Sir John Tuchet

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Generation: 1

  1. 1.  Sir John Tuchet was born (Heleigh, Staffordshire, England) (son of John Touchet and Joan Audley).

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Lord Audley

    John — Maud LNU. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. John Tuchet, III, Knight, 4th Lord Audley was born 23 Apr 1371, Heleigh, Staffordshire, England; died 19 Dec 1408, Heleigh, Staffordshire, England.

Generation: 2

  1. 2.  John Touchet was born 0___ 1327, Heleigh, Staffordshire, England; died 0___ 1371.

    John — Joan Audley. Joan (daughter of James Audley, 2nd Baron Audley (of Heleigh) and Joan de Mortimer, 2nd Baroness Geneville) was born 0___ 1331, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England; died 0___ 1393. [Group Sheet]


  2. 3.  Joan Audley was born 0___ 1331, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England (daughter of James Audley, 2nd Baron Audley (of Heleigh) and Joan de Mortimer, 2nd Baroness Geneville); died 0___ 1393.

    Other Events:

    • Baptism:

    Children:
    1. 1. John Tuchet was born (Heleigh, Staffordshire, England).


Generation: 3

  1. 6.  James Audley, 2nd Baron Audley (of Heleigh)James Audley, 2nd Baron Audley (of Heleigh) was born 8 Jan 1313, (Heleigh Castle, Staffordshire, England) (son of Nicholas de Audley, 1st Baron Audley and Joan FitzMartin); died 1 Apr 1386.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: James de Audley

    Notes:

    James Audley, 2nd Baron Audley (8 January 1312/13 – 1 April 1386) of Heighley Castle, Staffordshire, was an English peer. He was the son and heir of Nicholas Audley, 1st Baron Audley (1289–1316) by his wife Joan FitzMartin (died Feb. 1320 / 1 Aug. 1322)[clarification needed], who was the daughter of William FitzMartin (died 1324), feudal baron of Barnstaple, Devon, and was posthumously the eventual sole heiress of her brother William FitzMartin (died 1326) to the feudal barony of Barnstaple.

    Marriages and children

    James Audley married twice. His first marriage, before 13 June 1330, was to Joan Mortimer, daughter of Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March by his wife Joan de Geneville, 2nd Baroness Geneville. By Joan he had four children. Their eldest son, Nicholas, succeeded his father in the title, becoming Nicholas Audley, 3rd Baron Audley (c.1328–1391) – he married Elizabeth Beaumont, a daughter of Henry de Beaumont, 4th Earl of Buchan, but died without legitimate issue whereupon his nephew John Tuchet, 4th Baron Audley inherited the title and a one-third share of the lands of the barony of Audley.[2] Their second son Roger predeceased his father.[3] Joan (1331–1393), their first daughter, married Sir John Tuchet (1327–1371) – their son John (Nicholas's nephew) inherited the Audley barony.[2] Audley's last child by Joan was Margaret (born pre-1351, died 1410/11) who married Sir Roger Hillary.[4]

    After the death of his first wife, Audley married before December 1351 to Isabel LeStrange, daughter of Roger le Strange, 5th Baron Strange (c. 1327–1382) of Knokyn. They had four children: three sons, Thomas, Rodeland (or Rowland) and James, who all died childless,[4] and a daughter, Margaret Audley (died 1373), who married Fulk FitzWarin, 4th Baron FitzWarin (1341–1374) of Whittington Castle, Shropshire and Alveston, Gloucestershire.[5] Fulk's mother was said to be Joan de Beaumont, a daughter of Henry de Beaumont, 4th Earl of Buchan,[6] and was thus a sister of the wife of Fulk's half-brother-in-law Nicholas Audley, 3rd Baron Audley. In 1392 Margaret's 3-year-old grandson Fulk FitzWarin, 6th Baron FitzWarin (1389–1407) inherited the manor of Tawstock in Devon, thought to have been a later seat of the feudal barons of Barnstaple,[7] which had been settled in 1370 by James Audley, 2nd Baron, in tail male successively to his three childless sons from his second marriage.[4]

    Succession

    James Audley had settled the feudal barony of Barnstaple by means of an entail on his heirs male, with remainder to the crown.[3] As all his sons from both his marriages died childless, the barony became the inheritance of King Richard II, who granted the barony to his half-brother John Holland, 1st Duke of Exeter, in tail-male.[3]

    end

    James married Joan de Mortimer, 2nd Baroness Geneville 20 Sep 1301. Joan (daughter of Roger de Mortimer, 1st Earl of March and Joan de Geneville, 2nd Baroness Geneville) was born 2 Feb 1286, Ludlow Castle, Ludlow, Shropshire, England; died 19 Oct 1356. [Group Sheet]


  2. 7.  Joan de Mortimer, 2nd Baroness Geneville was born 2 Feb 1286, Ludlow Castle, Ludlow, Shropshire, England (daughter of Roger de Mortimer, 1st Earl of March and Joan de Geneville, 2nd Baroness Geneville); died 19 Oct 1356.

    Notes:

    Joan de Geneville, 2nd Baroness Geneville, Countess of March, Baroness Mortimer (2 February 1286 – 19 October 1356), also known as Jeanne de Joinville, was the daughter of Sir Piers de Geneville and Joan of Lusignan. She inherited the estates of her grandparents, Geoffrey de Geneville, 1st Baron Geneville, and Maud de Lacy, Baroness Geneville. She was one of the wealthiest heiresses in the Welsh Marches and County Meath, Ireland. She was the wife of Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March, the de facto ruler of England from 1327 to 1330. She succeeded as suo jure 2nd Baroness Geneville on 21 October 1314 upon the death of her grandfather, Geoffrey de Geneville.[1][2]

    As a result of her husband's insurrection against King Edward II of England, she was imprisoned in Skipton Castle for two years. Following the execution of her husband in 1330 for usurping power in England, Joan was once more taken into custody. In 1336, her lands were restored to her after she received a full pardon for her late husband's crimes from Edward II's son and successor, Edward III of England.

    Family and inheritance

    Ludlow Castle in Shropshire, the birthplace of Joan de Geneville
    Joan was born on 2 February 1286 at Ludlow Castle in Shropshire.[3] She was the eldest child of Sir Piers de Geneville, of Trim Castle and Ludlow, whose father Sir Geoffrey de Geneville, 1st Baron Geneville, was Justiciar of Ireland. Her mother Jeanne of Lusignan was part of one of the most illustrious French families, daughter of Hugh XII of Lusignan, Count of La Marche and of Angoulăeme, and sister of Yolanda of Lusignan, the suo jure Countess of La Marche. Joan had two younger sisters, Matilda and Beatrice who both became nuns at Aconbury Priory.[4] She also had two half-sisters from her mother's first marriage to Bernard Ezi III, Lord of Albret: Mathe, Dame d'Albret (died 1283), and Isabelle, Dame d'Albret (died 1 December 1294), wife of Bernard VI, Count of Armagnac.

    When her father died in Ireland shortly before June 1292, Joan became one of the wealthiest and most eligible heiresses in the Welsh Marches, with estates that included the town and castle of Ludlow, the lordship of Ewyas Lacy, the manors of Wolferlow, Stanton Lacy, and Mansell Lacy in Shropshire and Herefordshire as well as a sizeable portion of County Meath in Ireland.[5][6] She was due to inherit these upon the death of her grandfather, but in 1308, Baron Geneville conveyed most of the Irish estates which had belonged to his late wife Maud de Lacy to Joan and her husband Roger Mortimer. They both went to Ireland where they took seisin of Meath on 28 October of that same year. The baron died on 21 October 1314 at the House of the Friars Preachers at Trim, and Joan subsequently succeeded him, becoming the suo jure 2nd Baroness Geneville.[1][2]

    Marriage

    Joan married Roger Mortimer, eldest son of Edmund Mortimer, 2nd Baron Wigmore, and Margaret de Fiennes on 20 September 1301 at the manor of Pembridge.[7] Marriage to Joan was highly beneficial to Mortimer as it brought him much influence and prestige in addition to the rich estates he gained through their matrimonial alliance.[8][9] Three years later in 1304 he succeeded as Baron Mortimer, making Joan Baroness Mortimer. He was knighted on Whitsunday 22 May 1306 by King Edward I. The knighting ceremony took place in Westminster Abbey and was known as the Feast of the Swan as all those present made their personal vows upon two swans.[10] Two hundred and fifty-nine other young men received knighthoods along with Mortimer including the Prince of Wales who would shortly afterwards succeed his father as Edward II. Following the ceremony was a magnificent banquet held at the Great Hall of Westminster.[11]

    Upon taking seizen of her Irish lands in 1308, Joan and Mortimer travelled back and forth between their estates in Ireland and those in the Welsh Marches. Given that Joan opted to accompany her husband to Ireland rather than remain at home, and that she produced 12 surviving children over a period of just 17 years led Roger Mortimer's biographer Ian Mortimer to suggest they enjoyed a closer and more affectionate relationship than was typical of noble couples in the 14th-century. He described their union as having been " a mutually beneficial secure medieval partnership".[12]

    Issue

    Together Joan and Mortimer had twelve surviving children:[12][13][14]


    Effigies of Joan's daughter, Katherine Mortimer and her husband Thomas de Beauchamp, 11th Earl of Warwick. St. Mary's Church, Warwick
    Margaret Mortimer (2 May 1304- 5 May 1337), married Thomas de Berkeley, 3rd Baron Berkeley, by whom she had issue.
    Sir Edmund Mortimer (died 16 December 1331), married Elizabeth de Badlesmere, daughter of Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 1st Baron Badlesmere, and Margaret de Clare, by whom he had two sons, Roger Mortimer, 2nd Earl of March, and John, who died young.
    Roger Mortimer, married Joan Le Botiller
    Geoffrey Mortimer, Lord of Towyth (died 1372/5 May 1376), married Jeanne de Lezay, by whom he had issue.
    John Mortimer. He was killed in a tournament at Shrewsbury sometime after 1328.
    Katherine Mortimer (1314- 4 August 1369), married Thomas de Beauchamp, 11th Earl of Warwick, by whom she had fifteen children, including Thomas de Beauchamp, 12th Earl of Warwick, and William de Beauchamp, 1st Baron Bergavenny, who married Lady Joan FitzAlan.
    Joan Mortimer (died between 1337–1351), married James Audley, 2nd Baron Audley, by whom she had issue.
    Agnes Mortimer, married Laurence Hastings, 1st Earl of Pembroke, by whom she had issue
    Isabella Mortimer (died after 1327)
    Beatrice Mortimer (died 16 October 1383), married firstly Edward of Norfolk, and secondly, Thomas de Braose, 1st Baron Braose. She had issue by her second husband.
    Maud Mortimer (died after August 1345), married John de Charlton, Lord of Powys, by whom she had issue.
    Blanche Mortimer (c.1321- 1347), married Peter de Grandison, 2nd Baron Grandison, by whom she had issue.
    Mortimer's affair with Queen Isabella[edit]

    Joan's husband Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March, is allegedly depicted in the foreground with Queen Isabella in this 14th-century manuscript illustration
    Mortimer was appointed Lord Lieutenant of Ireland on 23 November 1316 and left for Ireland with a large force in February 1317.[15] While there, he fought against the Scots Army led by Edward Bruce, the younger brother of Robert the Bruce (who hoped to make Edward king of Ireland), and Bruce's Norman-Irish allies, the de Lacy's. Joan accompanied her husband to Ireland. They returned to England in 1318 after Mortimer had driven the Scots north to Carrickfergus, and dispersed the de Lacys, who were Joan's relatives. For the next few years, Mortimer occupied himself with baronial disputes on the Welsh border; nevertheless, on account of the increasing influence of Hugh Despenser, the Elder, and Hugh Despenser the Younger over King Edward II, Roger Mortimer became strongly disaffected with his monarch, especially after the younger Despenser had been granted lands which rightfully belonged to Mortimer.[16]

    In October 1321 King Edward and his troops besieged Leeds Castle, after the governor's wife, Margaret de Clare, Baroness Badlesmere, refused Queen Isabella admittance and subsequently ordered her archers to fire upon Isabella and her escort after the latter attempted to gain entry to the castle. Elizabeth, the third Badlesmere daughter, was married to Joan and Mortimer's eldest son, Edmund. King Edward exploited his new popularity in the wake of his military victory at Leeds to recall to England the Despensers, whom the Lords Ordainers, led by Thomas, 2nd Earl of Lancaster, had forced him to banish in August 1321.[17] The Marcher lords, already in a state of insurrection for some time prior to the Despensers' banishment,[n 1] immediately rose up against the King in full force, with Mortimer leading the confederation alongside Ordainer Humphrey de Bohun, 4th Earl of Hereford.[18] The King quelled the rebellion, which is also known as the Despenser War; Mortimer and his uncle Roger Mortimer de Chirk both surrendered to him at Shrewsbury on 22 January 1322. Mortimer and his uncle were dispatched as prisoners to the Tower of London,[16] where they were kept in damp, unhealthy quarters. This was likely a factor in Roger Mortimer de Chirk's death in 1326. Joan's husband had fared better; by drugging the constable and the Tower guards, he managed to escape to France on 1 August 1323.[19] It was there that he later became the lover of Queen Isabella, who was estranged from the King as a result of the Despensers' absolute control over him. She had been sent to France on a peace mission by Edward but used the occasion to seek help from her brother, Charles IV to oust the Despensers.[20] The scandal of their love affair forced them to leave the French court for Flanders, where they obtained help for an invasion of England.[21]

    Joan's imprisonment

    Skipton Castle, Yorkshire, where Joan was imprisoned from 1324 to 1326
    While the couple were still in France, King Edward had retaliated against Mortimer by taking Joan and all of their children into custody, and "treating them with severity".[22] In April 1324 Joan was removed from Hampshire where she had been confined in a lodging under house arrest and sent to Skipton Castle in Yorkshire; there she was imprisoned in a cell and endured considerable suffering and hardship.[23] Most of her household had been dismissed and she was permitted a small number of attendants to serve her. She was granted just one mark per day for her necessities, and out of this sum she had to feed her servants.[24] She was additionally allowed ten marks per annum at Easter and Michaelmas for new clothes.[25] Her daughters suffered worse privations having been locked up inside various religious houses with even less money at their disposal.[24] Joan was transferred from Skipton to Pontefract Castle in July 1326.[26]

    Countess of March

    Mortimer and Isabella landed in England two months later in September 1326, and they joined forces with Henry, 3rd Earl of Lancaster. On 16 November, King Edward was taken prisoner and eventually murdered at Berkeley Castle, presumably by Mortimer's hired assassins.[27] From 1327 to 1330, Mortimer and Isabella jointly held the Office of Regent for her son, King Edward III who was duly crowned following his father's death. Mortimer was made constable of Wallingford Castle; in September 1328, Mortimer was created Earl of March. This made Joan henceforth, the Countess of March; although it is not known what she thought about her husband's illegal assumption of power and flagrant affair with the Queen. What has been established is that Joan was never an active participant in her husband's insurrection against King Edward.[28]

    Mortimer and Queen Isabella were the de facto rulers of England. Hostility against the power Mortimer wielded over the kingdom and the young King Edward III, increased; his former friend Henry of Lancaster encouraged the King to assert his authority to oust Mortimer. When Mortimer ordered the execution of Edmund, Earl of Kent, half-brother of the late King Edward, anger and outrage engulfed the country. The King deposed his mother and her lover; Roger Mortimer was seized, arrested, and on 29 November 1330, hanged at Tyburn, London.[29]

    Following her husband's execution, Joan – as the wife of a traitor – was imprisoned again, this time in Hampshire where years before she had been placed under house arrest; her children were also taken into custody. In 1331, she was given an allowance for household expenses; however, her lands were only restored to her in 1336 after King Edward III granted her a full pardon for her late husband's crimes. In 1347 she received back the Liberty of Trim.[30]

    Death

    Joan de Geneville, Baroness Geneville, the widowed Countess of March, died on 19 October 1356 at the age of seventy. She was buried in Wigmore Abbey beside her husband, whose body had been returned to her by Edward III as she had requested. Her tomb no longer exists as the abbey was destroyed during the Dissolution of the Monasteries and only the ruins remain to this day.

    Lady Geneville's numerous direct descendants include the current British Royal Family, Sir Winston Churchill, and the 1st American President George Washington.

    end

    Joan Mortimer1

    F, #47256, d. between 1337 and 1351
    Last Edited=22 May 2004
    Consanguinity Index=0.2%
    Joan Mortimer was the daughter of Roger de Mortimer, 1st Earl of March and Joan de Geneville, Baroness Geneville.1 She married James Audley, 2nd Lord Audley (of Heleigh), son of Nicholas Audley, 1st Lord Audley (of Heleigh) and Joan Martin, before 13 June 1330.1 She died between 1337 and 1351.1
    From before 13 June 1330, her married name became Audley.1
    Children of Joan Mortimer and James Audley, 2nd Lord Audley (of Heleigh)

    Joan Audley+2
    Sir Nicholas Audley, 3rd Lord Audley (of Heleigh)2 b. c 1328, d. 22 Jul 1391
    Roger Audley2 b. a 1328
    Margery Audley2 b. b 1351, d. 1410/11
    Citations

    [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume I, page 339. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
    [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume I, page 340.

    end

    Children:
    1. 3. Joan Audley was born 0___ 1331, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England; died 0___ 1393.


Generation: 4

  1. 12.  Nicholas de Audley, 1st Baron Audley was born 11 Nov 1289, Heleigh Castle, Staffordshire, England (son of Nicholas de Audley and Katherine Giffard); died Bef 1316.

    Nicholas married Joan FitzMartin 0___ 1312. Joan was born ~ 1291, Barnstaple, Devonshire, England; died 1320-1322. [Group Sheet]


  2. 13.  Joan FitzMartin was born ~ 1291, Barnstaple, Devonshire, England; died 1320-1322.
    Children:
    1. 6. James Audley, 2nd Baron Audley (of Heleigh) was born 8 Jan 1313, (Heleigh Castle, Staffordshire, England); died 1 Apr 1386.

  3. 14.  Roger de Mortimer, 1st Earl of March was born 25 Apr 1287, Wigmore Castle, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England (son of Edmund Mortimer, Knight, 2nd Baron Mortimer and Margaret de Fiennes, Baroness Mortimer); died 29 Nov 1330, Tyburn, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Lord Lieutenant of Ireland
    • Also Known As: Baron Mortimer
    • Military:
    • Military: Despencer War

    Notes:

    Early life

    Mortimer, grandson of Roger Mortimer, 1st Baron Mortimer and Maud de Braose, Baroness Mortimer, was born at Wigmore Castle, Herefordshire, England, the firstborn of Marcher Lord Edmund Mortimer, 2nd Baron Mortimer, and Margaret de Fiennes. Edmund Mortimer had been a second son, intended for minor orders and a clerical career, but on the sudden death of his elder brother Ralph, Edmund was recalled from Oxford University and installed as heir. According to his biographer Ian Mortimer, Roger was possibly sent as a boy away from home to be fostered in the household of his formidable uncle, Roger Mortimer de Chirk.[2] It was this uncle who had carried the severed head of Llywelyn ap Gruffudd of Wales to King Edward I in 1282.[3] Like many noble children of his time, Roger was betrothed young, to Joan de Geneville (born 1286), the wealthy daughter of Sir Piers de Geneville, of Trim Castle and Ludlow. They were married on 20 September 1301. Their first child was born in 1302.[4]

    Marriage

    Through his marriage with Joan de Geneville, Roger not only acquired increased possessions in the Welsh Marches, including the important Ludlow Castle, which became the chief stronghold of the Mortimers, but also extensive estates and influence in Ireland. However, Joan de Geneville was not an "heiress" at the time of her marriage. Her grandfather Geoffrey de Geneville, at the age of eighty in 1308, conveyed most, but not all, of his Irish lordships to Roger Mortimer, and then retired, notably alive: he finally died in 1314, with Joan succeeding as suo jure 2nd Baroness Geneville. During his lifetime Geoffrey also conveyed much of the remainder of his legacy, such as Kenlys, to his younger son Simon de Geneville, who had meanwhile become Baron of Culmullin through marriage to Joanna FitzLeon. Roger Mortimer therefore succeeded to the eastern part of the Lordship of Meath, centred on Trim and its stronghold of Trim Castle. He did not succeed, however, to the Lordship of Fingal.[5]

    Military adventures in Ireland and Wales

    Roger Mortimer's childhood came to an abrupt end when his father was mortally wounded in a skirmish near Builth in July 1304. Since Roger was underage at the death of his father, he was placed by King Edward I under the guardianship of Piers Gaveston, 1st Earl of Cornwall. However, on 22 May 1306, in a lavish ceremony in Westminster Abbey with two hundred and fifty-nine others, he was knighted by Edward and granted livery of his full inheritance.[6]

    His adult life began in earnest in 1308, when he went to Ireland in person to enforce his authority. This brought him into conflict with the de Lacys, who turned for support to Edward Bruce, brother of Robert Bruce, King of Scots. Mortimer was appointed Lord Lieutenant of Ireland by Edward II on 23 November 1316. Shortly afterwards, at the head of a large army, he drove Bruce to Carrickfergus and the de Lacys into Connaught, wreaking vengeance on their adherents whenever they were to be found. He returned to England and Wales in 1318[7] and was then occupied for some years with baronial disputes on the Welsh border.

    Opposition to Edward II

    Main article: Despenser War
    Mortimer became disaffected with his king and joined the growing opposition to Edward II and the Despensers. After the younger Despenser was granted lands belonging to him, he and the Marchers began conducting devastating raids against Despenser property in Wales. He supported Humphrey de Bohun, 4th Earl of Hereford, in refusing to obey the king's summons to appear before him in 1321. Mortimer led a march against London, his men wearing the Mortimer uniform which was green with a yellow sleeve.[8] He was prevented from entering the capital, although his forces put it under siege. These acts of insurrection compelled the Lords Ordainers led by Thomas, 2nd Earl of Lancaster, to order the king to banish the Despensers in August. When the king led a successful expedition in October against Margaret de Clare, Baroness Badlesmere, after she had refused Queen Isabella admittance to Leeds Castle, he used his victory and new popularity among the moderate lords and the people to summon the Despensers back to England. Mortimer, in company with other Marcher Lords, led a rebellion against Edward, which is known as the Despenser War, at the end of the year.[citation needed]

    Forced to surrender to the king at Shrewsbury in January 1322, Mortimer was consigned to the Tower of London, but by drugging the constable, escaped to France in August 1323, pursued by warrants for his capture dead or alive.[9] In the following year Queen Isabella, anxious to escape from her husband, obtained his consent to her going to France to use her influence with her brother, King Charles IV, in favour of peace. At the French court the queen found Roger Mortimer, who became her lover soon afterwards. At his instigation, she refused to return to England so long as the Despensers retained power as the king's favourites.

