Joan Neville

Female 1372 - 1463  (~ 91 years)


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Generation: 1

  1. 1.  Joan Neville was born 0___ 1372, Farnley, Yorkshire, England (daughter of Robert de Neville and Margaret de la Pole); died 24 Nov 1463.

    Joan — John Langton. John was born 0___ 1379, Lincoln, Lincolnshire, England; died 25 Feb 1459. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. John Langton was born ~ 1387; died 25 Feb 1459, Farnley, Yorkshire, England.

Generation: 2

  1. 2.  Robert de Neville was born 0___ 1323, Hornby Castle, Hornby, Lancaster LA2 8LA, UK (son of Robert Neville and Joan Atherton); died 4 Apr 1413.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Robert Neville

    Robert married Margaret de la Pole 0___ 1344. Margaret (daughter of William de la Pole and Katherine de Norwich) was born 0___ 1327, (Ravenser Odd, Yorkshire, England); died 0___ 1366. [Group Sheet]


  2. 3.  Margaret de la Pole was born 0___ 1327, (Ravenser Odd, Yorkshire, England) (daughter of William de la Pole and Katherine de Norwich); died 0___ 1366.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Margaret Pole

    Children:
    1. 1. Joan Neville was born 0___ 1372, Farnley, Yorkshire, England; died 24 Nov 1463.


Generation: 3

  1. 4.  Robert Neville was born Bef 1302, England; died 0Jul 1373.

    Robert — Joan Atherton. Joan was born 0___ 1304, England; died 0___ 1353. [Group Sheet]


  2. 5.  Joan Atherton was born 0___ 1304, England; died 0___ 1353.
    Children:
    1. 2. Robert de Neville was born 0___ 1323, Hornby Castle, Hornby, Lancaster LA2 8LA, UK; died 4 Apr 1413.

  3. 6.  William de la PoleWilliam de la Pole was born 1290-1295, Ravenser Odd, Yorkshire, England; died 21 Jun 1366, Hull, Yorkshire, England; was buried Trinity Church, Kingston-upon-Hull, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Chief Baron of the Exchequer for King Edward II

    Notes:

    Sir William de la Pole (died 21 June 1366) was a wealthy wool merchant in Kingston upon Hull, England, a royal moneylender and briefly, Chief Baron of the Exchequer.

    He established the de la Pole family as one of the primary houses of England through his mercantile and financial success, as well as initiating the foundation of the Charterhouse monastery in Hull.

    Life

    William de la Pole is generally held to be the second eldest of three brothers; he had an elder brother and associate Richard de la Pole (died 1345) who was also a merchant, and a younger brother, John.[1] His date of birth has been estimated from 1295 to 1290 or possibly earlier.[2]

    Parentage

    There is much confusion and differing opinion on William's parentage, though a father William, of either Ravenser or Hull is referred to in a number of sources. Historical research may have been muddled through the presence of more than one William de la Pole in Hull in the first half of the 14th century, one the nephew of the other; the younger was the son of William's brother Richard.[3] Harvey (1957) found no documentary evidence for a man named William de la Pole in either Hull or Ravenser prior to William and Richard, and on the brothers Richard and William stated: "Neither their parentage nor place of origin seem to have been revealed by the brothers, and these remain unsolved mysteries".[4]

    Several Victorian era sources make the statement that his father was called William de la Pole,[5][6][7] as do the 17th century historians William Dugdale and William Camden.[8] Frost (1827) notes that the description of the father's status are subject to contradiction by historians: in some sources he is described as a merchant, in others as a knight.[5] A link to a William de la Pole, merchant of Totnes has also be suggested, but lacks evidence.[6]

    A number of sources identify Elena as the mother of William and Richard, and as wife of William the father;[9] Elena is said to have remarried to a John Rotenheryng, merchant of Hull after the father's death.[5] Harvey (1957) surmises that the identification of Elena as the mother of William is an error, based on a misinterpretation of the text the will of John Rotenhering;[n 1] Harvey (1957) concludes that the brother's were orphans of an important family, and that John Rotenhering (of Hull) and Robert Rotenhering (of Ravenser), both important merchants, acted as guardians.[11] John Rotenhering appears to have been acted as the de la Pole brothers' guardian; much of his property passed to the brothers after his heir Alicia died in 1340 with no descendents.[11]

    Fryde states that neither his father's name nor his father's occupation are accurately known.[12]

    Frost (1827) proposes that Wiliam's father was Sir William de la Pole of Powysland (d.1305), fourth son of Sir Griffin de la Pole,[n 2] Harvey (1957) suggests that the brothers' parents may have been Sir Lewis (Llywelyn) de la Pole (d.1294) and his wife Sibilla; and their grandfather Sir Griffin de la Pole of London.[11] Circumstantial evidence for a more knightly and less mercantile background is provided by the brother's tutelage under important merchants and subsequent rapid rise, which included close links to the crown.[13]

    Biography

    1880 portrait of de la Pole by Thomas Tindall Wildridge

    Both William and his brother were originally merchants in Ravenser; by the 1310s he had moved to Kingston upon Hull,[n 3] Both William and his brother Richard were already notable merchants by the late 1310s: by 1317, they were deputies of the Royal Chief Butler and from 1321 to 1324 both were and chamberlains of the town.[17] In the 1320s William was exporting increasing quantities of wool from Hull, during the same period William had begun providing finance to Edward II relating to his conflict with the French over Gascony; loans of 1,800 and 1,000 are recorded in 1325, the brothers had also become significant figures within the town of Hull, their actions included a sum of 306 spent on improving the fortifications of Hull.[18]

    After the downfall of Edward II, the brother's importance within the state increased as a consequence of the resumption of the wars with Scotland in 1327 during the reign of Edward III under the regency of Roger Mortimer and Queen Isabella; 4,000 was loaned for the Scottish campaign in 1327, in addition to 2,000 loaned for the pay of Dutch mercenaries employed during the ousting of Edward II;[14] By 1329 the total loans exceeded 13,000, amounts comparable to those provided by the traditional royal financiers, the Bardi of Florence.[19] The De la Poles financed the loans through lending from other merchants.[15] In return for these services the De la Poles obtained various privileges and other rewards from the crown: they obtained the manor of Myton in 1330; and in 1332 William became the first mayor of the town of Hull, a position he held until 1335; he also represented Hull in parliament in several years of the 1330s.[14] William and Richard de la Pole formally dissolved their partnership in 1331.[20][21]

    William was increasingly in the service of the king during the 1330s, both acquiring supplies, as well as providing ships for his wars with the Scots, and commissioning and commandeering ships for the dynastic dispute with France that became known as the Hundred Years War.[22] He jointly managed the English Wool Company, set up by the king to finance his war through control of the wool trade;[23] Smuggling of wool caused financial hardship, and the collapse of the scheme from June 1338 to October 1339 the king had to borrow over 100,000 from Pole; he acquired the estate of Burstwick (or lordship of Holderness) from the financially stricken king for 22,650, which brought about the king's resentment.[24][14] In 1339 he settled a loan of 50,000 florins from the Archbishop of Trier (Treves) in place of the king's crown, which had been used as collateral.[25] The same year De la Pole achieved the rank of Knight Banneret, and on 26 September 1339 he was made Baron of the Exchequer.[26]

    In 1340 William and Richard de la Pole, as well as Sir John de Pulteney were arrested, he was charged in relation to the failure of the English Wool Company, and De la Pole was incarcerated at Devizes Castle and his lands seized; the charge was annulled in 1344.[27][26] Between 1343 and 1345 he returned to organising the financing of the king's wars through the foundation of a new company. During a period of peace in the 1350s, the king renewed the wool smuggling charges against De la Pole, forcing him to renounce his claim to the manor of Burstwick; in 1354 he signed a document cancelling all the king's debts to him in exchange for his pardon.[27][28]

    In 1350 he founded a hospital in Hull, named the Maison Dieu; shortly before his death he obtained a license from Edward III for the foundation of a religious house, originally intended to be of the Order of Saint Clare; he died before it was completed, and the place was established by his son Michael de la Pole, 1st Earl of Suffolk as a Carthusian house dedicated to St. Michael (see Charterhouse, Kingston upon Hull).[29][26][n 4]

    He died on 22 June 1366.[31]

    In many sources it is stated that he was buried in the Holy Trinity Church, Hull, at the tomb commonly known as the de la Pole tomb,[n 5] Fryde and others state that his final interment was with his wife Katherine (d.1382) in the church of the Carthusian monastery in Hull; which was not established until 1377.[32][33]

