Maud FitzHugh

Female 1428 - 1466  (~ 38 years)


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Generation: 1

  1. 1.  Maud FitzHugh was born ~1428, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England (daughter of William Fitzhugh, 4th Baron FitzHugh and Margery Willoughby, Baroness of Ravensworth); died >1466, Streatlam, Durham, England.

    Notes:

    Maud Bowes formerly FitzHugh
    Born about 1428 in Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England
    ANCESTORS ancestors
    Daughter of William FitzHugh and Margery (Willoughby) FitzHugh
    Sister of Margery (FitzHugh) Melton, Elizabeth (FitzHugh) Greystoke, Lora (FitzHugh) Constable, Henry FitzHugh, Eleanor FitzHugh, Lucy FitzHugh and Joan (FitzHugh) le Scrope
    Wife of William Bowes — married about 1445 [location unknown]
    DESCENDANTS descendants
    Mother of Margaret (Bowes) Lisle, Joan Bowes, Ralph Bowes and Margery (Bowes) Hilton
    Died after 1466 in Streatlam, Durham, England


    Maud FitzHugh was the daughter of Sir William FitzHugh of Ravensworth and his wife Margery Willoughby, daughter of the 5th Lord Willoughby de Eresby and Lucy le Strange.

    She married Sir William Bowes of Streatlam (sheriff of NBL), son and heir of Sir William Bowes and Joan Greystoke.[1]

    They had 5 sons and 6 daughters:

    William Esq
    Robert
    Thomas
    Sir Ralph
    Henry
    Margery, wife of Sir William Hilton
    Joan, wife of Sir Ralph Bulmer
    Katherine, wife of Sir Richard Conyers (see query below)
    Margaret, wife of Sir Humphrey Lisle.[2]
    Isabel, wife of John Swinnow
    Anne, wife of Ralph Wycliffe.
    Maud was living when her husband died on 28 July 1466.

    Query. Maud's son Sir Ralph married Margery Conyers, daughter and co-heiress of Sir Richard Conyers of South Cowton and his wife Alice Wycliffe. This Sir Richard reportedly built the church and "Castle" at South Cowton, ca. 1450-1470. He or another Sir Richard is said to have cleared and demolished the village there in 1489-90.

    So did Sir Ralph's sister Katherine become a late 2nd wife of Sir Ralph's father-in-law? (Many similar cases of a man marrying his son-in-law's sister have been noted.) Or did Katherine marry a man from a different branch of the clan?

    Effigies in the church are said to be those of Sir Richard and his two wives, but are described elsewhere as those of Sir Christopher Boynton (of Sedbury) and his two wives.

    Sources

    Marlyn Lewis.
    Royal Ancestry by Douglas Richardson Vol. I page 493
    http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=7384491&pid=819153895
    Acknowledgement

    This person was created through the import of Redmond_Chambers(3).ged on 28 January 2011.

    end of biography

    Maud married William Bowes 1445. William (son of William Bowes and Joan Greystoke) was born ~1415, Streatlam Castle, Durham, England; died 28 Jul 1466, Streatlam, Durham, England. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. Ralph Bowes was born ~1450; died 1482; was buried Barnard Castle, Durham, England.

Generation: 2

  1. 2.  William Fitzhugh, 4th Baron FitzHugh was born ~ 1399, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England (son of Henry FitzHugh, IV, Knight, 3rd Baron FitzHugh and Elizabeth Grey); died 22 Oct 1452, (Ravensworth) Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Member of Parliament

    Notes:

    William FitzHugh, 4th Baron FitzHugh (c. 1399 - 22 October 1452) was an English nobleman and Member of Parliament.

    Born at Ravensworth, North Riding of Yorkshire, England. He was the son of Henry FitzHugh, 3rd Baron FitzHugh and Elizabeth Grey. He served as a Member of Parliament from 1429-1450.

    FitzHugh married, before 18 November 1406, at Ravensworth, Margery Willoughby, daughter of William Willoughby, 5th Baron Willoughby de Eresby, and Lucy le Strange, by whom he had a son and seven daughters:[1]

    Henry FitzHugh, 5th Baron FitzHugh, who married Lady Alice Neville, daughter of Richard Neville, 5th Earl of Salisbury and Alice Montacute, 5th Countess of Salisbury, daughter and heiress of Thomas de Montacute, 4th Earl of Salisbury and Lady Eleanor Holland.[2] They were great-grandparents to queen consort Catherine Parr.

    Elizabeth FitzHugh, whom married Ralph Greystoke, 5th Baron Greystoke.[2]
    Eleanor FitzHugh, who married Ranulph Dacre, 1st Baron Dacre of Gilsland.[2]
    Maud FitzHugh, whom married Sir William Bowes (d. 28 July 1466) of Streatlam, Durham, by whom she was the grandmother of Sir Robert Bowes.[3][2]
    Lora FitzHugh, who married Sir John Constable of Halsham, Yorkshire.[2]
    Lucy, who became a nun.[2]
    Margery FitzHugh, who married John Melton.[2]
    Joan FitzHugh, who married John Scrope, 5th Baron Scrope of Bolton.[2]

    end of biography

    Sir William's 5-generation pedigree... http://www.ourfamilyhistories.org/ahnentafel.php?personID=I20341&tree=00&parentset=0&generations=5

    Photo, map & history of Ravensworth Castle, home of the Fitzhugh family... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ravensworth_Castle_(North_Yorkshire)

    end

    William married Margery Willoughby, Baroness of Ravensworth Bef 18 Nov 1406, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England. Margery (daughter of William Willoughby, 4th Baron Willoughby de Eresby and Lucy le Strange) was born ~ 1398, Willoughby Manor, Eresby, Spilsby, Lincoln, England; died Bef 1453, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 3.  Margery Willoughby, Baroness of Ravensworth was born ~ 1398, Willoughby Manor, Eresby, Spilsby, Lincoln, England (daughter of William Willoughby, 4th Baron Willoughby de Eresby and Lucy le Strange); died Bef 1453, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Margaret Willoughby
    • Probate: 22 Oct 1452, Yorkshire, England

    Notes:

    Her lineage to William the Conqueror (1024-1087) ... http://www.ourfamilyhistories.org/ahnentafel.php?personID=I20303&tree=00&parentset=0&generations=12

    Birth:
    Map & history of Spilsby... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spilsby

    Children:
    1. Elizabeth Fitzhugh was born ~ 1419, Ravensworth, Kirby, North Riding, Yorkshire, England; died 20 Mar 1468, Greystoke Manor, Northumberland, England.
    2. Margery Fitzhugh was born Ravensworth, Kirby, North Riding, Yorkshire, England; died Aft 1510, Kirkby, North Yorkshire, England.
    3. Henry FitzHugh, 5th Baron FitzHugh was born 1429-1435, Ravensworth, Kirby, Yorkshire, England; died 8 Jun 1472, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England.
    4. Lora FitzHugh was born (Ravensworth, Kirby, Yorkshire, England).
    5. Joan FitzHugh was born (Ravensworth, Kirby, Yorkshire, England).
    6. 1. Maud FitzHugh was born ~1428, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England; died >1466, Streatlam, Durham, England.


Generation: 3

  1. 4.  Henry FitzHugh, IV, Knight, 3rd Baron FitzHughHenry FitzHugh, IV, Knight, 3rd Baron FitzHugh was born 1359-1363, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England (son of Henry FitzHugh, KG, 2nd Baron FitzHugh of Ravensworth and Joan Scrope); died 14 Jan 1425, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England; was buried Jervaulx Abbey, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Chamberlain of the Household for King Henry VI, 1413-1425
    • Occupation: Diplomat, 1420
    • Occupation: Member of Parliament, 1388
    • Occupation: Treasurer of England, 1416-1421
    • Residence: Vadstena Abbey, Vadstena, Sweden
    • Also Known As: Henry Scrope
    • Military: Battle of Agincourt (October 25, 1415)
    • Military: Battle of Homildon Hill, Wooler, Northumberland, England

    Notes:

    Henry FitzHugh, 3rd Baron FitzHugh KG (c.?1363 - 11 January 1425) was an English administrator and diplomat who served under Henry IV and Henry V.

    Royal service

    Summoned to parliament in 1388, FitzHugh became active in public affairs following Henry IV's succession. He was engaged in Anglo-Scottish diplomacy, taking part in the Battle of Humbleton Hill in 1402 and negotiating the surrender of his uncle, Archbishop of York Richard le Scrope, in 1405. The next year he travelled to Denmark as part of the escort of Philippa, Henry's daughter, for her marriage to Eric of Pomerania, king of Denmark, Norway and Sweden.[1]

    At the coronation of Henry V in 1413, FitzHugh was Constable.[2] During Henry's reign, he served as Chamberlain of the Household (1413–1425, into the reign of Henry VI), and Treasurer of England (1416–1421). He participated in the Battle of Agincourt in 1415 and subsequent diplomacy with the French, which led to the Treaty of Troyes in 1420. He travelled with the king to France, and he escorted the king's remains back to England following his death in 1422. He was an executor of Henry's will and was a feoffee of lands in the will.[1]

    He became a Knight of the Garter about 1409.[3]

    After his death on 11 January 1425, FitzHugh was buried at Jervaulx Abbey in Yorkshire at his request.[1]

    Religion

    During his travels to the Scandinavian Peninsula in 1406, he visited the Bridgettine Vadstena Abbey in Sweden, where he volunteered to help establish a Bridgettine community in England, including the promise of a manor at Cherry Hinton in Cambridgeshire. An English order was established in 1415 at Twickenham with the assistance of Henry V.[1][4] He also attended the Council of Constance in 1415.[1]

    Family

    A descendant of Akarius Fitz Bardolph,[2] FitzHugh was the first son of Hugh FitzHugh, 2nd Baron FitzHugh, and Joan, daughter of Henry Scrope, 1st Baron Scrope of Masham. He married Elizabeth Grey (born c. 1363), daughter of Sir Robert de Grey and his wife, Lora St Quentin. Robert was a son of John de Grey, 1st Baron Grey de Rotherfield and Avice Marmion (a descendant of John, King of England).[5] They had eight sons and six daughters, including:[5]

    William FitzHugh, 4th Baron FitzHugh, married to Margery Willoughby, daughter of William Willoughby, 5th Baron Willoughby de Eresby.[5] They were parents to Henry FitzHugh, 5th Baron FitzHugh who became a brother-in-law to "Warwick, the Kingmaker" by his marriage to Lady Alice Neville; they were great-grandparents to queen consort Catherine Parr.[5]

    Hon. Robert FitzHugh, Bishop of London[5]

    Eleanor FitzHugh, who married firstly to Philip Darcy, 6th Lord Darcy of Knayth; they were parents to Elizabeth Darcy, wife of Sir James Strangeways. Eleanor married secondly to Thomas Tunstall and thirdly to Henry Bromflete, 1st Baron Vesci.[5][6]

    Elizabeth FitzHugh, married firstly on 10 December 1427 to Sir Ralph Gray of Chillingham (d.17 March 1442/3) and secondly, in 1445, Sir Edmund Montfort.[5] Her only issue was by her first husband.[5] Elizabeth was a lady-in-waiting to queen consort Margaret of Anjou.[5]

    Maud FitzHugh, wife of Sir William Eure of Witton.[5]

    References

    ^ Jump up to: a b c d e Reeves, A. C. (January 2008). "Fitzhugh, Henry, third Baron Fitzhugh (1363?–1425)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/50151. Retrieved 5 June 2011. (subscription or UK public library membership required)
    ^ Jump up to: a b Burke, John (1831). A general and heraldic dictionary of the peerages of England, Ireland, and Scotland, extinct, dormant, and in abeyance. London: Henry Colburn and Richard Bentley. p. 202. Retrieved 30 May 2011.
    Jump up ^ "Knights of the Garter". leighrayment.com. 30 April 2011. Retrieved 5 June 2011.
    Jump up ^ "History of the Bridgettine Order in the UK". Bridgettine Order in the UK. Retrieved 5 June 2011.
    ^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h i j editor, Douglas Richardson ; Kimball G. Everingham,. Plantagenet ancestry : a study in colonial and medieval families (2nd ed.). Salt Lake City, UT.: Douglas Richardson. p. 83. ISBN 9781449966348.
    Jump up ^ Richardson, Douglas (2011). Magna Carta ancestry : a study in colonial and medieval families, Vol II (2nd ed.). Salt Lake City, UT.: Douglas Richardson. p. 27. ISBN 9781449966386.

    Occupation:
    The Lord Chamberlain or Lord Chamberlain of the Household is the senior officer of the Royal Household of the United Kingdom, overseeing the departments which support and provide advice to the Sovereign of the United Kingdom.

    The Lord Chamberlain is always sworn of the Privy Council, is usually a peer and before 1782 the post was of Cabinet rank. Until 1924 the position was a political one. The office dates from the Middle Ages, when the King's Chamberlain often acted as the King's spokesman in Council and Parliament.[1]

    Occupation:
    The post of Lord High Treasurer or Lord Treasurer was an English government position and has been a British government position since the Acts of Union of 1707. A holder of the post would be the third highest ranked Great Officer of State, below the Lord High Chancellor and above the Lord President of the Council.

    Occupation:
    led to the Treaty of Troyes in 1420...

    The Treaty of Troyes was an agreement that King Henry V of England and his heirs would inherit the throne of France upon the death of King Charles VI of France. It was signed in the French city of Troyes on 21 May 1420 in the aftermath of Henry's successful military campaign in France. It forms a part of the backdrop of the latter phase of the Hundred Years' War finally won by the French at the Battle of Castillon in 1453, and in which various English kings tried to establish their claims to the French throne.

    Residence:
    The Abbey of Our Lady and of St. Bridget (Latin: Monasterium sanctarum Mariµ Virgáinis et Brigidµ in Vatzstena), more commonly referred to as Vadstena Abbey, situated on Lake Včattern, in the Diocese of Linkčoping, Sweden, was the motherhouse of the Bridgettine Order. The abbey started on one of the farms donated to it by the king, but the town of Vadstena grew up around it. It was active from 1346 until 1595.

    Military:
    The Battle of Agincourt (Azincourt in French) was a major English victory in the Hundred Years' War.[a] The battle took place on Friday, 25 October 1415 (Saint Crispin's Day), near Azincourt, in northern France.[5][b] Henry V's victory at Agincourt, against a numerically superior French army, crippled France and started a new period in the war during which Henry V married the French king's daughter, and their son, later Henry VI of England and Henry II of France, was made heir to the throne of France as well as of England. English speakers found it easier to pronounce "Agincourt" with a "g" instead of the original "z". For all historians in the non-English speaking world, the battle is referred to with the toponymy of Azincourt, whereas English-only speaking historians kept the modified spelling of Agincourt.

    Henry V led his troops into battle and participated in hand-to-hand fighting. The French king of the time, Charles VI, did not command the French army himself as he suffered from severe psychotic illnesses with moderate mental incapacitation. Instead, the French were commanded by Constable Charles d'Albret and various prominent French noblemen of the Armagnac party.

    This battle is notable for the use of the English longbow in very large numbers, with English and Welsh archers forming most of Henry's army. The battle is the centrepiece of the play Henry V by William Shakespeare.

    more ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Agincourt

    Military:
    The Battle of Homildon Hill was a conflict between English and Scottish armies on 14 September 1402 in Northumberland, England. The battle was recounted in Shakespeare’s Henry IV, part 1. Although Humbleton Hill is the modern name of the site, over the centuries it has been variously named Homildon, Hameldun, Holmedon, and Homilheugh.

    more ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Homildon_Hill

    Henry married Elizabeth Grey ~ 1380, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England. Elizabeth (daughter of Robert de Grey and Lora St. Quintin) was born ~ 1363, Wilcote, Oxfordshire, England; died 12 Dec 1427, (Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England); was buried Jervaulx Abbey, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 5.  Elizabeth Grey was born ~ 1363, Wilcote, Oxfordshire, England (daughter of Robert de Grey and Lora St. Quintin); died 12 Dec 1427, (Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England); was buried Jervaulx Abbey, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Will: 24 Sep 1427
    • Probate: 29 Dec 1427

    Notes:

    Elizabeth Grey1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17
    F, #12937, b. between 1363 and 1366, d. 12 December 1427
    Father Sir Robert de Grey2,3,4,5,6,7,18,9,10,19,12,13,14,15,16,20 d. 19 Aug 1367
    Mother Lora de St. Quentin2,6,18,19,15,20 b. c 1342, d. 1369
    Elizabeth Grey was born between 1363 and 1366 at of Wilcote, Oxfordshire, England; Age 21 or 24 in 1387.2,6,15 She married Sir Henry FitzHugh, 3rd Lord FitzHugh, Lord High Treasurer, Chamberlain to King Henry V, son of Henry FitzHugh, 2nd Lord FitzHugh and Joan le Scrope, before 1391; They had 8 sons (Henry; John; Sir William, 4th Lord FitzHugh; Sir Geoffrey; Robert, Bishop of London; Ralph; Herbert; & Richard) & 6 daughters (Elizabeth; Joan, wife of Sir Robert, 6th Lord Willoughby; Eleanor, wife of Sir Philip, 6th Lord Darcy of Knaith, of Sir Thomas Tunstall, & of Sir Henry Bromflete, Lord Vescy; Maud, wife of Sir William Eure; Elizabeth, wife of Sir Ralph Gray, & of Sir Edmund Montfort; & Lora, wife of Sir Maurice Berkeley).2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17 Elizabeth Grey left a will on 24 September 1427.6,15 She wrote a codicil on 10 December 1427.6,15 She died on 12 December 1427; Buried at Jervaulx Abbey, Yorkshire.2,6,15 Her estate was probated on 29 December 1427.15
    Family
    Sir Henry FitzHugh, 3rd Lord FitzHugh, Lord High Treasurer, Chamberlain to King Henry V b. c 1358, d. 11 Jan 1425

    Children

    Matilda (Maud) FitzHugh+21,22,4,6,13,15 d. 17 Mar 1467
    Henry FitzHugh23
    John FitzHugh23
    Ralph FitzHugh23
    Herbert FitzHugh23
    Richard FitzHugh23
    Joan FitzHugh23
    Lora FitzHugh+23,24,22,5,6,14,15 d. a 12 Mar 1461
    Robert FitzHugh, Bishop of London23 d. 15 Jan 1436
    Eleanor FitzHugh+25,26,22,27,3,6,9,28,10,29,12,15,30 b. c 1391, d. 30 Sep 1457
    Sir William FitzHugh, 4th Lord FitzHugh+6,15 b. c 1399, d. 22 Oct 1452
    Geoffrey FitzHugh+ b. c 1405
    Elizabeth FitzHugh+23,22,31,6,7,15,16 b. c 1410, d. a 1453

    Citations

    [S3657] Unknown author, The Complete Peerage, by Cokayne, Vol. V, p. 422-425; Lineage and Ancestry of HRH Prince Charles by Paget, Vol. II, p. 405.
    [S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 324.
    [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. II, p. 27-28.
    [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. II, p. 126.
    [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. II, p. 172-173.
    [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. II, p. 198-199.
    [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. II, p. 258.
    [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. III, p. 272.
    [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. IV, p. 97-98.
    [S6] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: 2nd Edition, Vol. I, p. 407-408.
    [S6] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: 2nd Edition, Vol. II, p. 83-84.
    [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. II, p. 391.
    [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. II, p. 526.
    [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. II, p. 591.
    [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. II, p. 630-631.
    [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. III, p. 109-110.
    [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. IV, p. 275.
    [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. III, p. 271-272.
    [S6] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: 2nd Edition, Vol. II, p. 83.
    [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. IV, p. 274-275.
    [S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 295-296.
    [S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 325.
    [S11568] The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain, and the United Kingdom, by George Edward Cokayne, Vol. V, p. 434, chart.
    [S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 312.
    [S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 158-159.
    [S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 256.
    [S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 731.
    [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. IV, p. 237.
    [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. I, p. 571-572.
    [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. V, p. 217.
    [S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 354-355.

    Children:
    1. Eleanor Fitzhugh was born ~ 1391; died 30 Sep 1457, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England.
    2. 2. William Fitzhugh, 4th Baron FitzHugh was born ~ 1399, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England; died 22 Oct 1452, (Ravensworth) Yorkshire, England.
    3. Lora Fitzhugh was born ~ 1400, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England.

  3. 6.  William Willoughby, 4th Baron Willoughby de EresbyWilliam Willoughby, 4th Baron Willoughby de Eresby was born 1370-1375, Eresby, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England (son of Robert Willoughby, 4th Baron Willoughby de Eresby and Margery la Zouche, Baroness of Willoughby); died 4 Dec 1409, Edgefield, Linconshire, England; was buried St. James Church, Willoughby Chapel, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Ordained: 0Jan 1400

    Notes:

    William Willoughby, 5th Baron Willoughby de Eresby KG (c.1370 - 4 December 1409) was an English baron.

    Origins

    William Willoughby was the son of Robert Willoughby, 4th Baron Willoughby de Eresby, by his first wife,[1] Margery la Zouche, the daughter of William la Zouche, 2nd Baron Zouche of Harringworth, by Elizabeth de Roos, daughter of William de Roos, 2nd Baron de Roos of Hemsley, and Margery de Badlesmere (130-–1363), eldest sister and co-heir of Giles de Badlesmere, 2nd Baron Badlesmere. He had four brothers: Robert, Sir Thomas (died c. 20 August 1417), John and Brian.[2]

    After the death of Margery la Zouche, his father the 4th Baron married, before 9 October 1381, Elizabeth le Latimer (d. 5 November 1395), suo jure 5th Baroness Latimer, daughter of William Latimer, 4th Baron Latimer, and widow of John Neville, 3rd Baron Neville de Raby, by whom the 4th Baron had a daughter, Margaret Willoughby, who died unmarried. By her first marriage Elizabeth Latimer had a son, John Neville, 6th Baron Latimer (c.1382 – 10 December 1430), and a daughter, Elizabeth Neville, who married her step-brother, Sir Thomas Willoughby (died c. 20 August 1417).[3]

    Career

    The 4th Baron died on 9 August 1396, and Willoughby inherited the title as 5th Baron, and was given seisin of his lands on 27 September.[4]

    Hicks notes that the Willoughby family had a tradition of military service, but that the 5th Baron 'lived during an intermission in foreign war and served principally against the Welsh and northern rebels of Henry IV'.[5] Willoughby joined Bolingbroke, the future King Henry IV, soon after his landing at Ravenspur, was present at the abdication of Richard II in the Tower on 29 September 1399, and was one of the peers who consented to King Richard's imprisonment. In the following year he is said to taken part in Henry IV's expedition to Scotland.[6]

    In 1401 he was admitted to the Order of the Garter, and on 13 October 1402 was among those appointed to negotiate with the Welsh rebel, Owain Glyndwr. When Henry IV's former allies, the Percys, rebelled in 1403, Willoughby remained loyal to the King, and in July of that year was granted lands that had been in the custody of Henry Percy (Hotspur), who was killed at the Battle of Shrewsbury on 21 July 1403. Willoughby was appointed to the King's council in March 1404. On 21 February 1404 he was among the commissioners appointed to expel aliens from England.[7]

    In 1405 Hotspur's father, Henry Percy, 1st Earl of Northumberland, again took up arms against the King, joined by Lord Bardolf, and on 27 May Archbishop Scrope, perhaps in conjunction with Northumberland's rebellion, assembled a force of some 8000 men on Shipton Moor. Scrope was tricked into disbanding his army on 29 May, and he and his allies were arrested. Henry IV denied them trial by their peers, and Willoughby was among the commissioners[8] who sat in judgment on Scrope in his own hall at his manor of Bishopthorpe, some three miles south of York. The Chief Justice, Sir William Gascoigne, refused to participate in such irregular proceedings and to pronounce judgment on a prelate, and it was thus left to the lawyer Sir William Fulthorpe to condemn Scrope to death for treason. Scrope was beheaded under the walls of York before a great crowd on 8 June 1405, 'the first English prelate to suffer judicial execution'.[9] On 12 July 1405 Willoughby was granted lands forfeited by the rebel Earl of Northumberland.[10]

    In 1406 Willoughby was again appointed to the Council. On 7 June and 22 December of that year he was among the lords who sealed the settlement of the crown.[11]

    Marriages and issue

    Willoughby married twice:

    Firstly, soon after 3 January 1383, Lucy le Strange, daughter of Roger le Strange, 5th Baron Strange of Knockin, by Aline, daughter of Edmund FitzAlan, 9th Earl of Arundel, by whom he had two sons and three daughters:[12]

    Robert Willoughby, 6th Baron Willoughby de Eresby, who married firstly, Elizabeth Montagu, and secondly, Maud Stanhope.

    Sir Thomas Willoughby, who married Joan Arundel, daughter and co-heiress of Sir Richard Arundel by his wife, Alice. Their descendants, who include Catherine Willoughby, Duchess of Suffolk, inherited the Barony. Catherine became the 12th Baroness and the title descended through her children by her second husband, Richard Bertie.

    Elizabeth Willoughby, who married Henry Beaumont, 5th Baron Beaumont (d.1413).

    Margery Willoughby, who married William FitzHugh, 4th Baron FitzHugh. Their son, the 5th Baron, would marry Lady Alice Neville, sister of Warwick, the Kingmaker. Alice was a grandniece of Willoughby's second wife, Lady Joan Holland. The 5th Baron and his wife Alice were great-grandparents to queen consort Catherine Parr.

    Margaret Willoughby, who married Sir Thomas Skipwith.

    Secondly to Lady Joan Holland (d. 12 April 1434), widow of Edmund of Langley, 1st Duke of York, and daughter of Thomas Holland, 2nd Earl of Kent, by Lady Alice FitzAlan, daughter of Richard FitzAlan, 10th Earl of Arundel, by whom he had no issue.[13] After Willoughby's death his widow married thirdly Henry Scrope, 3rd Baron Scrope of Masham, who was beheaded on 5 August 1415 after the discovery of the Southampton Plot on the eve of King Henry V's invasion of France. She married fourthly, Henry Bromflete, Lord Vescy (d. 16 January 1469).[14]

    Death & burial

    Church of St. James, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, burial place of William Willoughby, 5th Baron
    Willoughby died at Edgefield, Norfolk on 4 December 1409 and was buried in the Church of St James in Spilsby, Lincolnshire, with his first wife.[15] A chapel in the church at Spilsby still contains the monuments and brasses of several early members of the Willoughby family, including the 5th Baron and his first wife.[16]

    Sources

    Cokayne, George Edward (1936). The Complete Peerage, edited by H.A Doubleday and Lord Howard de Walden IX. London: St. Catherine Press.
    Cokayne, G.E. (1959). The Complete Peerage, edited by Geoffrey H. White. XII (Part II). London: St. Catherine Press.
    Harriss, G.L. (2004). Willoughby, Robert (III), sixth Baron Willoughby (1385–1452). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Retrieved 5 December 2012. (subscription required)
    Hicks, Michael (2004). Willoughby family (per. c.1300–1523). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Retrieved 6 December 2012. (subscription required)
    Holmes, George (2004). Latimer, William, fourth Baron Latimer (1330–1381). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Retrieved 6 December 2012. (subscription required)
    McNiven, Peter (2004). Scrope, Richard (c.1350–1405). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Retrieved 7 December 2012. (subscription required)
    Richardson, Douglas (2011). Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, ed. Kimball G. Everingham I (2nd ed.). Salt Lake City. ISBN 1449966373
    Richardson, Douglas (2011). Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, ed. Kimball G. Everingham III (2nd ed.). Salt Lake City. ISBN 144996639X
    Richardson, Douglas (2011). Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, ed. Kimball G. Everingham IV (2nd ed.). Salt Lake City. ISBN 1460992709

    References

    Jump up ^ Cokayne and Hicks state that Margery was the 4th Baron's second wife; however Richardson states that recent research establishes that Margery was his first wife.
    Jump up ^ Cokayne 1959, pp. 661–2; Richardson III 2011, pp. 450–2; Richardson IV 2011, pp. 332–3, 422–5; Hicks 2004.
    Jump up ^ Cokayne 1936, p. 503; Cokayne 1959, pp. 661–2; Richardson I 2011, p. 333; Richardson III 2011, pp. 242–6; Richardson IV 2011, pp. 332–3; Holmes 2004.

    *

    Biography of Sir William... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Willoughby,_5th_Baron_Willoughby_de_Eresby

    The Most Noble Order of the Garter... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Order_of_the_Garter

    A listing of the "Knights of the Garter"... http://www.tudorplace.com.ar/Documents/Knights%20of%20the%20Garter.htm

    A panorama of St. James Church... http://www.panoramio.com/photo/53324562

    Willoughby Chapel in St. James Church... http://homepage.ntlworld.com/peter.fairweather/docs/spilsby.htm

    19th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Jesse D Hennessee (1880-1952)

    *

    Birth:
    Map & history of Spilsby... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spilsby

    Ordained:
    as a "Knight of the Garter"...

    Buried:
    William the fifth Lord ( Died 1410 ) and his wife are portrayed as 3’ 10" brasses and each has a canopy engraved

    William married Lucy le Strange Aft 3 Jan 1383, Dudley, Worcester, England. Lucy (daughter of Roger le Strange, 5th Baron Strange of Knockin and Aline FitzAlan) was born ~ 1365, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England; died 28 Apr 1398, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England; was buried St. James Church, Willoughby Chapel, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 7.  Lucy le Strange was born ~ 1365, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England (daughter of Roger le Strange, 5th Baron Strange of Knockin and Aline FitzAlan); died 28 Apr 1398, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England; was buried St. James Church, Willoughby Chapel, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alt Birth: Abt 1367, Knockyn, Shropshire, England
    • Alt Death: 28 Apr 1405, Lincolnshire, England

    Notes:

    Baroness Lucy's 5-generation pedigree... http://www.ourfamilyhistories.org/ahnentafel.php?personID=I20302&tree=00&parentset=0&generations=5

    Notes

    Some details of Lucy Strange were provided by Adrian Hill in hisHill-Dickson-Lamotte genealogy.

    Lucy Le Strange
    ?Birth about 1367 - Knockyn, Shropshire, England
    ?Died 28 April 1398 - Eresby, Lincolnshire, England; age at death:possibly 31 years old

    Parents

    ?Roger Strange Jr. ca 1327-1381
    ?Aline FitzAlan ca 1309-1385

    Spouse

    ?Married to William Willoughby ca 1370-1410
    (Parents: Robert Willoughby 1349-1396 & Alice Skipwith ca 1355-ca1412)

    Children

    ?Robert Willoughby 1385-1452
    ?Thomas Willoughby 1387-1432
    ?Elizabeth Willoughby 1388-1428
    ?Margaret Willoughby 1388
    ?Marjory Willoughby 1397-1452
    -- Alan Hill,http://gw0.geneanet.org/index.php3?b=aahill&lang=en;p=lucy;n=le+strange

    Sources

    1. GeneaNet
    Alan Hill,
    2. Angel Streur, GeneaNet genealogy
    http://gw.geneanet.org/index.php3?b=dragonladys&lang=en&n=N&v=Le%20Str
    3. Le Strange Website
    Descent, http://www.ls.u-net.com/le_Strange/Seat-H2.htm

    *

    Birth: 1367
    Shropshire, England
    Death: Apr. 28, 1405
    Lincolnshire, England

    Daughter of Roger Le Strange and Aline (Fitzalan) Le Strange,( the daughter of Edmund Fitzalan (Earl of Arundel). Married Lord William Willoughby Apr. 23, 1383. Mother of Margaret Willoughby (Skipwith).


    Family links:
    Spouse:
    William 5th Lord Willoughby (1370 - 1409)

    Children:
    Margaret Willoughby Oldhall*
    Thomas Willoughby*
    Margaret Willoughby Oldhall (____ - 1455)*
    Robert Willoughby (1385 - 1452)*

    *Calculated relationship

    Burial:
    Saint James Churchyard
    Spilsby
    East Lindsey District
    Lincolnshire, England

    Created by: Kaaren Crail Vining
    Record added: Mar 05, 2010
    Find A Grave Memorial# 49143946

    Birth:
    Map & history of Spilsby... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spilsby

    Children:
    1. 3. Margery Willoughby, Baroness of Ravensworth was born ~ 1398, Willoughby Manor, Eresby, Spilsby, Lincoln, England; died Bef 1453, Yorkshire, England.


Generation: 4

  1. 8.  Henry FitzHugh, KG, 2nd Baron FitzHugh of Ravensworth was born 0___ 1338, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England (son of Henry FitzHugh, 1st Baron FitzHugh of Ravensworth and Joan Fourneux); died 29 Aug 1368, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England.

    Henry married Joan Scrope Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England. Joan (daughter of Henry le Scrope, Knight, 1st Baron Scrope of Masham and Joan LNU) was born 0___ 1336, Masham, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1386, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 9.  Joan Scrope was born 0___ 1336, Masham, Yorkshire, England (daughter of Henry le Scrope, Knight, 1st Baron Scrope of Masham and Joan LNU); died 0___ 1386, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England.
    Children:
    1. 4. Henry FitzHugh, IV, Knight, 3rd Baron FitzHugh was born 1359-1363, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England; died 14 Jan 1425, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England; was buried Jervaulx Abbey, Yorkshire, England.
    2. Eleanor FitzHugh was born Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England.

  3. 10.  Robert de Grey was born ~ 1333 (son of John de Grey, KG, 2nd Baron Grey of Rotherfield and Avice Marmion); died Bef 30 Nov 1367, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Marmion

    Robert — Lora St. Quintin. Lora was born ~ 1342; died 0___ 1369, Brandesburton in Holderness, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 11.  Lora St. Quintin was born ~ 1342; died 0___ 1369, Brandesburton in Holderness, Yorkshire, England.
    Children:
    1. 5. Elizabeth Grey was born ~ 1363, Wilcote, Oxfordshire, England; died 12 Dec 1427, (Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England); was buried Jervaulx Abbey, Yorkshire, England.

  5. 12.  Robert Willoughby, 4th Baron Willoughby de Eresby was born 1343-1350, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England (son of John Willoughby and Cecily Ufford); died 9 Aug 1396, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England; was buried Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England.

    Notes:

    Alice Skipworth is also cited as a spouse...

    Robert married Margery la Zouche, Baroness of Willoughby Abt 1369. Margery (daughter of William la Zouche, 2nd Baron Zouche of Haryngworth and Elizabeth de Ros) was born Abt 1355, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England; died 18 Oct 1391. [Group Sheet]


  6. 13.  Margery la Zouche, Baroness of Willoughby was born Abt 1355, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England (daughter of William la Zouche, 2nd Baron Zouche of Haryngworth and Elizabeth de Ros); died 18 Oct 1391.

    Other Events:

    • Alt Death: Bef 1412, (Lincolnshire) England

    Notes:

    Married:
    He [Robert de Willoughby] married, 3rdly, Elizabeth, de jure suo jure (according to modern doctrine) BARONESS LATIMER, widow of John (DE NEVILLE), 3rd LORD NEVILLE (of Raby), daughter and heir of William (LE LATIMER), 4th LORD LATIMER, by his wife Elizabeth.

    Children:
    1. 6. William Willoughby, 4th Baron Willoughby de Eresby was born 1370-1375, Eresby, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England; died 4 Dec 1409, Edgefield, Linconshire, England; was buried St. James Church, Willoughby Chapel, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England.
    2. Thomas Willoughby was born Bef 1378, Eresby, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England; died Bef 20 Aug 1417.

  7. 14.  Roger le Strange, 5th Baron Strange of Knockin was born ~ 1327, Knockyn, Shropshire, England (son of Roger le Strange, 4th Baron Strange of Knockin and Joan de Ingham, Baroness Ingham); died 26 Aug 1382, Monmouthshire, Wales.

    Roger married Aline FitzAlan ~ 1350, Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England. Aline (daughter of Edmund FitzAlan, Knight, 9th Earl of Arundel and Alice de Warenne, Countess of Arundel) was born 0___ 1314, Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England; died 20 Jan 1386. [Group Sheet]


  8. 15.  Aline FitzAlan was born 0___ 1314, Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England (daughter of Edmund FitzAlan, Knight, 9th Earl of Arundel and Alice de Warenne, Countess of Arundel); died 20 Jan 1386.
    Children:
    1. 7. Lucy le Strange was born ~ 1365, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England; died 28 Apr 1398, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England; was buried St. James Church, Willoughby Chapel, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England.


Generation: 5

  1. 16.  Henry FitzHugh, 1st Baron FitzHugh of Ravensworth was born 1296-1297, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England; died 24 Sep 1352, (Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England).

    Notes:

    Henry FITZHUGH FITZHENRY (2° B. Fitzhugh of Ravensworth)

    Born: ABT 1338

    Died: 29 Aug 1386

    Father: Henry FITZHUGH (1° B. Fitzhugh of Ravensworth)

    Mother: Joan FOURNEUX

    Married: Joan SCROPE (B. Fitzhugh of Ravensworth) Sep 1350, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England

    Children:

    1. Henry FITZHUGH (3° B. Fitzhugh of Ravensworth)

    2. John FITZHENRY FITZHUGH

    3. Eleanor FITZHUGH

    end of biography

    Photos, history of "Baron FitzHugh" ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baron_FitzHugh

    ... Baron FitzHugh, of Ravensworth in North Yorkshire, is an abeyant title in the Peerage of England. It was created in 1321 for Sir Henry FitzHugh. The title passed through the male line until the death in 1513 of George FitzHugh, 7th Baron FitzHugh, when it became abeyant between his great-aunts Alice, Lady Fiennes and Elizabeth, Lady Parr, and to their descendants living today, listed below. The family seat was Ravensworth Castle in North Yorkshire.

