de Warenne Earls of Surrey
    William was among the Norman barons summoned to a council by Duke William when the decision was made to oppose King Harold II's accession to the throne of England.[7][13] He fought at the Battle of Hastings and was well rewarded with numerous holdings. The Domesday book records his lands stretched over thirteen counties and included the important Rape of Sussex, several manors in Norfolk, Suffolk and Essex, the significant manor of Conisbrough in Yorkshire and Castle Acre in Norfolk, which became his caput (see below).[7][8] He is one of the very few proven companions of William the Conqueror known to have fought at the Battle of Hastings in 1066.[14][15][16] He fought against rebels at the Isle of Ely in 1071, where he showed a special desire to hunt down Hereward the Wake who had killed his brother-in-law Frederick the year before.[17][18] Hereward is supposed to have unhorsed him with an arrow shot.[19]

    Later career

    Sometime between 1078 and 1082,[20] William and his wife Gundred traveled to Rome visiting monasteries along the way. In Burgundy they were unable to go any further due to a war between Emperor Henry IV and Pope Gregory VII. They visited Cluny Abbey and were impressed with the monks and their dedication. William and Gundred decided to found a Cluniac priory on their own lands in England. William restored buildings for an abbey. They sent to Hugh, the abbot of Cluny, for monks to come to England at their monastery. At first Hugh was reluctant but he finally sent several monks, including Lazlo who was to be the first abbot. The house they founded was Lewes Priory, dedicated to St. Pancras,[21][22] the first Cluniac priory in England[23]

    William was loyal to William II,[17] and it was probably in early 1088 that he was created Earl of Surrey.[24] He was mortally wounded at the First Siege of Pevensey Castle and died 24 June 1088 at Lewes, Sussex, and was buried next to his wife Gundred at the Chapterhouse of Lewes Priory.[25][26]

    Family

    He married first, before 1070, Gundred, daughter of William the Conqueror and Matilda his wife. This is shown in a charter of William referring to Gundrada (Gundred in Latin) as "Filae Meae" (my daughter),[27][28] sister of Gerbod the Fleming, 1st Earl of Chester. Ordericus Vitalis made many errors in his Ecclesiastical History of England and Normandy, which he wrote a hundred years after the Conquest. Ordericus Vitalis was a seventy-year-old man with an intense dislike for Normans, and continually made errors in his history (see Reverend Thomas Warren: History of the Warren Family); since then numerous English historians have tried to authenticate its account of Conqueror and his family, but have not succeeded. Gundred De Warren was buried at Lewes Castle. Her grave cover still exists as a marble slab of exactly the same design as that of her mother's grave cover, which is also in the same black decorated marble. DNA is likely to prove that Gundred and Matilda were mother and daughter. Such was the English dislike for the Normans, that they stole both William De Warren's and his wife's grave covers to place over graves of their own.[29][30][31]

    William married secondly a sister of Richard Gouet, who survived him.[32]

    Issue

    By Gundred Surrey had:

    William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey (d. 1138), who married Elisabeth (Isabelle) de Vermandois, widow of Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Leicester.[33]
    Edith de Warenne, who married firstly Gerard de Gournay, lord of Gournay-en-Bray, and secondly Drew de Monchy.[34]
    Reynold de Warenne, who inherited lands from his mother in Flanders[34] and died c. 1106–08.[35]
    An unnamed daughter, who married Ernise de Coulonces.[36]
    Surrey, by his second wife, had no issue.

    Possessions:
    Lewes Castle stands at the highest point of Lewes, East Sussex, England on an artificial mound constructed with chalk blocks. It was originally called Bray Castle.