    Descendants and legacy

    William de la Pole married Katherine, daughter of Sir Walter de Norwich,[34] and had six children, four sons and two daughters:[n 6] Michael, Walter, Thomas (died 1361), Edmund, Blanche and Margaret.[26] Katherine died on 28 January 1382.[31]

    Michael would become Michael de la Pole, 1st Earl of Suffolk, Edmund de la Pole became Captain of Calais in 1387, Walter and Thomas were both knights. Blanche married Richard le Scrope, 1st Baron Scrope of Bolton, whilst Margaret married Robert Neville of Hornby.[26]

    William's mercantile and financial prowess raised his family from relative obscurity to one of the primary families of the realm in a single generation.[35][36] At the end of the 14th century he was described in the 'Chronicle of Melsa' as "second to no other merchant of England" (nulli Angligenae mercatori postea secundus fuit).[37][26]

    The descendants of William de la Pole were notable figures in English history for the next 150 years, including several Dukes of Suffolk, and descendants who took part in the actions of the 'Hundred Years' War' with France. The family's fortunes changed with the loss of the English throne by the House of York in the late 15th century. His direct male descendents included:

    John de la Pole, 1st Earl of Lincoln (c. 1462-16 June 1487), who was named Richard III's heir and died at the Battle of Stoke fighting for Yorkist pretender, Lambert Simnel.
    Edmund de la Pole, 3rd Duke of Suffolk (1471-30 April 1513), who was executed by Henry VIII for claiming the throne as the next Yorkist heir after his elder brother.
    William de la Pole (14781539) who was incarcerated in the Tower of London by Henry VII, and his possessions confiscated due to a potential claim to the throne which he never pressed. His imprisonment lasted 37 years until his death in 1539.
    Richard de la Pole (1480-24 February 1525), another Yorkist pretender in succession to John and Edmund. He was killed at the Battle of Pavia.

    Notes

    Jump up ^ Elena wife of John Rotenhering pre-marriage surname was le Flekere, a known in Wyke upon Hull during that period.[10]
    Jump up ^ This claim contradicts the idea that his father's widow was called Elena, as this William de la Pole's widow was called Gladys (d.1344) and did not remarry.[10]
    Jump up ^ Kingsford gives a written date of at least 1318,[14] and Fryde gives 1317,[15] Fox Bourne states 1316, and supposed the brothers were operating there several years earlier.[16]
    Jump up ^ The building was the predecessor of the place known as The Charterhouse.[30]
    Jump up ^ e.g. Fox Bourne 1866, p. 68
    Jump up ^ Gent only mentions three children: Michael; Margaret and Edmund.[34]

    References

    Jump up ^ Fox Bourne 1831, p. 52.
    Jump up ^ Fryde 1988, p. 11.
    Jump up ^ Harvey 1957, pp. 24.
    Jump up ^ Harvey 1957, pp. 2,4.
    ^ Jump up to: a b c Frost 1827, De la Pole pedigree, note 'e', p. 31; and facing page to p. 31
    ^ Jump up to: a b Sheahan, James Joseph (1864), General and concise history and description of the town and port of Kingston-upon-Hull, Simpkin, Marshall & Co., note 'a', p. 35
    Jump up ^ Kingsford 1896.
    Jump up ^ Harvey 1957, pp. 23.
    Jump up ^ Kingsford 1896, p. 48.
    ^ Jump up to: a b Harvey 1957, p. 3.
    ^ Jump up to: a b c Harvey 1957, p. 4.
    Jump up ^ Fryde 1988, pp. 910.
    Jump up ^ Harvey 1957, pp. 45.
    ^ Jump up to: a b c d Kingsford 1896, p. 49.
    ^ Jump up to: a b Fryde 2004.
    Jump up ^ Fox Bourne 1866, p. 55.
    Jump up ^ Fryde 1988, pp. 11, 13.
    Jump up ^ Fryde 1988, pp. 1415.
    Jump up ^ Fryde 1988, p. 17.
    Jump up ^ Fryde 1988, pp. 2122.
    Jump up ^ Frost 1827, Appendix, "Deed of Partition between Richard De La Pole and William De La Pole, dated 12 July 1331, p. 39.
    Jump up ^ Fox Bourne 1866, pp. 5860.
    Jump up ^ Fryde 1988, pp. 2528.
    Jump up ^ Fryde 2004, The Dordrecht scheme and its consequences, 13371341.
    Jump up ^ Fox Bourne 1866, pp. 623.
    ^ Jump up to: a b c d e f Kingsford 1896, p. 50.
    ^ Jump up to: a b Fox Bourne 1866, pp. 6567.
    Jump up ^ Fryde 2004, Trials and tribulations, 13411354.
    Jump up ^ Gent 1869, pp. 6870.
    Jump up ^ Fox Bourne 1866, p. 67.
    ^ Jump up to: a b Fox Bourne 1866, p. 68.
    Jump up ^ Fryde 2004, Last years and family fortunes.
    Jump up ^ Badham, Sally (August 2012), "A Monument in Holy Trinity Church Hull", Monument of the Month, The Church Monuments Society
    ^ Jump up to: a b Gent 1869, p. 67.
    Jump up ^ Fryde 1988, p. 1.
    Jump up ^ Fryde 1962, pp. 1718.
    Jump up ^ de Burton 1868, p. 48.

    Sources

    de Burton, Thomas (1868) [1396], Bond, Edward A., ed., "Chronica Monasterii de Melsa, a Fundatione Usque ad Annum 1396, Auctore Thoma de Burton, Abbate. Accedit Continuatio ad Annum 1406", Rerum Britannicarum medii aevi scriptores (Chronicles and Memorials of Great Britain and Ireland during the Middle Ages) (in Latin and English), Longmans, Green, Reader and Dyer, 3, "Account of Sir William de la Pole", p. 48, Praescriptus autem dominus Willelmus de la Pole prius mercator fuit, et, apud Ravenserodd mercandizandi scientia instructus, nulli Angligenae mercatori postea secundus fuit. Ipse postea, apud Kyngestonam super Hullo commorans, primus omnium fuit major in eadem villa, monasteriumque Sancti Michaelis juxta dictam Kyngestonam, quod modo est Cartusiensium, inchoavit et fundavit, filiumque habuit suum primogenitum dominum Michaelem de la Pole comitem Suffolchiae, qui dictum monasterium per Carthusienses fecit inhabitari. Ipse quidem Willelmus de la Pole multa millia librarum auri regi Edwardo accommodavit, dum apud Andewerp in Brabantia moraretur. Quapropter rex, in recompensationem dicti auri, praefecit eum baronibus scaccarii sui, totumque dominium de Holderness una cum aliis terris dignitati regiae spectantibus per chartam regiam ei contulit ; in qua praecepit ut pro barinetto haberetur.

    Gent, Thomas (1869) [1735], Annales Regioduni Hullini : Or, The History of the Royal and Beautiful Town of Kingston-upon-Hull.., pp. 6771

    Frost, Charles (1827), Notices relative to the early history of the town and port of Hull, J.B. Nichols

    Burke, John (1831), A general and heraldic dictionary of the peerages of England, Ireland, and Scotland, extinct, dormant, and in abeyance, POLE : Barons De La Pole, .. , pp. 435438

    Fox Bourne, Henry Richard (1866), "II. The De La Poles of Hull (13111366)", English merchants: memoirs in illustration of the progress of British commerce, 1, Richard Bentley, pp. 5070 ; 2nd edition, 1886

    Kingsford, Charles Lethbridge (1896), "Pole, William de la (d.1366)", Dictionary of National Biography, 18851900, 46, pp. 4950, via wikisource

    Harvey, A.S. (1957), The De La Pole Family of Kingston upon Hull, East Yorkshire Local History Society

    Horrox, Rosemary (1983), The De la Poles of Hull, East Yorkshire Local History Society

    Fryde, E.B. (2004), "William de la Pole", The Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/22460

    Fryde, E. B. (1962). "The Last Trials of Sir William de la Pole". The Economic History Review. 15: 1730. doi:10.1111/j.1468-0289.1962.tb02225.x.