    Historians have speculated as to the date at which Mortimer and Isabella actually became lovers.[10] The modern view is that it began while both were still in England, and that after a disagreement, Isabella abandoned Roger to his fate in the Tower. His subsequent escape became one of medieval England's most colourful episodes. However almost certainly Isabella risked everything by chancing Mortimer's companionship and emotional support when they first met again at Paris four years later (Christmas 1325). King Charles IV's protection of Isabella at the French court from Despenser's would-be assassins played a large part in developing the relationship.[11] In 1326, Mortimer moved as Prince Edward's guardian to Hainault, but only after a furious dispute with the queen, demanding she remain in France.[12] Isabella retired to raise troops in her County of Ponthieu; Mortimer arranged the invasion fleet supplied by the Hainaulters.

    Invasion of England and defeat of Edward II

    The scandal of Isabella's relations with Mortimer compelled them both to withdraw from the French court to Flanders, where they obtained assistance for an invasion of England from Count William of Hainaut, although Isabella did not arrive from Ponthieu until the fleet was due to sail. Landing in the River Orwell on 24 September 1326, they were accompanied by Prince Edward and Henry, Earl of Lancaster. London rose in support of the queen, and Edward took flight to the west, pursued by Mortimer and Isabella. After wandering helplessly for some weeks in Wales, the king was taken prisoner on 16 November, and was compelled to abdicate in favour of his son. Though the latter was crowned as Edward III of England on 25 January 1327, the country was ruled by Mortimer and Isabella, who were widely believed to have arranged the murder of Edward II the following September at Berkeley Castle.[citation needed]

    Historian and biographer of Roger Mortimer and Edward III, Ian Mortimer, retells the old story that the ex-king was not killed and buried in 1327, but secretly remained alive at Corfe Castle. When Mortimer besieged the castle, Edward II was said to escape to Rome, where he stayed under papal protection.[13]

    Powers won and lost

    Rich estates and offices of profit and power were now heaped on Mortimer. He was made constable of Wallingford Castle and in September 1328 he was created Earl of March. However, although in military terms he was far more competent than the Despensers, his ambition was troubling to all. His own son Geoffrey, the only one to survive into old age, mocked him as "the king of folly." During his short time as ruler of England he took over the lordships of Denbigh, Oswestry, and Clun (the first of which belonged to Despenser, the latter two had been the Earl of Arundel's). He was also granted the marcher lordship of Montgomery by the queen.[citation needed]


    The "Tyburn Tree"

    The jealousy and anger of many nobles were aroused by Mortimer's use of power. Henry, Earl of Lancaster, one of the principals behind Edward II's deposition, tried to overthrow Mortimer, but the action was ineffective as the young king passively stood by. Then, in March 1330, Mortimer ordered the execution of Edmund, Earl of Kent, the half-brother of Edward II. After this execution Henry Lancaster prevailed upon the young king, Edward III, to assert his independence. In October 1330, a Parliament was summoned to Nottingham, just days before Edward's eighteenth birthday, and Mortimer and Isabella were seized by Edward and his companions from inside Nottingham Castle. In spite of Isabella's entreaty to her son, "Fair son, have pity on the gentle Mortimer," Mortimer was conveyed to the Tower. Accused of assuming royal power and of various other high misdemeanours, he was condemned without trial and ignominiously hanged at Tyburn on 29 November 1330, his vast estates forfeited to the crown. His body hung at the gallows for two days and nights in full view of the populace. Mortimer's widow Joan received a pardon in 1336 and survived till 1356. She was buried beside Mortimer at Wigmore, but the site was later destroyed.[14]

    In 2002, the actor John Challis, the current owner of the remaining buildings of Wigmore Abbey, invited the BBC programme House Detectives at Large to investigate his property. During the investigation, a document was discovered in which Mortimer's widow Joan petitioned Edward III for the return of her husband's body so she could bury it at Wigmore Abbey. Mortimer's lover Isabella had buried his body at Greyfriars in Coventry following his hanging. Edward III replied, "Let his body rest in peace." The king later relented, and Mortimer's body was transferred to Wigmore Abbey, where Joan was later buried beside him.[citation needed]

    Children of Roger and Joan

    The marriages of Mortimer's children (three sons and eight daughters) cemented Mortimer's strengths in the West.

    Sir Edmund Mortimer knt (1302-1331), married Elizabeth de Badlesmere; they produced Roger Mortimer, 2nd Earl of March, who was restored to his grandfather's title.
    Margaret Mortimer (1304 - 5 May 1337), married Thomas de Berkeley, 3rd Baron Berkeley
    Maud Mortimer (1307 - aft. 1345), married John de Charlton, Lord of Powys[15]
    Geoffrey Mortimer (1309-1372/6)
    John Mortimer (1310-1328)
    Joan Mortimer (c. 1312-1337/51), married James Audley, 2nd Baron Audley
    Isabella Mortimer (c. 1313 - aft. 1327)
    Katherine Mortimer (c. 1314-1369), married Thomas de Beauchamp, 11th Earl of Warwick
    Agnes Mortimer (c. 1317-1368), married Laurence Hastings, 1st Earl of Pembroke
    Beatrice Mortimer (d. 16 October 1383), who married firstly, Edward of Norfolk (d. before 9 August 1334), son and heir apparent of Thomas of Brotherton, by whom she had no issue, and secondly, before 13 September 1337, Thomas de Brewes (d. 9 or 16 June 1361), by whom she had three sons and three daughters.[16]
    Blanche Mortimer (c. 1321-1347), married Peter de Grandison, 2nd Baron Grandison

    Royal descendants

    Through his son Sir Edmund Mortimer, he is an ancestor of the last Plantagenet monarchs of England from King Edward IV to Richard III. By Edward IV's daughter, Elizabeth of York, the Earl of March is an ancestor to King Henry VIII and to all subsequent monarchs of England.

    Roger Mortimer, 1st earl of March, (born 1287?—died Nov. 29, 1330, Tyburn, near London, Eng.), lover of the English king Edward II’s queen, Isabella of France, with whom he contrived Edward’s deposition and murder (1327). For three years thereafter he was virtual king of England during the minority of Edward III.

    The descendant of Norman knights who had accompanied William the Conqueror, he inherited wealthy family estates and fortunes, principally in Wales and Ireland, and in 1304 became 8th Baron of Wigmore on the death of his father, the 7th baron. He devoted the early years of his majority to obtaining effective control of his Irish lordships against his wife’s kinsmen, the Lacys, who summoned to their aid Edward Bruce, brother of King Robert I of Scotland, when he was fighting to become king of Ireland. In 1316 Mortimer was defeated at Kells and withdrew to England, but afterward, as King Edward II’s lieutenant in Ireland (November 1316), he was largely instrumental in overcoming Bruce and in driving the Lacys from Meath.

    In 1317 he was associated with the Earl of Pembroke’s “middle party” in English politics; but distrust of the Despensers (see Despenser, Hugh Le and Hugh Le) drove him, in common with other marcher lords, into opposition and violent conflict with the Despensers in South Wales in 1321. But, receiving no help from Edward II’s other enemies, Roger and his uncle Roger Mortimer of Chirk made their submission in January 1322. Imprisoned in the Tower of London, Roger escaped in 1323 and fled to France, where in 1325 he was joined by Queen Isabella, who became his mistress. The exiles invaded England in September 1326; the fall of the Despensers was followed by the deposition of Edward II and his subsequent murder (1327), in which Mortimer was deeply implicated.

    Thereafter, as the queen’s paramour, Mortimer virtually ruled England. He used his position to further his own ends. Created Earl of March in October 1328, he secured for himself the lordships of Denbigh, Oswestry, and Clun, formerly belonging to the Earl of Arundel; the marcher lordships of the Mortimers of Chirk; and Montgomery, granted to him by the queen. His insatiable avarice, his arrogance, and his unpopular policy toward Scotland aroused against Mortimer a general revulsion among his fellow barons, and in October 1330 the young king Edward III, at the instigation of Henry of Lancaster, had him seized at Nottingham and conveyed to the Tower. Condemned for crimes declared to be notorious by his peers in Parliament, he was hanged at Tyburn as a traitor, and his estates were forfeited to the crown.

    One night in August 1323, a captive rebel baron, Sir Roger Mortimer, drugged his guards and escaped from the Tower of London. With the king's men-at-arms in pursuit he fled to the south coast and sailed to France. There he was joined by Isabella, the Queen of England, who threw herself into his arms.

    A year later, as lovers, they returned with an invading army: King Edward II's forces crumbled before them and Mortimer took power. He removed Edward II in the first deposition of a monarch in British history. Then the ex-king was apparently murdered, some said with a red-hot poker, in Berkeley Castle.

    Birth:
    History, map & images of Wigmore Castle ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wigmore_Castle

    Military:
    Military adventures in Ireland and Wales

    Roger Mortimer's childhood came to an abrupt end when his father was mortally wounded in a skirmish near Builth in July 1304. Since Roger was underage at the death of his father, he was placed by King Edward I under the guardianship of Piers Gaveston, 1st Earl of Cornwall. However, on 22 May 1306, in a lavish ceremony in Westminster Abbey with two hundred and fifty-nine others, he was knighted by Edward and granted livery of his full inheritance.[6]

    His adult life began in earnest in 1308, when he went to Ireland in person to enforce his authority. This brought him into conflict with the de Lacys, who turned for support to Edward Bruce, brother of Robert Bruce, King of Scots. Mortimer was appointed Lord Lieutenant of Ireland by Edward II on 23 November 1316. Shortly afterwards, at the head of a large army, he drove Bruce to Carrickfergus and the de Lacys into Connaught, wreaking vengeance on their adherents whenever they were to be found. He returned to England and Wales in 1318[7] and was then occupied for some years with baronial disputes on the Welsh border.

    Died:
    hanged as a traitor...

    Roger married Joan de Geneville, 2nd Baroness Geneville 20 Sep 1301. Joan (daughter of Piers de Geneville and Joan of Lusigman, 2nd Baroness Geneville) was born 2 Feb 1286, Ludlow Castle, Shropshire, England; died 19 Oct 1396, King's Stanley, Gloucestershire, England; was buried Wigmore Abbey, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 15.  Joan de Geneville, 2nd Baroness Geneville was born 2 Feb 1286, Ludlow Castle, Shropshire, England (daughter of Piers de Geneville and Joan of Lusigman, 2nd Baroness Geneville); died 19 Oct 1396, King's Stanley, Gloucestershire, England; was buried Wigmore Abbey, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Baroness Mortimer
    • Also Known As: Countess of March
    • Also Known As: Jeanne de Joinville

    Notes:

    Joan de Geneville, 2nd Baroness Geneville, Countess of March, Baroness Mortimer (2 February 1286 – 19 October 1356), also known as Jeanne de Joinville, was the daughter of Sir Piers de Geneville and Joan of Lusignan. She inherited the estates of her grandparents, Geoffrey de Geneville, 1st Baron Geneville, and Maud de Lacy, Baroness Geneville. She was one of the wealthiest heiresses in the Welsh Marches and County Meath, Ireland. She was the wife of Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March, the de facto ruler of England from 1327 to 1330. She succeeded as suo jure 2nd Baroness Geneville on 21 October 1314 upon the death of her grandfather, Geoffrey de Geneville.[1][2]

    As a result of her husband's insurrection against King Edward II of England, she was imprisoned in Skipton Castle for two years. Following the execution of her husband in 1330 for usurping power in England, Joan was once more taken into custody. In 1336, her lands were restored to her after she received a full pardon for her late husband's crimes from Edward II's son and successor, Edward III of England.

    Family and inheritance

    Ludlow Castle in Shropshire, the birthplace of Joan de Geneville
    Joan was born on 2 February 1286 at Ludlow Castle in Shropshire.[3] She was the eldest child of Sir Piers de Geneville, of Trim Castle and Ludlow, whose father Sir Geoffrey de Geneville, 1st Baron Geneville, was Justiciar of Ireland. Her mother Jeanne of Lusignan was part of one of the most illustrious French families, daughter of Hugh XII of Lusignan, Count of La Marche and of Angoulăeme, and sister of Yolanda of Lusignan, the suo jure Countess of La Marche. Joan had two younger sisters, Matilda and Beatrice who both became nuns at Aconbury Priory.[4] She also had two half-sisters from her mother's first marriage to Bernard Ezi III, Lord of Albret: Mathe, Dame d'Albret (died 1283), and Isabelle, Dame d'Albret (died 1 December 1294), wife of Bernard VI, Count of Armagnac.

    When her father died in Ireland shortly before June 1292, Joan became one of the wealthiest and most eligible heiresses in the Welsh Marches, with estates that included the town and castle of Ludlow, the lordship of Ewyas Lacy, the manors of Wolferlow, Stanton Lacy, and Mansell Lacy in Shropshire and Herefordshire as well as a sizeable portion of County Meath in Ireland.[5][6] She was due to inherit these upon the death of her grandfather, but in 1308, Baron Geneville conveyed most of the Irish estates which had belonged to his late wife Maud de Lacy to Joan and her husband Roger Mortimer. They both went to Ireland where they took seisin of Meath on 28 October of that same year. The baron died on 21 October 1314 at the House of the Friars Preachers at Trim, and Joan subsequently succeeded him, becoming the suo jure 2nd Baroness Geneville.[1][2]

    Marriage

    Joan married Roger Mortimer, eldest son of Edmund Mortimer, 2nd Baron Wigmore, and Margaret de Fiennes on 20 September 1301 at the manor of Pembridge.[7] Marriage to Joan was highly beneficial to Mortimer as it brought him much influence and prestige in addition to the rich estates he gained through their matrimonial alliance.[8][9] Three years later in 1304 he succeeded as Baron Mortimer, making Joan Baroness Mortimer. He was knighted on Whitsunday 22 May 1306 by King Edward I. The knighting ceremony took place in Westminster Abbey and was known as the Feast of the Swan as all those present made their personal vows upon two swans.[10] Two hundred and fifty-nine other young men received knighthoods along with Mortimer including the Prince of Wales who would shortly afterwards succeed his father as Edward II. Following the ceremony was a magnificent banquet held at the Great Hall of Westminster.[11]

    Upon taking seizen of her Irish lands in 1308, Joan and Mortimer travelled back and forth between their estates in Ireland and those in the Welsh Marches. Given that Joan opted to accompany her husband to Ireland rather than remain at home, and that she produced 12 surviving children over a period of just 17 years led Roger Mortimer's biographer Ian Mortimer to suggest they enjoyed a closer and more affectionate relationship than was typical of noble couples in the 14th-century. He described their union as having been " a mutually beneficial secure medieval partnership".[12]

    Issue

    Together Joan and Mortimer had twelve surviving children:[12][13][14]


    Effigies of Joan's daughter, Katherine Mortimer and her husband Thomas de Beauchamp, 11th Earl of Warwick. St. Mary's Church, Warwick

    Margaret Mortimer (2 May 1304- 5 May 1337), married Thomas de Berkeley, 3rd Baron Berkeley, by whom she had issue.
    Sir Edmund Mortimer (died 16 December 1331), married Elizabeth de Badlesmere, daughter of Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 1st Baron Badlesmere, and Margaret de Clare, by whom he had two sons, Roger Mortimer, 2nd Earl of March, and John, who died young.
    Roger Mortimer, married Joan Le Botiller
    Geoffrey Mortimer, Lord of Towyth (died 1372/5 May 1376), married Jeanne de Lezay, by whom he had issue.
    John Mortimer. He was killed in a tournament at Shrewsbury sometime after 1328.
    Katherine Mortimer (1314- 4 August 1369), married Thomas de Beauchamp, 11th Earl of Warwick, by whom she had fifteen children, including Thomas de Beauchamp, 12th Earl of Warwick, and William de Beauchamp, 1st Baron Bergavenny, who married Lady Joan FitzAlan.
    Joan Mortimer (died between 1337–1351), married James Audley, 2nd Baron Audley, by whom she had issue.
    Agnes Mortimer, married Laurence Hastings, 1st Earl of Pembroke, by whom she had issue
    Isabella Mortimer (died after 1327)
    Beatrice Mortimer (died 16 October 1383), married firstly Edward of Norfolk, and secondly, Thomas de Braose, 1st Baron Braose. She had issue by her second husband.
    Maud Mortimer (died after August 1345), married John de Charlton, Lord of Powys, by whom she had issue.
    Blanche Mortimer (c.1321- 1347), married Peter de Grandison, 2nd Baron Grandison, by whom she had issue.
    Mortimer's affair with Queen Isabella[edit]

    Joan's husband Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March, is allegedly depicted in the foreground with Queen Isabella in this 14th-century manuscript illustration
    Mortimer was appointed Lord Lieutenant of Ireland on 23 November 1316 and left for Ireland with a large force in February 1317.[15] While there, he fought against the Scots Army led by Edward Bruce, the younger brother of Robert the Bruce (who hoped to make Edward king of Ireland), and Bruce's Norman-Irish allies, the de Lacy's. Joan accompanied her husband to Ireland. They returned to England in 1318 after Mortimer had driven the Scots north to Carrickfergus, and dispersed the de Lacys, who were Joan's relatives. For the next few years, Mortimer occupied himself with baronial disputes on the Welsh border; nevertheless, on account of the increasing influence of Hugh Despenser, the Elder, and Hugh Despenser the Younger over King Edward II, Roger Mortimer became strongly disaffected with his monarch, especially after the younger Despenser had been granted lands which rightfully belonged to Mortimer.[16]

    In October 1321 King Edward and his troops besieged Leeds Castle, after the governor's wife, Margaret de Clare, Baroness Badlesmere, refused Queen Isabella admittance and subsequently ordered her archers to fire upon Isabella and her escort after the latter attempted to gain entry to the castle. Elizabeth, the third Badlesmere daughter, was married to Joan and Mortimer's eldest son, Edmund. King Edward exploited his new popularity in the wake of his military victory at Leeds to recall to England the Despensers, whom the Lords Ordainers, led by Thomas, 2nd Earl of Lancaster, had forced him to banish in August 1321.[17] The Marcher lords, already in a state of insurrection for some time prior to the Despensers' banishment,[n 1] immediately rose up against the King in full force, with Mortimer leading the confederation alongside Ordainer Humphrey de Bohun, 4th Earl of Hereford.[18] The King quelled the rebellion, which is also known as the Despenser War; Mortimer and his uncle Roger Mortimer de Chirk both surrendered to him at Shrewsbury on 22 January 1322. Mortimer and his uncle were dispatched as prisoners to the Tower of London,[16] where they were kept in damp, unhealthy quarters. This was likely a factor in Roger Mortimer de Chirk's death in 1326. Joan's husband had fared better; by drugging the constable and the Tower guards, he managed to escape to France on 1 August 1323.[19] It was there that he later became the lover of Queen Isabella, who was estranged from the King as a result of the Despensers' absolute control over him. She had been sent to France on a peace mission by Edward but used the occasion to seek help from her brother, Charles IV to oust the Despensers.[20] The scandal of their love affair forced them to leave the French court for Flanders, where they obtained help for an invasion of England.[21]

    Joan's imprisonment

    Skipton Castle, Yorkshire, where Joan was imprisoned from 1324 to 1326

    While the couple were still in France, King Edward had retaliated against Mortimer by taking Joan and all of their children into custody, and "treating them with severity".[22] In April 1324 Joan was removed from Hampshire where she had been confined in a lodging under house arrest and sent to Skipton Castle in Yorkshire; there she was imprisoned in a cell and endured considerable suffering and hardship.[23] Most of her household had been dismissed and she was permitted a small number of attendants to serve her. She was granted just one mark per day for her necessities, and out of this sum she had to feed her servants.[24] She was additionally allowed ten marks per annum at Easter and Michaelmas for new clothes.[25] Her daughters suffered worse privations having been locked up inside various religious houses with even less money at their disposal.[24] Joan was transferred from Skipton to Pontefract Castle in July 1326.[26]

    Countess of March

    Mortimer and Isabella landed in England two months later in September 1326, and they joined forces with Henry, 3rd Earl of Lancaster. On 16 November, King Edward was taken prisoner and eventually murdered at Berkeley Castle, presumably by Mortimer's hired assassins.[27] From 1327 to 1330, Mortimer and Isabella jointly held the Office of Regent for her son, King Edward III who was duly crowned following his father's death. Mortimer was made constable of Wallingford Castle; in September 1328, Mortimer was created Earl of March. This made Joan henceforth, the Countess of March; although it is not known what she thought about her husband's illegal assumption of power and flagrant affair with the Queen. What has been established is that Joan was never an active participant in her husband's insurrection against King Edward.[28]

    Mortimer and Queen Isabella were the de facto rulers of England. Hostility against the power Mortimer wielded over the kingdom and the young King Edward III, increased; his former friend Henry of Lancaster encouraged the King to assert his authority to oust Mortimer. When Mortimer ordered the execution of Edmund, Earl of Kent, half-brother of the late King Edward, anger and outrage engulfed the country. The King deposed his mother and her lover; Roger Mortimer was seized, arrested, and on 29 November 1330, hanged at Tyburn, London.[29]

    Following her husband's execution, Joan – as the wife of a traitor – was imprisoned again, this time in Hampshire where years before she had been placed under house arrest; her children were also taken into custody. In 1331, she was given an allowance for household expenses; however, her lands were only restored to her in 1336 after King Edward III granted her a full pardon for her late husband's crimes. In 1347 she received back the Liberty of Trim.[30]

    Death

    Joan de Geneville, Baroness Geneville, the widowed Countess of March, died on 19 October 1356 at the age of seventy. She was buried in Wigmore Abbey beside her husband, whose body had been returned to her by Edward III as she had requested. Her tomb no longer exists as the abbey was destroyed during the Dissolution of the Monasteries and only the ruins remain to this day.

    Lady Geneville's numerous direct descendants include the current British Royal Family, Sir Winston Churchill, and the 1st American President George Washington.

    Birth:
    Click this link to view images, history & map of the massive Ludlow Castle in Shropshire ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ludlow_Castle

    Children:
    1. Edmund Mortimer was born ~ 1304, Wigmore Castle, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England; died 16 Dec 1331, Wigmore Castle, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England.
    2. Margaret Mortimer, Baroness Berkeley was born 2 May 1304, (Wigmore Castle, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England); died 5 May 1337; was buried St. Augustine's Abbey, Bristol, Gloucestershire, England.
    3. 7. Joan de Mortimer, 2nd Baroness Geneville was born 2 Feb 1286, Ludlow Castle, Ludlow, Shropshire, England; died 19 Oct 1356.
    4. Katherine de Mortimer, Countess of Warwick was born 0___ 1314, Wigmore Castle, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England; died 4 Aug 1369, (Warwickshire) England; was buried St. Mary's Church, Warwick, Warwickshire, England.


Generation: 5

  1. 24.  Nicholas de Audley was born Bef 1258, Heleighley Castle, Staffordshire, England (son of James de Audley, Knight and Ela Longespee); died 28 Aug 1299.