    Henry — Joan Fourneux. Joan (daughter of Richard Fourneux and Sybil LNU) was born ~ 1297, Carlton in Lindrick, Nottinghamshire , England; died 15 Sep 1349, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England; was buried Jervaulx Abbey, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 17.  Joan Fourneux was born ~ 1297, Carlton in Lindrick, Nottinghamshire , England (daughter of Richard Fourneux and Sybil LNU); died 15 Sep 1349, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England; was buried Jervaulx Abbey, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Joan de Fourneaux

    Notes:

    Joan de Fourneaux
    Also Known As: "Orreby FitzHenry"
    Birthdate: circa 1297 (52)
    Birthplace: Carlton in Lindrick, Nottinghamshire , England
    Death: September 15, 1349 (48-56)
    Ravensworth, North Riding, Yorkshire , England
    Place of Burial: Jervaulx Abbey, York, England, United Kingdom
    Immediate Family:
    Daughter of Richard de Fourneux, Sir and Sibil (Unk MN) de Fourneux
    Wife of John de Orreby and Sir Henry FitzHenry, of Ravensworth
    Mother of Hugh FitzHugh; Joane FitzHenry, Baroness Greystroke and Henry Fitzhugh, 2nd Baron Ravensworth
    Sister of William Fourneys
    Managed by: Private User
    Last Updated: September 20, 2016

    About Joan de Fourneaux
    Joan de Forneaux

    Birth: 1297 in Carlton in Lindrick, Nottinghamshire, England 3
    Death: SEP 1349 in Ravensworth, Yorkshire, North Riding, England 4 3
    Father: Richard DE FOURNEUX b: 1256 in Carlton in Lindrick, Nottinghamshire, England
    Mother: Sibil OF NOTTINGHAM b: ABT 1270 in Botharnsall, Nottinghamshire, England
    Marriage

    John DE ORREBY b: 1258 in Hatherton, Cheshire, England Married: 1316
    Henry FITZHENRY of Ravensworth b: 1297 in Ravensworth, Yorlshire, North Riding, England Married: MAR 1330
    Children with 2nd husband

    Hugh FITZHENRY b: 1331 in Ravensworth, Yorkshire, North Riding, England
    Joan FITZHUGH b: 1333 in Ravensworth, Yorlshire, North Riding, England
    Henry FitzHugh LORD FITZHUGH b: 1337 in Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England
    http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=REG&db=tmebl&id=I09536
    http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00140240&tree=LEO
    http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=labron00&id=I64611

    Buried:
    Jervaulx Abbey in East Witton near the city of Ripon, was one of the great Cistercian abbeys of Yorkshire, England, dedicated to St. Mary in 1156.

    The place-name Jervaulx is first attested in 1145, where it appears as Jorvalle. The name means 'the Ure valley', in French, and is perhaps a translation of the English 'Ure-dale',[2] aka Yoredale. The valley is now called Wensleydale.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jervaulx_Abbey

    Children:
    1. 8. Henry FitzHugh, KG, 2nd Baron FitzHugh of Ravensworth was born 0___ 1338, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England; died 29 Aug 1368, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England.

  3. 18.  Henry le Scrope, Knight, 1st Baron Scrope of Masham was born 29 Sep 1312, Masham, Yorkshire, England (son of Geoffrey le Scrope, Knight and Ivette de Ros); died 31 Jul 1391, Ghent, Belgium; was buried Coverham Abbey, Coverham, Yorkshire, England.

    Notes:

    Henry SCROPE (1° B. Scrope of Masham)

    Born: 29 Sep 1312, Masham, Yorkshire, England

    Died: 31 Jul 1391, Ghent

    Buried: Coverham Abbey, Coverham, Yorkshire, England

    Father: Geoffrey SCROPE of Masham (Sir Knight)

    Mother: Ivetta De ROS

    Married 1: Blanche De NORWICH ABT 1336, Masham, Yorkshire, England

    Children:

    1. Geoffrey SCROPE

    2. Stephen SCROPE (2° B. Scrope of Masham)

    Married 2: Joan (Agnes) ?

    Children:

    3. Joan SCROPE (B. Fitzhugh of Ravensworth)

    4. Isabella SCROPE

    5. Henry SCROPE

    6. John SCROPE (Sir)

    7. William SCROPE

    8. Richard SCROPE (Archbishop of York)

    Henry — Joan LNU. [Group Sheet]


  4. 19.  Joan LNU

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Agnes

    Children:
    1. 9. Joan Scrope was born 0___ 1336, Masham, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1386, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England.
    2. Isabella Scrope was born Masham, Yorkshire, England.
    3. Henry le Scrope was born Masham, Yorkshire, England.
    4. John Scrope was born Masham, Yorkshire, England.
    5. Geoffrey, Knight was born 1330-1336, Alnwick, Northumberland, England; died 0___ 1362, Lithuania; was buried Konigsberg, Germany.
    6. William Scrope was born ~ 1349, Masham, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1399.
    7. Richard Scrope, Knight was born ~ 1350, Masham, Yorkshire, England; died 8 Jun 1405.

  5. 20.  John de Grey, KG, 2nd Baron Grey of Rotherfield was born 9 Oct 1300, Rotherfield, Oxfordshire, England (son of John de Grey, 1st Baron Grey de Rotherfield and Margaret de Odingsells); died 1 Sep 1359, Rotherfield, Oxfordshire, England.

    Notes:

    John de Grey, 2nd Baron Grey de Rotherfield, KG (9 October 1300[1] – September 1359[1]) was an English soldier and courtier. John was the son and heir of Sir John de Grey, 1st Baron Grey de Rotherfield,[2] by Margaret who was daughter William de Odingsells and the granddaughter of Ida II Longespee.[3]

    John de Grey of Rotherfield was a founding member of the Most Noble Order of the Garter. He is often confused with John Grey of Codnor, who bore the same coat of arms (Barry argent and azure).

    By December 1349,[1] John was Lord Steward of the Royal Household of King Edward III. He distinguished himself well in the Scotch and French wars. He was summoned to parliament often from 1338 to 1357, and is regarded as having become Baron Grey of Rotherfield.[1]

    Family

    He married firstly, shortly before 1313,[1] Katherine Fitzalan, daughter and coheir of Bryan FitzAlan, Lord FitzAlan of Bedale, Yorkshire and had a single son and heir:

    Sir John de Grey, 3rd Baron Grey de Rotherfield.[2]

    He married secondly Avice, daughter of John Marmion, Baron of Winteringham, a descendant of John of England.[1][4] by whom he had the following issue:

    John de Grey aka Marmion, (d.s.p. 1385)[4] m. Elizabeth St. Quintin (b.1341)[5]
    Sir Robert de Grey aka Marmion, m. Lora St. Quintin (b.1343)[5] and whose granddaughter Elizabeth m. Henry FitzHugh, 3rd Baron FitzHugh[4]

    References

    ^ Jump up to: a b c d e f Henry Summerson, ‘Grey, John, first Lord Grey of Rotherfield (1300–1359)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, September 2004; online edn, January 2008. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/11544
    ^ Jump up to: a b Burke, Sir Bernard. A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire.
    Jump up ^ Richardson, D. (2011) Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study ... pg 642 (via Google)
    ^ Jump up to: a b c Nicolas, Nicholas Harris (1857). Historic Peerage of England. London: John Murray.
    ^ Jump up to: a b Calendar of Inquisitions Post Mortem, XI, London: HMSO, 1935
    Peerage of England
    Preceded by
    John de Grey, 1st Baron Grey de Rotherfield Baron Grey of Rotherfield
    1338–1359 Succeeded by
    John de Grey

    *

    About John de Grey, 2nd Baron Grey of Rotherfield
    In 1300 a lavish banquet was held to celebrate the birth and baptism (at Rotherfield Greys) of John de Grey, 'which feast is still notorious in these parts because abbots, priors and almost all other good men of those parts were present'. 374. Cal. Inq. p.m. VI, pp. 204–5. https://www.british-history.ac.uk/vch/oxon/vol16/pp266-302#anchorn374
    Knight of the Garter. Received livery of his lands in the fifteenth year of the reign of Edward II. In 1336 he was fighting for the King in Scotland; in 1342 he took part in the expedition to Flanders. He was in France in 1343, 1345-6, 1348 and again in 1356. He took part in the Battle of Crecy in 1346 with Edward III and his son Edward, the Black Prince, and it was after his return (after the fall of Calais in 1347) that he was given licence to crenellate Rotherfield. In the 6th of the reign of Edward III, upon some differences between his lordship and William la Zouche of Haryngworth, another great baron, which was heard before the King, Lord Grey, under the irritation of the moment, drew his knife upon Lord Zouche in the royal presence, whereupon both lords were committed to prison; but the Lord Zouche was soon afterwards released, while Lord Grey was remanded and his lands seized upon by the crown. He was, however, within a short time, upon making submission, restored to favour. In 1353 he was commissioner of array for the counties of Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire, and in 1356 was one of the witnesses to the charters by which Edward Baliol granted all his rights in Scotland to Edward III. He was steward of the king's household and had summons to parliament from the 1st to the 29th Edward III, inclusive. Was one of the Original Knights of the Garter instituted at its foundation in 1344 and confirmed in 1348, where he occupied the eighth stall on the sovereign's side at Windsor Castle. [Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, England, 1883, p. 247, Grey, Barons Grey, of Rotherfield, co. Oxford]

    src: tudorplace.com.ar/Grey1.htm

    ----------------------------------------------

    Summoned to 1338 Parliament

    Knight of the Garter - 1348

    John Gray/de Gray in 1348 was the founder of the Order of the garter

    John was married 1st to Katherine Fitz Alan who died before 7,Aug,1328.

    He was married 2nd to Avice Marmion, dughter of Sir Hohn marmion and maud de furnival,dau of Thomas de Furnival and Joan le Despenser,daughter of Hugh le Despenser.

    John Grey/de Grey had an argument with William la Zouche Mortimer,1st Lord Zoucje in January 1331/1332 and he drew his knife in the presence of the King. He was commandered to prison and was pardoned on 27 March 1332.

    He was summoned to Parliment from 15 November 1338 to 15 December 1357.

    He died 1 September 1359.

    Pedigreees of Some of Emperor Charlemage's Descendants page 255

    http://www.tudorplace.com.ar/GREY1.htm#John De GREY (2° B. Grey of Rotherfield)

    John De GREY (2° B. Grey of Rotherfield)

    Born: 9 Oct 1300, Rotherfield, Oxfordshire, England

    Christened: 1 Nov 1300, Rotherfield, Oxfordshire, England

    Died: 1 Sep 1359, Rotherfield, Oxfordshire, England

    Notes: Knight of the Garter. Received livery of his lands in the fifteenth year of the reign of Edward II. In 1336 he was fighting for the King in Scotland; in 1342 he took part in the expedition to Flanders. He was in France in 1343, 1345-6, 1348 and again in 1356. He took part in the Battle of Crecy in 1346 with Edward III and his son Edward, the Black Prince, and it was after his return (after the fall of Calais in 1347) that he was given licence to crenellate Rotherfield. In the 6th of the reign of Edward III, upon some differences between his lordship and William la Zouche of Haryngworth, another great baron, which was heard before the King, Lord Grey, under the irritation of the moment, drew his knife upon Lord Zouche in the royal presence, whereupon both lords were committed to prison; but the Lord Zouche was soon afterwards released, while Lord Grey was remanded and his lands seized upon by the crown. He was, however, within a short time, upon making submission, restored to favour. In 1353 he was commissioner of array for the counties of Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire, and in 1356 was one of the witnesses to the charters by which Edward Baliol granted all his rights in Scotland to Edward III. He was steward of the king's household and had summons to parliament from the 1st to the 29th Edward III, inclusive. Was one of the Original Knights of the Garter instituted at its foundation in 1344 and confirmed in 1348, where he occupied the eighth stall on the sovereign's side at Windsor Castle. [Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, England, 1883, p. 247, Grey, Barons Grey, of Rotherfield, co. Oxford]

    Father: John De GREY (1° B. Grey of Rotherfield)

    Mother: Margaret De ODDINGESELLS

    Married 1: Catherine FITZBRIAN (Dau. of Brian Fitzalan, B. Bedale and Agnes Baliol) BEF 27 Dec 1317, Rotherfield, Oxfordshire, England

    Children:

    1. John De GREY (3° B. Grey of Rotherfield)

    2. Maud De GREY

    Married 2: Avice MARMION (b. ABT 1302/9 - d. AFT 20 Mar 1378) (dau. of John De Marmion and Maud Furnival) ABT 1342

    Children:

    3. Joan De GREY

    4. Robert De GREY (Sir Knight)

    5. John De GREY (B. Marmion)

    http://our-royal-titled-noble-and-commoner-ancestors.com/p431.htm#i12940

    Sir John de Grey, 1st Lord Grey of Rotherfield1,2

    M, b. 9 October 1300, d. 1 September 1359

    Father Sir John de Grey3 b. c 1272, d. 17 Oct 1311

    Mother Margaret de Odingsells3 b. c 1277, d. c 1330

    Sir John de Grey, 1st Lord Grey of Rotherfield was born on 9 October 1300 at Rotherfield, Oxfordshire, England. He married Katherine FitzAlan, daughter of Sir Bryan FitzAlan, Baron Bedale and Maud (Agnes), before 1 March 1312; They had 1 son, John.2 Sir John de Grey, 1st Lord Grey of Rotherfield married Avice Marmion, daughter of Sir John de Marmion 2nd Baron Marmion and Maud Furnival, before 1343; They had 2 sons (John Marmion & Robert de Grey) and 1 daughter (Maud).4,2 Sir John de Grey, 1st Lord Grey of Rotherfield died on 1 September 1359 at Rotherfield, Oxfordshire, England, at age 58.2

    Family 1 Avice Marmion d. a 20 Mar 1379

    Children ?Sir Robert de Grey+5,2 d. 19 Aug 1367

    ?Maud Grey+6,2 d. 29 Jan 1394

    Family 2 Katherine FitzAlan b. c 1300, d. b 7 Aug 1328

    Children

    ?Joane Grey+

    ?Sir John de Grey, 2nd Lord Grey of Rotherfield+2 b. bt 1319 - 1329, d. 4 Jun 1375

    Citations

    1.[S3660] Unknown author, The Complete Peerage, by Cokayne, Vol. V, p. 397/8, Vol. VI, p. 145-147; Magna Charta Sureties, 1215, by F. L. Weis, 4th Ed., p. 60; The Ancestry of Dorothea Poyntz, by Ronny O. Bodine, p. 57.

    2.[S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 554-555.

    3.[S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 553-555.

    4.[S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 493-494.

    5.[S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 324.

    6.[S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 376.

    John de Grey, 1st Baron Grey de Rotherfield, KG (29 October 1300[1] - September 1359 He was an English soldier and courtier. John Grey of Rotherfield was one of the founder members of the Most Noble Order of the Garter. He is often confused with John Grey of Codnor, who bore the same coat of arms (Barry argent and azure). By December 1349, John was Lord Steward of the Royal Household of King Edward III. He distinguished himself well in the Scotch and French wars. He was summoned to parliament many times from 1338 to 1357, and is thus regarded as having become Lord Grey of Rotherfield. John was the son and heir of Sir John Grey, by Margaret only daughter and coheir of William de Odingbells. He married firstly, shortly before 1313, Katherine Fitzalan, daughter and coheir of Bryan FitzAlan, Lord FitzAlan of Bedale, Yorkshire. He married secondly Avice, daughter of John, 2nd Lord Marmion.

    Sir John de Grey, First Lord Grey of Rotherfield
    John de Grey, Knight of the Garter, 1st Lord Grey of Rotherfield was a Founder Knight of the Order of the Garter in 1348. John Grey had an argument with William la Zouche Mortimer, 1st Lord Zouche in January 1331/32 and he drew his knife in the presence of the King. He was committed to prison and was pardoned on March 27, 1332. John was summoned to Parliament from November 15, 1338 to December 15, 1357.

    John married first to before 1311/12 to Katherine, daughter and heir of Sir Bryan Fitz Alan. They had one son, John de Grey, 2nd Lord Grey of Rotherfield. Katherine died before August 7, 1328. John married secondly before 1343 to Avice Marmion, daughter of Sir John Marmion, 2nd Lord Marmion.

    John and Avice had the following children:

    John Marmion, Knight, died in 1387

    Robert de Grey, Knight, of Wilcote, Oxfordshire who married Lora de Saint Quintin.

    Maud Grey

    *

    John — Avice Marmion. Avice (daughter of John Marmion, Knight, 4th Baron of Winteringham and unnamed spouse) was born 0___ 1309; died Aft 20 Mar 1347. [Group Sheet]


  6. 21.  Avice Marmion was born 0___ 1309 (daughter of John Marmion, Knight, 4th Baron of Winteringham and unnamed spouse); died Aft 20 Mar 1347.
    Children:
    1. 10. Robert de Grey was born ~ 1333; died Bef 30 Nov 1367, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England.

  7. 24.  John Willoughby was born ~1320, Eresby, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England; died 29 Mar 1372, Eresby, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England.

    John — Cecily Ufford. Cecily (daughter of Robert de Ufford, (II), Knight, 1st Earl of Suffolk and Margaret Norwich) was born 29 Mar 1372, Eresby, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  8. 25.  Cecily Ufford was born 29 Mar 1372, Eresby, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England (daughter of Robert de Ufford, (II), Knight, 1st Earl of Suffolk and Margaret Norwich).
    Children:
    1. 12. Robert Willoughby, 4th Baron Willoughby de Eresby was born 1343-1350, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England; died 9 Aug 1396, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England; was buried Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England.
    2. Joan Willoughby was born 0___ 1345, Eresby, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England; died Bef 1413, (Astley, Warwickshire, England).

  9. 26.  William la Zouche, 2nd Baron Zouche of Haryngworth was born 25 Dec 1321, Harringworth, Northampton, England; died 23 Apr 1382; was buried Biddlesdon Abbey, Biddlesdon, Buckingham, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Constable of Wark Castle
    • Occupation: Sheriff of Yorkshire

    William married Elizabeth de Ros Bef 16 Jul 1334, England. Elizabeth (daughter of William de Ros, Knight, 2nd Baron de Ros and Margery de Badlesmere) was born 0___ 1325, Helmsley, Yorkshire, England; died 24 May 1380, Harringworth, Northamptonshire, , England. [Group Sheet]


  10. 27.  Elizabeth de Ros was born 0___ 1325, Helmsley, Yorkshire, England (daughter of William de Ros, Knight, 2nd Baron de Ros and Margery de Badlesmere); died 24 May 1380, Harringworth, Northamptonshire, , England.

    Other Events:

    • Will: 16 May 1380

    Notes:

    Biography

    Father Sir William de Roos, 2nd Lord Roos, Sheriff of Yorkshire, Constable of Wark Castle b. c 1288, d. 3 Feb 1343

    Mother Margery de Badlesmere b. c 1306, d. 18 Oct 1363

    Elizabeth de Roos[1] was born circa 1325 at of Helmsley, Yorkshire, England. She married Sir William la Zouche, 2nd Lord Zouche of Haryngworth, son of Sir Eudes la Zouche and Joan Inge, before 16 July 1334;

    They had 3 sons (

    Sir William, 3rd Lord Zouche of Harringworth;

    Sir Thomas; &

    Eudes, Chancellor of Cambridge University)

    and 2 daughters

    (Elizabeth, wife of Sir John Basing; &
    Margery, wife of Sir Robert, 4th Lord Willoughby of Eresby).[2]

    Elizabeth de Roos left a will on 16 May 1380.4,6 She died on 24 May 1380.[3]

    Family

    Sir William la Zouche, 2nd Lord Zouche of Haryngworth b. c 25 Dec 1321, d. 23 Apr 1382

    Children

    Margery la Zouche d. 18 Oct 1391
    Sir William la Zouche, 3rd Lord Zouche of Harringworth b. c 1342, d. 13 May 1396
    Sir Thomas la Zouche4,6 b. c 1345, d. 30 Oct 1404

    Children:
    1. 13. Margery la Zouche, Baroness of Willoughby was born Abt 1355, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England; died 18 Oct 1391.

  11. 28.  Roger le Strange, 4th Baron Strange of Knockin was born 15 Aug 1301, Ellesmere, Shropshire, England; died 29 Jul 1349, Sedgrebrook, Lincolnshire, England.

    Notes:

    Roger Le STRANGE (5ş B. Strange of Knockin)

    Born: 15 Aug 1301, Ellesmere, Shropshire, England

    Died: 29 Jul 1349

    Notes: brother and heir. On 20 Jan 1326/7 he was made a Banneret. In 1335 he was found to be heir to his uncle, Eubolo Lestrange (q.v.), whose widow, Alice, Countess of Lincoln, granted him in 1336/7 a life-estate in the manor of Ellesmere;

    in Jun 1337 he was sum. to come to the King;

    in 1341/2 to a Council at Westminster;

    and on 20 Nov 1348 (22 Edw. III) to Parl. as Roger Lestrange.

    In 1340 and 1345 he was in commissions for Salop. In Aug 1347 he was staying at the war overseas.

    He married 1stly, Maud; and 2ndly, before 25 Mar. 1344, Joan, dau. and coheir (and eventually heir) of Oliver De Ingham, Lord Ingham.

    He died 29 Jul 1349 in the Manor of Sedgebrook, Lincs.

    Joan, married 2ndly, Sir Miles De Stapleton, K.G. She died before 12 Dec 1365 and was Buried at Ingham. Miles died 4 Oct 1364 and was Buried at Ingham.

    Father: John Le STRANGE (3ş B. Strange of Knockin)

    Mother: Isolda De WALTON

    Married 1: Maud ? (b. 1305 - d. 1344)

    Married 2: Joan De INGHAM (b. 1299 / 1337) (dau. of Sir Oliver De Ingham and Elizabeth La Zouche) (m.2 of Miles De Stapelton)

    Children:

    1. Roger Le STRANGE (6ş B. Strange of Knockin)

    2. Maud Le STRANGE

    3. Alianor Le STRANGE (B. Grey of Ruthin)

    *

    Died:
    at the manor...

    Roger married Joan de Ingham, Baroness Ingham Bef 25 Mar 1344. Joan (daughter of Oliver de Ingham, Knight, Lord Ingham and Elizabeth la Zouche) was born ~ 1320, Ellesmere, Shropshire, England; died 12 Dec 1365, Ingham, Norfolkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  12. 29.  Joan de Ingham, Baroness Ingham was born ~ 1320, Ellesmere, Shropshire, England (daughter of Oliver de Ingham, Knight, Lord Ingham and Elizabeth la Zouche); died 12 Dec 1365, Ingham, Norfolkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Jane de Ingham

    Notes:

    Joan was the daughter and coheiress of Oliver de Ingham in Norfolk, and widow of Roger Le Strange of Nockin.

    Joan married Sir Roger Le Strange 4th Baron Strange of Knockyn, son of Sir John Le Strange 2nd Baron le Strange of Knockyn and Iseult (Isolda), before March 25, 1344.He was her 1st husband and his 2nd wife. (Sir Roger Le Strange 4th Baron Strange of Knockyn was born on 15 Aug 1301 in Knockin, Oswestry, Shropshire, England and died on 29 Jul 1349 in Sedgebrook, Lincolnshire, England

    Joan also married Sir Miles II Staplton K.G., of Bedale, son of Sir Gilbert de Stapleton of Bedale and Agnes FitzAlan Heiress of Bedale, on 30 Nov 1350. her 2nd husband and his 2nd wife. (Sir Miles II Staplton K.G., of Bedale was born in 1320 in Bedale, North Riding Yorkshire, England, died on 4 Oct 1364 in Battle of Auray, France and was buried in Ingham, Smallburgh, Norfolk, England.)

    Henceforward Stapleton is often described as 'of Ingham' as of 'Bedale', and became a considerable proprietor in Norfolk. Stapleton's eldest son John died before him, and he was succeeded at Ingham as well as Bedale by Miles, his son by the heiress of Ingham.

    *

    Died:
    at Ingham Manor...

    Children:
    1. Maude le Strange was born Abt 1321, Knockin, Shropshire, England.
    2. 14. Roger le Strange, 5th Baron Strange of Knockin was born ~ 1327, Knockyn, Shropshire, England; died 26 Aug 1382, Monmouthshire, Wales.

  13. 30.  Edmund FitzAlan, Knight, 9th Earl of Arundel was born 1 May 1285, Marlborough Castle, Marlborough, Wiltshire, England (son of Richard FitzAlan, Knight, 8th Earl of Arundel and Alice of Saluzzo, Countess of Arundel); died 17 Nov 1326, Hereford, Herefordshire, England; was buried Haughmond Abbey, Shropshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Residence: Paris, France
    • Also Known As: 3rd Earl of Arundel

    Notes:

    Edmund FitzAlan, 9th Earl of Arundel[a] (1 May 1285 – 17 November 1326) was an English nobleman prominent in the conflict between Edward II and his barons. His father, Richard FitzAlan, 2nd Earl of Arundel, died on 9 March 1301, while Edmund was still a minor. He therefore became a ward of John de Warenne, Earl of Surrey, and married Warenne's granddaughter Alice. In 1306 he was styled Earl of Arundel, and served under Edward I in the Scottish Wars, for which he was richly rewarded.

    After Edward I's death, Arundel became part of the opposition to the new king Edward II, and his favourite Piers Gaveston. In 1311 he was one of the so-called Lords Ordainers who assumed control of government from the king. Together with Thomas, Earl of Lancaster, he was responsible for the death of Gaveston in 1312. From this point on, however, his relationship to the king became more friendly. This was to a large extent due to his association with the king's new favourite Hugh Despenser the Younger, whose daughter was married to Arundel's son. Arundel supported the king in suppressing rebellions by Roger Mortimer and other Marcher Lords, and eventually also Thomas of Lancaster. For this he was awarded with land and offices.

    His fortune changed, however, when the country was invaded in 1326 by Mortimer, who had made common cause with the king's wife, Queen Isabella. Immediately after the capture of Edward II, the queen, Edward III's regent, ordered Arundel executed, his title forfeit and his property confiscated. Arundel's son and heir Richard only recovered the title and lands in 1331, after Edward III had taken power from the regency of Isabella and Mortimer. In the 1390s, a cult emerged around the late earl. He was venerated as a martyr, though he was never canonised.

    Family and early life

    Edmund FitzAlan was born in the Castle of Marlborough, in Wiltshire, on 1 May 1285.[1] He was the son of Richard FitzAlan, 8th Earl of Arundel, and his wife, Alice of Saluzzo, daughter of Thomas I of Saluzzo in Italy. Richard had been in opposition to the king during the political crisis of 1295, and as a result he had incurred great debts and had parts of his land confiscated.[2] When Richard died in 09/03/1301, Edmund's wardship was given to John de Warenne, Earl of Surrey. Warenne's only son, William, had died in 1286, so his daughter Alice was now heir apparent to the Warenne earldom. Alice was offered in marriage to Edmund, who for unknown reasons initially refused her. By 1305 he had changed his mind, however, and the two were married.[3]

    In April 1306, shortly before turning twenty-one, Edmund was granted possession of his father's title and land. On 22 May 1306, he was knighted by Edward I, along with the young Prince Edward – the future Edward II.[1] The knighting was done in expectation of military service the Scottish Wars, and after the campaign was over, Arundel was richly rewarded. Edward I pardoned the young earl a debt of ą4,234. This flow of patronage continued after the death of Edward I in 1307; in 1308 Edward II returned the hundred of Purslow to Arundel, an honour that Edward I had confiscated from Edmund's father.[4] There were also official honours in the early years of Edward II's reign. At the new king's coronation on 25 February 1308, Arundel officiated as chief butler (or pincerna), a hereditary office of the earls of Arundel.[3]

    Opposition to Edward II

    Though the reign of Edward II was initially harmonious, he soon met with opposition from several of his earls and prelates.[5] At the source of the discontent was the king's relationship with the young Gascon knight Piers Gaveston, who had been exiled by Edward I, but was recalled immediately upon Edward II's accession.[6] Edward's favouritism towards the upstart Gaveston was an offence to the established nobility, and his elevation to the earldom of Cornwall was particularly offensive to the established nobility.[7] A group of magnates led by Henry de Lacy, Earl of Lincoln, forced Gaveston into exile in 1308.[8] By 1309, however, Edward had reconciled himself with the opposition, and Gaveston was allowed to return.[9]

    Arundel joined the opposition at an early point, and did not attend the Stamford parliament in July 1309, where Gaveston's return was negotiated.[10] After Gaveston returned, his behaviour became even more offensive, and opposition towards him grew.[11] In addition to this, there was great discontent with Edward II's failure to follow up his father's Scottish campaigns.[12] On 16 March 1310, the king had to agree to the appointment of a committee known as the Lords Ordainers, who were to be in charge of the reform of the royal government. Arundel was one of eight earls among the twenty-one Ordainers.[13]

    The Ordainers once more sent Gaveston into exile in 1311, but by 1312 he was back.[14] Now the king's favourite was officially an outlaw, and Arundel was among the earls who swore to hunt him down. The leader of the opposition – after Lincoln's death the year before – was now Thomas, Earl of Lancaster.[15] In June 1312 Gaveston was captured, tried before Lancaster, Arundel and the earls of Warwick and Hereford, and executed.[16] A reconciliation was achieved between the king and the offending magnates, and Arundel and the others received pardons, but animosity prevailed. In 1314 Arundel was among the magnates who refused to assist Edward in a campaign against the Scottish, resulting in the disastrous English defeat at the Battle of Bannockburn.[10]

    Return to loyalty

    Around the time of Bannockburn, however, Arundel's loyalty began to shift back towards the king. Edward's rapprochement towards the earl had in fact started earlier, when on 2 November 1313, the king pardoned Arundel's royal debts.[17] The most significant factor in this process though, was the marriage alliance between Arundel and the king's new favourites, the Despensers. Hugh Despenser the Younger and his father Hugh Despenser the elder were gradually taking over control of the government, and using their power to enrich themselves.[18] While this alienated most of the nobility, Arundel's situation was different. At some point in 1314–1315, his son Richard was betrothed to Isabel, daughter of Hugh Despenser the Younger.[17] Now that he found himself back in royal favour, Arundel started receiving rewards in the form of official appointments. In 1317 he was appointed Warden of the Marches of Scotland, and in August 1318, he helped negotiate the Treaty of Leake, which temporarily reconciled the king with Thomas of Lancaster.[10]


    Clun Castle was the source of the personal animosity between Arundel and Roger Mortimer.
    With Arundel's change of allegiance came a conflict of interest. In August 1321, a demand was made to the king that Hugh Despenser and his father, Hugh Despenser the elder, be sent into exile.[19] The king, facing a rebellion in the Welsh Marches, had no choice but to assent.[20] Arundel voted for the expulsion, but later he claimed that he did so under compulsion, and also supported their recall in December.[10] Arundel had suffered personally from the rebellion, when Roger Mortimer seized his castle of Clun.[21][22] Early in 1322, Arundel joined King Edward in a campaign against the Mortimer family.[20] The opposition soon crumbled, and the king decided to move against Thomas of Lancaster, who had been supporting the marcher rebellion all along. Lancaster was defeated at the Battle of Boroughbridge in March, and executed.[23]

    In the aftermath of the rebellion, the Despensers enriched themselves on the forfeited estates of the rebels, and Hugh Despenser the elder was created Earl of Winchester in May 1322.[24] Also Arundel, who was now one of the king's principal supporters, was richly rewarded. After the capture of Roger Mortimer in 1322, he received the forfeited Mortimer lordship of Chirk in Wales.[10] He was also trusted with important offices: he became Chief Justiciar of North and South Wales in 1323, and in 1325 he was made Warden of the Welsh Marches, responsible for the array in Wales.[1] He also extended his influence through marriage alliances; in 1325 he secured marriages between two of his daughters and the sons and heirs of two of Lancaster's main allies: the deceased earls of Hereford and Warwick.[b]

    Final years and death

    In 1323, Roger Mortimer, who had been held in captivity in the Tower of London, escaped and fled to France.[22] Two years later, Queen Isabella travelled to Paris on an embassy to the French king. Here, Isabella and Mortimer developed a plan to invade England and replace Edward II on the throne with his son, the young Prince Edward, who was in the company of Isabella.[25] Isabella and Mortimer landed in England on 24 September 1326, and due to the virulent resentment against the Despenser regime, few came to the king's aid.[26] Arundel initially escaped the invading force in the company of the king, but was later dispatched to his estates in Shropshire to gather troops.[27] At Shrewsbury he was captured by his old enemy John Charlton of Powys, and brought to Queen Isabella at Hereford. On 17 November – the day after Edward II had been taken captive – Arundel was executed, allegedly on the instigation of Mortimer.[10] According to a chronicle account, the use of a blunt sword was ordered, and the executioner needed 22 strokes to sever the earl's head from his body.[28]


    The ruins of Haughmond Abbey, Arundel's final resting place.
    Arundel's body was initially interred at the Franciscan church in Hereford. It had been his wish, however, to be buried at the family's traditional resting place of Haughmond Abbey in Shropshire, and this is where he was finally buried.[29] Though he was never canonised, a cult emerged around the late earl in the 1390s, associating him with the 9th-century martyr king St Edmund. This veneration may have been inspired by a similar cult around his grandson, Richard FitzAlan, 11th Earl of Arundel, who was executed by Richard II in 1397.[30]

    Arundel was attainted at his execution; his estates were forfeited to the crown, and large parts of these were appropriated by Isabella and Mortimer.[31] The castle and honour of Arundel was briefly held by Edward II's half-brother Edmund, Earl of Kent, who was executed on 3 September 1330.[1] Edmund FitzAlan's son, Richard, failed in an attempted rebellion against the crown in June 1330, and had to flee to France. In October the same year, the guardianship of Isabella and Mortimer was supplanted by the personal rule of King Edward III. This allowed Richard to return and reclaim his inheritance, and on 8 February 1331, he was fully restored to his father's lands, and created Earl of Arundel.[32]

    Issue

    Edmund and Alice had at least seven children:[33]

    Name Birth date Death date Notes
    Richard FitzAlan, 10th Earl of Arundel c. 1313 24 January 1376 Married (1) Isabel le Despenser, (2) Eleanor of Lancaster
    Edmund — c. 1349
    Michael — —
    Mary — 29 August 1396 Married John le Strange, 4th Baron Strange of Blackmere[34]
    Aline — 20 January 1386 Married Roger le Strange, 5th Baron Strange of Knockin[35]
    Alice — 1326 Married John de Bohun, 5th Earl of Hereford
    Katherine — d. 1375/76 Married (1) Henry Hussey, 2nd Baron Hussey, (2) Andrew Peverell
    Eleanor — — Married Gerard de Lisle, 1st Baron Lisle
    Elizabeth - - Married William Latimer, 4th Baron Latimer
    Ancestry[edit]

    Residence:
    in exile...

    Died:
    executed...

    Edmund married Alice de Warenne, Countess of Arundel 0___ 1305. Alice (daughter of William de Warenne and Joan de Vere) was born 15 Jun 1287, Warren, Sussex, England; died 23 May 1338. [Group Sheet]


  14. 31.  Alice de Warenne, Countess of Arundel was born 15 Jun 1287, Warren, Sussex, England (daughter of William de Warenne and Joan de Vere); died 23 May 1338.

    Notes:

    Alice de Warenne, Countess of Arundel (15 June 1287 -23 May 1338) was an English noblewoman and heir apparent to the Earldom of Surrey. In 1305, she married Edmund FitzAlan, 9th Earl of Arundel.

    Family

    Alice, the only daughter of William de Warenne (1256-1286) and Joan de Vere, was born on 15 June 1287 in Warren, Sussex, six months after her father was accidentally killed in a tournament on 15 December 1286. On the death of her paternal grandfather, John de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey in 1304, her only sibling John de Warenne, 7th Earl of Surrey succeeded to the earldom. He became estranged from his childless wife and they never reconciled, leaving Alice as the heir presumptive to the Surrey estates and title.

    Marriage to the Earl of Arundel

    In 1305, Alice married Edmund Fitzalan, 9th Earl of Arundel,[1] the son of Richard Fitzalan, 8th Earl of Arundel and Alice of Saluzzo.[2] He had initially refused her, for reasons which were not recorded;[citation needed] however, by 1305, he had changed his mind and they were wed.[1] They had nine recorded children,[citation needed] and their chief residence was Arundel Castle in Sussex. Arundel inherited his title on 9 March 1302 upon his father's death.[2] He was summoned to Parliament as Lord Arundel in 1306, and was later one of the Lords Ordainers. He also took part in the Scottish wars.

    The Earl of Arundel and his brother-in-law John de Warenne were the only nobles who remained loyal to King Edward II, after Queen Isabella and her lover Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March returned to England in 1326. He had allied himself to the King's favourite Hugh le Despenser, and agreed to the marriage of his son to Despenser's granddaughter. Arundel had previously been granted many of the traitor Mortimer's forfeited estates, and was appointed Justice of Wales in 1322 and Warden of the Welsh Marches in 1325. He was also made Constable of Montgomery Castle which became his principal base.

    The Earl of Arundel was captured in Shropshire by the Queen's party.[3] On 17 November 1326 in Hereford, Arundel was beheaded by order of the Queen, leaving Alice de Warenne a widow. Her husband's estates and titles were forfeited to the Crown following Arundel's execution, but later restored to her eldest son, Richard.[citation needed]

    Alice died before 23 May 1338,[1] aged 50. Her brother died in 1347 without legitimate issue, thus the title of Surrey eventually passed to Alice's son, Richard.

    Issue

    Richard FitzAlan, 10th Earl of Arundel, known as Copped Hat, (1306 Arundel Castle, Sussex – 24 January 1376), also succeeded to the title of Earl of Surrey on 12 April 1361. He married firstly Isabel le Despenser, whom he later repudiated, and was granted an annulment by Pope Clement VI. He had a son Edmund who was bastardised by the annulment. His second wife, whom he married on 5 February 1345, by Papal dispensation, was Eleanor of Lancaster, the daughter of Henry, 3rd Earl of Lancaster and Maud Chaworth. She was the widow of John de Beaumont, 2nd Lord Beaumont. Richard and Eleanor had three sons and four daughters, including Richard FitzAlan, 11th Earl of Arundel and Joan de Bohun, Countess of Hereford.
    Edward FitzAlan (1308–1398)
    Alice FitzAlan (born 1310), married John de Bohun, 5th Earl of Hereford.
    Joan FitzAlan (born 1312), married Warin Gerard, Baron L'Isle.
    Aline FitzAlan (1314–1386), married Roger le Strange, 5th Baron Strange of Knockyn, by whom she had issue.
    John FitzAlan (born 1315)
    Catherine FitzAlan (died 1376), married firstly Andrew Peverell, and secondly Henry Hussey of Cockfield. Had issue by her second husband.
    Elizabeth FitzAlan (1320–1389), married William Latimer, 4th Baron Latimer, by whom she had one daughter, Elizabeth.
    Eleanor FitzAlan

    Notes:

    Residence (Family):
    Arundel Castle is a restored and remodeled medieval castle in Arundel, West Sussex, England. It was established by Roger de Montgomery on Christmas Day 1067. Roger became the first to hold the earldom of Arundel by the graces of William the Conqueror. The castle was damaged in the English Civil War and then restored in the 18th and 19th centuries.

    View image, history & source ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arundel_Castle

    Children:
    1. Richard FitzAlan, Knight, 10th Earl of Arundel was born 1306-1313, Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England; died 24 Jan 1376, Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England; was buried Lewes Priory, Southover, Sussex, England.
    2. Mary de Arundel was born Corfham Castle, Diddlebury, Shropshire, England; died 29 Aug 1396, Corfham, Shropshire, England.
    3. 15. Aline FitzAlan was born 0___ 1314, Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England; died 20 Jan 1386.
    4. Elizabeth FitzAlan was born 0___ 1320, (England); died 0___ 1389.