    Fryde, E.B. (1964), "The Wool Accounts of William de la Pole: a Study of Some Aspects of the English wool trade at the start of the Hundred Years' War", St. Anthony's Hall Publications, Borthwick Institute of Historical Research (25), ISBN 978-0-900701-26-9

    Fryde, E.B. (1988), William de la Pole: Merchant and King's Banker: Merchant and King's Banker (d. 1366), Hambleton Press, ISBN 0 907628 35 4

    *

    Immediate Family

    Katherine de Norwich
    wife

    Margaret de Neville
    daughter

    Blanche Scrope (de la Pole)
    daughter

    Michael de la Pole, 1st Earl of ...
    son

    Joan de la Pole
    daughter

    Walter De La Pole
    son

    Thomas de la Pole
    son

    Sir Edmund de la Pole, Kt., MP
    son

    Sir John de la Pole
    son

    Catherine de la Pole
    daughter

    Richard de la Pole
    son

    Margaret E De la Pole
    wife
    About William de la Pole
    William De La POLE (Sir)

    Born: ABT 1302, Linby, Nottinghamshire, England

    Died: 21 Jun 1366

    Buried: Carthusian Priory, Hull

    Notes: The Complete Peerage vol.XIIp1.p.434-437.

    Father: William De La POLE (Sir)

    Mother: Elena ROTENHERYNG

    Married: Margaret (Catherine) De NORWICH (b. ABT 1306 - d. 1382) (dau. of Walter De Norwich and Catherine De Hadersete)

    Children:

    1. Michael De La POLE (1 E. Suffolk)

    2. Edmund De La POLE (Sir)

    3. Walter De La POLE (Sir)

    4. Thomas De La POLE (Sir)

    5. Blanche De La POLE (B. Scrope of Bolton)

    6. Catherine De La POLE

    7. Margaret De La POLE

    8. Isabel De La POLE

    William de la Pole of Hull (d. 1366) was a wealthy merchant in Kingston upon Hull, a royal moneylender, a baron of the Exchequer, and ultimately a baron.

    Sir William and his (probably older) brother Sir Richard de la Pole (died 1345) were merchants at Hull by 1317, importing Gascon wines. From 1317, they were deputies of the Royal Chief Butler. From 1321, they were collectors of customs and chamberlains of the town. With the accession of Edward III (then under the tutelage of Roger Mortimer and Queen Isabella), war with Scotland was resumed. They loaned the pair large sums of money in 1327, and in return Richard received the appointment of Chief Butler of England. When the Bardi, Edward's Florentine bankers were unable to lend the king money to pay his troops, the Pole brothers did so. They were owed 13,482 by February 1329.

    Contrary to earlier suggestions, they did not lose power with Mortimer's fall, but their wealth meant they could not be totally excluded from the government of Edward III. Richard continued to attend court at a time when Mortimer's supporters were absent. In July 1331, the brothers divided their assets. Richard was again Chief Butler of England from 1333 to 1338. He was an alderman of London from 1330 to 1340 (when he was knighted), but died in 1345. His son William is principally known as a Northamptonshire landowner.

    In 1331 Sir William persuaded the king to make Hull into an autonomous borough, instead of having a royal warden. On the death of the last warden in 1333, the brothers took over the royal property there and Sir William became Mayor of Hull, a post which he filled for the next 4 years. He also represented the city of Hull in five sessions of Parliament (March 1332, September 1334, May 1335, September 1336, and February 1338).

    He continued financing Edward's Scottish wars but also bought much property in Yorkshire and Durham. His trading activities included the large scale export of wool to Dortrecht, but he and his partners abused the right of compulsory purchase that they were granted, smuggling wool, and thus ruined the financing of the king's campaigns in the Netherlands in 133840.

    As a result of this, he and his associates were arrested after the king's return in November 1340, and deprived of the property. However, he was released in May 1342 and the proceedings were quashed, probably because the king needed his help financially. He organised a new company, which managed the Customs and lent vast sums to the king, also buying up royal debts at a large discount. He withdrew from the company in 1345. The company continued, and financed the Crecy campaign and the Siege of Calais, but were ruined as a result of the Black Death. He escaped liability for the debts of the now bankrupt company. However, the prosecution of 1341 was revived, and Sir William only escaped by renouncing all debts due from the crown. This, however, still left him a wealthy man. He died in May 1366, five months after his son Michael was summoned to Parliament as a peer.

    Family

    The orgins of Sir William are obscure. His father's name is not certainly known but may have been William. His mother Elena remarried John Rotenheryng. Some genealogical tables indicate Sir William was related to the old ruling house of Powys Wenwynwyn [1], however other contest this and there is no concrete evidence that he was or wasn't related to these princes whose descendants used the surname de la Pole,[1] (i.e. of Welshpool). The surname (meaning 'of the pool') was no doubt not exceptional. Sir William had three sons:

    Michael de la Pole, 1st Earl of Suffolk

    Sir Edmund de la Pole

    Sir Thomas de la Pole

    De la Pole Avenue, located in the west of Kingston upon Hull, is named after Sir William.

    References

    E. B. Fryde, Pole, Sir William de la (d. 1366), Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, Sept 2004; online edn, Jan 2008 accessed 12 April 2008

    William de la Pole of Hull

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    William de la Pole of Hull (died 1366) was a wealthy merchant in Kingston upon Hull, a royal moneylender, a baron of the Exchequer, and ultimately a baron.

    Sir William and his (probably older) brother Sir Richard de la Pole (died 1345) were merchants at Hull by 1317, importing Gascon wines. From 1317, they were deputies of the Royal Chief Butler. From 1321, they were collectors of customs and chamberlains of the town. With the accession of Edward III (then under the tutelage of Roger Mortimer and Queen Isabella), war with Scotland was resumed. They loaned the pair large sums of money in 1327, and in return Richard received the appointment of Chief Butler of England. When the Bardi, Edward's Florentine bankers were unable to lend the king money to pay his troops, the Pole brothers did so. They were owed 13,482 by February 1329.

    Contrary to earlier suggestions, they did not lose power with Mortimer's fall, but their wealth meant they could not be totally excluded from the government of Edward III. Richard continued to attend court at a time when Mortimer's supporters were absent. In July 1331, the brothers divided their assets. Richard was again Chief Butler of England from 1333 to 1338. He was an alderman of London from 1330 to 1340 (when he was knighted), but died in 1345. His son William is principally known as a Northamptonshire landowner.

    In 1331 Sir William persuaded the king to make Hull into an autonomous borough, instead of having a royal warden. On the death of the last warden in 1333, the brothers took over the royal property there and Sir William became Mayor of Hull, a post which he filled for the next 4 years. He also represented the city of Hull in five sessions of Parliament (March 1332, September 1334, May 1335, September 1336, and February 1338).

    He continued financing Edward's Scottish wars but also bought much property in Yorkshire and Durham. His trading activities included the large scale export of wool to Dortrecht, but he and his partners abused the right of compulsory purchase that they were granted, smuggling wool, and thus ruined the financing of the king's campaigns in the Netherlands in 133840.

    As a result of this, he and his associates were arrested after the king's return in November 1340, and deprived of the property. However, he was released in May 1342 and the proceedings were quashed, probably because the king needed his help financially. He organised a new company, which managed the Customs and lent vast sums to the king, also buying up royal debts at a large discount. He withdrew from the company in 1345. The company continued, and financed the Crecy campaign and the Siege of Calais, but were ruined as a result of the Black Death. He escaped liability for the debts of the now bankrupt company. However, the prosecution of 1341 was revived, and Sir William only escaped by renouncing all debts due from the crown. This, however, still left him a wealthy man. He died in May 1366, five months after his son Michael was summoned to Parliament as a peer.

    [edit] Family

    The origins of Sir William are obscure. His father's name is not certainly known but may have been William. His mother Elena remarried John Rotenheryng. Some genealogical tables[1] indicate Sir William was related to the old ruling house of Powys Wenwynwyn. However, there is no concrete evidence whatever of this alleged relationship, though those princes' descendants used the surname de la Pole (i.e. "of the Pool", referring to their case to Welshpool).[1] This surname was no doubt not exceptional.

    Sir William had three sons:

    Michael de la Pole, 1st Earl of Suffolk

    Sir Edmund de la Pole

    Sir Thomas de la Pole

    De la Pole Avenue, located in the west of Kingston upon Hull, is named after Sir William.