    Other Events:

    • Baptism: Red Castle, Weston, Shropshire, England

    Notes:

    Birth:
    Heighley Castle (or Heleigh Castle) is a ruined medieval castle near Madeley, Staffordshire. The castle was completed by the Audley family in 1233 and for over 300 years was one of their ancestral homes. It was held for Charles I during the English Civil War and was destroyed by Parliamentary forces in the 1640s. The ruinous remains comprise masonry fragments, mostly overgrown by vegetation. The site is protected by Grade II listed building status and is a Scheduled Ancient Monument. The castle is privately owned and is not open to visitors.

    Heleigh Castle was built by Henry de Aldithley (c.1175-1246) (later "de Audley"), Sheriff of Shropshire 1227-1232. He also built the nearby Red Castle, Shropshire. He endowed the nearby Cistercian Abbey of St. Mary at Hulton in 1223, and donated to it a large amount of land, some of which was an inheritance from his mother and some of which was purchased.

    Nicholas married Katherine Giffard ~ 1288. Katherine was born 0___ 1272, of, Brimpsfield, Gloucester, England; died Aft 1322, of, Ledbury, Hereford, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 25.  Katherine Giffard was born 0___ 1272, of, Brimpsfield, Gloucester, England; died Aft 1322, of, Ledbury, Hereford, England.
    Children:
    1. 12. Nicholas de Audley, 1st Baron Audley was born 11 Nov 1289, Heleigh Castle, Staffordshire, England; died Bef 1316.

  3. 28.  Edmund Mortimer, Knight, 2nd Baron Mortimer was born 0___ 1251, (Wigmore Castle, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England) (son of Roger Mortimer, Knight, 1st Baron Mortimer and Maud de Braose, Lady Mortimer); died 17 Jul 1304, Wigmore Castle, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England.

    Notes:

    Edmund Mortimer, 2nd Lord Mortimer (1251 – 17 July 1304)[1] was the second son and eventual heir of Roger Mortimer, 1st Baron Mortimer. His mother was Maud de Braose. As a younger son, Edmund had been intended for clerical or monastic life, and had been sent to study at Oxford University.

    He was made Treasurer of York in 1265. By 1268 he is recorded as studying Theology in the house of the Archbishop of York. King Henry III showed favour by supplementing his diet with the luxury of venison.

    The sudden death of his elder brother, Ralph, in 1274,[2] made him heir to the family estates; yet he continued to study at Oxford. But his father's death eventually forced his departure.

    He returned to the March in 1282 as the new Lord Mortimer of Wigmore and immediately became involved in Welsh Marches politics. Together with his brother Roger Mortimer, Baron of Chirk, John Giffard, and Roger Lestrange, he devised a plan to trap Llywelyn ap Gruffudd.[3] Edmund, a great-grandson of Llywelyn the Great, sent a message to his kinsman Llywelyn, grandson of Llywelyn the Great, telling him he was coming to Llywelyn's aid and arranged to meet with him at Builth. At Irfon Bridge[4] the Welsh prince became separated from his army. Edmund's brothers secretly forded the river behind Llywelyn's army and surprised the Welsh. In the resulting battle Llywelyn was killed and beheaded. Edmund then sent his brother Roger Mortimer of Chirk to present Llywelyn's severed head to King Edward I of England at Rhuddlan Castle. The head was displayed on the Tower of London as a warning to all rebels.[5]

    In return for his services Edmund was knighted by King Edward at Winchester in 1283. In September 1285, he married Margaret de Fiennes, the daughter of William II de Fiennes and Blanche de Brienne (herself the granddaughter of John of Brienne by his third wife Berenguela of Leon), the family entering the blood royal. Their surviving children were:

    Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March (25 April 1287 – 29 November 1330) married Joan de Geneville,[6] by whom he had twelve children.
    Maud Mortimer, married Sir Theobald II de Verdun, by whom she had four daughters, Joan de Verdun, who married John de Montagu (d. August 1317), eldest son and heir apparent of William Montagu, 2nd Baron Montagu; Elizabeth de Verdun, who married Bartholomew de Burghersh, 1st Baron Burghersh; Margaret de Verdun, who married firstly Sir William le Blount of Sodington, Worcestershire, secondly Sir Mark Husee, and thirdly Sir John de Crophill; and (allegedly) Katherine de Verdun.[6][7]
    John Mortimer, accidentally slain in a joust by John de Leyburne.[6]
    Walter Mortimer, a priest, Rector of Kingston.[6]
    Edmund, a priest, Rector of Hodnet, Shropshire and Treasurer of the cathedral at York.[6]
    Hugh Mortimer, a priest, Rector of church at Old Radnor.[6]
    They also had two daughters who became nuns; Elizabeth and Joan.[6]

    Mortimer served in the king's Scottish campaign, and returned to fight in Wales. He was mortally wounded in a skirmish near Builth, and died at Wigmore Castle.

    Notes

    Jump up ^ 'M Prestwich, The Three Edwards' (2003)
    Jump up ^ J. J. Crump, ‘Mortimer, Roger (III) de, lord of Wigmore (1231–1282)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004.
    Jump up ^ known in Welsh as Llywelyn Ein Llyw Olaf
    Jump up ^ also known as Orewin Bridge
    Jump up ^ M Prestwich,(1), 13–14.
    ^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g Sir Bernard Burke. A genealogical history of the dormant, abeyant, forfeited, and extinct peerages of the British empire, Harrison, 1866. p. 384. Google eBook
    Jump up ^ Richardson IV 2011, pp. 252, 255.
    References[edit]
    Richardson, Douglas (2011). Everingham, Kimball G., ed. Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families. IV (2nd ed.). Salt Lake City. ISBN 1460992709.
    Bibliography[edit]
    Mortimer, Ian. The Greatest Traitor: The Life of Sir Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March, Ruler of England 1327–1330, (Jonathan Cape, London 2003).
    Cokayne, G. E. The Complete Peerage of Great Britain and Ireland of titles extinct, abeyant, and dormant, 14 vols (London, 1910–37).
    Prestwich, M, The Three Edwards: War and State in England, 1272–1377, London, 2003.
    Prestwich, M, Plantagenet England, 1265–1399 London, 2005.

    Died:
    History, map & images of Wigmore Castle ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wigmore_Castle

    Edmund — Margaret de Fiennes, Baroness Mortimer. Margaret (daughter of William de Fiennes, II, Knight, Baron Tingy and Blanche de Brienne, Baroness Tingry) was born Aft 1269; died 7 Feb 1333. [Group Sheet]


  4. 29.  Margaret de Fiennes, Baroness Mortimer was born Aft 1269 (daughter of William de Fiennes, II, Knight, Baron Tingy and Blanche de Brienne, Baroness Tingry); died 7 Feb 1333.

    Notes:

    Margaret de Fiennes, Baroness Mortimer (after 1269 – 7 February 1333), was an English noblewoman born to William II de Fiennes, Baron Tingry and Blanche de Brienne. Her paternal grandparents were Enguerrand II de Fiennes and Isabelle de Conde. Her maternal grandparents were Jean de Brienne and Jeanne, Dame de Chateaudun.

    Margaret had a sister, Joan de Fiennes (c. 1273 - before 26 October 1309), whose daughter, Margaret Wake, was the mother of Joan of Kent. Therefore, Margaret de Fiennes was a great-aunt of Joan, the Fair Maid of Kent. Margaret de Fiennes was also a first cousin of Humphrey de Bohun, 4th Earl of Hereford.

    In September 1285, when she was fourteen or fifteen years old, Margaret married Edmund Mortimer of Wigmore, 2nd Baron Mortimer, the son of Roger Mortimer, 1st Baron Mortimer and Maud de Braose. They had eight children.

    Children

    Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March (25 April 1287 – 29 November 1330) married Joan de Geneville,[1] by whom he had twelve children. Through this union are descended the last Plantagenet monarchs of England from King Edward IV to Richard III, and every monarch of England after King Henry VII.
    Maud Mortimer, married Sir Theobald II de Verdun, by whom she had four daughters, Joan, Elizabeth, Margaret, and Katherine de Verdun. Queen consort Catherine Parr is a descendant of Margaret de Verdun by her marriage to Sir Thomas de Crophull.[1][2]
    John Mortimer, accidentally slain in battle by John de Leyburne.[1]
    Walter Mortimer, a priest, Rector of Kingston.[1]
    Edmund, a priest, Rector of Hodnet and Treasurer of the cathedral at York.[1]
    Hugh Mortimer, a priest, Rector of the church at Old Radnor.[1]
    They also had two daughters who became nuns; Elizabeth and Joan.[1]

    References

    ^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g Sir Bernard Burke. A genealogical history of the dormant, abeyant, forfeited, and extinct peerages of the British empire, Harrison, 1866. pg 384. Google eBook
    Jump up ^ Douglas Richardson. Magna Carta Ancestry, Genealogical Publishing Com, 2005. pg 247-49.
    Richardson, Douglas, Kimball G. Everingham, and David Faris. Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families. Royal ancestry series. (p. 155) Baltimore, Md: Genealogical Pub. Co, 2004. googlebooks Accessed March 30, 2008

    Children:
    1. 14. Roger de Mortimer, 1st Earl of March was born 25 Apr 1287, Wigmore Castle, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England; died 29 Nov 1330, Tyburn, England.
    2. Maud de Mortimer was born (1295-1300), (Wigmore Castle, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England); died 18 Sep 1312, Alton Castle, Cheadle, Staffordshire, England.

  5. 30.  Piers de Geneville was born 0___ 1256, Dublin, Leinster, Ireland (son of Geoffrey de Geneville and Maud de Lacy, Baroness Geneville); died 0Jun 1292.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Sir Piers de Geneville of Trim and Ludlow Castle

    Piers married Joan of Lusigman, 2nd Baroness Geneville 0___ 1283. Joan was born 0___ 1260, Angouleme, France; died 13 Apr 1323; was buried Abbaye de Valence, France. [Group Sheet]


  6. 31.  Joan of Lusigman, 2nd Baroness Geneville was born 0___ 1260, Angouleme, France; died 13 Apr 1323; was buried Abbaye de Valence, France.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Jeanne of Lusignan

    Notes:

    Joan of Lusignan (1260 – 13 April 1323) was a French noblewoman. She succeeded her uncle, Guy de la Marche, Knt., sometime in the period, 1310/13, as Lady of Couche and Peyrat, but not as Countess of La Marche since after her sister, Yolande's death, it was annexed by Philip IV of France and given as an appanage to Philip's son Charles the Fair. Previously, in 1308, following the death of her brother Guy (or Guiard), Jeanne and her sister Isabelle, as co-heiresses, had sold the county of Angoulăeme to the King.[1]

    She was married twice. Her first husband was Bernard Ezi III, Lord of Albret, by whom she had two daughters. By her second husband Sir Piers de Geneville, she had another three daughters; the eldest of whom was Joan de Geneville, 2nd Baroness Geneville, wife of Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March, the de facto ruler of England from 1327 to 1330.

    She is sometimes referred to as Jeanne of Lusignan.

    Family

    Joan was a younger daughter of Hugh XII of Lusignan, Count of La Marche and Angoulăeme, lord of Lusignan and Fougáeres, and Jeanne de Fougáeres.[2]

    Marriages

    Joan married firstly Bernard Ezi III, Lord of Albret, by whom she had two daughters:

    Mathe, Dame d'Albret (died 1283)
    Isabelle, Dame d'Albret (died 1 December 1294), married Bernard VI, Count of Armagnac, as his first wife. Their marriage was childless.[3]
    After the death of her first husband on 24 December 1280, Joan married secondly before 11 Oct. 1283 (date of charter), Sir Piers de Geneville, of Trim and Ludlow Castle (1256 – before June 1292), by whom she had another three daughters:

    Joan de Geneville (2 February 1286 – 19 October 1356), in 1301 married Roger de Mortimer, 1st Earl of March (d. 29 November 1330), by whom she had twelve children.
    Maud de Geneville, a nun at Aconbury Priory
    Beatrice de Geneville, a nun at Aconbury Priory
    Death and legacy[edit]
    Joan died 13 April 1323 at the age of 63, and was buried at the Abbaye de Valence.

    end

    Children:
    1. 15. Joan de Geneville, 2nd Baroness Geneville was born 2 Feb 1286, Ludlow Castle, Shropshire, England; died 19 Oct 1396, King's Stanley, Gloucestershire, England; was buried Wigmore Abbey, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England.


Generation: 6

  1. 48.  James de Audley, Knight was born 0___ 1220, Heleighley Castle, Staffordshire, England; died 11 Jun 1272, Ireland.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Justiciar of Ireland
    • Also Known As: James Aiditheley
    • Also Known As: James de Aldithel
    • Also Known As: James de Aldthley, Justice of Chester

    Notes:

    James de Audley (1220 - 1272), or James de Aldithel and Alditheley, was an English baron.[1]

    Biography

    Audley was born in 1220 to Henry de Audley, and was, like him, a lord-marcher. In 1257 he accompanied Richard, king of the Romans, to his coronation at Aachen (Matt. Paris), sailing on 29 April (Rymer) and returning to England in the autumn to take part in the Welsh campaign (1257-1260). In the following year (1258) he was one of the royalist members of the council of fifteen nominated by the Provisions of Oxford, and witnessed, as 'James of Aldithel,' their confirmation by the king (18 Oct.). He also, with his brother-in-law, Peter de Montfort, was appointed commissioner to treat with Llewelyn (18 Aug.), and two years later he acted as an itinerant justice. On Llewelyn of Wales attacking Mortimer, a royalist marcher, Audley joined Prince Edward at Hereford, 9 January 1263 to resist the invasion. But the barons, coming to Llewelyn's assistance, dispersed the royalist forces, and seized on his castles and estates. He is wrongly said by Dugdale and Foss to have been made 'justice of Ireland' in this year, but in December he was one of the royalist sureties in the appeal to Louis of France. At the time of the battle of Lewes (May 1264) he was in arms for the king on the Welsh marches (Matthew Paris), and he was one of the first to rise against the government of Simon de Montfort. On Gloucester embracing the royal cause, early in 1265, Audley joined him with the other marchers, and took part in the campaign of Evesham and the overthrow of the baronial party. He appears to have gone on a pilgrimage to Galicia in 1268, and also, it is stated, to Palestine in 1270; but though his name occurs among the 'Crucesignati' of 21 May 1270, it is clear that he never went, for he was appointed justiciary of Ireland a few months later, his name first occurring in connection with that office 5 September 1270.

    He also served as High Sheriff of Staffordshire and Shropshire in 1261 and 1270.[2] During his tenure as Justiciar of Ireland he led several expeditions against 'the Irish rebels,' but died by 'breaking his neck' about 11 June 1272 (when he is last mentioned as justiciary), and was succeeded by his son James, who did homage 29 July 1272.

    Birth:
    Heighley Castle (or Heleigh Castle) is a ruined medieval castle near Madeley, Staffordshire. The castle was completed by the Audley family in 1233 and for over 300 years was one of their ancestral homes. It was held for Charles I during the English Civil War and was destroyed by Parliamentary forces in the 1640s. The ruinous remains comprise masonry fragments, mostly overgrown by vegetation. The site is protected by Grade II listed building status and is a Scheduled Ancient Monument. The castle is privately owned and is not open to visitors.

    Heleigh Castle was built by Henry de Aldithley (c.1175-1246) (later "de Audley"), Sheriff of Shropshire 1227-1232. He also built the nearby Red Castle, Shropshire. He endowed the nearby Cistercian Abbey of St. Mary at Hulton in 1223, and donated to it a large amount of land, some of which was an inheritance from his mother and some of which was purchased.

    ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heighley_Castle

    James married Ela Longespee 0___ 1244. Ela (daughter of William Longespee, II, Knight, Earl of Salisbury, Crusader and Odoine de Camville) was born ~ 1228, (Salisbury, Wiltshire) England; died 22 Nov 1299. [Group Sheet]


  2. 49.  Ela Longespee was born ~ 1228, (Salisbury, Wiltshire) England (daughter of William Longespee, II, Knight, Earl of Salisbury, Crusader and Odoine de Camville); died 22 Nov 1299.
    Children:
    1. 24. Nicholas de Audley was born Bef 1258, Heleighley Castle, Staffordshire, England; died 28 Aug 1299.
    2. Maud Audley was born ~ 1260, Stratton Audley, Oxfordshire, England.
    3. Hugh de Audley, 1st Baron Audley of Stratton was born 0___ 1267, Stratton Audley, Oxfordshire, England; died Bef 1326; was buried Much Marcle, Saint Bartholomew's Churchyard, Much Marcle, Herefordshire, England.

  3. 56.  Roger Mortimer, Knight, 1st Baron Mortimer was born 0___ 1231, (Wigmore Castle, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England) (son of Ralph de Mortimer, Knight and Gwladus Ddu); died 30 Oct 1292; was buried Wigmore Abbey, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England.

    Notes:

    Roger Mortimer, 1st Baron Mortimer, of Wigmore (1231 – 30 October 1282), was a famous and honoured knight from Wigmore Castle in Herefordshire. He was a loyal ally of King Henry III of England. He was at times an enemy, at times an ally, of Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, Prince of Wales.

    Early career

    Born in 1231, Roger was the son of Ralph de Mortimer and his Welsh wife, Princess Gwladys Ddu, daughter of Llywelyn ab Iorwerth and Joan Plantagenet, daughter of John "Lackland", King of England.

    In 1256 Roger went to war with Llywelyn ap Gruffudd when the latter invaded his lordship of Gwrtheyrnion or Rhayader. This war would continue intermittently until the deaths of both Roger and Llywelyn in 1282. They were both grandsons of Llywelyn ab Iorwerth.

    Mortimer fought for the King against the rebel Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester, and almost lost his life in 1264 at the Battle of Lewes fighting Montfort's men. In 1265 Mortimer's wife, Maud de Braose helped rescue Prince Edward; and Mortimer and the Prince made an alliance against de Montfort.

    Victor at Evesham

    In August 1265, de Montfort's army was surrounded by the River Avon on three sides, and Prince Edward's army on the fourth. Mortimer had sent his men to block the only possible escape route, at the Bengeworth bridge. The Battle of Evesham began in earnest. A storm roared above the battle field. Montfort's Welsh soldiers broke and ran for the bridge, where they were slaughtered by Mortimer's men. Mortimer himself killed Hugh Despencer and Montfort, and crushed Montfort's army. Mortimer was awarded Montfort's severed head and other parts of his anatomy, which he sent home to Wigmore Castle as a gift for his wife, Lady Mortimer.

    Welsh wars and death

    See also: Conquest of Wales by Edward I

    Mortimer took part in Edward I's 1282 campaign against Llewelyn the Last, and was put in charge of operations in mid-Wales.[1] It was a major setback for Edward when Mortimer died in October 1282.[1]

    Marriage and children

    Lady Mortimer was Maud de Braose, daughter of William de Braose, Lord of Abergavenny by Eva Marshal. Roger Mortimer had married her in 1247. She was, like him, a scion of a Welsh Marches family. Their six known children were:[2]

    Ralph Mortimer, died 10 August 1274, Sheriff of Shropshire and Staffordshire.
    Edmund Mortimer, 2nd Baron Mortimer (1251–1304), married Margaret de Fiennes, the daughter of William II de Fiennes and Blanche de Brienne. Had issue, including Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March
    Isabella Mortimer, died 1292. She married (1) John Fitzalan, 7th Earl of Arundel,[2] (2) Ralph d'Arderne and (3) Robert de Hastang;[3]
    Margaret Mortimer, died 1297. She married Robert de Vere, 6th Earl of Oxford
    Roger Mortimer, 1st Baron Mortimer of Chirk, died 1326.
    Geoffrey Mortimer, died 1273.
    William Mortimer, died before June 1297, a knight, married Hawise, daughter and heir of Robert de Mucegros. Died childless.
    Their eldest son, Ralph, was a famed knight but died in his youth. The second son, Edmund, was recalled from Oxford University and appointed his father's heir.

    Epitaph

    Roger Mortimer died on 30 October 1282, and was buried at Wigmore Abbey, where his tombstone read:

    Here lies buried, glittering with praise, Roger the pure, Roger Mortimer the second, called Lord of Wigmore by those who held him dear. While he lived all Wales feared his power, and given as a gift to him all Wales remained his. It knew his campaigns, he subjected it to torment.

    Buried:
    his tombstone read:

    Here lies buried, glittering with praise, Roger the pure, Roger Mortimer the second, called Lord of Wigmore by those who held him dear. While he lived all Wales feared his power, and given as a gift to him all Wales remained his. It knew his campaigns, he subjected it to torment.

    Roger — Maud de Braose, Lady Mortimer. Maud (daughter of William de Braose, Lord of Brycheiniog and Eva Marshal) was born ~ 1224, (Wales); died 0___ 1301. [Group Sheet]


  4. 57.  Maud de Braose, Lady Mortimer was born ~ 1224, (Wales) (daughter of William de Braose, Lord of Brycheiniog and Eva Marshal); died 0___ 1301.
    Children:
    1. Isabella Mortimer died 0___ 1292.
    2. 28. Edmund Mortimer, Knight, 2nd Baron Mortimer was born 0___ 1251, (Wigmore Castle, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England); died 17 Jul 1304, Wigmore Castle, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England.

  5. 58.  William de Fiennes, II, Knight, Baron Tingy was born 0___ 1245, Wendover, Buckinghamshire, England (son of Enguerrand de Fiennes, Knight, Seigneur of Fiennes and Isabelle de Conde).

    William married Blanche de Brienne, Baroness Tingry 0___ 1269. Blanche (daughter of Jean de Brienne and Jeanne de Chateaudun) was born ~ 1252, France; died ~ 1302. [Group Sheet]


  6. 59.  Blanche de Brienne, Baroness Tingry was born ~ 1252, France (daughter of Jean de Brienne and Jeanne de Chateaudun); died ~ 1302.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Dame de La Loupeland

    Notes:

    Blanche de Brienne, Baroness Tingry (c. 1252 – c. 1302) was the wife of William II de Fiennes, Baron of Tingry (c. 1250 – 11 July 1302). She was also known as Dame de La Loupeland, and Blanche of Acre.

    Family[edit]
    Blanche was born in about the year 1252 in France. She was the only child and heiress of Jean de Brienne, Grand Butler of France, and his first wife, Jeanne, Dame de Chateaudun, widow of Jean I de Montfort. Her paternal grandparents were John of Brienne, King of Jerusalem, Emperor of Constantinople, and Berenguela of Leon, and her maternal grandparents were Geoffrey VI, Viscount de Chateaudun and Clâemence des Roches. Blanche had a uterine half-sister Beatrice de Montfort, Countess of Montfort-l'Amaury from her mother's first marriage to Jean I de Montfort (died 1249 in Cyprus). In 1260, Beatrice married Robert IV of Dreux, Count of Dreux, by whom she had six children.