Generation: 6

  1. 34.  Richard Fourneux

    Richard — Sybil LNU. [Group Sheet]


  2. 35.  Sybil LNU
    Children:
    1. 17. Joan Fourneux was born ~ 1297, Carlton in Lindrick, Nottinghamshire , England; died 15 Sep 1349, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England; was buried Jervaulx Abbey, Yorkshire, England.

  3. 36.  Geoffrey le Scrope, Knight was born 0___ 1280, (Masham, Yorkshire, England) (son of William le Scrope and Constance Newsham); died 2 Dec 1340, Ghent, Belgium; was buried Coverham Abbey, North Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: 18th Lord Chief Justice of England
    • Occupation: Soldier, Diplomat & Lawyer
    • Alt Birth: 0___ 1285

    Notes:

    Sir Geoffrey le Scrope (1285 – 2 December 1340) was an English lawyer, and Chief Justice of the King's Bench for four periods between 1324 and 1338.

    He was the son of Sir William le Scrope, who was bailiff to the earl of Richmond in Richmondshire. Geoffrey's older brother Henry was also a lawyer, and served as Chief Justice twice, 1317–23 and 1329–30. His mother was Constance, daughter and heiress of Thomas, son of Gillo de Newsham, variously described as of Newsham-on-Tees and of Newsham-on-Tyne. Geoffrey Scrope certainly had an estate at Whalton, near Morpeth, a few miles south-east of which there is a Newsham, but it is not upon the Tyne.[1]

    Like his brother, Scrope adopted the profession of the law, and by 1316 he was king's serjeant. He is also called 'valettus regis.' He was summoned to councils and parliaments, and occasionally sat on judicial commissions.[1] In the baronial conflicts of the reign of Edward II he was a loyal adherent of the crown. He was involved in the proceedings both against Thomas of Lancaster and Andrew Harclay. He was knighted in 1323, and became Chief Justice for the first time on 21 March 1324. He managed, however, to survive politically the overthrow both of Edward II in 1326 and of Roger Mortimer in 1330.

    After retiring as a justice, he campaigned with Edward III in Flanders, and distinguished himself as a soldier. He was also one of the instigators behind the king's actions against Archbishop Stratford in 1340. The small estate he held as early as 1312 in Coverdale, south of Wensleydale, he augmented before 1318, by the acquisition of the manor of Clifton on Ure at the entrance of the latter dale, where he obtained a license to build a castle in that year. Early in the next reign he purchased the neighbouring manor of Masham from the representatives of its old lords, the Wautons, who held it from the Mowbrays by the service of an annual barbed arrow. Eltham Mandeville and other Vesci lands in Kent had passed into his hands by 1318. One of Edward II's last acts was to invest him with the great castle and honour of Skipton in Craven forfeited by Roger, lord Clifford. So closely was he identified with the court party that Mortimer was alleged to have projected the same fate for him as for the Despensers. But though Edward's deposition was followed by Scrope's removal from office, he received a pardon in February 1328, and was reinstated as chief justice.[1]

    He was a soldier and diplomatist as well as a lawyer, and his services in the former capacities were in such request that his place had frequently to be supplied by substitutes, one of whom was his brother Henry, and for a time (1334–7) he seems to have exchanged his post for the (nominal) second justiceship of the common pleas. Again chief justice in 1338, he finally resigned the office before October in that year on the outbreak of the French war.[1]

    In the tournaments of the previous reign, at one of which he was knighted, Scrope had not disgraced the azure bend or of his family, which he bore with a silver label for difference, and in the first months of Edward III's rule he was with the army which nearly joined battle with the Scots at Stanhope Park in Weardale. But it was in diplomatic business that Edward III found Scrope most useful. He took him to France in 1329. In 1331 and 1333, he was entrusted with important foreign missions. He had only just been designated (1334) one of the deputies to keep a watch over John Baliol when he was sent on an embassy to Brittany and France. In 1335 and again in 1337, Scottish affairs engaged his attention.[1]

    Just before crossing to Flanders in 1338 Edward III sent Scrope with the Earl of Northampton to his ally the emperor, and later in the year he was employed in the negotiations opened at the eleventh hour with Philip VI. He had at least six knights in his train, and took the field in the campaign which ended bloodlessly at Buironfosse (1339). Galfrid le Baker (p. 65) relates the well-known anecdote of Scrope's punishing Cardinal Bernard de Montfavence's boasts of the inviolability of France by taking him up a high tower and showing him her frontiers all in flames.[1]

    He now appears with the formal title of king's secretary, and spent the winter of 1339–40 in negotiating a marriage between the heir of Flanders and Edward's daughter Isabella. Returning to England with the King in February, he was granted two hundred marks a year to support his new dignity of banneret. Going back to Flanders in June, he took part in the siege of Tournay, and about Christmas died at Ghent. His body was carried to Coverham Abbey, to which he had given the church of Sadberge. Jervaulx and other monasteries had also experienced his liberality. Besides his Yorkshire and Northumberland estates, he left manors in five other counties. Scrope was the more distinguished of the two notable brothers whose unusual fortune it was to found two great baronial families within the limits of a single Yorkshire dale.[1]

    Family

    Geoffrey and his wife Ivette (de Ros) had five sons. Their eldest son, Henry (whose daughter Joan married Henry Fitzhugh), became the first Baron Scrope of Masham.[1]

    Scrope married Ivetta, in all probability daughter of Sir William de Roos of Ingmanthorpe, near Wetherby. A second marriage with Lora, daughter of Gerard de Furnival of Hertfordshire and Yorkshire, and widow of Sir John Ufflete or Usflete, has been inferred from a gift of her son, Gerard Ufflete, to Scrope and his mother jointly in 1331; but Ivetta is named as Scrope's wife in 1332.[1]

    By the latter he had five sons and three daughters. The sons were:

    Henry, first baron Scrope of Masham;
    Thomas, who predeceased his father;
    William (1325?–1367), who fought at the Battle of Crâecy, Poitiers, and Najara, and died in Spain;
    Stephen, who was at the Battle of Crâecy and the siege of Berwick (1356);
    Geoffrey (died 1383), LL.B. (probably of Oxford), prebendary of Lincoln, London, and York.
    The daughters were Beatrice and Constance, who married respectively Sir Andrew and Sir Geoffrey Luttrell of Lincolnshire; and Ivetta, the wife of John de Hothom.[1]

    Notes

    ^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h i j Tair 1897.

    References

    Attribution

    This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Tait, James (1897). "Scrope, Geoffrey le". In Lee, Sidney. Dictionary of National Biography. 51. London: Smith, Elder & Co.

    Sources

    E.L.G. Stones, 'Sir Geoffrey le Scrope (c.1285–1340), chief justice of the king's bench', English Historical Review, 69 (1954), pp. 1–17.
    Brigette Vale (2004). "Scrope, Sir Geoffrey (d. 1340)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford University Press. Retrieved 7 August 2006.

    *

    Geoffrey le Scrope (d. 1340)

    Sir Geoffrey le Scrope (died 1340), chief justice of the kings bench as mentioned above, uncle of the first Baron Scrope of Bolton, had a son Henry, who in 1350 was summoned to parliament by writ as Baron Scrope, the designation of Masham being added in the time of his grandson to distinguish the title from that held by the elder branch of the family.

    Henry's fourth son was Richard le Scrope (c. 1350 – 1405), Archbishop of York, who took part with the Percies in opposition to Henry IV, and was beheaded for treason in June 1405.

    Despite this, Henry Scrope, 3rd Baron Scrope of Masham (c. 1376 – 1415), became a favorite of Henry V, by whom he was made treasurer in 1410 and employed on diplomatic missions abroad. However, in 1415 he was involved in a conspiracy to assassinate Henry (along with the King's cousin Richard of Conisburgh, 3rd Earl of Cambridge) and was ignominiously executed at Southampton. His title was forfeited. It was, however, restored to his brother John in 1455; and it fell into abeyance on the death, in 1517, of Geoffrey, 11th Baron Scrope of Masham, without male heirs.

    Occupation:
    In office 21 March 1324 - 1 May 1329

    Buried:
    Photo & History ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coverham_Abbey

    Geoffrey married Ivette de Ros 0___ 1306, Masham, Yorkshire, England. Ivette (daughter of William de Ros, Knight and Eustache FitzRalph) was born 0___ 1285, Ingmanthorpe, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1331; was buried Coverham Abbey, Coverham, Richmondshire, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 37.  Ivette de Ros was born 0___ 1285, Ingmanthorpe, Yorkshire, England (daughter of William de Ros, Knight and Eustache FitzRalph); died 0___ 1331; was buried Coverham Abbey, Coverham, Richmondshire, Yorkshire, England.

    Notes:

    Birth: 1285
    North Yorkshire, England
    Death: 1331
    North Yorkshire, England

    Born in 1285 in Ingmanthrope, Yorkshire, England to Baroness Eustace FitzRalph and Sir William de Ros. Married Knight Geoffrey I de SCROPE in 1306 in Masham, Yorkshire, England. Mother of John born in Masham, Yorkshire and Henry and Geoffrey Scrope.

    Family links:
    Parents:
    William de Ros (____ - 1310)
    Eustache FitzRalph Ros

    Spouse:
    Geoffrey Scrope (1280 - 1340)

    Children:
    Henry Scrope (1312 - 1392)*
    Ivetta Scrope (1327 - 1391)*

    *Calculated relationship

    Burial:
    Coverham Abbey
    Coverham
    Richmondshire District
    North Yorkshire, England

    Created by: Kaaren Crail Vining
    Record added: Jan 24, 2014
    Find A Grave Memorial# 124086009

    Buried:
    Picture & History ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coverham_Abbey

    Children:
    1. 18. Henry le Scrope, Knight, 1st Baron Scrope of Masham was born 29 Sep 1312, Masham, Yorkshire, England; died 31 Jul 1391, Ghent, Belgium; was buried Coverham Abbey, Coverham, Yorkshire, England.
    2. Thomas Scrope died Bef 1340.
    3. William Scrope was born ~ 1325, Masham, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1367, Spain.
    4. Stephen Scrope, Knight was born ~ 1321, Masham, Yorkshire, England; died Aft 1359.
    5. Geoffrey Scrope was born 0___ 1319, Masham, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1383.
    6. Beatrice Scrope
    7. Constance Scrope

  5. 40.  John de Grey, 1st Baron Grey de Rotherfield was born ~ 1271, Rotherfield, Oxfordshire, England.

    Notes:

    John de Grey, 1st Baron of Rotherfield
    Also Known As: "1st Baron of Rotherfield"
    Birthdate: circa 1271
    Birthplace: Rotherfield Greys, Oxfordshire, England
    Death: Died October 17, 1311 in Rotherfield Greys, Oxfordshire, England
    Place of Burial: Rotherfield,Oxford,England
    Immediate Family:
    Son of Sir Robert de Grey, of Rotherfield and Joan de Valoines
    Husband of Margaret de Oddingseles
    Father of John de Grey, 2nd Baron Grey of Rotherfield; Maud de Botetourt and Joan De Grey
    Brother of Maud Matilda de Grey; Margaret De Grey FitzBernard and Thomas de Grey
    Occupation: Baron
    Managed by: Shirley Marie Caulk
    Last Updated: December 20, 2016

    About Baron John de Grey
    According to the National Trust (about Greys Court)...

    In the early 13th century the estate belonged to Walter de Grey, Archbishop of York. But it was his nephew, the 1st Baron de Grey, John, who was responsible for fortifying the mansion and surrounding buildings.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~

    John was summoned to Parliament as first Baron Grey of Rotherfield on 26 Jan 1297. He took part in the Scottish wars under Edward I "Longshanks" and fought in the glorious victory at Falkirk in 1298 against William Wallace, when a large part of Edward's troops refused to fight. He was back in Scotland again in 1306 after the rebellion and enthronement of Robert Bruce

    src: tudorplace.com.ar/Grey1.htm

    *

    John — Margaret de Odingsells. Margaret (daughter of William de Odingsells and Ela Fitzwalter, Countess of Warwick) was born ~ 1276, Solihull, Warwickshire, England; died 17 Oct 1311, Rotherfield Greys, Oxfordshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  6. 41.  Margaret de Odingsells was born ~ 1276, Solihull, Warwickshire, England (daughter of William de Odingsells and Ela Fitzwalter, Countess of Warwick); died 17 Oct 1311, Rotherfield Greys, Oxfordshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Margaret de Oddingseles
    • Also Known As: Margaret Moreby

    Notes:

    Margaret de Oddingseles
    Also Known As: "Margaret Moreby"
    Birthdate: circa 1276
    Birthplace: Solihull, Warwickshire, England
    Death: Died October 17, 1311 in Rotherfield Greys, Oxfordshire, England
    Immediate Family:
    Daughter of William de Oddingseles, II and Ela FitzWalter de Longespee
    Wife of Robert Franceys; Robert de Moreby and Baron John de Grey
    Mother of Lord John Grey, KG; John de Grey, 2nd Baron Grey of Rotherfield; Maud de Botetourt and Joan De Grey
    Sister of Ida de Clinton; Alice Oddingsles; Edmund Oddingsles and Walter de Odingsells
    Occupation: (dau. of William Oddingsells of Maxstoke and Ela Fitzwalter)
    Managed by: Shirley Marie Caulk
    Last Updated: December 20, 2016

    About Margaret de Oddingseles
    http://www.tudorplace.com.ar/GREY1.htm#John De GREY of Thurrock1

    *

    Children:
    1. 20. John de Grey, KG, 2nd Baron Grey of Rotherfield was born 9 Oct 1300, Rotherfield, Oxfordshire, England; died 1 Sep 1359, Rotherfield, Oxfordshire, England.

  7. 42.  John Marmion, Knight, 4th Baron of Winteringham was born 0___ 1292 (son of John Marmion, Knight, 3rd Baron Marmion of Winteringha and Isabella (Peck)); died 0___ 1335.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Member of Parliament

    Notes:

    Sir John Marmion, Baron Marmion of Winteringham was an Anglo-Norman baron and descendant of King John who represented Lincolnshire in Parliament and fought in the Wars of Scottish Independence.

    Ancestry

    He was the son and heir of Sir John Marmion, 3rd Baron Marmion of Winteringham & Isabella[2] and was born c.1292.[3]

    Career and Life[edit]
    John was an adherent of the king's cousin and rival Thomas, 2nd Earl of Lancaster and on 16 Oct 1313 was pardoned for his role in the death of Piers Gaveston.[4] He again found himself in trouble in 1314 when an arrest warrant was issued for both John and his father who lead a group of dozens of men on a raid upon the Abbot of Fountains Abbey's land at Aldeburgh and Balderby, Yorkshire.[5] Timber, two hundred sheep, fifty oxen and four carts were stolen and the Abbot's servants suffered kidnapping, beatings, cuts and had their beards plucked out.[5] The Abbot and his monks may not have been entirely innocent having themselves been accused of violent assault in 1307[6] and of stealing deer in 1316.[6]

    In May 1314 John was summoned to serve in Sir Henry Tyes' company at the Battle of Bannockburn.[7] Following the disastrous defeat Robert the Bruce and his armies swept south[8] and John was again summoned to defend the north against the rampant Scots at Berwick-upon-Tweed on 30 Jun 1314.[4]

    He joined John de Mowbray's company in Aymer de Valence's attempt to re-capture Berwick in August 1319[7] which led to the Battle of Myton and a two-year truce.[8]

    His father died at or shortly after the Battle of Boroughbridge in 1322 whereupon John Jnr took over his father's lands. This was at a time when the Fens were gradually becoming flooded and at least one of John's meadows at Cherry Willingham sank under water.[9]

    Robert the Bruce used Boroughbridge as an opportunity to invade eighty miles into the north-west of England plundering and burning towns such as Lancaster and Preston as he went.[8] In the last half of 1322 John was summoned to help repel Bruce and drive him back into Scotland where he operated a scorched earth policy to deprive the English of food.[4] Hunger and dysentery forced King Edward to withdraw his forces back to York.[8] Marmion was stationed there in May 1323 when a thirteen-year truce was agreed between King Edward and Bruce.[4]

    John was summoned to a Great Council at Westminster in May 1324 as a Knight of Gloucestershire, Yorkshire and Lindsey, Lincolnshire.[4]

    He accompanied John de Warenne, 7th Earl of Surrey and Queen Isabella in their negotiations with King Charles IV of France in Gascony in March 1325.[4] Rather than returning to England Isabella stayed in France where she embarked upon an affair with Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March and formed a plot to oust her husband, Edward II, from the throne. The plot was successful and Isabella called a Parliament in January 1327, which was attended by John Marmion,[4] and which ratified Isabella's eldest son Edward III as the new king.

    In April 1327 John was sued by William de Paris (a former MP for Lincs) for the wardship of William, the underage son and heir of the late Leicestershire MP and knight Sir William Marmion (a leading candidate to be the Knight of Norham Castle fame) and his land at Keisby, Lincs.[10][a]

    When the Queen and Roger Mortimer gathered a vast army[b] at York in July 1327 John joined them.[7] The campaign saw little fighting and after the Battle of Stanhope Park the English army returned to York and disbanded.[8]

    On 25 May 1329 John was granted protection for three years to go on pilgrimage to the Holy Land.[5] Deer were stolen from his park at Tanfield in his absence and an arrest warrant to catch the thieves was issued on 11 Oct 1331.[5]

    He was appointed to arrest all disturbers of the peace in Sussex on 21 Mar 1332, shortly before the start of the Second War of Scottish Independence.[5]

    Sir John died in 1335,[2] the year of Edward III's 'Great Invasion of Scotland' and the Battle of Boroughmuir.


    Family and descendants[edit]
    John first married Elizabeth[3] before then marrying Maud daughter of Thomas, 1st Lord Furnival[2] and had the following children:

    Robert Marmion (d.s.p. 1360)[11] Of infirm condition and never summoned to Parliament.[2]
    Joan Marmion (d.1362[12]), m1. John Bernack[2][13][c] m2. John Folville.[12][14] Issue Maud Bernack m. Ralph de Cromwell[12]
    Avice Marmion, 2nd wife of John de Grey, K.G. of Rotherfield.[2] Issue John and Robert adopted the Marmion name and their Fitz-Hugh descendants became the eventual heirs of the lands at Winteringham, Tanfield, etc.

    Notes

    Jump up ^ It has not been proved exactly how the Marmions of Keisby (who also had land at Galby, Cold Newton, Ringstone, etc) were related to the Marmion Barons of Winteringham but they were their tenants and took over some of their land via the Ridell family who linked the two families
    Jump up ^ including 2500 heavy Flemish cavalry and, for the first time, the cannon
    Jump up ^ MP for Lincs in 1346

    References

    Jump up ^ Burke 1884, p. 660
    ^ Jump up to: a b c d e f Nicolas 1857
    ^ Jump up to: a b Cal Inq PMs VI.
    ^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g ParlWrits 1827.
    ^ Jump up to: a b c d e Patent Rolls 1232–1509.
    ^ Jump up to: a b PatRolls 1232–1509.
    ^ Jump up to: a b c Cal Docs Rel Scotland 3 1887.
    ^ Jump up to: a b c d e Scott 1982
    Jump up ^ Platts 1985
    Jump up ^ De Banco Roll Index 1909.
    Jump up ^ Cokayne 1893, p. 522
    ^ Jump up to: a b c Cal Inq PMs XI.
    Jump up ^ Sympson 1911, p. 182
    Jump up ^ Farnham 1919–20, p. 463

    Bibliography[edit]

    Burke, Bernard (1884). Burkes General Armoury. London: Burkes.
    Cokayne, George Edward (1893). Complete Peerage. I. London: George Bell & Sons.
    Farnham, George F. (1919–20). Leicestershire Manors: The Manors of Allexton, Appleby and Ashby Folville (PDF). Leicester: Leicestershire Archaelogical and Historical Society.
    Calendar of Inquisitions Post Mortem. VI. London: HMSO. 1910.
    Calendar of Inquisitions Post Mortem. XI. London: HMSO. 1935.
    Nicolas, Nicholas Harris (1857). Historic Peerage of England. London: John Murray.
    Nichols, John (1795). The History and Antiquities of the County of Leicester. Leicester: John Nichols.
    Palmer, Charles Ferrers R. (1875). History of the Baronial Family of Marmion, Lords of the Castle of Tamworth, etc. Tamworth: J. Thompson.
    Platts, Graham (1985). Land and People in Medieval Lincolnshire. Lincoln: History of Lincolnshire Committee. ISBN 978-0902668034.
    Close Rolls. Westminster: Parliament of England. 1224–1468.
    Fine Rolls. Westminster: Parliament of England. 1199–1461.
    Patent Rolls. Westminster: Parliament of England. 1232–1509.
    Lists and Indexes, No. XXXII. (In Two Parts). Index of Placita De Banco, preserved in the Public Record Office. A.D. 1327-1328. I. London: Public Record Office. 1909.
    Calendar of Documents Relating to Scotland. III. Edinburgh: Public Record Office. 1887.
    Parliamentary Writs. London: Public Record Office. 1827.
    Scott, Ronald McNair (1982). Robert the Bruce King of Scots. London: Hutchinson & Co.
    Sympson, Edward Mansel (1911). Memorials of Old Lincolnshire. London: George Allen & Sons Ltd.

    External links

    Marmion Tombs in Winteringham Church
    Possible site of Marmion Hermitage Manor House at West Tanfield
    Marmion Tower/Gatehouse at West Tanfield

    John — unnamed spouse. [Group Sheet]


  8. 43.  unnamed spouse
    Children:
    1. 21. Avice Marmion was born 0___ 1309; died Aft 20 Mar 1347.

  9. 50.  Robert de Ufford, (II), Knight, 1st Earl of Suffolk was born 9 Aug 1298, Ufford, Suffolk, England (son of Robert de Ufford, I, 1st Lord Ufford and Cecily Valoines); died 4 Nov 1369, (Suffolk, Suffolkshire, England).

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Robert Ufford
    • Also Known As: Suffolk

    Notes:

    Robert de Ufford, 1st Earl of Suffolk, KG (9 August 1298 - 4 November 1369) was an English peer. He was created Earl of Suffolk in 1337.

    Early life

    Born 9 August 1298, Robert de Ufford was the second but eldest surviving son of Robert de Ufford (1279–1316), Lord Ufford of Ufford, Suffolk, and Cecily de Valoignes (d.1325), daughter and coheir of Sir Robert de Valoignes (d.1289) and Eve de La Pecche. He had a younger brother, Sir Ralph Ufford (d.1346).[1][2]

    On 19 May 1318 he had livery of his father's Suffolk lands. He was knighted and received some official employments, being occupied, for example, in 1326 in levying ships for the royal use in Suffolk, and serving in November 1327 on a commission of the peace in the eastern counties under the statute of Winchester. In May and June 1329 he attended the young Edward III on his journey to Amiens.[3]

    He was employed on state affairs down to the end of the rule of Isabella of France and Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March, and on 1 May 1330 received a grant for life of Orford Castle in Suffolk, which had been previously held by his father; he also obtained grants of other lands. On 28 July he was appointed to array and command the levies of Norfolk and Suffolk summoned to fight "against the king's rebels". Nevertheless, in October he associated himself with William de Montacute in the attack on Mortimer at Nottingham. He took part in the capture of Mortimer in Nottingham Castle, and was implicated in the deaths of Sir Hugh de Turplington and Richard de Monmouth that occurred during the scuffle; that on 12 February 1331 he received a special pardon for the homicide. He was rewarded by the grant of the manors of Cawston and Fakenham in Norfolk, and also of some houses in Cripplegate that had belonged to Mortimer's associate, John Maltravers, succeeding Maltravers in some posts. He was summoned as a baron to parliament on 27 January 1332. From that time he was one of the most trusted warriors, counsellors, and diplomats in Edward III's service.[3]

    Earl of Suffolk

    On 1 November 1335 Ufford was appointed a member of an embassy empowered to treat with the Scots. He then served in a campaign against them, and was made warden of Bothwell Castle. On 14 January 1337 he was made admiral of the king's northern fleet jointly with Sir John Ros; Ufford ceased to hold this office later in the year. In March he was created Earl of Suffolk, and was granted lands. During his absence in parliament the Scots retook Bothwell Castle.[3]

    Hundred Years' War

    In opening moves of the Edwardian War, Suffolk was sent on 3 October 1337, with Henry Burghersh, the Earl of Northampton, and Sir John Darcy, to treat for peace or a truce with the French. Further powers were given them to deal with Louis IV, Holy Roman Emperor and other allies, and on 7 October they were also commissioned to treat with David Bruce, then staying in France, and were accredited to the two cardinals sent by the pope to make an Anglo-French reconciliation. Next year, on 1 July, Suffolk was associated with John de Stratford and others on an embassy to France, and left England along with the two cardinals sent to treat for peace. He attended the king in Brabant, serving in September 1339 in the expedition that besieged Cambrai, and in the army that prepared to fight a major battle at Buironfosse that came to nothing, where he and the Earl of Derby held a joint command. On 15 November of the same year he was appointed joint ambassador to Louis I, Count of Flanders and the Flemish estates, to treat for an alliance.[3]

    After Edward's return to England, Suffolk stayed behind with Salisbury, in garrison at Ypres. During Lent 1340 they attacked the French near Lille, pursued the enemy into the town, were made prisoners and were sent to Paris. Philip VI of France, it was said, wished to kill them, and they were spared only through the intervention of John of Bohemia. The truce of 25 September 1340 provided for the release of all prisoners, but it was only after a heavy ransom, to which Edward III contributed, that Suffolk was freed. He took part in a tournament at Dunstable in the spring of 1342 and at great jousts in London. He was one of the members of Edward's Round Table at Windsor, which assembled in February 1344, and fought in a tournament at Hertford in September 1344. he was one of the early members of Order of the Garter.[3]

    Suffolk served through the English intervention in the Breton War of Succession during July 1342, and at the siege of Rennes. In July 1343 he was joint ambassador to Pope Clement VI at Avignon. On 8 May 1344 he was appointed captain and admiral of the northern fleet, and on 3 July accompanied Edward on a short expedition to Flanders. He continued admiral in person or deputy until March 1347, when he was succeeded by Sir John Howard. On 11 July 1346 Suffolk sailed with the king from Portsmouth on the invasion of France which resulted in the battle of Crâecy. On the retreat northwards, a day after the passage of the River Seine, Suffolk and Sir Hugh le Despenser defeated a French force. Suffolk was one of those who advised Edward to select the field of Crâecy as his battle-ground; in the English victory he fought in on the left wing. Next morning, 27 August, he took part in the Earl of Northampton's reconnaissance that resulted in a sharp fight with the unbroken remnant of the French army.[3]

    Suffolk's diplomatic activity went on. He was one of the commissioners appointed to treat with France on 25 September 1348, and with Flanders on 11 October. The negotiations were conducted at Calais. On 10 March 1349, and again on 15 May 1350, he had similar commissions. On 29 August 1350 he fought in the naval victory, the Battle of Winchelsea. In May 1351 and in June 1352 he was chief commissioner of array in Norfolk and Suffolk.[3]

    In south-west France

    In September 1355 Suffolk sailed with The Black Prince, to Aquitaine. Between October and December he was on the prince's raid through Languedoc to Narbonne, where he commanded the rear-guard, William de Montacute, 2nd Earl of Salisbury, serving with him. After his return he was quartered at Saint-Emilion, his followers being stationed round Libourne. In January 1356 he led another foray, towards Rocamadour. Suffolk also shared in the Black Prince's northern foray of 1356, and in the battle of Poitiers which resulted from it, where he commanded, with Salisbury, the third "battle" or the rearward. The Prince's attempted retreat over the Miausson, threw the brunt of the first fighting on Suffolk and Salisbury. On the march back to Bordeaux he led the vanguard. Now 58 years old, he took part in the expedition into the County of Champagne in 1359. After that he was employed only in embassies, the last of those on which he served being that commissioned on 8 February 1362 to negotiate the proposed marriage of Edmund of Langley to the daughter of the Count of Flanders.[3]

    Last years

    In his declining years Suffolk devoted himself to the removal of Leiston Abbey, near Saxmundham, to a new site somewhat further inland. In 1363 it was transferred to its new home, where some ruins remain.[3]

    Suffolk died on 4 November 1369.[3]

    Marriage and issue

    In 1334 he married Margaret Norwich (d. 2 April 1368), daughter of Sir Walter Norwich (d.1329), Treasurer of the Exchequer, and Catherine de Hedersete, by whom he had a large family, including:[2]

    Robert Ufford, who predeceased his father without issue.[2]
    William de Ufford, 2nd Earl of Suffolk (d. 15 February 1382), second son, who married Joan Montagu (2 February 1349 - before 27 June 1376), daughter of Edward Montagu, 1st Baron Montagu (d. 3 July 1461) and Alice of Norfolk, by whom he had four sons and a daughter.[4]
    Walter Ufford (born 3 October 1343), third son, who married, before February 1359, Elizabeth de Montagu (c.1344 - before July 1361), daughter of Edward Montagu, 1st Baron Montagu (d. 3 July 1461) and Alice of Norfolk, by whom he had no issue.[4]
    Joan Ufford, eldest daughter, who was contracted to marry her father's ward, John de St Philibert; however the marriage did not take place.[2]
    Catharine Ufford (born c.1317, date of death unknown)[citation needed] married Robert de Scales, 3rd Baron Scales.[2][5]
    Cecily Ufford (born c. 1327 – died before 29 March 1372),[citation needed] who married William, Lord Willoughby of Eresby.[2]
    Margaret Ufford (born c. 1330 – died before 25 May 1368),[citation needed] who married Sir William Ferrers, 3rd Baron Ferrers of Groby.[2]
    Maud Ufford, who became a nun at the Augustinian priory in Campsea Ashe, Suffolk.[2]

    Robert married Margaret Norwich 0___ 1334. Margaret (daughter of Walter de Norwich, Knight and Catherine de Hadersete) was born 0___ 1286, Mettingham, Suffolk, England; died 2 Apr 1368. [Group Sheet]


  10. 51.  Margaret Norwich was born 0___ 1286, Mettingham, Suffolk, England (daughter of Walter de Norwich, Knight and Catherine de Hadersete); died 2 Apr 1368.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Margaret de Norwich
    • Alt Death: 3 Sep 1375, Thurston, Suffolk, England

    Notes:

    Birth:
    daughter of Sir Walter de Norwich, Knight, Lord High Treasurer

    Notes:

    Residence (Family):
    Orford Castle is a castle in the village of Orford, Suffolk, England, located 12 miles (20 km) northeast of Ipswich, with views over the Orford Ness. It was built between 1165 and 1173 by Henry II of England to consolidate royal power in the region. The well-preserved keep, described by historian R. Allen Brown as "one of the most remarkable keeps in England", is of a unique design and probably based on Byzantine architecture. The keep still stands among the earth-covered remains of the outer fortifications.

    Photos, map, history & source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orford_Castle

    Children:
    1. Margaret de Ufford was born ~ 1330, Ufford, Suffolk, England; died Bef 25 May 1368, Eresby, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England.
    2. 25. Cecily Ufford was born 29 Mar 1372, Eresby, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England.

  11. 54.  William de Ros, Knight, 2nd Baron de RosWilliam de Ros, Knight, 2nd Baron de Ros was born 0___ 1288, Helmsley, Yorkshire, England (son of William de Ros, Knight, 1st Baron de Ros of Hamlake and Maud de Vaux); died 3 Feb 1343, Kirkham, Yorkshire, England; was buried Kirkham Priory, Kirkham, North Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Member of Parliament
    • Also Known As: 3rd Baron de Ros of Hamlake, Werke, Trusbot & Belvoir
    • Also Known As: Lord Ross of Werke
    • Military: Lord High Admiral

    Notes:

    William de Ros, 2nd Baron de Ros of Helmsley (c.1288 - 3 February 1343) was the son of William de Ros, 1st Baron de Ros.

    Biography

    As 2nd Baron de Ros of Hamlake, Werke, Trusbut & Belvoir, he was summoned to Parliament during the reigns of Edward II and Edward III of England. In 1321 he completed the religious foundation which his father had begun at Blakeney. He was created Lord Ross of Werke. He was appointed Lord High Admiral and was one of the commissioners with the Archbishop of York, and others, to negotiate peace between the king and Robert de Bruce, who had assumed the title of king of Scotland.

    William de Ros was buried at Kirkham Priory, near the great altar.

    Family

    William de Ros married, before 25 November 1316, Margery De Badlesmere (c.1306 - 18 October 1363), eldest daughter of Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 1st Baron Badlesmere, with Margaret, daughter of Sir Thomas de Clare, with whom he had two sons and three daughters:[2]

    William, who succeeded his father as Baron.
    Thomas, who succeeded his brother as Baron.
    Margaret, who married Sir Edward de Bohun.
    Maud, who married John de Welles, 4th Baron Welles.
    Elizabeth, who married William la Zouche, 2nd Lord Zouche of Haryngworth, a descendant of Breton nobility.

    Maud survived her husband by many years and was one of the very few English people present at the Jubilee, at Rome, in 1350; the king had tried to prevent the attendance of his subjects at this ceremony on account of the large sums of money usually taken out of the kingdom on such occasions.

    *

    Biography

    more...

    Residing in Wark Castle in August 1310. He was summoned for service in Scotland 1316-19, 1322, 1323, 1327, and 1335, and to Parliament 20 November 1317 to 21 Feb 1339/40. Received the surrender of Knaresborough, as a joint commander in January 1317/18, and remained loyal during the Earl of Lancaster's rebellion in 1321-22. Summoned for service in Gascony in December of 1324. He was appointed, by Prince Edward's government, Sheriff of Yorkshire (Nov 1326) and was a member of the Council of Regency in February 1326/27. In November 1327, he served as a commissioner to negotiate with the Scots for peace, as well as a similar role with France in February 1329/30. In 1334, he entertained the King at Helmsley, and during the King's absence in Flanders, he was one of the commissioners to preserve the peace in that country. He took part in the defense of Newcastle against the Scots. Buried at Kirkham in Lancashire.

    Children

    They had two sons, William, Knt. [3rd Lord Roos of Helmsley] and Thomas, Knt. [4th Lord Roos of Helmsley], and three daughters, Margaret, Maud, and Elizabeth. (Ref: Magna Carta Ancestry)

    William de Ros, 3rd Baron de Ros

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    William de Ros, 3rd Baron de Ros (died February 16, 1342) was the son of William de Ros, 2nd Baron de Ros.

    As 3rd Baron de Ros of Hamlake, Werke, Trusbut & Belvoir, he was summoned to Parliament during the reigns of Edward II and Edward III of England. In 1321 he completed the religious foundation which his father had begun at Blakeney. He was created Lord Ross of Werke. He was appointed Lord High Admiral and was one of the commissioners with the Archbishop of York, and others, to negotiate peace between the king and Robert de Bruce, who had assumed the title of king of Scotland.
    He married Margery De Badlesmere (1306-1363), the eldest sister and co-heir of Giles de Badlesmere, 2nd Baron Badlesmere of Leeds Castle, county of Kent. She survived her husband by many years and was one of the very few English people present at the Jubilee, at Rome, in 1350; the king had tried to prevent the attendance of his subjects at this ceremony on account of the large sums of money usually taken out of the kingdom on such occasions.

    Their children were:

    * William de Ros, 4th Baron de Ros
    * Thomas de Ros, 5th Baron de Ros
    * Sir John De Ros
    * Margaret de Ros
    * Matilda de Ros

    William de Ros was buried at Kirkham Priory, near the great altar.

    *

    more...

    Baron de Ros (pronounced "Roose") is one of the most ancient baronial titles in the Peerage of England . (The spelling of the title and of the surname of the original holders has been rendered differently in various texts. The word "Ros" is sometimes spelt "Roos", and the word "de" is sometimes dropped.)


    Barons de Ros of Helmsley (1264)[edit]
    William de Ros, 1st Baron de Ros (d. 1317)
    William de Ros, 2nd Baron de Ros (d. 1343)
    William de Ros, 3rd Baron de Ros (c. 1326–1352)
    Thomas de Ros, 4th Baron de Ros (1336–1384)
    John de Ros, 5th Baron de Ros (c. 1360–1394)
    William de Ros, 6th Baron de Ros (c. 1369–1414)
    John de Ros, 7th Baron de Ros (d. 1421)
    Thomas de Ros, 8th Baron de Ros (c. 1405–1431)
    Thomas de Ros, 9th Baron de Ros (c. 1427–1464) (forfeit 1464)
    Edmund de Ros, 10th Baron de Ros (d. 1508) (restored 1485, barony abeyant in 1508)
    George Manners, 11th Baron de Ros (d. 1513) (abeyance terminated about 1512)
    Thomas Manners, 1st Earl of Rutland, 12th Baron de Ros (d. 1543)
    Henry Manners, 2nd Earl of Rutland, 13th Baron de Ros (1526–1563)
    Edward Manners, 3rd Earl of Rutland, 14th Baron de Ros (1549–1587)
    Elizabeth Cecil, 16th Baroness de Ros (c. 1572–1591)
    William Cecil, 17th Baron de Ros (1590–1618)
    Francis Manners, 6th Earl of Rutland, 18th Baron de Ros (1578–1632)
    Katherine Villiers, Duchess of Buckingham, 19th Baroness de Ros (d. 1649)
    George Villiers, 2nd Duke of Buckingham, 20th Baron de Ros (1628–1687) (barony abeyant 1687)
    Charlotte FitzGerald-de Ros, 21st Baroness de Ros (1769–1831) (abeyance terminated 1806)
    Henry William FitzGerald-de Ros, 22nd Baron de Ros (1793–1839)
    William Lennox Lascelles FitzGerald-de Ros, 23rd Baron de Ros (1797–1874)
    Dudley Charles FitzGerald-de Ros, 24th Baron de Ros (1827–1907)
    Mary Dawson, Countess of Dartrey, 25th Baroness de Ros (1854–1939) (abeyant 1939)
    Una Mary Ross, 26th Baroness de Ros (1879–1956) (abeyance terminated 1943; abeyant 1956)
    Georgiana Angela Maxwell, 27th Baroness de Ros (1933–1983) (abeyance terminated 1958)
    Peter Trevor Maxwell, 28th Baron de Ros (b. 1958)
    The heir apparent is the present holder's son Hon. Finbar James Maxwell (b. 1988).