    ID: I51174
    Name: William De la Pole Earl of Suffolk
    Surname: De la Pole
    Given Name: William
    Suffix: Earl of Suffolk
    Prefix: Sir
    Nickname: Sir
    Sex: M
    Birth: 1302 in Hull, Yorkshire, England
    Death: 21 Jun 1366 in Hull, Yorkshire, England
    Burial: Trinity Church, Kingston-upon-Hull, Yorkshire, England
    _UID: 3507583900CCE846A44A0FF24DDE71C81A6A

    Note:

    Sir William de la Pole, called in English William Atte Pool (d 1366), baron of the exchequer and merchant, was second son fo Sir William de la Pole, a merchant of Ravenser Odd (Ravensrode) and Hull, who is described as a knight in 1296 and died about 1329, having made his will in December 1328. The father married Elena, daughter of John Rotenheryng, 'merchant of Hull,' by whom he had three sons, Richard, William, and John.

    The eldest brother, Sir Richard de la Pole (d 1345), was, in 1319, attorney for the king's butler at Hull, and a mainpernor for certain merchants of Lubeck. He was collector of the customs at Hull in 1320, as was M.P. for that town in the parliaments of May 1322 and September 1327. Through the influence of Roger Mortimer he became the king's chief butler in 1327, and, in conjunction with his brother William, obtained the office of gauger of wines throughout the realm for life on 22 May 1329, and a similar grant of the customs of Hull, on 9 May 1330. The two brothers are frequently mentioned as advancing money for the king. After the fall of Mortimer they lost the post of granger of wines, but Sir Richard continued to be chief butler until 1338. He was a guardian of the peace for Derbyshire, and served on a commission of oyer and terminer in Leicestershire in 1332. About 1333 he seems to have moved to London, and in his will and elsewhere is styled a citizen of London. He was knighted in 1340 and, dying on 1 Aug 1345 at his manor of Milton, Northamptonshire, was buried in the Trinity Chapel at Hull. His will is printed in 'Testamenta Everacensin.' By his wive Joan he had two sons, William and John, and three daughters: Joan, wife of Ralph Basset of Weldon, Northampshire; Elizabeth a nun; and Margaret. His son William (1316), who is carefully to be distinguished from his uncle, married Margaret daughter of Edmund Peverel, and held propberty at Brington and Ashby, Northamptonshire. He died on 26 June 1366, leaving a son John, who married Joan, daughter of John lord Cobham; by her he was father of Joan, baroness Cobham and wife of Sir John Oldcastle. The armes of this branch of the family were azure, two bars wavy, or.

    Sir William de la Pole, the baron of the exchequer, first learnt the business of a merchant at Ravenser Odd, but afterwards moved to Hull, and is mentioned as a merchant of that town in 1319 and 1322. He was associated with his elder brother as gauger of wines in 1327, and in supplying money for the royal service. During the regency of Mortimer and Isabella they advanced large sums to the government: 4,000 on 12 July 1327 for the abortive Scots campaing, and 2,000 six weeks later as wages for the Netherland mercenaries, who had landed to effect Edward II's deposition. As repayment they received the issues of customs in London and other principal ports. They also received a grant of the manor of Myton in Yorkshire for their good services in 1330, and on 2 Aug were appointed joint wardens of Hull. On the fall of Mortimer their position was endangered, and they lost the office of gaugers of wine. But they kept aloof from politices, and their wealth insured their pardon. On 15 July 1331 William de la Pole, then described as the king's yeoman and butler, was granted repayment for his advances to Queen Philippa out of the customs of Hull. In 1332 he entertained the king at Hull, and obtained from Edward the title of mayor of the chief magistrate of the town, being himself the first to fill the office, which he retained for four years til 1335. Pole represented Hull in the parliaments of March 1332, September 1334, May and September 1336, and February 1338. During 1333 and the two following years he was employed on the various negotiations with Flanders, with which, as a wool merchant, he had commercial relations.

    On 29 Sept 1335 he was appointed custos of the tables of exchange, established to prevent the export of gold and silver, and receiver of the old and new customs of Hull and Boston. In consideration of the latter appointment he undertook to pay the expenses of the royal household at 10 a day. In 1337 he was charged ot build a galley for the king at Hull, and on 1 Sept of this year was associated with Reginal de Conduit in purchasing wool to be sent abroad for the king. On 14 Nov 1338 Edward gave his an acknowledgment for 11,000 advanced, and for 7,500 for which he had become bound; and this same year, in consideration of other moneys advanced by Pole, granted him various manors in Nottinghamshire and Yorkshire, including the lordship of Holderness, together with the rank of knight-bannerer, the reversion of one thousand marks in rent in France when the king recovered his rights there, and the houses in Lombard Street, London, which had belonged to the 'Societas Bardorum.'

    The 'Chronicle of Meaux' also states that Pole's appointment as baron of the exchequer was in reward for the same services. The date of his appointment as second baron was 26 SEpt 1339, and as one of the judges he was present in the parliament of October 1339 and April 13340. He was a commissionar of array for Yorkshire in 1339. During this and the following year he was much employed by the king in commercial and financial business. In 1339 he was a hostage for the payment of the king's expenses at Antwerp. In 1340 he undertook to obtain wool for the king's aid, and to advance three thousand marks. But his conduct of affairs did not satisfy the king, and when Edward returned in haste to London on 30 Nov 1340, William de la Pole, his brother Richard, and Sir John de Pulteney were among the merchants who were arrested. Pole's lands were taken into the king's hands and he was for a short time imprisoned at Devizes Castle. The particular charge against Pole arose out of his commission with Reginald de Conduit three years before; but though judgment was given against them in the exchequer, the whole process was annulled in the parliament of July 1344. Sir William de la Pole survived to enjoy the king's favour for more than twenty years, but he does not again appear in a prominent position. About 1350 he founded a hospital, the Maison Dieu, outside Hull, which he had at first intended to be a cell of Meaux, but afterwards converted to a college for six priests. In the last year of his life he obtained license to change it to a house for nuns of the order of St Clare, and eventually, in 1376, his son Michale established it as a Carthusian priory. Pole died at Hull on 21 April or 22 June 1366, and was buried, like his brother, in the Trinity Chapel. HIs will is printed in 'Testamenta Eboracensia.'

    He married Katherine, daughter of Sir Walter de Norwich, who survived him, and dying in 1381, was buried at the Charterhouse, Hull; her will is printed in 'Testamenta Eboracensa.' Pole had four sons: Michael, earl of Suffolk, Walter and Thomas (d 1361), both of whom were knights; and Edmund (1337-1417), who was captain of Calais in 1387, when he refused admission to his brother Michael lest he should be found false to his trust. The Edmund who fought at Agincourt was probably his grandson. Pole had also two daughters: Blanche, who married Richard, first lord le Scrope of Bolton; and Margaret, married Robert Neville of Hornby, Lancashire. Sir William de la Pole's arms were azure, a fess between three leopards' faces cr. The 'Chronicle of Meaux' describes him as 'second to no merchant of England.' He is memorable in English commercial history as the first merchant who became the founder of a great noble house. His own and his wife's effigies, from the tomb in the church of the Holy Trinity, Hull, are engraved in Gough's 'Sepulchral Monuments.' [Dictionary of National Biography XVI:48-50]
    _________________________