    Images, history & source citation ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lewes_Castle

    William married Gundred of Flanders, Countess of Surrey Bef 1070. Gundred was born Flanders, Belgium; died 27 May 1085, Castle Acre, Norfolk, England; was buried Lewes Priory, Sussex, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 61.  Gundred of Flanders, Countess of Surrey was born Flanders, Belgium; died 27 May 1085, Castle Acre, Norfolk, England; was buried Lewes Priory, Sussex, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Gundrada
    • Also Known As: Gundreda

    Notes:

    Gundred or Gundreda (Latin: Gundrada) (died 27 May 1085)[1] was the Flemish-born wife of an early Norman baron, William de Warenne, 1st Earl of Surrey. She and her husband established Lewes Priory in Sussex.

    Life

    Gundred was almost certainly born in Flanders, and was a sister of Gerbod the Fleming, 1st Earl of Chester.[2][3][4][5] She is explicitly so called by Orderic Vitalis,[6] as well as the chronicle of Hyde Abbey[7] She was also sister of Frederick of Oosterzele-Scheldewindeke, who was killed c.1070 by Hereward the Wake.[8] Legends based in part on late Lewes priory cartulary[a] suggested Gundred was a daughter of William the Conqueror by his spouse Matilda of Flanders,[9] but this is not accepted by most modern historians.[10][11] The early-19th-century writer Thomas Stapleton had argued she was a daughter of Matilda, born prior to her marriage to Duke William.[12] This sparked a debate consisting of a series of published papers culminating with those of Edmond Chester Waters and Edward Augustus Freeman who argued the theories could not be supported.[13][14][15] Regardless, some genealogical and historical sources continue to make the assertion that she was the Conqueror's daughter.[16][17][18][19]

    Gundred married before 1070[20] William de Warenne, 1st Earl of Surrey (d. 20 June 1088),[1] who rebuilt Lewes Castle, making it his chief residence. Sometime between 1078 and 1082,[21] Gundrada and her husband set out for Rome visiting monasteries along the way. In Burgundy they were unable to go any further due to a war between Henry IV and Pope Gregory VII. They visited Cluny Abbey and were impressed with the monks and their dedication. William and Gundred decided to found a Cluniac priory on their own lands in England. They sent to Hugh the abbot of Cluny for monks to come to England at their monastery. Hugh was reluctant yet eventually sent several monks including Lazlo who became the first abbot. The house they founded was Lewes Priory dedicated to St. Pancras.[22][23] Gundred died in childbirth 27 May 1085 at Castle Acre, Norfolk, one of her husband's estates, and was buried at the Chapter house of Lewes Priory.[1][23] He was later buried beside her.[24]

    Tombstone

    In the course of the centuries which followed, both tombstones disappeared from the priory but in 1774 William Burrell, Esq., an antiquary, discovered Gundred's in Isfield Church (seven miles from Lewes), over the remains of Edward Shirley, Esq., (d. 1550), and had it removed on October 2, 1775, to St. John's Church, Southover, where it was placed on display.[25]

    In 1845, during excavations through the Priory grounds for the Brighton Lewes and Hastings Railway, the lead chests containing the remains of the Earl and his Countess were discovered and were deposited temporarily beneath Gundred's tombstone.[25] In 1847 a Norman Revival chapel was erected by public subscription, adjoining the present vestry and chancel. Prior to re-interring the remains in this chapel, both chests were opened to ascertain if there were any contents, which was found to be the case. New chests were made and used, and the ancient ones preserved and placed in two recessed arches in the southern wall. The Earl's chest has lost some lead. Gundred's chest remains in a good state of preservation. Across the upper part of the right arch is the name Gvndrada. Her tombstone is of black Tournai marble.[26]

    Family

    The children of William de Warenne and Gundred were:

    William II de Warenne (d. 11 May 1138), buried in Lewes Priory.[2][27]
    Reginald de Warenne, an adherent of Robert of Normandy.[2][24]
    Edith de Warenne, married, 1stly, Gerard de Gournay, Lord of Gournay-en-Bray, 2ndly, Drew de Monchy.[2][24]