    Footnotes

    Jump up ^ Debrett's Peerage, 1968, p.347
    Jump up ^ The British herald; or, Cabinet of armorial bearings of the nobility & gentry of Great Britain & Ireland, from the earliest to the present time: with a complete glossary of heraldic terms: to which is prefixed a History of heraldry, collected and arranged ...
    Jump up ^ Cokayne 1949, p. 95; Richardson III 2011, p. 448.
    Jump up ^ Cokayne 1949, p. 95.
    Jump up ^ http://www.cracroftspeerage.co.uk/online/content/Ros1299.htm

    References

    Cokayne, George Edward (1949). The Complete Peerage, edited by Geoffrey H. White XI. London: St. Catherine Press.
    Richardson, Douglas (2011). Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, ed. Kimball G. Everingham III (2nd ed.). Salt Lake City. ISBN 144996639X

    Birth:
    (pronounced "Roose")

    Buried:
    The ruins of Kirkham Priory are situated on the banks of the River Derwent, at Kirkham, North Yorkshire, England. The Augustinian priory was founded in the 1120s by Walter l'Espec, lord of nearby Helmsley, who also built Rievaulx Abbey ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kirkham_Priory

    Images for Kirkham Priory ... https://www.google.com/search?q=Kirkham+Priory&rlz=1C1KMZB_enUS591US591&espv=2&biw=1440&bih=810&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjYj6LQuIzPAhXCJiYKHVRGC3wQsAQIMA

    William married Margery de Badlesmere Bef 25 Nov 1316. Margery (daughter of Bartholomew de Badlesmere, Knight, 1st Baron Badlesmere and Margaret de Clare, Baroness Badlesmere) was born 0___ 1306, Badlesmere Manor, Kent, England; died 18 Oct 1363. [Group Sheet]


  12. 55.  Margery de Badlesmere was born 0___ 1306, Badlesmere Manor, Kent, England (daughter of Bartholomew de Badlesmere, Knight, 1st Baron Badlesmere and Margaret de Clare, Baroness Badlesmere); died 18 Oct 1363.
    Children:
    1. 27. Elizabeth de Ros was born 0___ 1325, Helmsley, Yorkshire, England; died 24 May 1380, Harringworth, Northamptonshire, , England.
    2. Thomas de Ros, Knight, 4th Baron de Ros was born 13 Jan 1335, Helmsley, Yorkshire, England; died 8 Jun 1383, Uffington, Lincolnshire, England; was buried Rievaulx Abbey, Helmsley, North Yorkshire, England.
    3. Maud de Ros, Lady Welles was born (Helmsley, Yorkshire, England); died 9 Dec 1388.

  13. 58.  Oliver de Ingham, Knight, Lord Ingham was born ~ 1287, Ingham, Norfolkshire, England (son of John de Ingham and Margery LNU); died Bef 1344; was buried Holy Trinity Church, Ingham, Norfolkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Knight Banneret
    • Residence: Scotland
    • Alt Birth: 0___ 1278

    Notes:

    Sir Oliver Ingham (about 1287–1344) was an English knight and landowner who served as a soldier and administrator under Kings Edward II and Edward III. He was responsible for the civil government and military defence of the Duchy of Aquitaine during the War of Saint-Sardos and the early part of the Hundred Years' War.[1]

    Early life

    Born about 1287, he was the son and heir of Sir John Ingham (1260-1309) of Ingham, Norfolk, who had served in the wars of King Edward I against the Scots, and his wife Margery. In 1310 he not only inherited his father's lands in Norfolk, Suffolk, Wiltshire and Hampshire but was himself summoned by King Edward II for military service against Scotland. Appointed a household knight of the king, he received many royal grants including the custody of Ellesmere Castle in Shropshire, keeper for the counties of Cheshire and Flintshire, and official positions in Shropshire and Wiltshire. As a knight banneret, he served in Scotland with the king in August 1322.[2][2]

    First term in Aquitaine

    In 1324 he was appointed adviser to the king's half-brother Edmund of Woodstock, 1st Earl of Kent, who represented Edward as his Lieutenant in Aquitaine. Tensions had led to the outbreak of war with France, which captured much of the ill-defended Agenais. Ingham, dispatched to Aquitaine with a force of Spanish and other mercenary troops, regained some of the losses in the Agenais and in Saintonge. After arranging a truce, the Earl of Kent departed for England in 1325 and in 1326 Ingham was appointed Seneschal of Gascony, the highest post in what remained in English possession, holding extensive powers over the law and finance of the duchy. Though he appears to have earned the confidence of many members of the Gascon nobility, an agreement with the French in 1327 led to his removal from Aquitaine.[2]

    Crises in England

    Partly as a result of English losses in the war, the political climate at home had changed dramatically. Edward II had been deposed and replaced by his young son Edward III, under the regency of his mother Queen Isabella and her lover Roger Mortimer. As the regents wanted peace, in the final treaty with France the loss of the Agenais was accepted and Ingham’s conquests there abandoned. Although he had been an associate of the Despensers, he largely escaped the retaliations that followed their fall. Becoming an adherent of Mortimer, he was summoned to parliament between June 1328 and September 1330 and was one of the not impartial judges in the trial of the conspirators who attempted to overthrow Mortimer in February 1329. In October 1330, when Mortimer was removed from power, Ingham was captured by the forces of Edward III at Nottingham and sent for trial to London. On 22 October, his lands and goods were declared forfeit. However he was pardoned on 8 December 1330, the new king acknowledging his loyal service in the past, and his property was restored to him with the important exception of grants from the crown.[2]

    Second term in Aquitaine

    From this time on, he served the king in Aquitaine and rarely returned to England. On 29 June 1331 he was reappointed as seneschal in Aquitaine, responsible for the peace, order, and defence of the duchy at a time of deteriorating Anglo-French relations, which culminated in the outbreak of the Hundred Years' War in 1337. The defences of the duchy had been undermined by the loss of several key castles in the previous war and the loyalty of the local nobility was divided, as many owned estates on both sides of the border. By August 1336 the duchy was on a war footing again, Ingham being ordered to forbid all Gascon men-at-arms to leave the land without licence and to ensure all major strongholds were properly garrisoned, equipped, and victualled.[2]

    On 24 May 1337, King Philip VI of France announced that he was confiscating Aquitaine and French commissioners were sent to take possession of the duchy. Ingham met them at Libourne and refused to surrender his territory. He then began military operations, mostly in the Agenais. Overall English strategy concentrated on attacking the north of France, with the result that Ingham in the south-west received neither troops nor funds from England and had to rely entirely on local resources. The income of the duchy depended mainly on tolls and custom dues from goods conveyed along the great rivers, but trade dried up almost entirely with the onset of war. Most of what revenue remained had to be used to support garrison commanders. As a result, Ingham’s government in the capital city of Bordeaux had very limited options over how to conduct the defence. Although losing Penne-d'Agenais, he successfully defended Bonnegarde and other strongholds and fought off a French attack on Bordeaux itself in 1339. Despite financial stringency, he retained substantial companies of Gascon nobles in his service. His services to the crown in Aquitaine were acknowledged when his and his ancestors' debts were written off.[2]

    Death and burial

    Leaving Aquitaine in 1343, he returned to England and died, probably at Ingham, on 29 January 1344. The inquisition post mortem recorded that in Ingham he held the manor and the advowson of the church, where he was buried in a tomb that has survived.[2] His widow died on 11 October 1350 and was buried beside him,[3][4] the inscription, in medieval French, having been recorded as: Mounsier Oliver de Ingham gist icy et Dame Elizabeth sa compagne que luy Dieux de les almes eit mercy (Sir Oliver Ingham lies here and Dame Elizabeth his wife; may God have mercy on their souls).[2][5]

    Family

    With his wife Elizabeth Zouche, daughter of William Zouche, Baron Zouche, and his wife Maud Lovell, he had four children: Oliver (died 1326), John (died 1339), Elizabeth (dead by 1344), and Joan. As three of the children died before him, his inheritance was split between his granddaughter Mary, aged eight, only child of Elizabeth and her husband John Curzon, and Joan, aged 24.[2] Joan had married first Sir Roger Lestrange of Knockin (15 Aug 1301-29 Jul 1349), son of Sir John Lestrange and his wife Isolda Walton, and then, reportedly on 30 Nov 1350, Sir Miles Stapleton of Bedale (about 1318-4 Dec 1364 ), son of Sir Gilbert Stapleton and his wife Agnes (or Maud) FitzAlan. In June 1360 she and Miles founded a chantry at Ingham to commemorate the souls of, among others, her father and mother. She was dead by 1365, leaving as heir her son, Sir Miles Stapleton (1357-1419).[2]

    *

    Occupation:
    A knight banneret, sometimes known simply as banneret, was a medieval knight ("a commoner of rank")[1] who led a company of troops during time of war under his own banner (which was square-shaped, in contrast to the tapering standard or the pennon flown by the lower-ranking knights) and was eligible to bear supporters in English heraldry.

    The military rank of a knight banneret was higher than a knight bachelor (who fought under another's banner), but lower than an earl or duke; the word derives from the French banneret, from bannire, banner, elliptical for seigneur - or chevalier banneret, Medieval Latin banneretus.

    Under English custom the rank of knight banneret could only be conferred by the sovereign on the field of battle. There were some technical exceptions to this; when his standard was on the field of battle he could be regarded as physically present though he was not. His proxy could be regarded as a sufficient substitution for his presence.

    ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knight_banneret

    Oliver — Elizabeth la Zouche. Elizabeth (daughter of Eudo la Zouche and Millicent de Cantilupe) was born ~ 1272, Ellesmere, Shropshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  14. 59.  Elizabeth la Zouche was born ~ 1272, Ellesmere, Shropshire, England (daughter of Eudo la Zouche and Millicent de Cantilupe).

    Notes:

    Elizabeth La ZOUCHE

    Born: ABT 1272, Ellesmere, Shropshire, England

    Father: Eudo La ZOUCHE

    Mother: Ĺ?

    Married: Oliver De INGHAM (Sir Knight) (b. 1278 - d. BEF 1344) (son of Sir John De Ingham and Margery ?)

    Children:

    1. Joan De INGHAM (b. 1299 / 1337) (m.1 Miles De Stapelton - m.2 Roger Le Strange)

    *

    Children:
    1. 29. Joan de Ingham, Baroness Ingham was born ~ 1320, Ellesmere, Shropshire, England; died 12 Dec 1365, Ingham, Norfolkshire, England.

  15. 60.  Richard FitzAlan, Knight, 8th Earl of ArundelRichard FitzAlan, Knight, 8th Earl of Arundel was born 2 Mar 1266, Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England (son of John FitzAlan, Knight, 7th Earl of Arundel and Isabella Mortimer); died 9 Mar 1302, Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England; was buried Haughmond Abbey, Shropshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Baron Arundel

    Notes:

    Richard FitzAlan, 8th Earl of Arundel (7th Earl of Arundel per Ancestral Roots) (3 February 1266/7 – 9 March 1301/2) was an English Norman medieval nobleman.

    Lineage

    He was the son of John FitzAlan, 7th Earl of Arundel (6th Earl of Arundel per Ancestral Roots) and Isabella Mortimer, daughter of Roger Mortimer, 1st Baron Wigmore and Maud de Braose. His paternal grandparents were John Fitzalan, 6th Earl of Arundel and Maud le Botiller.

    Richard was feudal Lord of Clun and Oswestry in the Welsh Marches. After attaining his majority in 1289 he became the 8th Earl of Arundel, by being summoned to Parliament by a writ directed to the Earl of Arundel.

    He was knighted by King Edward I of England in 1289.

    Fought in Wales, Gascony & Scotland

    He fought in the Welsh wars, 1288 to 1294, when the Welsh castle of Castell y Bere (near modern-day Towyn) was besieged by Madog ap Llywelyn. He commanded the force sent to relieve the siege and he also took part in many other campaigns in Wales ; also in Gascony 1295-97; and furthermore in the Scottish wars, 1298-1300.

    Marriage & Issue

    He married sometime before 1285, Alice of Saluzzo (also known as Alesia di Saluzzo), daughter of Thomas I of Saluzzo in Italy. Their issue:

    Edmund FitzAlan, 9th Earl of Arundel.
    John, a priest.
    Alice FitzAlan, married Stephen de Segrave, 3rd Lord Segrave.
    Margaret FitzAlan, married William le Botiller (or Butler).
    Eleanor FitzAlan, married Henry de Percy, 1st Baron Percy.[a]

    Burial

    Richard and his mother are buried together in the sanctuary of Haughmond Abbey, long closely associated with the FitzAlan family.

    Ancestry

    [show]Ancestors of Richard FitzAlan, 8th Earl of Arundel

    Notes

    Jump up ^ Standard accounts of the Percy family identify Eleanor as the daughter of the "Earl of Arundel". Arrangements for Eleanor's marriage to Lord Percy are found in the recognizance made in 1300 by Eleanor's father, Richard, Earl of Arundel, for a debt of 2,000 marks which he owed Sir Henry Percy. Eleanor was styled as a "kinswoman" of Edward II on two separate occasions; once in 1318 and again in 1322 presumably by her descent from Amadeus IV, Count of Savoy who was the brother of Edward II's great-grandmother, Beatrice of Savoy. Eleanor's brothers, Edmund and John were also styled as "kinsmen" of the king. Eleanor's identity is further indicated by the presence of the old and new arms of FitzAlan (or Arundel) at her tomb.

    References

    Jump up ^ www.briantimms.net, Charles's Roll
    Jump up ^ Debrett's Peerage, 1968, p.833
    Wikisource link to Fitzalan, Richard (1267-1302) (DNB00). Wikisource.
    Weis, Frederick Lewis. Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700.
    External links[edit]
    Medieval Lands Project on Richard FitzAlan

    Richard married Alice of Saluzzo, Countess of Arundel Bef 1285. Alice (daughter of Thomas of Saluzzo, Marquis of Saluzzo and Luigia de Ceva) was born 0___ 1269, Saluzzo, Italy; died 25 Sep 1292, Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England; was buried Haughmond Abbey, Shropshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  16. 61.  Alice of Saluzzo, Countess of Arundel was born 0___ 1269, Saluzzo, Italy (daughter of Thomas of Saluzzo, Marquis of Saluzzo and Luigia de Ceva); died 25 Sep 1292, Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England; was buried Haughmond Abbey, Shropshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Alesia di Saluzzo
    • Also Known As: Alisona de Saluzzo

    Notes:

    Alice of Saluzzo, Countess of Arundel (died 25 September 1292),[1] also known as Alesia di Saluzzo, was an Italian-born noblewoman and an English countess. She was a daughter of Thomas I of Saluzzo, and the wife of Richard Fitzalan, 8th Earl of Arundel. Alice was one of the first Italian women to marry into an English noble family. She assumed the title of Countess of Arundel in 1289.

    Family

    Alesia was born on an unknown date in Saluzzo (present-day Province of Cuneo, Piedmont); the second eldest daughter of Thomas I, 4th Margrave of Saluzzo, and Luigia di Ceva (died 22 August 1291/1293), daughter of Giorgio, Marquis of Ceva[2] and Menzia d'Este.[1] Alesia had fifteen siblings. Her father was a very wealthy and cultured nobleman under whose rule Saluzzo achieved a prosperity, freedom, and greatness it had never known previously.[citation needed]

    Marriage and issue

    Sometime before 1285, Alice married Richard Fitzalan, feudal Lord of Clun and Oswestry in the Welsh Marches, the son of John Fitzalan, 7th Earl of Arundel and Isabella Mortimer. Richard would succeed to the title of Earl of Arundel in 1289, thus making Alice the 8th Countess of Arundel. Along with her aunt, Alasia of Saluzzo who married Edmund de Lacy, 2nd Earl of Lincoln in 1247, Alice was one of the first Italian women to marry into an English noble family. Her marriage had been arranged by the late King Henry III's widowed Queen consort Eleanor of Provence.

    Richard and Alice's principal residence was Marlborough Castle in Wiltshire, but Richard also held Arundel Castle in Sussex and the castles of Clun and Oswestry in Shropshire. Her husband was knighted by King Edward I in 1289, and fought in the Welsh Wars (1288–1294), and later in the Scottish Wars. The marriage produced four children:[3]

    Edmund Fitzalan, 9th Earl of Arundel (1 May 1285- 17 November 1326 by execution), married Alice de Warenne, by whom he had issue.
    John Fitzalan, a priest
    Alice Fitzalan (died 7 September 1340), married Stephen de Segrave, 3rd Lord Segrave, by whom she had issue.
    Margaret Fitzalan, married William le Botiller, by whom she had issue.
    Eleanor Fitzalan, married Henry de Percy, 1st Baron Percy, by whom she had issue.
    Alice died on 25 September 1292 and was buried in Haughmond Abbey, Shropshire. Her husband Richard died on 09/03/1301 and was buried alongside Alice. In 1341, provision was made for twelve candles to be burned beside their tombs.[2] The Abbey is now a ruin as the result of a fire during the English Civil War. Her many descendants included the Dukes of Norfolk, the English queen consorts of Henry VIII, Sir Winston Churchill, Diana, Princess of Wales, and the current British Royal Family.

    References

    ^ Jump up to: a b Cawley, Charles, Saluzzo, Medieval Lands database, Foundation for Medieval Genealogy,[better source needed]
    ^ Jump up to: a b The Complete Peerage, vol.1, page 241.[full citation needed]
    Jump up ^ Cawley, Charles, Earls of Arundel, Medieval Lands database, Foundation for Medieval Genealogy,[better source needed]

    Categories: 13th-century births1292 deathsPeople from SaluzzoWomen of medieval Italy

    end of biography

    Children of Alisona di Saluzzo and Richard FitzAlan Baron of Arundel are:

    i. Edmund FitzAlan 9th Earl of Arundel was born 1 MAY 1285 in Marlborough Castle, Marlborough, Wiltshire, England, and died 17 NOV 1326 in Hereford, Herefordshire, England. He married Alice Warenne 1305 in Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England, daughter of William de Warenne Earl of Surrey and Joan de Vere. She was born ABT 1286 in Warren, Sussex, England, and died BEF 23 MAY 1338.
    21. ii. Margaret FitzAlan was born 1302 in Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England. She married William 2nd Baron le Boteler Sir of Wemme in Shropshire, England, son of William 1st Baron le Boteler Sir of Wemme and Beatrice de Herdeburgh. He was born 8 SEP 1296 in Wem, Shropshire, England, and died DEC 1361 in Oversley, Alcester, Warwickshire, England.
    iii. Alice FitzAlan. She married Stephen 3rd Lord de Seagrave, son of John 2nd Baron de Segrave & Penn Sir and Christian de Plessis Heir of Stottesdon. He was born 1285 in Seagrave, Leicestershire, England, and died 1326.
    iv. Thomas FitzAlan Baron of Arundel.

    Children:
    1. Eleanor FitzAlan was born 0___ 1282; died 0___ 1328; was buried Beverley Minster, Yorkshire, England.
    2. 30. Edmund FitzAlan, Knight, 9th Earl of Arundel was born 1 May 1285, Marlborough Castle, Marlborough, Wiltshire, England; died 17 Nov 1326, Hereford, Herefordshire, England; was buried Haughmond Abbey, Shropshire, England.
    3. Alice FitzAlan was born 0___ 1291, Arundel, Sussex, England; died 7 Feb 1340, Northamptonshire, England; was buried Chacombe Priory, Chacombe, Northamptonshire, England.
    4. Margaret FitzAlan was born 1302, Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England.

  17. 62.  William de Warenne was born 9 Feb 1256, Lewes Castle, Lewes, East Sussex, England (son of John de Warenne, Knight, 6th Earl of Surrey and Alice de Lusignan); died 15 Dec 1296, Croydon, England.

    Notes:

    William de Warenne (9 February 1256 - 15 December 1286) was the only son of John de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey and his wife Alice de Lusignan.[1]

    Life

    William married Joan, daughter of Robert de Vere, 5th Earl of Oxford. They had the following children:

    John de Warenne, 7th Earl of Surrey (30 June 1286 – June 1347)
    Alice de Warenne (15 June 1287 - 23 May 1338), wife of Edmund FitzAlan, 9th Earl of Arundel.
    William was killed in a tournament at Croydon in 1286,[1] predeceasing his father. It has been suggested that this was murder, planned in advance by William's enemies.[2][3] On the 5th Earl's death the title went to John, the only son of William. John died without legitimate children, so on his death the title passed to Richard FitzAlan, 10th Earl of Arundel, eldest son of Edmund FitzAlan and John' sister Alice.

    William — Joan de Vere. [Group Sheet]


  18. 63.  Joan de Vere (daughter of Robert de Vere, Knight, 5th Earl of Oxford and Alice de Sanford).
    Children:
    1. John de Warenne, Knight, 7th Earl of Surrey was born 30 Jun 1286; died 0Jun 1347.
    2. 31. Alice de Warenne, Countess of Arundel was born 15 Jun 1287, Warren, Sussex, England; died 23 May 1338.


Generation: 7

  1. 72.  William le Scrope was born ~ 1259, Bolton, North Yorkshire, England; died ~ 1311.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Bailiff

    Notes:

    The great-great-great-grandson of Hugh was Sir William le Scrope (c.1259 – c. 1311) of Bolton, in Wensleydale, Yorkshire, who had two sons, Henry le Scrope (died 1336) and Geoffrey le Scrope (died 1340), both of whom were in succession chief justice of the king's bench and prominent supporters of the court in the reign of King Edward II of England.

    William — Constance Newsham. Constance (daughter of Thomas Newsham and Lucy FitzPeter, Baroness de Ros) was born 0___ 1249; died 0Dec 1320, Bracewell, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 73.  Constance Newsham was born 0___ 1249 (daughter of Thomas Newsham and Lucy FitzPeter, Baroness de Ros); died 0Dec 1320, Bracewell, Yorkshire, England.

    Notes:

    His mother was Constance, daughter and heiress of Thomas, son of Gillo de Newsham, variously described as of Newsham-on-Tees and of Newsham-on-Tyne.

    Children:
    1. Henry le Scrope, Knight was born Bef 1268, (Masham, Yorkshire, England); died 7 Sep 1336; was buried St Agatha's Abbey, Easby, Yorkshire, England.
    2. 36. Geoffrey le Scrope, Knight was born 0___ 1280, (Masham, Yorkshire, England); died 2 Dec 1340, Ghent, Belgium; was buried Coverham Abbey, North Yorkshire, England.

  3. 74.  William de Ros, Knight was born ~ 1244, (Yorkshire) England (son of William de Ros, Knight and Lucy FitzPeter, Baroness de Ros); died 0May 1310, (Yorkshire) England; was buried Greyfriars Abbey Church, King's Straith, York, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Residence: Ingmanthorpe, Yorkshire, England
    • Residence: Scotland
    • Residence: Gascony, France
    • Also Known As: Baron Ingmanthorpe
    • Also Known As: William de Roos

    Notes:

    Birth: unknown, England
    Death: May, 1310, England

    Knight of Ingmanthorpe in Kirk Deighton, Yorkshire, in right of his wife, of Greasley, Nottinghamshire, Ilkeston, Derbyshire.

    Third son of Sir William de Ros and Lucy FitzPeter, grandson of Sir Robert de Ros and Isabel of Scotland, Peter FitzHubert and Alice FitzRoger.

    Husband of Eustache FitzEalph, daughter and heiress of Sir Ralph FitzHugh of Greasley and the daughter of Sir John de la Haye, widow of Sir Nicholas de Cantelowe of Buckinghamshire. They married in 1268 and had one son and five daughters:
    * Sir William
    * Lucy
    * Isabel
    * Margaret
    * Ivette
    * Mary, the Prioress of Rosedale Priory

    Sir William served in Scotland 1257 and 1258, Gascony in 1294 and then Scotland in 1296. Sir William died shortly before May 28 1310, the date of his burial, and was buried beside his wife who died previously.

    The family surname is found both Ros and Roos.

    Family links:
    Parents:
    William de Ros (1192 - 1264)
    Lucy FitzPiers de Ros (1207 - 1267)

    Spouse:
    Eustache FitzRalph Ros

    Children:
    Ivetta De Ros Scrope (1285 - 1331)*

    Siblings:
    William de Ros (____ - 1310)
    Alice de Ros (____ - 1286)*
    Robert de Ros (1223 - 1285)*
    Lucy de Ros de Kyme (1230 - ____)*

    *Calculated relationship

    Burial:
    Greyfriars Abbey Church (Defunct)
    York
    York Unitary Authority
    North Yorkshire, England

    Created by: Anne Shurtleff Stevens
    Record added: Apr 02, 2013
    Find A Grave Memorial# 107743856

    Buried:
    Greyfriars Abbey Church (Defunct)

    William married Eustache FitzRalph 0___ 1268. Eustache was born England; died Bef 1310, England; was buried Greyfriars Abbey Church, King's Straith, York, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 75.  Eustache FitzRalph was born England; died Bef 1310, England; was buried Greyfriars Abbey Church, King's Straith, York, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Eustace FitzHugh

    Notes:

    Birth: unknown, England
    Death: unknown, England

    Eustache FitzHugh de Cantelowe de Ros

    Daughter and heiress of Sir Ralph FitzHugh of Greasley and the daughter of Sir John de la Haye. Of her own right of Greasley, Nottinghamshire, and of Ilkeston, Derbyshire.

    She was the wife of Sir Nicholas de Cantelowe of Buckinghamshire, who died after May 1262.

    Secondly wife of Sir William de Ros, third son of Sir William de Ros and Lucy FitzPeter. They married in 1268 and had one son and five daughters;
    * Sir William
    * Lucy
    * Isabel
    * Margaret
    * Ivette
    * Mary, the Prioress of Rosedale Priory

    Eustace was also the heir to her kinsman, Peter de la Haye of Arlington, Sussex. She died before her husband who died in May of 1310. They were buried together at GreyFriars, York.

    The family surname is found both Ros and Roos.

    Family links:
    Spouse:
    William de Ros (____ - 1310)*

    Children:
    Ivetta De Ros Scrope (1285 - 1331)*

    *Calculated relationship

    Burial:
    Greyfriars Abbey Church (Defunct)
    York
    York Unitary Authority
    North Yorkshire, England

    Created by: Anne Shurtleff Stevens
    Record added: Apr 03, 2013
    Find A Grave Memorial# 107756207

    Buried:
    Greyfriars Abbey Church (Defunct)

    Children:
    1. Lucia Ros was born ~ 1272; died ~ 1362.
    2. Isabel de Ros was born ~ 1276, Helmsley Castle, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1318, Cleveland, Yorkshire, England.
    3. 37. Ivette de Ros was born 0___ 1285, Ingmanthorpe, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1331; was buried Coverham Abbey, Coverham, Richmondshire, Yorkshire, England.

  5. 82.  William de Odingsells was born Abt 1211, Maxstoke, Warwick, England; died 19 Apr 1295, (Warwickshire) England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Justiciar of Ireland
    • Also Known As: William de Odyngsells

    William married Ela Fitzwalter, Countess of Warwick Abt 1257, Maxstoke, Warwick, England. Ela (daughter of Walter FitzRobert, Knight and Ida Longespee, II) was born ~ 1245, of Maxstoke and Solihull, Warwickshire, England; died 8 Feb 1297, Oseney Abbey, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England; was buried Oseney Abbey, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  6. 83.  Ela Fitzwalter, Countess of Warwick was born ~ 1245, of Maxstoke and Solihull, Warwickshire, England (daughter of Walter FitzRobert, Knight and Ida Longespee, II); died 8 Feb 1297, Oseney Abbey, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England; was buried Oseney Abbey, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alt Birth: Salisbury, Wiltshire, England

    Children:
    1. Ida Odingsells, Baroness of Clinton was born ~1275, Maxstoke, Warwick, England; was christened Amington, Warwick, England; died Aft 1 Mar 1321.
    2. 41. Margaret de Odingsells was born ~ 1276, Solihull, Warwickshire, England; died 17 Oct 1311, Rotherfield Greys, Oxfordshire, England.

  7. 84.  John Marmion, Knight, 3rd Baron Marmion of Winteringha (son of William Marmion, 2nd Baron Marmion of Winteringham and Lorette FitzRoy); died Bef 7 May 1322.

    Notes:

    John Marmion, Baron Marmion of Winteringham was an Anglo-Norman baron and descendant of King John who represented Lincolnshire in Parliament and fought in the Wars of Scottish Independence.

    Ancestry

    He was the son of William Marmion, 2nd Baron Marmion of Winteringham and his wife Lorette, daughter of Richard FitzRoy and granddaughter of King John.[2]

    Career and Life[edit]
    In 1276 John paid homage to the Abbot of Peterborough who granted him his father's lands.[3] He was distrained for knighthood in 1278.[4]

    Sir John served repeatedly in the Scottish War from 1291 to 1322.[3]

    He was summoned to the King's Councils on 8 Jun 1294, 26 Jan 1297 and from 26 Jul 1313 to 14 Mar 1322[2] and as a Knight of the Shire for Lincolnshire to York on 25 May 1298.[5]

    During the turbulence of 1314 that saw growing friction between Edward II, Piers Gaveston and Thomas, 2nd Earl of Lancaster and his large private army, Marmion became involved in trouble for reasons not immediately obvious. An arrest warrant was issued for both John and his son who lead a group of dozens of men on a raid upon the Abbot of Fountains Abbey's land at Aldeburgh and Balderby, Yorkshire.[6] Timber, two hundred sheep, fifty oxen and four carts were stolen and the Abbot's servants suffered kidnapping, beatings, cuts and had their beards plucked out.[6] The Abbot and his monks may not have been entirely innocent having themselves been accused of violent assault in 1307[6] and of stealing deer in 1316.[6]

    The dispute seems to have been overtaken by events and after the disastrous Battle of Bannockburn Marmion was summoned to defend the north against the rampant Scots.[5] Forgiveness was forthcoming and on 24 Sep 1314 he was granted licence to crenellate his mansion "the Hermitage" in his wood at Tanfield.[6]

    The King ordered Sir John to not go to the Earl of Lancaster's meeting of good peers on 29 Nov 1321.[3] He was then ordered to bring his forces to Coventry on 28 Feb 1322 to march against the Earl's adherents.[3] This culminated in the Battle of Boroughbridge on 16 March 1322.

    Sir John likely died at the battle, or shortly after, as on 7 May 1322[a] an Inquisition Post-Mortem was held to assess his estates in Yorkshire which established that he owned West Tanfield, Wath, Langeton and Wirton manors and one Knight's fee in Exelby.[7] A second Inquisition found he owned Quinton, Gloucestershire, Berwick and Wingeton in Sussex, Luddington and Castre in Northamptonshire and Willingham and Winteringham in Lincolnshire.[7]

    In addition to his manors John also held four Knight's fees at Wintringham and Wolingham, one at Keisby and a 1/4 at Trickingham and Stowe.[4]


    Family and descendants

    Sir John married Isabella (perhaps Peck?) and had the following children:

    John Marmion, (d.1335).
    John may have had other junior children including:

    Richard Marmion. Accused of cutting William Gentyl's right hand off at Gunthorpe, Lincolnshire in 1317.[8]

    Notes

    Jump up ^ This is the death date usually quoted by historians but none have explained why an Inquisition Post-Mortem was held for a John Marmion of Winteringham in 1295.[7] It is possible that John was held hostage in Scotland or became lost and an Inquisition was made prematurely. On the other hand it is feasible that instead of there being two generations of Winteringham Marmions called John there were actually three who died in 1295, 1322 and 1335.

    References

    Jump up ^ Burke 1884, p. 660
    ^ Jump up to: a b Nicolas 1857
    ^ Jump up to: a b c d Cokayne 1893
    ^ Jump up to: a b Harleian 1929
    ^ Jump up to: a b ParlWrits 1827.
    ^ Jump up to: a b c d e Patent Rolls 1232–1509.
    ^ Jump up to: a b c Caley 1806
    Jump up ^ Close Rolls 1224–1468.

    Bibliography

    Banks, Thomas Christopher (1844). Baronies in Fee. London: W. M. Harrison.
    Burke, Bernard (1884). Burkes General Armoury. London: Burkes.
    Curia Regis Rolls. London: HMSO. 1189–1250.
    Caley, John (1806). Calendarium Inquisitionum post mortem sive Escaetarum. 1. London: Record Commission.
    Cokayne, George Edward (1893). Complete Peerage. I. London: George Bell & Sons.
    Harleian (1929). The Knights of Edward I. I. London: Harleian Society.
    Nicolas, Nicholas Harris; Courthope, William (1857). Historic Peerage of England. London: John Murray.
    Palmer, Charles Ferrers R. (1875). History of the Baronial Family of Marmion, Lords of the Castle of Tamworth, etc. Tamworth: J. Thompson.
    Close Rolls. Westminster: Parliament of England. 1224–1468.
    Patent Rolls. Westminster: Parliament of England. 1232–1509.
    Parliamentary Writs. London: Public Record Office. 1827. p. 417.
    Stapleton, Thomas (1844). Magni Rotuli Scaccarii Normannias. London: Society of Antiquaries.

    External links

    Marmion Tombs in Winteringham Church
    Possible site of Marmion Hermitage Manor House at West Tanfield
    Marmion Tower/Gatehouse at West Tanfield

    John — Isabella (Peck). [Group Sheet]


  8. 85.  Isabella (Peck)
    Children:
    1. 42. John Marmion, Knight, 4th Baron of Winteringham was born 0___ 1292; died 0___ 1335.

  9. 100.  Robert de Ufford, I, 1st Lord Ufford was born 11 Jun 1279, Parham & Wickham, Suffolk, England; died 9 Sep 1316, Woodbridge, Suffolk, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Justiciar of Ireland

    Notes:

    Biography

    Father Sir Robert de Ufford, Justiciar of Ireland, Justice of Chester d. c 9 Sep 1298

    Mother Mary d. bt 10 Aug 1280 - 1285


    Sir Robert Ufford, 1st Lord Ufford was born on 11 June 1279 at of Parham & Wickham, Suffolk, England. [1]

    He married Cecily de Valoines, daughter of Sir Robert Valoines, Lord Walsham and Eve de Criketot, before 1298.[2]

    Sir Robert Ufford, 1st Lord Ufford died circa 9 September 1316.[3]


    Family

    Cecily de Valoines b. c 1281, d. 16 Jul 1325

    Children


    Sir Ralph de Ufford, Justiciary of Ireland, Constable of Corfe Castle d. 9 Apr 1346
    Eva de Ufford d. a May 1370
    William de Ufford d. 1382
    Joan de Ufford d. a 8 Oct 1319
    Sir Robert de Ufford, 1st Earl Suffolk, 2nd Lord Ufford b. 9 Aug 1298, d. 4 Nov 1369

    Sources

    ? Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. I, p. 362.
    ? Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. I, p. 389.
    ? Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. II, p. 60
    http://knight-france.com/geneal/names/2421.htm

    Robert married Cecily Valoines Bef 1298. Cecily (daughter of Robert de Valoines, II, Lord of Walsham & Icksworth and Eve de Criketot) was born ~ 1281, Walsham, Suffolkshire, England; died 16 Jul 1325, Thurston, Suffolk, England. [Group Sheet]


  10. 101.  Cecily Valoines was born ~ 1281, Walsham, Suffolkshire, England (daughter of Robert de Valoines, II, Lord of Walsham & Icksworth and Eve de Criketot); died 16 Jul 1325, Thurston, Suffolk, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Cecily Valoines

    Notes:

    Married:
    He married Cecily de Valoines, daughter of Sir Robert Valoines, Lord Walsham and Eve de Criketot, before 1298.

    Children:
    1. Joan Ufford was born 0___ 1290; died 10 Apr 1319.
    2. 50. Robert de Ufford, (II), Knight, 1st Earl of Suffolk was born 9 Aug 1298, Ufford, Suffolk, England; died 4 Nov 1369, (Suffolk, Suffolkshire, England).

  11. 102.  Walter de Norwich, Knight was born ~ 1274, Walsingham, Norfolkshire, England (son of Geoffrey Norwich and Cecily Valoines); died 20 Jan 1329, Wangford, Suffolk, England; was buried Raveningham, Norfolkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Burial: Norwich Cathedral, Norwich, Norfolkshire, England
    • Occupation: Chief Baron of the Exchequer
    • Also Known As: Lord Norwich

    Notes:

    Biography

    Birth: Between 1250-1280

    Died: Between 1326-1329

    Arms: Per pale gules and azure, a lion rampant ermine.

    He was summoned to Parliament as Lord Norwich by Edward II in 1314.

    Residence: Sculthorpe, Norfolk, England

    Burke's A General and Heraldic Dictionary of Peerages p. 402: Walter de Norwich, who in the 5th of Edward II, was made one of the Barons of the Exchequer, and at the same time obtained a charter of free warren in all his demense lands. In some years afterwards he was made treasure of the exchequer, and had a grant of the manors of Dalham and Bradenfield, with the advowson of the church of Dalham, in Suffolk. He was a learned judge, and died in 2 Edward III. He was succeeded by his son, Sir John de Norwick, Knight.