    WILLIAM DE LA POLE, in 1319 with his brothers Richard and John obtained an acknowledgment of a debt; in 1325 he was pardoned for acquiring the manor of Linby, Notts. In 1327 grants were made to his brother Richard (King's butler) and himself towards the King's indebtedness to them, and thereafter they constantly appear as advancing money to the King. In May 1329, with his brother, he was appointed gauger of wines throughout the kingdom, but this appointment was vacated on the fall of Mortimer by the re-appointment in December 1330 of the previous holder, who had been removed without the King's consent; in the same month, however, the brothers, described as King's serjeants, were granted that they should have for life the custody of the town of Hull, on the death of the then warden, Robert Hastang, and were subsequently appointed jointly with him. William was M.P. for Hull in 1328, 1332, 1334, 1335, 1336 and 1338. In July 1331, described as King's yeoman and merchant, he received a sum out of the customs of Hull in return for paying the expenses of Queen Philippa's household. In February 1332/3 Henry de Beaumont and Isabel de Beaumont, Lady of Vescy, were licensed to demise to him for ten years the manor of Barton, Lincs. In 1333 he was mayor of Hull, and in the same year, and again in 1335, was appointed to treat with Lewis, Count of Flanders. On 23 Sep. 1334 he had his writ de expensis for attending Parliament at Westminster on 2o September. On 7 October 1337 he was summoned to be at London on the morrow of St. Andrew to give counsel. In 1337 he was an executor of the will of John le Gras, who had been sheriff of Yorkshire. In 1338 he was three times summoned to be before the Council, in February and November in London, in July at Northampton. In June 1338, for a sum of 6,000, the King enfeoffed him of certain manors for ten years. In August 1338, described as King's merchant, he was mayor of the staple in Antwerp. In October he was with the King overseas. On 26 September 1339 he was appointed 2nd Baron of the Exchequer. From 1339-1349 he is described as "Lord of Holderness, knight and merchant." In July 1340 he had returned from Dordrecht, and a commission was appointed to audit his accounts. He is styled knight. In August he had licence to go beyond seas to sell wool, in return for one of his frequent loans to the King. In November 1340 the King crossed from Flanders to London, and had some of the judges and officers of state arrested privily by night, among them William de la Pole. On 16 May 1342 it was ordered that he should be released from the Fleet prison on being mainperned to be before the Treasurer and Barons from day to day to render his accounts. In 1344 claims were made against him and another as receivers of wool, and a commission was appointed to consider whether they might be relieved. In the same year it was ordered that he should have his own lands, but not those which he had had from the King by gift or purchase. In July 1345 he was directed to go to London to treat with certain lieges on arduous affairs of the realm, and in February 1346/7 to attend a council in London to speak on secret matters. In March 1348/9 he was collector of the custom of wool hides and wool fells in the port of Hull, and was ordered to be before the King and his council at Westminster on the day after Low Sunday to speak upon certain matters touching the realm. In November 1354 he was licensed to found a hospital in Hull. In May 1355 it is recorded that in return for his great services in lending money to the King, he had been made knight and banneret; but in the preceding February there were proceedings pending against him in the Exchequer, and he had apparently been imprisoned, because the Treasurer and Barons of the Exchequer were directed to let him go free until after Easter without mainprise. In March he surrendered certain manors, and on 6 August executed a release to the King from all debts up to the preceding 20 November. In 1360 he was in France, and in June he and his wife had a grant of escheated land in Yorkshire, in consideration of his great services to the King and the great place which he held in many ways in his necessities. In October 1362 he was going beyond seas, and in May 1363, styled 'chivaler,' he was pardoned for selling wool intended for export. He married Katharine. He died 21 June 1366, and was buried at Trinity Church, Kingston-upon-Hull. M.I. Katherine survived him and died 28 January 1381/2. [Complete Peerage XII/1:434-7]

    1 _FA1
    2 PLAC Merchant.
    1 _FA2
    2 PLAC All 3 daughters unmarried in 1339, when King promised to findhusbands for them.
    1 _FA3
    2 PLAC Interred: Trinity Church, Kingston-upon-Hull, Yorkshire,England.
    1 _FA4
    2 PLAC Mayor of Hull, Baron of the Exchequer.
    2 SOUR S001127
    3 PAGE line 218 p 182
    William de la Pole died 1366, his wife Katherine died
    1381.
    Charles Frost in his article on the family thought the de la Pole brothers (Richard and William) were the sons of William and Elena, who subsequently remarried John Rottenherring. However A.S. Harvey "The de la Pole Family of Kingston-upon-Hull" published Hull, 1957 proved neither parent correct. William and Katherine had three daughters, Katherine, Blanche and Margaret. All three were still unmarried in 1339, when the king promised to provide them with suitable husbands.

    By May 1340 Katherine had married Constantine, the son of Adam de Clifton. The second daughter, Blanche, married Richard lord Scrope of Bolton. Margaret, the third daughter, married Robert Neville of Hornby. This marriage probably took place
    around 1362. Dr. Horrox stated "Robert's father, Robert senior, was then heavily in debt to William, and had been imprisoned in the Fleet for non-payment of two thousand pounds. Michael de la Pole obtained his release in May claiming that the money had been repaid.
    This seems unlikely; three days later Robert senior took out another bond promising repayment of the two thousand pounds."
    1 2

    Change Date: 14 Jun 2009 at 01:00:00
    Father: William ap Gwilym b: ABT 1278 in Ravenser Odd, Yorkshire, England

    Mother: Elena Rotenheryng b: ABT 1287 in Hull, Yorkshire, England

    Marriage 1 Katherine De Norwich b: ABT 1306 in Stoke, Norfolk, England

    Children

    1. Has Children Michael De la Pole 1st Earl Suffolk b: ABT 1330 in Hull, Yorkshire, England
    2. Has No Children Walter De la Pole b: ABT 1332 in Hull, Yorkshire, England
    3. Has No Children Thomas De la Pole b: ABT 1333 in Hull, Yorkshire, England
    4. Has No Children Blanche De la Pole b: ABT 1335 in Ravenser Odd, Yorkshire, England
    5. Has No Children Edmund De la Pole b: 1337 in Hull, Yorkshire, England
    6. Has Children Catherine De la Pole b: ABT 1338 in Hull, Yorkshire, England
    7. Has Children Margaret De la Pole b: ABT 1340 in Hull, Yorkshire, England
    8. Has No Children John De la Pole
    9. Has No Children Joan De la Pole
    Sources:


    1. Repository:
    Title: The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant
    Author: Editor: G.E. Cokayne, with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden
    Publication: St. Catherine Press, 29 Great Queen St, Kingsway, W.C. 1959
    Page: XII/1:434-437
    2. Repository:
    Title: Dictionary of National Biography
    Author: Ed by Sir Leslie S
    Publication: George Smith, Oxford Press, Vols 1-21 (Orignially published 1885-90)
    Page: XVI:48-50
    http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=aet-t&id=I51174

    Birth:
    Ravenser Odd, also spelled Ravensrodd, was a port in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England, during the medieval period, built on the sandbanks at the mouth of the Humber estuary.

    The name Ravenser comes from the Viking Hrafn's Eyr or "Raven's tongue" referring to the lost sandbank promontory, the modern successor of which is now known as Spurn Point.[1][2] The town was founded by the Count of Aumale in the mid-thirteenth century, and had more than one hundred houses and a flourishing market by 1299, when it was granted a borough charter.[3]

    In the 13th century the town was a more important port than Kingston upon Hull, further up the Humber, and was represented in the Model Parliament of 1295,[citation needed] but as the sandbanks shifted the town was swept away. Storms over the winter of 135657 completely flooded the town, leading to its abandonment,[3] and it was largely destroyed by the Grote Mandrenke storm of January 1362.[4] The site is now completely underwater.[1]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ravenser_Odd

    Buried:
    History:

    It is the largest parish church in England by floor area. The church dates back to about 1300[1] and contains what is widely acknowledged to be some of the finest mediaeval brick-work in the country, particularly in the transepts. Holy Trinity Church is now a Grade I listed building.

    Holy Trinity Church is a member of the Greater Churches Group.

    William Wilberforce, who led the parliamentary campaign against the slave trade, was baptised in Holy Trinity Church.[2]

    In November 2014 plans were unveiled to reorder the church, creating an outstanding venue for performances, exhibitions and banquets, a visitor destination, and a place where those in need of help can find assistance. The aim is to create a place for the whole community, and a venue that will be a driving force in the regeneration of Hull's Old Town. The transformation, costing a total of 4.5 million, will take place in phases from 2016 onwards.

    Photo & Source ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holy_Trinity_Church,_Hull

    William — Katherine de Norwich. Katherine (daughter of Walter de Norwich, Knight and Catherine de Hadersete) was born ~ 1306; died 28 Jan 1382. [Group Sheet]


  4. 7.  Katherine de Norwich was born ~ 1306 (daughter of Walter de Norwich, Knight and Catherine de Hadersete); died 28 Jan 1382.
    Children:
    1. Blanche de la Pole was born (Ravenser Odd, Yorkshire, England).
    2. 3. Margaret de la Pole was born 0___ 1327, (Ravenser Odd, Yorkshire, England); died 0___ 1366.


Generation: 4

  1. 14.  Walter de Norwich, Knight was born ~ 1274, Walsingham, Norfolkshire, England (son of Geoffrey Norwich and Cecily Valoines); died 20 Jan 1329, Wangford, Suffolk, England; was buried Raveningham, Norfolkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Burial: Norwich Cathedral, Norwich, Norfolkshire, England
    • Occupation: Chief Baron of the Exchequer
    • Also Known As: Lord Norwich

    Notes:

    Biography

    Birth: Between 1250-1280

    Died: Between 1326-1329

    Arms: Per pale gules and azure, a lion rampant ermine.

    He was summoned to Parliament as Lord Norwich by Edward II in 1314.