    Controversy on parentage

    Legends based in part on late Lewes Priory cartulary[a] suggested Gundred was a daughter of William the Conqueror by his spouse Matilda of Flanders,[19] but this is not accepted by most modern historians.[20][21] The early-19th-century writer Thomas Stapleton had argued she was a daughter of Matilda born prior to her marriage to Duke William.[22] This theory sparked a debate consisting of a series of published papers. It culminated with those of Edmond Chester Waters and Edward Augustus Freeman, who argued the theories could not be supported.[23][24][b] Nonetheless, some genealogical and historical sources continue to make the assertion that she was the Conqueror's daughter.[25][26][27][28]

    Notes

    Jump up ^ The reference here to late Lewes priory cartulary is to copies of charters that date centuries after the originals and specifically those which had been altered or forged to add the desired evidence she was the daughter of royalty. For more information on these forged charters see: English Historical Documents 1042-1189, ed. David C. Douglas, George W. Greenaway, Vol. II (Oxford University Press, New York, 1953), p. 605; L.C. Loyd, 'The Origin of the Family of Warenne' ‘’Yorks Archaeol. Journal’’, vol. xxxi, pp. 97-113; and C. T. Clay, ‘'Early Yorkshire Charters’’, vol. VIII (1949), pp. 59.-62.

