Sir Hugh le Despenser, IV, Knight, Baron Despenser

Male 1286 - 1326  (~ 40 years)


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  1. 1.  Sir Hugh le Despenser, IV, Knight, Baron Despenser was born ~ 1286, England (son of Hugh le Despenser, Knight, 1st Earl of Winchester and Isabella Beauchamp); died 24 Nov 1326, Hereford, Herefordshire, England; was buried (Hulton Abbey, Staffordshire, England).

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: 1st Lord Despenser

    Notes:

    Hugh le Despenser, 1st Lord Despenser (c. 1286[1] – 24 November 1326), also referred to as "the younger Despenser",[2] was the son and heir of Hugh le Despenser, Earl of Winchester (the elder Despenser) by his wife Isabella de Beauchamp daughter of William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick.[3] He rose to national prominence as royal chamberlain and a favourite of Edward II of England. A series of subsequent controversies eventually led to him being hanged, drawn and quartered.

    Titles and possessions

    Hugh le Despenser the younger was knight of Hanley Castle, Worcestershire, King's Chamberlain, Constable of Odiham Castle, Keeper of Porchester Castle and town, Keeper of the royal Bristol Castle, the town and barton of Bristol and, in Wales, Keeper of Dryslwyn Castle and town and of Dryslwyn, and the region of Cantref Mawr, Carmarthenshire.

    Also in Wales, by marriage he became Lord of Glamorgan, seated at Cardiff Castle.

    He was also Keeper of the castles, manor, and lands of Brecknock, Hay, Cantref Selyf, etc., in County Brecon, and, in England of Huntington, Herefordshire.

    He was given Wallingford Castle although this had previously been given to Queen Isabella for life.

    Marriage

    In May 1306 Hugh le Despenser the younger was knighted, and that summer he married Eleanor de Clare, daughter of Gilbert de Clare, 9th Lord of Clare and 7th Earl of Hertford and Joan of Acre.

    Eleanor's grandfather, Edward I, owed the elder Despenser 2,000 marks (ą1,000,000 at today's prices) and the marriage settled this debt, and was a reward for the elder Hugh's loyal service.

    When Eleanor's brother, Gilbert, was killed in 1314 at the Battle of Bannockburn, she unexpectedly became one of the three co-heiresses to the rich Gloucester earldom, and in her right, Hugh inherited Glamorgan and other properties.[4] In just a few years Hugh went from a landless knight to one of the wealthiest magnates in the kingdom.

    Eleanor was also the niece of the new king, Edward II of England, and this connection brought Despenser closer to the English royal court. He joined the baronial opposition to Piers Gaveston, the king's favourite (and Hugh's brother-in-law, as Gaveston was married to Eleanor's sister Margaret).

    Eager for power and wealth, Despenser seized Tonbridge Castle in 1315, after his brother-in-law's death under the misapprehension that it belonged to his mother-in-law (he relinquished it on discovering that the rightful owner was the Archbishop of Canterbury).[5] In 1318 he murdered Llywelyn Bren, a Welsh hostage in his custody.

    Eleanor and Hugh had nine children to survive infancy:

    Hugh le Despencer, 2nd Baron le Despencer (1308–1349), 2nd Baron Le Despencer, who was restored to his grandfather's title of Baron le Despencer in 1338. At his death without issue, his nephew Edward, son of Edward (below), was created Baron Le Despencer in a new creation of 1357.
    Gilbert le Despenser, (1309–1381).

    Edward le Despenser, (1310–1342), soldier, killed at the siege of Vannes;[6] father of Edward II le Despenser, Knight of the Garter, who became Baron Le Despencer in a new creation of 1357. His son was Thomas le Despenser, 1st Earl of Gloucester and 2nd Baron Le Despencer of the 1357 creation, who was married to a daughter of Edmund of Langley, Duke of York, youngest son of Edward III, and was attainted and beheaded in 1400 for his attempts to restore Richard II, his wife's cousin, to the throne. His attainder was reversed in 1461, with the victory of Edward IV, and the barony of the first creation (1264/1295) was eventually awarded in 1604 to Dame Mary Fane, heiress of Thomas's daughter Isabel Le Despencer, who married two cousins. The barony is now held by the Viscounts Falmouth.

    Isabel le Despenser, Countess of Arundel (1312–1356), married, as his 1st wife, Richard Fitzalan, 10th Earl of Arundel. The marriage was annulled and their child, Edmund, was disinherited.
    John le Despenser, (1311 – June 1366).
    Eleanor le Despenser, (c. 1315–1351), nun at Sempringham Priory
    Joan le Despenser, (c. 1317–1384), nun at Shaftesbury Abbey
    Margaret le Despenser, (c. 1319–1337), nun at Whatton Priory
    Elizabeth le Despenser, Baroness Berkeley|Elizabeth le Despenser]], born 1325, died 13 July 1389, married Maurice de Berkeley, 4th Baron Berkeley.

    Political manoeuverings

    Hugh le Despenser the younger became royal chamberlain in 1318. As a royal courtier, Despenser manoeuvred into the affections of King Edward, displacing the previous favourite, Roger d'Amory. This was much to the dismay of the baronage as they saw him both taking their rightful places at court and being a worse version of Gaveston. By 1320 his greed was running free. He also supposedly vowed to be revenged on Roger Mortimer because Mortimer's grandfather had killed Hugh's grandfather, and once stated (though probably in jest) that he regretted he could not control the wind. By 1321 he had earned many enemies in every stratum of society, from Queen Isabella to the barons to the common people. There was even a plot to kill Despenser by sticking his wax likeness with pins.

    Finally the barons prevailed upon King Edward and forced Despenser and his father into exile in August 1321. Following the exile of the Despensers, the barons who opposed them fell out among themselves, and the King summoned the two men back to England. Early in the following year, King Edward took advantage of these divisions to secure the surrender of Marcher Lord Roger Mortimer, and the defeat and execution of the Earl of Lancaster, the Despensers' chief opponents. The pair returned and King Edward quickly reinstated Despenser as royal favourite. The time from the Despensers' return from exile until the end of Edward II's reign was a time of uncertainty in England. With the main baronial opposition leaderless and weak, having been defeated at the Battle of Boroughbridge, and Edward willing to let them do as they pleased, the Despensers were left unchecked. This maladministration caused hostile feeling for them and, by proxy, Edward II. Despenser repeatedly pressed King Edward to execute Mortimer,[citation needed] who had been held prisoner in the Tower of London, following his surrender. However, Mortimer escaped from the Tower and fled to France.

    Criminality

    Like his father, Hugh Despenser the Elder, the younger Despenser was accused by a significant number of people of widespread criminality. Examples include;

    Theft from Relatives - Despenser seized the Welsh lands of his wife's inheritance, ignoring the claims of his two brothers-in-law and cheated his sister-in-law Elizabeth de Clare out of Gower and Usk.
    Theft - forced Alice de Lacy, Countess of Lincoln, to give up her lands,
    Torture - he had Lady Baret's arms and legs broken until she went insane.
    Murder - unlawfully killing a prisoner (Llweyn Bren) who was awaiting trial[7]
    Piracy - during his exile he became a pirate in the English Channel, "a sea monster, lying in wait for merchants as they crossed the sea".[8]
    False Imprisonment & Death Threats - he imprisoned Sir William Cokerell in the Tower of London, where Cokerell was forced to pay to save his life[9]
    Accusations of sodomy[edit]
    14th century court historian Froissart wrote that "he was a sodomite." According to Froissart, Despenser's penis was severed and burned in his execution as a punishment for his sodomy and heresy.[10]

    Relationship with Isabella and downfall

    Queen Isabella had a special dislike for Hugh le Despenser the younger. Alison Weir, in her 2005 book Queen Isabella: Treachery, Adultery, and Murder in Medieval England, speculates that he had raped Isabella and that was the source of her hatred. While Isabella was in France to negotiate between her husband and the French king, she formed a liaison with Roger Mortimer and began planning an invasion. Despenser supposedly tried to bribe French courtiers to assassinate Isabella, sending barrels of silver as payment.[citation needed] Roger Mortimer and the Queen invaded England in October 1326. Their forces numbered only about 1,500 mercenaries to begin with, but the majority of the nobility rallied to them throughout October and November. By contrast, very few people were prepared to fight for Edward II, mainly because of the hatred that the Despensers had aroused.

    The Despensers fled West with the King, with a sizeable sum from the treasury. The escape was unsuccessful. Separated from the elder Despenser, the King and the younger Despenser were deserted by most of their followers, and were captured near Neath in mid-November. King Edward was placed in captivity and later forced to abdicate in favour of his son. The elder Despenser (the father) was hanged at Bristol on 27 October 1326, and younger Despenser (the son) was brought to trial.

    Trial and execution

    The execution of Hugh le Despenser the younger, from a manuscript of Jean Froissart.
    Hugh le Despenser the Younger tried to starve himself before his trial,[11] but he did face trial on 24 November 1326, in Hereford, before Mortimer and the Queen. In Froissart's account of the execution, Despenser was then tied firmly to a ladder, and—in full view of the crowd—had his genitals sliced off and burned in his still-conscious sight, then his entrails slowly pulled out, and, finally, his heart cut out and thrown into the fire. Froissart (or rather Jean le Bel's chronicle, on which he relied) is the only source to describe castration, where all other contemporary accounts have Despenser hanged, drawn and quartered (which usually involved castration).[12]

    Finally, his corpse was beheaded, his body cut into four pieces, and his head mounted on the gates of London.[2]

    Remains

    Four years later, in December 1330, his widow was given permission to gather and bury his remains at the family's Gloucestershire estate,[2] but only the head, a thigh bone and a few vertebrae were returned to her.[13]

    What may be the body of Despenser was identified in February 2008 in the village of Abbey Hulton in Staffordshire, the former site of Hulton Abbey. The skeleton, which was first uncovered during archaeological work in the 1970s, appeared to be that of a victim of a drawing and quartering as it had been beheaded and chopped into several pieces with a sharp blade, suggesting a ritual killing. Furthermore, it lacked several body parts, including the ones given to Despenser's wife. Radiocarbon analysis dated the body to between 1050 and 1385, and later tests suggested it to be that of a man over 34 years old. Despenser was 40 at the time of his death. In addition, the Abbey is located on lands that belonged to Hugh Audley, Despenser's brother-in-law, at the time.[13]

    Legacy

    No book-length biographical study of Hugh le Despenser exists, although The Tyranny and Fall of Edward II: 1321–1326 by historian Natalie Fryde is a study of Edward's reign during the years that the Despensers' power was at its peak. Fryde pays particular attention to the subject of the Despensers' ill-gotten landholdings.[14] The numerous accusations against the younger Despenser at the time of his execution have never been the subject of close critical scrutiny, although Roy Martin Haines called them "ingenuous" and noted their propagandistic nature.[15]

    Despite the crucial and disastrous role he played in the reign of Edward II, Despenser is almost a minor character in Christopher Marlowe's play Edward II (1592), where, as "Spencer", he is little more than a substitute for the dead Gaveston. In 2006, he was selected by BBC History Magazine as the 14th century's worst Briton.[16]

    His image on the stained glass window of the Banqueting Hall of Cardiff Castle, shows his coat of arms inverted—a symbol of disgrace.

    Ancestry

    Edward II of England and Hugh Despenser the elder extorted the lands of Alice de Lacy, 4th Countess of Lincoln, and to make the transfers of title appear legitimate, declared Hugh the younger her "kinsman".

    [show]Ancestors of Hugh Despenser the Younger

    Notable descendants

    Anne Neville, the queen consort of King Richard III of England, is a direct descendant of Hugh le Despenser the younger. Anne's grandmother, Isabel le Despenser, Countess of Worcester and Warwick, was the granddaughter of Edward le Despencer, 1st Baron le Despencer, who in turn was the grandson of the younger Despenser.

    The sixth and last queen consort to Henry VIII, Catherine Parr, also descended from the 1st Baron le Despencer, through his daughter Margaret, who married Robert de Ferrers, 4th Baron Ferrers of Chartley.[17]

    The New England Protestant reformer Anne (Marbury) Hutchinson was a descendant of Hugh through his grandson Edward.[18] Through her, many Americans including Franklin D. Roosevelt and George W. Bush, can claim Hugh the younger as an ancestor.[19]

    *

    Died:
    Hanged, drawn and quartered for High treason...

    Hugh married Eleanor de Clare, Baroness of Despencer 1 May 1306, Westminster Abbey, 20 Deans Yd, London SW1P 3PA, United Kingdom. Eleanor (daughter of Gilbert de Clare, Knight, Earl of Hertford and Joan (Plantagenet) of Acre) was born 0Oct 1292, Caerphilly Castle, Caerphilly, Urban, Glamorgan, Wales; died 30 Jun 1337, Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England; was buried (Tewkesbury Abbey, Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England GL20 5RZ). [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. Isabe le Despenser, Countess of Arundel was born 0___ 1312; died ~ 1376.
    2. Elizabeth Despencer was born 0___ 1322, Bishop's Stoke, Westbury Upon Trym, Gloucester, England; died 13 Jul 1389; was buried St. Botolph Aldersgate, London, Middlesex, England.
    3. Edward le Despencer

Generation: 2

  1. 2.  Hugh le Despenser, Knight, 1st Earl of WinchesterHugh le Despenser, Knight, 1st Earl of Winchester was born 1 Mar 1261; died 27 Oct 1326, Bristol, Gloucestershire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: "the Elder Despenser"

    Notes:

    Hugh le Despenser (1 March 1261 – 27 October 1326), sometimes referred to as "the Elder Despenser", was for a time the chief adviser to King Edward II of England.[1]

    Ancestry

    He was the son of Hugh le Despencer, 1st Baron le Despencer (or Despenser), and Aline Basset, only daughter and heiress of Philip Basset. His father was killed at the Battle of Evesham when Hugh was just a boy, but Hugh's patrimony was saved through the influence of his maternal grandfather (who had been loyal to the king).[2] He married Isabella de Beauchamp, daughter of William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick and Maud FitzJohn.