    WALTER DE NORWICH had a protection February 1297, and, as the King's clerk, in December 129 9 licence to inclose a lane adjoining his messuage in Norwich. He was Remembrancer of the Exc hequer, March 1307/8, appointed a Baron, August 1311; Chief Baron, March 1311/2; Treasurer (a fter serving several periods as deputy Treasurer), September 1314 to May 1317. In 1315, for h is good services as Treasurer, he had a grant of 1,000 marks, to maintain his state more hono urably in the King's service. Keeper of the office of the Treasurer, November 1319 to Februar y following, and again in 1321, 1322, and 1324. He was summoned to Councils at York and Linco ln, January and June 1312, and (among the justices) to Parliaments, July 1312 onwards. As far mer of the custody of the lands of Thomas de Cailly, during the minority of the heir, he wa s Keeper of Buckenham Castle, August 1316 till September 1325. In July 1322 he was a member o f the commission to try the Mortimers, and in 1324 was returned by the sheriff of Norfolk a s summoned to attend the Great Council at Westminster. He m. Catherine, da. of Sir John DE HEDERSETE, and widow of Piers BRAUNCHE. He died between 1 2 April 1328 and 20 February 1328/9, and was buried in Norwich Cathedral. His widow had wri t for dower, and died between January 1340/1 and October 1343. [CP 9:762-3]


    Sir Walter Yorwich Yorwich ... [1]


    Sources

    Julia Dickinson, firsthand knowledge. Click the Changes tab for the details of edits by Julia and others.
    ? Entered by Julia Dickinson, Jun 28, 2012

    Biography

    NORWICH, Sir WALTER de (d. 1329), chief baron of the exchequer, was son of Geoffrey de Norwich, and perhaps a descendant of that Geoffrey de Norwich who in 1214 fell under John's displeasure (Matt. Paris, ii. 537). A Geoffrey de Norwich ‘clericus’ represented Norwich in parliament in 1306 (Returns of Members of Parliament, i. 22). The first reference to Walter de Norwich is as holding the manor of Stoke, Norfolk, in 1297. He was in the royal service in the exchequer; on 15 March 1308 he occurs as remembrancer; on 7 Aug. he was placed on a commission of oyer and terminer in Suffolk; and on 24 Nov. as clerk of the exchequer (Cal. Close Rolls, pp. 57, 131). On 29 Aug. 1311 he was appointed a baron of the exchequer, but resigned this position on 23 Oct. in order to act as lieutenant of the treasurer; on 3 March 1312 he was reappointed a baron of the exchequer, and on 8 March was made chief baron. A week later Norwich ceased to act as lieutenant of the treasurer, but on 17 May he was again directed to act in that capacity while retaining his post as chief baron, and thus he continued till 4 Oct. (Parl. Writs). On 30 Sept., when sitting in London, Norwich refused to admit the new sheriffs, as one of them was absent (Chron. Edw. I. and Edw. II. i. 218). In December 1313 he was appointed to supervise the collection of the twentieth and fifteenth in London (Fśdera, ii. 159), and in July 1314 was a justice of oyer and terminer in Norfolk and Suffolk (Parl. Writs, ii. 79). On 26 Sept. he was appointed treasurer, and two days later resigned his office as chief baron. Norwich resigned the treasurership on 27 May 1317 through illness; but before long he resumed his post at the exchequer apparently as chief baron, for he is so styled on 9 June 1320, though on some occasions he is referred to as baron simply. On 22 Dec. 1317 he was employed to inquire into the petitions of certain cardinals (Fśdera, ii. 349). In April 1318 Norwich, as one of the barons of the exchequer, was present at the council or parliament held at Leicester to endeavour to effect a reconciliation between the king and Thomas of Lancaster. In May he was appointed to treat with Robert, count of Flanders, regarding the injury done to English merchants; and in November he was one of the justices for the trial of sheriffs and others for oppression in Norfolk and Suffolk. On 25 Feb. 1319 he sat as one of the barons of the exchequer at the Guildhall, London (Chron. Edw. I. and Edw. II. i. 285). From 6 Nov. 1319 to 18 Feb. 1320 Norwich was once more lieutenant for the treasurer; both in this year and in 1321 he appears as a justice for the counties of Essex, Suffolk, and Norfolk. In 1321 he was keeper of the treasury, and in July 1322, after the fall of Thomas of Lancaster, was one of the judges appointed for the trial of the two Roger Mortimers of Chirk and Wigmore. Norwich continued in office during the reign of Edward II; in the next reign he was reappointed chief baron on 2 Feb. 1327, in spite of his share in the condemnation of the Mortimers, the sentence on whom was cancelled on 27 March 1327. He was employed in May 1328 to inquire into the complaints of the weavers of Norwich, and in November to settle the differences between the abbot and townsmen of St. Edmund's (Pat. Rolls, Edw. III, 141, 297, 353). Norwich died in 1329, and was buried in Norwich Cathedral. Dugdale says that Norwich was summoned to parliament as a baron in 1314, but not at any other time. This is an error; for, though Norwich attended parliament in this and in other years as one of the barons of the exchequer, he was never summoned as a baron of parliament. Norwich married between 1295 and 1304 Catherine, daughter of John de Hedersett, and widow of Peter Braunche. She survived her second husband, and was living in 1349. By her Norwich had three sons: John, who is separately noticed; Roger (d. 1372); and Thomas whose daughter, Catherine de Brewse, was in 1375 declared heiress to her cousin John, a great-grandson of Walter de Norwich. Walter de Norwich had also a daughter Margaret, who married, first, Sir Thomas Cailey; and, secondly, Robert Ufford, earl of Suffolk; her descendants by the second marriage were her father's eventual heirs. The Norwich family had large estates in Norfolk, Suffolk, Lincolnshire, and Hertfordshire.


    [Chronicles of Edward I and Edward II (Rolls Ser.); Fśdera, Record ed.; Cal. of Close Rolls Edward II, 1307–18, and Patent Rolls Edward III, 1327–30; Palgrave's Parl. Writs, iv. 1237–9; Madox Hist. of Exchequer, i. 75, ii. 49, 84; Blomefield's Hist. of Norfolk, iii. 76, iv. 39, 164, v. 126, 129, 138, 522, vi. 137, viii. 52–3, 55, ed. 1812; Dugdale's Baronage, ii. 90–1; Foss's Judges of England, iii. 469–71.]

    Sources

    ? Entered by Julia Dickinson, Jun 28, 2012
    http://www.thepeerage.com/p19904.htm
    http://books.google.com/books?id=SfApAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA229&lpg=PA229&dq=Catherine+de+Hedersett&source=bl&ots=4z-ZssVGNd&sig=tI75FAdmMH_rSlfXtDagU1xbNqs&hl=en&ei=WN7XS4z6KpKksgOu7fWyBg&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=4&ved=0CAwQ6AEwAzgK#v=onepage&q=Catherine%20de%20Hedersett&f=false ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    *

    bullet Sources, Comments and Notes

    [There is much confusion and differing opinion on Katherine's parentage who married Robert de Scales. If her father was a "Norwich", who was her father's name: John or Walter ?]


    Source :

    "Sir William de la Pole (died 21 June 1366) ...

    Descendants and legacy

    William de la Pole married Katherine, daughter of Sir Walter de Norwich, ..."
    ..........................................
    Robert de Ufford, 1st Earl of Suffolk, KG (9 August 1298 \endash 4 November 1369) was an English peer. He was created Earl of Suffolk in 1337. ...

    In 1334 he married Margaret Norwich (d. 2 April 1368), daughter of Sir Walter Norwich (d.1329), Treasurer of the Exchequer, and Catherine de Hedersete, by whom he had a large family,
    ________________________
    Source Par Jennifer C. Ward:
    "... Most of the other household accounts which survive were drawn up for widows, and the households range from the widows of knights to those of women of the highest standing. Katherine de Norwich, whose roll of household expenses survives for 1336-7, was the widow of Sir Walter de Norwich, chief baron of the exchequer and acting treasurer at various times under Edward II. ..."
    ________________________
    Source Par Francis Blomefield,Charles Parkin:
    "... After this, I find no mention of it till 1313, when Margery, relict of Roger Cosyn of Norwich, granted it to Sir Walter de Norwich, and Catherine his wife, and their heirs, and by a fine levied in 1316, it appears that Margery had only her life in it, for then Walter de Norwich and Katerine his wife settled it on Tho. de Caily and Margaret his wife and their heirs; for lack of which it was to return to Walter and his heirs; ..."
    _______________________
    Source Par Alfred Suckling:
    "In the reign of Edward I., Sir John de Norwich was lord, and obtained from that monarch, in 1302, a grant of free-warren in Mettingham, Shipmeadow, Redesham, &c In the ninth of Edward II., Walter de Norwich held it, and in the reign of Edward III. it was the manor of Sir John de Norwich, the same who built the castle. He died in 1361, when the manor devolved to his grandson, also named Sir John, who dying at Mettingham Castle, in 1373, appointed his body to be buried at Raveningham, by the side of his father, Sir Walter, ..."

    "... In the thirty-seventh of Henry III. occurs R. de Norwico, Chancellor of Ireland; and in the fifth of Edward II.7 we meet with Walter de Norwich, one of the Barons of the Exchequer, constituted locum tenens of the Treasurer till the King could provide one. On the 25th of October in the same year, he was admitted one of the Privy Council, and in 1314 summoned to Parliament. Two years afterwards he was appointed Chief Baron of the Exchequer, and in the twentieth of the same reign made locum tenens of William de Melton, Archbishop of York, and Treasurer to the King. This distinguished member of the family married Katharine, daughter of John, and sister to Sir Simon de Hetherset, and was father of Sir John de Norwich, his no less distinguished son, who founded Mettingham Castle. ..."
    _______________________
    Source Par Alfred Suckling:
    "Sir John de Norwich, Lord of Mettingham, temp. Edw. I. =
    - Sir Walter de Norwich.= Katharine Hetherset
    - Sir Roger de Norwich.
    - Sir Thomaa de Norwich. =
    - Catharine de Norwich = ___ De Brews
    - Sir John de Norwich, built Mettingham Castle, ob. 1361 = Margaret.
    - Waller tie Norwich, died in his father's lifetime. = Wolirna Stapleton, of Bedale, Yorkshire.
    - Margaret de Norwich = Robert de Ufford, earl of Suffolk. ..."
    ________________________________
    Source Par Thomas Christopher Banks:
    "In the time of king John, Geffery De Norwich was in rebellion against that king. From whom descended, as presumed, Walter De Norwich, one of the barons of the exchequer, and summoned to parliament the 8th Edward II. but no more.
    To whom succeeded Sir John De Norwich, knight, who was in the wars of France and Scotland; and had summons to parliament, the 16th and 34th Edward III. but no more.
    His successor was John, his grandson (viz. son of Walter, who died in his lifetime); which John, the 46th Edward III. making proof of his age, had livery of his lands; and being afterwards a knight, died the 38th Edward III. leaving Catherine de Brews, daughter of Thomas, brother to John, his grandfather, his cousin, and next heir; but she becoming a nun at Dartford, in Kent, William de Ufford, earl of Suffolk, son of Margaret, sister of Thomas de Norwich, father of the said Catherine, was found to be her next heir; and accordingly had livery of the inheritance. ..."


    Walter married Dame Catherine DE HETHERSET, De Norwich [3913]. (Dame Catherine DE HETHERSET, De Norwich [3913] was born in , , England and died after 1337 in , , England.)

    *

    Walter — Catherine de Hadersete. Catherine died Aft 1337, (Norfolkshire) England. [Group Sheet]


  12. 103.  Catherine de Hadersete died Aft 1337, (Norfolkshire) England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Catherine de Hederset
    • Also Known As: Catherine de Hetherset

    Notes:

    Sources, Comments and Notes

    [There is much confusion and differing opinion on Katherine's parentage
    If her father was a "Norwich", who was her father's name: John or Walter ?]

    Source Par Jennifer C. Ward:
    "... Most of the other household accounts which survive were drawn up for widows, and the households range from the widows of knights to those of women of the highest standing. Katherine de Norwich, whose roll of household expenses survives for 1336\emdash 7, was the widow of Sir Walter de Norwich, chief baron of the exchequer and acting treasurer at various times under Edward II. ..."
    ___________________________
    Source Par Alfred Suckling:
    "... In the thirty-seventh of Henry III. occurs R. de Norwico, Chancellor of Ireland; and in the fifth of Edward II.7 we meet with Walter de Norwich, one of the Barons of the Exchequer, constituted locum tenens of the Treasurer till the King could provide one. On the 25th of October in the same year, he was admitted one of the Privy Council, and in 1314 summoned to Parliament. Two years afterwards he was appointed Chief Baron of the Exchequer, and in the twentieth of the same reign made locum tenens of William de Melton, Archbishop of York, and Treasurer to the King. This distinguished member of the family married Katharine, daughter of John, and sister to Sir Simon de Hetherset, and was father of Sir John de Norwich, his no less distinguished son, who founded Mettingham Castle. ..."
    __________________________
    Source :

    "Sir William de la Pole (died 21 June 1366) ...

    Descendants and legacy

    William de la Pole married Katherine, daughter of Sir Walter de Norwich, ..."
    ..........................................

    Robert de Ufford, 1st Earl of Suffolk, KG (9 August 1298 - 4 November 1369) was an English peer. He was created Earl of Suffolk in 1337. ...

    In 1334 he married Margaret Norwich (d. 2 April 1368), daughter of Sir Walter Norwich (d.1329), Treasurer of the Exchequer, and Catherine de Hedersete, by whom he had a large family, ..."
    ____________________________
    Source publiâe par Carole Rawcliffe, Richard Wilson:
    "... Katherine was the widow of Sir Walter de Norwich (d. 1329), a former treasurer of the exchequer. She had rights of dower in a number of Norfolk and Suffolk manors, the closest to Norwich being Blackworth, about five miles from the city in the parishes of Stoke Holy Cross and Howe. Her household accounts survive from late September 1336. After periods of residence at Mettingham, Suffolk, and Blackworth, she moved to Norwich in January 1337 and remained there until at least the end of April, when the detailed accounts cease. Her stay included the anniversary of Sir Walter's death on 20 January when she held a great dinner costing almost a sixth of the expenditure recorded in the whole seven months. ..."


    Catherine married Sir Walter DE NORWICH, Knt., Chief Baron Of The Exchequer [3912], son of John DE NORWICH [4984] and Unknown. (Sir Walter DE NORWICH, Knt., Chief Baron Of The Exchequer [3912] was born in , , England, died on 20 Jan 1329 in , , England and was buried in Raveningham, Norfolk, England.)

    Children:
    1. 51. Margaret Norwich was born 0___ 1286, Mettingham, Suffolk, England; died 2 Apr 1368.
    2. Katherine de Norwich was born ~ 1306; died 28 Jan 1382.

  13. 108.  William de Ros, Knight, 1st Baron de Ros of Hamlake was born ~ 1255, Helmsley Castle, Yorkshire, England (son of Robert de Ros, Knight and Isabel d'Aubigny); died 8 Aug 1316, Youlton, Yorkshire, England; was buried Kirkham, Yorkshire, England.

    Notes:

    William de Ros or Roos, 1st Baron de Ros of Helmsley (c.1255 – 6 or 8 August 1316), was one of the claimants of the crown of Scotland in 1292 during the reign of Edward I.[2]

    Family

    William de Ros was the eldest son of Robert de Ros (d. 17 May 1285) of Helmsley, Yorkshire, and Isabel d'Aubigny (c.1233 – 15 June 1301), daughter and heiress of William D'Aubigny of Belvoir, Leicestershire, and granddaughter of William d'Aubigny.[3] He had four brothers and three sisters:[4]

    Sir Robert de Ros of Gedney, Lincolnshire.
    John de Ros.
    Nicholas de Ros, a cleric.
    Peter de Ros, a cleric.
    Isabel de Ros, who married Walter de Fauconberg, 2nd Baron Fauconberg.
    Joan de Ros, who married John Lovell, 1st Baron Lovell.
    Mary de Ros, who married William de Braose, 1st Baron Braose.

    Career

    On 24 December 1264 William's father, Robert de Ros (d.1285), was summoned to Simon de Montfort's Parliament in London as Robert de Ros,[5] and for some time it was considered that the barony was created by writ in that year, and that Robert de Ros was the 1st Baron Ros. According to The Complete Peerage:

    In 1616 the barony of De Ros was allowed precedence from this writ [of 24 December 1264], a decision adopted by the Lords in 1806 (Round, Peerage and Pedigree, vol. i, pp. 249-50); but these writs, issued by Simon in the King's name, are no longer regarded as valid for the creation of peerages.[6]

    Accordingly, the barony is now considered to have been created when William de Ros was summoned to Parliament from 6 February 1299 to 16 October 1315 by writs directed Willelmo de Ros de Hamelak.[7]

    William de Ros succeeded to the family honours and estates on the death of his mother. He was an unsuccessful competitor for the crown of Scotland, founding his claim on his descent from his great grandmother, Isabel, a bastard daughter of William I of Scotland. He was buried at Kirkham Priory. He was involved in the wars of Gascony and Scotland.[8] He discovered that Robert De Ros, Lord of Werke, intended to give up his castle to the Scots. William notified the king of this, who sent him with a thousand men to defend that place. The place was then forfeited because of the treason of Robert De Ros. William De Ros then took possession of it. William was appointed warden of the west Marches of Scotland.[8]

    Through his marriage to Maud de Vaux the patronage of Penteney and Blakeney Priories in Norfolk and of Frestun in Lincolnshire came into the De Ros family. A video relating to relics found belonging to William de Ros and the Battle of Falkirk can be seen on YouTube under the title "braveheart battle camp metal detecting uk".

    Marriage and issue

    William de Ros married, before 1287, Maud de Vaux (born c.1261), younger daughter and coheiress of John De Vaux, by whom he had four sons and three daughters.[9]

    William de Ros, 2nd Baron de Ros.
    Sir John de Ros (d. before 16 November 1338), who married Margaret de Goushill (d. 29 July 1349).
    Thomas de Ros.
    George de Ros.
    Agnes de Ros, who married firstly Sir Pain de Tibetot, and secondly Sir Thomas de Vere.
    Alice de Ros, who married Sir Nicholas de Meinill. Their daughter, Elizabeth de Meinill, married Sir John Darcy, 2nd Lord Darcy of Knayth.
    Margaret de Ros.

    Footnotes:

    Jump up ^ Debrett's Peerage, 1968, p.347
    Jump up ^ http://www.celtic-casimir.com/webtree/13/24725.htm
    Jump up ^ Cokayne 1949, p. 96; Richardson I 2011, pp. 69–73; Richardson III 2011, pp. 447–8.
    Jump up ^ Richardson III 2011, pp. 447–8.
    Jump up ^ Cokayne 1949, p. 95; Richardson III 2011, p. 448.
    Jump up ^ Cokayne 1949, p. 95.
    Jump up ^ Cokayne 1949, p. 97; Richardson III 2011, p. 448.
    ^ Jump up to: a b Burke, John (1831). A general and heraldic dictionary of the peerages of England, Ireland, and Scotland, extinct, dormant, and in abeyance. England. Oxford University
    Jump up ^ Richardson III 2011, pp. 448–51.

    References:

    Cokayne, George Edward (1949). The Complete Peerage, edited by Geoffrey H. White. XI. London: St. Catherine Press.
    Richardson, Douglas (2011). Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, ed. Kimball G. Everingham. I (2nd ed.). Salt Lake City. ISBN 1449966373
    Richardson, Douglas (2011). Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, ed. Kimball G. Everingham. III (2nd ed.). Salt Lake City. ISBN 144996639X

    Birth:
    Map & History ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helmsley_Castle

    William — Maud de Vaux. [Group Sheet]


  14. 109.  Maud de Vaux
    Children:
    1. 54. William de Ros, Knight, 2nd Baron de Ros was born 0___ 1288, Helmsley, Yorkshire, England; died 3 Feb 1343, Kirkham, Yorkshire, England; was buried Kirkham Priory, Kirkham, North Yorkshire, England.
    2. Alice de Ros was born Abt 1310, Helmsley Castle, Yorkshire, England; died Bef 4 Jul 1344, Stokesley, Yorkshire, England.

  15. 110.  Bartholomew de Badlesmere, Knight, 1st Baron BadlesmereBartholomew de Badlesmere, Knight, 1st Baron Badlesmere was born 18 Aug 1275, Blean, Canterbury, Kent, England (son of Gunselm de Badlesmere and Joan LNU); died 14 Apr 1322, Blean, Canterbury, Kent, England.

    Notes:

    Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 1st Baron Badlesmere (circa 1275 - 14 April 1322), English soldier, diplomat, Member of Parliament, landowner and nobleman, was the son and heir of Gunselm de Badlesmere (died circa 1301). He fought in the English army both in France and Scotland during the later years of the reign of Edward I of England[2] and the earlier part of the reign of Edward II of England. He was executed after participating in an unsuccessful rebellion led by the Earl of Lancaster.

    Career

    The earliest records of Bartholomew's life relate to his service in royal armies, which included campaigns in Gascony (1294), Flanders (about 1297) and Scotland (1298, 1300, 1301-4, 1306, 1307, 1308, 1310–11, 1314, 1315 and 1319).[3] However, even at a relatively young age his activities were not limited to soldiering. In October 1300, was one of the household of Henry de Lacy, Earl of Lincoln who were permitted by the King to accompany the Earl when he set out for Rome during the following month in order to complain to Pope Boniface VIII of injury done by the Scots.[4][5]

    A writ issued on 13 April 1301, presumably soon after the death of Jocelin (Guncelinis, Goscelinus) de Badlesmere, initiated inquests into the identity of the next heir of lands that he held direct from the King. This led to a hearing on 30 April of that year in relation to property in Kent at Badlesmere and Donewelleshethe, where it was confirmed that the heir was his son Bartholomew, then aged 26.[6]

    Bartholomew de Badlesmere and Fulk Payfrer were the knights who represented the county of Kent at the Parliament that sat at Carlisle from January 1306/7 until 27 March 1307.[7] Also in 1307 Bartholomew was appointed governor of Bristol Castle.[2] In that role he took charge of the subjugation of the city when it defied royal authority in 1316.[8]

    In 1310, Bartholomew acted as deputy Constable of England on behalf of the Earl of Hereford.[9] Bartholomew served as his lieutenant when Hereford refused to perform his duties in the Scottish campaign of 1310-11.[10] He was one of the retinue of the Earl of Gloucester at the Battle of Bannockburn on 24 June 1314, Bartholomew's own sub-retinue consisting of at least 50 men.[10] He was criticised for not coming to his aid when Gloucester lost his life in an impetuous attack on the Scottish sheltron on that occasion.[11]

    In the following January, Bartholomew was one of the many notables who attended the funeral of Piers Gaveston.[12]

    On 28 April 1316, Bartholomew was one of four men who were authorised to grant safe conducts in the King's name to Robert Bruce and other Scots so that they could come to England to negotiate a truce. In December of that year, he was commissioned, along with the Bishop of Ely and the Bishop of Norwich to go on an embassy to Pope John XXII at Avignon to seek his help against the Scots and request a Bull to release the King from his oath to the Ordinances.[13] In June of the same year, Bartholomew's daughter Elizabeth married Edward, the son and heir of Roger Mortimer. Elizabeth's father was sufficiently wealthy to pay ą2,000 for the marriage, in exchange for which extensive property was settled on the bride.[14]

    On 1 November 1317, the King appointed Bartholomew as custodian of Leeds Castle in Kent [15] This was followed by a transaction on 20 March 1317/18 by which the King granted the castle and manor of Leeds along with the advowson of the priory of Leeds to Bartholomew and his heirs in exchange for the manor and advowson of Adderley, Shropshire, which Bartholomew surrendered to the King [16]

    By late November 1317, Bartholomew made a compact with a number of noblemen and prelates, including the Earl of Pembroke, the Earl of Hereford and the Archbishop of Canterbury with the aim of reducing the influence on the King of advisors of whom they disapproved.[17] Bartholomew and his associates formed a loose grouping which has been referred to by modern historians as the "Middle Party", who detested alike Edward's minions, like the Despensers, and his violent enemies like Lancaster. However, although he was very hostile to Thomas, Earl of Lancaster, Bartholomew helped to make peace between the king and the earl in 1318.[2]

    On 1 October 1318, Bartholomew was with the King at York, setting out to repel an invasion by the Scots.[18] Nineteen days later, he was appointed as the King's household steward in place of William Montagu. This position was of major importance, as it provided continual access to the King's presence and considerable influence over who else could obtain access to him.[19] Bartholomew was still holding this appointment in June 1321. Financial grants that he received during this period included ą500 on appointment as steward and over ą1,300 in October 1319.[20]

    In 1319, Bartholomew obtained the king's licence to found a priory on his manor of Badlesmere, but the proposed priory was never established.[21] In June of the following year, he hosted a splendid reception at Chilham Castle for Edward II and his entourage when they were travelling to Dover en route for France.[22] Also in 1320, he was granted control of Dover Castle and Wardenship of the Cinque Ports and in 1321 was appointed governor of Tunbridge Castle.

    During the earlier part of 1321, Bartholomew, along with the Bishop of Worcester and the Bishop of Carlisle and others represented the King in unsuccessful negotiations with the Scots for either a permanent peace or an extended truce.[23]

    Rebellion

    By the summer of 1321, Bartholomew defied the King by associating with their mutual enemy the Earl of Lancaster and his allies in their active opposition to Edward's "evil councillors" such as the Despensers. The Lancastrian forces moved from the North to London, reaching the capital by the end of July.

    In the autumn, the King started to apply pressure targeted on Bartholomew, probably partly because many of his manors were closer to London than those of magnates such as Lancaster and partly because of anger at the disloyalty of his own household steward. Edward took control of Dover Castle and forbade Bartholomew entrance to the county of Kent, an injunction that he promptly breached. Bartholomew then returned to Witney, Oxfordshire, where a tournament attended by many of his new allies was being held. When returning to London from a pilgrimage to Canterbury, the Queen did not take the most direct route but detoured to Leeds Castle, where she demanded access, precipitating the siege and its aftermath that is described in detail in the article about Bartholomew's wife. Although Bartholomew assembled an armed force and marched from Witney towards Kent, by the time he reached Kingston upon Thames it was clear that he would not receive help from Lancaster and his followers and so he was not able to take effective action to relieve the siege.[24] During the following months, civil war broke out.

    On 26 December 1321, the King ordered the sheriff of Gloucester to arrest Bartholomew.[25] Shortly afterwards, the King offered safe conducts to the rebels who would come over to him, with the specific exception of Bartholomew de Badlesmere.[26]

    Details contained in arrest warrants signpost the progress of Bartholomew and his companions across England. By 15 January 1321/2, they had occupied and burned the town of Bridgnorth and sacked the castles at Elmley and Hanley.[27] By 23 February, the rebels had been sighted in Northamptonshire.[28] On 1 March, Bartholomew was reported as one of a number of prominent rebels who had reached Pontefract.[29] On 11 March the sheriff of Nottingham and Derby was ordered to arrest the same group, who had taken Burton upon Trent but they departed from that town when the royal army approached.[30]

    On 16 March 1321/2, the Earl of Lancaster and his allies were defeated at the Battle of Boroughbridge.

    Death

    Bartholomew fled south from Boroughbridge and, according to the "Livere de Reis", was captured in a small wood near Brickden and taken by the Earl of Mar to Canterbury.[31] Alternative details appear in John Leland's "Collectanea", which states that "Syr Barptolemew Badelesmere was taken at Stow Parke yn the Manoyr of the Bishop of Lincoln that was his nephew."[32] Stow Park is about 10 miles north-west of the centre of Lincoln, where the current bishop was Henry Burghersh. Stow Park was one of the principal residences of the Bishop in that era but none of the medieval buildings still survive above ground.[33] The identity of "Brickden" is uncertain but may well refer to Buckden, Huntingdonshire, another place where the Bishop of Lincoln had a manor house (Buckden Towers). If so, that may be the reason for the differing accounts of the place that Bartholomew had reached when he was arrested, as they both featured residences of his nephew.

    Bartholomew was tried at Canterbury on 14 April 1322 and sentenced to death. On the same day he was drawn for three miles behind a horse to Blean, where he held property.[34] There he was hanged and beheaded. His head was displayed on the Burgh Gate at Canterbury and the rest of his body left hanging at Blean. There is probably remained for quite some time, as it was not until the Lent Parliament of 1324 that the prelates successfully petitioned for the bodies of the nobles still hanging on the gallows to be given ecclesiastical burial.[35] In a book that was first published in 1631, the antiquary John Weever stated that Bartholomew was buried at White Friars, Canterbury;[36] this was a community of the Order of St Augustine.[37]

    Property

    By the latter part of his life, Bartholomew possessed a vast portfolio of properties, either in his own right or jointly with his wife Margaret. These assets were forfeited because of Bartholomew’s rebellion. During the first four years of reign of Edward III, a series of inquisitions post mortem established the properties to which Margaret was entitled and also those of which her son Giles would be the right heir. Much of the property was restored to Bartholomew’s widow or assigned to Giles, who at that juncture was still a minor in the King’s wardship.[38]

    Some of the properties that Bartholomew held are listed below; the list is not exhaustive and he did not necessarily hold all of them at the same time.

    Bedfordshire: The manor of Sondyington (i.e. Sundon).
    Buckinghamshire: The manor of Hambleden. Also the manors of Cowley and Preston, both of which were in the parish of Preston Bissett.
    Essex: The manors of Chingford, Latchley (i.e. Dagworth Manor at Pebmarsh), Little Stambridge and Thaxted.
    Gloucestershire: The manor of Oxenton.
    Herefordshire: The manor of Lenhales and Lenhales Castle at Lyonshall.
    Hertfordshire: The manors of Buckland, Mardleybury (at Welwyn) and Plashes (at Standon).
    Kent: The manors of Badlesmere, Bockingfold (north of Goudhurst), Chilham, Hothfield, Kingsdown, Lesnes, Rydelyngwelde (i.e. Ringwould), Tonge and Whitstable. Bartholomew’s possessions in this county included Chilham Castle and Leeds Castle.
    Oxfordshire: The manor of Finmere.
    Shropshire: The manors of Adderley and Ideshale (at Shifnal).
    Suffolk: The manors of Barrow and Brendebradefeld (i.e. Bradfield Combust).
    Sussex: The manors of Eastbourne and Laughton. Also reversions of the manors of Drayton, Etchingham and West Dean.
    Wiltshire: The manors of Castle Combe, Knook, Orcheston and West Heytesbury
    The relevant inquisitions post mortem also contain details of numerous advowsons and other property rights that Bartholomew owned.

    Family

    Bartholomew married Margaret, the widow of Gilbert de Umfraville. The marriage had taken place by 30 June 1308, when the couple were jointly granted the manor of Bourne, Sussex.[39] Margaret was a daughter of Thomas de Clare and his wife Juliana FitzGerald.[40] A comprehensive overview of their children can be seen in the records of numerous inquisitions post mortem that were held after the death of their son Giles on 7 June 1338.[41] The evidence given at each hearing rested on local knowledge and there were some inconsistencies about the names of Giles' sisters and their precise ages. However, taken as a whole, it is clear from the inquisition records that the names of Bartholomew's children were as follows, listed in descending order of age:

    Margery de Badlesmere, married William de Ros, 2nd Baron de Ros, then Thomas de Arundel
    Maud de Badlesmere, married Robert FitzPayn, then John de Vere, 7th Earl of Oxford
    Elizabeth de Badlesmere, married Sir Edmund Mortimer, then William de Bohun, 1st Earl of Northampton
    Giles de Badlesmere, 2nd Baron Badlesmere, married Elizabeth Montagu, and died without issue[42]
    Margaret de Badlesmere, married John Tiptoft, 2nd Baron Tibetot

    Birth:
    More about Badlesmere ... http://bit.ly/1OpzcUw

    Died:
    near Blean...

    was hanged, drawn and quartered by orders of King Edward II, following his participation in the Earl of Lancaster's rebellion and his subsequent capture after the Battle of Boroughbridge

    Bartholomew married Margaret de Clare, Baroness Badlesmere Bef 30 Jun 1308. Margaret (daughter of Thomas de Clare, Knight, Lord of Thomond and Juliana Fitzgerald, Lady of Thomond) was born ~ 1 Apr 1287, Ireland; died 22 Oct 1333, Aldgate, London, Middlesex, England. [Group Sheet]


  16. 111.  Margaret de Clare, Baroness Badlesmere was born ~ 1 Apr 1287, Ireland (daughter of Thomas de Clare, Knight, Lord of Thomond and Juliana Fitzgerald, Lady of Thomond); died 22 Oct 1333, Aldgate, London, Middlesex, England.

    Notes:

    Margaret de Clare, Baroness Badlesmere (ca. 1 April 1287 – 22 October 1333/3 January 1334, disputed) was a Norman-Irish noblewoman, suo jure heiress, and the wife of Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 1st Baron Badlesmere.[1]

    She was arrested and subsequently imprisoned in the Tower of London for the duration of a year from November 1321 to November 1322, making her the first recorded female prisoner in the Tower's history.[2][3] She was jailed on account of having ordered an armed assault on Isabella of France, Queen consort of King Edward II of England. Before Margaret had instructed her archers to fire upon Isabella and her escort, she had refused the Queen admittance to Leeds Castle where her husband, Baron Badlesmere held the post of governor, but which was legally the property of Queen Isabella as part of the latter's dowry. Margaret surrendered the castle on 31 October 1321 after it was besieged by the King's forces using ballistas. Edward's capture of Leeds Castle was the catalyst which led to the Despenser War in the Welsh Marches and the north of England.

    Upon her release from the Tower, Margaret entered a religious life at the convent house of the Minorite Sisters outside Aldgate. King Edward granted her a stipend to pay for her maintenance.

    Background

    Margaret was born at an unrecorded place in either Ireland or England on or about 1 April 1287, the youngest child of Thomas de Clare, Lord of Thomond and Juliana FitzGerald of Offaly, and granddaughter of Richard de Clare, Earl of Hertford and Gloucester. She had two brothers, Gilbert de Clare, Lord of Thomond, and Richard de Clare, 1st Lord Clare, Lord of Thomond, who was killed at the Battle of Dysert O'Dea in 1318;[4] and an elder sister, Maud, whose first husband was Robert de Clifford, 1st Baron de Clifford. Margaret had an illegitimate half-brother, Richard.[5] Her parents resided in both Ireland and England throughout their marriage;[6] it has never been established where Juliana was residing at the time of Margaret's birth although the date is known.

    *

    A foremother of 24 times to David A. Hennessee (1942) ... http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=I3&secondpersonID=&maxrels=24&disallowspouses=1&generations=24&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I43875

    Her father died on 29 August 1287, when she was almost five months of age. His cause of death has never been ascertained by historians. Her mother married her second husband, Nicholas Avenel sometime afterwards, but the exact date of this marriage is not known. Between 11 December 1291 and 16 February 1292, Margaret acquired another stepfather when her mother married her third husband, Adam de Cretynges.

    Inheritance

    A series of inquisitions post mortem held in response to writs issued on 10 April 1321 established that Margaret, the wife of Bartholomew de Badlesmere and Maud, wife of Sir Robert de Welle (sisters of Richard de Clare and both aged 30 years and above) were the next heirs of Richard's son Thomas.[7] Thomas' estate included the stewardship of the Forest of Essex, the town and castle at Thomond and numerous other properties in Ireland that are listed in the reference.

    First Marriage

    She married firstly before the year 1303, Gilbert de Umfraville, son of Gilbert de Umfraville, Earl of Angus, and Elizabeth Comyn. Upon their marriage, the Earl of Angus granted Gilbert and Margaret the manors of Hambleton and Market Overton; however, when Gilbert died childless prior to 1307, the manors passed to Margaret.

    Second Marriage

    On an unrecorded date earlier than 30 June 1308, when the couple were jointly granted the manor of Bourne, Sussex,[8] Margaret married Bartholomew de Badlesmere, an English soldier and court official who was afterwards created 1st Baron Badlesmere by writ of summons. He had held the post of Governor of Bristol Castle since 1307, and during his life accumulated many renumerative grants and offices. It is feasible that Margaret's marriage to Badlesmere had been arranged by her brother-in-law, Baron Clifford; Badlesmere having been one of Clifford's retainers during the Scottish Wars. Clifford was later killed at the Battle of Bannockburn, where Badlesmere also fought.

    Margaret was styled as Baroness Badlesmere on 26 October 1309 (the date her husband was by writ summoned to Parliament by the title of Baron Badlesmere) and henceforth known by that title.[9]

    When Margaret was visiting Cheshunt Manor in Hertfordshire in 1319, she was taken hostage by a group of sixty people, both men and women.[10] Her captors demanded a ransom of ą100 for her release. She was held prisoner for one night before being rescued on the following day by the King's favourite, Hugh Despenser the Younger.[10] Hugh was married to Margaret's first cousin, Eleanor de Clare, eldest daughter of Gilbert de Clare, 7th Earl of Gloucester and Joan of Acre and also Eleanor was Edward II's niece. The King ordered the arrest and imprisonment of twenty of Margaret's kidnappers; they all, however, were eventually pardoned.

    Issue

    The five children of Margaret and Baron Badlesmere were:

    Margery de Badlesmere (1308/1309- 18 October 1363), married before 25 November 1316 William de Ros, 2nd Baron de Ros of Hamlake, by whom she had six children.
    Maud de Badlesmere (1310- 24 May 1366), married firstly, Robert FitzPayn; secondly, John de Vere, 7th Earl of Oxford, by whom she had seven children.
    Elizabeth de Badlesmere (1313- 8 June 1356), married firstly in 1316 Sir Edmund Mortimer, eldest son of Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March and Joan de Geneville, 2nd Baroness Geneville; she married secondly in 1335, William de Bohun, 1st Earl of Northampton. Both marriages produced children.
    Giles de Badlesmere, 2nd Baron Badlesmere (18 October 1314- 7 June 1338), married Elizabeth Montagu, but did not have any children by her.
    Margaret de Badlesmere (born 1315), married Sir John Tiptoft, 2nd Lord Tiptoft, by whom she had one son, Robert Tiptoft.
    The siege of Leeds Castle[edit]

    Queen consort Isabella, whom Margaret offended by refusing her admittance to Leeds Castle
    Margaret's husband, Baron Badlesmere was appointed Governor of the Royal Castle of Leeds in Kent in the fifth year of Edward II's reign (1312).[11] In October 1321, nine years after his assumption of the office, the queen consort Isabella went on a pilgrimage to the shrine of St. Thomas at Canterbury. She decided to interrupt her journey by stopping at Leeds Castle which legally belonged to her as the fortress and its demesne were Crown property and part of her dowry to be retained in widowhood.[12] Badlesmere, who by then had become disaffected with King Edward and had joined the swelling ranks of his opponents, was away at a meeting of the Contrariants[n 1] in Oxford at the time and had left Margaret in charge of the castle.