    References

    ^ Jump up to: a b c G. E. Cokayne, The Complete Peerage, vol. xii/1 (The St. Catherine Press, London, 1953), p. 494
    ^ Jump up to: a b c d Early Yorkshire Charters, ed: William Farrer, Charles Travis Clay, Volume VIII - The Honour of Warenne (The Yorkshire Archaeological Society, 1949), pp. 40-46
    Jump up ^ F. Anderson, Uxor Mea: The First Wife of the First William of Warenne, Sussex archaeological collections, Vol. 130 (Sussex Archaeological Society, 1992) pp. 107-8
    Jump up ^ Elisabeth van Houts, 'Epitaph of Gundrada of Warenne', Nova de Veteribus, Mitel-und neulateinische Studien fur Paul Gerhard Schmidt (K.G. Saur, Munchen Leipzig, 2004), p. 372
    Jump up ^ P. Anselme de Sainte-Marie, Histoire de la maison royale de France et des grands officiers de la Couronne, V.6 (Estienne Loyson, 1674), p. 26
    Jump up ^ Ordericus Vitalis, The Ecclesiastical History of England and Normandy, Translated by Thomas Forester, Vol. ii, (Henry G. Bohn, London, MDCCCLIV (1854), p. 49
    Jump up ^ Hyde Abbey, Liber Monasterii de Hyda: Comprising a Chronicle of the affairs of England, (Longmans, Green, Reader, and Dyer, London, 1866), p. xcvii. Note: the anonymous Hyde chronicler identified two of Gundred's brothers, Gerbod, Earl of Cheter and Frederick.
    Jump up ^ Elisabeth van Houts, 'Frederick, Brother-in-Law of William of Warenne', Anglo-Saxon England, Vol. 28 (1999), pp. 218-220
    Jump up ^ George Duckett, 'Observations on the Parentage of Gundreda, Countess of Warenne', The Yorkshire Archaeological and Topographical Journal, Vol. ix, Part xxxiii, 1885, pp. 421-437 Note: Sir George Duckett, Bart., was the leading proponent of the theory that Gundred was the daughter of William the Conqueror and Matilda
    Jump up ^ G. E. Cokayne, The Complete Peerage, vol. xii/1 (The St. Catherine Press, London, 1953), p. 494 note (j)
    Jump up ^ David C. Doulgas, William the Conqueror (University of California Press, 1964), p. 392
    Jump up ^ Stapleton, Thomas, 'Observations in disproof of the pretended marriage of William de Warren, Earl of Surrey, with a daughter begotten of Matildis, daughter of Baldwin, Comte of Flanders, by William the Conqueror, and illustrative of the origin and early history of the family in Normandy', The Archaeological Journal 3 (1846):1-26 Note: despite the confusing title Stapleton's theory was that Gundred was a daughter of Matilda of Flanders by an earlier marriage.
    Jump up ^ Edmond Chester Waters, 'Gundrada de Warenne', The Archaeological Journal, Vol. xli (London, 1884), pp. 300-312
    Jump up ^ Edward A. Freeman, 'The Parentage of Gundrada, Wife of William of Warren', The English Historical Review, Vol. 3, No. 12 (Oct., 1888), pp. 680-701
    Jump up ^ For an extensive discussion regarding the participants of this nineteenth-century debate see : Victoria Chandler, 'Gundrada de Warenne and the Victorian Gentlemen-Scholars', Southern History, Vol. 12 (1990), pp. 68-81
    Jump up ^ American Biography; a New Cyclopedia, Vol. ix (The American Historial Society, New York, 1921)p. 276
    Jump up ^ Colonial Families of the United States of America, ed. Nelson Osgood Rhoades, Vol. VII (Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1966). pp. 319, 347
    Jump up ^ Rene Beckley, Ancient Walls of East Anglia (Terence Dalton, Ltd., Lavenham, Suffolk, 1979), p. 66
    Jump up ^ Charles Cooper, A village in Sussex: the history of Kingston-near-Lewes (I.B. Taurus, London, 2006), p. 44
    Jump up ^ Elisabeth van Houts, 'The Warenne View of the Past 1066-1203)', Anglo-Norman Studies XXIV, Proceedings of the Battle Conference 2003, Vol. 26 (The Boydell Press, Woodbridge, 2004), p. 104 & n. 8
    Jump up ^ Early Yorkshire Charters, ed: William Farrer, Charles Travis Clay, Volume VIII - The Honour of Warenne (The Yorkshire Archaeological Society, 1949), p. 4
    Jump up ^ B. Golding, 'The Coming of the Cluniacs', Anglo-Norman Studies III; Proceedings of the Battle Conference 1980, Vol. iii (Boydell Press, Woodbridge, 1981), pp. 65, 67
    ^ Jump up to: a b Early Yorkshire Charters, ed: William Farrer, Charles Travis Clay, Volume VIII - The Honour of Warenne (The Yorkshire Archaeological Society, 1949), pp. 50-55
    ^ Jump up to: a b c G. E. Cokayne, The Complete Peerage, vol. xii/1 (The St. Catherine Press, London, 1953), p. 495 note (b)
    ^ Jump up to: a b Elisabeth van Houts, 'Epitaph of Gundrada of Warenne', Nova de Veteribus, Mitel-und neulateinische Studien fur Paul Gerhard Schmidt (K.G. Saur, Munchen Leipzig, 2004), p. 367
    Jump up ^ Elisabeth van Houts, 'Epitaph of Gundrada of Warenne', Nova de Veteribus, Mitel-und neulateinische Studien fur Paul Gerhard Schmidt (K.G. Saur, Munchen Leipzig, 2004), pp. 366,368-9
    Jump up ^ G. E. Cokayne, The Complete Peerage, vol. xii/1 (The St. Catherine Press, London, 1953), pp. 495-6

    Additional references

    Barlow, Frank, The Feudal Kingdom of England 1012 - 1216, London, 1955
    Cokayne, George Edward, The Complete Peerage, Vol. iv, p. 670 Chart:Surrey or Warenne before 1135…
    Keats-Rohan, K.S.B., Domesday People, a Prosopography of Persons Occurring in English Documents 1066-1166 (The Boydell Press, Woodbridge, 1999), p. 480
    Moriarty, George Andrews, The Plantagenet Ancestry (Mormon Pioneer Genealogy Society, Salt Lake City, UT, 1985), p. 184
    Norgate, Kate (1890). "Gundrada de Warenne". In Stephen, Leslie; Lee, Sidney. Dictionary of National Biography. 23. London: Smith, Elder & Co. p. 338.
    Schwennicke, Detlev, Europèaische Stammtafeln: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europaischen Staaten, Neue Folge, Band III Teilband 4, Das Feudale Frankreich und Sien Einfluss auf des Mittelalters (Marburg, Germany: Verlag von J. A. Stargardt, 1989), Tafel 699
    Weis, Frederick Lewis, The Magna Charta Sureties, 1215, ed: Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr., William R. Beall, 5th Edition (Genealogical Publishing Co., 1999), Line 158-1