    Life

    He served Edward I on numerous occasions in battle and in diplomacy and was created a baron by writ of summons to Parliament in 1295. His son, Hugh Despenser the Younger, became a favourite of Edward II, in what is believed to be a homosexual relationship. [3] Hugh the Elder was loyal to his son and the King, which worried the barons. To that time, his highest office was justice of the forests.[4]

    He was one of the few barons to remain loyal to Edward during the controversy regarding Piers Gaveston. Despenser became Edward's loyal servant and chief administrator after Gaveston was executed in 1312, but the jealousy of other barons - and, more importantly, his own corruption and unjust behaviour - led to his being exiled along with his son Hugh Despenser the younger in 1321, when Edmund of Woodstock, Earl of Kent replaced him as Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports.

    Edward found it difficult to manage without them, and recalled them to England a year later, an action which enraged the queen, Isabella, the more so when Despenser was created Earl of Winchester in 1322. Although not as bad as his son, Despencer the Elder was accused by a significant number of people of widespread criminality during the next few years, often involving false accusations of trespass or theft and the extortion of money or land.

    Death

    When Isabella, Queen of England, and her lover, Roger Mortimer, led a rebellion against her husband Edward, they captured both Despensers—first the elder, later the younger. Queen Isabella interceded for Hugh the elder, but his enemies, notably Roger Mortimer and Henry, Earl of Lancaster, insisted both father and son should face trial and execution.

    The elder Despenser was hanged immediately in his armour at Bristol on 27 October 1326. He was then beheaded and his body cut into pieces for the dogs. His head was sent for display to Winchester, which had supported the king.[5]

    Pardons were issued to thousands of people who had been falsely accused by Despencer following his death.

    Family

    Hugh and his wife, Isabella, had also two daughters, Aline (c. - 1353) and Isabel (d. 1334). Isabel married, as his second wife, John Hastings, 1st Baron Hastings and had issue. Shouldn't it say "Isabel married, as her second husband, (not wife) John Hastings......etc.

    Notes

    Jump up ^ "Despenser, Hugh le (1262-1326)". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900.
    Jump up ^ Fryde 28
    Jump up ^ "Abbey body identified as gay lover of Edward II". Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 14 December 2013.
    Jump up ^ Gwilym Dodd, Anthony Musson, The Reign of Edward II: New Perspectives, pp. 214-217.
    Jump up ^ Rev. John Milner, History of Antiquities of Winchester, p. 213.

    References

    Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis, Lines: 72-31, 74-31, 74A-31, 93A-29
    Fryde, Natalie (1979). The tyranny and fall of Edward II, 1321-1326. ISBN 0-521-54806-3.
    Karau, Bjčorn: Gčunstlinge am Hof Edwards II. von England - Aufstieg und Fall der Despensers, MA-Thesis, Kiel 1999. (Free Download: http://www.despensers.de/download.htm)
    Wikisource link to Despenser, Hugh le (1262-1326) (DNB00). Wikisource.
    Hunt, William (1888). "Hugh Despenser". Dictionary of National Biography. 14.

    end

    Died:
    ...was hanged immediately in his armour at Bristol on 27 October 1326. He was then beheaded and his body cut into pieces for the dogs. His head was sent for display to Winchester, which had supported the king.

    Hugh — Isabella Beauchamp. Isabella (daughter of William de Beauchamp, Knight, 9th Earl of Warwick and Maud FitzGeoffrey) was born ~ 1263, Warwickshire, England; died Bef 30 May 1306. [Group Sheet]


  2. 3.  Isabella Beauchamp was born ~ 1263, Warwickshire, England (daughter of William de Beauchamp, Knight, 9th Earl of Warwick and Maud FitzGeoffrey); died Bef 30 May 1306.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Isabel de Beauchamp
    • Also Known As: Lady Despencer
    • Also Known As: Lady Kidwelly

    Notes:

    Isabella de Beauchamp, Lady Kidwelly, Lady Despenser (born c. 1263 - died before 30 May 1306), was an English noblewoman and wealthy heiress.

    Family

    Isabella was born in about 1263 in Warwickshire, England. She was the only daughter of William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick and Maud FitzJohn who appears to have married; two sisters who were nuns at Shouldham are mentioned in her father's will.[1] She had a brother, Guy de Beauchamp, 10th Earl of Warwick who married Alice de Toeni, by whom he had seven children. Her paternal grandparents were William de Beauchamp of Elmley Castle and Isabel Maudit, and her maternal grandparents were Sir John FitzGeoffrey, Lord of Shere, and Isabel Bigod.

    Marriages and issue

    Sometime before 1281, she married firstly Sir Patrick de Chaworth, Lord of Kidwelly in Carmarthenshire, South Wales. The marriage produced one daughter:

    Maud Chaworth (2 February 1282- 1322), married Henry, 3rd Earl of Lancaster, by whom she had seven children.
    Following Patrick's death in 1286, Isabella had in her possession four manors in Wiltshire and two manors in Berkshire, assigned to her until her dowry should be set forth along with the livery of Chedworth in Gloucestershire and the Hampshire manor of Hartley Mauditt which had been granted to her and Sir Patrick in frankmarriage by her father.[2]

    That same year 1286, she married secondly Sir Hugh le Despenser without the King's licence for which Hugh had to pay a fine of 2000 marks.[2] He was created Lord Despenser by writ of summons to Parliament in 1295, thereby making Isabella Lady Despenser.

    Together Hugh and Isabella had four children:

    Hugh le Depenser, Lord Despenser the Younger (1286- executed 24 November 1326), married Eleanor de Clare, by whom he had issue.
    Aline le Despenser (died before 28 November 1353), married Edward Burnell, Lord Burnell
    Isabella le Despenser (died 4/5 December 1334), married firstly as his second wife, John Hastings, 1st Baron Hastings, by whom she had three children. Their descendants became the Lords Hastings; she married secondly as his second wife, Sir Ralph de Monthermer, 1st Baron Monthermer.[4]
    Phillip le Despenser (died 1313), married as his first wife Margaret de Goushill, by whom he had issue.
    Isabella died sometime before 30 May 1306. Twenty years later, her husband and eldest son, favourites of King Edward II, were both executed by the orders of Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March and Queen Isabella. The couple were by that time the de facto rulers of England, and along with most of the people in the kingdom, they had resented the power both Despensers wielded over the King.

    As her husband had been made Earl of Winchester in 1322, Isabella was never styled as the Countess of Winchester.

    References

    Jump up ^ Testamenta Vestusta by Nicholas Harris Nicolas.
    ^ Jump up to: a b http://www.powernet.co.uk/barfield/chap1.htm.[dead link]
    Jump up ^ Charles Cawley, Medieval Lands, Earls of Winchester
    Jump up ^ Richardson, D. (2011) Magna Carta Ancestry 2nd Edition, pg 325 (via Google)
    Charles Cawley, Medieval Lands, Earls of Warwick
    Charles Cawley, Medieval Lands, Earls of Winchester

    Children:
    1. 1. Hugh le Despenser, IV, Knight, Baron Despenser was born ~ 1286, England; died 24 Nov 1326, Hereford, Herefordshire, England; was buried (Hulton Abbey, Staffordshire, England).
    2. Aline le Despencer was born (England).
    3. Isabel le Despencer was born (England).
    4. Elizabeth le Despenser was born 0___ 1297, Barton, Gloucestershire, England; died 0___ 1370.
    5. Philip le Despenser, of Goxhill was born (Gloucestershire) England.


Generation: 3

  1. 6.  William de Beauchamp, Knight, 9th Earl of WarwickWilliam de Beauchamp, Knight, 9th Earl of Warwick was born 0___ 1237, Elmley Castle, Worcestershire, England (son of William de Beauchamp and Isabel Mauduit); died 0___ 1298, (Elmley Castle, Worcestershire, England).

    Notes:

    William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick (1237-1298) was an English nobleman and soldier, described as a "vigorous and innovative military commander". He was active in the field against the Welsh for many years, and at the end of his life campaigned against the Scots.

    Career

    He became hereditary High Sheriff of Worcestershire for life on the death of his father in 1268.

    He was a close friend of Edward I of England, and was an important leader in Edward's invasion of Wales in 1277.[2][3] In 1294 he raised the siege of Conwy Castle, where the King had been penned in,[4] crossing the estuary.[5] He was victorious on 5 March 1295 at the battle of Maes Moydog, against the rebel prince of Wales, Madog ap Llywelyn.[6] In a night attack on the Welsh infantry he used cavalry to drive them into compact formations which were then shot up by his archers and charged.[7]R

    Family

    His father was William de Beauchamp (d.1268) of Elmley Castle and his mother Isabel Mauduit, sister and heiress of William Mauduit, 8th Earl of Warwick, from whom he inherited his title in 1268. He had a sister, Sarah, who married Richard Talbot.

    He married Maud FitzJohn. Their children included:

    Isabella de Beauchamp,[8] married firstly, Sir Patrick de Chaworth and, secondly, Hugh le Despenser, 1st Earl of Winchester
    Guy de Beauchamp, 10th Earl of Warwick, who married Alice de Toeni, widow of Thomas de Leyburne
    .

    Ancestry

    [show]Ancestors of William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick
    References[edit]
    Jump up ^ Barfield, Sebastian. "Chapter 1 - The Beauchamp family to 1369". The Beauchamp Earls of Warwick, 1298-1369. Retrieved 5 November 2011.
    Jump up ^ F. M. Powicke, The Thirteenth Century (1962 edition), p. 409.
    Jump up ^ Osprey Publishing - The Castles of Edward I in Wales 1277–1307
    Jump up ^ Welsh Castles - Conwy Castle
    Jump up ^ T. F. Tout, The History of England From the Accession of Henry III. to the Death of Edward III (1216-1377) ,online.
    Jump up ^ R. R. Davies, The Age of Conquest: Wales 1063-1415 (1991), p. 383.
    Jump up ^ Powicke, p. 442-3.
    Jump up ^ Lundy, Darryl. "p. 10687 § 106863 - Person Page 10687". The Peerage.[unreliable source]

    External links

    Lundy, Darryl. "p. 2648 § 26478 page". The Peerage.
    http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~mysouthernfamily/myff/d0041/g0000063.html

    Birth:
    The ruins of an important Norman and medieval castle, from which the village derives its name, are located in the deer park, just over half a mile south on Bredon Hill. The castle is supposed to have been built for Robert Despenser in the years following the Norman Conquest. After his death (post 1098) it descended to his heirs, the powerful Beauchamp family. It remained their chief seat until William de Beauchamp inherited the earldom and castle of Warwick from his maternal uncle, William Maudit, 8th Earl of Warwick, in 1268. Thereafter, Elmley Castle remained a secondary property of the Earls of Warwick until it was surrendered to the Crown in 1487. In 1528 the castle seems to have been still habitable, for Walter Walshe was then appointed constable and keeper, and ten years later Urian Brereton succeeded to the office. In 1544, however, prior to the grant to Christopher Savage (d.1545), who had been an Esquire of the Body of King Henry VIII, a survey was made of the manor and castle of Elmley, and it was found that the castle, strongly situated upon a hill surrounded by a ditch and wall, was completely uncovered and in decay.

    Map & Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elmley_Castle

    William married Maud FitzGeoffrey ~ 1261. Maud (daughter of John FitzGeoffrey, Justicar of Ireland and Isabelle Bigod, Countess of Essex) was born ~ 1238, Shere, Surrey, England; died 18 Apr 1301; was buried Friars Minor, Worcester, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 7.  Maud FitzGeoffrey was born ~ 1238, Shere, Surrey, England (daughter of John FitzGeoffrey, Justicar of Ireland and Isabelle Bigod, Countess of Essex); died 18 Apr 1301; was buried Friars Minor, Worcester, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Maud FitzJohn

    Notes:

    Maud FitzJohn, Countess of Warwick (c. 1238 – 16/18 April 1301) was an English noblewoman and the eldest daughter of John FitzGeoffrey, Lord of Shere. Her second husband was William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick, a celebrated soldier. Through her daughter, Isabella, Maud was the maternal grandmother of Hugh the younger Despenser, the unpopular favourite of King Edward II of England, who was executed in 1326.

    Family

    Maud was born in Shere, Surrey, England in about 1238, the eldest daughter of John FitzGeoffrey, Lord of Shere, Justiciar of Ireland, and Isabel Bigod, a descendant of Strongbow and Aoife of Leinster. Maud had two brothers, Richard FitzJohn of Shere and John FitzJohn of Shere, and three younger sisters, Aveline FitzJohn, Joan FitzJohn, and Isabel FitzJohn. She also had a half-brother, Walter de Lacy, and two half-sisters, Margery de Lacy, and Maud de Lacy, Baroness Geneville, from her mother's first marriage to Gilbert de Lacy of Ewyas Lacy. The chronicle of Tintern Abbey in Monmouthshire names Matilda uxor Guidono comitis Warwici as the eldest daughter of Johanni Fitz-Geffrey and Isabella Bygod.[1] Her paternal grandparents were Geoffrey Fitzpeter, 1st Earl of Essex and Aveline de Clare, and her maternal grandparents were Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk and Maud Marshal.


    Guy de Beauchamp, 10th Earl of Warwick, the only son of Maud FitzJohn. Here he is shown with the decapitated body of Piers Gaveston

    Marriages and issue

    Maud married her first husband, Gerald de Furnivalle, Lord Hallamshire on an unknown date. Sometime after his death in 1261, Maud married her second husband, the celebrated soldier, William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick. Upon their marriage, Maud was styled as Countess of Warwick.