    Blanche was co-heiress to her mother, by which she inherited Loupeland in Maine.[1]

    Marriage and issue

    In the year 1269, Blanche married William II de Fiennes, Baron of Tingry and Fiennes, son of Enguerrand II de Fiennes and Isabelle de Conde. His other titles included Lord of Wendover, Buckinghamshire, of Lambourne, Essex, of Chokes and Gayton, Northamptonshire, of Martock, Somerset, of Carshalton and Clapham, Surrey, and custodian of the county of Ponthieu. The settlement for the marriage had been made in February 1266/67.[2] William and Blanche had at least one son and two daughters:

    Jean de Fiennes, Seigneur of Fiennes and Tingry (b. before 1281 in France – 1340), in 1307 married Isabelle de Dampierre, daughter of Guy de Dampierre, Count of Flanders and Isabelle of Luxembourg. They had a son Robert, who was Constable of France, and two daughters, Jeanne de Fiennes who married Jean de Chăatillon, Count of Saint-Pol, and Mahaut de Fiennes who married Jean de Bournonville.[2]
    Joan de Fiennes (d. before 26 October 1309), in 1291 married John Wake, 1st Baron Wake of Liddell. Had issue, including Margaret Wake, 3rd Baroness Wake of Liddell, mother of Joan of Kent and grandmother of Richard II of England.
    Margaret de Fiennes (b. after 1269 – 7 February 1333), in September 1285, married Edmund Mortimer, 2nd Baron Wigmore. They had three children, including Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March.
    Blanche is ancestress of Edward IV and all subsequent English monarchs. Her other descendants include Lady Margaret Beaufort (mother of King Henry VII) and queen consorts Elizabeth Woodville, Lady Anne Neville, Anne Boleyn, Jane Seymour, Catherine Howard, and Catherine Parr.

    In 1285, Blanche received the gift of twelve leafless oak stumps from Selwood Forest from King Edward I for her fuel.[2]

    Blanche de Brienne died on an unknown date around the year 1302. Her husband William was killed on 11 July 1302 at the Battle of Courtrai.

    Children:
    1. 29. Margaret de Fiennes, Baroness Mortimer was born Aft 1269; died 7 Feb 1333.
    2. Joan de Fiennes was born ~ 1273; died Bef 26 Oct 1309.

  7. 60.  Geoffrey de Geneville died 0___ 1249.

    Geoffrey — Maud de Lacy, Baroness Geneville. Maud (daughter of Gilbert de Lacy and Isabel Bigod) was born 0___ 1230, Dublin, Leinster, Ireland; died 11 Apr 1304, Trim Castle, Meath, Ireland. [Group Sheet]


  8. 61.  Maud de Lacy, Baroness Geneville was born 0___ 1230, Dublin, Leinster, Ireland (daughter of Gilbert de Lacy and Isabel Bigod); died 11 Apr 1304, Trim Castle, Meath, Ireland.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Matilda de Lacy

    Notes:

    Maud de Lacy, Baroness Geneville (1230 – 11 April 1304) was a Norman-Irish noblewoman and wealthy heiress who upon the death of her grandfather, Walter de Lacy, Lord of Trim and Ludlow inherited half his estates. The lordships of Trim and Ludlow passed to her second husband Sir Geoffrey de Geneville, 1st Baron Geneville by right of his marriage to her; although she helped to rule and administer the estates in an equal partnership. She is sometimes referred to as Matilda de Lacy.[a]

    Family

    Maud was born in Dublin,Ireland in 1230, the youngest child of Gilbert de Lacy of Ewyas Lacy and Isabel Bigod. Her paternal grandparents were Walter de Lacy and Margaret de Braose, daughter of Maud de Braose who was walled up alive by King John of England. Her maternal grandparents were Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk and Maud Marshal.[1] She had an elder brother, Walter and sister Margery. On 25 December 1230, the year of her birth, Maud's father died, leaving her mother a widow at the age of eighteen. Less than four years later on 12 April 1234, her mother married again; he was John FitzGeoffrey, Lord of Shere in Surrey, England, and Justiciar of Ireland. Maud had six younger half-siblings from her mother's second marriage to John.

    In early 1241, Maud's brother Walter died. He was in his early teens. When their grandfather Walter de Lacy died shortly afterwards on 24 February, Maud and her sister, Margery inherited his vast estates and lordships in Ireland, Herefordshire, and the Welsh Marches. Maud and Margery both received a moiety of Ewyas Lacy in Herefordshire, and a share of the lordship with the taxes and revenues that attached to it.[2]

    Marriages and issue

    On an unknown date, Maud married her first husband Pierre de Genáeve, son of Humbert, Count of Genáeve, and a relative of Eleanor of Provence. He was one of the "Savoyards" who had arrived in England in the retinue of Queen Eleanor when she married King Henry III. The marriage produced a son and a daughter whose names were not recorded.[3] Pierre died in 1249, and sometime before 8 August 1252, Maud married her second husband, another "Savoyard", Sir Geoffrey de Geneville, Seigneur of Vaucouleurs( c.1226- 21 October 1314), son of Simon de Joinville and Beatrix d'Auxonne. Both Maud's marriages and the marriage of her sister, Margery[b] were personally arranged by King Henry III to ensure that the estates they inherited from their grandfather were retained in the hands of those known to be trusted servants of the Crown.[4]


    Trim Castle, Ireland, one of the lordships of Maud de Lacy
    The king granted Geoffrey and Maud, and their heirs rights in the land of Meath held by her grandfather, Walter de Lacy by charter dated 8 August 1252.[5] On 18 September 1254, the king granted them all the liberties and free customs in Meath which her grandfather had held; and they might issue their own writs in Meath according to the law and custom of Ireland. On 21 September 1252, they had livery of Trim Castle and a moiety of forty marcates of lands as the inheritance of Maud.[6] They made Trim Castle their chief residence. Maud and Geoffrey jointly ruled and administered their estates together in an equal partnership. They later donated property to Dore Abbey.

    In 1254, Maud accompanied Queen Eleanor to Gascony.

    Maud's husband was a loyal supporter and favourite of Prince Edward who would in 1272 reign as King Edward I of England. Geoffrey fought with the Prince against Simon de Monfort at the Battle of Evesham, and it was at Ludlow Castle that Prince Edward was sheltered following his escape in May 1265 from Montfortian captivity.[7] Geoffrey was appointed Justiciar of Ireland by his friend and patron, the new king, Edward I in September 1273, a post he held until June 1276; however, he had little success against the Irish of Leinster.[8] He was summoned to Parliament by writ as 1st Baron Geneville on 6 February 1299.

    Together Geoffrey and Maud had at least three children:[c]

    Geoffrey de Geneville (died 1292

    Sir Piers de Geneville, of Trim and Ludlow (1256- shortly before June 1292), who in his turn married in 1283 Jeanne of Lusignan, by whom he had three daughters, including Joan de Geneville, 2nd Baroness Geneville.
    Joan de Geneville, married Gerald FitzMaurice FitzGerald (died 1287).

    Later years

    In 1283, Maud gave all her lands in England and Wales to Piers, her second eldest son by Geoffrey. These included Ludlow Castle in Shropshire, and Walterstone Manor as well as all the knights' fees which she had held in England.[9] That same year, her son Geoffrey died.

    Maud was described as independent-minded, and she usually accompanied her husband on his numerous travels abroad, which included Rome where he was sent on a mission to Pope Nicholas IV in 1290. She was aged sixty at the time. Maud was highly protective of her properties, and always ready to enter into litigation at the slightest threat to her lands or privileges whether posed by family members, the Church or the Dublin administration.[10]

    Maud died at Trim Castle on 11 April 1304 at the age of seventy-four. Her husband Geoffrey died ten years later. Their son Piers had died in 1292, leaving Joan as heiress-apparent to the estates and lordships. She succeeded as the suo jure 2nd Baroness Geneville on 21 October 1314. She was the wife of Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March, by whom she had twelve children.

    Notes

    Jump up ^ The names Maud and Matilda were used interchangeably in the Middle Ages, both being versions of the French name Mahaut. Most primary source documents record Maud de Lacy as Mahaut, as can be seen in Cawley, Charles, Medieval Lands database, Foundation for Medieval Genealogy Missing or empty |title= (help),[self-published source][better source needed]
    Jump up ^ Margery married John de Verdun, Lord of Westmeath, by whom she had issue.
    Jump up ^ Geoffrey de Geneville and Maud de Lacy possibly had two additional sons, Gautier and Jean.
    Jump up ^ The Complete Peerage[page needed]
    Jump up ^ The History of Ewyas Lacy, An ancient Hundred of South-West Herefordshire, theme: de Lacy family history, date: 1000s, 1100s, 1200s, Ewyas Lacy, retrieved on 30 June 2009, http://www.ewyaslacy.org.uk/doc.php?d=rs_ewy[not in citation given]
    Jump up ^ Cawley, Charles, Burgundy, Comtes de Geneve, Medieval Lands database, Foundation for Medieval Genealogy,[self-published source][better source needed]
    Jump up ^ The History of Ewyas Lacy', retrieved on 30 June 2009'
    Jump up ^ Cawley, Charles, Lords of Meath, Medieval Lands database, Foundation for Medieval Genealogy,[self-published source][better source needed]
    Jump up ^ The Complete Peerage, Vol. V (628-634)
    Jump up ^ Medieval Ireland, p.196, by Sean Duffy, Aibhe MacShamhrain, James Moynes, retrieved 30 June 2009
    Jump up ^ The Oxford Companion to Irish History, retrieved on 30 June 2009
    Jump up ^ The Complete Peerage[page needed]
    Jump up ^ The Heiress as Fortune-Maker and Widow in Thirteenth-Century Anglo-Norman Ireland: Christiana de Marisco, Matilda de Lacy, and the de Genevre Brothers, by Gillian Kenny, Department of Medieval History, retrieved on 30 June 2009

    end

    Children:
    1. 30. Piers de Geneville was born 0___ 1256, Dublin, Leinster, Ireland; died 0Jun 1292.


Generation: 7

  1. 98.  William Longespee, II, Knight, Earl of Salisbury, CrusaderWilliam Longespee, II, Knight, Earl of Salisbury, Crusader was born 0___ 1212, (Salisbury, Wiltshire) England (son of William (Plantagenet) Longespee, 3rd Earl of Salisbury and Ela FitzPatrick, 3rd Countess of Salisbury); died 8 Feb 1250, Al-Mansurah, Egypt.

    Notes:

    Sir William Longespâee (c. 1212 - 8 February 1250) was an English knight, the son of William Longespâee and Ela, Countess of Salisbury. His death became of significant importance to the English psyche, having died as a martyr due to the purported mistakes of the French at the Battle of Mansurah, near Al-Mansurah in Egypt.

    Biography

    Longespâee made a pilgrimage to the Holy Land in 1240, and again in 1247. The second time, he proceeded to Rome and made a plea to Pope Innocent IV for support:

    "Sir, you see that I am signed with the cross and am on my journey with the King of France to fight in this pilgrimage. My name is great and of note, viz., William Longespâee, but my estate is slender, for the King of England, my kinsman and liege lord, hath bereft me of the title of earl and of that estate, but this he did judiciously, and not in displeasure, and by the impulse of his will; therefore I do not blame him for it. Howbeit, I am necessitated to have recourse to your holiness for favour, desiring your assistance in this distress. We see here (quoth he) that Earl Richard (of Cornwall) who, though he is not signed with the cross, yet, through the especial grace of your holiness, he hath got very much money from those who are signed, and therefore, I, who am signed and in want, do intreat the like favour."[1]

    Having succeeded in gaining the favour of the Pope, Longespâee raised a company of 200 English horse to join with King Louis on his crusade. To raise funds for his expedition, he sold a charter of liberties to the burgesses of the town of Poole in 1248 for 70 marks.[2] During the Seventh Crusade, Longespâee commanded the English forces. He became widely known for his feats of chivalry and his subsequent martyrdom. The circumstances of his death served to fuel growing English animosity toward the French; it is reported that the French Count d'Artois lured Longespâee into attacking the Mameluks before the forces of King Louis arrived in support. D'Artois, Longespâee and his men, along with 280 Knights Templar, were killed at this time.

    It is said that his mother, Countess Ela, had a vision of the martyr being received into heaven by angels on the day of his death. In 1252, the Sultan delivered Longespâee's remains to a messenger who conveyed them to Acre for burial at the church of St Cross. However, his effigy is found amongst family members at Salisbury Cathedral, in England.

    Marriage and issue

    Longespâee married Idoine de Camville, daughter of Richard de Camville and Eustacia Basset. They had three sons and a daughter:

    Edmund Longespâee, The Book of Lacock names “Guill Lungespee tertium, Ric´um, Elam et Edmundum” as the children of “Guill Lungespee secundus” & his wife.
    Ela Longespâee, married James De Audley (1220–1272), of Heleigh Castle, Staffordshire, son of Henry De Audley and Bertred Mainwaring
    William III Longespâee, married Maud de Clifford, granddaughter of Llewelyn ap Iorwerth, Prince of North Wales. Their daughter Margaret married Henry de Lacy, 3rd Earl of Lincoln.[3]
    Richard Longespâee, married Alice le Rus, daughter of William le Rus of Suffolk and died shortly before 27 December 1261.[4]

    *

    William — Odoine de Camville. Odoine (daughter of Richard de Camville and Eustacia Basset) was born ~ 1210, Brattleby, Lincolnshire, England; died 0___ 1252. [Group Sheet]


  2. 99.  Odoine de Camville was born ~ 1210, Brattleby, Lincolnshire, England (daughter of Richard de Camville and Eustacia Basset); died 0___ 1252.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Idonea de Camville

    Children:
    1. 49. Ela Longespee was born ~ 1228, (Salisbury, Wiltshire) England; died 22 Nov 1299.
    2. William Longespee, III was born ~ 1230, Amesbury, Wiltshire, England; died 1256-1257, Blyth, Nottinghamshire, England.
    3. Richard Longespee was born ~ 1240, (Salisbury, Wiltshire) England; died Bef 1265; was buried Woodbridge Priory, Suffolk, England.
    4. Edmund Longespee was born (Salisbury, Wiltshire) England.

  3. 112.  Ralph de Mortimer, Knight was born Bef 1198, Wigmore Castle, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England (son of Roger de Mortimer and Isabel de Ferrers); died Bef 6 Aug 1246.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Ranulph

    Notes:

    Ranulph or Ralph de Mortimer (before 1198 to before 6 August 1246) was the second son of Roger de Mortimer and Isabel de Ferrers of Wigmore Castle in Herefordshire. He succeeded his elder brother before 23 November 1227 and built Cefnllys and Knucklas castles in 1240.

    Marriage and issue

    In 1230, Ralph married Princess Gwladus, daughter of Llywelyn ab Iorwerth. They had the following children:

    Roger Mortimer, 1st Baron Mortimer, married Maud de Braose and succeeded his father.
    Hugh de Mortimer
    John de Mortimer
    Peter de Mortimer

    References

    Remfry, P.M., Wigmore Castle Tourist Guide and the Family of Mortimer (ISBN 1-899376-76-3)
    Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis; Lines 132C-29, 176B-28, 28-29, 67-29, 77-29, 176B-29
    A history of Wales from the earliest times to the Edwardian conquest (Longmans, Green & Co.) John Edward Lloyd (1911)

    Ralph — Gwladus Ddu. Gwladus (daughter of Llywelyn the Great and Joan Plantagenet, Lady of Wales) was born 0___ 1206, Wales; died 0___ 1251, Windsor, Berkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 113.  Gwladus Ddu was born 0___ 1206, Wales (daughter of Llywelyn the Great and Joan Plantagenet, Lady of Wales); died 0___ 1251, Windsor, Berkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Residence: London, Middlesex, England
    • Also Known As: Gwladus ferch Llywelyn

    Notes:

    Gwladus Ddu, ("Gwladus the Dark"), full name Gwladus ferch Llywelyn (died 1251) was a Welsh noblewoman who was a daughter of Llywelyn the Great of Gwynedd and married two Marcher lords.

    Sources differ as to whether Gwladus was Llywelyn's legitimate daughter by his wife Joan or an illegitimate daughter by Tangwystl Goch. Some sources[who?] say that Joan gave her lands to Gwladus, which suggests, but does not prove, the former. Gwladus is recorded in Brut y Tywysogion as having died at Windsor in 1251.

    Marriage

    She married firstly, Reginald de Braose, Lord of Brecon and Abergavenny in about 1215, but they are not known to have had a daughter Matilda de Braose. After Reginald's death in 1228 she was probably the sister recorded as accompanying Dafydd ap Llywelyn to London in 1229.
    She married secondly, Ralph de Mortimer of Wigmore about 1230. Ralph died in 1246, and their son, Roger de Mortimer, inherited the lordship.

    Issue

    Roger Mortimer, 1st Baron Mortimer, in 1247, married Maud de Braose, by whom he had seven children.
    Hugh de Mortimer
    John de Mortimer
    Peter de Mortimer

    References

    Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis; Lines 132-C-29, 176B-28
    John Edward Lloyd (1911) A history of Wales from the earliest times to the Edwardian conquest (Longmans, Green & Co.)

    Children:
    1. 56. Roger Mortimer, Knight, 1st Baron Mortimer was born 0___ 1231, (Wigmore Castle, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England); died 30 Oct 1292; was buried Wigmore Abbey, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England.

  5. 114.  William de Braose, Lord of Brycheiniog was born 0___ 1197, Brecon, Wales (son of Reginald de Braose, Knight and Grace Brewer); died 2 May 1230, Wales; was buried Wigmore Abbey, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: 7th Baron Bramber
    • Also Known As: Lord of Abergavenny

    Notes:

    William de Braose (c. 1197 – 2 May 1230) was the son of Reginald de Braose by his first wife, Grecia Briwere. He was an ill-fated member of a powerful and long-lived dynasty of Marcher Lords.

    Early years

    William de Braose was born in Brecon, probably between 1197 and 1204. The Welsh, who detested him and his family name, called him Gwilym Ddu, Black William. He succeeded his father in his various lordships in 1227, including Abergavenny and Buellt.[citation needed]

    Career

    He was captured by the Welsh forces of Prince Llywelyn the Great, in fighting in the commote of Ceri near Montgomery, in 1228. William was ransomed for the sum of ą2,000 and then furthermore made an alliance with Llywelyn, arranging to marry his daughter Isabella de Braose to Llywelyn's only legitimate son Dafydd ap Llywelyn. However, it became known that William had committed adultery with Llywelyn's wife, Joan, Lady of Wales, and Braose was taken at his own home and transported to Wales.[2] The marriage planned between their two children did, however, take place.[3]

    Execution

    The Chronicle of Ystrad Fflur's entry for 1230 reads:[citation needed]

    "In this year William de Breos the Younger, lord of Brycheiniog, was hanged by the Lord Llywelyn in Gwynedd, after he had been caught in Llywelyn's chamber with the king of England's daughter, Llywelyn's wife".[citation needed]
    Llywelyn had William publicly hanged on 2 May 1230,[4] possibly at Crogen, near Bala, though others believe the hanging took place near Llywelyn's palace at Abergwyngregyn.

    Legacy

    With William's death by hanging and his having four daughters, who divided the de Braose inheritance between them and no male heir, the titles now passed to the junior branch of the de Braose dynasty, the only male heir was now John de Braose who had already inherited the titles of Gower and Bramber from his far-sighted uncle Reginald de Braose.[citation needed]

    Family

    William married Eva Marshal, daughter of William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke. They had four daughters:[citation needed]

    Isabella de Braose (born c. 1222), wife of Prince Dafydd ap Llywelyn
    Maud de Braose (born c. 1224 – 1301), wife of Roger Mortimer, 1st Baron Mortimer another very powerful Marcher dynasty.
    Eleanor de Braose (c. 1226 – 1251), wife of Humphrey de Bohun and mother of Humphrey de Bohun, 3rd Earl of Hereford.
    Eva de Braose (c. 1227- July 1255), wife of William III de Cantilupe.
    William's wife Eva continued to hold de Braose lands and castles in her own right, after the death of her husband. She was listed as the holder of Totnes in 1230, and was granted 12 marks to strengthen Hay Castle by King Henry III on the Close Rolls (1234–1237).[citation needed]

    *

    Born: about 1197
    His father handed over the Sussex lands of Bramber and Knepp to him in August 1218, so it is probable that he came of age in that year.

    Died: 2nd May 1230

    William succeeded his father as lord of Abergavenny (right), Builth and other Marcher lordships in 1227. Styled by the Welsh as "Black William", he was imprisoned by Llewelyn ap Iorwerth in 1229 during Hubert de Burgh's disastrous Kerry (Ceri) campaign. He was ransomed and released after a short captivity during which he agreed to cede Builth as a marriage portion for his daughter Isabel on her betrothal to Dafydd, son and heir of Llewelyn. The following Easter, Llewelyn discovered an intrigue between his wife, Joan, and William. Supported by a general clamour for his death, Llewelyn had William publicly hanged on 2nd May 1230.

    Father: Reginald de Braose

    Mother: Grace Brewer

    William was married to Eva Marshal (1206 -1246)

    Child 1: Isabel, the eldest
    Child 2: Maud
    Child 3: Eva
    Child 4: Eleanor

    Note: The arms shown above are attributed to this William by Matthew Paris. (see Aspilogia II, MP I No 44 & MP IV No 27). In the two existing versions of the manuscript the arms are given differently.

    Died:
    Eva's husband was publicly hanged by Llywelyn the Great, Prince of Wales on 2 May 1230 after being discovered in the Prince's bedchamber together with his wife Joan, Lady of Wales.

    William — Eva Marshal. Eva (daughter of William Marshal, Knight, 1st Earl Pembroke and Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke) was born 0___ 1203, Pembroke Castle, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales; died 0___ 1246. [Group Sheet]


  6. 115.  Eva Marshal was born 0___ 1203, Pembroke Castle, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales (daughter of William Marshal, Knight, 1st Earl Pembroke and Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke); died 0___ 1246.

    Notes:

    Eva Marshal (1203 – 1246) was a Cambro-Norman noblewoman and the wife of the powerful Marcher lord William de Braose. She was the daughter of William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke, and the granddaughter of Strongbow and Aoife of Leinster.

    She held de Braose lands and castles in her own right following the public hanging of her husband by the orders of Llywelyn the Great, Prince of Wales.

    Family and marriage

    Lady Eva was born in 1203, in Pembroke Castle, Pembrokeshire, Wales, the fifth daughter[1] and tenth child of William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke and Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke. Her paternal grandparents were John Marshal and Sibyl of Salisbury, and her maternal grandparents were Richard de Clare, 2nd Earl of Pembroke, known to history as Strongbow and Aoife of Leinster, for whom she was probably named.

    Lady Eva was the youngest of ten children, having had five older brothers and four older sisters. Eva and her sisters were described as being handsome, high-spirited girls.[2] From 1207 to 1212, Eva and her family lived in Ireland.

    Sometime before 1221, she married Marcher lord William de Braose, who in June 1228 succeeded to the lordship of Abergavenny,[n 1] and by whom she had four daughters. William was the son of Reginald de Braose and his first wife Grecia Briwere. He was much hated by the Welsh who called him Gwilym Ddu or Black William.