    External links

    The Lewes Priory Trust Photo Gallery (copyrighted images)
    The Gundrada Chapel, Southover Church, Lewes, East Sussex
    Tomb of Gundred in 1787 The Gentleman's Magazine

    *

    Buried:
    In the course of the centuries which followed, both tombstones disappeared from the priory but in 1774 William Burrell, Esq., an antiquary, discovered Gundred's in Isfield Church (seven miles from Lewes), over the remains of Edward Shirley, Esq., (d. 1550), and had it removed on October 2, 1775, to St. John's Church, Southover, where it was placed on display.[25]

    In 1845, during excavations through the Priory grounds for the Brighton Lewes and Hastings Railway, the lead chests containing the remains of the Earl and his Countess were discovered and were deposited temporarily beneath Gundred's tombstone.[25] In 1847 a Norman Revival chapel was erected by public subscription, adjoining the present vestry and chancel. Prior to re-interring the remains in this chapel, both chests were opened to ascertain if there were any contents, which was found to be the case. New chests were made and used, and the ancient ones preserved and placed in two recessed arches in the southern wall. The Earl's chest has lost some lead. Gundred's chest remains in a good state of preservation. Across the upper part of the right arch is the name Gvndrada. Her tombstone is of black Tournai marble.[26]

    Children:
    1. 30. William de Warenne, Knight, 2nd Earl of Surrey was born 0___ 1065, East Sussex, England; died 11 May 1138; was buried Lewes Priory, Sussex, England.

  3. 62.  Hugues de France was born 0___ 1057, France (son of Henri, I, King of France and Anna Agnesa Yaraslavno, Queen of France); died 18 Oct 1102; was buried Church of St Paul, Mersin, Mersin, Turkey.

    Notes:

    Birth: 1057
    Death: Oct. 18, 1102

    Nobility. Son of Henri I of France and his second wife Anna Iaroslavna of Kiev. He married Adelais de Vermandois who bore him nine children.

    Family links:
    Parents:
    King Henri (1008 - 1060)
    Anna Agnesa Yaroslavna (1036 - 1075)

    Spouse:
    Adelaide, Countess of Vermandois*

    Children:
    Isabel Of Vermandois Beaumont de Warenne (1081 - 1131)*
    Raoul I de Vermandois (1094 - 1152)*

    Siblings:
    Philip I of France (1052 - 1108)*
    Hugh I Count of Vermandois (1057 - 1102)*
    Hugues de France (1057 - 1102)

    *Calculated relationship

    Burial:
    Church of St Paul
    Mersin
    Mersin, Turkey

    Created by: Lutetia
    Record added: Jan 13, 2013
    Find A Grave Memorial# 103487897

    end

    Hugues — Adelaide of Vermandois. [Group Sheet]


  4. 63.  Adelaide of Vermandois
    Children:
    1. 31. Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester was born 0___ 1081, Basse-Normandie, France; died 17 Feb 1131, France; was buried Lewes Priory, Southover, Sussex, England.


Generation: 7

  1. 124.  Henri, I, King of France was born 4 May 1008, Reims, France; died 4 Aug 1060, Vitry-aux-Loges, Centre, France; was buried Saint Denis Basilique, Ile-de-France, France.

    Henri — Anna Agnesa Yaraslavno, Queen of France. Anna was born 0___ 1036, Kiev, Ukraine; died 5 Sep 1075. [Group Sheet]


  2. 125.  Anna Agnesa Yaraslavno, Queen of France was born 0___ 1036, Kiev, Ukraine; died 5 Sep 1075.
    Children:
    1. 62. Hugues de France was born 0___ 1057, France; died 18 Oct 1102; was buried Church of St Paul, Mersin, Mersin, Turkey.