    Residence: Sculthorpe, Norfolk, England

    Burke's A General and Heraldic Dictionary of Peerages p. 402: Walter de Norwich, who in the 5th of Edward II, was made one of the Barons of the Exchequer, and at the same time obtained a charter of free warren in all his demense lands. In some years afterwards he was made treasure of the exchequer, and had a grant of the manors of Dalham and Bradenfield, with the advowson of the church of Dalham, in Suffolk. He was a learned judge, and died in 2 Edward III. He was succeeded by his son, Sir John de Norwick, Knight.

    WALTER DE NORWICH had a protection February 1297, and, as the King's clerk, in December 129 9 licence to inclose a lane adjoining his messuage in Norwich. He was Remembrancer of the Exc hequer, March 1307/8, appointed a Baron, August 1311; Chief Baron, March 1311/2; Treasurer (a fter serving several periods as deputy Treasurer), September 1314 to May 1317. In 1315, for h is good services as Treasurer, he had a grant of 1,000 marks, to maintain his state more hono urably in the King's service. Keeper of the office of the Treasurer, November 1319 to Februar y following, and again in 1321, 1322, and 1324. He was summoned to Councils at York and Linco ln, January and June 1312, and (among the justices) to Parliaments, July 1312 onwards. As far mer of the custody of the lands of Thomas de Cailly, during the minority of the heir, he wa s Keeper of Buckenham Castle, August 1316 till September 1325. In July 1322 he was a member o f the commission to try the Mortimers, and in 1324 was returned by the sheriff of Norfolk a s summoned to attend the Great Council at Westminster. He m. Catherine, da. of Sir John DE HEDERSETE, and widow of Piers BRAUNCHE. He died between 1 2 April 1328 and 20 February 1328/9, and was buried in Norwich Cathedral. His widow had wri t for dower, and died between January 1340/1 and October 1343. [CP 9:762-3]


    Sir Walter Yorwich Yorwich ... [1]


    Sources

    Julia Dickinson, firsthand knowledge. Click the Changes tab for the details of edits by Julia and others.
    ? Entered by Julia Dickinson, Jun 28, 2012

    Biography

    NORWICH, Sir WALTER de (d. 1329), chief baron of the exchequer, was son of Geoffrey de Norwich, and perhaps a descendant of that Geoffrey de Norwich who in 1214 fell under John's displeasure (Matt. Paris, ii. 537). A Geoffrey de Norwich clericus represented Norwich in parliament in 1306 (Returns of Members of Parliament, i. 22). The first reference to Walter de Norwich is as holding the manor of Stoke, Norfolk, in 1297. He was in the royal service in the exchequer; on 15 March 1308 he occurs as remembrancer; on 7 Aug. he was placed on a commission of oyer and terminer in Suffolk; and on 24 Nov. as clerk of the exchequer (Cal. Close Rolls, pp. 57, 131). On 29 Aug. 1311 he was appointed a baron of the exchequer, but resigned this position on 23 Oct. in order to act as lieutenant of the treasurer; on 3 March 1312 he was reappointed a baron of the exchequer, and on 8 March was made chief baron. A week later Norwich ceased to act as lieutenant of the treasurer, but on 17 May he was again directed to act in that capacity while retaining his post as chief baron, and thus he continued till 4 Oct. (Parl. Writs). On 30 Sept., when sitting in London, Norwich refused to admit the new sheriffs, as one of them was absent (Chron. Edw. I. and Edw. II. i. 218). In December 1313 he was appointed to supervise the collection of the twentieth and fifteenth in London (Fdera, ii. 159), and in July 1314 was a justice of oyer and terminer in Norfolk and Suffolk (Parl. Writs, ii. 79). On 26 Sept. he was appointed treasurer, and two days later resigned his office as chief baron. Norwich resigned the treasurership on 27 May 1317 through illness; but before long he resumed his post at the exchequer apparently as chief baron, for he is so styled on 9 June 1320, though on some occasions he is referred to as baron simply. On 22 Dec. 1317 he was employed to inquire into the petitions of certain cardinals (Fdera, ii. 349). In April 1318 Norwich, as one of the barons of the exchequer, was present at the council or parliament held at Leicester to endeavour to effect a reconciliation between the king and Thomas of Lancaster. In May he was appointed to treat with Robert, count of Flanders, regarding the injury done to English merchants; and in November he was one of the justices for the trial of sheriffs and others for oppression in Norfolk and Suffolk. On 25 Feb. 1319 he sat as one of the barons of the exchequer at the Guildhall, London (Chron. Edw. I. and Edw. II. i. 285). From 6 Nov. 1319 to 18 Feb. 1320 Norwich was once more lieutenant for the treasurer; both in this year and in 1321 he appears as a justice for the counties of Essex, Suffolk, and Norfolk. In 1321 he was keeper of the treasury, and in July 1322, after the fall of Thomas of Lancaster, was one of the judges appointed for the trial of the two Roger Mortimers of Chirk and Wigmore. Norwich continued in office during the reign of Edward II; in the next reign he was reappointed chief baron on 2 Feb. 1327, in spite of his share in the condemnation of the Mortimers, the sentence on whom was cancelled on 27 March 1327. He was employed in May 1328 to inquire into the complaints of the weavers of Norwich, and in November to settle the differences between the abbot and townsmen of St. Edmund's (Pat. Rolls, Edw. III, 141, 297, 353). Norwich died in 1329, and was buried in Norwich Cathedral. Dugdale says that Norwich was summoned to parliament as a baron in 1314, but not at any other time. This is an error; for, though Norwich attended parliament in this and in other years as one of the barons of the exchequer, he was never summoned as a baron of parliament. Norwich married between 1295 and 1304 Catherine, daughter of John de Hedersett, and widow of Peter Braunche. She survived her second husband, and was living in 1349. By her Norwich had three sons: John, who is separately noticed; Roger (d. 1372); and Thomas whose daughter, Catherine de Brewse, was in 1375 declared heiress to her cousin John, a great-grandson of Walter de Norwich. Walter de Norwich had also a daughter Margaret, who married, first, Sir Thomas Cailey; and, secondly, Robert Ufford, earl of Suffolk; her descendants by the second marriage were her father's eventual heirs. The Norwich family had large estates in Norfolk, Suffolk, Lincolnshire, and Hertfordshire.


    [Chronicles of Edward I and Edward II (Rolls Ser.); Fdera, Record ed.; Cal. of Close Rolls Edward II, 130718, and Patent Rolls Edward III, 132730; Palgrave's Parl. Writs, iv. 12379; Madox Hist. of Exchequer, i. 75, ii. 49, 84; Blomefield's Hist. of Norfolk, iii. 76, iv. 39, 164, v. 126, 129, 138, 522, vi. 137, viii. 523, 55, ed. 1812; Dugdale's Baronage, ii. 901; Foss's Judges of England, iii. 46971.]

    Sources

    ? Entered by Julia Dickinson, Jun 28, 2012
    http://www.thepeerage.com/p19904.htm
    http://books.google.com/books?id=SfApAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA229&lpg=PA229&dq=Catherine+de+Hedersett&source=bl&ots=4z-ZssVGNd&sig=tI75FAdmMH_rSlfXtDagU1xbNqs&hl=en&ei=WN7XS4z6KpKksgOu7fWyBg&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=4&ved=0CAwQ6AEwAzgK#v=onepage&q=Catherine%20de%20Hedersett&f=false ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    *

    bullet Sources, Comments and Notes

    [There is much confusion and differing opinion on Katherine's parentage who married Robert de Scales. If her father was a "Norwich", who was her father's name: John or Walter ?]


    Source :

    "Sir William de la Pole (died 21 June 1366) ...

    Descendants and legacy

    William de la Pole married Katherine, daughter of Sir Walter de Norwich, ..."
    ..........................................
    Robert de Ufford, 1st Earl of Suffolk, KG (9 August 1298 \endash 4 November 1369) was an English peer. He was created Earl of Suffolk in 1337. ...