    Issue

    Isabella de Braose (b.1222), married Prince Dafydd ap Llywelyn. She died childless.
    Maud de Braose (1224 – 1301), in 1247, she married Roger Mortimer, 1st Baron Wigmore, by whom she had issue, including Edmund Mortimer, 2nd Baron Mortimer and Isabella Mortimer, Countess of Arundel.
    Eva de Braose (1227 – 28 July 1255), married William de Cantelou, by whom she had issue.
    Eleanor de Braose (c.1228 – 1251). On an unknown date after August 1241, she married Humphrey de Bohun. They had two sons, Humphrey de Bohun, 3rd Earl of Hereford and Gilbert de Bohun, and one daughter, Alianore de Bohun. All three children married and had issue. Eleanor was buried in Llanthony Secunda Priory.

    Widowhood

    Eva's husband was publicly hanged by Llywelyn the Great, Prince of Wales on 2 May 1230 after being discovered in the Prince's bedchamber together with his wife Joan, Lady of Wales. Several months later, Eva's eldest daughter Isabella married the Prince's son, Dafydd ap Llywelyn, as their marriage contract had been signed prior to William de Braose's death. Prince Llywelyn wrote to Eva shortly after the execution, offering his apologies, explaining that he had been forced to order the hanging due to the insistence by the Welsh lords. He concluded his letter by adding that he hoped the execution would not affect their business dealings.[3]

    Following her husband's execution, Eva held de Braose lands and castles in her own right. She is listed as holder of Totnes in 1230, which she held until her death. It is recorded on the Close Rolls (1234–1237) that Eva was granted 12 marks by King Henry III of England to strengthen Hay Castle. She had gained custody of Hay as part of her dower.[4]

    In early 1234, Eva was caught up in her brother Richard's rebellion against King Henry and possibly acted as one of the arbitrators between the King and her mutinous brothers following Richard's murder in Ireland.[5] This is evidenced by the safe conduct she received in May 1234, thus enabling her to speak with the King. By the end of that month, she had a writ from King Henry granting her seisen of castles and lands he had confiscated from her following her brother's revolt. Eva also received a formal statement from the King declaring that she was back in "his good graces again".[6]

    She died in 1246 at the age of forty-three.

    Royal descendants

    Most notably through her daughter Maud, who married Roger Mortimer, she was the ancestress of the English kings: Edward IV, Edward V, Richard III, and all monarchs from Henry VIII onwards. She was also the ancestress of Queen consorts Anne Boleyn, Jane Seymour, Catherine Howard, and Catherine Parr by three of her four daughters; Eleanor, Maud, and Eva de Braose.

    Ancestry

    [show]Ancestors of Eva Marshal

    Notes

    Jump up ^ Although he held the lordship in tenancy, he never held the title Lord Abergavenny.
    References[edit]
    ^ Jump up to: a b c d e f Cawley, Charles (2010). Medieval Lands, Earls of Pembroke 1189-1245( Marshal)
    Jump up ^ Costain, Thomas B.(1959). The Magnificent Century. Garden City, New York: Doubleday and Company Inc. p.103
    Jump up ^ Gen-Medieval-L Archives, retrieved on 7 November 2009
    Jump up ^ Close Rolls (1234-1237)
    Jump up ^ Linda Elizabeth Mitchell (2003). Portraits of Medieval Women: Family, Marriage and Politics in England 1225-1350. New York: Palgrave MacMillan. p.47
    Jump up ^ Mitchell, p.47

    Sources

    Cawley, Charles, ENGLISH NOBILITY MEDIEVAL: Earls of Pembroke 1189-1245, Medieval Lands database, Foundation for Medieval Genealogy,[better source needed]
    de Braose family genealogy
    Cokayne, G. E. The Complete Peerage
    Costain, Thomas B. (1959). The Magnificent Century. Garden City, New York: Doubleday and Company, Inc.

    Birth:
    Images, History, Map & Source for Pembroke Castle, Wales ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pembroke_Castle

    Children:
    1. Isabella de Braose was born ~ 1222, (Wales).
    2. 57. Maud de Braose, Lady Mortimer was born ~ 1224, (Wales); died 0___ 1301.
    3. Eleanor de Braose was born ~ 1228, Breconshire, Wales; died 0___ 1251; was buried Llanthony Priory, Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England.
    4. Eva de Braose was born 0___ 1227; died 28 Jul 1255.

  7. 116.  Enguerrand de Fiennes, Knight, Seigneur of Fiennes was born 0___ 1192, Tolleshunt, Essex, England (son of Guillaume de Fiennes, Seigneur de Tingry and Agnes Dammartin); died 0___ 1265, Wendover Manor, Buckinghamshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Enguerrand Ingelram II de Fiennes, Baron de Tingry
    • Also Known As: Lord of Wendover

    Notes:

    Enguerrand Ingelram de Fiennes, Seigneur de Fiennes
    Also Known As: "Ingelram /De Fiennes/"
    Birthdate: 1192
    Birthplace: Tolleshunt, Essex, England
    Death: Died 1265 in Wendover Manor, Buckinghamshire, England
    Place of Burial: Was Civil War in time of Henry III
    Immediate Family:
    Son of Guillaume, seigneur de Fiennes et de Tingry and Agnes Dammartin
    Husband of Agnáes de Condâe and Isabelle Fiennes (de Condâe)
    Father of Elisabeth de Fiennes; Robert I de Fiennes, seigneur de Heuchin; Enguerrand de Fiennes; Guillaume II de Fiennes, baron de Tingry, Lord of Wendover; Maude de Fiennes and 2 others
    Brother of Michel de Fiennes; Baudouin de Fiennes; William de la Plaunche Bastard Fiennes and Mahaut de Fiennes
    Half brother of William de Fiennes
    Occupation: Baron de Tingry & de Ruminghen, Seigneur de Fiennes, Lord of Wendover; Seigneur de Fiennes; Baron de Tingry
    Managed by: James Fred Patin, Jr.
    Last Updated: June 29, 2016
    View Complete Profile
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    Immediate Family

    Agnáes de Condâe
    wife

    Elisabeth de Fiennes
    daughter

    Isabelle Fiennes (de Condâe)
    wife

    Robert I de Fiennes, seigneur de...
    son

    Enguerrand de Fiennes
    son

    Guillaume II de Fiennes, baron d...
    son

    Maude de Fiennes
    daughter

    Reginald de Fiennes
    son

    Jean de Fiennes
    son

    Guillaume, seigneur de Fiennes e...
    father

    Agnes Dammartin
    mother

    Michel de Fiennes
    sister
    About Enguerrand Ingelram II de Fiennes, baron de Tingry
    The line goes further back. When I get time, I'll continue to check it out & add what I can confirm. It is listed at http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=chan83&id=I003489

    ID: P26622 Birth: 1192 in Conde, France _APID: 1,7249::109510975 1 Death: Age: 75 1267 _APID: 1,7249::109510975 1 Name: *INGELRAM ENGUERRAND II DE FIENNES _APID: 1,7249::109510975 1 Sex: M 2

    HintsAncestry Hints for *INGELRAM ENGUERRAND II DE FIENNES

    1 possible matches found on Ancestry.com Ancestry.com
    Father: *GUILLAUME WILLIAM DE FIENNES SHERIFF OF WENDOVER SIR LORD BARON b: 1160 in Wendover, Buckinghamshire, England Mother: *AGNES DE MELLO DEDAMMARTIN b: 1185 in Dampmartin, I-de-F, France

    Marriage 1 *ISABEL DE CONDE b: 1210 in of Bucks, England

    Children

    Has Children *WILLIAM II DE FIENNES BARON TINGRY b: 1245 in Wendover, Bucks, England Has No Children Maud De Fiennes b: 1246 Has No Children Giles De Fiennes Sir b: 1250 in Wendover Manor, Bucks, England
    Sources:

    Repository: Name: Ancestry.co.uk Note:
    Title: Millennium File Author: Heritage Consulting Publication: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2003.Original data - Heritage Consulting. The Millennium File. Salt Lake City, UT, USA: Heritage Consulting.Original data: Heritage Consulting. The Millennium File. Salt Lake City, UT, USA: Note: Repository: Name: Ancestry.com Note:
    Title: Ancestry Family Trees Publication: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members. Note: This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created. Page: Ancestry Family Tree Text: http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=11811357&pid=26622

    Enguerrand — Isabelle de Conde. [Group Sheet]


  8. 117.  Isabelle de Conde

    Other Events:

    • Residence: Buckinghamshire, England
    • Also Known As: Agnes de Conde

    Children:
    1. 58. William de Fiennes, II, Knight, Baron Tingy was born 0___ 1245, Wendover, Buckinghamshire, England.
    2. Maud de Fiennes was born ~ 1251, Wendover, Buckinghamshire, England; died 6 Nov 1298; was buried Saffron Walden, Essex, England.

  9. 118.  Jean de Brienne was born 0___ 1230, France (son of John of Brienne, King of Jerusalem and Berenguela of Leon); died 0___ 1296.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Grand Butler of France

    Jean married Jeanne de Chateaudun 0___ 1249. Jeanne (daughter of Geoffrey de Chateaudun, VI, Viscount de Chateaudun and Clemence des Roches) was born ~ 1227, Chateau of Chateaudun, Eure-et-Loir, France; died Aft 1252. [Group Sheet]


  10. 119.  Jeanne de Chateaudun was born ~ 1227, Chateau of Chateaudun, Eure-et-Loir, France (daughter of Geoffrey de Chateaudun, VI, Viscount de Chateaudun and Clemence des Roches); died Aft 1252.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Dame de Chateaudun

    Notes:

    Jeanne, Dame de Chateaudun (c. 1227 – after 1252) was a French heiress and the wife of two French noblemen Jean I de Montfort, and Jean de Brienne, Grand Butler of France.

    Family

    Jeanne was born in France in about the year 1227, the eldest daughter and co-heiress of Geoffrey VI, Viscount de Chateaudun (d. 6 February 1250 on Crusade), and his wife Clâemence des Roches (died after September 1259). Her father also held the titles of seigneur of Chateaudun, Chateau-du-Loir, Mayet, Loupeland, Montdoubleau, and la Suze.[1] In 1229, he participated in the Crusade against the Albigenses in the Languedoc.


    Chateau of Chateaudun, Eure-et-Loir
    Her paternal grandparents were Geoffrey V, Viscount de Chateaudun and Alix de Freteval, and her maternal grandparents were William des Roches, Seneschal of Anjou, and Marguerite de Sablâe, daughter of Robert de Sablâe and Clâemence de Mayenne. Jeanne had a younger sister Clâemence de Chateaudun (after 1227- before 1 February 1259), who married Robert de Dreux, Viscount de Chateaudun (1217–1264). She had a brother Pierre de Chateaudun (died after 1251), who was a monk.[2]

    Marriages and issue

    In March 1248 Jeanne married her first husband Jean I de Montfort, son of Amaury VI, count of Montfort and Beatrice of Burgundy, by whom she had one daughter:

    Beatrice de Montfort, Countess of Montfort-l'Amaury (c. December 1248/1249- 9 March 1312), in 1260 married Robert IV of Dreux, Count of Dreux (1241–1282), they were the parents of six children, including John II, Count of Dreux and Yolande de Dreux, Queen consort of Alexander III of Scotland.

    In the year 1249, de Montfort died in Cyprus, while participating in the Seventh Crusade. Jeanne married her second husband Jean de Brienne (1230–1296), Grand Butler of France, in 1251. She was his first wife. De Brienne was the son of John of Brienne, King of Jerusalem, Emperor of Constantinople, and his third wife Berenguela of Leon. A daughter was born to Jean de Brienne and Jeanne:

    Blanche de Brienne, Baroness Tingry (c. 1252- c.1302). In 1269, married William II de Fiennes, Baron of Tingry. They had at least three children, including Margaret de Fiennes, mother of Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March
    Legacy[edit]
    Jeanne died on an unknown date. There is a source which claims that she attained the title of Dame de Chateau-du-Loir in 1265.[2] The title of Loupeland she passed on to her daughter Blanche.[3]

    Notable descendants of Jeanne de Chateaudun include Anne of Brittany, Joan of Kent, Anne Mortimer (mother of Richard of York), Elizabeth Woodville, and King Henry VII making her the ancestress of all monarchs of England from Edward IV onward. Through another descendant, Joan Beaufort who married James I of Scotland, she is the ancestor of all monarchs of Scotland from James II of Scotland onward.

    Her husband Jean de Brienne subsequently married Marie de Coucy (c.1218- 1285), widow of King Alexander II of Scotland, but had no children by her.

    Children:
    1. 59. Blanche de Brienne, Baroness Tingry was born ~ 1252, France; died ~ 1302.

  11. 122.  Gilbert de Lacy (son of Walter de Lacy, Lord of Meath and Margaret de Braose, Lady of Trim).

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Gilbert de Lacy of Ewyas Harold

    Gilbert — Isabel Bigod. [Group Sheet]


  12. 123.  Isabel Bigod (daughter of Hugh Bigod, Knight, 3rd Earl of Norfolk and Maud Marshal, Countess of Norfolk).
    Children:
    1. 61. Maud de Lacy, Baroness Geneville was born 0___ 1230, Dublin, Leinster, Ireland; died 11 Apr 1304, Trim Castle, Meath, Ireland.
    2. Margaret de Lacy


Generation: 8

  1. 196.  William (Plantagenet) Longespee, 3rd Earl of SalisburyWilliam (Plantagenet) Longespee, 3rd Earl of Salisbury was born ~ 1176, (Salisbury, Wiltshire) England (son of Henry II, King of England and Ida de Tosny, Countess of Norfolk); died 7 Mar 1226, Salisbury Castle, Salisbury, Wiltshire, England; was buried Salisbury Cathedral, Salisbury, Wiltshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: William Longsword

    Notes:

    William Longespâee, 3rd Earl of Salisbury (c. 1176 – 7 March 1226) ("Long Sword", Latinised to de Longa Spatha) was an English noble, primarily remembered for his command of the English forces at the Battle of Damme and for remaining loyal to his half-brother, King John. His nickname "Longespâee" is generally taken as a reference to his great size and the outsize weapons he wielded.

    Early life

    He was an illegitimate son of Henry II, King of England. His mother was unknown for many years until the discovery of a charter William made that mentions "Comitissa Ida, mater mea" (Countess Ida, my mother).[1][2] This referred to Ida de Tosny, a member of the prominent Tosny (or Toesny) family, who had married Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk[3] in 1181.

    Prior to the discovery of the charter mentioning Countes Ida, speculation and folklore gave Rosamond Clifford, another misress of Henry II, as William's mother. URL https://www.genealogieonline.nl/en/family-tree-fountaine-fontaine-fountain-lafontaine/P2800.php

    King Henry acknowledged William as his son and gave him the honour of Appleby, Lincolnshire, in 1188. Eight years later, his half brother King Richard I married him to a great heiress, Ela of Salisbury, 3rd Countess of Salisbury.

    During the reign of King John, Salisbury was at court on several important ceremonial occasions and held various offices: sheriff of Wiltshire; lieutenant of Gascony; constable of Dover; and Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports; and later warden of the Welsh Marches. He was appointed sheriff of Cambridgeshire and Huntingdonshire about 1213.

    Military career

    He was a commander in the king's Welsh and Irish expeditions of 1210–1212 and was appointed Viceroy of Ireland, jointly with John de Gray, Bishop of Norwich, when the king left for England in 1210.[4] The king also granted him the honour of Eye in Suffolk.

    In 1213, Salisbury led a large fleet to Flanders, where he seized or destroyed a good part of a French invasion fleet anchored at or near Damme. This ended the invasion threat but not the conflicts between England and France. In 1214, Salisbury was sent to help Otto IV of Germany, an English ally, who was invading France. Salisbury commanded the right wing of the army at their disastrous defeat in that year at the Battle of Bouvines, where he was captured.

    By the time he returned to England, revolt was brewing amongst the barons. Salisbury was one of the few who remained loyal to John. In the civil war that took place the year after the signing of the Magna Carta, Salisbury was one of the leaders of the king's army in the south. He was made High Sheriff of Wiltshire again, this time for life. After raising the siege of Lincoln with William Marshall he was also appointed High Sheriff of Lincolnshire (in addition to his current post as High Sheriff of Somerset) and governor of Lincoln castle. However, after the French prince Louis (later Louis VIII) landed as an ally of the rebels, Salisbury went over to his side. Presumably, he thought John's cause was lost.


    Tomb of William Longespâee in Salisbury Cathedral
    After John's death and the departure of Louis, Salisbury, along with many other barons, joined the cause of John's young son, now Henry III of England. He held an influential place in the government during the king's minority and fought in Gascony to help secure the remaining part of the English continental possessions. He was appointed High Sheriff of Devon in 1217 and High Sheriff of Staffordshire and Shropshire in 1224. Salisbury's ship was nearly lost in a storm while returning to England in 1225, and he spent some months in refuge at a monastery on the French island of Râe.

    Death

    He died not long after his return to England at Salisbury Castle. Roger of Wendover alleged that he was poisoned by Hubert de Burgh. He was buried at Salisbury Cathedral in Salisbury, Wiltshire, England.

    William Longespâee's tomb was opened in 1791. Bizarrely, the well-preserved corpse of a rat which carried traces of arsenic, was found inside his skull.[5] The rat is now on display in a case at the Salisbury and South Wiltshire Museum.[5]

    Likeness

    A terracotta statue of Longespâee, dating from 1756, is located in the Great Hall of Lacock Abbey in Lacock, Wiltshire, England. A likeness of his wife Ela is also on display, while several other statues are believed to show their children.

    Family

    By his wife Ela, Countess of Salisbury, he had four sons and six daughters:[6]

    William II Longespâee (1212?–1250), who was sometimes called Earl of Salisbury but never legally bore the title because he died before his mother, Countess Ela, who held the earldom until her death in 1261.
    Richard, a canon of Salisbury.
    Stephen (d. 1260), who was seneschal of Gascony and married Emeline de Ridelsford, widow of Hugh de Lacy, 1st Earl of Ulster. Their two daughters were Eleanor Longspee, who married Sir Roger La Zouche and Emeline Longspee, who married Sir Maurice FitzMaurice, Justiciar of Ireland.
    Nicholas (d. 1297), bishop of Salisbury.
    Isabella Longespâee, who married Sir William de Vesci.
    Ela Longespâee, who first married Thomas de Beaumont, 6th Earl of Warwick, and then married Philip Basset. No issue.[7]
    Ida Longespâee, married firstly Ralph who was son of Ralph de Somery, Baron of Dudley, and Margaret, daughter of John Marshal;[7] she married secondly William de Beauchamp, Baron of Bedford, by whom she had six children, including Maud de Beauchamp, wife of Roger de Mowbray.[8]
    Ida II de Longespâee (she is alternatively listed as William and Ela's granddaughter: see notes below), married Sir Walter FitzRobert, son of Robert Fitzwalter, by whom she had issue including Ela FitzWalter, wife of William de Odyngsells. Ela's and Williams's grandsons include William de Clinton and John de Grey.[7]
    Mary Longespâee, married. No issue.[7]
    Pernel Longespâee.

    *

    William Longespâee was the illegitimate son of the first Plantagenet king, Henry II and Ida de Tosny, a member of the Tosny (or Toesny) family. The epithet "Longespâee" ,or Longsword is a reference to his great size and the huge weapons he wielded.

    Ida de Tosny was a royal ward who became the mistress of King Henry II. The first evidence of contemporary information about Ida came to light in 1979 with the publication in the of two charters found in the Bradenstoke Priory Cartulary where he mentions "Comitissa Ida, mater mea" (Countess Ida, my mother), until then, it was assumed that Rosamund Clifford, a previous and more famous mistress of King Henry II's, was William's mother. Four years after William's birth, in 1181, Ida de Tosny was married to Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk, by whom she had a number of children.

    King Henry II readily acknowledged William as his son and in 1188 granted him the honour of Appleby in Lincolnshire. Following the death of his father in 1189, his half brother King Richard I 'the Lionheart' succeeded to the throne, William began his successful military career by fighting alongside his half brother in Normandy.

    King Richard arranged for the marriage of his half brother to the young heiress, Ela FitzPatrick, who was Countess of Salisbury in her own right, the daughter of William FitzPatrick, 2nd Earl of Salisbury and Elâeonore de Vitrâe.

    Richard died of a crossbow wound at Chalus, near Limoges in 1199 to be succeeded by his younger brother, King John, William held various offices during John's reign, sheriff of Wiltshire; lieutenant of Gascony; constable of Dover; and Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports; and later warden of the Welsh Marches. He was appointed sheriff of Cambridgeshire and Huntingdonshire about 1213.

    William LongswordWilliam took part in John's Welsh and Irish expeditions of 1210-1212. In 1213, Salisbury led a large fleet to Flanders, where he seized or destroyed a good part of a French invasion fleet anchored at or near Damme, then the port of Bruges, thus temporarily ending the French invasion threat.

    In 1214, Salisbury was dispatched to aid John's nephew and ally, Otto IV of Germany, in his invasion of France. Salisbury commanded the right wing of Otto's army at their disastrous and decisive defeat in that year at the Battle of Bouvines, where he was taken prisoner by the French.

    William returned to England to find the barons in revolt against John, he was one of the few who remained loyal to his unpopular half brother. In the civil war that broke out the year after the signing of the Magna Carta, William served as one of the leaders of the king's army in the south. Along with William Marshall he raised the siege of Lincoln, but after Prince Louis of France, son and heir of the John's arch enemy French King Philip II 'Augustus' landed in England in alliance with the rebels, Salisbury, assuming John's cause now lost, deserted him and went over to the rebels.

    William LongswordWhile retreating before this incursion, King John died of dysentry at Newark on the wild stormy night of 18th October, 1216, leaving England in a state of anarchy and civil war. His nine year old son Henry was crowned King Henry III of England at the Abbey Church of Gloucester with a circlet belonging to his mother Isabella of Angouleme, since his father had previously lost the royal treasure in the Wash.

    After the defeat of Louis, Salisbury joined the cause of John's young son Henry. By 1218, the English and French signed the Treaty of Lambeth, which agreed that the French prince Louis would surrender his claims to the English throne.

    William held an influential place in the government during the young king's minority and fought in Gascony to help secure the remaining remnant of the once great Angevin Empire in France. He fell sick after campaigning in Gascony in 1226. Salisbury's ship was nearly lost in a storm while returning to England, and he spent some months in refuge at a monastery on the French island of Râe.

    William Longespâee died on 7 March 1226 at Salisbury Castle soon after his return to England. Roger of Wendover alleged that he had been poisoned by Hubert de Burgh. He was buried at Salisbury Cathedral of which he had been a benefactor. His eldest son William succeeded to the title Earl of Salisbury, His widow, Ela, Countess of Salisbury lived on until 1261 and was buried in Lacock Abbey.

    The tomb of William Longespâee was opened in 1791, inside his skull was found the remains of a rat which carried traces of arsenic. The rat is now on display at the Salisbury and South Wiltshire Museum.