    Shortly before, Baron Badlesmere had deposited all of his treasure and goods inside Leeds Castle for safe-keeping.[13]

    Due to her strong dislike of Isabella as well as her own belligerent and quarrelsome character,[14][n 2] Margaret refused the Queen admittance.[15] It was suggested by Francis Lancellott that Margaret's antipathy towards Queen Isabella had its origins in about 1317 when she had asked Isabella to use her influence on behalf of a friend who was seeking an appointment in the Exchequer Office. When Isabella refused her request, for reasons unknown, a quarrel ensued and henceforth Margaret became the Queen's enemy.[16] Margaret allegedly told Isabella's marshal, whom she met on the lowered drawbridge, that "the Queen must seek some other lodging, for I would not admit anyone within the castle without an order from my lord [Baron Badlesmere]".[17] After issuing her message, she subsequently ordered her archers to loose their arrows upon Isabella from the battlements when the Queen (having apparently ignored Margaret's communication) approached the outer barbican,[18][19] in an attempt to enter the castle by force.[20] The unexpected, lethal volley of arrows, which killed six of the royal escort, compelled Isabella to make a hasty retreat from the castle and to seek alternative accommodation for the night.[21] Historian Paul C. Doherty suggests that the pilgrimage was a ruse on the part of the King and Queen in order to create a casus belli. Edward would have known beforehand that Baron Badlesmere was with the Contrariants in Oxford and had left Leeds Castle in the hands of the belligerently hostile Baroness Badlesmere; therefore he had given instructions for Isabella to deliberately stop at Leeds aware she would likely be refused admittance. Using the insult against the Queen as a banner, he would then be able to gather the moderate nobles and outraged populace to his side as a means of crushing the Contrariants.[22]

    When King Edward heard of the violent reception his consort was given by Margaret, he was predictably outraged and personally mustered a sizeable force of men "aged between sixteen and sixty", including at least six earls,[23] to join him in a military expedition which he promptly led against Margaret and her garrison at Leeds Castle to avenge the grievous insult delivered to the Queen by one of his subjects. Following a relentless assault of the fortress, which persisted for more than five days[n 3] and with the King's troops using ballistas, Margaret surrendered at curfew on 31 October having received a "promise of mercy" from Edward.[24] Throughout the siege, she had expected the Earl of Lancaster to arrive with his soldiery to relieve her, but this he had refused to do;[23][n 4] nor had any of the other Contrariants or the Marcher Lords[n 5] come to her assistance, which left her to defend the castle with merely her husband's nephew, Bartholomew de Burghersh, and the garrison troops.[23] Baron Badlesmere, although supportive of Margaret's conduct, had during that crucial time, sought refuge at Stoke Park, seat of the Bishop of Lincoln; however he did manage to despatch some knights from Witney to augment the garrison troops in the defence of Leeds.[15] Once King Edward had gained possession of the castle and the Badlesmere treasure within, the seneschal, Walter Colepepper and 12 of the garrison were hanged from the battlements.[23][25][n 6] Margaret was arrested and sent as a prisoner, along with her five children and Bartholomew de Burghersh, to the Tower of London;[14][26] she therefore became the first recorded woman imprisoned in the Tower.[2][3] On her journey to the fortress, she was insulted and jeered at by the citizens of London who, out of loyalty to Isabella, had followed her progression through the streets to vent their fury against the person who had dared maltreat their queen.[27]

    Aftermath

    Main article: Despenser War

    The King's military victory at Leeds, accomplished with the help of six influential earls including the Earls of Pembroke and Richmond, encouraged him to reclaim and assert the prerogative powers that Lancaster and the Lords Ordainers had so long denied him.[28][n 7] The dominant baronial oligarchy broke up into factions. Many of the nobles who had previously been hostile to Edward rushed to his side to quell the insurrection of the Marcher Lords, known as the Despenser War, which had erupted in full force after the King defiantly recalled to England the two Despensers (father and son,) whom the Ordainers had compelled him to banish in August 1321.[29] The first sparks to the uprising had been ignited when, prior to his expulsion, the rapacious Hugh le Despenser the Younger had persuaded the infatuated King to grant him lands in the Welsh Marches which rightfully belonged to entrenched Marcher barons such as Roger Mortimer,[30] his uncle Roger Mortimer de Chirk, and Humphrey de Bohun, 4th Earl of Hereford, a staunch Ordainer albeit the King's brother-in-law.[n 8] They had formed a confederation and made devastating raids against Despenser holdings in Wales; and Mortimer led his men in an unsuccessful march on London. These mutinous events, in addition to other incidents which created a tense situation and called for a mobilisation of forces throughout the realm, eventually led to the Ordainers constraining the King to exile the favourites. However, subsequent to his capture of Leeds Castle and the harsh sentences he had meted out to the insubordinate Margaret de Clare and her garrison, King Edward defied the Contrariants by persuading the bishops to declare the Despensers' banishment illegal at a convocation of the clergy, and he summoned them home.[28] This act had dire consequences in addition to the Despenser War: it paved the way for the complete domination of the grasping Despensers over Edward and his kingdom, leading to Roger Mortimer and Queen Isabella's 1326 Invasion of England, their assumption of power, the execution of the two Despensers, and finally, Edward's deposition.

    Imprisonment

    Margaret was the first recorded woman imprisoned in the Tower of London[2][3]

    Baron Badlesmere excused his wife's bellicose actions at Leeds with his declaration that when he had left Margaret in charge of Leeds, he had given her strict instructions not to admit anyone inside the castle without his specific orders.[18] This, he had insisted, included the Queen, with the words that "the royal prerogative of the King in the case of refusal of entry should not be assumed to provide a legal right for the Queen, who was merely his wife".[25] As a result of Margaret's imprisonment, Badlesmere remained firmly aligned with the King's opponents; shortly afterwards he participated in the Earl of Lancaster's rebellion. Badlesmere was captured after taking part in the Battle of Boroughbridge on 16 March 1322 which had ended with a royalist victory. Following trial at Canterbury, he was executed at Blean on 14 April 1322.[20]

    Margaret remained imprisoned in the Tower until 3 November 1322, when she was released on the strength of a bond from her son-in-law William de Ros and five others.[31] Presumably her children were released with her, but a record of the exact dates of their liberation has not been found.

    Later life

    Margaret retired to the convent house of the Minorite Sisters, outside Aldgate,[32] where the abbess Alice de Sherstede was personally acquainted with Queen Isabella, who took an interest in the convent's business affairs.[33] On 13 February 1322/3, the King granted Margaret a stipend of two shillings a day for her maintenance, which was paid to her by the Sheriff of Essex.[34] She also received a considerable proportion of her late husband's manors for her dowry.[35]

    Edward demonstrated his good will toward Margaret again on 1 July 1324, by giving her "permission to go to her friends within the realm whither she will, provided that she be always ready to come to the king when summoned".[36] It appears that after then she lived at Hambleton, Rutland as it was from there that on 27 May 1325 she submitted a petition in connection with property at Chilham.[37]

    Her son Giles obtained a reversal of his father's attainder in 1328, and succeeded by writ to the barony as the 2nd Baron Badlesmere. By this time Edward III had ascended the throne; however, the de facto rulers of England were Queen Isabella and her lover, Marcher Lord Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March (father-in-law of Margaret's daughter Elizabeth), who jointly held the Office of Regent for the new king. Edward II had been deposed in January 1327 and allegedly murdered in September by Mortimer's hired assassins.[38] The regency of Queen Isabella and Lord Mortimer ended in October 1330 when Edward III now nearly 18 had Mortimer hanged as a traitor and Queen Isabella exiled for the remaining 28 years of her life at Castle Rising in Norfolk.

    Margaret died between 22 October 1333 [39] and 3 January 1333/4.[40]

    Died:
    in the Convent house of the Minorite Sisters...

    Children:
    1. 55. Margery de Badlesmere was born 0___ 1306, Badlesmere Manor, Kent, England; died 18 Oct 1363.
    2. Maude de Badlesmere, Countess of Oxford was born 0___ 1310, Badlesmere Manor, Kent, England; died 24 May 1366, Hall Place, Earl's Colne, Essex, England; was buried Colne Priory, Essex, England.
    3. Elizabeth Badlesmere, Countess of Northampton was born 0___ 1313, Badlesmere Manor, Kent, England; died 8 Jun 1356, (Lancashire) England; was buried Black Friars, Blackburn, Lancashire, England.

  17. 116.  John de Ingham was born 0___ 1260, Ingham, Norfolkshire, England; died 0___ 1309.

    Notes:

    Birth:
    Ingham is mentioned in the Domesday Book of 1086 as the village of Hincham[4] in the hundred of Happing.[5] Possible etymologies are "homestead or village of [a man called] Inga" or "home of the Inguiones" (an ancient Germanic tribe).

    The Lordship of Ingham was possessed at a very early date by the Ingham family. An Oliver de Ingham was living in 1183 and a John de Ingham is known to have been Lord in the reign of Richard I. The great grandson of John, the distinguished Oliver Ingham lived here and his son-in-law Miles Stapleton of Bedale, Yorkshire, inherited jure uxoris.[6]

    Ingham Old Hall has its origins in the medieval times having been built circa 1320.[7] In the fourteenth century the Hall was inhabited by the local Lord of the Manor, Sir Miles Stapleton, whose tomb stands in Ingham’s Holy Trinity church alongside that of his father in law, Sir Oliver de Ingham.[8]

    ... Map and more history ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ingham,_Norfolk

    John — Margery LNU. [Group Sheet]


  18. 117.  Margery LNU
    Children:
    1. 58. Oliver de Ingham, Knight, Lord Ingham was born ~ 1287, Ingham, Norfolkshire, England; died Bef 1344; was buried Holy Trinity Church, Ingham, Norfolkshire, England.

  19. 118.  Eudo la Zouche was born (1206-1216) (son of Roger la Zouche and Margaret Biset).

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Professional Soldier
    • Residence: Harringworth, Northamptonshire, England

    Eudo — Millicent de Cantilupe. Millicent (daughter of William de Cantilupe, III, Lord of Abergavenny and Eva de Braose) was born ~ 1250, (Wiltshire, England); died 0___ 1299. [Group Sheet]


  20. 119.  Millicent de Cantilupe was born ~ 1250, (Wiltshire, England) (daughter of William de Cantilupe, III, Lord of Abergavenny and Eva de Braose); died 0___ 1299.
    Children:
    1. Eva la Zouche
    2. 59. Elizabeth la Zouche was born ~ 1272, Ellesmere, Shropshire, England.

  21. 120.  John FitzAlan, Knight, 7th Earl of Arundel was born 14 Sep 1246, Clun, Shropshire, England (son of John FitzAlan, Knight, 6th Earl of Arundel and Maud de Verdon); died 18 Mar 1272, Arundel, Sussex, England; was buried Haughmond Abbey, Shropshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Baron of Clun and Oswestry

    Notes:

    Biography

    John FitzAlan was born on the day of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross, 30 Henry III (14 September, 1246),[1] or 1245,[2] in Arundel, Sussex.

    John was the oldest son and heir of his parents, John son of Alan[1] or Fitz Alan, feudal Lord of Clun and Oswestry, Salop, and his wife Maud, who was the daughter of Theobald le Botiller, 2nd Baron Butler, and his second wife, Rohese de Verndun; Rohese's children were known by their mother's surname, Verdun.[3]

    John married Isabel, the daughter of Roger de Mortimer of Wigmore and his wife, Maud, the daughter and coheir of William de Briouze of Brecknock,[3] before 14 May 1260.[2]

    John and Isabel had children:

    Richard, only son and heir.[3]
    His father died before 10 November, 52 Henry III, when a writ was issued, resulting in Inquisitions held in Sussex and Salop in the same year, which found that John, aged 22 on his last birthday, was his heir, and the properties his father held included Oswestry, Westhope, Clawne, La Hethe, and Halchameston, and he held of the king in chief the two whole baronies of Cloun and Blaunkmoster and 1/4 of the earldom of Arundel.[1]

    After his father's death, his mother was married to Richard d'Amundeville.[3]

    John son of Alan died on the Friday before the Annunciation in 56 Henry III, (18 Mar 1272), Inquisitions were taken in Sussex and Salop that year and found his son Richard, aged 5 on the day of St Blaise, was his heir to extensive properties including Arundel castle with the honour, held for 1/4 of a barony.[4]

    He was buried at Haughmond Abbey, Shropshire, England.[2]

    Neither John nor his father were known as earls of Arundel in their lifetimes.[3]

    Sources

    ? 1.0 1.1 1.2 The Deputy Keeper of the Records, Calendar of Inquisitions Post Mortem and other Analogous Documents preserved in the Public Record Office, Vol I Henry III, (London: His Majesty's Principal Secretary of State for the Home Department, 1904), accessed 6 September 2014, https://archive.org/stream/calendarinquisi00offigoog#page/n275/mode/2up pp.216. Abstract No 684 John son of Alan - very damaged.
    ? 2.0 2.1 2.2 Medieval Lands: John Fitzalan
    ? 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 George Edward Cockayne, The Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland and Great Britain and the United Kingdom Extant Extinct or Dormant, Ed. Hon Vicary Gibbs, Vol I AB-ADAM to Basing, (London: The St Catherine Press LTD, 1910), accessed 6 September 2014, http://www.archive.org/stream/completepeerageo01coka#page/238/mode/2up pp.239-40.
    ? The Deputy Keeper of the Records, Calendar of Inquisitions Post Mortem and other Analogous Documents preserved in the Public Record Office, Vol I Henry III, (London: His Majesty's Principal Secretary of State for the Home Department, 1904), accessed 6 September 2014, https://archive.org/stream/calendarinquisi00offigoog#page/n337/mode/2up pp.278-9. Abstract No 812 John son of Alan.

    See also:

    Wikipedia: John FitzAlan, 7th Earl of Arundel

    end of biography

    Children

    Has No Children Joan FitzAlan b: ABT 1262 in Winchester, Hampshire, England
    Has Children Maud FitzAlan b: ABT 1264 in Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England
    Has Children Richard FitzAlan Baron of Arundel b: 3 FEB 1267 in Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England
    Has No Children John FitzAlan b: ABT 1271 in Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England
    Has No Children Amy FitzAlan b: ABT 1273 in Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England
    Has Children Eleanor FitzAlan b: ABT 1275 in Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England

    Marriage 2 Robert de Hastings b: 1247
    Married: 3rd husband 2 SEP 1285 in Poling, Sussex, England 4

    John married Isabella Mortimer 0___ 1260. Isabella (daughter of Roger Mortimer, Knight, 1st Baron Mortimer and Maud de Braose, Lady Mortimer) was born 0___ 1248, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England; died 0___ 1292. [Group Sheet]


  22. 121.  Isabella Mortimer was born 0___ 1248, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England (daughter of Roger Mortimer, Knight, 1st Baron Mortimer and Maud de Braose, Lady Mortimer); died 0___ 1292.

    Other Events:

    • Alt Death: 0___ 1274

    Children:
    1. 60. Richard FitzAlan, Knight, 8th Earl of Arundel was born 2 Mar 1266, Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England; died 9 Mar 1302, Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England; was buried Haughmond Abbey, Shropshire, England.

  23. 122.  Thomas of Saluzzo, Marquis of Saluzzo was born Saluzzo, Italy; died (Saluzzo, Italy).

    Thomas married Luigia de Ceva (Saluzzo, Italy). Luigia was born (Saluzzo, Italy). [Group Sheet]


  24. 123.  Luigia de Ceva was born (Saluzzo, Italy).
    Children:
    1. 61. Alice of Saluzzo, Countess of Arundel was born 0___ 1269, Saluzzo, Italy; died 25 Sep 1292, Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England; was buried Haughmond Abbey, Shropshire, England.

  25. 124.  John de Warenne, Knight, 6th Earl of Surrey was born 0___ 1231, Lewes Castle, Lewes, East Sussex, England (son of William de Warenne, Knight, 5th Earl of Surrey and Maud Marshal, Countess of Norfolk); died 29 Sep 1304, Kennington, Kent, England; was buried Lewes Priory, Southover, Sussex, England.

    Notes:

    Birth:
    Lewes Castle stands at the highest point of Lewes, East Sussex, England on an artificial mound constructed with chalk blocks. It was originally called Bray Castle.

    Photos, history & source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lewes_Castle

    John married Alice de Lusignan 0Aug 1247, Surrey, England. [Group Sheet]


  26. 125.  Alice de Lusignan (daughter of Hugh of Lusignan, X, Knight, Count of La Marche and Isabelle of Angouleme, Queen of England).
    Children:
    1. Isabella de Warenne, Baroness of Bywell was born 23 Sep 1253; died Bef 1292.
    2. Eleanor de Warenne was born 0___ 1251.
    3. 62. William de Warenne was born 9 Feb 1256, Lewes Castle, Lewes, East Sussex, England; died 15 Dec 1296, Croydon, England.

  27. 126.  Robert de Vere, Knight, 5th Earl of Oxford was born ~ 1240, Hedingham Castle, Essex, England (son of Hugh de Vere, Knight, 4th Earl of Oxford and Hawise de Quincy); died Bef 7 SEPT 1296; was buried Earls Coine, Essex, England.

    Notes:

    Robert de Vere, 5th Earl of Oxford (c. 1240 – 1296) was the son and heir of Hugh de Vere, 4th Earl of Oxford.

    Early life

    Robert de Vere was born about 1240, the only son of Hugh de Vere, 4th Earl of Oxford, and Hawise de Quincy, daughter of Saer de Quincy, 1st Earl of Winchester. He had three sisters, Isabel, Lora and Margaret.[1]

    Career

    He was among the followers of Simon de Montfort during the Second Barons' War, and was with Simon's son, Hugh, when Edward I of England attacked Kenilworth Castle prior to the Battle of Evesham. De Vere's title and property were forfeited, but restored shortly afterwards by the Dictum of Kenilworth.

    Marriage and issue

    Before 22 February 1252 he married Alice de Sanford, daughter and heiress of Gilbert de Sanford. They had six sons and two daughters:[2]

    Robert de Vere, 6th Earl of Oxford, who married Margaret de Mortimer, daughter of Roger Mortimer, 1st Baron Wigmore
    Sir Hugh de Vere, who married Denise de Munchensy, daughter and heiress of Sir William de Munchensy of Swanscombe, Kent
    Sir Alphonse de Vere, who married Jane Foliot, daughter of Sir Jordan Foliot, Lord Foliot, and by her was father of John de Vere, 7th Earl of Oxford
    Thomas de Vere
    Gilbert de Vere, a cleric
    Philip de Vere, a cleric
    Joan de Vere, who married Sir William de Warenne
    Hawise de Vere

    Death

    Robert de Vere died before 7 September 1296. His widow, Alice, died at Canfield, Essex on 7 September 1312. They were both buried at Earls Colne, Essex.[3]

    *

    Robert married Alice de Sanford Bef 22 Feb 1252. Alice died 7 Sep 1312, Canfield, Essex, England. [Group Sheet]


  28. 127.  Alice de Sanford died 7 Sep 1312, Canfield, Essex, England.
    Children:
    1. 63. Joan de Vere
    2. Alphonse de Vere was born Bef 1262, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England; died Bef 20 Dec 1328, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England; was buried St. Albans Abbey, Hertfordshire, England.


Generation: 8

  1. 146.  Thomas Newsham was born ~ 1223, Yorkshire, England (son of Gillo de Newsham and unnamed spouse); died 0___ 1264, Yorkshire, England.

    Thomas — Lucy FitzPeter, Baroness de Ros. Lucy (daughter of Peter FitzHerbert, Lord of Brecknock and Alice FitzRoger) was born 1207-1210, Forest Dean, Gloucestershire, England; died 0___ 1267, North Yorkshire, England; was buried Kirkham Priory, Kirkham, North Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 147.  Lucy FitzPeter, Baroness de Ros was born 1207-1210, Forest Dean, Gloucestershire, England (daughter of Peter FitzHerbert, Lord of Brecknock and Alice FitzRoger); died 0___ 1267, North Yorkshire, England; was buried Kirkham Priory, Kirkham, North Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Lucia of Brecknock FitzPiers
    • Also Known As: Lucy FitzPiers

    Notes:

    Lucy FitzPiers
    Also Known As: "Lucia", "Lucy;de;ros; Lucy", "FITZ", "PETER", "ros"
    Birthdate: circa 1210
    Birthplace: Forest Dean, Gloucestershire, England, (Present UK)
    Death: Died 1247 in Yorkshire, England, (Present UK)
    Immediate Family:
    Daughter of Piers FitzHerbert, Lord of Brecknock and Alice Fitzpiers
    Wife of Thomas de Newsom and Sir William de Ros
    Mother of Constance Scrope (de Newsom); Sir Alexander de Braose; Sir Herbert de Braose; Alicia de Ros, of Helmsley; Robert de Ros and 10 others
    Sister of Beatrix Fitzpiers; Reginald FitzPiers, Lord of Blaen Llyfni and Herbert Fitzpiers, Sheriff Hampshire
    Half sister of Joan de Verdun

    The de Ros family, from Scottish Kings to English Gentry

    Lucy FitzPiers
    Also Known As: "Lucia", "Lucy;de;ros; Lucy", "FITZ", "PETER", "ros"
    Birthdate: circa 1210
    Birthplace: Forest Dean, Gloucestershire, England, (Present UK)
    Death: Died 1247 in Yorkshire, England, (Present UK)
    Immediate Family:
    Daughter of Piers FitzHerbert, Lord of Brecknock and Alice Fitzpiers
    Wife of Thomas de Newsom and Sir William de Ros
    Mother of Constance Scrope (de Newsom); Sir Alexander de Braose; Sir Herbert de Braose; Alicia de Ros, of Helmsley; Robert de Ros and 10 others
    Sister of Beatrix Fitzpiers; Reginald FitzPiers, Lord of Blaen Llyfni and Herbert Fitzpiers, Sheriff Hampshire
    Half sister of Joan de Verdun
    Managed by: James Fred Patin, Jr.
    Last Updated: April 1, 2016
    View Complete Profile
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    view all 31
    Immediate Family

    Thomas de Newsom
    husband

    Constance Scrope (de Newsom)
    daughter

    Sir Alexander de Braose
    son

    Sir Herbert de Braose
    son

    Sir William de Ros
    husband

    Alicia de Ros, of Helmsley
    daughter

    Robert de Ros
    son

    Lucy de Ros
    daughter

    Robert de Ros, Lord of Belvoir
    son

    Alexander de Ros
    son

    Peter de Ros
    son

    Mary de Ros
    daughter
    About Lucy FitzPiers, Baroness de Ros
    Individual Record FamilySearch™ Pedigree Resource File

    Search Results | Print

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Lucia of Brecknock FitzPiers Compact Disc #41 Pin #277411 Pedigree

    Sex: F
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Event(s)

    Birth: abt 1196
    Helmsley,Yorkshire,England
    Death: aft 1266
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Parents

    Father: Piers FitzHerbert Disc #41 Pin #283090
    Mother: Alice de Warkworth FitzRobert Disc #41 Pin #283089
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Marriage(s)

    Spouse: Sir William I of Hamlake de Ros Disc #41 Pin #277410
    Marriage:
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Notes and Sources

    Notes: None
    Sources: Available on CD-ROM Disc# 41
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Submitter

    Kathy LONGHURST
    1175 S. 180 W. Hurricane Utah

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Submission Search: 1606834-0220102210938

    URL:
    CD-ROM: Pedigree Resource File - Compact Disc #41
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    Order Pedigree Resource File CD-ROMS
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    About FamilySearch Pedigree Resource File

    The Pedigree Resource File is a new lineage linked database of records available on compact disc containing family history records submitted by individuals through FamilySearch Internet Genealogy Service. Family information is organized in family groups and pedigrees and includes submitted notes and sources. Many charts and reports can be printed from this data. Each disc contains about 1.1 million names. With the publication of every five discs, a master index for those discs will be published and packaged with that set of discs. With the publication of every 25 discs, a master index for those discs will also be published and packaged with that volume of discs. Discs may be purchased as sets or volumes.
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    Lucia FITZPIERS Pedigree

    Female Family
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Event(s):

    Birth: 1195
    Christening:
    Death:
    Burial:
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Parents:

    Father: Herbert FITZHERBERT Family
    Mother: Alice FITZ ROGER
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Marriages:

    Spouse: William De ROSS Family
    Marriage: About 1259 Of Igmanthorpe, , Yorkshire, England
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Messages:

    Record submitted after 1991 by a member of the LDS Church. No additional information is available. Ancestral File may list the same family and the submitter.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Source Information:

    No source information is available.
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    Lucy FITZPIERS (-1266) [Pedigree]

    Daughter of Piers FITZHERBERT (-1235) and Alice de WARKWORTH (-1225)

    b. of Brecknock, Wales
    d. AFT 1266
    Married Sir William de ROS (1193-1264)

    Children: [listed under entry for William de ROS]

    References:

    1. "Magna Charta Sureties, 1215",

    F. L. Weis,
    4th Ed..
    2. "Burke's Peerage, 1938".

    3. "Presidents GEDCOM File",

    Otto-G. Richter, Brian Tompsett.
    4. "Ancestral roots of certain American colonists who came

    to America before 1700",
    Frederick Lewis Weis, 1992, seventh edition.
    The earlier editions were called: "Ancestral roots of
    sixty colonists who came to New England 1623-1650"
    Lucy FitzPiers

    (say 1195 - )

    Lucy FitzPiers|b. s 1195|p317.htm#i18533|Reginald or Piers FitzPeirs or FitzHerbert||p317.htm#i14306||||||||||||||||

    Lucy FitzPiers married Sir William de Ros, son of Sir Robert de Ros Fursan and Isabel Avenal of Scotland. Rosie Bevan wrote: That William de Ros of Helmsley was married to Lucy fitz Piers identified, ( CP (XI : 94) as you say, citing Dugdale), as daughter of Piers fitz Herbert, lord of Brecknock, would appeare to be borne out by the names of their children - Robert, William, Alexander, Herbert, John, Piers, Lucy and Alice, as listed in CP XI p. 94 note (l) and supported by about ten references. Lucy FitzPiers was born say 1195 at Wales. Dugdale citing Glover, Somerset Herald, stated that she was the daughter of Reginald FitzPiers of Blewlebeny in Wales. If she belonged to this family, she was presumably sister of Herbert Fitzpiers and of his brother and heir Reynold FitzPiers, and daughter of Piers FitzHerbert, lords of the Honour of Brecknock, whose castle was built at Blaenllyfni. She was the daughter of Reginald or Piers FitzPeirs or FitzHerbert.
    She was living at Michaelmas 1266, when there is a record of her claim for dower in Ulceby, Lincs, against Alice de Ros, and in a manor in Yorks against Piers de Ros.
    Children of Lucy FitzPiers and Sir William de Ros

    * Sir William de Ros (of Ingmanthorpe)+ d. b 28 May 1310
    * Sir Alexander de Ros
    * Sir Herbert de Ros
    * Sir John de Ros
    * Piers de Ros
    * Sir Robert de Ros 1st Baron+ b. bt 1220 - 1223, d. 17 May 1285
    * Lucy de Ros+ b. s 1230, d. a 1279
    * Alice de Ros d. 29 Apr 1286
    Lucy FitzPiers1

    F, #176196

    Lucy FitzPiers||p17620.htm#i176196|Piers FitzHerbert||p36888.htm#i368871||||||||||||||||

    Last Edited=13 Jun 2009

    Lucy FitzPiers is the daughter of Piers FitzHerbert.2 She married Sir William de Ros, son of Robert de Ros, 1st Lord Ros of Helmsley and Isabella (?).1
    Children of Lucy FitzPiers and Sir William de Ros

    * Sir Robert de Ros+ d. 17 Mar 12852
    * Sir William de Ros+ d. 28 May 13101
    * Piers Ros 2
    Citations

    1. [S1545] Mitchell Adams, "re: West Ancestors," e-mail message from (Australia) to Darryl Roger Lundy, 6 December 2005 - 19 June 2009. Hereinafter cited as "re: West Ancestors".
    2. [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke's Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke's Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 1, page 1107. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
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    William De ROSS Pedigree

    Male Family
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Event(s):

    Birth:
    Christening:
    Death:
    Burial:
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Marriages:

    Spouse: Lucia FITZPIERS Family
    Marriage: About 1259 Of Igmanthorpe, , Yorkshire, England
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Messages:

    Record submitted after 1991 by a member of the LDS Church. No additional information is available. Ancestral File may list the same family and the submitter.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Source Information:

    No source information is available.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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    Lucy[1,2,3]

    - 1266
    Sex Female

    Lived In Scotland

    Complete *

    Died Aft 1265

    Person ID I00113893 Leo

    Last Modified 22 Aug 1997

    Father Piers FitzHerbert

    Mother Alice

    Family ID F00119593 Group Sheet

    Family Sir William de Ros, of Helmsley

    Children

    1. Sir Robert de Ros, of Helmsley, b. est 1235

    2. Sir William de Ros, of Ingmanthorpe, b. est 1240

    3. Alexander de Ros
    4. Herbert de Ros
    5. John de Ros
    6. Piers de Ros
    7. Lucy de Ros
    8. Alice de Ros
    Last Modified 22 Aug 1997

    Family ID F00049669 Group Sheet

    Sources 1. [S00058] The Complete Peerage, 1936 , Doubleday, H.A. & Lord Howard de Walden, Reference: XI Ros 94n

    2. [S01336] Descendants of Leofric of Mercia 2002 , Ravilious, John & Rosie Bevan

    3. [S00123] ~Living descendants of Blood Royal in America , Angerville, Count d', Reference: 54

    "Of Brecknock, Wales"

    Children:
    1. 73. Constance Newsham was born 0___ 1249; died 0Dec 1320, Bracewell, Yorkshire, England.

  3. 148.  William de Ros, Knight was born 0___ 1192, Helmsley, Yorkshire, England (son of Robert de Ros, Knight and Isabella Mac William); died 1264-1265, England; was buried Kirkham Priory, Kirkham, North Yorkshire, England.

    Notes:

    Birth: 1192
    Helmsley
    North Yorkshire, England
    Death: 1264, England

    Knight of Helmsley and Hunsingore, Yorkshire

    Son and heir to Robert de Ros and Isabel of Scotland, grandson of Everard de Ros and Roese Trussebut, William the Lion, King of Scotland and a mistress Avenel. Sir Robert was born before 1200.

    Husband of Lucy FitzPeter, daughter of Peter FitzHerbert of Blaen Llyfni, Breconshire, Wales and Alice FitzRobert, daughter of Robert FitzRoger of Warkworth, Northumbria. They were married before 24 Jan 1234 and had six sons and two daughters;

    * Sir Robert
    * Sir Peter
    * Sir William
    * Sir Alexander
    * Herbert
    * John
    * Lucy
    * Alice

    William was excommunicated with his father by Pope Innocent III on 16th of December 1215. He was taken as prisoner at the Battle of Lincoln on 20 May 1217, released on sureties 26 Oct 1217. He took no part in the Baron's war and was apparently faithful to the king. Sir William was the benefactor of the monasteries of Kirkham, Rievaulx, Meaux and of the Templars.

    Sir William died 1258 or 1264, buried at Kirkham. His widow, Lucy, was alive Michaelmas 1266.

    Sir William's name is spelled both Ros and Roos.

    Family links:
    Parents:
    Robert De Ros (1170 - 1226)
    Isabella nic William de Ros (1175 - 1240)

    Spouse:
    Lucy FitzPiers de Ros (1207 - 1267)*

    Children:
    Alice de Ros (____ - 1286)*
    William de Ros (____ - 1310)*
    Robert de Ros (1223 - 1285)*
    Lucy de Ros de Kyme (1230 - ____)*

    Sibling:
    William de Ros (1192 - 1264)
    Robert de Ros (1195 - 1269)*

    *Calculated relationship

    Burial:
    Kirkham Priory
    Kirkham
    Ryedale District
    North Yorkshire, England

    Maintained by: Anne Shurtleff Stevens
    Originally Created by: Jerry Ferren
    Record added: May 25, 2011
    Find A Grave Memorial# 70352904

    William — Lucy FitzPeter, Baroness de Ros. Lucy (daughter of Peter FitzHerbert, Lord of Brecknock and Alice FitzRoger) was born 1207-1210, Forest Dean, Gloucestershire, England; died 0___ 1267, North Yorkshire, England; was buried Kirkham Priory, Kirkham, North Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 149.  Lucy FitzPeter, Baroness de Ros was born 1207-1210, Forest Dean, Gloucestershire, England (daughter of Peter FitzHerbert, Lord of Brecknock and Alice FitzRoger); died 0___ 1267, North Yorkshire, England; was buried Kirkham Priory, Kirkham, North Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Lucia of Brecknock FitzPiers
    • Also Known As: Lucy FitzPiers

    Notes:

    Lucy FitzPiers
    Also Known As: "Lucia", "Lucy;de;ros; Lucy", "FITZ", "PETER", "ros"
    Birthdate: circa 1210
    Birthplace: Forest Dean, Gloucestershire, England, (Present UK)
    Death: Died 1247 in Yorkshire, England, (Present UK)
    Immediate Family:
    Daughter of Piers FitzHerbert, Lord of Brecknock and Alice Fitzpiers
    Wife of Thomas de Newsom and Sir William de Ros
    Mother of Constance Scrope (de Newsom); Sir Alexander de Braose; Sir Herbert de Braose; Alicia de Ros, of Helmsley; Robert de Ros and 10 others
    Sister of Beatrix Fitzpiers; Reginald FitzPiers, Lord of Blaen Llyfni and Herbert Fitzpiers, Sheriff Hampshire
    Half sister of Joan de Verdun

    The de Ros family, from Scottish Kings to English Gentry

    Lucy FitzPiers
    Also Known As: "Lucia", "Lucy;de;ros; Lucy", "FITZ", "PETER", "ros"
    Birthdate: circa 1210
    Birthplace: Forest Dean, Gloucestershire, England, (Present UK)
    Death: Died 1247 in Yorkshire, England, (Present UK)
    Immediate Family:
    Daughter of Piers FitzHerbert, Lord of Brecknock and Alice Fitzpiers
    Wife of Thomas de Newsom and Sir William de Ros
    Mother of Constance Scrope (de Newsom); Sir Alexander de Braose; Sir Herbert de Braose; Alicia de Ros, of Helmsley; Robert de Ros and 10 others
    Sister of Beatrix Fitzpiers; Reginald FitzPiers, Lord of Blaen Llyfni and Herbert Fitzpiers, Sheriff Hampshire
    Half sister of Joan de Verdun
    Managed by: James Fred Patin, Jr.
    Last Updated: April 1, 2016
    View Complete Profile
    Matching family tree profiles for Lucy FitzPiers, Baroness de Ros view all matches ›

    Lucy De Ros (born Fitzpiers) in MyHeritage family trees (Maynard, Jr. Web Site)

    Lucy (Lucia) De Ross (born Fitzpiers) in MyHeritage family trees (Keefe Web Site)

    Lucy De Ros (born Fitzpiers) in MyHeritage family trees (Carter Family Website)

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    view all 31
    Immediate Family

    Thomas de Newsom
    husband

    Constance Scrope (de Newsom)
    daughter

    Sir Alexander de Braose
    son

    Sir Herbert de Braose
    son

    Sir William de Ros
    husband

    Alicia de Ros, of Helmsley
    daughter

    Robert de Ros
    son

    Lucy de Ros
    daughter

    Robert de Ros, Lord of Belvoir
    son

    Alexander de Ros
    son

    Peter de Ros
    son

    Mary de Ros
    daughter
    About Lucy FitzPiers, Baroness de Ros
    Individual Record FamilySearch™ Pedigree Resource File

    Search Results | Print

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Lucia of Brecknock FitzPiers Compact Disc #41 Pin #277411 Pedigree

    Sex: F
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Event(s)

    Birth: abt 1196
    Helmsley,Yorkshire,England
    Death: aft 1266
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Parents

    Father: Piers FitzHerbert Disc #41 Pin #283090
    Mother: Alice de Warkworth FitzRobert Disc #41 Pin #283089
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Marriage(s)

    Spouse: Sir William I of Hamlake de Ros Disc #41 Pin #277410
    Marriage:
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Notes and Sources

    Notes: None
    Sources: Available on CD-ROM Disc# 41
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Submitter

    Kathy LONGHURST
    1175 S. 180 W. Hurricane Utah

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Submission Search: 1606834-0220102210938

    URL:
    CD-ROM: Pedigree Resource File - Compact Disc #41
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    About FamilySearch Pedigree Resource File

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    Lucia FITZPIERS Pedigree

    Female Family
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Event(s):

    Birth: 1195
    Christening:
    Death:
    Burial:
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Parents:

    Father: Herbert FITZHERBERT Family
    Mother: Alice FITZ ROGER
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Marriages:

    Spouse: William De ROSS Family
    Marriage: About 1259 Of Igmanthorpe, , Yorkshire, England
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Messages:

    Record submitted after 1991 by a member of the LDS Church. No additional information is available. Ancestral File may list the same family and the submitter.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Source Information:

    No source information is available.
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    Lucy FITZPIERS (-1266) [Pedigree]

    Daughter of Piers FITZHERBERT (-1235) and Alice de WARKWORTH (-1225)

    b. of Brecknock, Wales
    d. AFT 1266
    Married Sir William de ROS (1193-1264)

    Children: [listed under entry for William de ROS]

    References:

    1. "Magna Charta Sureties, 1215",

    F. L. Weis,
    4th Ed..
    2. "Burke's Peerage, 1938".

    3. "Presidents GEDCOM File",

    Otto-G. Richter, Brian Tompsett.
    4. "Ancestral roots of certain American colonists who came

    to America before 1700",
    Frederick Lewis Weis, 1992, seventh edition.
    The earlier editions were called: "Ancestral roots of
    sixty colonists who came to New England 1623-1650"
    Lucy FitzPiers

    (say 1195 - )

    Lucy FitzPiers|b. s 1195|p317.htm#i18533|Reginald or Piers FitzPeirs or FitzHerbert||p317.htm#i14306||||||||||||||||

    Lucy FitzPiers married Sir William de Ros, son of Sir Robert de Ros Fursan and Isabel Avenal of Scotland. Rosie Bevan wrote: That William de Ros of Helmsley was married to Lucy fitz Piers identified, ( CP (XI : 94) as you say, citing Dugdale), as daughter of Piers fitz Herbert, lord of Brecknock, would appeare to be borne out by the names of their children - Robert, William, Alexander, Herbert, John, Piers, Lucy and Alice, as listed in CP XI p. 94 note (l) and supported by about ten references. Lucy FitzPiers was born say 1195 at Wales. Dugdale citing Glover, Somerset Herald, stated that she was the daughter of Reginald FitzPiers of Blewlebeny in Wales. If she belonged to this family, she was presumably sister of Herbert Fitzpiers and of his brother and heir Reynold FitzPiers, and daughter of Piers FitzHerbert, lords of the Honour of Brecknock, whose castle was built at Blaenllyfni. She was the daughter of Reginald or Piers FitzPeirs or FitzHerbert.
    She was living at Michaelmas 1266, when there is a record of her claim for dower in Ulceby, Lincs, against Alice de Ros, and in a manor in Yorks against Piers de Ros.
    Children of Lucy FitzPiers and Sir William de Ros

    * Sir William de Ros (of Ingmanthorpe)+ d. b 28 May 1310
    * Sir Alexander de Ros
    * Sir Herbert de Ros
    * Sir John de Ros
    * Piers de Ros
    * Sir Robert de Ros 1st Baron+ b. bt 1220 - 1223, d. 17 May 1285
    * Lucy de Ros+ b. s 1230, d. a 1279
    * Alice de Ros d. 29 Apr 1286
    Lucy FitzPiers1

    F, #176196

    Lucy FitzPiers||p17620.htm#i176196|Piers FitzHerbert||p36888.htm#i368871||||||||||||||||

    Last Edited=13 Jun 2009

    Lucy FitzPiers is the daughter of Piers FitzHerbert.2 She married Sir William de Ros, son of Robert de Ros, 1st Lord Ros of Helmsley and Isabella (?).1
    Children of Lucy FitzPiers and Sir William de Ros

    * Sir Robert de Ros+ d. 17 Mar 12852
    * Sir William de Ros+ d. 28 May 13101
    * Piers Ros 2
    Citations

    1. [S1545] Mitchell Adams, "re: West Ancestors," e-mail message from (Australia) to Darryl Roger Lundy, 6 December 2005 - 19 June 2009. Hereinafter cited as "re: West Ancestors".
    2. [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke's Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke's Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 1, page 1107. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
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    William De ROSS Pedigree

    Male Family
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Event(s):

    Birth:
    Christening:
    Death:
    Burial:
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Marriages:

    Spouse: Lucia FITZPIERS Family
    Marriage: About 1259 Of Igmanthorpe, , Yorkshire, England
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Messages:

    Record submitted after 1991 by a member of the LDS Church. No additional information is available. Ancestral File may list the same family and the submitter.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Source Information:

    No source information is available.
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    Lucy[1,2,3]

    - 1266
    Sex Female

    Lived In Scotland

    Complete *

    Died Aft 1265

    Person ID I00113893 Leo

    Last Modified 22 Aug 1997

    Father Piers FitzHerbert

    Mother Alice

    Family ID F00119593 Group Sheet

    Family Sir William de Ros, of Helmsley

    Children

    1. Sir Robert de Ros, of Helmsley, b. est 1235

    2. Sir William de Ros, of Ingmanthorpe, b. est 1240

    3. Alexander de Ros
    4. Herbert de Ros
    5. John de Ros
    6. Piers de Ros
    7. Lucy de Ros
    8. Alice de Ros
    Last Modified 22 Aug 1997

    Family ID F00049669 Group Sheet

    Sources 1. [S00058] The Complete Peerage, 1936 , Doubleday, H.A. & Lord Howard de Walden, Reference: XI Ros 94n

    2. [S01336] Descendants of Leofric of Mercia 2002 , Ravilious, John & Rosie Bevan

    3. [S00123] ~Living descendants of Blood Royal in America , Angerville, Count d', Reference: 54

    "Of Brecknock, Wales"

    Children:
    1. Robert de Ros, Knight was born ~ 1223, Helmsley Castle, Yorkshire, England; died 17 May 1285; was buried Kirkham Priory, Kirkham, North Yorkshire, England.
    2. Peter de Ros was born (Yorkshire, England).
    3. Alexander de Ros was born (Yorkshire, England).
    4. Herbert de Ros was born (Yorkshire, England).
    5. 74. William de Ros, Knight was born ~ 1244, (Yorkshire) England; died 0May 1310, (Yorkshire) England; was buried Greyfriars Abbey Church, King's Straith, York, Yorkshire, England.
    6. Anne de Ros was born ~ 1246, Helmsley, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1290.