    Together William and Maud had at least two children:[2]

    Guy de Beauchamp, 10th Earl of Warwick (1270/1271- 28 July 1315), on 28 February 1310, he married as her second husband, heiress Alice de Toeni, by whom he had seven children.
    Isabella de Beauchamp (died before 30 May 1306), married firstly in 1281 Sir Patrick de Chaworth, Lord of Kidwelly, by whom she had a daughter, Maud Chaworth; she married secondly in 1286, Hugh le Despenser, Lord Despenser by whom she had four children including Hugh Despenser the younger, the unpopular favourite of King Edward II, who was executed in 1326, shortly after his father.
    Maud died between 16 and 18 April 1301. She was buried at the house of the Friars Minor in Worcester.

    end of biography

    Children of Maud FitzJohn and William de Beauchamp 9th Earl of Warwick are:

    i. Isabel Beauchamp was born ABT 1267 in Warwick Castle, Warwick, Warwickshire, England, and died BEF 30 MAY 1306 in Elmley Castle, Worcestershire, England. She married Patrick 5th Baron de Chaworth ABT 1281, son of Patrick de Chaworth of Kidwelly and Hawise de Londres. He was born ABT 1250 in Kidwelly, Carmarthenshire, Wales, and died BEF 7 JUL 1283. She married Hugh Baron le Despenser Earl of Winchester BEF 1286, son of Hugh 1st Baron le Despenser Sir and Aline Basset Countess of Norfolk. He was born 1 MAR 1260/61 in Loughborough, Leicestershire, England, and died 27 OCT 1326 in Bristol, Bristol, England.
    18. ii. Guy of Beauchamp 2nd Earl of Warwick was born 1271 in Warwick Castle, Warwick, Warwickshire, England, was christened 1257 in Elmley Castle, Worcestershire, England, and died 12 AUG 1315 in Warwick Castle, Warwick, Warwickshire, England. He married Alice de Toeni Countess of Warwick 1303 in Warwick Castle, Warwick, Warwickshire, England, daughter of Ralph VI de Toeni Lord of Flamstead and Mary Clarissa de Brus. She was born 8 JAN 1282/83 in Castle Maud, Flamstead, Hertfordshire, England, was christened 1264 in Flamstead, Hertfordshire, England, and died 1 JAN 1324/25 in Warwick Castle, Warwick, Warwickshire, England. He married Isabella de Clare Lady BEF 11 MAY 1297 in Worcester, Worcestershire, England, daughter of Gilbert de Clare 7th Earl of Hertford and Alice de Lusignan Countess of Surrey. She was born 10 MAR 1262/63 in Monmouth Castle, Monmourth, Monmouthshire, Wales, and died 1338 in Elmley Castle, Worcestershire, England.
    iii. Robert de Beauchamp was born ABT 1271 in Warwick, Warwickshire, England.
    iv. John de Beauchamp was born ABT 1273 in Warwick, Warwickshire, England.
    v. Anne Beauchamp was born ABT 1274 in Warwick, Warwickshire, England, and died AFT 1296.
    vi. Amy Beauchamp was born ABT 1276 in Warwick, Warwickshire, England, and died AFT 1296.
    vii. Margaret Beauchamp was born ABT 1278 in Warwick, Warwickshire, England. She married John Sudley.
    viii. Maud Beauchamp was born ABT 1282 in Warwick, Warwickshire, England, and died 1360. She married HusbandofMaudBeauchamp Rithco.

    Children:
    1. 3. Isabella Beauchamp was born ~ 1263, Warwickshire, England; died Bef 30 May 1306.


Generation: 4

  1. 12.  William de Beauchamp was born ~ 1215, Elmley Castle, Worcestershire, England (son of Walter de Beauchamp and Joan Mortimer); died 0___ 1268, Elmley Castle, Worcestershire, England.

    Notes:

    William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick (1237-1298) was an English nobleman and soldier, described as a “vigorous and innovative military commander."[1] He was active in the field against the Welsh for many years, and at the end of his life campaigned against the Scots.

    Career

    He became hereditary High Sheriff of Worcestershire for life on the death of his father in 1268.

    He was a close friend of Edward I of England, and was an important leader in Edward's invasion of Wales in 1277.[2][3] In 1294 he raised the siege of Conwy Castle, where the King had been penned in,[4] crossing the estuary.[5] He was victorious on 5 March 1295 at the battle of Maes Moydog, against the rebel prince of Wales, Madog ap Llywelyn.[6] In a night attack on the Welsh infantry he used cavalry to drive them into compact formations which were then shot up by his archers and charged.[7]R

    Family

    His father was William de Beauchamp (d.1268) of Elmley Castle and his mother Isabel Mauduit, sister and heiress of William Mauduit, 8th Earl of Warwick, from whom he inherited his title in 1268. He had a sister, Sarah, who married Richard Talbot.

    He married Maud FitzJohn. Their children included:

    Isabella de Beauchamp,[8] married firstly, Sir Patrick de Chaworth and, secondly, Hugh le Despenser, 1st Earl of Winchester
    Guy de Beauchamp, 10th Earl of Warwick, who married Alice de Toeni, widow of Thomas de Leyburne

    *

    Birth:
    The ruins of an important Norman and medieval castle, from which the village derives its name, are located in the deer park, just over half a mile south on Bredon Hill. The castle is supposed to have been built for Robert Despenser in the years following the Norman Conquest. After his death (post 1098) it descended to his heirs, the powerful Beauchamp family. It remained their chief seat until William de Beauchamp inherited the earldom and castle of Warwick from his maternal uncle, William Maudit, 8th Earl of Warwick, in 1268. Thereafter, Elmley Castle remained a secondary property of the Earls of Warwick until it was surrendered to the Crown in 1487. In 1528 the castle seems to have been still habitable, for Walter Walshe was then appointed constable and keeper, and ten years later Urian Brereton succeeded to the office. In 1544, however, prior to the grant to Christopher Savage (d.1545), who had been an Esquire of the Body of King Henry VIII, a survey was made of the manor and castle of Elmley, and it was found that the castle, strongly situated upon a hill surrounded by a ditch and wall, was completely uncovered and in decay.

    Map & Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elmley_Castle

    William — Isabel Mauduit. Isabel (daughter of William de Maudit, IV, Knight, Baron of Hanslape & Hartley and Alice de Newburgh) was born ~ 1214, Hanslope, Buckinghamshire, England; died 7 Jan 1268, Elmley Castle, Worcestershire, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 13.  Isabel Mauduit was born ~ 1214, Hanslope, Buckinghamshire, England (daughter of William de Maudit, IV, Knight, Baron of Hanslape & Hartley and Alice de Newburgh); died 7 Jan 1268, Elmley Castle, Worcestershire, England.
    Children:
    1. 6. William de Beauchamp, Knight, 9th Earl of Warwick was born 0___ 1237, Elmley Castle, Worcestershire, England; died 0___ 1298, (Elmley Castle, Worcestershire, England).
    2. Guy de Beauchamp, Knight, 10th Earl of Warwick was born 0___ 1262, Elmley Castle, Worcester, England; died 12 Aug 1315, Warwick Castle, Warwickshire, England; was buried Bordesley Abbey, Worcester, England.

  3. 14.  John FitzGeoffrey, Justicar of Ireland was born ~ 1213, Shere, Surrey, England (son of Geoffrey FitzPiers, Knight, Earl of Essex and Aveline de Clare); died 23 Nov 1253, (Surrey) England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Lord of Kirtling
    • Also Known As: Sheriff of Yorkshire
    • Alt Birth: ~ 1205, Shere, Surrey, England

    Notes:

    John FitzGeoffrey, Lord of Shere and Justiciar of Ireland (1205? in Shere, Surrey, England – 23 November 1258) was an English nobleman.

    John Fitz Geoffrey was the son of Geoffrey Fitz Peter, 1st Earl of Essex and Aveline de Clare, daughter of Roger de Clare, 2nd Earl of Hertford and his wife Maud de Saint-Hilaire.

    He was appointed Justiciar of Ireland, serving from 1245 to 1255.[1]

    He was not entitled to succeed his half-brother as Earl of Essex in 1227, the Earldom having devolved from his father's first wife. He was the second husband of Isabel Bigod, daughter of Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk and his wife Maud Marshal of Pembroke. They had six children, one being Maud who married William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick.

    Children

    Note: The males took the FitzJohn surname ("fitz" mean "son of").

    John FitzJohn of Shere (?–1275). Married Margary, daughter of Philip Basset of Wycombe (?–1271).
    Richard FitzJohn of Shere (?–1297). Lord FitzJohn 1290. Married as her first husband, Emma (?-1332).
    Maud FitzJohn (? – 16/18 April 1301). Married firstly to Gerard de Furnivalle, Lord of Hallamshire (?–1261). Married secondly to William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick, son of William de Beauchamp of Elmley, Worcestershire and his wife Isabel Mauduit. Had issue.
    Isabel. Married Robert de Vespont, Lord of Westmoreland (?–1264). Had issue.
    Aveline (1229–1274). Married Walter de Burgh, Earl of Ulster (1230–1271). Had issue, including Richard Óg de Burgh, 2nd Earl of Ulster who in turn married Margaret de Burgh, by whom he had ten children.
    Joan (? – 4 April 1303). Married Theobald le Botiller. Had issue, from whom descend the Butler Earls of Ormond.

    John FitzGeoffrey
    Spouse(s) Isabel Bigod
    Father Geoffrey Fitz Peter, 1st Earl of Essex
    Mother Aveline de Clare
    Born 1205?
    Shere, Surrey,
    Kingdom of England
    Died 23 November 1258

    *

    John married Isabelle Bigod, Countess of Essex ~1228. Isabelle (daughter of Hugh Bigod, Knight, 3rd Earl of Norfolk and Maud Marshal, Countess of Norfolk) was born ~ 1211, Thetford, Norfolk, England; died 0___ 1239. [Group Sheet]


  4. 15.  Isabelle Bigod, Countess of Essex was born ~ 1211, Thetford, Norfolk, England (daughter of Hugh Bigod, Knight, 3rd Earl of Norfolk and Maud Marshal, Countess of Norfolk); died 0___ 1239.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Isabel Bigod
    • Alt Birth: ~ 1212
    • Alt Death: 0___ 1250

    Children:
    1. Aveline FitzJohn was born 0___ 1236, Shere, Surrey, England; died 20 May 1274.
    2. 7. Maud FitzGeoffrey was born ~ 1238, Shere, Surrey, England; died 18 Apr 1301; was buried Friars Minor, Worcester, England.
    3. Joan FitzJohn was born ~1250; died 4 Apr 1303.


Generation: 5

  1. 24.  Walter de Beauchamp was born 1195-1197, Worcestershire, England; died 0___ 1236.

    Notes:

    Walter de Beauchamp (1195/97–1236) was an English judge, son and heir of William de Beauchamp and Amice de Beauchamp, lord of Elmley, Worcester, and hereditary castellan of Worcester and sheriff of the county.

    A minor at his father's death, he did not obtain his shrievalty till February 1216. Declaring for Louis of France on his arrival (May 1216), he was excommunicated by the legate at Whitsuntide, and his lands seized by the Marchers. But hastening to make his peace, on the accession of Henry, he was one of the witnesses to his reissue of the charter, and was restored to his shrievalty and castellanship.

    He also Attested Henry's 'Third Charter,' on 11 February 1225. In May 1226 and in January 1227 he was appointed an itinerant justice, and 14 April 1236 he died, leaving by his wife Joane Mortimer, daughter of his guardian, Roger de Mortimer, whom he had married in 1212, and who died in 1225, a son and heir, William, who married the eventual heiress of the earls of Warwick, and was grandfather of Guy de Beauchamp, 10th Earl of Warwick.

    *

    Walter married Joan Mortimer 0May 1212. Joan (daughter of Roger de Mortimer and Isabel de Ferrers) was born (Wigmore Castle, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England); died 0___ 1225. [Group Sheet]


  2. 25.  Joan Mortimer was born (Wigmore Castle, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England) (daughter of Roger de Mortimer and Isabel de Ferrers); died 0___ 1225.
    Children:
    1. 12. William de Beauchamp was born ~ 1215, Elmley Castle, Worcestershire, England; died 0___ 1268, Elmley Castle, Worcestershire, England.
    2. Sarah de Beauchamp was born 0___ 1255, Elmley Castle, Worcester, England; died Aft 1316.

  3. 26.  William de Maudit, IV, Knight, Baron of Hanslape & Hartley was born ~ 1196, Hanslape, Borough of Milton Keynes, Buckinghamshire, England; died 15 Apr 1257, Hertley Mauduit, Hampshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Chamberlain of the Exchequer
    • Also Known As: 8th Earl of Warwick

    Notes:

    About William Mauduit, IV, Baron of Hanslape and Hartley, Chamberlain of the Exchequer
    William de Maudit, Baron of Hanslape, Chamberlain to the King. They children were:

    1. William Maudit, 8th Earl of Warwick; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Maudit,_8th_Earl_of_Warwick 2. Isabel de Maudit, married William de Beauchamp, Baron Emley. Their son was William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick.
    http://www.thepeerage.com/p25498.htm#i254979 William Mauduit1 M, #254979

    Last Edited=15 Jun 2009

    William Mauduit married Alice de Newburgh, daughter of Waleran de Newburgh, 4th Earl of Warwick and Alice de Harcourt.2 William Mauduit gained the title of Baron of Hanslape [feudal barony].2
    Child of William Mauduit William Mauduit, 8th Earl of Warwick3 Child of William Mauduit and Alice de Newburgh Isabel Mauduit+1

    Citations [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume XII/1, page 610. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage. [S22] Sir Bernard Burke, C.B. LL.D., A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire, new edition (1883; reprint, Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1978), page 399. Hereinafter cited as Burkes Extinct Peerage. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume XII/2, page 367.

    http://thepeerage.com/p25498.htm#i254979 William Mauduit1 M, #254979
    Last Edited=15 Jun 2009

    William Mauduit married Alice de Newburgh, daughter of Waleran de Newburgh, 4th Earl of Warwick and Alice de Harcourt.2 William Mauduit gained the title of Baron of Hanslape [feudal barony].2
    Child of William Mauduit William Mauduit, 8th Earl of Warwick3 Child of William Mauduit and Alice de Newburgh Isabel Mauduit+1

    Citations [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume XII/1, page 610. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage. [S22] Sir Bernard Burke, C.B. LL.D., A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire, new edition (1883; reprint, Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1978), page 399. Hereinafter cited as Burkes Extinct Peerage. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume XII/2, page 367.