    *

    Sir William is the 24th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Jesse D Hennessee (1880-1952)

    Click on this link to view their lineage ... http://bit.ly/1AJ6pEc

    More history and images for Sir William ... http://bit.ly/1FlUhIj

    More history and images for Salisbury Cathedral ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salisbury_Cathedral

    *

    Buried:
    The cathedral has the tallest church spire in the United Kingdom (123m/404 ft).

    The tomb of William Longespâee was opened in 1791, inside his skull was found the remains of a rat which carried traces of arsenic. The rat is now on display at the Salisbury and South Wiltshire Museum.

    More history and images for Salisbury Cathedral ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salisbury_Cathedral

    Died:
    Roger of Wendover alleged that he had been poisoned by Hubert de Burgh.

    William married Ela FitzPatrick, 3rd Countess of Salisbury 0___ 1196, Salisbury, Wiltshire, England. Ela (daughter of William of Salisbury, Knight, 2nd Earl of Salisbury and Eleonore de Vitre, Countess of Salisbury) was born 0___ 1187, Amesbury, Wiltshire, England; died 24 Aug 1261, Lacock Abbey, Wiltshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 197.  Ela FitzPatrick, 3rd Countess of Salisbury was born 0___ 1187, Amesbury, Wiltshire, England (daughter of William of Salisbury, Knight, 2nd Earl of Salisbury and Eleonore de Vitre, Countess of Salisbury); died 24 Aug 1261, Lacock Abbey, Wiltshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Ela d'Evreux
    • Also Known As: Ela of Salisbury

    Notes:

    Ela of Salisbury, 3rd Countess of Salisbury (1187 - 24 August 1261) was a wealthy English heiress and the suo jure Countess of Salisbury, having succeeded to the title in 1196 upon the death of her father, William FitzPatrick, 2nd Earl of Salisbury.[1] Her husband William Longespâee, an illegitimate half-brother of kings Richard I of England and John of England assumed the title of 3rd Earl of Salisbury by right of his marriage to Ela, which took place in 1196 when she was nine years old.

    Ela held the post of High Sheriff of Wiltshire for two years after William's death, then became a nun, and eventually Abbess of Lacock Abbey in Wiltshire, which she had founded in 1229.

    Family

    Ela was born in Amesbury, Wiltshire in 1187, the only child and heiress of William FitzPatrick, 2nd Earl of Salisbury, Sheriff of Wiltshire and Elâeonore de Vitrâe (c.1164- 1232/1233).[2] In 1196, she succeeded her father as suo jure 3rd Countess of Salisbury. There is a story that immediately following her father's death she was imprisoned in a castle in Normandy by one of her paternal uncles who wished to take her title and enormous wealth for himself. According to the legend, Ela was eventually rescued by William Talbot, a knight who had gone to France where he sang ballads under windows in all the castles of Normandy until he received a response from Ela.[3]

    In 1198, Ela's mother married her fourth husband, Gilbert de Malesmains.

    Marriage and issue

    In 1196, the same year she became countess and inherited her father's numerous estates, Ela married William Longespâee, an illegitimate son of King Henry II of England, by his mistress Ida de Tosny, who later married Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk. Longespee became 3rd Earl of Salisbury by right of his wife. The Continuator of Florence recorded that their marriage had been arranged by King Richard I of England, who was William's legitimate half-brother.[1]

    Together William and Ela had at least eight or possibly nine children:

    William II Longespâee, titular Earl of Salisbury (c.1209- 7 February 1250), married in 1216 Idoine de Camville, daughter of Richard de Camville and Eustache Basset, by whom he had four children. William was killed while on crusade at the Battle of Mansurah.

    Richard Longespâee, clerk and canon of Salisbury.

    Stephen Longespâee, Seneschal of Gascony and Justiciar of Ireland (1216–1260), married as her second husband 1243/1244 Emmeline de Ridelsford, daughter of Walter de Ridelsford and Annora Vitrâe, by whom he had two daughters: Ela, wife of Sir Roger La Zouche, and Emmeline (1252–1291), the second wife of Maurice FitzGerald, 3rd Lord of Offaly.

    Nicholas Longespâee, Bishop of Salisbury (died 28 May 1297)

    Isabella Longespâee (died before 1244), married as his first wife shortly after 16 May 1226, William de Vescy, Lord of Alnwick, by whom she had issue.

    Petronilla Longespâee, died unmarried

    Ela Longespâee, who first married Thomas de Beaumont, 6th Earl of Warwick, and then married Philip Basset. No issue.[4]

    Ida Longespâee, married firstly Ralph who was son of Ralph de Somery, Baron of Dudley, and Margaret, daughter of John Marshal;[4] she married secondly William de Beauchamp, Baron of Bedford, by whom she had six children, including Maud de Beauchamp, wife of Roger de Mowbray.[5]

    Ida II de Longespâee (she is alternatively listed as William and Ela's granddaughter: see notes below), married Sir Walter FitzRobert, son of Robert Fitzwalter, by whom she had issue including Ela FitzWalter, wife of William de Odyngsells. Ela's and Williams's grandsons include William de Clinton and John de Grey.[4]

    Mary Longespâee, married. No issue.[4]

    Pernel Longespâee.

    Lacock Abbey, founded in 1229 by Ela, Countess of Salisbury

    Later life

    In 1225, Ela's husband William was shipwrecked off the coast of Brittany, upon returning from Gascony. He spent months recovering at a monastery on the Island of Râe in France. He died at Salisbury Castle on 7 March 1226 just several days after arriving in England. Ela held the post of Sheriff of Wiltshire for two years following her husband's death.

    Three years later in 1229, Ela founded Lacock Abbey in Wiltshire as a nunnery of the Augustinian order. In 1238, she entered the abbey as a nun; she was made Abbess of Lacock in 1240, and held the post until 1257. The Book of Lacock recorded that Ela founded the monasteries at Lacock and Henton.[1] During her tenure as abbess, Ela obtained many rights for the abbey and village of Lacock.

    Ela, Countess of Salisbury died on 24 August 1261 and was buried in Lacock Abbey. The inscription on her tombstone, originally written in Latin, reads:

    Below lie buried the bones of the venerable Ela, who gave this sacred house as a home for the nuns. She also had lived here as holy abbess and Countess of Salisbury, full of good works[6]

    Her numerous descendants included English kings Edward IV and Richard III, Mary, Queen of Scots, Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex, Sir Winston Churchill, Diana, Princess of Wales, the Dukes of Norfolk, and the English queen consorts of King Henry VIII: Anne Boleyn, Jane Seymour, Catherine Howard, and Catherine Parr.

    Ela has been described as having been "one of the two towering female figures of the mid-13th century", the other one being Margaret de Quincy, Countess of Lincoln.[7]

    Died:
    Lacock Abbey in the village of Lacock, Wiltshire, England, was founded in the early 13th century by Ela, Countess of Salisbury, as a nunnery of the Augustinian order. The Abbey remained a nunnery until the suppression of Catholic institutions in England in the 16th century.

    Some interior sequences in Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets were filmed at Lacock, including the cloister walk (illustrated, left) where Harry comes out from Professor Lockhart's room after serving detention and hears the basilisk. During four days in October 2007 Lacock was also used to film some scenes for the sixth Harry Potter film, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince.

    The Abbey was one of two major locations for the 2008 film version of the historical novel The Other Boleyn Girl.

    Lacock appears in the "Robin Hood and the Sorcerer", "Cromm Cruac" and "The Pretender" episodes of Robin of Sherwood. It was also used in the 1995 BBC/A&E production of Pride and Prejudice.

    In the Spring of 2012, it was a filming location of the fantasy adventure movie Mariah Mundi and the Midas Box, which is scheduled for release in 2013.

    Scenes for the BBC's historical TV serial Wolf Hall were filmed there in 2014.

    Photos, history & source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lacock_Abbey

    Notes:

    Married:
    King Richard arranged for the marriage of his half brother to the young heiress, Ela FitzPatrick, who was Countess of Salisbury in her own right, the daughter of William FitzPatrick, 2nd Earl of Salisbury and Elâeonore de Vitrâe.

    Children:
    1. 98. William Longespee, II, Knight, Earl of Salisbury, Crusader was born 0___ 1212, (Salisbury, Wiltshire) England; died 8 Feb 1250, Al-Mansurah, Egypt.
    2. Richard Longespee was born (Salisbury, Wiltshire) England.
    3. Ida Longespee, II was born (Salisbury, Wiltshire) England.
    4. Stephen Longespee was born ~ 1216, (Salisbury, Wiltshire) England; died ~ 1260.
    5. Ida Longespee was born 1205-1210, Salisbury, Wiltshire, England; died 0___ 1269, England.

  3. 198.  Richard de Camville was born ~ 1178, Brattleby, Lincolnshire, England; died 0___ 1226, Brattleby, Lincolnshire, England.

    Notes:

    Richard de Camville (died 1191) (Richard's grandfather) was an English crusader knight, and one of Richard the Lionheart's senior commanders during the Third Crusade. In June 1190, at Chinon, he was, with 3 others, put in charge of King Richard's fleet sailing for the Holy Land.

    In 1191 he was appointed governor of Cyprus, jointly with Robert of Thornham. He died later in the same year at the Siege of Acre.

    He was the son of another Richard de Camville (died 1176), an Anglo-Norman landowner, and Millicent de Rethel, a kinswoman (second cousin) of Adeliza of Louvain, the second wife of King Henry I.

    The family probably originated from Canville-les-Deux-âEglises (Canvilla 1149, Camvilla 1153) in Normandy. He had at least one son, Gerard de Camville, and one daughter, Matilda, wife of William de Ros.

    In England, his holdings included land at Stanton Harcourt, Oxfordshire, Blackland, Wiltshire, and Speen (possibly posthumously and Avington, both in Berkshire.

    Richard married Eustacia Basset ~ 1205. Eustacia was born ~ 1185, Bicester, Oxfordshire, England; died ~ 1215, Brattleby, Lincolnshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 199.  Eustacia Basset was born ~ 1185, Bicester, Oxfordshire, England; died ~ 1215, Brattleby, Lincolnshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Eustache Basset, Heriess of Bicester

    Children:
    1. 99. Odoine de Camville was born ~ 1210, Brattleby, Lincolnshire, England; died 0___ 1252.

  5. 224.  Roger de Mortimer was born Bef 1153 (son of Hugh de Mortimer and Matilda Le Meschin); died Bef 1215.

    Other Events:

    • Residence: Wales
    • Also Known As: Roger Mortimer of Wigmore

    Notes:

    Roger de Mortimer (before 1153-before 8 July 1214) was a medieval marcher lord, residing at Wigmore Castle in the English county of Herefordshire. He was the son of Hugh de Mortimer (d. 26 February 1181) and Matilda Le Meschin.

    Early life

    Roger would appear to have been of age in 1174 when he fought for King Henry II against the rebellion of his son, Henry. In 1179 Roger was instrumental in the killing of Cadwallon ap Madog, the prince of Maelienydd and Elfael, both of which Mortimer coveted. He was imprisoned until June 1182 at Winchester for this killing.

    Children

    He had married Isabel (d. before 29 April 1252), the daughter of Walchelin de Ferriers of Oakham Castle in Rutland before 1196. With Isabel, Roger had three sons and a daughter:

    Hugh de Mortimer (d.1227) - married Annora (Eleanor) de Braose, daughter of William de Braose and his wife Maud.[1]
    Ralph de Mortimer (d.1246).
    Philip Mortimer
    Joan Mortimer (d.1225) - married May 1212 to Walter de Beauchamp[2]
    He is often wrongly stated to have been the father of Robert Mortimer of Richards Castle (died 1219) - married Margary de Say,[3] daughter of Hugh de Say. But this Robert was born before 1155 and therefore could not have been a son of Roger.

    Lord of Maelienydd

    In 1195 Roger, with the backing of troops sent by King Richard I invaded Maelienydd and rebuilt Cymaron Castle. In 1196 he joined forces with Hugh de Say of Richards Castle and fought and lost the battle of New Radnor against Rhys ap Gruffydd, allegedly losing some forty knights and an innumerable number of foot in the fight. By 1200 he had conquered Maelienydd and issued a new charter of rights to Cwmhir Abbey. In the summer of 1214 he became gravely ill and bought the right for his son to inherit his lands while he still lived from King John. He died before 8 July 1214.

    *

    Roger — Isabel de Ferrers. Isabel (daughter of Walchelin de Ferriers and unnamed spouse) was born Oakham Castle, Rutland, England. [Group Sheet]


  6. 225.  Isabel de Ferrers was born Oakham Castle, Rutland, England (daughter of Walchelin de Ferriers and unnamed spouse).

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Isabel de Ferriers

    Children:
    1. 112. Ralph de Mortimer, Knight was born Bef 1198, Wigmore Castle, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England; died Bef 6 Aug 1246.
    2. Hugh de Mortimer was born (Wigmore Castle, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England); died 0___ 1227.
    3. Philip Mortimer was born (Wigmore Castle, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England).
    4. Joan Mortimer was born (Wigmore Castle, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England); died 0___ 1225.

  7. 226.  Llywelyn the Great was born ~ 1172, Dolwyddelan, Wales; died 11 Apr 1240, Aberconwy Abbey, Wales; was buried Aberconwy Abbey, Wales.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Llywelyn ap Iorwerth
    • Also Known As: Prince of Gwynedd

    Notes:

    Llywelyn the Great (Welsh: Llywelyn Fawr, [??'w?l?n va??r]), full name Llywelyn ap Iorwerth, (c. 1172 – 11 April 1240) was a Prince of Gwynedd in north Wales and eventually de facto ruler over most of Wales. By a combination of war and diplomacy he dominated Wales for 40 years.

    During Llywelyn's boyhood, Gwynedd was ruled by two of his uncles, who split the kingdom between them, following the death of Llywelyn's grandfather, Owain Gwynedd, in 1170. Llywelyn had a strong claim to be the legitimate ruler and began a campaign to win power at an early age. He was sole ruler of Gwynedd by 1200 and made a treaty with King John of England that year. Llywelyn's relations with John remained good for the next ten years. He married John's natural daughter Joan in 1205, and when John arrested Gwenwynwyn ab Owain of Powys in 1208, Llywelyn took the opportunity to annex southern Powys. In 1210, relations deteriorated, and John invaded Gwynedd in 1211. Llywelyn was forced to seek terms and to give up all lands west of the River Conwy, but was able to recover them the following year in alliance with the other Welsh princes. He allied himself with the barons who forced John to sign Magna Carta in 1215. By 1216, he was the dominant power in Wales, holding a council at Aberdyfi that year to apportion lands to the other princes.

    Following King John's death, Llywelyn concluded the Treaty of Worcester with his successor, Henry III, in 1218. During the next fifteen years, Llywelyn was frequently involved in fights with Marcher lords and sometimes with the king, but also made alliances with several major powers in the Marches. The Peace of Middle in 1234 marked the end of Llywelyn's military career, as the agreed truce of two years was extended year by year for the remainder of his reign. He maintained his position in Wales until his death in 1240 and was succeeded by his son Dafydd ap Llywelyn.

    Children

    Llywelyn married Joan, natural daughter of King John of England, in 1205. Llywelyn and Joan had three identified children in the records but in all probability had more as Llywelyn's children were fully recognised during his marriage to Joan whilst his father-in-law, King John, was alive. The identity of the mother of some of Llywelyn's children before this union is uncertain, but the following are recorded in contemporary or near-contemporary records.

    Dafydd ap Llywelyn (c. 1212–1246), son by Joan, wife of Llywelyn.
    Elen (Helen) ferch Llywelyn (c. 1206–1253), daughter by Joan. M. John Earl of Huntington m. 2nd Robert de Quincy 3rd Donald Malcolm Mar Earl of Mar.
    Susanna ferch Llywelyn, died after November 1228, daughter by Joan. Henry III King of England granted the upbringing of "L. princeps Norwallie et Johanna uxor sua et…soror nostra Susannam filiam suam" to "Nicholao de Verdun et Clementie uxori sue" by order dated 24 Nov 1228[273]. Her birth date is estimated on the assumption that Susanna was under marriageable age, but older than an infant, at the time.
    Gruffydd ap Llywelyn (c. 1196–1244), a son by Tangwystl Goch (d. c. 1198).
    Gwladus Ddu (c. 1206–1251), probable daughter by Joan.
    Angharad ferch Llywelyn (c. 1212–1256), probable daughter of Joan; married Maelgwn Fychan.
    Marared ferch Llywelyn (died after 1268), married John de Braose and secondly (about 1232) Walter III de Clifford. Marared had issue by both husbands.[64]
    Elen the Younger ferch Llywelyn (before 1230-after 16 Feb 1295) who married firstly Mâael Coluim II, Earl of Fife, son of Duncan Macduff of Fife & his wife Alice Corbet. She married secondly (after 1266) Domhnall I, Earl of Mar, son of William, Earl of Mar & his first wife Elizabeth Comyn of Buchan. Elen and Domhall's daughter, Isabella of Mar, married Robert, the Bruce, King of Scots. Isabella had one child by the King of Scots, Marjorie Bruce, who was the mother of the first Stewart monarch, Robert II of Scotland.
    Tegwared y Baiswen ap Llywelyn (c. 1215), a son by a woman named as Crysten in some sources, a possible twin of Angharad[65]

    Little is known of Llywelyn's mistress, Tangwystl Goch, except that she was the daughter of Llywarch "Goch" of Rhos.[66] Gruffydd ap Llywelyn (c. 1196–1244) was Llywelyn's eldest son and known to be the son of Tangwystl. He married Senena, daughter of Caradoc ap Thomas of Anglesey. Their sons included Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, who for a period occupied a position in Wales comparable to that of his grandfather, and Dafydd ap Gruffydd who ruled Gwynedd briefly after his brother's death.

    Llywelyn married Joan Plantagenet, Lady of Wales 1203-1204. Joan (daughter of John I, King of England and Clemence) was born ~ 1191, (France); died 2 Feb 1237. [Group Sheet]


  8. 227.  Joan Plantagenet, Lady of Wales was born ~ 1191, (France) (daughter of John I, King of England and Clemence); died 2 Feb 1237.

    Other Events:

    • Residence: England
    • Also Known As: her Welsh name is Siwan
    • Also Known As: Lady of Snowdon

    Notes:

    Joan, Lady of Wales and Lady of Snowdon, also known by her Welsh name of Siwan, (c. 1191 – 2 February 1237) was the wife of Llywelyn the Great, Prince of Wales and Gwynedd, effective ruler of most of Wales.

    Early life

    Joan was a natural daughter of King John of England. She should not be confused with her half-sister, Joan, Queen consort of Scotland.

    Little is known about her early life. Her mother's name is known only from Joan's obituary in the Tewkesbury Annals, where she is called "Regina Clementina" (Queen Clemence); there is no evidence that her mother was in fact of royal blood. Joan may have been born in France, and probably spent part of her childhood there, as King John had her brought to the Kingdom of England from Normandy in December 1203 in preparation for her wedding to prince Llywelyn ab Iorwerth.

    Thomas Pennant, in "Tours in Wales", Volume 2, published London, 1810, writes : "It is said that Llewelyn the Great had near this place [Trefriw] a palace; ... The church of Trefriw was originally built by Llewelyn, for the ease of his princess, who before was obliged to go on foot to Llanrhychwyn, a long walk among the mountains."

    Marriage

    Joan married Llywelyn the Great between December 1203 and October 1204. The wedding was celebrated at St Werburgh's Abbey in Chester. She and Llywelyn had at least two children together:

    Elen ferch Llywelyn (Helen or Ellen) (1207–1253), married (1) John the Scot, Earl of Chester and (2) Robert II de Quincy
    Dafydd ap Llywelyn (c. 1212–1246) married Isabella de Braose, died at Abergwyngregyn.
    Some of Llywelyn's other recorded children may also have been Joan's:

    Gwladus Ddu (1206–1251), married (1) Reginald de Braose and (2) Ralph de Mortimer (had issue).
    Susanna, who was sent to England as a hostage in 1228.
    Angharad ferch Llywelyn
    Margaret, who married (1) Sir John de Braose (called 'Tadody'), the grandson of William de Braose, 4th Lord of Bramber. She married (2) Sir Walter de Clifford and had children by both husbands.[1]
    In April 1226 Joan obtained a papal decree from Pope Honorius III, declaring her legitimate on the basis that her parents had not been married to others at the time of her birth, but without giving her a claim to the English throne.[2]

    Adultery with William de Braose

    At Easter 1230, William de Braose, who was Llywelyn's prisoner at the time, was discovered with Joan in Llywelyn's bedchamber. William de Braose was hanged on 2 May 1230, according to local folklore at Abergwyngregyn; the place was known as 'Gwern y Grog'. A letter from Nicholas, Abbot of Vaudy, suggests that the execution took place at Crogen near Bala (crogi = to hang).[3]

    Joan was placed under house arrest for twelve months after the incident. She was then, according to the Chronicle of Chester, forgiven by Llywelyn, and restored to favour. She may have given birth to a daughter early in 1231.

    Joan was never called Princess of Wales, but, in Welsh, "Lady of Wales".

    Death and burial

    She died at the royal home at Abergwyngregyn, on the north coast of Gwynedd, in 1237. Llywelyn's great grief at her death is recorded; he founded a Franciscan friary on the seashore at Llanfaes, opposite the royal home, in her honour. The friary was consecrated in 1240, shortly before Llywelyn died. It was destroyed in 1537 by Henry VIII of England during the Dissolution of the Monasteries. A stone coffin originally identified as Joan's can be seen in St Mary's and St Nicholas's parish church, Beaumaris, Anglesey. Above the empty coffin is a slate panel inscribed: "This plain sarcophagus, (once dignified as having contained the remains of Joan, daughter of King John, and consort of Llewelyn ap Iowerth, Prince of North Wales, who died in the year 1237), having been conveyed from the Friary of Llanfaes, and alas, used for many years as a horsewatering trough, was rescued from such an indignity and placed here for preservation as well as to excite serious meditation on the transitory nature of all sublunary distinctions. By Thomas James Warren Bulkeley, Viscount Bulkeley, Oct 1808"


    The slate panel at Beaumaris
    In recent years, doubt has been cast on the identity of the woman depicted on the coffin lid, which is not thought to belong to the coffin on which it now rests. Experts have suggested that the costume and style of carving belong to a much later decade than the 1230s when Joan died, although the coronet suggests a member of the royal family. Eleanor de Montfort is considered the most likely alternative

    Children:
    1. Marared ferch Llywelyn was born 0___ 1202, Kingdom of Gwynedd, Wales; died Aft 1268.
    2. 113. Gwladus Ddu was born 0___ 1206, Wales; died 0___ 1251, Windsor, Berkshire, England.
    3. Dafydd ap Llywelyn, Knight was born 0Mar 1212, Castell Hen Blas, Coleshill, Bagillt in Flintshire, Wales; died 25 Feb 1246, Abergwyngregyn, Wales.
    4. Elen ferch Llywelyn was born ~ 1218, (Wales); died 0___ 1253.