  5. 166.  Walter FitzRobert, Knight was born ~ 1204, Woodham Walter, Essex, England (son of Robert FitzWalter, Knight, Baron FitzWalter and Rohese LNU); died 10 Apr 1258.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Lord of LIttle Dunmow
    • Also Known As: Sir Walter Fitzwalter

    Notes:

    Walter FitzRobert de Clare, Lord of Little Dunmow

    son of Robert FitzWalter (Magna Carta Surety) and Rohese

    married Ida (Idonea) de Longespee de Salisbury (daughter of Ela de Salisbury and William Longespee son of Henry II - they apparently had *two* daughters named Ida. [He married the younger one.]

    Daughter:

    Ela Fitz Walter b abt 1245, of Maxstoke and Solihull, Warwickshire, England. She md Sir William de Odingsells, Justiciar of Ireland, abt 1258, son of William de Odingsells and Joan.

    The instability of surnames at this early period is shown by his being known as both "FitzWalter" (a genuine surname) and "FitzRobert" (a Norman patronymic).

    Walter — Ida Longespee, II. Ida (daughter of William (Plantagenet) Longespee, 3rd Earl of Salisbury and Ela FitzPatrick, 3rd Countess of Salisbury) was born (Salisbury, Wiltshire) England. [Group Sheet]


  6. 167.  Ida Longespee, II was born (Salisbury, Wiltshire) England (daughter of William (Plantagenet) Longespee, 3rd Earl of Salisbury and Ela FitzPatrick, 3rd Countess of Salisbury).
    Children:
    1. 83. Ela Fitzwalter, Countess of Warwick was born ~ 1245, of Maxstoke and Solihull, Warwickshire, England; died 8 Feb 1297, Oseney Abbey, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England; was buried Oseney Abbey, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England.
    2. Robert FitzWalter, 1st Baron FitzWalter was born 0___ 1247, Henham, Essex, England; died 18 Jan 1326.

  7. 168.  William Marmion, 2nd Baron Marmion of Winteringham was born ~ 1230, Polesworth, Warwickshire, England (son of Robert Marmion, Knight and Amicia Fitz-Hugh); died 0___ 1276, Lincolnshire, England.

    Notes:

    About William Marmion, Knight

    Sir William Marmion Knight,son of Robert marmion of Tanfield married Lorette.Lora de Dover,de Chilham,daughter of Richard Fitz Roy also known as Richard de Warenne and Richard de Chilham.

    Children:

    1 John Marmion

    Lora de Dover, also Lorette de Dover, Lorette de Chilham.

    Lora married before June 7, 1248 to Sir William Marmion, Knight, son and heir of Robert Marmion of Tanfield. Sir William accompanied King Hnery III to France in 1259, but took the side of the Barons against King Henry III for which he was pardoned on July 1, 1267. Sir William died in 1275 or 1276.
    Lora and William had the following son:

    John Marmion

    References Richardson: p.493 Roberts p.403 Weis, Ancestral: 218-28

    He was under age in 1243 and in the custody of William de Cauntelo. On 30 Apr 1251 he quitclaimed to the Prioress of Fosse the advowson of the church of Willingham in co. Lincoln. He was knighted, apparently at the occasion of the knighting of Prince Edward. He was in the service of the King in 1259 in France. He took the side of the Barons against Henry III, and, as a supporter of Simon de Montfort, was summoned to Parliament 24 Dec 1264. He was among the "disinherited" who were admitted to the King's peace 1 Jul 1267, and pardoned for their trespasses. He was apparently deceased by 1276, when his son, John, did homage to the Abbot of Peterborough.

    William — Lorette FitzRoy. Lorette (daughter of Richard FitzRoy, Knight and Rohese de Dover) was born (Kent, England). [Group Sheet]


  8. 169.  Lorette FitzRoy was born (Kent, England) (daughter of Richard FitzRoy, Knight and Rohese de Dover).
    Children:
    1. 84. John Marmion, Knight, 3rd Baron Marmion of Winteringha died Bef 7 May 1322.

  9. 202.  Robert de Valoines, II, Lord of Walsham & Icksworth was born 0___ 1247, Thurston, Suffolk, England (son of Robert Valoines and Rohesia Blount); died 0___ 1289.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: DE VALAINES, DE VALONYES, DE VALOYNES, DE WALEYNS, DE WALONIIS and DE WALOYNIS
    • Also Known As: Robert de Valognes
    • Also Known As: Robert de Valoignes

    Notes:

    Sources, Comments and Notes

    Source :
    "ROBERT de Valoignes . m EVA Tregoz, daughter of ---. Robert & his wife had children:
    a) CECILY de Valoignes ([1280/81]-16 Jul 1325). m (before 1298) ROBERT de Ufford , son of ROBERT de Ufford & his first wife Mary --- (11 Jun 1279-9 Sep 1316 or before). He was summoned to Parliament 4 Mar 1309, whereby he is held to have become Lord Ufford."
    ___________________________________
    Source Par Thomas Christopher Banks:
    "'john De Valoins succeeded his brother Robert, as the next heir male; and by Ifabella his wife, daughter of Sir Robert de Creke, of North Creke, in Norfolk, had Robert, his son and heir; who, by Roesia, one of the sisters and coheirs of Sir William le Blund, left Robert de Valoins, his son, who took to wise Eve de Criketot, and was lord of . Icksworth, in Suffolk, as heir to Blund; and had issue, two daughters (Ixwortb.) and heirs, viz. Roesc, married to Sir Edward, or Edmund, de Pakenham; and Cicely, to Robert de Ufford, earl of Suffolk.
    Of this family was also Alan De Valoins, sheriff of Kent. temp. Henry II. and Richard I. about the 6th of whofe reign he died, without issue."
    ____________________________________
    Source :
    "? Robert 1er de Valognes ° 1217 âep. Rose Blund ° ~1217
    - Robert II de Valognes ° 1247 + 1282 Lord of Orford âep. 1) Eve Criketot ° ~1254 (veuve de William Tregoz) âep. 2) Rohaise Le Blount (fille de William Le Blount, Lord of Ixworth)
    - Cecily de Valognes ° 1284 (Thurston, Suffolk) âep. Robert 1er Ufford °1279"
    ____________________________
    Source :
    "Robert II De Valoines Lord of Walsham was born in 1247 in Thurston, Suffolk, England. He married Eve De Tregoz-Criketot in 1280 in Suffolk, England.

    Eve De Tregoz-Criketot was born in 1259. She married Robert II De Valoines Lord of Walsham in 1280 in Suffolk, England.
    They had the following children:

    F i Cecily De Valoines
    F ii Rohesia De Valoines"
    _____________________________
    Source :
    "Sir Robert Valoines, Lord Walsham d. circa 1282
    Father Robert de Valoines
    Mother Roesia Blund
    Sir Robert Valoines, Lord Walsham was born at of Ixworth & Walsham, Suffolk, England.2 He married Eve de Criketot, daughter of William de Criketot. Sir Robert Valoines, Lord Walsham died circa 1282.

    Family Eve de Criketot b. 1247
    Child Cecily de Valoines+2,3 b. c 1281, d. 16 Jul 1325"
    _____________________________
    Source :
    "Robert II de Valognes, Lord Walsham (c.1245 - 1282)
    Birthdate: circa 1245 Birthplace: Thurston, Suffolk, England
    Death: Died 1282 in England

    Immediate Family
    Eve De Valoines (Criketot) wife
    Cecily de Valognes, Lady Of Orford daughter
    Eve de Tregoz wife
    Roesia le Blount mother
    Robert Valoines-Walsham, I father
    Thomas de Valoines brother
    Lucy stepdaughter
    Joan Loudham stepdaughter"
    _____________________________
    Source
    "Robert son of Robert de Valoignes ...
    Sum of all the lands of the said Robert, excepting the manors of Toleshunt and Blunteshal, whereof Eva, late his wife, was enfeoffed as dower, 46l. 19s. 2d. Dower 15l. 13s. 0˝d.
    His daughters, Rose (Roysea) aged 2 at the feast of All Saints, 10 Edw. I., and Cecily, aged 1 about the said feast, are his next heirs. ...

    From: 'Inquisitions Post Mortem, Edward I, File 30', Calendar of Inquisitions Post Mortem, Volume 2: Edward I (1906), pp. 245-252. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=108102 Date accessed: 18 November 2012."


    Robert married Eve DE CRIKETOT [2431], daughter of Sir William IV DE CRIKETOT [2437] and Agnes BLUND [2439], in 1280 in , Suffolk, England. (Eve DE CRIKETOT [2431] was born about 1250 in Thurston, Suffolk, England and died in 1316 in Thurston, Suffolk, England.)

    Robert married Eve de Criketot 0___ 1280, Suffolkshire, England. Eve (daughter of William Criketot and unnamed spouse) was born 0___ 1259, Thurston, Suffolk, England; died 0___ 1316, Thurston, Suffolk, England. [Group Sheet]


  10. 203.  Eve de Criketot was born 0___ 1259, Thurston, Suffolk, England (daughter of William Criketot and unnamed spouse); died 0___ 1316, Thurston, Suffolk, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Eva Tregoz
    • Also Known As: Eve de la Pecche

    Children:
    1. 101. Cecily Valoines was born ~ 1281, Walsham, Suffolkshire, England; died 16 Jul 1325, Thurston, Suffolk, England.

  11. 204.  Geoffrey Norwich

    Geoffrey — Cecily Valoines. Cecily (daughter of Robert de Valoines, II, Lord of Walsham & Icksworth and Eve de Criketot) was born ~ 1281, Walsham, Suffolkshire, England; died 16 Jul 1325, Thurston, Suffolk, England. [Group Sheet]


  12. 205.  Cecily Valoines was born ~ 1281, Walsham, Suffolkshire, England (daughter of Robert de Valoines, II, Lord of Walsham & Icksworth and Eve de Criketot); died 16 Jul 1325, Thurston, Suffolk, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Cecily Valoines

    Children:
    1. 102. Walter de Norwich, Knight was born ~ 1274, Walsingham, Norfolkshire, England; died 20 Jan 1329, Wangford, Suffolk, England; was buried Raveningham, Norfolkshire, England.

  13. 216.  Robert de Ros, Knight was born ~ 1223, Helmsley Castle, Yorkshire, England (son of William de Ros, Knight and Lucy FitzPeter, Baroness de Ros); died 17 May 1285; was buried Kirkham Priory, Kirkham, North Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Member of Parliament
    • Also Known As: Sir Robert de Ros, Lord of Belvoir
    • Alt Birth: Bef 1237, Helmsley, Yorkshire, England

    Notes:

    Sir Robert de Ros (before 1237 – 17 May 1285) was an English nobleman.

    Family

    Robert de Ros of Helmsley, Yorkshire, born before 1237, was the grandson of Sir Robert de Ros, one of the twenty-five barons who guaranteed the observance of Magna Carta, and Isabel of Scotland, an illegitimate daughter of William the Lion, King of the Scots, by a daughter of Robert Avenel.[1]

    He was the son of Sir William de Ros (died c.1264/5) and Lucy FitzPeter, the daughter of Peter FitzHerbert and Alice FitzRoger. He had five brothers, Sir Peter, Sir William, Sir Alexander, Sir Herbert, and John, and two sisters, Lucy and Alice.[2]

    Career

    On 24 December 1264 he was summoned to Simon de Montfort's Parliament in London as Robert de Ros,[3][4] and for some time it was considered that the barony was created by writ in that year, and that Robert de Ros was the 1st Baron Ros. According to The Complete Peerage:

    In 1616 the barony of De Ros was allowed precedence from this writ [of 24 December 1264], a decision adopted by the Lords in 1806 (Round, Peerage and Pedigree, vol. i, pp. 249-50); but these writs, issued by Simon in the King's name, are no longer regarded as valid for the creation of peerages.[3]

    Accordingly, the barony is now considered to have been created when Robert's eldest son, William de Ros was summoned to Parliament from 6 February 1299 to 16 October 1315 by writs directed Willelmo de Ros de Hamelak.[5]<[4]

    On 3 July 1257, Ros obtained from Henry III a grant of the free warren, in the lordship of Belvoir, by which the boundary was determined. In 1258, he was actively employed in Scotland, in delivering King Alexander III of Scotland out of the hands of his rebellious subjects; and at Chester, in resisting the hostile invasions of Llewelyn the Last. In the same year, he and his lady Isabel had a controversy with the Prior and Convent of Belvoir, relative to the right of presentation to the Church of Redmile (near Bottesford), which was amicably compromised by their relinquishing the patronage to the convent, for a certain compensation. In 1261 he obtained from the king the grant of a weekly market, to be held at Belvoir, on Tuesday; and of an annual fair on the feast of St John the Baptist, to continue for three days. In 1264, he was one of the insurgent barons who defeated Henry III at the battle of Lewes, and took him and the prince prisoner, confining them in Farleigh Hungerford Castle. In 1264, de Ros was summoned to the parliament, which was called by the barons in the king's name. He died in 1285, and was buried at Kirkham Priory.[6]

    Marriage and issue

    Robert de Ros married, about 1243, Isabel d'Aubigny (c.1233 – 15 June 1301), granddaughter (her father, William, died in 1247) and heiress of William d'Aubigny (died 1236) of Belvoir, Leicestershire, by his second wife, Isabel, by whom he had five sons and three daughters:[7]

    William de Ros, 1st Baron de Ros.
    Sir Robert de Ros of Gedney, Lincolnshire, who married a wife named Erneburge.
    John de Ros.
    Nicholas de Ros, a cleric.
    Peter de Ros, a cleric.
    Isabel de Ros, who married Walter de Fauconberg, 2nd Baron Fauconberg.
    Joan de Ros, who married John Lovell, 1st Baron Lovell.
    Mary de Ros, who married William de Braose, 1st Baron Braose.

    Footnotes

    Jump up ^ Richardson III 2011, pp. 444–7.
    Jump up ^ Richardson III 2011, pp. 444–6.
    ^ Jump up to: a b Cokayne 1949, p. 95
    ^ Jump up to: a b Richardson III 2011, p. 448
    Jump up ^ Cokayne 1949, p. 97
    Jump up ^ Pedigrees of some Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants Vol II, Aileen Lewers Langston & J. Orton Buck, Jr 1974.
    Jump up ^ Richardson III 2011, pp. 447–8.

    References

    Cokayne, George Edward (1949). The Complete Peerage, edited by Geoffrey H. White. XI. London: St. Catherine Press.
    Richardson, Douglas (2011). Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, ed. Kimball G. Everingham. III (2nd ed.). Salt Lake City. ISBN 144996639X

    *

    Robert De ROS (Sir)

    Born: ABT 1223, Hamlake, Holderness, Yorkshire, England

    Died: 17 May 1285

    Buried: 16 Jun 1285, Kirkham, Yorkshire, England

    Notes: M.P. 1261, 1265, summoned to Parliament in 1264 as Baron Ros of Belvoir Castle. In 1258 he was apointed chief commissioner of Herfordshire to inquire into excesses there. In that same year he was summoned for service against the Welsh and the Scots. He sided with Simon de Montfort in 1264/4 and was holding Northampton under the younger Simon when the King took it. He was summoned to Monfort's parliament; but these writs, issued by Simon in the King's name, are no longer regarded as valid for the creation of peerages. In May 1265 Prince Edward (TKing Edward I) escaped from his custody at Hereford to Wigmore Castle, with help of Roger de Mortimer. Robert later surrendered Gloucester Castle to the Prince. After Montfort was slain and his rebellion quashed at the Battle of Eversham Robert received a full pardon at the insistance of Prince Edward. In 1276 he was one of the magnates, who, in council at Westminster, gave judgement against Llewelyn, and was summoned for servive in the consequent campaign. By his marriage he became Lord of Belvoir.

    Father: William De ROS (Sir)

    Mother: Lucy FITZPIERS

    Married: Isabel D'ALBINI 17 May 1246

    Children:

    1. William De ROS (1ş B. Ros of Hamlake)

    2. Isabel De ROS

    3. Joan De ROS

    4. Mary De ROS

    5. Avelina De ROS

    6. Robert De ROS

    7. John De ROS (Bishop of Carlisle)

    8. Nicholas De ROS

    Buried:
    The ruins of Kirkham Priory are situated on the banks of the River Derwent, at Kirkham, North Yorkshire, England. The Augustinian priory was founded in the 1120s by Walter l'Espec, lord of nearby Helmsley, who also built Rievaulx Abbey ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kirkham_Priory

    Images for Kirkham Priory ... https://www.google.com/search?q=Kirkham+Priory&rlz=1C1KMZB_enUS591US591&espv=2&biw=1440&bih=810&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjYj6LQuIzPAhXCJiYKHVRGC3wQsAQIMA

    Robert married Isabel d'Aubigny 17 May 1246. Isabel (daughter of William d'Aubigny and unnamed spouse) was born ~ 1233; died 15 Jun 1301. [Group Sheet]


  14. 217.  Isabel d'Aubigny was born ~ 1233 (daughter of William d'Aubigny and unnamed spouse); died 15 Jun 1301.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Isabel D'Albini

    Children:
    1. 108. William de Ros, Knight, 1st Baron de Ros of Hamlake was born ~ 1255, Helmsley Castle, Yorkshire, England; died 8 Aug 1316, Youlton, Yorkshire, England; was buried Kirkham, Yorkshire, England.
    2. Avelina de Ros

  15. 220.  Gunselm de Badlesmere was born ~ 1232; died ~ 1301.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Guncelin de Badlesmere

    Notes:

    Guncelin de Badlesmere (c.1232–c.1301), son of Bartholomew de Badlesmere (died 1248), was Justice of Chester and Cheshire in England.[1]

    Guncelin de Badlesmere was appointed to the office of Justice of Chester and Cheshire on 16 October 1274.[2] He held this position until 1281, when Reynold de Grey was appointed to this role and Gunselm was instructed to deliver the associated premises to him with effect from 29 September of that year.[3]

    An example of his close connection with the Crown appears in the account of the delivery of the royal seal of King Edward I by his son Edward to the Lord Chancellor, John de Langeton, which took place at Tonbridge Castle, Kent on 27 August 1297, with Sir Guncelin de Badlesmere being one of the witnesses.[4]

    Gunselin was evidently still alive on 22 March 1299/1300, when Walter de Gloucester, as "escheator this side the Trent", was instructed to investigate allegations that Guncelm had damaged property belonging to the estate of Edward, son and heir of Philip Burnel, a minor whom the King had committed into Guncelin's custody.[5]

    On 13 April 1301, a writ was issued to initiate enquiries into the identity of the next heir of lands that had been held directly from the King by Guncelin de Badlesmere. Presumably, he had died shortly before that date. An inquisition post mortem held on 30 April of that year in respect of land he held in Kent at Badlesmere and Donewelleshethe confirmed that the next heir was his son Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 1st Baron Badlesmere (c.1275–1322).[6]

    By 4 October 1302, it was established that the damage to Edward Burnel's inheritance had taken place before Gunselin became involved. Therefore, the lands concerned were to be delivered to the executors of Gunselin's will.[7]

    He died in the 29th year of the reign of Edward I (in 1301), and was buried in Badlesmere church, where in 1800 it was reported that his wooden cross-legged effigy could still be found.[1]

    Gunselm — Joan LNU. [Group Sheet]


  16. 221.  Joan LNU
    Children:
    1. 110. Bartholomew de Badlesmere, Knight, 1st Baron Badlesmere was born 18 Aug 1275, Blean, Canterbury, Kent, England; died 14 Apr 1322, Blean, Canterbury, Kent, England.
    2. Maud de Badlesmere was born ~ 1282, Kent, England.

  17. 222.  Thomas de Clare, Knight, Lord of Thomond was born ~ 1245, Tonbridge, Kent, England (son of Richard de Clare, Knight, 6th Earl of Gloucester and Maud de Lacy); died 29 Aug 1287, Ireland.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Lord of Inchiquin and Youghal

    Notes:

    Thomas de Clare, Lord of Inchiquin and Youghal (c. 1245 - 29 August 1287) was a Hiberno-Norman peer and soldier. He was the second son of Richard de Clare, 6th Earl of Gloucester and his wife Maud de Lacy, Countess of Gloucester. On 26 January 1276 he was granted the lordship of Thomond by Edward I of England; he spent the next eight years attempting to conquer it from the O'Brien dynasty, kings of Thomond.

    Career

    Thomas was born in about 1245 in Tonbridge, Kent, England, the second eldest son of Richard de Clare and Maud de Lacy.[1] He and his brother Bogo received gifts from King Henry III when they were studying at Oxford from 1257–59.[2]

    Thomas was a close friend and intimate advisor of Prince Edward of England, who would in 1272 accede to the throne as King Edward I. Together they took part in the Ninth Crusade. He held many important posts such as Governor of Colchester Castle (1266) and Governor of The City of London (1273). He was made Commander of the English forces in Munster, Ireland and created Lord of Inchiquin and Youghal. On 26 January 1276, he was granted the entire lordship of Thomond by King Edward.

    That same year, he jointly commanded a Norman army along with Sir Geoffrey de Geneville, Justiciar of Ireland against the Irish clans of County Wicklow. They were joined by a contingent of men from Connacht led by his father-in-law Maurice FitzGerald, 3rd Lord of Offaly. Thomas and Justiciar de Geneville's forces attacked the Irish at Glenmalure, but they were soundly defeated and suffered severe losses.[3]

    Civil war raged in Thomond between the rival factions of the O'Brien dynasty. In 1276, Brian Ruad, the deposed King of Thomond appealed to Thomas for support to help him regain his kingdom from his great-nephew Toirrdelbach MacTaidg O' Brien, who had usurped the throne. In return for his aid, Brian Ruad promised that Thomas would be allowed to colonise all the land between Athsollus in Quin and Limerick.[4] Together, Thomas and Brian Ruad expelled Toirrdelbach MacTaidg O'Brien and recaptured Clonroad which the latter had taken from Brian Ruad. O'Brien escaped to Galway where he elicited the help of his cousin William de Burgh, and in 1277 together with the assistance from clans, MacNamara and O'Dea they defeated the combined forces of Thomas and Brian Ruad. The latter fled to Bunratty Castle, but Thomas had his former ally hanged and drawn for treason.[5] The civil war continued for the next seven years, with Thomas supporting Brian Ruad's son Donnchad against Toirrdelbach; however, following the drowning death of Donnchad in 1284, Toirrdelbach emerged the victor. Thereafter until his death in 1306, Toirrdelbach MacTaidg O'Brien ruled as undisputed King of Thomond and Thomas had no choice but to accommodate him. O'Brien rented part of Bunratty Manor at ą121 per annum.[5]

    In 1280, Thomas embarked on a castle-building project at Quin, but was disrupted in his efforts by the O'Briens and MacNamaras. Thomas also reconstructed Bunratty Castle in stone, replacing the earlier wooden building.

    Marriage and children

    In February 1275, he married Juliana FitzGerald, the 12-year-old daughter of Maurice FitzGerald, 3rd Lord of Offaly and Maud de Prendergast.[6]

    Thomas and Juliana had four children:

    Maud de Clare (c. 1276–1326/27), married firstly, Robert de Clifford, 1st Baron de Clifford, by whom she had issue; and secondly Robert de Welles.
    Gilbert de Clare, Lord of Thomond, (3 February 1281–1308)
    Richard de Clare, Steward of Forest of Essex, 1st Lord Clare, Lord of Thomond (after 1281 – 10 May 1318), married a woman by the name of Joan, by whom he had one son, Thomas. He was killed at the Battle of Dysert O'Dea.
    Margaret de Clare (c. 1 April 1287 – 22 October 1333/3 January 1334), married firstly, Gilbert de Umfraville; and secondly Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 1st Baron Badlesmere, by whom she had issue.
    During their marriage, Thomas and Juliana lived in Ireland and in England. For instance, on 5 May 1284 the King notified his bailiffs and lieges in Ireland of the attorneys who were to act in Ireland on behalf of the couple as they were then in England. This arrangement was to continue for three years, except when Thomas and Juliana went to Ireland.[7]

    Death

    When evidence was taken in 1302 to prove the age of his son Gilbert, it was established that Thomas had died on 29 August 1287.[8] A mid-18th century compilation known as the Dublin Annals of Inisfallen states that Thomas was killed in battle against Turlough son of Teige and others. However, none of the earlier records of his death indicate that Thomas met a violent end. Some of the witnesses to Gilbert's age in 1302 referred to the date of Thomas' death in their calculations but all were silent as to its circumstances. This and much other evidence on the subject has been set out and evaluated by Goddard Henry Orpen of Trinity College, Dublin.[9]

    Thomas was succeeded as Lord of Thomond by his eldest son, Gilbert who was six years old. His widow Juliana, aged 24 years, would go on to marry two more times.

    Thomas married Juliana Fitzgerald, Lady of Thomond 0Feb 1275, (Ireland). Juliana (daughter of Maurice FitzGerald, II, 3rd Lord Offally and Emmeline Longespee) was born 12 Apr 1266, Dublin, Ireland; died 24 Sep 1300. [Group Sheet]


  18. 223.  Juliana Fitzgerald, Lady of Thomond was born 12 Apr 1266, Dublin, Ireland (daughter of Maurice FitzGerald, II, 3rd Lord Offally and Emmeline Longespee); died 24 Sep 1300.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Juliana FitzMaurice
    • Also Known As: Lady of Inchiquin and Youghal
    • Alt Birth: 0___ 1263, Dublin, Ireland

    Notes:

    Juliana FitzMaurice, Lady of Thomond (12 Apr 1266 - 29 Sep 1300) was a Norman-Irish noblewoman, the daughter of Maurice FitzGerald, 3rd Lord of Offaly, and the wife of Thomas de Clare, Lord of Thomond, a powerful Anglo-Norman baron in Ireland, who was a younger brother of Gilbert de Clare, 6th Earl of Hertford. Juliana was married three times; Thomas being her first. She is sometimes referred to as Juliane FitzMaurice.

    Early life and family

    Juliana FitzMaurice was born 12 Apr 1266 in Dublin, Ireland, the eldest daughter of Maurice FitzGerald II, 3rd Lord of Offaly, Justiciar of Ireland and Emeline Longspee.[1] She had a sister Amabel who married but was childless. Her first cousin was John FitzGerald, 1st Earl of Kildare. Her paternal grandparents were Maurice FitzGerald I, 2nd Lord of Offaly and Juliana, and her maternal grandparents were Sir Gerald de Prendergast of Beauvoir and the unnamed daughter of Richard Mor de Burgh, Lord of Connacht and Egidia de Lacy. Juliana's maternal ancestors included Brian Boru, Dermot McMurrough, and Maud de Braose.

    Juliana's father, Maurice FitzGerald, was married twice, first to Maud de Prendergast and secondly to Emmeline Longespee. It has been some source of contention as to which of his two wives had issue Juliana. However, at her death, Emmeline Longespee did not mention Juliana as her daughter and heir; rather, Emmeline's heir was her neice, Maud la Zouche, wife of Robert la Zouche, 1st Lord Holland. It has been concluded by several reputable researchers that Juliana's mother was Maurice FitzGerald's first wife, Maud de Prendergast. Supporters for Emmeline Longespee being the mother have yet to produce any counter-evidence beyond hearsay.

    Marriages and issue

    In 1278, at the age of 12, Juliana married her first husband, Thomas de Clare, Lord of Inchiquin and Youghal. He was the second eldest son of Richard de Clare, 5th Earl of Hertford, 2nd Earl of Gloucester and Maud de Lacy. Thomas was a friend of King Edward I of England, with whom he went on a Crusade. He held many important posts including the Office of Governor of Colchester Castle (1266), Governor of the City of London (1273). He was also the commander of the English forces in Munster, Ireland, and on 26 January 1276, he was granted the lordship of Thomond. He was born in 1245, which made him about eighteen years older than Juliana. Throughout their marriage, the couple lived in both Ireland and England. It is recorded that on 5 May 1284, King Edward notified his lieges and bailiffs in Ireland of the attorneys who were to act on behalf of Thomas and Juliana as they were in England at the time. This arrangement continued for another three years except while they were residing in Ireland.[2]

    Thomas and Juliana had four children:[3]

    Maud de Clare (c. 1276–1326/27), married firstly on 3 November 1295 Robert de Clifford, 1st Baron de Clifford, by whom she had issue; she married secondly after 1314 Robert de Welle.
    Gilbert de Clare, Lord of Thomond (3 February 1281–1308)
    Richard de Clare, Steward of Forest of Essex, 1st Lord Clare, Lord of Thomond (after 1281 – 10 May 1318 at the Battle of Dysert O'Dea), married a woman by the name of Joan by whom he fathered one son, Thomas.
    Margaret de Clare (c. 1 April 1287 – 22 October 1333), married firstly in 1303 Gilbert de Umfraville; she married secondly before 30 June 1308 Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 1st Lord Badlesmere, by whom she had four daughters and one son.

    The era was marked by unrest and strife as civil war was waged between rival factions of the powerful O'Brien clan. In 1277, Juliana's husband had his former ally Brian Ruad, the deposed King of Thomond, hanged for treason at Bunratty.[4]

    Thomas died on 29 August 1287, leaving Juliana a widow at the age of twenty-four with four small children; the youngest, Margaret was not quite five months old. On an unknown date she married her second husband, Nicholas Avenel. He presumably died before 11 December 1291/16 February 1292, as this is when she married her third husband, Adam de Cretynges.[5][6]

    Death and legacy

    Juliana died on 24 September 1300. Her numerous descendants included Ralph Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland who married Lady Joan Beaufort and thus their descendant, the English king Edward IV. By Edward IV's daughter, Elizabeth of York, consort of Henry VII, she was an ancestress to all subsequent monarchs of England and the current British Royal Family. Henry VIII's queens consort Anne Boleyn, Jane Seymour, Catherine Howard, and Catherine Parr also descended from her.

    Ancestors of Juliana FitzMaurice[show)

    Notes

    Jump up ^ The Complete Peerage
    Jump up ^ Calendar of Documents relating to Ireland 1252-1284, No. 2210
    Jump up ^ Cawley, Charles, Earls of Gloucester (Clare), Medieval Lands database, Foundation for Medieval Genealogy,[better source needed]
    Jump up ^ Joe Power, The Normans in Thomond, retrieved on 28 May 2009
    Jump up ^ Calendar of Patent Rolls, 1281–1292, pp.463, 476
    Jump up ^ "Adam de Cretinge et Juliana uxor ejus (filia Mauritii filii Mauritii defuncti) quondam uxor Thomµ de Clare defuncti." Calendarium Genealogicum Henry III and Edward I, ed. Charles Roberts, 1:431, 448.

    References

    The Complete Peerage, Vol. VII, p. 200
    Cawley, Charles, Medieval Lands, Ireland, Earls of Kildare, Medieval Lands database, Foundation for Medieval Genealogy,[better source needed]
    Cawley, Charles, Medieval Lands, Earls of Gloucester (Clare), Medieval Lands database, Foundation for Medieval Genealogy,[better source needed]
    Power, Joe. "The Normans in Thomond". Retrieved 28 May 2009.

    Children:
    1. Maude de Clare was born 0___ 1276; died 0___ 1327.
    2. 111. Margaret de Clare, Baroness Badlesmere was born ~ 1 Apr 1287, Ireland; died 22 Oct 1333, Aldgate, London, Middlesex, England.

  19. 236.  Roger la Zouche was born ~ 1175, (Brittany, France) (son of Alan la Zouche and Alice de Bermeis); died Bef 14 May 1238.

    Other Events:

    • Residence: Devonshire, England

    Roger — Margaret Biset. [Group Sheet]


  20. 237.  Margaret Biset
    Children:
    1. Alan la Zouche was born 0___ 1205, (Ashby de La Zouch, Leicester, England); died 10 Aug 1270.
    2. 118. Eudo la Zouche was born (1206-1216).

  21. 238.  William de Cantilupe, III, Lord of AbergavennyWilliam de Cantilupe, III, Lord of Abergavenny was born 0___ 1216, Wiltshire, England; died 25 Sep 1254.

    Notes:

    William de Cantilupe (died 25 September 1254) (anciently Cantelow, Cantelou, Canteloupe, etc, Latinised to de Cantilupo) [2] was jure uxoris Lord of Abergavenny, in right of his wife Eva de Braose, heiress of the de Braose dynasty of Welsh Marcher Lords. His chief residences were at Calne in Wiltshire and Aston Cantlow (named after his family), in Warwickshire, until he inherited Abergavenny Castle and the other estates of that lordship.

    He was the eldest son and heir of William de Cantilupe (died 1251) by his wife Millicent de Gournay. His younger brother was Thomas de Cantilupe, Bishop of Hereford and Chancellor of England.

    At some time before 15 February 1248 he married Eva de Braose, daughter and heiress of William de Braose (died 1230) by his wife Eva Marshal, daughter of William Marshall, 1st Earl of Pembroke. By his wife he had children including:

    George de Cantilupe (died 1273), Lord of Abergavenny, only son and heir, who died childless, leaving his sisters or their issue as his co-heiresses.
    Milicent de Cantilupe (died 1299[3]), who married twice, firstly to Eudo la Zouche and secondly to John de Montalt[4][3]
    Joan de Cantilupe (died 1271), who married Henry de Hastings (c. 1235 – 1269).[5]
    He died "in the flower of his youth"[6] in 1254. Simon de Montfort, a close friend of the family, was one of the chief mourners at his funeral.[7]

    *

    William married Eva de Braose Bef 15 Feb 1248, Calne, Wiltshire, England. Eva (daughter of William de Braose, Lord of Brycheiniog and Eva Marshal, Countess of Abergavenny) was born 0___ 1227; died 28 Jul 1255. [Group Sheet]


  22. 239.  Eva de Braose was born 0___ 1227 (daughter of William de Braose, Lord of Brycheiniog and Eva Marshal, Countess of Abergavenny); died 28 Jul 1255.

    Notes:

    Residence (Family):
    Photo, maps & history of Abergavenny Castle ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abergavenny_Castle

    Children:
    1. Joan de Cantilupe was born 0___ 1240, (Wiltshire, England); died 0___ 1271.
    2. 119. Millicent de Cantilupe was born ~ 1250, (Wiltshire, England); died 0___ 1299.

  23. 240.  John FitzAlan, Knight, 6th Earl of Arundel was born 6 May 1223, Oswestry Castle, Shropshire, England (son of John FitzAlan, Knight, 3rd Lord of Oswestry and Isabel d'Aubigny); died 10 Nov 1267, Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Earl of Arundel
    • Also Known As: Lord of Clun and Oswestry

    Notes:

    John FitzAlan (1223–1267), Lord of Oswestry and Clun, and de jure matris Earl of Arundel, was a Breton-English nobleman and Marcher Lord with lands in the Welsh Marches.

    Family

    The son and heir of John Fitzalan, Lord of Oswestry and Clun, from Shropshire. His mother was Isabel, and she was the daughter of William d'Aubigny, 3rd Earl of Arundel by his wife, Mabel of Chester. John obtained possession of his paternal estates on 26 May 1244, aged 21 years.

    After the death of his mother's brother Hugh d'Aubigny, 5th Earl of Arundel, and without direct heirs, he inherited jure matris the castle and honour of Arundel in 1243, which, according to the admission of 1433, he was held to have become de jure Earl of Arundel.[1]

    Welsh Conflicts

    In 1257 the Welsh Lord Gruffydd ap Gwenwynwyn, in the southern realm of the Kingdom of Powys, sought the aid of the Lord of Oswestry against Llywelyn ap Gruffudd. John Fitzalan was a surviving member of the English force that was defeated at the hands of the Welsh at Cymerau in Carmarthenshire.

    In 1258 he was one of the key English military commanders in the Welsh Marches and was summoned yet again in 1260 for further conflict against the Welsh.

    As Earl of Arundel, John vacillated in the conflicts between Henry III and the Barons. He fought on the King's side at the Battle of Lewes in 1264, where he was taken prisoner.

    By 1278 to 1282 his sons were engaged in Welsh border hostilities, attacking the lands of Llywelyn.