    In 1334 he married Margaret Norwich (d. 2 April 1368), daughter of Sir Walter Norwich (d.1329), Treasurer of the Exchequer, and Catherine de Hedersete, by whom he had a large family,
    ________________________
    Source Par Jennifer C. Ward:
    "... Most of the other household accounts which survive were drawn up for widows, and the households range from the widows of knights to those of women of the highest standing. Katherine de Norwich, whose roll of household expenses survives for 1336-7, was the widow of Sir Walter de Norwich, chief baron of the exchequer and acting treasurer at various times under Edward II. ..."
    ________________________
    Source Par Francis Blomefield,Charles Parkin:
    "... After this, I find no mention of it till 1313, when Margery, relict of Roger Cosyn of Norwich, granted it to Sir Walter de Norwich, and Catherine his wife, and their heirs, and by a fine levied in 1316, it appears that Margery had only her life in it, for then Walter de Norwich and Katerine his wife settled it on Tho. de Caily and Margaret his wife and their heirs; for lack of which it was to return to Walter and his heirs; ..."
    _______________________
    Source Par Alfred Suckling:
    "In the reign of Edward I., Sir John de Norwich was lord, and obtained from that monarch, in 1302, a grant of free-warren in Mettingham, Shipmeadow, Redesham, &c In the ninth of Edward II., Walter de Norwich held it, and in the reign of Edward III. it was the manor of Sir John de Norwich, the same who built the castle. He died in 1361, when the manor devolved to his grandson, also named Sir John, who dying at Mettingham Castle, in 1373, appointed his body to be buried at Raveningham, by the side of his father, Sir Walter, ..."

    "... In the thirty-seventh of Henry III. occurs R. de Norwico, Chancellor of Ireland; and in the fifth of Edward II.7 we meet with Walter de Norwich, one of the Barons of the Exchequer, constituted locum tenens of the Treasurer till the King could provide one. On the 25th of October in the same year, he was admitted one of the Privy Council, and in 1314 summoned to Parliament. Two years afterwards he was appointed Chief Baron of the Exchequer, and in the twentieth of the same reign made locum tenens of William de Melton, Archbishop of York, and Treasurer to the King. This distinguished member of the family married Katharine, daughter of John, and sister to Sir Simon de Hetherset, and was father of Sir John de Norwich, his no less distinguished son, who founded Mettingham Castle. ..."
    _______________________
    Source Par Alfred Suckling:
    "Sir John de Norwich, Lord of Mettingham, temp. Edw. I. =
    - Sir Walter de Norwich.= Katharine Hetherset
    - Sir Roger de Norwich.
    - Sir Thomaa de Norwich. =
    - Catharine de Norwich = ___ De Brews
    - Sir John de Norwich, built Mettingham Castle, ob. 1361 = Margaret.
    - Waller tie Norwich, died in his father's lifetime. = Wolirna Stapleton, of Bedale, Yorkshire.
    - Margaret de Norwich = Robert de Ufford, earl of Suffolk. ..."
    ________________________________
    Source Par Thomas Christopher Banks:
    "In the time of king John, Geffery De Norwich was in rebellion against that king. From whom descended, as presumed, Walter De Norwich, one of the barons of the exchequer, and summoned to parliament the 8th Edward II. but no more.
    To whom succeeded Sir John De Norwich, knight, who was in the wars of France and Scotland; and had summons to parliament, the 16th and 34th Edward III. but no more.
    His successor was John, his grandson (viz. son of Walter, who died in his lifetime); which John, the 46th Edward III. making proof of his age, had livery of his lands; and being afterwards a knight, died the 38th Edward III. leaving Catherine de Brews, daughter of Thomas, brother to John, his grandfather, his cousin, and next heir; but she becoming a nun at Dartford, in Kent, William de Ufford, earl of Suffolk, son of Margaret, sister of Thomas de Norwich, father of the said Catherine, was found to be her next heir; and accordingly had livery of the inheritance. ..."


    Walter married Dame Catherine DE HETHERSET, De Norwich [3913]. (Dame Catherine DE HETHERSET, De Norwich [3913] was born in , , England and died after 1337 in , , England.)

    *

    Walter — Catherine de Hadersete. Catherine died Aft 1337, (Norfolkshire) England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 15.  Catherine de Hadersete died Aft 1337, (Norfolkshire) England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Catherine de Hederset
    • Also Known As: Catherine de Hetherset

    Notes:

    Sources, Comments and Notes

    [There is much confusion and differing opinion on Katherine's parentage
    If her father was a "Norwich", who was her father's name: John or Walter ?]

    Source Par Jennifer C. Ward:
    "... Most of the other household accounts which survive were drawn up for widows, and the households range from the widows of knights to those of women of the highest standing. Katherine de Norwich, whose roll of household expenses survives for 1336\emdash 7, was the widow of Sir Walter de Norwich, chief baron of the exchequer and acting treasurer at various times under Edward II. ..."
    ___________________________
    Source Par Alfred Suckling:
    "... In the thirty-seventh of Henry III. occurs R. de Norwico, Chancellor of Ireland; and in the fifth of Edward II.7 we meet with Walter de Norwich, one of the Barons of the Exchequer, constituted locum tenens of the Treasurer till the King could provide one. On the 25th of October in the same year, he was admitted one of the Privy Council, and in 1314 summoned to Parliament. Two years afterwards he was appointed Chief Baron of the Exchequer, and in the twentieth of the same reign made locum tenens of William de Melton, Archbishop of York, and Treasurer to the King. This distinguished member of the family married Katharine, daughter of John, and sister to Sir Simon de Hetherset, and was father of Sir John de Norwich, his no less distinguished son, who founded Mettingham Castle. ..."
    __________________________
    Source :

    "Sir William de la Pole (died 21 June 1366) ...

    Descendants and legacy

    William de la Pole married Katherine, daughter of Sir Walter de Norwich, ..."
    ..........................................

    Robert de Ufford, 1st Earl of Suffolk, KG (9 August 1298 - 4 November 1369) was an English peer. He was created Earl of Suffolk in 1337. ...

    In 1334 he married Margaret Norwich (d. 2 April 1368), daughter of Sir Walter Norwich (d.1329), Treasurer of the Exchequer, and Catherine de Hedersete, by whom he had a large family, ..."
    ____________________________
    Source publie par Carole Rawcliffe, Richard Wilson:
    "... Katherine was the widow of Sir Walter de Norwich (d. 1329), a former treasurer of the exchequer. She had rights of dower in a number of Norfolk and Suffolk manors, the closest to Norwich being Blackworth, about five miles from the city in the parishes of Stoke Holy Cross and Howe. Her household accounts survive from late September 1336. After periods of residence at Mettingham, Suffolk, and Blackworth, she moved to Norwich in January 1337 and remained there until at least the end of April, when the detailed accounts cease. Her stay included the anniversary of Sir Walter's death on 20 January when she held a great dinner costing almost a sixth of the expenditure recorded in the whole seven months. ..."


    Catherine married Sir Walter DE NORWICH, Knt., Chief Baron Of The Exchequer [3912], son of John DE NORWICH [4984] and Unknown. (Sir Walter DE NORWICH, Knt., Chief Baron Of The Exchequer [3912] was born in , , England, died on 20 Jan 1329 in , , England and was buried in Raveningham, Norfolk, England.)

    Children:
    1. Margaret Norwich was born 0___ 1286, Mettingham, Suffolk, England; died 2 Apr 1368.
    2. 7. Katherine de Norwich was born ~ 1306; died 28 Jan 1382.


Generation: 5

  1. 28.  Geoffrey Norwich

    Geoffrey — Cecily Valoines. Cecily (daughter of Robert de Valoines, II, Lord of Walsham & Icksworth and Eve de Criketot) was born ~ 1281, Walsham, Suffolkshire, England; died 16 Jul 1325, Thurston, Suffolk, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 29.  Cecily Valoines was born ~ 1281, Walsham, Suffolkshire, England (daughter of Robert de Valoines, II, Lord of Walsham & Icksworth and Eve de Criketot); died 16 Jul 1325, Thurston, Suffolk, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Cecily Valoines

    Children:
    1. 14. Walter de Norwich, Knight was born ~ 1274, Walsingham, Norfolkshire, England; died 20 Jan 1329, Wangford, Suffolk, England; was buried Raveningham, Norfolkshire, England.