    Waleran de Beaumont, 4th Earl of Warwick From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    His second wife was Alice de Harcourt, widow of John de Limesy, Lord of Cavendish, daughter of Robert de Harcourt and had one child: Alice de Beaumont (died before 1263), married William de Maudit, Baron of Hanslape, Chamberlain to the King. They children were: William Maudit, 8th Earl of Warwick; Isabel de Maudit, married William de Beauchamp, Baron Emley. Their son was William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick.

    William — Alice de Newburgh. Alice (daughter of Waleran de Newburgh, Knight, 4th Earl of Warwick and Alice de Harcourt) died Bef 1263. [Group Sheet]


  4. 27.  Alice de Newburgh (daughter of Waleran de Newburgh, Knight, 4th Earl of Warwick and Alice de Harcourt); died Bef 1263.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Alice de Beaumont

    Children:
    1. 13. Isabel Mauduit was born ~ 1214, Hanslope, Buckinghamshire, England; died 7 Jan 1268, Elmley Castle, Worcestershire, England.
    2. William Mauduit, Knight, 8th Earl of Warwick was born ~ 1220; died 8 Jan 1267.

  5. 28.  Geoffrey FitzPiers, Knight, Earl of Essex was born 0___ 1162, Walden, Essex, England; died 14 Oct 1213.

    Other Events:

    • Baptism: Cherhill, Wiltshire, England
    • Occupation: Chief Justiciar
    • Occupation: High Sheriff of Bedfordshire and Buckinghamshire
    • Occupation: High Sheriff of Northamptonshire
    • Occupation: High Sheriff of Yorkshire
    • Also Known As: Geoffrey Fitz Peter
    • Also Known As: Geoffrey Fitzpiers de Mandeville Earl of Essex

    Notes:

    Geoffrey Fitz Peter, Earl of Essex (c. 1162–1213) was a prominent member of the government of England during the reigns of Richard I and John. The patronymic is sometimes rendered Fitz Piers, for he was the son of Piers de Lutegareshale, forester of Ludgershall.

    Life

    He was from a modest landowning family that had a tradition of service in mid-ranking posts under Henry II. Geoffrey's elder brother Simon Fitz Peter was at various times High Sheriff of Northamptonshire, Buckinghamshire, and Bedfordshire. Geoffrey, too, got his start in this way, as High Sheriff of Northamptonshire for the last five years of Henry II's reign.

    Around this time Geoffrey married Beatrice de Say, daughter and eventual co-heiress of William de Say II. This William was the elder son of William de Say I and Beatrice, sister of Geoffrey de Mandeville, 1st Earl of Essex. This connection with the Mandeville family was later to prove unexpectedly important. In 1184 Geoffrey's father-in-law died, and he received a share of the de Say inheritance by right of his wife, co-heiress to her father. He also eventually gained the title of earl of Essex by right of his wife, becoming the 4th earl.

    When Richard I left on crusade, he appointed Geoffrey one of the five judges of the king's court, and thus a principal advisor to Hugh de Puiset, Bishop of Durham, who, as Chief Justiciar, was one of the regents during the king's absence. Late in 1189, Geoffrey's wife's cousin William de Mandeville, 3rd Earl of Essex died, leaving no direct heirs. His wife's inheritance was disputed between Geoffrey and Beatrice's uncle, Geoffrey de Say, but Geoffrey Fitz Peter used his political influence to eventually obtain the Mandeville lands (although not the earldom, which was left open) for himself.

    He served as Constable of the Tower of London from 1198 to 1205.

    He served as High Sheriff of Yorkshire from 1198 to 1201 and again in 1203 and as High Sheriff of Bedfordshire and Buckinghamshire from 1200 to 1205.[1] On 11 July 1198, King Richard appointed Geoffrey Chief Justiciar, which at that time effectively made him the king's principal minister. On his coronation day the new king ennobled Geoffrey as Earl of Essex.

    King John granted Berkhamsted Castle to Geoffrey; the castle had previously been granted as a jointure palace to Queen Isabel prior to the annulment of the royal marriage. Geoffrey founded two hospitals in Berkhamsted, one dedicated to St John the Baptist and one to St John the Evangelist; the latter is still commemorated in the town with the name St John's Well Lane.[2]

    After the accession of King John, Geoffrey continued in his capacity as the king's principal minister until his death on 14 October 1213.[3]

    Marriage and issue

    Spouses

    m1. Beatrice de Say, daughter of William de Say and heiress of the Mandeville Earls of Essex.
    m2. Aveline, daughter of Roger de Clare, 2nd Earl of Hertford.

    Children of Beatrice

    Note that his sons by this marriage took the de Mandeville surname.

    Geoffrey FitzGeoffrey de Mandeville, 2nd Earl of Essex.
    William FitzGeoffrey de Mandeville, 3rd Earl of Essex.
    Henry, Dean of Wolverhampton.
    Maud Fitzgeoffrey, who married Henry de Bohun, 1st Earl of Hereford.

    Children of Aveline

    John Fitzgeoffrey, Lord of Shere and Justiciar of Ireland.
    Cecily Fitzgeoffrey.
    Hawise Fitzgeoffrey.
    Geoffrey's first two sons died without issue. The earldom had been associated with their mother's Mandeville heritage, and the earldom was next granted to the son of their sister Maud and her husband Henry De Bohun instead of their half-brother John.

    Notes

    Jump up ^ "Sheriffs of Buckinghamshire". Retrieved 2011-05-20.
    Jump up ^ Cobb, John Wolstenholme (1988) [originally published by Nichols & Sons, 1855 & 1883]. Two Lectures on the History and Antiquities of Berkhamsted. Biling & Sons. pp. 14, 72. ISBN 1-871372-03-8.
    Jump up ^ Powicke Handbook of British Chronology p. 70

    References

    Powicke, F. Maurice and E. B. Fryde Handbook of British Chronology 2nd. ed. London:Royal Historical Society 1961

    Geoffrey — Aveline de Clare. Aveline (daughter of Roger de Clare, Knight, 3rd Earl of Hertford and Maud de St. Hilary) was born ~1166, (Tonbridge Castle, Kent, England); died 4 Jun 1225. [Group Sheet]


  6. 29.  Aveline de Clare was born ~1166, (Tonbridge Castle, Kent, England) (daughter of Roger de Clare, Knight, 3rd Earl of Hertford and Maud de St. Hilary); died 4 Jun 1225.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Eveline de Clare

    Children:
    1. 14. John FitzGeoffrey, Justicar of Ireland was born ~ 1213, Shere, Surrey, England; died 23 Nov 1253, (Surrey) England.

  7. 30.  Hugh Bigod, Knight, 3rd Earl of NorfolkHugh Bigod, Knight, 3rd Earl of Norfolk was born ~ 1182, Thetford, Norfolk, England (son of Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk and Ida de Tosny, Countess of Norfolk); died 18 Feb 1225, (Norfolk, England); was buried Thetford Priory, Thetford, Norfolk, England.

    Notes:

    Hugh Bigod (c.?1182 - 1225) was a member of the powerful early Norman Bigod family and was for a short time the 3rd Earl of Norfolk.

    He was born c. 1182, the eldest son of Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk by his wife Ida de Tosny.

    Born c.?1182
    Died 18 February 1225
    Title 3rd Earl of Norfolk
    Tenure 1221-1225
    Nationality English
    Predecessor Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk
    Successor Roger Bigod, 4th Earl of Norfolk
    Spouse(s) Maud Marshal
    Parents Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk
    Ida de Tosny

    Career

    In 1215 he was one of the twenty-five sureties of Magna Carta of King John. He succeeded to his father’s estates (including Framlingham Castle) in 1221.

    Marriage & progeny

    In late 1206 or early 1207, Hugh married Maud Marshal (1192 - 27 March 1248), daughter of William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke (1147–1219), Marshal of England, by his wife Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke. They had four, or possibly five, children:

    Roger Bigod, 4th Earl of Norfolk (c.?1209-1270), died without progeny.
    Hugh Bigod (1211–1266), Justiciar of England. Married Joan de Stuteville, by whom he had issue.
    Isabel Bigod (c. 1212- 1250), married twice: Firstly to Gilbert de Lacy, by whom she had issue; Secondly to John FitzGeoffrey, Lord of Shere, by whom she had issue, including Maud FitzJohn, and Joan FitzJohn who married Theobald le Botiller, and from whom descended the Irish Earls of Ormond.
    Ralph Bigod (born c. 1215)
    Contrary to the assertion of Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots, there is no evidence for a fourth son called Simon Bigod. A man of that name appears as a witness to one of Earl Hugh's charters (Morris, HBII 2), but as the eighteenth name in a list of twenty, suggesting no close connection to the main branch of the family. He is also named among the knights who surrendered to King John at Framlingham Castle in 1216. He was a probably a descendant of Hugh or William Bigod, half-brothers to Earl Roger II Bigod.

    Death

    Hugh died on 18 Feb 1225. Very soon after Hugh's death, his widow Maud remarried William de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey.

    Hugh Bigod in fiction[edit]
    Hugh Bigod and his wife [Mahelt] are the main characters in Elizabeth Chadwick's To Defy a King. They also appear as secondary characters in novels chronicling their parents such as The Time of Singing (UK: Sphere, 2008) published in the USA as For the King's Favor; The Greatest Knight; and The Scarlet Lion.

    Ancestry

    [show]Ancestors of Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk

    References

    M. Morris, The Bigod Earls of Norfolk in the Thirteenth Century (Woodbridge, 2005)

    External links

    Cawley, Charles, Medieval Lands on Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk, Medieval Lands database, Foundation for Medieval Genealogy
    Cawley, Charles, Medieval Lands on Isabel Bigod, Medieval Lands database, Foundation for Medieval Genealogy

    Hugh married Maud Marshal, Countess of Norfolk 1206-1207, (Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales). Maud (daughter of William Marshal, Templar Knight, 1st Earl Pembroke and Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke) was born ~ 1193, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales; died 27 Mar 1248, Tintern Abbey, Chapel Hill, Monmouthshire, Wales. [Group Sheet]


  8. 31.  Maud Marshal, Countess of Norfolk was born ~ 1193, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales (daughter of William Marshal, Templar Knight, 1st Earl Pembroke and Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke); died 27 Mar 1248, Tintern Abbey, Chapel Hill, Monmouthshire, Wales.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Countess of Surrey

    Notes:

    Maud Marshal, Countess of Norfolk, Countess of Surrey (1192 – 27 March 1248) was an Anglo-Norman noblewoman and a wealthy co-heiress of her father William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke, and her mother Isabel de Clare suo jure 4th Countess of Pembroke. Maud was their eldest daughter.[1] She had two husbands: Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk, and William de Warenne, 5th Earl of Surrey.

    Maud was also known as Matilda Marshal.

    Family

    Maud's birthdate is unknown other than being post 1191. She was the eldest daughter of William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke and Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke, herself one of the greatest heiresses in Wales and Ireland. Maud had five brothers and four younger sisters. She was a co-heiress to her parents' extensive rich estates.

    Her paternal grandparents were John FitzGilbert Marshal and Sybilla of Salisbury, and her maternal grandparents were Richard de Clare, 2nd Earl of Pembroke, known as "Strongbow", and Aoife of Leinster.

    Marriages and issue

    Sometime before Lent in 1207, Maud married her first husband, Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk. It was through this marriage between Maud and Hugh that the post of Earl Marshal of England came finally to the Howard (Dukes of Norfolk).[2] In 1215, Hugh was one of the twenty-five sureties of the Magna Carta. He came into his inheritance in 1221, thus Maud became the Countess of Norfolk at that time. Together they had five children:[3]

    Roger Bigod, 4th Earl of Norfolk (1209–1270) He died childless.
    Hugh Bigod (1212–1266), Justiciar of England. Married Joan de Stuteville, by whom he had issue.
    Isabel Bigod (c. 1215–1250), married firstly Gilbert de Lacy of Ewyas Lacy, by whom she had issue; she married secondly John Fitzgeoffrey, Lord of Shere, by whom she had issue.
    Ralph Bigod (born c. 1218, date of death unknown), married Bertha de Furnival, by whom he had one child.
    William Bigod
    Hugh Bigod died in 1225. Maud married her second husband, William de Warenne, 5th Earl of Surrey before 13 October that same year. Together they had two children:

    Isabella de Warenne (c. 1228 – before 20 September 1282), married Hugh d'Aubigny, 5th Earl of Arundel. She died childless.
    John de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey (August 1231 – c. 29 September 1304), in 1247 married Alice de Lusignan, a half-sister of King Henry III of England, by whom he had three children.
    Maud's second husband died in 1240. Her youngest son John succeeded his father as the 6th Earl of Surrey, but as he was a minor, Peter of Savoy, uncle of Queen consort Eleanor of Provence, was guardian of his estates.

    Death

    Maud died on 27 March 1248 at the age of about fifty-six years and was buried at Tintern Abbey with her mother, possibly her maternal grandmother, and two of her brothers.

    Maud Marshal in literature

    Maud Marshal is the subject of a novel by Elizabeth Chadwick, titled To Defy a King. In the book she is called Mahelt rather than Maud. She and her first husband Hugh Bigod appear as secondary characters in books chronicling their parents's lives: The Time of Singing (UK: Sphere, 2008) published in the USA as For the King's Favor; The Greatest Knight; and The Scarlet Lion.