    Marriage

    He married Maud de Verdon, daughter of Theobald le Botiller (Boteler) by his wife Rohesia de Verdon (alias Rohese), by whom he had progeny including:

    John FitzAlan, 7th Earl of Arundel, eldest son and heir.
    Joan FitzAlan (c.1267-after 6 October 1316), wife of Sir Richard of Cornwall (d.1296), an illegitimate son of Richard of England, 1st Earl of Cornwall and King of the Romans (1209-1272) (the second son of King John (1199-1216)) by his mistress Joan de Bath (alias de Valletort).
    References[edit]
    Jump up ^ "The complete peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain, and the United Kingdom : extant, extinct, or dormant". Archive.org. pp. Volume 1, 239–40, as corrected by Vol. 14, p. 38. Retrieved 2013-05-10.
    Weis, Frederick Lewis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700, Lines: 70A-29, 149-29.

    *

    Sir John FitzAlan 6th Earl of Arundel[1]
    Name: John III Fitz Alan[2][3][4][5][6]
    Name: John, 6th Earl Arundel Lord of Oswestry and Clun FitzAlan[7]
    Birth Date: May 1223, Arundel, Sussex, England[8][9]
    Title: Earl Arundel, Lord Clun
    John FitzAlan (1223-1267), Lord of Oswestry and Clun, and de jure Earl of Arundel, was a Breton-English nobleman and Marcher Lord with lands in the Welsh Marches.[10]
    Marriage: 1242, England
    Sir John married Maud le Botiller (Maud de Verdun), daughter of Theobald le Botiller (Boteler) and Rohese or Rohesia de Verdon. His son and successor was:
    John Fitzalan, 7th Earl of Arundel
    Death: bef. 10 Nov 1267, Arundel, Sussex, England[11][12][13]
    Burial: Before 10 Nov 1267[14]
    Citations
    Source: ^ Cockayne, G. E., edited by the Hon. Vicary Gibbs, & H. A. Doubleday,London, 1926, vol.v, p.392
    Source: Weis, Frederick Lewis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700, Lines: 70A-29, 149-29.
    Family

    The son and heir of John Fitzalan, Lord of Oswestry and Clun, in Shropshire, and Isabel, daughter of William d'Aubigny, 3rd Earl of Arundel by his wife, Mabel of Chester, he obtained possession of his paternal estates on May 26, 1244, aged 21 years.
    After the death without direct heirs of his mother's brother Hugh d'Aubigny, 5th Earl of Arundel, he inherited 'jure matris' the castle and honour of Arundel in 1243, which, according to the admission of 1433, he was held to have become 'de jure' Earl of Arundel.[1]
    Sir John was succeeded by right of his mother, the 27 Nov 1243, to the Castle and Honor of Arundel. In 26 May 1244 he obtained possession of his paternal estates in Shropshire. According to some early accounts he married Maud de Verdon[15], daughter of Rhys de Verdon, 6th Earl of Arundel; Lord of Oswestry and Clun. Burial BEF 10 Nov 1267
    Welsh Conflicts

    In 1257 the Welsh Lord of Gwenwynwyn, in the southern realm of the Welsh Kingdom of Powys, sought the aid of the Lord of Oswestry against Llywelyn ap Gruffydd and John FitzAlan was a member of the English Force that was defeated at the hands of the Welsh at Cymerau in Carmarthenshire, which he survived.
    In 1258 he was one of the key English military commanders in the Welsh Marches and was summoned yet again in 1260 for further conflict against the Welsh.
    Arundel vacillated in the conflicts between Henry III and the Barons, and fought on the King's side at the Battle of Lewes in 1264, where he was taken prisoner.
    By 1278 to 1282 his own sons were also engaged in Welsh border hostilities, attacking the lands of Llywelyn the son of Gruffydd ap Madog.
    Sources

    Source: Ancestral File Number: 8JDT-WP
    Source: http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=225892&pid=4891
    Source: http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=document&guid=5be12808-996e-45e5-beff-db793b00550a&tid=13078823&pid=332637204
    Source: The Magna Charta Sureties, 1215, Edition: 4th ed., Record Number: CS55 A31979 Abbreviation: Magna Charta, 4th ed. Author: Weis, Frederick Lewis Publication: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, MD, 1991
    Source: S2375940657 Repository: #R2375940656 Title: Ancestry Family Trees Publication: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry member. Page: Ancestry Family Trees; Text: http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=27624422&pid=970
    Source: S-2024265482 Royal and Noble Genealogical Data: Brian Tompsett: Copyright 1994-2001, Version March 25, 2001 http://www.dcs.hull.ac.uk/public/genealogy/GEDCOM.html, Department of Computer Science, University of Hull, Hull, UK, HU6 7RX, B.C.Tompsett@dcs.hull.ac.uk
    Source: S-1968866219 Repository #R-1969211483 Title: Ancestry Family Trees; Publication: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members.
    Source: Repository: R-1969211483 Name: Ancestry.com; Address: http://www.Ancestry.com
    Source: S96 Record ID Number: MH:S96 User ID: CCD7662F-AD30-47C8-B9BC-6B348174ACE3 Title: Eula Maria McKeaig II - 061204.FTW Note: Other
    Footnotes

    ? Source: #S-1968866219 Page: Ancestry Family Trees; Text: http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=2886322&pid=1757493331
    ? Source: #S004330 Birth date: May 1223 Birthplace: Clun/Oswestry, Salop, England Death date: 1267 Death place:
    ? Source: #S004444 Page: Ancestry Family Trees; Text: http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=13078823&pid=332637204
    ? Source: #S004444 Page: Ancestry Family Trees Data: Text: http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=13078823&pid=332637204
    ? Source: #S004444 Page: Ancestry Family Trees Data: Text: http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=13078823&pid=332637204
    ? Source: #S004444 Page: Ancestry Family Trees Data: Text: http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=13078823&pid=332637204
    ? Text: http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=6835128&pid=-1207650802
    ? Source: #S004330 Text: Birth Date: May 1223; Birth Place: Clun/Oswestry, Salop, England Death Date: 1267
    ? Source: #S27185
    ? Source: John FitzAlan. Wikipedia. Commons. Accessed: 30 March 2015
    ? Source: #S004330 Birth Date: May 1223; Birthplace: Clun/Oswestry, Salop, England; Death Date: 1267
    ? Source: #S37 Page: 134
    ? Source: #S27185
    ? Source: #S96 Date of Import: Jul 25, 2005; ID: 74386626-64E7-433B-91B6-677D4331906C; ID Number: MH:IF7037
    ? Richardson's Royal Ancestry, Vol. V, page 154 succinctly states John FitzAlan married Maud de Verdun
    See also:

    Note: Shropshire Map
    Note: Coronet for an Earl
    Note: Arundel Castle
    Note: Shropshire COA
    Note: England COA
    Note: Arundel Family Crest
    Note: FitzAlan Arms
    Note: Sussex COA
    Note: Clun Castle
    Note: England Flag
    Note: Map of England
    Note: Coronet for a Baron
    Note: Sussex Map
    Note: Oswestry Castle
    Note: FitzAlan COA
    Acknowledgments

    Created through the import of Rodney Timbrook Ancestors and Relatives_2010-09-10.ged on 10 September 2010.
    Fitz Alan-48 created through the import of WILLIAMS 2011.GED on Jun 22, 2011 by Ted Williams.
    Created through the import of Acrossthepond.ged on 21 February 2011.
    Created through the import of Bwiki.ged on 03 April 2011. Fitz-Alan-13 created through the import of wikitree.ged on Aug 1, 2011 by Abby Brown.
    Created through the import of LJ Pellman Consolidated Family_2011-03-21.ged on 21 March 2011.
    FitzAlan-35 created through the import of MOORMAN FAMILY.GED on May 31, 2011 by Mary Elizabeth Stewart.
    Fitzalan-341 created through the import of FISCUS Family Tree.ged on Jun 6, 2011 by Liisa Small.
    Created through the import of master 11_12.ged on 21 October 2010.
    Created through the import of GerwingLoueyFamilyTree2009_2011-04-27.ged on 28 April 2011.
    FitzAlan-415 created through the import of The BTM Tree.ged on Jun 26, 2011 by Carolyn Trenholm.
    FitzAlan-479 created through the import of Bierbrodt.GED on Jul 14, 2011 by Becky Bierbrodt.
    fitzrandtocharlemange.FTW. Fitz alan-61 created through the import of heinakuu2011-6.ged on Jul 5, 2011 by Johanna Amnelin.
    Thank you to Tracy Conrad for creating WikiTree profile Fitzalan-554 through the import of Pedersen Family Tree.ged on May 19, 2013. Click to the Changes page for the details of edits by Tracy and others.
    Thank you to Steve Woods for creating WikiTree profile Fitz Alan-120 through the import of Woods Beedle Wiki.GED on Mar 1, 2013.
    This person was created through the import of Hooker Family Tree.ged on 30 March 2011.
    Record ID Number

    ID Number: MH:I3935
    User ID

    ID: 11A6FA5B-8E15-40F3-8FF5-A43B6A0BB55B

    Notes

    [Eula Maria McKeaig II - 061204.FTW] Burke's Peerage, p. 2098, on Lineage of FitzAlan:

    The d'Aubigny male line died out by 1243, whereupon the huge family estates were parcelled out between the last d'Aubigny, Earl of Arundel's sisters. Isabel, the second eldest, was wife of John FitzAlan, who through her came into possession of Arundel Castle but, perhaps significantly, did not style himself Earl of Arundel and was not so referred to by third parties. A contributory factor here seems to have been the longevity of the last d'Aubigny Earl of Arundel's widow, who survived her husband almost forty years, and who may in some sense therefore have been regarded as Countess of Arundel in her own right.

    Note: I assume the d'Aubigny widow who survived her husband almost 40 years was wife of Hugh d'Aubigny, 5th Earl of Arundel, brother of Isabel. - Jim Weber
    Note NI4017!SOURCES: 1. A9C7 p. 234; 2. Eng 116, p. 107-08; 3. Bucks 1 Vol 1 p. 455

    John — Maud de Verdon. Maud (daughter of Theobald le Botiller, 2nd Chief Butler of Ireland and Rohesia de Verdon) died 27 Nov 1283. [Group Sheet]


  24. 241.  Maud de Verdon (daughter of Theobald le Botiller, 2nd Chief Butler of Ireland and Rohesia de Verdon); died 27 Nov 1283.
    Children:
    1. 120. John FitzAlan, Knight, 7th Earl of Arundel was born 14 Sep 1246, Clun, Shropshire, England; died 18 Mar 1272, Arundel, Sussex, England; was buried Haughmond Abbey, Shropshire, England.
    2. Joan FitzAlan was born ~ 1267; died Aft 6 October 1316.

  25. 242.  Roger Mortimer, Knight, 1st Baron Mortimer was born 0___ 1231, (Wigmore Castle, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England) (son of Ralph de Mortimer, Knight and Gwladus Ddu); died 30 Oct 1292; was buried Wigmore Abbey, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Roger de Mortimer

    Notes:

    Roger Mortimer, 1st Baron Mortimer, of Wigmore (1231 – 30 October 1282), was a famous and honoured knight from Wigmore Castle in Herefordshire. He was a loyal ally of King Henry III of England. He was at times an enemy, at times an ally, of Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, Prince of Wales.

    Early career

    Born in 1231, Roger was the son of Ralph de Mortimer and his Welsh wife, Princess Gwladys Ddu, daughter of Llywelyn ab Iorwerth and Joan Plantagenet, daughter of John "Lackland", King of England.

    In 1256 Roger went to war with Llywelyn ap Gruffudd when the latter invaded his lordship of Gwrtheyrnion or Rhayader. This war would continue intermittently until the deaths of both Roger and Llywelyn in 1282. They were both grandsons of Llywelyn ab Iorwerth.

    Mortimer fought for the King against the rebel Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester, and almost lost his life in 1264 at the Battle of Lewes fighting Montfort's men. In 1265 Mortimer's wife, Maud de Braose helped rescue Prince Edward; and Mortimer and the Prince made an alliance against de Montfort.

    Victor at Evesham

    In August 1265, de Montfort's army was surrounded by the River Avon on three sides, and Prince Edward's army on the fourth. Mortimer had sent his men to block the only possible escape route, at the Bengeworth bridge. The Battle of Evesham began in earnest. A storm roared above the battle field. Montfort's Welsh soldiers broke and ran for the bridge, where they were slaughtered by Mortimer's men. Mortimer himself killed Hugh Despencer and Montfort, and crushed Montfort's army. Mortimer was awarded Montfort's severed head and other parts of his anatomy, which he sent home to Wigmore Castle as a gift for his wife, Lady Mortimer.

    Welsh wars and death

    See also: Conquest of Wales by Edward I

    Mortimer took part in Edward I's 1282 campaign against Llewelyn the Last, and was put in charge of operations in mid-Wales.[1] It was a major setback for Edward when Mortimer died in October 1282.[1]

    Marriage and children

    Lady Mortimer was Maud de Braose, daughter of William de Braose, Lord of Abergavenny by Eva Marshal. Roger Mortimer had married her in 1247. She was, like him, a scion of a Welsh Marches family. Their six known children were:[2]

    Ralph Mortimer, died 10 August 1274, Sheriff of Shropshire and Staffordshire.
    Edmund Mortimer, 2nd Baron Mortimer (1251–1304), married Margaret de Fiennes, the daughter of William II de Fiennes and Blanche de Brienne. Had issue, including Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March
    Isabella Mortimer, died 1292. She married (1) John Fitzalan, 7th Earl of Arundel,[2] (2) Ralph d'Arderne and (3) Robert de Hastang;[3]
    Margaret Mortimer, died 1297. She married Robert de Vere, 6th Earl of Oxford
    Roger Mortimer, 1st Baron Mortimer of Chirk, died 1326.
    Geoffrey Mortimer, died 1273.
    William Mortimer, died before June 1297, a knight, married Hawise, daughter and heir of Robert de Mucegros. Died childless.
    Their eldest son, Ralph, was a famed knight but died in his youth. The second son, Edmund, was recalled from Oxford University and appointed his father's heir.

    Epitaph

    Roger Mortimer died on 30 October 1282, and was buried at Wigmore Abbey, where his tombstone read:

    Here lies buried, glittering with praise, Roger the pure, Roger Mortimer the second, called Lord of Wigmore by those who held him dear. While he lived all Wales feared his power, and given as a gift to him all Wales remained his. It knew his campaigns, he subjected it to torment.

    Buried:
    his tombstone read:

    Here lies buried, glittering with praise, Roger the pure, Roger Mortimer the second, called Lord of Wigmore by those who held him dear. While he lived all Wales feared his power, and given as a gift to him all Wales remained his. It knew his campaigns, he subjected it to torment.

    Roger married Maud de Braose, Lady Mortimer 0___ 1247, King's Stanley, Gloucestershire, England. Maud (daughter of William de Braose, Lord of Brycheiniog and Eva Marshal, Countess of Abergavenny) was born ~ 1224, (Wales); died 0___ 1301. [Group Sheet]


  26. 243.  Maud de Braose, Lady Mortimer was born ~ 1224, (Wales) (daughter of William de Braose, Lord of Brycheiniog and Eva Marshal, Countess of Abergavenny); died 0___ 1301.
    Children:
    1. 121. Isabella Mortimer was born 0___ 1248, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England; died 0___ 1292.
    2. Edmund Mortimer, Knight, 2nd Baron Mortimer was born 0___ 1251, (Wigmore Castle, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England); died 17 Jul 1304, Wigmore Castle, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England.

  27. 248.  William de Warenne, Knight, 5th Earl of Surrey was born (England) (son of Hamelin de Warenne, Knight, Earl of Surrey and Isabel de Warenne, 4th Countess of Surrey); died 27 May 1240.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: High Sheriff of Surrey, 1217-1226
    • Occupation: Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports, 1204-1206
    • Residence: Normandie, France

    Notes:

    William de Warenne, 5th Earl of Surrey (died 27 May 1240[1]) was the son of Hamelin de Warenne and Isabel,[2] daughter of William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey. His father Hamelin granted him the manor of Appleby, North Lincolnshire.

    De Warenne was present at the coronation of John, King of England on 27 May 1199. When Normandy was lost to the French in 1204 he lost his Norman holdings, (in 1202 he was lieutenant of Gascony), but John recompensed him with Grantham and Stamford.

    His first tenure of office as Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports began in 1204, and lasted until 1206. He was also a Warden of the Welsh Marches between 1208 and 1213.

    William was one of the few barons who remained loyal to King John (who was his cousin) during the king’s difficulties with the barons, when they sought for the French prince to assume the English throne, and is listed as one of those who advised John to accede to the Magna Carta. His allegiance only faltered a few times when the king’s cause looked hopeless.

    In March 1217 he again demonstrated his loyalty to England by supporting the young King Henry III, and he was also responsible for the establishment of Salisbury Cathedral.

    Between the years 1200 and 1208, and during 1217–1226 he was to serve as the High Sheriff of Surrey. In 1214 he was again appointed Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports.

    William married Maud Marshal,[3] on 13 October 1225. They had a son and a daughter.[4] The son John (1231–1304) succeeded his father as earl, while the daughter, Isabel de Warenne (c. 1228–1282), married Hugh d'Aubigny, 5th Earl of Arundel.

    William may also have had an earlier, childless marriage to another Matilda, daughter of William d'Aubigny, 2nd Earl of Arundel.[5]

    William married Maud Marshal, Countess of Norfolk 13 Oct 1225, (England). Maud (daughter of William Marshal, Templar Knight, 1st Earl Pembroke and Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke) was born ~ 1193, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales; died 27 Mar 1248, Tintern Abbey, Chapel Hill, Monmouthshire, Wales. [Group Sheet]


  28. 249.  Maud Marshal, Countess of Norfolk was born ~ 1193, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales (daughter of William Marshal, Templar Knight, 1st Earl Pembroke and Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke); died 27 Mar 1248, Tintern Abbey, Chapel Hill, Monmouthshire, Wales.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Countess of Surrey

    Notes:

    Maud Marshal, Countess of Norfolk, Countess of Surrey (1192 – 27 March 1248) was an Anglo-Norman noblewoman and a wealthy co-heiress of her father William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke, and her mother Isabel de Clare suo jure 4th Countess of Pembroke. Maud was their eldest daughter.[1] She had two husbands: Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk, and William de Warenne, 5th Earl of Surrey.

    Maud was also known as Matilda Marshal.

    Family

    Maud's birthdate is unknown other than being post 1191. She was the eldest daughter of William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke and Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke, herself one of the greatest heiresses in Wales and Ireland. Maud had five brothers and four younger sisters. She was a co-heiress to her parents' extensive rich estates.

    Her paternal grandparents were John FitzGilbert Marshal and Sybilla of Salisbury, and her maternal grandparents were Richard de Clare, 2nd Earl of Pembroke, known as "Strongbow", and Aoife of Leinster.

    Marriages and issue

    Sometime before Lent in 1207, Maud married her first husband, Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk. It was through this marriage between Maud and Hugh that the post of Earl Marshal of England came finally to the Howard (Dukes of Norfolk).[2] In 1215, Hugh was one of the twenty-five sureties of the Magna Carta. He came into his inheritance in 1221, thus Maud became the Countess of Norfolk at that time. Together they had five children:[3]

    Roger Bigod, 4th Earl of Norfolk (1209–1270) He died childless.
    Hugh Bigod (1212–1266), Justiciar of England. Married Joan de Stuteville, by whom he had issue.
    Isabel Bigod (c. 1215–1250), married firstly Gilbert de Lacy of Ewyas Lacy, by whom she had issue; she married secondly John Fitzgeoffrey, Lord of Shere, by whom she had issue.
    Ralph Bigod (born c. 1218, date of death unknown), married Bertha de Furnival, by whom he had one child.
    William Bigod
    Hugh Bigod died in 1225. Maud married her second husband, William de Warenne, 5th Earl of Surrey before 13 October that same year. Together they had two children:

    Isabella de Warenne (c. 1228 – before 20 September 1282), married Hugh d'Aubigny, 5th Earl of Arundel. She died childless.
    John de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey (August 1231 – c. 29 September 1304), in 1247 married Alice de Lusignan, a half-sister of King Henry III of England, by whom he had three children.
    Maud's second husband died in 1240. Her youngest son John succeeded his father as the 6th Earl of Surrey, but as he was a minor, Peter of Savoy, uncle of Queen consort Eleanor of Provence, was guardian of his estates.

    Death

    Maud died on 27 March 1248 at the age of about fifty-six years and was buried at Tintern Abbey with her mother, possibly her maternal grandmother, and two of her brothers.

    Maud Marshal in literature

    Maud Marshal is the subject of a novel by Elizabeth Chadwick, titled To Defy a King. In the book she is called Mahelt rather than Maud. She and her first husband Hugh Bigod appear as secondary characters in books chronicling their parents's lives: The Time of Singing (UK: Sphere, 2008) published in the USA as For the King's Favor; The Greatest Knight; and The Scarlet Lion.

    Ancestors[edit]
    [show]Ancestors of Maud Marshal

    References

    Jump up ^ Thomas B. Costain, The Magnificent Century, pp. 103-104
    Jump up ^ Costain, The Magnificent Century, pp. 103-104
    Jump up ^ Charles Cawley, Medieval Lands, Earls of Norfolk, Bigod
    Thomas B. Costain, The Magnificent Century, published by Doubleday and Company, Garden City, New York, 1959
    Charles Cawley, Medieval Lands, Earls of Pembroke
    thePeerage.com/p 10677.htm#106761

    Children:
    1. 124. John de Warenne, Knight, 6th Earl of Surrey was born 0___ 1231, Lewes Castle, Lewes, East Sussex, England; died 29 Sep 1304, Kennington, Kent, England; was buried Lewes Priory, Southover, Sussex, England.

  29. 250.  Hugh of Lusignan, X, Knight, Count of La MarcheHugh of Lusignan, X, Knight, Count of La Marche was born ~ 1183, Angouleme, France; died 5 Jun 1249, Angouleme, France.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Hugh I of Angoulăeme
    • Also Known As: Hugh V of La Marche
    • Also Known As: Hugh X de Lusignan
    • Also Known As: Hugues X & V & I de Lusignan

    Notes:

    Hugh X de Lusignan, Hugh V of La Marche or Hugh I of Angoulăeme or Hugues X & V & I de Lusignan (c. 1183 or c. 1195 – c. 5 June 1249, Angoulăeme) succeeded his father Hugh IX as Seigneur de Lusignan and Count of La Marche in November 1219 and was Count of Angoulăeme by marriage.

    His father, Hugh IX de Lusignan was betrothed to marry 12-year-old Isabel of Angoulăeme in 1200,[2] when King John of England took her for his Queen, an action which resulted in the entire de Lusignan family rebelling against the English king. Following John's death, Queen Isabella returned to her native France, where she married Hugh X de Lusignan on 10 May 1220 [3]

    By Hugh's marriage to Isabella, he became Count of Angoulăeme until her death in 1246. Together they founded the abbey of Valence. They had nine children:

    Hugues XI & III & II de Lusignan, seigneur of Lusignan, Count of La Marche and Count of Angoulăeme (1221–1250)
    Aymer de Lusignan, Bishop of Winchester c. 1250 (c. 1222 – Paris, 5 December 1260 and buried there)
    Agathe de Lusignan (c. 1223 – aft. 7 April 1269), married Guillaume II de Chauvigny, seigneur of Chăateauroux (1224 – Palermo, 3 January 1271)
    Alice de Lusignan (1224 – 9 February 1256), married 1247 John de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey
    Guy de Lusignan (d. 1264), seigneur of Couhe, Cognac, and Archiac in 1249, killed at the Battle of Lewes.[citation needed] (Prestwich states he fled after the Battle of Lewes)[4]
    Geoffroi de Lusignan (d. 1274), seigneur of Jarnac, married in 1259 Jeanne de Chăatellerault, Vicomtess of Chăatellerault (d. 16 May 1315) and had issue:
    Eustachie de Lusignan (d. Carthage, Tunisia, 1270), married 1257 Dreux III de Mello (d. 1310)
    William (or Guillaume) de Valence (d. 1296)
    Marguerite de Lusignan (c. 1226/1228–1288), married (1st) 1240/1241 Raymond VII of Toulouse (1197–1249), married (2nd) c. 1246 Aimery IX de Thouars, Viscount of Thouars (d. 1256), and married (3rd) Geoffrey V de Chateaubriant, seigneur of Chateubriant
    Isabella of Lusignan (1224 – 14 January 1299), lady of Beauvoir-sur-Mer et de Mercillac, married (1st) Maurice IV de Craon (1224/1239 – soon before 27 May 1250/1277) (2nd) Geoffrey de Rancon, seigneur of Taillebourg.
    Hugh X was succeeded by his eldest son, Hugh XI of Lusignan.

    According to explanations in the manuscripts of Gaucelm Faidit's poems, this troubadour was a rival of Hugh X of Lusignan for the love of Marguerite d'Aubusson.

    He was buried at Angoulăeme.

    Hugh married Isabelle of Angouleme, Queen of England 10 May 1220, (Angouleme) France. Isabelle was born 0___ 1188, Angouleme, France; died 31 May 1246, Fontevrault L'abbe, Maine-Ete-Loire, France; was buried 31 May 1246, Fontevrault L'abbe, Maine-Ete-Loire, France. [Group Sheet]


  30. 251.  Isabelle of Angouleme, Queen of EnglandIsabelle of Angouleme, Queen of England was born 0___ 1188, Angouleme, France; died 31 May 1246, Fontevrault L'abbe, Maine-Ete-Loire, France; was buried 31 May 1246, Fontevrault L'abbe, Maine-Ete-Loire, France.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Countess of Angouleme
    • Also Known As: Isabella de Taillefer, Queen of England
    • Alt Birth: Abt 1173
    • Alt Death: 14 Oct 1217
    • Alt Death: 4 Jun 1246

    Notes:

    Isabel of Gloucester (c. 1173 - 14 October 1217) was the first wife of John of England . She is known by an exceptionally large number of alternative names: Hadwisa, Hawisia, Hawise, Joan, Eleanor, Avise and Avisa.

    *

    Isabella of Angoulăeme (French: Isabelle d'Angoulăeme, IPA: [izab?l d?~gul?m]; c.1188 – 4 June 1246) was queen consort of England as the second wife of King John from 1200 until John's death in 1216. She was also reigning Countess of Angoulăeme from 1202 until 1246.

    She had five children by the king including his heir, later Henry III. In 1220, Isabella married Hugh X of Lusignan, Count of La Marche, by whom she had another nine children.

    Some of her contemporaries, as well as later writers, claim that Isabella formed a conspiracy against King Louis IX of France in 1241, after being publicly snubbed by his mother, Blanche of Castile for whom she had a deep-seated hatred.[1] In 1244, after the plot had failed, Isabella was accused of attempting to poison the king. To avoid arrest, she sought refuge in Fontevraud Abbey where she died two years later, but none of this can be confirmed.

    Queen of England

    She was the only daughter and heir of Aymer Taillefer, Count of Angoulăeme, by Alice of Courtenay, who was sister of Peter II of Courtenay, Latin Emperor of Constantinople and granddaughter of King Louis VI of France.

    Isabella became Countess of Angoulăeme in her own right on 16 June 1202, by which time she was already queen of England. Her marriage to King John took place on 24 August 1200, in Angoulăeme,[2] a year after he annulled his first marriage to Isabel of Gloucester. She was crowned queen in an elaborate ceremony on 8 October at Westminster Abbey in London. Isabella was originally betrothed to Hugh IX le Brun, Count of Lusignan,[3] son of the then Count of La Marche. As a result of John's temerity in taking her as his second wife, King Philip II of France confiscated all of their French lands, and armed conflict ensued.

    At the time of her marriage to John, the blonde and blue-eyed 12-year-old Isabella was already renowned by some for her beauty[4] and has sometimes been called the Helen of the Middle Ages by historians.[5] Isabella was much younger than her husband and possessed a volatile temper similar to his own. King John was infatuated with his young, beautiful wife; however, his acquisition of her had as much, if not more to do with spiting his enemies, than romantic love. She was already engaged to Hugh IX le Brun, when she was taken by John. It had been said that he neglected his state affairs to spend time with Isabella, often remaining in bed with her until noon. However, these were rumors, ignited by John's enemies to discredit him as being a weak and grossly irresponsible ruler. Given that at the time they were made John was engaging in a desperate war with King Phillip of France to hold on to the remaining Plantagenet dukedoms. The common people began to term her a "siren" or "Messalina", which spoke volumes as to common opinion .[6] Her mother-in-law, Eleanor of Aquitaine readily accepted her as John's wife.[7]

    On 1 October 1207 at Winchester Castle, Isabella gave birth to a son and heir who was named Henry after the King's father, Henry II. He was quickly followed by another son, Richard, and three daughters, Joan, Isabel, and Eleanor. All five children survived into adulthood, and would make illustrious marriages; all but Joan would produce offspring of their own.

    Second marriage

    When King John died in October 1216, Isabella's first act was to arrange the speedy coronation of her nine-year-old son at the city of Gloucester on 28 October. As the royal crown had recently been lost in The Wash, along with the rest of King John's treasure, she supplied her own golden circlet to be used in lieu of a crown.[8] The following July, less than a year after his crowning as King Henry III of England, she left him in the care of his regent, William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke and returned to France to assume control of her inheritance of Angoulăeme.

    In the spring of 1220, she married Hugh X of Lusignan, "le Brun", Seigneur de Luisignan, Count of La Marche, the son of her former fiancâe, Hugh IX, to whom she had been betrothed before her marriage to King John. It had been previously arranged that her eldest daughter Joan should marry Hugh, and the little girl was being brought up at the Lusignan court in preparation for her marriage. Hugh, however, upon seeing Isabella, whose beauty had not diminished,[9] preferred the girl's mother. Princess Joan was provided with another husband, King Alexander II of Scotland, whom she wed in 1221.

    Isabella had married Hugh without waiting to receive the consent of the King's council in England, which was the required procedure for a former Queen of England, as the Council had the power to not only choose the Queen Dowager's second husband, but to decide whether or not she should be allowed to marry at all. Isabella's flouting of this law caused the Council to confiscate her dower lands and stop the payment of her pension.[10] Isabella and her husband retaliated by threatening to keep Princess Joan, who had been promised in marriage to the King of Scotland, in France. The council first responded by sending furious letters, signed in the name of young King Henry, to the Pope, urging him to excommunicate Isabella and her husband, but then decided to come to terms with Isabella, as to avoid conflict with the Scottish king, who was eager to receive his bride. Isabella was granted, in compensation for her dower lands in Normandy, the stannaries in Devon and the revenue of Aylesbury for a period of four years. She also received ą3000 as payment for arrears in her pension.[11]

    By Hugh X, Isabella had nine more children. Their eldest son Hugh XI of Lusignan succeeded his father as Count of La Marche and Count of Angoulăeme in 1249.

    Isabella's children from her past marriage continued their lives in England.

    Rebellion and death[edit]
    Described by some contemporaries as "vain, capricious, and troublesome,"[12] Isabella could not reconcile herself with her less prominent position in France. Though Queen dowager of England, Isabella was now mostly regarded as a mere Countess of La Marche and had to give precedence to other women.[13] In 1241, when Isabella and Hugh were summoned to the French court to swear fealty to King Louis IX of France's brother, Alphonse, who had been invested as Count of Poitou, their mother, the Queen Dowager Blanche openly snubbed her. This so infuriated Isabella, who had a deep-seated hatred of Blanche due to the latter having fervently supported the French invasion of England during the First Barons' War in May 1216, that she began to actively conspire against King Louis. Isabella and her husband, along with other disgruntled nobles, including her son-in-law Raymond VII of Toulouse, sought to create an English-backed confederacy which united the provinces of the south and west against the French king.[14] She encouraged her son Henry in his invasion of Normandy in 1230, but then did not provide him the support she had promised.[15]

    In 1244, after the confederacy had failed and Hugh had made peace with King Louis, two royal cooks were arrested for attempting to poison the King; upon questioning they confessed to having been in Isabella's pay.[16] Before Isabella could be taken into custody, she fled to Fontevraud Abbey, where she died on 4 June 1246.[17]

    By her own prior arrangement, she was first buried in the Abbey's churchyard, as an act of repentance for her many misdeeds. On a visit to Fontevraud, her son King Henry III of England was shocked to find her buried outside the Abbey and ordered her immediately moved inside. She was finally placed beside Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine. Afterwards, most of her many Lusignan children, having few prospects in France, set sail for England and the court of Henry, their half-brother.

    Issue

    With King John of England: 5 children, all of whom survived into adulthood, including:
    King Henry III of England (1 October 1207 – 16 November 1272). Married Eleanor of Provence, by whom he had issue, including his heir, King Edward I of England.
    Richard, Earl of Cornwall and King of the Romans (5 January 1209 – 2 April 1272). Married firstly Isabel Marshal, secondly Sanchia of Provence, and thirdly Beatrice of Falkenburg. Had issue.
    Joan (22 July 1210 – 1238), the wife of King Alexander II of Scotland. Her marriage was childless.
    Isabella (1214–1241), the wife of Emperor Frederick II, by whom she had issue.
    Eleanor (1215–1275), who would marry firstly William Marshal, 2nd Earl of Pembroke; and secondly Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester, by whom she had issue.

    With Hugh X of Lusignan, Count of La Marche: nine children, all of whom survived into adulthood, including:

    Hugh XI of Lusignan (1221–1250), Count of La Marche and Count of Angoulăeme. Married Yolande de Dreux, Countess of Penthiáevre and of Porhoet, by whom he had issue.
    Aymer of Lusignan (1222–1260), Bishop of Winchester
    Agnáes de Lusignan (1223–1269). Married William II de Chauvigny (d. 1270), and had issue.
    Alice of Lusignan (1224 – 9 February 1256). Married John de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey, by whom she had issue.
    Guy of Lusignan (c. 1225 – 1264), killed at the Battle of Lewes. (Tufton Beamish maintains that he escaped to France after the Battle of Lewes and died there in 1269).
    Geoffrey of Lusignan (c. 1226 – 1274). Married in 1259 Jeanne, Viscountess of Chăatellerault, by whom he had issue.
    Isabella of Lusignan (c.1226/1227 14 January 1299). Married firstly before 1244 Maurice IV, seigneur de Craon (1224–1250),[18] by whom she had issue; she married secondly, Geoffrey de Rancon.[19]
    William of Lusignan (c. 1228 – 1296). 1st Earl of Pembroke. Married Joan de Munchensi, by whom he had issue.
    Marguerite de Lusignan (c. 1229 – 1288). Married firstly in 1243 Raymond VII of Toulouse; secondly c. 1246 Aimery IX de Thouars, Viscount of Thouars and had issue

    Birth:
    Aquitaine, Charente department...

    Children:
    1. William de Valence, Knight, 1st Earl of Pembroke was born 1225-1230, Cistercian Abbey, Valence, France; died 18 May 1296, Bayonne, Gascony, France; was buried Westminster Abbey, 20 Deans Yd, London SW1P 3PA, United Kingdom.
    2. 125. Alice de Lusignan

  31. 252.  Hugh de Vere, Knight, 4th Earl of Oxford was born ~ 1208, (Essex, England) (son of Robert de Vere, Knight, 3rd Earl of Oxford and Isabel de Bolebec, Countess of Oxford); died 0Dec 1263, (Essex, England).

    Notes:

    Hugh de Vere, 4th Earl of Oxford (c. 1208 – December 1263) was the only son and heir of Robert de Vere, 3rd Earl of Oxford and Isabel de Bolebec, daughter and eventual sole heiress of Hugh de Bolebec.

    Early life

    Hugh de Vere was born about 1208, soon after the marriage of his parents. He was a minor when his father died in autumn 1221. Hugh's mother, Isabel de Bolebec, Countess of Oxford, purchased her son's wardship from the crown for 6000 marks.[1] Hugh did homage to King Henry III in October 1231, and was knighted by the King at Gloucester on 22 May 1233.[2] Two days later the King 'girt him with the sword of the Earldom of Oxford and directed the sheriff to let him have what he ought to have in the name of the Earldom of Oxford as his predecessors had had'.[3]

    Career

    He inherited the office of Master Chamberlain of England which had been granted to his great-grandfather Aubrey de Vere II. By right of that office, he participated in the coronation of Queen Eleanor in 1236. Earl Hugh was a critic of King Henry from 1246, and in 1258 and 1259 was elected to serve on various baronial committees attempting to reform royal government.[4] The earl purchased the right to hold a market at the town on his primary estate, Castle Hedingham in Essex, and founded a chantry there.[5]

    Marriage and issue

    Hugh de Vere married Hawise de Quincy,[6] daughter of Saer de Quincy, 1st Earl of Winchester, and his wife, Margaret de Beaumont. They had a son and three daughters:[7]

    Robert de Vere, 5th Earl of Oxford.
    Isabel de Vere, who married firstly, Sir John de Courtenay of Okehampton, Devon, and secondly, Oliver de Dinham, Lord Dinham.
    Lora de Vere, who married Reynold d'Argentine of Melbourn, Cambridgeshire.
    Margaret de Vere, who married Hugh de Cressy (d. shortly before 24 April 1263).[8]
    Hugh de Vere died before 23 December 1263 and was buried at Earls Colne. His widow was living in 1273 and died on 3 February thereafter. She was buried at Earls Colne Priory.[9]

    Footnotes

    Jump up ^ Cokayne 1945, p. 213.
    Jump up ^ Richardson IV 2011, p. 262.
    Jump up ^ Cokayne 1945, p. 214.
    Jump up ^ Cokayne 1945, p. 214.
    Jump up ^ Victoria County History of Essex, vol. II, p. 184.
    Jump up ^ Richardson IV 2011, p. 262.
    Jump up ^ Complete Peerage, X, 215 note 'h'.
    Jump up ^ Richardson IV 2011, pp. 262-e.
    Jump up ^ Richardson IV 2011, p. 262.

    References

    Cokayne, George Edward (1945). The Complete Peerage, edited by H.A. Doubleday. X. London: St. Catherine Press.
    Richardson, Douglas (2011). Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, ed. Kimball G. Everingham. IV (2nd ed.). Salt Lake City. ISBN 1460992709

    Hugh married Hawise de Quincy (Essex, England). [Group Sheet]


  32. 253.  Hawise de Quincy (daughter of Saer de Quincy, Knight, 1st Earl of Winchester and Margaret de Beaumont).

    Notes:

    Residence (Family):
    Hedingham Castle, in the village of Castle Hedingham, Essex, is the best preserved Norman keep in England.

    Picture, history & source ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hedingham_Castle

    Children:
    1. 126. Robert de Vere, Knight, 5th Earl of Oxford was born ~ 1240, Hedingham Castle, Essex, England; died Bef 7 SEPT 1296; was buried Earls Coine, Essex, England.
    2. Isabel de Vere was born ~ 1222, (Essex, England); died Aft 11 Aug 1299.
    3. Lora De Vere was born (Essex, England).
    4. Margaret de Vere was born (Essex, England).