Generation: 6

  1. 58.  Robert de Valoines, II, Lord of Walsham & Icksworth was born 0___ 1247, Thurston, Suffolk, England (son of Robert Valoines and Rohesia Blount); died 0___ 1289.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: DE VALAINES, DE VALONYES, DE VALOYNES, DE WALEYNS, DE WALONIIS and DE WALOYNIS
    • Also Known As: Robert de Valognes
    • Also Known As: Robert de Valoignes

    Notes:

    Sources, Comments and Notes

    Source :
    "ROBERT de Valoignes . m EVA Tregoz, daughter of ---. Robert & his wife had children:
    a) CECILY de Valoignes ([1280/81]-16 Jul 1325). m (before 1298) ROBERT de Ufford , son of ROBERT de Ufford & his first wife Mary --- (11 Jun 1279-9 Sep 1316 or before). He was summoned to Parliament 4 Mar 1309, whereby he is held to have become Lord Ufford."
    ___________________________________
    Source Par Thomas Christopher Banks:
    "'john De Valoins succeeded his brother Robert, as the next heir male; and by Ifabella his wife, daughter of Sir Robert de Creke, of North Creke, in Norfolk, had Robert, his son and heir; who, by Roesia, one of the sisters and coheirs of Sir William le Blund, left Robert de Valoins, his son, who took to wise Eve de Criketot, and was lord of . Icksworth, in Suffolk, as heir to Blund; and had issue, two daughters (Ixwortb.) and heirs, viz. Roesc, married to Sir Edward, or Edmund, de Pakenham; and Cicely, to Robert de Ufford, earl of Suffolk.
    Of this family was also Alan De Valoins, sheriff of Kent. temp. Henry II. and Richard I. about the 6th of whofe reign he died, without issue."
    ____________________________________
    Source :
    "? Robert 1er de Valognes 1217 ep. Rose Blund ~1217
    - Robert II de Valognes 1247 + 1282 Lord of Orford ep. 1) Eve Criketot ~1254 (veuve de William Tregoz) ep. 2) Rohaise Le Blount (fille de William Le Blount, Lord of Ixworth)
    - Cecily de Valognes 1284 (Thurston, Suffolk) ep. Robert 1er Ufford 1279"
    ____________________________
    Source :
    "Robert II De Valoines Lord of Walsham was born in 1247 in Thurston, Suffolk, England. He married Eve De Tregoz-Criketot in 1280 in Suffolk, England.

    Eve De Tregoz-Criketot was born in 1259. She married Robert II De Valoines Lord of Walsham in 1280 in Suffolk, England.
    They had the following children:

    F i Cecily De Valoines
    F ii Rohesia De Valoines"
    _____________________________
    Source :
    "Sir Robert Valoines, Lord Walsham d. circa 1282
    Father Robert de Valoines
    Mother Roesia Blund
    Sir Robert Valoines, Lord Walsham was born at of Ixworth & Walsham, Suffolk, England.2 He married Eve de Criketot, daughter of William de Criketot. Sir Robert Valoines, Lord Walsham died circa 1282.

    Family Eve de Criketot b. 1247
    Child Cecily de Valoines+2,3 b. c 1281, d. 16 Jul 1325"
    _____________________________
    Source :
    "Robert II de Valognes, Lord Walsham (c.1245 - 1282)
    Birthdate: circa 1245 Birthplace: Thurston, Suffolk, England
    Death: Died 1282 in England

    Immediate Family
    Eve De Valoines (Criketot) wife
    Cecily de Valognes, Lady Of Orford daughter
    Eve de Tregoz wife
    Roesia le Blount mother
    Robert Valoines-Walsham, I father
    Thomas de Valoines brother
    Lucy stepdaughter
    Joan Loudham stepdaughter"
    _____________________________
    Source
    "Robert son of Robert de Valoignes ...
    Sum of all the lands of the said Robert, excepting the manors of Toleshunt and Blunteshal, whereof Eva, late his wife, was enfeoffed as dower, 46l. 19s. 2d. Dower 15l. 13s. 0d.
    His daughters, Rose (Roysea) aged 2 at the feast of All Saints, 10 Edw. I., and Cecily, aged 1 about the said feast, are his next heirs. ...

    From: 'Inquisitions Post Mortem, Edward I, File 30', Calendar of Inquisitions Post Mortem, Volume 2: Edward I (1906), pp. 245-252. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=108102 Date accessed: 18 November 2012."


    Robert married Eve DE CRIKETOT [2431], daughter of Sir William IV DE CRIKETOT [2437] and Agnes BLUND [2439], in 1280 in , Suffolk, England. (Eve DE CRIKETOT [2431] was born about 1250 in Thurston, Suffolk, England and died in 1316 in Thurston, Suffolk, England.)

    Robert married Eve de Criketot 0___ 1280, Suffolkshire, England. Eve (daughter of William Criketot and unnamed spouse) was born 0___ 1259, Thurston, Suffolk, England; died 0___ 1316, Thurston, Suffolk, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 59.  Eve de Criketot was born 0___ 1259, Thurston, Suffolk, England (daughter of William Criketot and unnamed spouse); died 0___ 1316, Thurston, Suffolk, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Eva Tregoz
    • Also Known As: Eve de la Pecche

    Children:
    1. 29. Cecily Valoines was born ~ 1281, Walsham, Suffolkshire, England; died 16 Jul 1325, Thurston, Suffolk, England.


Generation: 7

  1. 116.  Robert Valoines was born ~ 1198; died 0___ 1263, Orford, Suffolkshire, England.

    Robert — Rohesia Blount. Rohesia (daughter of William Blount, Lord of Ixworth and Cecilia de Vere) was born 0___ 1217; died 0___ 1271, Suffolkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 117.  Rohesia Blount was born 0___ 1217 (daughter of William Blount, Lord of Ixworth and Cecilia de Vere); died 0___ 1271, Suffolkshire, England.
    Children:
    1. 58. Robert de Valoines, II, Lord of Walsham & Icksworth was born 0___ 1247, Thurston, Suffolk, England; died 0___ 1289.

  3. 118.  William Criketot was born ~ 1239 (son of William Criketot and Agnes Blount); died 0___ 1269.

    William — unnamed spouse. [Group Sheet]


  4. 119.  unnamed spouse
    Children:
    1. 59. Eve de Criketot was born 0___ 1259, Thurston, Suffolk, England; died 0___ 1316, Thurston, Suffolk, England.


Generation: 8

  1. 234.  William Blount, Lord of Ixworth was born ~ 1163, Suffolk, England (son of Gilbert Blount, 4th Lord of Ixworth and Agnes Lisle); died ~ 1228, Lewes, Sussex, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: William le Blount

    William — Cecilia de Vere. Cecilia (daughter of Robert de Vere, Lord of Twywell and Matilda de Furnell) was born ~ 1175, Thrapston, Northamptonshire, England; died ~ 1234, Ixworth, Suffolk, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 235.  Cecilia de Vere was born ~ 1175, Thrapston, Northamptonshire, England (daughter of Robert de Vere, Lord of Twywell and Matilda de Furnell); died ~ 1234, Ixworth, Suffolk, England.

    Notes:

    Cecilia le Blount formerly de Vere
    Born about 1175 in Thrapston, Northamptonshire, England
    ANCESTORS ancestors
    Daughter of Robert de Vere and Matilda (Furnell) de Vere
    Sister of Henry de Vere, Robert de Vere [half] and Alice (de Vere) de Stokes
    Wife of William (Blount) le Blount married before 1217 [location unknown]
    DESCENDANTS descendants
    Mother of Galfridus le Eyre, Agnes (Blount) Criketot and Rohesia (Blount) de Valoignes
    Died about 1234 in Ixworth, Suffolk, England

    Biography

    Sir William was born about 1153. Sir William le Blount ... He passed away about 1228.[1]

    According to the Monasticon Anglicanum, William was the son, and heir, of Hubert. His mother was Agnes de Insul (of the Island, de L'isle), his wife was Cecelia de Vere, and they had children, William, Agnes, and Rose. Son William married Alice de Capell (de Chapel), but died at the Battle of Lewes, without issue, his sisters becoming his heirs. [2]

    Sources

    A source for this information is needed.
    Monasticon Anglicanum, Vol 6, Pt 1, p 312 [1]

    end of biography

    Children:
    1. Agnes Blount was born ~ 1204, Suffolk, England; died Allerton, Yorkshire, England.
    2. 117. Rohesia Blount was born 0___ 1217; died 0___ 1271, Suffolkshire, England.

  3. 236.  William Criketot was born ~ 1219, (Yorkshire) England.

    William — Agnes Blount. Agnes (daughter of William Blount, Lord of Ixworth and Cecilia de Vere) was born ~ 1204, Suffolk, England; died Allerton, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 237.  Agnes Blount was born ~ 1204, Suffolk, England (daughter of William Blount, Lord of Ixworth and Cecilia de Vere); died Allerton, Yorkshire, England.
    Children:
    1. 118. William Criketot was born ~ 1239; died 0___ 1269.