    Ancestors[edit]
    [show]Ancestors of Maud Marshal

    References

    Jump up ^ Thomas B. Costain, The Magnificent Century, pp. 103-104
    Jump up ^ Costain, The Magnificent Century, pp. 103-104
    Jump up ^ Charles Cawley, Medieval Lands, Earls of Norfolk, Bigod
    Thomas B. Costain, The Magnificent Century, published by Doubleday and Company, Garden City, New York, 1959
    Charles Cawley, Medieval Lands, Earls of Pembroke
    thePeerage.com/p 10677.htm#106761

    Children:
    1. Ralph Bigod, Knight was born 1208, Thetford, Norfolk, England; died Bef 28 Jul 1260, Thetford, Norfolk, England.
    2. 15. Isabelle Bigod, Countess of Essex was born ~ 1211, Thetford, Norfolk, England; died 0___ 1239.
    3. Hugh Bigod, Knight was born ~ 1215, Thetford, Norfolk, England; died Bef 7 May 1266.


Generation: 6

  1. 50.  Roger de Mortimer was born Bef 1153 (son of Hugh de Mortimer and Matilda Le Meschin); died Bef 1215.

    Other Events:

    • Residence: Wales
    • Also Known As: Roger Mortimer of Wigmore

    Notes:

    Roger de Mortimer (before 1153-before 8 July 1214) was a medieval marcher lord, residing at Wigmore Castle in the English county of Herefordshire. He was the son of Hugh de Mortimer (d. 26 February 1181) and Matilda Le Meschin.

    Early life

    Roger would appear to have been of age in 1174 when he fought for King Henry II against the rebellion of his son, Henry. In 1179 Roger was instrumental in the killing of Cadwallon ap Madog, the prince of Maelienydd and Elfael, both of which Mortimer coveted. He was imprisoned until June 1182 at Winchester for this killing.

    Children

    He had married Isabel (d. before 29 April 1252), the daughter of Walchelin de Ferriers of Oakham Castle in Rutland before 1196. With Isabel, Roger had three sons and a daughter:

    Hugh de Mortimer (d.1227) - married Annora (Eleanor) de Braose, daughter of William de Braose and his wife Maud.[1]
    Ralph de Mortimer (d.1246).
    Philip Mortimer
    Joan Mortimer (d.1225) - married May 1212 to Walter de Beauchamp[2]
    He is often wrongly stated to have been the father of Robert Mortimer of Richards Castle (died 1219) - married Margary de Say,[3] daughter of Hugh de Say. But this Robert was born before 1155 and therefore could not have been a son of Roger.

    Lord of Maelienydd

    In 1195 Roger, with the backing of troops sent by King Richard I invaded Maelienydd and rebuilt Cymaron Castle. In 1196 he joined forces with Hugh de Say of Richards Castle and fought and lost the battle of New Radnor against Rhys ap Gruffydd, allegedly losing some forty knights and an innumerable number of foot in the fight. By 1200 he had conquered Maelienydd and issued a new charter of rights to Cwmhir Abbey. In the summer of 1214 he became gravely ill and bought the right for his son to inherit his lands while he still lived from King John. He died before 8 July 1214.

    *

    Roger — Isabel de Ferrers. Isabel (daughter of Walchelin de Ferriers and unnamed spouse) was born Oakham Castle, Rutland, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 51.  Isabel de Ferrers was born Oakham Castle, Rutland, England (daughter of Walchelin de Ferriers and unnamed spouse).

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Isabel de Ferriers

    Children:
    1. Ralph de Mortimer, Knight was born Bef 1198, Wigmore Castle, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England; died Bef 6 Aug 1246.
    2. Hugh de Mortimer was born (Wigmore Castle, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England); died 0___ 1227.
    3. Philip Mortimer was born (Wigmore Castle, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England).
    4. 25. Joan Mortimer was born (Wigmore Castle, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England); died 0___ 1225.

  3. 54.  Waleran de Newburgh, Knight, 4th Earl of Warwick was born 0___ 1153 (son of Roger de Beaumont and Gundred de Warenne); died 12 Dec 1204.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Waleran de Beaumont
    • Also Known As: Walerian de Newburg

    Notes:

    Waleran de Beaumont, 4th Earl of Warwick (1153 – 12 December 1204) was the younger son of Roger de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Warwick and Gundred de Warenne, daughter of William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey and Elizabeth de Vermandois. He was also known as Walerian de Newburg.

    After his brother's death an impostor arose, claiming to be the deceased Earl; he gave Waleran a great deal of trouble in maintaining his claim. He does not appear to have been a great soldier, for he paid scutage money to escape military service in Wales. His position in the Court is attested by his bearing the right hand Sword of State at the Coronation of King John, 27 May 1199.

    He liberally supported the hospital of St. Michael's Hospital, Warwick and gave to the nuns of Pinley land at Claverdon, and land at Brailes to the nuns at Wroxall, Warwickshire.

    Family and children[edit]
    He married first to Margery, daughter of Henry d'Oily and Maud de Bohun and had children:

    Henry de Beaumont, 5th Earl of Warwick, his heir.
    Waleran de Beaumont of Gretham and Cotismore.
    Gundred de Beaumont. She and her cousin Mabel became nuns at the Abbey of Pinley.
    His second wife was Alice de Harcourt, widow of John de Limesy, Lord of Cavendish, daughter of Robert de Harcourt and she had one child:

    Alice de Beaumont (died before 1263), married William de Maudit, Baron of Hanslape, Chamberlain to the King. Their children were:
    William Maudit, 8th Earl of Warwick;
    Isabel de Maudit, married William de Beauchamp, Baron Elmley. Their son was William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick.
    References[edit]

    This article includes a list of references, related reading or external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks inline citations. Please help to improve this article by introducing more precise citations. (July 2008) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)
    A Realignment of the 12th and 13th Century Pedigree of the Earls of Warwick by Rosie Bevan
    A Complete Peerge Correction in Foundations, Waleran v. 1 #3, Jan. 2440, pp. 194–197 (see Cawley, Charles, ENGLISH NOBILITY MEDIEVAL: Waleran Warwick died 1203, Medieval Lands database, Foundation for Medieval Genealogy,[better source needed])
    Edward T. Beaumont, J.P. The Beaumonts in History. A.D. 850-1850. Oxford.

    Waleran — Alice de Harcourt. [Group Sheet]


  4. 55.  Alice de Harcourt
    Children:
    1. 27. Alice de Newburgh died Bef 1263.

  5. 58.  Roger de Clare, Knight, 3rd Earl of Hertford was born 0___ 1116, Tonbridge Castle, Kent, England (son of Richard Fitz Gilbert de Clare and Alice de Gernon); died 0___ 1173, Oxfordshire, England.

    Notes:

    Roger de Clare, 2nd Earl of Hertford, 5th Lord of Clare, 5th lord of Tonbridge, 5th Lord of Cardigan (1116–1173) was a powerful Norman noble during the 12th century England. He succeeded to the Earldom of Hertford and Honor of Clare, Tonbridge and Cardigan when his brother Gilbert died without issue.[1]

    Life

    Roger was a son of Richard Fitz Gilbert de Clare and Alice de Gernon.[2] In 1153, he appears with his cousin, Richard Strongbow, Earl of Pembroke, as one of the signatories to the Treaty of Wallingford, in which Stephen recognises Prince Henry as his successor. He is found signing charters at Canterbury and Dover in 1156. Next year, according to Powell, he received from Henry II a grant of whatever lands he could conquer in South Wales. This is probably only an expansion of the statement of the Welsh chronicles that in this year (about 1 June) he entered Cardigan and 'stored' the castles of Humfrey, Aberdovey, Dineir, and Rhystud. Rhys ap Gruffydd, the prince of South Wales, appears to have complained to Henry II of these encroachments ; but being unable to obtain redress from the king of England sent his nephew Einion ab Anarawd to attack Humfirey and the other Norman fortresses. The 'Annales Cambriµ seem to assign these events to the year 1159 ; and the 'Brut' adds that Prince Rhys burnt all the French castles in Cardigan.[1]

    In 1158 or 1160, Clare advanced with an army to the relief of Carmarthen Castle, then besieged by Rhys, and pitched his camp at Dinweilir. Not daring to attack the Welsh prince, the English army offered peace and retired home. In 1163, Rhys again invaded the conquests of Clare, who, we learn incidentally, has at some earlier period caused Einion, the capturer of Humfrey Castle, to be murdered by domestic treachery.[1]In 1164 he assisted with the Constitutions of Clarendon. From his munificence to the Church and his numerous acts of piety, Roger was called the "Good Earl of Hertford".[a] He was the founder of Little Marcis Nunnery prior to 1163.[3]

    A second time all Cardigan was wrested from the Norman hands ; and things now wore so threatening an aspect that Henry II led an army into Wales in 1165, although, according to one Welsh account, Rhys had made his peace with the king in 1164, and had even visited him in England. The causes assigned by the Welsh chronicle for this fresh outbreak of hostility are that Henry failed to keep his promises — presumably of restitution — and secondly that Roger, earl of Clare, was honourably receiving Walter, the murderer of Rhys's nephew Einion. For the third time we now read that Cardigan was overrun and the Norman castles burnt; but it is possible that the events assigned by the 'Annales Cambrµ' to the year 1165 are the same as those assigned by the 'Brut y Tywysogion' to 1163.[1]

    In the intervening years, Clare had been abroad, and is found signing charters at Le Mans, probably about Christmas 1160, and again at Rouen in 1161 (Eyton, pp. 52, 53). In July 1163 he was summoned by Becket to do homage in his capacity of steward to the archbishops of Canterbury for the castle of Tunbridge. In his refusal, which he based on the grounds that he held the castle of the king and not of the archbishop, he was supported by Henry II (Ralph de Diceto, i. 311; Gervase of Canterbury, i. 174, ii. 391). Next year he was one of the ‘recognisers’ of the constitutions of Clarendon (Select Charters, p. 138). Early in 1170 he was appointed one of a band of commissioners for Kent, Surrey, and other arts of southern England (Gerv. Cant. i. 216). His last known signature seems to belong to June or July 1171, and is dated abroad from Chevaillâee.[1]He appears to have died in 1173, and certainly before July or August 1174, when we find Richard, earl of Clare, his son, coming to the king at Northampton.[1]

    Family

    Roger married Maud de St. Hilary, daughter of James de St. Hilary and Aveline.[4] Together they had seven children:

    Mabel de Clare, d. 1204, m. (c. 1175), Nigel de Mowbray.
    Richard de Clare, b. c. 1153, Tonbridge Castle, Kent, England, d. 28 November 1217, 3rd Earl of Hertford
    James de Clare
    Eveline (Aveline) de Clare, d. 4 June 1225, m. [1] (c. 1204), Geoffrey IV Fitz Piers (Fitz Peter), 1st Earl of Essex.[5] m. [2] Sir William Munchensy, (b. c. 1184), son of Warin de Munchensy and Agnes Fitz John.
    Roger de Clare, d. 1241, Middleton, Norfolk, England.
    John de Clare
    Henry de Clare

    Birth:
    Photos, map & history for Tonbridge Castle ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tonbridge_Castle

    Roger — Maud de St. Hilary. [Group Sheet]


  6. 59.  Maud de St. Hilary
    Children:
    1. 29. Aveline de Clare was born ~1166, (Tonbridge Castle, Kent, England); died 4 Jun 1225.

  7. 60.  Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of NorfolkRoger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk was born 1144-1150, Norfolk, England (son of Hugh Bigod, Knight, 1st Earl of Norfolk and Juliane de Vere, Countess of Norfolk); died 0___ 1221, (Norfolk, England); was buried Thetford, Norfolk, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Ambassador to France
    • Military: 17 Oct 1173; Battle of Fornham

    Notes:

    Roger Bigod (c.?1144/1150 - 1221) was the son of Hugh Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk and his first wife, Juliana de Vere. Although his father died 1176 or 1177, Roger did not succeed to the earldom of Norfolk until 1189 for his claim had been disputed by his stepmother for her sons by Earl Hugh in the reign of Henry II. Richard I confirmed him in his earldom and other honours, and also sent him as an ambassador to France in the same year. Roger inherited his father's office as royal steward. He took part in the negotiations for the release of Richard from prison, and after the king's return to England became a justiciar.

    During the Revolt of 1173-74, Roger remained loyal to the king while his father sided with the king's rebellious sons. Roger fought at the Battle of Fornham on 17 October 1173, where the royalist force defeated a rebel force led by Robert de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester.[1]

    In most of the years of the reign of King John, the earl was frequently with the king or on royal business. Yet Roger was to be one of the leaders of the baronial party which obtained John's assent to Magna Carta, and his name and that of his son and heir Hugh II appear among the twenty-five barons who were to ensure the king's adherence to the terms of that document. The pair were excommunicated by the pope in December 1215, and did not make peace with the regents of John's son Henry III until 1217.

    Around Christmas 1181, Roger married Ida, apparently Ida de Tosny (or Ida de Toesny),[2] and by her had a number of children including:

    Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk who married in 1206/ 1207, Maud, a daughter of William Marshal
    William Bigod
    Ralph Bigod
    Roger Bigod
    Margery, married William de Hastings
    Mary Bigod, married Ralph fitz Robert[3]

    Many historians, including Marc Morris have speculated that the couple had a third daughter, Alice, who married Aubrey de Vere IV, Earl of Oxford as his second wife. If so, the marriage would have been well within the bounds of consanguinity, for the couple would have been quite closely related, a daughter of the second earl of Norfolk being first cousin once removed to the second earl of Oxford.