  9. 228.  Reginald de Braose, KnightReginald de Braose, Knight was born (Bramber, West Sussex, England) (son of William de Braose, III, Knight, 4th Lord of Bramber and Maud de St. Valery, Lady of the Haie); died BY 1228; was buried Saint John's, Brecon, Wales.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Lord of Brecon, Abergavenny, Builth

    Notes:

    Died: by 1228
    Reginald is said to be buried at St. John's, Brecon (right).

    Reginald supported Giles in his rebellions against King John. They were both active against the King in the barons' war. Neither was present at the signing of Magna Carta because they were still rebels who refused to compromise. King John aquiesced to Reginald's claims to the de Braose estates in Wales in May 1216.

    He became Lord of Brecon, Abergavenny, Builth and other Marcher lordships but was very much a vassal of Llywelyn Fawr, Prince of Gwynedd and now his father-in-law.

    Henry III restored Reginald to favour and the Bramber estates (confiscated from William by King John) in 1217.

    At this seeming betrayal, Rhys and Owain, Reginald's nephews who were princes of Deheubarth, were incensed and they took Builth (except the castle). Llewelyn Fawr also became angry and besieged Brecon. Reginald eventually surrendered to Llewelyn and gave up Seinhenydd (Swansea).

    By 1221 they were at war again with Llewelyn laying siege to Builth. The seige was relieved by Henry III's forces. From this time on Llewelyn tended to support the claims of Reginald's nephew John concerning the de Braose lands.

    sealReginald was a witness to the re-issue of Magna Carta by Henry III in 1225.

    Father: William de Braose, 4th Lord of Bramber

    Mother: Maud de St. Valery

    Married (1) to Grace, daughter of William Brewer

    Child 1: William de Braose, Lord of Abergavenny

    Child 2 ? Matilda = Rhys Mechyll (of Deheubarth)

    Married (2) to Gwladus Ddu (1215)

    Reginald — Grace Brewer. [Group Sheet]


  10. 229.  Grace Brewer (daughter of William Brewer and unnamed spouse).
    Children:
    1. 114. William de Braose, Lord of Brycheiniog was born 0___ 1197, Brecon, Wales; died 2 May 1230, Wales; was buried Wigmore Abbey, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England.

  11. 230.  William Marshal, Knight, 1st Earl PembrokeWilliam Marshal, Knight, 1st Earl Pembroke was born 1146-1147, (Berkshire, England) (son of John FitzGilbert and Sibyl of Salisbury); died 14 Apr 1219, Caversham, Berkshire, England; was buried Temple Church, London, Middlesex, England.

    Notes:

    William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke (1146 or 1147 - 14 May 1219), also called William the Marshal (Norman French: Williame le Mareschal), was an Anglo-Norman soldier and statesman.[1] He served five English kings – The "Young King" Henry, Henry II, Richard I, John, and Henry III.

    Knighted in 1166, he spent his younger years as a knight errant and a successful tournament fighter; Stephen Langton eulogized him as the "best knight that ever lived."[2] In 1189, he received the title of Earl of Pembroke through marriage during the second creation of the Pembroke Earldom. In 1216, he was appointed protector for the nine-year-old Henry III, and regent of the kingdom.

    Before him, his father's family held an hereditary title of Marshal to the king, which by his father's time had become recognized as a chief or master Marshalcy, involving management over other Marshals and functionaries. William became known as 'the Marshal', although by his time much of the function was actually delegated to more specialized representatives (as happened with other functions in the King's household). Because he was an Earl, and also known as the Marshal, the term "Earl Marshal" was commonly used and this later became an established hereditary title in the English Peerage.


    Early life

    Tomb effigy of William Marshal in Temple Church, London
    William's father, John Marshal, supported King Stephen when he took the throne in 1135, but in about 1139 he changed sides to back the Empress Matilda in the civil war of succession between her and Stephen which led to the collapse of England into "the Anarchy".[4]

    When King Stephen besieged Newbury Castle in 1152, according to William's biographer, he used the young William as a hostage to ensure that John kept his promise to surrender the castle. John, however, used the time allotted to reinforce the castle and alert Matilda's forces. When Stephen ordered John to surrender immediately or William would be hanged, John replied that he should go ahead saying, "I still have the hammer and the anvil with which to forge still more and better sons!" Subsequently there was a bluff made to launch William from a pierriáere, a type of trebuchet towards the castle. Fortunately for the child, Stephen could not bring himself to harm young William.[5] William remained a crown hostage for many months, only being released following the peace that resulted from the terms agreed at Winchester on 6 November 1153 that ended the civil war.

    Knight-Errant

    As a younger son of a minor nobleman, William had no lands or fortune to inherit, and had to make his own way in life. Around the age of twelve, when his father's career was faltering, he was sent to Normandy to be brought up in the household of William de Tancarville, a great magnate and cousin of young William's mother. Here he began his training as a knight. This would have included basic biblical stories and prayers written in Latin, as well as exposure to French romances, which conferred the basic precepts of chivalry to the budding knight.[6] In addition, while in Tancarville’s household, it is likely that Marshal also learned important and lasting practical lessons concerning the politics of courtly life. According to his thirteenth-century biography, L'Histoire de Guillaume le Marechal, Marshal had a number of adversaries in court who machinated to his disadvantage—these individuals likely would have been threatened by the boy’s close relationship with the magnate.[7] He was knighted in 1166 on campaign in Upper Normandy, then being invaded from Flanders. His first experience in battle came with mixed reviews. According to L'Histoire, everyone who witnessed the young knight in action agreed that he had acquitted himself well in combat. However, as medieval historian David Crouch explains, “War in the twelfth century was not fought wholly for honour. Profit was there to be made…”[8] On this front, Marshal was not so successful, as he was unable to parlay his combat victories into profit from either ransom or seized booty. As described in L'Histoire, the Earl of Essex, who was expecting the customary tribute from his valorous knight following battle, jokingly remarked: “Oh? But Marshal, what are you saying? You had forty or sixty of them — yet you refuse me so small a thing!”[9] In 1167 he was taken by William de Tancarville to his first tournament where he found his true mâetier. Quitting the Tancarville household he then served in the household of his mother's brother, Patrick, Earl of Salisbury. In 1168 his uncle was killed in an ambush by Guy de Lusignan. William was injured and captured in the same skirmish. It is known that William received a wound to his thigh and that someone in his captor's household took pity on the young knight. He received a loaf of bread in which were concealed several lengths of clean linen bandages with which he could dress his wounds. This act of kindness by an unknown person perhaps saved Marshal's life as infection setting into the wound could have killed him. After a period of time, he was ransomed by Eleanor of Aquitaine, who was apparently impressed by tales of his bravery.

    Thereafter he found he could make a good living out of winning tournaments, dangerous, often deadly, staged battles in which money and valuable prizes could be won by capturing and ransoming opponents, their horses and armour. His record is legendary: on his deathbed he recalled besting 500 knights during his tourneying career.[10]

    Royal favour

    13th-century depiction by Matthew Paris of the Earl of Pembroke's coat of arms[11]
    Upon his return during the course of 1185 William rejoined the court of King Henry II, and now served the father as a loyal captain through the many difficulties of his final years. The returns of royal favour were almost immediate. The king gave William the large royal estate of Cartmel in Cumbria, and the keeping of Heloise, the heiress of the northern barony of Lancaster. It may be that the king expected him to take the opportunity to marry her and become a northern baron, but William seems to have had grander ambitions for his marriage. In 1188 faced with an attempt by Philip II to seize the disputed region of Berry, Henry II summoned the Marshal to his side. The letter by which he did this survives, and makes some sarcastic comments about William's complaints that he had not been properly rewarded to date for his service to the king. Henry therefore promised him the marriage and lands of Dionisia, lady of Chăateauroux in Berry. In the resulting campaign, the king fell out with his heir Richard, count of Poitou, who consequently allied with Philip II against his father. In 1189, while covering the flight of Henry II from Le Mans to Chinon, William unhorsed the undutiful Richard in a skirmish. William could have killed the prince but killed his horse instead, to make that point clear. He is said to have been the only man ever to unhorse Richard. Nonetheless after Henry's death, Marshal was welcomed at court by his former adversary, now King Richard I, who was wise to include a man whose legendary loyalty and military accomplishments were too useful to ignore, especially in a king who was intending to go on Crusade.[1]

    During the old king's last days he had promised the Marshal the hand and estates of Isabel de Clare (c.1172–1220), but had not completed the arrangements. King Richard however, confirmed the offer and so in August 1189, at the age of 43, the Marshal married the 17-year-old daughter of Richard de Clare (Strongbow). Her father had been Earl of Pembroke, and Marshal acquired large estates and claims in England, Wales, Normandy and Ireland. Some estates however were excluded from the deal. Marshal did not obtain Pembroke and the title of earl, which his father-in-law had enjoyed, until 1199, as it had been taken into the king's hand in 1154. However, the marriage transformed the landless knight from a minor family into one of the richest men in the kingdom, a sign of his power and prestige at court. They had five sons and five daughters, and have numerous descendants.[1] William made numerous improvements to his wife's lands, including extensive additions to Pembroke Castle and Chepstow Castle.[citation needed]

    William was included in the council of regency which the King appointed on his departure for the Third Crusade in 1190. He took the side of John, the king's brother, when the latter expelled the justiciar, William Longchamp, from the kingdom, but he soon discovered that the interests of John were different from those of Richard. Hence in 1193 he joined with the loyalists in making war upon him. In spring 1194, during the course of the hostilities in England and before King Richard's return, William Marshal's elder brother John Marshal (who was serving as seneschal) was killed while defending Marlborough for the king's brother John. Richard allowed Marshal to succeed his brother in the hereditary marshalship, and his paternal honour of Hamstead Marshall. The Marshal served the king in his wars in Normandy against Philip II. On Richard's death-bed the king designated Marshal as custodian of Rouen and of the royal treasure during the interregnum.[1]

    King John and Magna Carta

    A 13th-century depiction of the Second Battle of Lincoln, which occurred at Lincoln Castle on 20 May 1217; the illustration shows the death of Thomas du Perche, the Comte de la Perche

    William supported King John when he became king in 1199, arguing against those who maintained the claims of Arthur of Brittany, the teenage son of John's elder brother Geoffrey Plantagenet. William was heavily engaged with the defence of Normandy against the growing pressure of the Capetian armies between 1200 and 1203. He sailed with King John when he abandoned the duchy in December 1203. He and the king had a falling out in the aftermath of the loss of the duchy, when he was sent with the earl of Leicester as ambassadors to negotiate a truce with King Philip II of France in 1204. The Marshal took the opportunity to negotiate the continued possession of his Norman lands.

    Before commencing negotiations with King Philip, William had been generously permitted to do homage to the King of France by King John so he might keep his possessions in Normandy; land which must have been of sentimental value due to the time spent there in his youth and adolescence. However, once official negotiations began, Philip demanded that such homage be paid exclusively to him, which King John had not consented to.[12] When William paid homage to King Philip, John took offence and there was a major row at court which led to cool relations between the two men. This became outright hostility in 1207 when John began to move against several major Irish magnates, including William. Though he left for Leinster in 1207 William was recalled and humiliated at court in the autumn of 1208, while John's justiciar in Ireland Meilyr fitz Henry invaded his lands, burning the town of New Ross.

    Meilyr's defeat by Countess Isabel led to her husband's return to Leinster. He was once again in conflict with King John in his war with the Braose and Lacy families in 1210, but managed to survive. He stayed in Ireland until 1213, during which time he had Carlow Castle erected[13] and restructured his honour of Leinster. Taken back into favour in 1212, he was summoned in 1213 to return to the English court. Despite their differences, William remained loyal throughout the hostilities between John and his barons which culminated on 15 June 1215 at Runnymede with the sealing of Magna Carta. William was one of the few English earls to remain loyal to the king through the First Barons' War. It was William whom King John trusted on his deathbed to make sure John's nine-year-old son Henry would get the throne. It was William who took responsibility for the king's funeral and burial at Worcester Cathedral.[1]

    On 11 November 1216 at Gloucester, upon the death of King John, William Marshal was named by the king's council (the chief barons who had remained loyal to King John in the First Barons' War) to serve as protector of the nine-year-old King Henry III, and regent of the kingdom. In spite of his advanced age (around 70) he prosecuted the war against Prince Louis and the rebel barons with remarkable energy. In the battle of Lincoln he charged and fought at the head of the young King's army, leading them to victory. He was preparing to besiege Louis in London when the war was terminated by the naval victory of Hubert de Burgh in the straits of Dover. [1]

    William was criticised for the generosity of the terms he accorded to Louis and the rebels in September 1217; but his desire for an expeditious settlement was dictated by sound statesmanship. Self-restraint and compromise were the keynote of Marshal's policy, hoping to secure peace and stability for his young liege. Both before and after the peace of 1217 he reissued Magna Carta, in which he is a signatory as one of the witnessing barons.

    Death and legacy

    William Marshal was interred in Temple Church, London
    Marshal's health finally failed him early in 1219. In March 1219 he realised that he was dying, so he summoned his eldest son, also William, and his household knights, and left the Tower of London for his estate at Caversham in Berkshire, near Reading, where he called a meeting of the barons, Henry III, the Papal legate Pandulf Verraccio, the royal justiciar (Hubert de Burgh), and Peter des Roches (Bishop of Winchester and the young King's guardian). William rejected the Bishop's claim to the regency and entrusted the regency to the care of the papal legate; he apparently did not trust the Bishop or any of the other magnates that he had gathered to this meeting. Fulfilling the vow he had made while on crusade, he was invested into the order of the Knights Templar on his deathbed. He died on 14 May 1219 at Caversham, and was buried in the Temple Church in London, where his tomb can still be seen.[1]

    Descendants of William Marshal and Isabel de Clare

    William Marshal, 2nd Earl of Pembroke (1190–6 April 1231), married (1) Alice de Bâethune, daughter of Earl of Albemarle; (2) 23 April 1224 Eleanor Plantagenet, daughter of King John of England. They had no children.
    Richard Marshal, 3rd Earl of Pembroke (1191–16 April 1234), married Gervase le Dinant. He died in captivity. They had no children.
    Maud Marshal (1194–27 March 1248), married (1) Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk, they had four children; (2) William de Warenne, 5th Earl of Surrey, they had two children; (3) Walter de Dunstanville.
    Gilbert Marshal, 4th Earl of Pembroke (1197–27 June 1241), married (1) Marjorie of Scotland, youngest daughter of King William I of Scotland; by an unknown mistress he had one illegitimate daughter:
    Isabel Marshal, married to Rhys ap Maeldon Fychan.
    Walter Marshal, 5th Earl of Pembroke (c. 1199 – November 1245), married Margaret de Quincy, Countess of Lincoln, granddaughter of Hugh de Kevelioc, 3rd Earl of Chester. No children.
    Isabel Marshal (9 October 1200 – 17 January 1240), married (1) Gilbert de Clare, 5th Earl of Hertford, whose daughter Isabel de Clare married Robert Bruce, 5th Lord of Annandale, the grandfather of Robert the Bruce; (2) Richard Plantagenet, Earl of Cornwall
    Sibyl Marshal (c. 1201–27 April 1245), married William de Ferrers, 5th Earl of Derby–they had seven daughters.
    Agnes Ferrers (died 11 May 1290), married William de Vesci.

    Isabel Ferrers (died before 26 November 1260)
    Maud Ferrers (died 12 March 1298), married (1) Simon de Kyme, and (2) William de Vivonia (de Forz), and (3) Amaury IX of Rochechouart.
    Sibyl Ferrers, married Sir Francis or Franco de Bohun.
    Joan Ferrers (died 1267)
    Agatha Ferrers (died May 1306), married Hugh Mortimer, of Chelmarsh.
    Eleanor Ferrers (died 16 October 1274), married to:

    Eva Marshal (1203–1246), married William de Braose, Lord of Abergavenny

    Isabella de Braose (b.1222), married Prince Dafydd ap Llywelyn. She died childless.
    Maud de Braose (1224–1301), in 1247, she married Roger Mortimer, 1st Baron Mortimer and they had descendants.
    Eva de Braose (1227 – 28 July 1255), married Sir William de Cantelou and had descendants.
    Eleanor de Braose (c.1228–1251). On an unknown date after August 1241, she married Sir Humphrey de Bohun and had descendants.

    Anselm Marshal, 6th Earl of Pembroke (c. 1208–22 December 1245), married Maud de Bohun, daughter of Humphrey de Bohun, 2nd Earl of Hereford. They had no children.
    Joan Marshal (1210–1234), married Warin de Munchensi (d. 1255), Lord of Swanscombe
    Joan de Munchensi (1230–20 September 1307) married William of Valence, the fourth son of King John's widow, Isabella of Angoulăeme, and her second husband, Hugh X of Lusignan, Count of La Marche. Valence was half-brother to Henry III and Edward I's uncle.

    The fate of the Marshal family

    During the civil wars in Ireland, William had taken two manors that the Bishop of Ferns claimed but could not get back. Some years after William's death, that bishop is said[14] to have laid a curse on the family that William's sons would have no children, and the great Marshal estates would be scattered. Each of William's sons did become earl of Pembroke and marshal of England, and each died without legitimate issue. William's vast holdings were then divided among the husbands of his five daughters. The title of "Marshal" went to the husband of the oldest daughter, Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk, and later passed to the Mowbray dukes of Norfolk and then to the Howard dukes of Norfolk, becoming "Earl Marshal" along the way. The title of "Earl of Pembroke" passed to William of Valence, the husband of Joan Marshal's daughter, Joan de Munchensi; he became the first of the de Valence line of earls of Pembroke.

    Through his daughter Isabel, William is ancestor to the both the Bruce and Stewart kings of Scots. Through his granddaughter Maud de Braose, William is ancestor to the last Plantagenet kings, Edward IV through Richard III, and all English monarchs from Henry VIII and afterward.

    Buried:
    at Temple Church...

    The Temple Church is a late 12th-century church in the City of London located between Fleet Street and the River Thames, built by the Knights Templar as their English headquarters. During the reign of King John (1199-1216) it served as the royal treasury, supported by the role of the Knights Templars as proto-international bankers. It is jointly owned by the Inner Temple and Middle Temple[1] Inns of Court, bases of the English legal profession. It is famous for being a round church, a common design feature for Knights Templar churches, and for its 13th and 14th century stone effigies. It was heavily damaged by German bombing during World War II and has since been greatly restored and rebuilt. The area around the Temple Church is known as the Temple and nearby formerly in the middle of Fleet Street stood the Temple Bar, an ornamental processional gateway. Nearby is the Temple Underground station.

    Photo, history & source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Temple_Church

    Died:
    Caversham is a suburb in the Borough of Reading...

    Map, history & source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caversham,_Berkshire

    William married Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke 0Aug 1189. Isabel was born 0___ 1172, Pembrokeshire, Wales; died 0___ 1220, Pembrokeshire, Wales; was buried Tintern Abbey, Tintern, Monmouthshire, Wales. [Group Sheet]


  12. 231.  Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke was born 0___ 1172, Pembrokeshire, Wales; died 0___ 1220, Pembrokeshire, Wales; was buried Tintern Abbey, Tintern, Monmouthshire, Wales.

    Notes:

    Isabel de Clare, suo jure Countess of Pembroke and Striguil (1172-1220) was a Cambro-Norman-Irish noblewoman, go to this link for further clarification ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cambro-Norman, and one of the wealthiest heiresses in Wales and Ireland. She was the wife of William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke, who served four successive kings as Lord Marshal of England. Her marriage had been arranged by King Richard I.

    Daniel Maclise's painting of the marriage of Isabel's parents, Strongbow and Aoife of Leinster in August 1170, the day after the capture of Waterford.
    Isabel was born in 1172 in Pembrokeshire, Wales, the eldest child of Richard de Clare, 2nd Earl of Pembroke (1130 – 20 April 1176), known to history as "Strongbow", and Aoife of Leinster, who was the daughter of Dermot MacMurrough, the deposed King of Leinster and Mor Ui Thuathail. The latter was a daughter of Muirchertach Ua Tuathail and Cacht Nâi Morda. The marriage of Strongbow and Aoife took place in August 1170, the day after the capture of Waterford by the Cambro-Norman forces led by Strongbow.

    Isabel's paternal grandparents were Gilbert de Clare, 1st Earl of Pembroke and Isabel de Beaumont. She had a younger brother Gilbert de Striguil who, being a minor, was not formally invested with either the earldom of Pembroke or of Striguil. It is unlikely that his father could have passed on the title to Pembroke as he himself did not possess it. When Gilbert died in 1185, Isabel became Countess of Pembroke in her own right (suo jure) until her death in 1220. In this way, she could be said to be the first successor to the earldom of Pembroke since her grandfather Gilbert, the first earl. By this reckoning, Isabel ought to be called the second countess, not the fourth countess of Pembroke. In any event, the title Earl was re-created for her husband. She also had an illegitimate half-sister Basile de Clare, who married three times. Basile's husbands were: Robert de Quincy; Raymond Fitzgerald, Constable of Leinster: Geoffrey FitzRobert, Baron of Kells.

    Isabel was described as having been "the good, the fair, the wise, the courteous lady of high degree".[2] She allegedly spoke French, Irish and Latin.[3] After her brother Gilbert's death, Isabel became one of the wealthiest heiresses in the kingdom, owning besides the titles of Pembroke and Striguil, much land in Wales and Ireland.[4] She inherited the numerous castles on the inlet of Milford Haven, guarding the South Channel, including Pembroke Castle.[5] She was a legal ward of King Henry II, who carefully watched over her inheritance.[6]

    Marriage

    The new King Richard I arranged her marriage in August 1189 to William Marshal, regarded by many as the greatest knight and soldier in the realm. Henry II had promised Marshal he would be given Isabel as his bride, and his son and successor Richard upheld the promise one month after his accession to the throne. At the time of her marriage, Isabel was residing in the Tower of London in the protective custody of the Justiciar of England, Ranulf de Glanville.[7] Following the wedding, which was celebrated in London "with due pomp and ceremony",[8] they spent their honeymoon at Stoke d'Abernon in Surrey which belonged to Enguerrand d'Abernon.[9]

    Marriage to Isabel elevated William Marshal from the status as a landless knight into one of the richest men in the kingdom. He would serve as Lord Marshal of England, four kings in all: Henry II, Richard I, John, and Henry III. Although Marshal did not become the jure uxoris 1st Earl of Pembroke, Earl of Striguil until 1199, he nevertheless assumed overlordship of Leinster in Ireland, Pembroke Castle, Chepstow Castle, as well as Isabel's other castles in Wales such as the keep of Haverford, Tenby, Lewhaden, Narberth, Stackpole.[10]

    Shortly after their marriage, Marshal and Isabel arrived in Ireland, at Old Ros, a settlement located in the territory which belonged to her grandfather, Dermot MacMurrough. A motte was hastily constructed, a medieval borough quickly grew around it, and afterwards the Marshals founded the port town by the river which subsequently became known as New Ross. The Chronicles of Ros, which are housed in the British Museum, described Isabel and Marshal's arrival in Ireland and records that Isabella set about building a lovely city on the banks of the Barrow.