    Roger Bigod in fiction

    Roger Bigod and his wife Ida de Tosny are the main characters in Elizabeth Chadwick's The Time of Singing (Sphere, 2008), published in the USA as For the King's Favor. They appear as minor characters in other of her books set at the same time, notably To Defy a King, which concerns the marriage of their son Hugh to Maud, a daughter of William Marshal

    References

    Jump up ^ Bartlett, Robert C. (2000). England Under the Norman and Angevin Kings: 1075–1225. Oxford: Clarendon Press. pp. 257–258. ISBN 0-19-822741-8.
    Jump up ^ For Ida's ancestry, see "Some corrections and additions to the Complete Peerage: Volume 9: Summary" and Marc Morris's The Bigod Earls of Norfolk in the Thirteenth Century
    Jump up ^ S. D. Church, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography
    Liber Vitae Ecclesiae Dunelmensis, Vol. 13
    Morris, Marc. The Bigod Earls of Norfolk in the Thirteenth Century (2005)
    Cawley, Charles, Medieval Lands Project on Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk, Foundation for Medieval Genealogy, retrieved August 2012,[better source needed]

    *

    more ...

    Four years after William's birth, in 1181, Ida de Tosny was married to Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk, by whom she had a number of children.

    Roger married Ida de Tosny, Countess of Norfolk 0___ 1181, (Norfolk, England). Ida (daughter of Ralph de Tosny, V, Knight, Earl and Margaret de Beaumont) was born <1160, Flamstead, Hertfordshire, England; died Aft 1185. [Group Sheet]


  8. 61.  Ida de Tosny, Countess of Norfolk was born <1160, Flamstead, Hertfordshire, England (daughter of Ralph de Tosny, V, Knight, Earl and Margaret de Beaumont); died Aft 1185.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Ida de Toesny

    Notes:

    Ida de Tosny, Countess of Norfolk was very likely a daughter of Ralph V de Tosny (died 1162) and his wife Margaret (born circa 1125 and living in 1185), a daughter of Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester.[1]

    Relationship to Henry II

    Ida de Tosny was a royal ward and mistress of King Henry II, by whom she was mother of one of his illegitimate sons, William Longespâee, 3rd Earl of Salisbury, (b c. 1176-March 7, 1226). For many years, until the discovery of a charter of William mentioning "Comitissa Ida, mater mea" (Countess Ida, my mother),[2] it was assumed that Rosamund Clifford, a previous mistress of Henry's, was the mother, but painstaking genealogical detective work [3] has since shown otherwise. Ida was not the first English royal ward to be taken as a royal mistress. Isabel de Beaumont (Elizabeth de Beaumont), daughter of Robert de Beaumont, who fought at the Battle of Hastings with the Conqueror, was the ward of King Henry I and the mistress of one of his sons.[4]

    Marriage

    Around Christmas 1181, Ida de Tosny was given in marriage to Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk by Henry II, together with the manors of Acle, Halvergate and South Walsham, which had been confiscated from his inheritance after his father's death (Hugh Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk).[5] Ida and Roger had a number of children including:

    Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk who married in 1206 or 1207, Maud Marshal, a daughter of William Marshal
    William Bigod
    Ralph Bigod
    Roger Bigod
    Margery Bigod, married William de Hastings
    Mary Bigod, married Ralph fitz Robert

    Many historians, including Marc Morris have speculated that the couple had a third daughter, Alice, who married Aubrey de Vere IV, 2nd Earl of Oxford as his second wife. If so, the marriage would have been well within the bounds of consanguinity, for the couple would have been quite closely related, a daughter of the second earl of Norfolk being first cousin once removed to the second earl of Oxford.

    Ida de Tosney in fiction

    Ida de Tosny and her husband Roger are the main characters in Elizabeth Chadwick's The Time of Singing (Sphere, 2008), published in the USA as For the King's Favor. They appear as minor characters in other of her books set at the same time, notably To Defy a King, which concerns the marriage of their son Hugh to Maud, a daughter of William Marshal

    *

    more ...

    Ida de Tosny was a royal ward who became the mistress of King Henry II. The first evidence of contemporary information about Ida came to light in 1979 with the publication in the of two charters found in the Bradenstoke Priory Cartulary where he mentions "Comitissa Ida, mater mea" (Countess Ida, my mother), until then, it was assumed that Rosamund Clifford, a previous and more famous mistress of King Henry II's, was William's mother.

    Notes:

    Married:
    around Christmas...

    Children:
    1. 30. Hugh Bigod, Knight, 3rd Earl of Norfolk was born ~ 1182, Thetford, Norfolk, England; died 18 Feb 1225, (Norfolk, England); was buried Thetford Priory, Thetford, Norfolk, England.

  9. 62.  William Marshal, Templar Knight, 1st Earl PembrokeWilliam Marshal, Templar Knight, 1st Earl Pembroke was born 1146-1147, (Berkshire, England) (son of John FitzGilbert and Sibyl of Salisbury); died 14 Apr 1219, Caversham, Berkshire, England; was buried Temple Church, London, Middlesex, England.

    Notes:

    William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke (1146 or 1147 - 14 May 1219), also called William the Marshal (Norman French: Williame le Mareschal), was an Anglo-Norman soldier and statesman.[1] He served five English kings – The "Young King" Henry, Henry II, Richard I, John, and Henry III.

    Knighted in 1166, he spent his younger years as a knight errant and a successful tournament fighter; Stephen Langton eulogized him as the "best knight that ever lived."[2] In 1189, he received the title of Earl of Pembroke through marriage during the second creation of the Pembroke Earldom. In 1216, he was appointed protector for the nine-year-old Henry III, and regent of the kingdom.

    Before him, his father's family held an hereditary title of Marshal to the king, which by his father's time had become recognized as a chief or master Marshalcy, involving management over other Marshals and functionaries. William became known as 'the Marshal', although by his time much of the function was actually delegated to more specialized representatives (as happened with other functions in the King's household). Because he was an Earl, and also known as the Marshal, the term "Earl Marshal" was commonly used and this later became an established hereditary title in the English Peerage.


    Early life

    Tomb effigy of William Marshal in Temple Church, London
    William's father, John Marshal, supported King Stephen when he took the throne in 1135, but in about 1139 he changed sides to back the Empress Matilda in the civil war of succession between her and Stephen which led to the collapse of England into "the Anarchy".[4]

    When King Stephen besieged Newbury Castle in 1152, according to William's biographer, he used the young William as a hostage to ensure that John kept his promise to surrender the castle. John, however, used the time allotted to reinforce the castle and alert Matilda's forces. When Stephen ordered John to surrender immediately or William would be hanged, John replied that he should go ahead saying, "I still have the hammer and the anvil with which to forge still more and better sons!" Subsequently there was a bluff made to launch William from a pierriáere, a type of trebuchet towards the castle. Fortunately for the child, Stephen could not bring himself to harm young William.[5] William remained a crown hostage for many months, only being released following the peace that resulted from the terms agreed at Winchester on 6 November 1153 that ended the civil war.

    Knight-Errant

    As a younger son of a minor nobleman, William had no lands or fortune to inherit, and had to make his own way in life. Around the age of twelve, when his father's career was faltering, he was sent to Normandy to be brought up in the household of William de Tancarville, a great magnate and cousin of young William's mother. Here he began his training as a knight. This would have included basic biblical stories and prayers written in Latin, as well as exposure to French romances, which conferred the basic precepts of chivalry to the budding knight.[6] In addition, while in Tancarville’s household, it is likely that Marshal also learned important and lasting practical lessons concerning the politics of courtly life. According to his thirteenth-century biography, L'Histoire de Guillaume le Marechal, Marshal had a number of adversaries in court who machinated to his disadvantage—these individuals likely would have been threatened by the boy’s close relationship with the magnate.[7] He was knighted in 1166 on campaign in Upper Normandy, then being invaded from Flanders. His first experience in battle came with mixed reviews. According to L'Histoire, everyone who witnessed the young knight in action agreed that he had acquitted himself well in combat. However, as medieval historian David Crouch explains, “War in the twelfth century was not fought wholly for honour. Profit was there to be made…”[8] On this front, Marshal was not so successful, as he was unable to parlay his combat victories into profit from either ransom or seized booty. As described in L'Histoire, the Earl of Essex, who was expecting the customary tribute from his valorous knight following battle, jokingly remarked: “Oh? But Marshal, what are you saying? You had forty or sixty of them — yet you refuse me so small a thing!”[9] In 1167 he was taken by William de Tancarville to his first tournament where he found his true mâetier. Quitting the Tancarville household he then served in the household of his mother's brother, Patrick, Earl of Salisbury. In 1168 his uncle was killed in an ambush by Guy de Lusignan. William was injured and captured in the same skirmish. It is known that William received a wound to his thigh and that someone in his captor's household took pity on the young knight. He received a loaf of bread in which were concealed several lengths of clean linen bandages with which he could dress his wounds. This act of kindness by an unknown person perhaps saved Marshal's life as infection setting into the wound could have killed him. After a period of time, he was ransomed by Eleanor of Aquitaine, who was apparently impressed by tales of his bravery.

    Thereafter he found he could make a good living out of winning tournaments, dangerous, often deadly, staged battles in which money and valuable prizes could be won by capturing and ransoming opponents, their horses and armour. His record is legendary: on his deathbed he recalled besting 500 knights during his tourneying career.[10]

    Royal favour

    13th-century depiction by Matthew Paris of the Earl of Pembroke's coat of arms[11]
    Upon his return during the course of 1185 William rejoined the court of King Henry II, and now served the father as a loyal captain through the many difficulties of his final years. The returns of royal favour were almost immediate. The king gave William the large royal estate of Cartmel in Cumbria, and the keeping of Heloise, the heiress of the northern barony of Lancaster. It may be that the king expected him to take the opportunity to marry her and become a northern baron, but William seems to have had grander ambitions for his marriage. In 1188 faced with an attempt by Philip II to seize the disputed region of Berry, Henry II summoned the Marshal to his side. The letter by which he did this survives, and makes some sarcastic comments about William's complaints that he had not been properly rewarded to date for his service to the king. Henry therefore promised him the marriage and lands of Dionisia, lady of Chăateauroux in Berry. In the resulting campaign, the king fell out with his heir Richard, count of Poitou, who consequently allied with Philip II against his father. In 1189, while covering the flight of Henry II from Le Mans to Chinon, William unhorsed the undutiful Richard in a skirmish. William could have killed the prince but killed his horse instead, to make that point clear. He is said to have been the only man ever to unhorse Richard. Nonetheless after Henry's death, Marshal was welcomed at court by his former adversary, now King Richard I, who was wise to include a man whose legendary loyalty and military accomplishments were too useful to ignore, especially in a king who was intending to go on Crusade.[1]

    During the old king's last days he had promised the Marshal the hand and estates of Isabel de Clare (c.1172–1220), but had not completed the arrangements. King Richard however, confirmed the offer and so in August 1189, at the age of 43, the Marshal married the 17-year-old daughter of Richard de Clare (Strongbow). Her father had been Earl of Pembroke, and Marshal acquired large estates and claims in England, Wales, Normandy and Ireland. Some estates however were excluded from the deal. Marshal did not obtain Pembroke and the title of earl, which his father-in-law had enjoyed, until 1199, as it had been taken into the king's hand in 1154. However, the marriage transformed the landless knight from a minor family into one of the richest men in the kingdom, a sign of his power and prestige at court. They had five sons and five daughters, and have numerous descendants.[1] William made numerous improvements to his wife's lands, including extensive additions to Pembroke Castle and Chepstow Castle.[citation needed]

    William was included in the council of regency which the King appointed on his departure for the Third Crusade in 1190. He took the side of John, the king's brother, when the latter expelled the justiciar, William Longchamp, from the kingdom, but he soon discovered that the interests of John were different from those of Richard. Hence in 1193 he joined with the loyalists in making war upon him. In spring 1194, during the course of the hostilities in England and before King Richard's return, William Marshal's elder brother John Marshal (who was serving as seneschal) was killed while defending Marlborough for the king's brother John. Richard allowed Marshal to succeed his brother in the hereditary marshalship, and his paternal honour of Hamstead Marshall. The Marshal served the king in his wars in Normandy against Philip II. On Richard's death-bed the king designated Marshal as custodian of Rouen and of the royal treasure during the interregnum.[1]

    King John and Magna Carta

    A 13th-century depiction of the Second Battle of Lincoln, which occurred at Lincoln Castle on 20 May 1217; the illustration shows the death of Thomas du Perche, the Comte de la Perche

    William supported King John when he became king in 1199, arguing against those who maintained the claims of Arthur of Brittany, the teenage son of John's elder brother Geoffrey Plantagenet. William was heavily engaged with the defence of Normandy against the growing pressure of the Capetian armies between 1200 and 1203. He sailed with King John when he abandoned the duchy in December 1203. He and the king had a falling out in the aftermath of the loss of the duchy, when he was sent with the earl of Leicester as ambassadors to negotiate a truce with King Philip II of France in 1204. The Marshal took the opportunity to negotiate the continued possession of his Norman lands.

    Before commencing negotiations with King Philip, William had been generously permitted to do homage to the King of France by King John so he might keep his possessions in Normandy; land which must have been of sentimental value due to the time spent there in his youth and adolescence. However, once official negotiations began, Philip demanded that such homage be paid exclusively to him, which King John had not consented to.[12] When William paid homage to King Philip, John took offence and there was a major row at court which led to cool relations between the two men. This became outright hostility in 1207 when John began to move against several major Irish magnates, including William. Though he left for Leinster in 1207 William was recalled and humiliated at court in the autumn of 1208, while John's justiciar in Ireland Meilyr fitz Henry invaded his lands, burning the town of New Ross.

    Meilyr's defeat by Countess Isabel led to her husband's return to Leinster. He was once again in conflict with King John in his war with the Braose and Lacy families in 1210, but managed to survive. He stayed in Ireland until 1213, during which time he had Carlow Castle erected[13] and restructured his honour of Leinster. Taken back into favour in 1212, he was summoned in 1213 to return to the English court. Despite their differences, William remained loyal throughout the hostilities between John and his barons which culminated on 15 June 1215 at Runnymede with the sealing of Magna Carta. William was one of the few English earls to remain loyal to the king through the First Barons' War. It was William whom King John trusted on his deathbed to make sure John's nine-year-old son Henry would get the throne. It was William who took responsibility for the king's funeral and burial at Worcester Cathedral.[1]

    On 11 November 1216 at Gloucester, upon the death of King John, William Marshal was named by the king's council (the chief barons who had remained loyal to King John in the First Barons' War) to serve as protector of the nine-year-old King Henry III, and regent of the kingdom. In spite of his advanced age (around 70) he prosecuted the war against Prince Louis and the rebel barons with remarkable energy. In the battle of Lincoln he charged and fought at the head of the young King's army, leading them to victory. He was preparing to besiege Louis in London when the war was terminated by the naval victory of Hubert de Burgh in the straits of Dover. [1]

    William was criticised for the generosity of the terms he accorded to Louis and the rebels in September 1217; but his desire for an expeditious settlement was dictated by sound statesmanship. Self-restraint and compromise were the keynote of Marshal's policy, hoping to secure peace and stability for his young liege. Both before and after the peace of 1217 he reissued Magna Carta, in which he is a signatory as one of the witnessing barons.

    Death and legacy

    William Marshal was interred in Temple Church, London
    Marshal's health finally failed him early in 1219. In March 1219 he realised that he was dying, so he summoned his eldest son, also William, and his household knights, and left the Tower of London for his estate at Caversham in Berkshire, near Reading, where he called a meeting of the barons, Henry III, the Papal legate Pandulf Verraccio, the royal justiciar (Hubert de Burgh), and Peter des Roches (Bishop of Winchester and the young King's guardian). William rejected the Bishop's claim to the regency and entrusted the regency to the care of the papal legate; he apparently did not trust the Bishop or any of the other magnates that he had gathered to this meeting. Fulfilling the vow he had made while on crusade, he was invested into the order of the Knights Templar on his deathbed. He died on 14 May 1219 at Caversham, and was buried in the Temple Church in London, where his tomb can still be seen.[1]

    Descendants of William Marshal and Isabel de Clare

    William Marshal, 2nd Earl of Pembroke (1190–6 April 1231), married (1) Alice de Bâethune, daughter of Earl of Albemarle; (2) 23 April 1224 Eleanor Plantagenet, daughter of King John of England. They had no children.
    Richard Marshal, 3rd Earl of Pembroke (1191–16 April 1234), married Gervase le Dinant. He died in captivity. They had no children.
    Maud Marshal (1194–27 March 1248), married (1) Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk, they had four children; (2) William de Warenne, 5th Earl of Surrey, they had two children; (3) Walter de Dunstanville.
    Gilbert Marshal, 4th Earl of Pembroke (1197–27 June 1241), married (1) Marjorie of Scotland, youngest daughter of King William I of Scotland; by an unknown mistress he had one illegitimate daughter:
    Isabel Marshal, married to Rhys ap Maeldon Fychan.
    Walter Marshal, 5th Earl of Pembroke (c. 1199 – November 1245), married Margaret de Quincy, Countess of Lincoln, granddaughter of Hugh de Kevelioc, 3rd Earl of Chester. No children.
    Isabel Marshal (9 October 1200 – 17 January 1240), married (1) Gilbert de Clare, 5th Earl of Hertford, whose daughter Isabel de Clare married Robert Bruce, 5th Lord of Annandale, the grandfather of Robert the Bruce; (2) Richard Plantagenet, Earl of Cornwall
    Sibyl Marshal (c. 1201–27 April 1245), married William de Ferrers, 5th Earl of Derby–they had seven daughters.
    Agnes Ferrers (died 11 May 1290), married William de Vesci.

    Isabel Ferrers (died before 26 November 1260)
    Maud Ferrers (died 12 March 1298), married (1) Simon de Kyme, and (2) William de Vivonia (de Forz), and (3) Amaury IX of Rochechouart.
    Sibyl Ferrers, married Sir Francis or Franco de Bohun.
    Joan Ferrers (died 1267)
    Agatha Ferrers (died May 1306), married Hugh Mortimer, of Chelmarsh.
    Eleanor Ferrers (died 16 October 1274), married to:

    Eva Marshal (1203–1246), married William de Braose, Lord of Abergavenny

    Isabella de Braose (b.1222), married Prince Dafydd ap Llywelyn. She died childless.
    Maud de Braose (1224–1301), in 1247, she married Roger Mortimer, 1st Baron Mortimer and they had descendants.
    Eva de Braose (1227 – 28 July 1255), married Sir William de Cantelou and had descendants.
    Eleanor de Braose (c.1228–1251). On an unknown date after August 1241, she married Sir Humphrey de Bohun and had descendants.

    Anselm Marshal, 6th Earl of Pembroke (c. 1208–22 December 1245), married Maud de Bohun, daughter of Humphrey de Bohun, 2nd Earl of Hereford. They had no children.
    Joan Marshal (1210–1234), married Warin de Munchensi (d. 1255), Lord of Swanscombe
    Joan de Munchensi (1230–20 September 1307) married William of Valence, the fourth son of King John's widow, Isabella of Angoulăeme, and her second husband, Hugh X of Lusignan, Count of La Marche. Valence was half-brother to Henry III and Edward I's uncle.

    The fate of the Marshal family

    During the civil wars in Ireland, William had taken two manors that the Bishop of Ferns claimed but could not get back. Some years after William's death, that bishop is said[14] to have laid a curse on the family that William's sons would have no children, and the great Marshal estates would be scattered. Each of William's sons did become earl of Pembroke and marshal of England, and each died without legitimate issue. William's vast holdings were then divided among the husbands of his five daughters. The title of "Marshal" went to the husband of the oldest daughter, Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk, and later passed to the Mowbray dukes of Norfolk and then to the Howard dukes of Norfolk, becoming "Earl Marshal" along the way. The title of "Earl of Pembroke" passed to William of Valence, the husband of Joan Marshal's daughter, Joan de Munchensi; he became the first of the de Valence line of earls of Pembroke.

    Through his daughter Isabel, William is ancestor to the both the Bruce and Stewart kings of Scots. Through his granddaughter Maud de Braose, William is ancestor to the last Plantagenet kings, Edward IV through Richard III, and all English monarchs from Henry VIII and afterward.

    Buried:
    at Temple Church...

    The Temple Church is a late 12th-century church in the City of London located between Fleet Street and the River Thames, built by the Knights Templar as their English headquarters. During the reign of King John (1199-1216) it served as the royal treasury, supported by the role of the Knights Templars as proto-international bankers. It is jointly owned by the Inner Temple and Middle Temple[1] Inns of Court, bases of the English legal profession. It is famous for being a round church, a common design feature for Knights Templar churches, and for its 13th and 14th century stone effigies. It was heavily damaged by German bombing during World War II and has since been greatly restored and rebuilt. The area around the Temple Church is known as the Temple and nearby formerly in the middle of Fleet Street stood the Temple Bar, an ornamental processional gateway. Nearby is the Temple Underground station.

    Photo, history & source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Temple_Church

    Died:
    Caversham is a suburb in the Borough of Reading...

    Map, history & source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caversham,_Berkshire

    William married Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke 0Aug 1189, London, England. Isabel (daughter of Richard de Clare, Knight, 2nd Earl Pembroke and Eva Aoife Mac Murchada, Countess Pembroke) was born 0___ 1172, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales; died 14 Oct 1217, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales; was buried Tintern Abbey, Tintern, Monmouthshire, Wales. [Group Sheet]


  10. 63.  Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke was born 0___ 1172, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales (daughter of Richard de Clare, Knight, 2nd Earl Pembroke and Eva Aoife Mac Murchada, Countess Pembroke); died 14 Oct 1217, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales; was buried Tintern Abbey, Tintern, Monmouthshire, Wales.

    Other Events:

    • Alt Death: 0___ 1220, Pembrokeshire, Wales

    Notes:

    F Isabel De CLAREPrint Family Tree
    Born in 1172 - Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales
    Deceased 14 October 1217 - Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales , age at death: 45 years old
    Buried in 1217 - Monmouth, Monmouthshire, Wales

    Parents
    Richard (Strongbow) De ( 2nd Earl Pembroke, Lord Marshall) CLARE, born in 1125 - Tonbridge, Kent, England, Deceased 20 April 1176 - Dublin, Ireland age at death: 51 years old , buried in 1176 - Dublin, Ireland
    Married 26 August 1171, Waterford, Waterford, Ireland, to
    Eva Aoife Mac (Countess Pembroke) MURCHADA, born 26 April 1141 - Dublin, Ireland, Deceased in 1188 - Waterford, Ireland age at death: 47 years old , buried - Tintern, Monmouthshire, Wales

    Spouses, children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren
    Married in August 1189, London, England, to William (SIR - Knight Templar)(Earl Pembroke) MARSHALL, born 12 May 1146 - Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales, Deceased 14 May 1219 - Reading, Berkshire, England age at death: 73 years old , buried in 1219 - London, England (Parents : M John (Fitzgilbert) (Earl of Pembroke, Marshall of England) MARSHALL 1105-1165 & F Sibilla De SALISBURY 1109-1155) with
    F Maud (Countess of Norfolk Countess of Surrey) MARSHALL 1192-1248 married to William (de Warenne) WARREN 1166-1240 with
    M John De (SIR - Earl of Surrey) WARREN 1231-1304 married before 1244, England, to Alice (Le Brun) De (Countess of Surrey) LUSIGNAN 1224-1291 with :
    F Eleanor (Plantagenet) De WARREN 1244-1282
    M William De (SIR) WARREN 1256-1286

    John De (SIR - Earl of Surrey) WARREN 1231-1304 married in 1247, Surrey, England, to Isabel De Surrey 1234-
    Maud (Countess of Norfolk Countess of Surrey) MARSHALL 1192-1248 married to Hugh (Magna Charta Baron - EARL of NORFOLK) BIGOD 1175-1225 with
    F Isabel BIGOD ca 1215-1239 married before 1235, Shere, Surrey, England, to John (Fitzgeoffrey) (SIR - Lord of Shere) (Justiciar of England) FITZPIERS 1215-1258 with :
    F Aveline (Fitzjohn) FITZPIERS ca 1235-1274
    F Maud (Fitzjohn) (Countess of WARWICK) FITZPIERS 1237-1301
    F Eve (Baroness of Abergavenny) MARSHALL 1194-1246 married 2 May 1230, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales, to William "Black William" (de Braose) BRUCE 1204-1230 with
    M William (de Braose) BRUCE 1210-1292 married to Maud De Fay 1180-1249 with :
    F Eleanor (de Braose) BRUCE 1230-
    F Isabella (de Braose) BRUCE 1220/- married to Dafydd (Ap Llywelyn) (Prince of WALES) TUDOR 1208-1246
    F Eva (de Braose) BRUCE 1220-1255 married 25 July 1238, Calne, Wiltshire, England, to William De CANTILUPE 1216-1254 with :
    F Joane CANTILUPE 1240-1271
    F Sybilla De Cantilupe ca 1240-
    F Millicent (Cauntelo) De CANTILUPE ca 1250-/1299
    F Maud (de Braose) (BARONESS WIGMORE) BRUCE 1226-1300 married in 1247, King's Stanley, Gloucestershire, England, to Roger De (SIR) MORTIMER 1231-1282 with :
    F Isabella De MORTIMER 1248-1274
    M Edmund De (Sir - 7th Lord) MORTIMER 1252-1303
    F Isolde De MORTIMER 1267-1338
    Eve (Baroness of Abergavenny) MARSHALL 1194-1246 married in 1230, England, to Milo (de Saint Maur) (SIR) SEYMOUR ca 1200-1245 with
    M Richard SEYMOUR 1230-1271 married in 1250 to Isabel (Lady) MARSHALL 1238-1268 with :
    M Roger (de Saint Maur) SEYMOUR 1258-1300
    F Katherine SEYMOUR ca 1265-ca 1335
    M Gilbert MARSHALL 1196-1241 married to Marjorie Of SCOTLAND 1204-1244 with
    F Isabel (Lady) MARSHALL 1238-1268 married in 1250 to Richard SEYMOUR 1230-1271 with :
    M Roger (de Saint Maur) SEYMOUR 1258-1300
    F Katherine SEYMOUR ca 1265-ca 1335
    M William (4th Earl of Pembroke/ChiefJusticar of Ireland) MARSHALL 1198-1231 married 23 April 1224, Hampshire, England, to Eleanor (Princess of England) PLANTAGENET ca 1205-1275 with
    F Isabel Marshall 1225/-1239
    M X MARSHALL ca 1230- married to ? ? with :
    M X MARSHALL ca 1260-
    F Isabel (Fitzgilbert) (Countess MARSHALL) MARSHALL 1200-1239 married 9 October 1217, Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England, to Gilbert III De (Earl of Gloucester - Hertford) CLARE, MAGNA CARTA BARON ca 1180-1230 with
    M Richard De (Earl of Herts - Gloucs) CLARE 1222-1262 married 25 January 1238, Lincolnshire, England, to Maud De (Countess of Gloucester) LACY 1223-1289 with :
    M Gilbert IV De (Earl of Herts - Gloucs) CLARE 1243-1295
    M Thomas De (Lord of Thomand, Connaught, Chancellor of Ireland) CLARE 1245-1287
    F Rohesia De CLARE 1252-1316
    F Isabel De (Lady Annabelle - 3rd Countess of Pembroke) CLARE 1226-1264 married in May 1240, Scotland, to Robert "the Competitor" De (SIR - 5th Lord of Annandale) BRUCE 1210-1295 with :
    M Robert De (Lord Annadale) BRUCE 1243-1304
    F Mary Clarissa De BRUCE 1255-1283
    Isabel (Fitzgilbert) (Countess MARSHALL) MARSHALL 1200-1239 married 30 March 1231, Bucks, Pennsylvania, USA, to Richard (Earl of CORNWALL) CORNWALL 1209-1272 with
    M Richard (SIR) (PLANTAGENET) CORNWALL 1234-1272 married before 1280, Cornwall, England, to Joan SAINT OWEN 1234-1308 with :
    M Edmund De (PLANTAGENET) CORNWALL 1280-1354
    F Sibyl MARSHALL ca 1201-1245 married 14 May 1219, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales, to William De (SIR - 5th Earl of Derby,) (Sheriff of Leicester) FERRERS 1190-1254 with
    F Maud De FERRERS ca 1215-1298 married in 1248 to William (Fortibus) De (SIR) VIVONNE 1215-1259 with :
    F Joan de ** (Countess of Chewton) VIVONNE 1235-1314
    F Margaret (Joan) De (to Wynter) FERRERS ca 1220-1267 married 5 December 1242, England, to Roger De Quincy ca 1215-1242/
    Margaret (Joan) De (to Wynter) FERRERS ca 1220-1267 married before 1245, England, to John De MOHUN ca 1220-1255 with :
    M John De MOHUN ca 1243-1279