    In 1192, Isabel and her husband assumed the task of managing their vast lands; starting with the rebuilding of Kilkenny Castle and the town, both of which had been damaged by the O'Brien clan in 1173. Later they commissioned the construction of several abbeys in the vicinity.[11]

    The marriage was happy, despite the vast difference in age between them. William Marshal and Isabel produced a total of five sons and five daughters.[12]

    Buried:
    Tintern Abbey (Welsh: Abaty Tyndyrn, About this sound pronunciation in Welsh (help·info)) was founded by Walter de Clare, Lord of Chepstow, on 9 May 1131. It is situated adjacent to the village of Tintern in Monmouthshire, on the Welsh bank of the River Wye, which forms the border between Monmouthshire in Wales and Gloucestershire in England. It was only the second Cistercian foundation in Britain, and the first in Wales. Falling into ruin after the Dissolution of the Monasteries in the 16th century, the remains were celebrated in poetry and often painted by visitors from the 18th century onwards. In 1984 Cadw took over responsibility for the site.

    Photos, history & source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tintern_Abbey

    Children:
    1. William Marshal, Knight, 2nd Earl of Pembroke was born 0___ 1190, (Berkshire, England); died 6 Apr 1231, London, Middlesex, England.
    2. Maud Marshal, Countess of Norfolk was born ~ 1193, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales; died 27 Mar 1248, Tintern Abbey, Chapel Hill, Monmouthshire, Wales.
    3. Isabel Marshal was born 9 Oct 1200, Pembroke Castle, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales; died 17 Jan 1240, Berkhamsted Castle, Berkhamsted, Hertforshire, England.
    4. Sybil Marshal was born ~ 1201, (Pembroke Castle, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales); died 0Apr 1245.
    5. 115. Eva Marshal was born 0___ 1203, Pembroke Castle, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales; died 0___ 1246.
    6. Joan Marshal was born 0___ 1210, (England); died 0___ 1234, (England).

  13. 232.  Guillaume de Fiennes, Seigneur de Tingry was born 0___ 1160, Wendover Manor, Buckinghamshire, England.

    Guillaume — Agnes Dammartin. [Group Sheet]


  14. 233.  Agnes Dammartin
    Children:
    1. 116. Enguerrand de Fiennes, Knight, Seigneur of Fiennes was born 0___ 1192, Tolleshunt, Essex, England; died 0___ 1265, Wendover Manor, Buckinghamshire, England.

  15. 236.  John of Brienne, King of Jerusalem was born 0___ 1170, (Champagne) France (son of Erard of Brienne, II, Count of Brienne and Agnes of Montfaucon); died 27 Mar 1237.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Count of Brienne
    • Also Known As: Emperor of Constantinople
    • Also Known As: John I

    Notes:

    John of Brienne (c. 1170 – 27 March 1237), also known as John I, was King of Jerusalem from 1210 to 1225 and Latin Emperor of Constantinople from 1229 to 1237. He was the youngest son of Erard II of Brienne, a wealthy nobleman in Champagne. John, originally destined for an ecclesiastical career, became a knight and owned small estates in Champagne around 1200. After the death of his brother, Walter III, he ruled the County of Brienne on behalf of his minor nephew Walter IV (who lived in southern Italy).

    The barons of the Kingdom of Jerusalem proposed that John marry Maria, Queen of Jerusalem. With the consent of Philip II of France and Pope Innocent III, he left France for the Holy Land and married the queen; the royal couple were crowned in 1210. After Maria's death in 1212 John administered the kingdom as regent for their infant daughter, Isabella II; an influential lord, John of Ibelin, attempted to dethrone him. John was a leader of the Fifth Crusade. Although his claim of supreme command of the crusader army was never unanimously acknowledged, his right to rule Damietta (in Egypt) was confirmed shortly after the town fell to the crusaders in 1219. He claimed the Armenian Kingdom of Cilicia on behalf of his second wife, Stephanie of Armenia, in 1220. After Stephanie and their infant son died that year, John returned to Egypt. The Fifth Crusade ended in failure (including the recovery of Damietta by the Egyptians) in 1221.

    John was the first king of Jerusalem to visit Europe (Italy, France, England, Leâon, Castile and Germany) to seek assistance for the Holy Land. He gave his daughter in marriage to Holy Roman Emperor Frederick II in 1225, and Frederick ended John's rule of the Kingdom of Jerusalem. Although the popes tried to persuade Frederick to restore the kingdom to John, the Jerusalemite barons regarded Frederick as their lawful ruler. John administered papal domains in Tuscany, became the podestáa of Perugia and was a commander of Pope Gregory IX's army during Gregory's war against Frederick in 1228 and 1229.

    He was elected emperor in 1229 as the senior co-ruler (with Baldwin II) of the Latin Empire, and was crowned in Constantinople in 1231. John III Vatatzes, Emperor of Nicaea, and Ivan Asen II of Bulgaria occupied the last Latin territories in Thrace and Asia Minor, besieging Constantinople in early 1235. John directed the defence of his capital during the months-long siege, with the besiegers withdrawing only after Geoffrey II of Achaea and united fleets from Italian towns defeated their fleet in 1236. The following year, John died as a Franciscan friar.

    Much more ...

    John married Berenguela of Leon 0___ 1224. Berenguela (daughter of Alfonso IX, King of Leon and Galacia and Berengaria of Castile, Queen of Castile) was born 0___ 1204; died 12 Apr 1237. [Group Sheet]


  16. 237.  Berenguela of Leon was born 0___ 1204 (daughter of Alfonso IX, King of Leon and Galacia and Berengaria of Castile, Queen of Castile); died 12 Apr 1237.
    Children:
    1. 118. Jean de Brienne was born 0___ 1230, France; died 0___ 1296.

  17. 238.  Geoffrey de Chateaudun, VI, Viscount de Chateaudun was born (Chateau of Chateaudun, Eure-et-Loir, France); died 6 Feb 1250.

    Notes:

    Died:
    on Crusade...

    Geoffrey married Clemence des Roches (France). Clemence was born (France); died Aft 1259, (France). [Group Sheet]


  18. 239.  Clemence des Roches was born (France); died Aft 1259, (France).
    Children:
    1. 119. Jeanne de Chateaudun was born ~ 1227, Chateau of Chateaudun, Eure-et-Loir, France; died Aft 1252.

  19. 244.  Walter de Lacy, Lord of Meath was born ~ 1172; died 0___ 1241, Trim Castle, Meath, Ireland.

    Notes:

    Walter de Lacy (c. 1172–1241) was Lord of Meath in Ireland. He was also a substantial land owner in Weobley, Herefordshire, in Ludlow, Shropshire, in Ewyas Lacy in the Welsh Marches, and several lands in Normandy.[1] He was the eldest son of Hugh de Lacy, a leading Cambro-Norman baron in the Norman invasion of Ireland.


    Life[edit]
    With his father he built Trim Castle (Irish: 'Caisletheâan Bhaile Atha Troim) in Trim, County Meath.

    During the revolt of Prince John Lackland, Lord of Ireland, against his brother, King Richard the Lionheart, in 1193-94, Walter joined with John de Courcy to support Richard. Walter apprehended some knights loyal to John along with Peter Pipard, John's justiciar in Ireland.[2] Walter did homage to Richard for his lands in Ireland in 1194, receiving his lordship of Meath.[2] After mounting the throne of England in 1199, John wrote to his justiciar in Ireland to complain that de Courcy and de Lacy had destroyed John's land of Ireland.[2] Walter had made John his enemy.[2]

    In 1203, John granted custody of the city of Limerick to Walter's father-in-law, William de Braose, 4th Lord of Bramber.[3] As de Braose was an absentee, Walter served as de Braose's deputy in Limerick.[3]

    In 1206-07, Walter became involved in a conflict with Meiler Fitzhenry, Justiciar of Ireland, and Walter's feudal tenants for lands in Meath; Meiler had seized Limerick.[3] King John summoned Walter to appear before him in England in April, 1207.[4] After Walter's brother Hugh de Lacy, 1st Earl of Ulster, had taken Meiler FitzHenry prisoner, John in March, 1208 acquiesced in giving Walter a new charter for his lands in Meath.[4] Upon his return to Ireland later in 1208, Walter may have acted as Justiciar of Ireland in lieu of the deposed Meiler fitz Henry.[5] By this time, John had begun his infamous persecution of Walter's father-in-law, de Braose, who fled to Ireland.[5]

    On 20 June 1210, King John landed in Crook, now in Co. Waterford, with his feudal levy and a force of Flemish mercenaries; John marched north through Leinster.[5] When John reached Dublin on 27 or 28 June, Walter attempted to throw himself on John's mercy, sending five of his tenants to Dublin to place his lands in Meath back in the king's hand, and disclaiming any attempt to shelter his brother Hugh from John's wrath.[6] John attacked eastern Meath, and was joined by 400 of Walter's deserting followers.[6] John would hold Walter's lands in Meath for five years.[7]

    In 1211 Walter erected the castle on Turbet Island in the abortive Anglo-Norman attempt to gain control of West Ulster.

    Attempting to secure support in Ireland against the brewing revolt that would lead to Magna Carta, John began negotiations to restore Walter to his lands in Meath in the summer of 1215.[7]

    Walter was Sheriff of Herefordshire from 1218 to 1222. In 1230 he joined with Geoffrey de Marisco and Richard Mâor de Burgh to subdue Aedh mac Ruaidri Ó Conchobair, King of Connacht.

    He was a benefactor to the abbeys of Lanthony and Craswall (Herefordshire) and also founded the abbey of Beaubec in Ireland.

    On his death his estate was divided between his granddaughters Margery and Maud.

    Ancestry[edit]
    [show]Ancestors of Walter de Lacy, Lord of Meath
    Family, Marriage and Issue[edit]
    He married Margaret de Braose, the daughter of William de Braose, 4th Lord of Bramber and Maud de St. Valery and had issue.

    Petronilla (or Pernal) de Lacy (c.1201 – after 25 November 1288), married Sir Ralph VI de Toeni, Lord of Flamstead, son of Sir Roger IV de Toeni, Lord of Flamstead & Constance de Beaumont.
    Egidia de Lacy (also called Gille) who married Richard Mor de Burgh Lord of Connaught and Strathearn. Together they had many notable descendants, including Elizabeth de Burgh, Catherine Parr,[9] Margaret de Clare, the Earls of Ormond, King Edward IV of England, King Richard III of England, and many other British monarchs.
    Gilbert de Lacy of Ewyas Harold, Herefordshire was taken hostage for his father in August 1215. He predeceased his father before 25 December 1230. Gilbert married Isabel Bigod, daughter of Sir Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk (Magna Charta Surety) & Maud Marshal. They had 1 son and 2 daughters:
    Walter de Lacy, who married Rohese le Botiller but had no issue. Walter died between 1238 and 1241.
    Margery (Margaret) de Lacy, who married Sir John de Verdun, Lord of Westmeath, the son of Theobald le Botiller, 2nd Chief Butler of Ireland and Rohese de Verdun.
    Maud de Lacy, who married Lord Geoffrey de Geneville, Justiciar of Ireland, the son of Simon de Joinville, Seneschal of Champagne, and Beatrix of Burgundy.[10] Together Geoffrey and Maud had at least three children:[a]
    Geoffrey de Geneville (died 1283)
    Sir Piers de Geneville, of Trim and Ludlow (1256- shortly before June 1292), who in his turn married in 1283 Jeanne of Lusignan by whom he had three daughters, including Joan de Geneville, 2nd Baroness Geneville.
    Joan de Geneville, married Gerald FitzMaurice FitzGerald (died 1287).

    end

    Walter — Margaret de Braose, Lady of Trim. Margaret (daughter of William de Braose, III, Knight, 4th Lord of Bramber and Maud de St. Valery, Lady of the Haie) was born (Ireland); died Aft 1255, Corfe Castle, Dorset, England. [Group Sheet]


  20. 245.  Margaret de Braose, Lady of Trim was born (Ireland) (daughter of William de Braose, III, Knight, 4th Lord of Bramber and Maud de St. Valery, Lady of the Haie); died Aft 1255, Corfe Castle, Dorset, England.

    Notes:

    Margaret de Braose, Lady of Trim (died after 1255), was an Anglo-Welsh noblewoman, the daughter of Marcher Lord William de Braose, 4th Lord of Bramber and the legendary Maud de St. Valâery, who was left to starve to death by orders of King John of England. Margaret founded a religious house, the Hospital of St. John in her mother Maud's memory.[1] Margaret was the wife of Walter de Lacy, Lord of Trim Castle in County Meath, Ireland, and Ludlow Castle in Shropshire.

    Family[edit]
    Margaret was a daughter of William de Braose, 4th Lord of Bramber, a powerful Marcher Lord, and Maud de St. Valâery. She was reputed to have had about fifteen siblings, although only eight have been recorded. Her paternal grandparents were William de Braose, 3rd Lord Bramber and Bertha of Hereford, and her maternal grandparents were Bernard de St. Valery and Matilda.

    Marriage and issue[edit]
    In November 1200, Margaret married Walter de Lacy, Lord of Trim Castle in County Meath, Ireland, and Ludlow Castle in Shropshire. He also owned many estates and manors in Herefordshire including Ewyas Lacy. He was later appointed Sheriff of Hereford. It was an advantageous marriage as Walter and her father both held castles and lordships in the Welsh Marches as well as Ireland, and thus the two men looked after each other's interests in both places.[2]

    Together Walter and Margaret had at least six children who included:

    Gilbert de Lacy (1202 – 25 December 1230), married as her first husband Isabel Bigod, by whom he had issue.
    Pernel de Lacy (1201 – after 25 November 1288), married firstly William St. Omer, and secondly Ralph VI de Toeni by whom she had issue.
    Egidia de Lacy (born c. 1205), married Richard Mor de Burgh, by whom she had issue.
    Hospital of St. John[edit]
    In 1208, Margaret's parents lost favour with their patron, King John of England, who seized all of the de Braose castles in the Welsh Marches. In order to escape from John's vindictive wrath, Margaret's mother, Maud and her eldest brother William fled to Ireland where they found refuge with Margaret and her family at Trim Castle. In 1210, however, King John sent an expedition to Ireland. Maud and William escaped from Trim but were apprehended on the Antrim coast while attempting to sail to Scotland.[3] They were dispatched to England where they were both left to starve to death inside the dungeon of Corfe Castle, Dorset on the orders of King John. Walter de Lacy's estates were forfeited to the Crown as punishment for having harboured traitors inside his castle.

    By 1215, Walter and Margaret were back in the King's favour, and Walter's confiscated estates were restored to him. As a further token of John's favour, Walter was appointed Castellan and Sheriff of Hereford the following year,[2] and Margaret obtained permission to found a religious house in memory of her mother. On 10 October 1216, eight days before his death, King John conceded three carucates of land in the royal forest of Aconbury, Herefordshire to Margaret for the construction of the Hospital of St. John. King John sent the instructions to her husband Walter by letters patent.[4] Margaret's subsequent attempts to free her foundation from the control of the Hospitallers led her into a lengthy dispute which ultimately involved the Pope.

    Margaret died on an unknown date sometime after 1255. Her husband had died in 1241, leaving his vast holdings and lordships to their granddaughters by their son Gilbert, Margery de Lacy, and Maud de Lacy, Baroness Geneville.[5]

    end

    Died:
    ... they were both left to starve to death inside the dungeon of Corfe Castle, Dorset on the orders of King John.

    Children:
    1. 122. Gilbert de Lacy
    2. Egidia de Lacy was born ~ 1205, (Ireland).

  21. 246.  Hugh Bigod, Knight, 3rd Earl of NorfolkHugh Bigod, Knight, 3rd Earl of Norfolk was born ~ 1182, Thetford, Norfolk, England (son of Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk and Ida de Tosny, Countess of Norfolk); died 18 Feb 1225, (Norfolk, England); was buried Thetford Priory, Thetford, Norfolk, England.

    Notes:

    Hugh Bigod (c.?1182 - 1225) was a member of the powerful early Norman Bigod family and was for a short time the 3rd Earl of Norfolk.

    He was born c. 1182, the eldest son of Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk by his wife Ida de Tosny.

    Career

    In 1215 he was one of the twenty-five sureties of Magna Carta of King John. He succeeded to his father’s estates (including Framlingham Castle) in 1221.

    Marriage & progeny

    In late 1206 or early 1207, Hugh married Maud Marshal (1192 - 27 March 1248), daughter of William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke (1147–1219), Marshal of England, by his wife Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke. They had four, or possibly five, children:

    Roger Bigod, 4th Earl of Norfolk (c.?1209-1270), died without progeny.
    Hugh Bigod (1211–1266), Justiciar of England. Married Joan de Stuteville, by whom he had issue.
    Isabel Bigod (c. 1212- 1250), married twice: Firstly to Gilbert de Lacy, by whom she had issue; Secondly to John FitzGeoffrey, Lord of Shere, by whom she had issue, including Maud FitzJohn, and Joan FitzJohn who married Theobald le Botiller, and from whom descended the Irish Earls of Ormond.
    Ralph Bigod (born c. 1215)
    Contrary to the assertion of Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots, there is no evidence for a fourth son called Simon Bigod. A man of that name appears as a witness to one of Earl Hugh's charters (Morris, HBII 2), but as the eighteenth name in a list of twenty, suggesting no close connection to the main branch of the family. He is also named among the knights who surrendered to King John at Framlingham Castle in 1216. He was a probably a descendant of Hugh or William Bigod, half-brothers to Earl Roger II Bigod.

    Death

    Hugh died on 18 Feb 1225. Very soon after Hugh's death, his widow Maud remarried William de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey.

    Hugh Bigod in fiction[edit]
    Hugh Bigod and his wife [Mahelt] are the main characters in Elizabeth Chadwick's To Defy a King. They also appear as secondary characters in novels chronicling their parents such as The Time of Singing (UK: Sphere, 2008) published in the USA as For the King's Favor; The Greatest Knight; and The Scarlet Lion.

    Ancestry

    [show]Ancestors of Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk

    References

    M. Morris, The Bigod Earls of Norfolk in the Thirteenth Century (Woodbridge, 2005)

    External links

    Cawley, Charles, Medieval Lands on Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk, Medieval Lands database, Foundation for Medieval Genealogy
    Cawley, Charles, Medieval Lands on Isabel Bigod, Medieval Lands database, Foundation for Medieval Genealogy

    Hugh married Maud Marshal, Countess of Norfolk 1206-1207, (Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales). Maud (daughter of William Marshal, Knight, 1st Earl Pembroke and Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke) was born ~ 1193, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales; died 27 Mar 1248, Tintern Abbey, Chapel Hill, Monmouthshire, Wales. [Group Sheet]


  22. 247.  Maud Marshal, Countess of Norfolk was born ~ 1193, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales (daughter of William Marshal, Knight, 1st Earl Pembroke and Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke); died 27 Mar 1248, Tintern Abbey, Chapel Hill, Monmouthshire, Wales.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Countess of Surrey

    Notes:

    Maud Marshal, Countess of Norfolk, Countess of Surrey (1192 – 27 March 1248) was an Anglo-Norman noblewoman and a wealthy co-heiress of her father William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke, and her mother Isabel de Clare suo jure 4th Countess of Pembroke. Maud was their eldest daughter.[1] She had two husbands: Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk, and William de Warenne, 5th Earl of Surrey.

    Maud was also known as Matilda Marshal.

    Family

    Maud's birthdate is unknown other than being post 1191. She was the eldest daughter of William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke and Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke, herself one of the greatest heiresses in Wales and Ireland. Maud had five brothers and four younger sisters. She was a co-heiress to her parents' extensive rich estates.

    Her paternal grandparents were John FitzGilbert Marshal and Sybilla of Salisbury, and her maternal grandparents were Richard de Clare, 2nd Earl of Pembroke, known as "Strongbow", and Aoife of Leinster.

    Marriages and issue

    Sometime before Lent in 1207, Maud married her first husband, Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk. It was through this marriage between Maud and Hugh that the post of Earl Marshal of England came finally to the Howard (Dukes of Norfolk).[2] In 1215, Hugh was one of the twenty-five sureties of the Magna Carta. He came into his inheritance in 1221, thus Maud became the Countess of Norfolk at that time. Together they had five children:[3]

    Roger Bigod, 4th Earl of Norfolk (1209–1270) He died childless.
    Hugh Bigod (1212–1266), Justiciar of England. Married Joan de Stuteville, by whom he had issue.
    Isabel Bigod (c. 1215–1250), married firstly Gilbert de Lacy of Ewyas Lacy, by whom she had issue; she married secondly John Fitzgeoffrey, Lord of Shere, by whom she had issue.
    Ralph Bigod (born c. 1218, date of death unknown), married Bertha de Furnival, by whom he had one child.
    William Bigod
    Hugh Bigod died in 1225. Maud married her second husband, William de Warenne, 5th Earl of Surrey before 13 October that same year. Together they had two children:

    Isabella de Warenne (c. 1228 – before 20 September 1282), married Hugh d'Aubigny, 5th Earl of Arundel. She died childless.
    John de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey (August 1231 – c. 29 September 1304), in 1247 married Alice de Lusignan, a half-sister of King Henry III of England, by whom he had three children.
    Maud's second husband died in 1240. Her youngest son John succeeded his father as the 6th Earl of Surrey, but as he was a minor, Peter of Savoy, uncle of Queen consort Eleanor of Provence, was guardian of his estates.

    Death

    Maud died on 27 March 1248 at the age of about fifty-six years and was buried at Tintern Abbey with her mother, possibly her maternal grandmother, and two of her brothers.

    Maud Marshal in literature

    Maud Marshal is the subject of a novel by Elizabeth Chadwick, titled To Defy a King. In the book she is called Mahelt rather than Maud. She and her first husband Hugh Bigod appear as secondary characters in books chronicling their parents's lives: The Time of Singing (UK: Sphere, 2008) published in the USA as For the King's Favor; The Greatest Knight; and The Scarlet Lion.

    Ancestors[edit]
    [show]Ancestors of Maud Marshal

    References

    Jump up ^ Thomas B. Costain, The Magnificent Century, pp. 103-104
    Jump up ^ Costain, The Magnificent Century, pp. 103-104
    Jump up ^ Charles Cawley, Medieval Lands, Earls of Norfolk, Bigod
    Thomas B. Costain, The Magnificent Century, published by Doubleday and Company, Garden City, New York, 1959
    Charles Cawley, Medieval Lands, Earls of Pembroke
    thePeerage.com/p 10677.htm#106761

    Children:
    1. Ralph Bigod, Knight was born ~ 1215, Thetford, Norfolk, England; died Bef 28 Jul 1260, Thetford, Norfolk, England.
    2. Hugh Bigod, Knight was born ~ 1215, Thetford, Norfolk, England; died Bef 7 May 1266.
    3. Isabelle Bigod, Countess of Essex was born ~ 1211, Thetford, Norfolk, England; died 0___ 1239.
    4. 123. Isabel Bigod