    Margaret (Joan) De (to Wynter) FERRERS ca 1220-1267 married about 1256, Derbyshire, England, to Roger (SIR ) (MIDLANDS) WYNTER ca 1220- with :
    M Robert ** (Bedfordshire) WYNTER /1260-
    M Roger de ** (Suffolk - ??) WYNTER /1267-ca 1327
    M ** (Connection speculative) WYNTER /1268-
    F Isabel De FERRERS 1223-1252 married after 1247, England, to Reginald De MOHUN 1202-1256 with :
    F Isabel De MOHUN 1248-1280
    F Agatha De FERRERS ca 1225- married to Hugh De MORTIMER 1219-1274 with :
    M Robert De MORTIMER 1251-1287
    F Mary De MORTIMER 1260-1290
    M William De (SIR) FERRERS 1235-1287 married in 1262, Wootton Bassett, Wiltshire, England, to Anne le De SPENCER 1240/-1280 with :
    M ? ?
    F Anne De (to GREY) FERRERS 1268-1324
    M William De (SIR - to Wynter via VERDON) FERRERS 1272-1325
    M Robert De (6th Earl of Derby) (to NEVILLE) FERRERS ca 1239-1279 married 26 June 1269, Staffordshire, England, to Alianore De BOHUN 1240-1314 with :
    M John De (SIR - Baron of Chartley) FERRERS 1271-1312
    F Joane MARSHALL 1202-1234 married to Warin Munchensy 1192-1255 with
    F Joan MUNCHENSY 1222-1307 married to William (de Lusignan) (Earl of Pembroke) VALENCE 1225-1296 with :
    F Margaret De (Baroness de la ROCHE) VALENCE 1254-1315
    F Isabel De VALENCE ca 1262-1305

    Siblings
    M Richard III De (SIR) CLARE, MAGNA CARTA BARON ca 1153-1217 Married in 1180, England, to Amicie De CAEN 1160-1225
    F Joan De ( Baroness of Gamage) CLARE 1175-1222/ Married in 1196, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales, to Godfrey De (Sir) ( Lord of Gamage) GAMAGE 1176-1253

    Paternal grand-parents, uncles and aunts
    M Gilbert De (1st Earl Pembroke) CLARE 1100-1148 married (1130)
    F Isabel De (Countess Pembroke and Buckingham) BEAUMONT 1086-1147
    M Richard (Strongbow) De ( 2nd Earl Pembroke, Lord Marshall) CLARE 1125-1176
    married (1171)
    3 children

    F Isabel De (Countess Pembroke and Buckingham) BEAUMONT 1086-1147
    married (1098)M Henry I (Beauclerc) (KING OF ENGLAND) NORMANDY 1068-1135
    F Constance Maude FITZROY 1098-
    married (1120)
    1 child



    Maternal grand-parents, uncles and aunts
    M Dermot Dairmait Mac (King of Leinster) MURCHADA 1110-1171 married (1140)
    F Mor Tauthail Moringen Murchertaig (Queen of Ireland) O'TOOLE 1114-1191
    F Eva Aoife Mac (Countess Pembroke) MURCHADA 1141-1188
    married (1171)
    3 children
    F Urlachen Mac MURCHADA 1154-1200
    married (1171)
    2 children



    Notes
    Individual Note
    Source: Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Millennium File - Heritage Consulting - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2003.Original data - Heritage Consulting. The Millennium File. Salt Lake City, UT, USA: Heritage Consulting.Original data: Heritage Consulting. The Millennium File. Salt Lake City, UT, USA: - 1,7249::0
    http://search.Ancestry.com.au/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=millind&h=10154284&ti=5544&indiv=try&gss=pt Birth date: 1172 Birth place: Pembroke, Wales Death date: 1220 Death place: Pembroke, Wales 1,7249::10154284
    Source: Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - Web: International, Find A Grave Index - Ancestry.com - Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. - 1,70699::0 1,70699::438790
    Source: Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - UK and Ireland, Find A Grave Index, 1300s-Current - Ancestry.com - Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. - 1,60526::0 1,60526::219175

    Death
    Age: 48


    Sources
    Individual:
    - Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Ancestry Family Trees - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members. - This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created. - Ancestry Family Trees - http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=18829447&pid=8010
    - Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Ancestry Family Trees - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members. - This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created. - Ancestry Family Trees - http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=18829447&pid=8010
    - Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Ancestry Family Trees - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members. - This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created. - Ancestry Family Trees - http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=18829447&pid=8010
    - Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Ancestry Family Trees - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members. - This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created. - Ancestry Family Trees - http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=18829447&pid=8010
    Birth, death:
    - Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Millennium File - Heritage Consulting - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2003.Original data - Heritage Consulting. The Millennium File. Salt Lake City, UT, USA: Heritage Consulting.Original data: Heritage Consulting. The Millennium File. Salt Lake City, UT, USA: - 1,7249::0
    Note http://search.Ancestry.com.au/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=millind&h=10154284&ti=5544&indiv=try&gss=pt - Birth date: 1172 Birth place: Pembroke, Wales Death date: 1220 Death place: Pembroke, Wales - 1,7249::10154284
    - Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - Web: International, Find A Grave Index - Ancestry.com - Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. - 1,70699::0 - 1,70699::438790
    - Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - UK and Ireland, Find A Grave Index, 1300s-Current - Ancestry.com - Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. - 1,60526::0 - 1,60526::219175
    Burial:
    - Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - Web: International, Find A Grave Index - Ancestry.com - Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. - 1,70699::0 - 1,70699::438790
    - Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - UK and Ireland, Find A Grave Index, 1300s-Current - Ancestry.com - Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. - 1,60526::0 - 1,60526::219175

    Family Tree Preview
    Ancestry Chart Descendancy Chart
    _____| 16_ Richard (Fitzgilbert) De CLARE 1030-1089
    _____| 8_ Gilbert (Fitzrichard) De (Some say - Lord of Chepstow) CLARE 1065-1114
    _____| 4_ Gilbert De (1st Earl Pembroke) CLARE 1100-1148
    / \ _____| 18_ Hugh De CLERMONT 1030-1101
    |2_ Richard (Strongbow) De ( 2nd Earl Pembroke, Lord Marshall) CLARE 1125-1176
    | \ _____| 20_ Roger De (SIR - Barbatus le Barber) BEAUMONT 1022-1094
    | \ _____| 10_ Robert De (SIR - 1st Earl Leics - Count Melun) BEAUMONT 1046-1118
    | \ _____| 22_ Hugh (The Great) (Count of Vermandois) CAPET 1053-1102
    |--1_ Isabel De CLARE 1172-1217
    | _____| 24_ Murchad Macdairmata MURCHADA 1032-1070
    | _____| 12_ Donnchad Enna Mac MURCHADA 1085-1115
    | _____| 6_ Dermot Dairmait Mac (King of Leinster) MURCHADA 1110-1171
    | / \ _____| 26_ Gilla Michil O'BRIEN 1055-1068
    |3_ Eva Aoife Mac (Countess Pembroke) MURCHADA 1141-1188
    \ _____| 28_ Gilla-Comgaill II (King of Ui Muriedaig) O'TOOLE 1055-1127
    \ _____| 14_ Mouirchertach (King of Ui Muiredaig) O'TOOLE 1089-1164
    \ _____| 30_ Loigsech (King of Loigsi) O'MORDA

    end of biography

    Isabel de Clare, suo jure Countess of Pembroke and Striguil (1172-1220) was a Cambro-Norman-Irish noblewoman, go to this link for further clarification ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cambro-Norman, and one of the wealthiest heiresses in Wales and Ireland. She was the wife of William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke, who served four successive kings as Lord Marshal of England. Her marriage had been arranged by King Richard I.

    Daniel Maclise's painting of the marriage of Isabel's parents, Strongbow and Aoife of Leinster in August 1170, the day after the capture of Waterford.
    Isabel was born in 1172 in Pembrokeshire, Wales, the eldest child of Richard de Clare, 2nd Earl of Pembroke (1130 – 20 April 1176), known to history as "Strongbow", and Aoife of Leinster, who was the daughter of Dermot MacMurrough, the deposed King of Leinster and Mor Ui Thuathail. The latter was a daughter of Muirchertach Ua Tuathail and Cacht Nâi Morda. The marriage of Strongbow and Aoife took place in August 1170, the day after the capture of Waterford by the Cambro-Norman forces led by Strongbow.

    Isabel's paternal grandparents were Gilbert de Clare, 1st Earl of Pembroke and Isabel de Beaumont. She had a younger brother Gilbert de Striguil who, being a minor, was not formally invested with either the earldom of Pembroke or of Striguil. It is unlikely that his father could have passed on the title to Pembroke as he himself did not possess it. When Gilbert died in 1185, Isabel became Countess of Pembroke in her own right (suo jure) until her death in 1220. In this way, she could be said to be the first successor to the earldom of Pembroke since her grandfather Gilbert, the first earl. By this reckoning, Isabel ought to be called the second countess, not the fourth countess of Pembroke. In any event, the title Earl was re-created for her husband. She also had an illegitimate half-sister Basile de Clare, who married three times. Basile's husbands were: Robert de Quincy; Raymond Fitzgerald, Constable of Leinster: Geoffrey FitzRobert, Baron of Kells.

    Isabel was described as having been "the good, the fair, the wise, the courteous lady of high degree".[2] She allegedly spoke French, Irish and Latin.[3] After her brother Gilbert's death, Isabel became one of the wealthiest heiresses in the kingdom, owning besides the titles of Pembroke and Striguil, much land in Wales and Ireland.[4] She inherited the numerous castles on the inlet of Milford Haven, guarding the South Channel, including Pembroke Castle.[5] She was a legal ward of King Henry II, who carefully watched over her inheritance.[6]

    Marriage

    The new King Richard I arranged her marriage in August 1189 to William Marshal, regarded by many as the greatest knight and soldier in the realm. Henry II had promised Marshal he would be given Isabel as his bride, and his son and successor Richard upheld the promise one month after his accession to the throne. At the time of her marriage, Isabel was residing in the Tower of London in the protective custody of the Justiciar of England, Ranulf de Glanville.[7] Following the wedding, which was celebrated in London "with due pomp and ceremony",[8] they spent their honeymoon at Stoke d'Abernon in Surrey which belonged to Enguerrand d'Abernon.[9]

    Marriage to Isabel elevated William Marshal from the status as a landless knight into one of the richest men in the kingdom. He would serve as Lord Marshal of England, four kings in all: Henry II, Richard I, John, and Henry III. Although Marshal did not become the jure uxoris 1st Earl of Pembroke, Earl of Striguil until 1199, he nevertheless assumed overlordship of Leinster in Ireland, Pembroke Castle, Chepstow Castle, as well as Isabel's other castles in Wales such as the keep of Haverford, Tenby, Lewhaden, Narberth, Stackpole.[10]

    Shortly after their marriage, Marshal and Isabel arrived in Ireland, at Old Ros, a settlement located in the territory which belonged to her grandfather, Dermot MacMurrough. A motte was hastily constructed, a medieval borough quickly grew around it, and afterwards the Marshals founded the port town by the river which subsequently became known as New Ross. The Chronicles of Ros, which are housed in the British Museum, described Isabel and Marshal's arrival in Ireland and records that Isabella set about building a lovely city on the banks of the Barrow.

    In 1192, Isabel and her husband assumed the task of managing their vast lands; starting with the rebuilding of Kilkenny Castle and the town, both of which had been damaged by the O'Brien clan in 1173. Later they commissioned the construction of several abbeys in the vicinity.[11]

    The marriage was happy, despite the vast difference in age between them. William Marshal and Isabel produced a total of five sons and five daughters.[12]

    end of biography

    Buried:
    Tintern Abbey (Welsh: Abaty Tyndyrn, About this sound pronunciation in Welsh (help·info)) was founded by Walter de Clare, Lord of Chepstow, on 9 May 1131. It is situated adjacent to the village of Tintern in Monmouthshire, on the Welsh bank of the River Wye, which forms the border between Monmouthshire in Wales and Gloucestershire in England. It was only the second Cistercian foundation in Britain, and the first in Wales. Falling into ruin after the Dissolution of the Monasteries in the 16th century, the remains were celebrated in poetry and often painted by visitors from the 18th century onwards. In 1984 Cadw took over responsibility for the site.

    Photos, history & source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tintern_Abbey

    Children:
    1. William Marshal, Knight, 2nd Earl of Pembroke was born 1190-1198, (Berkshire, England); died 6 Apr 1231, London, Middlesex, England.
    2. 31. Maud Marshal, Countess of Norfolk was born ~ 1193, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales; died 27 Mar 1248, Tintern Abbey, Chapel Hill, Monmouthshire, Wales.
    3. Isabel Marshal, Countess Marshall was born 9 Oct 1200, Pembroke Castle, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales; died 17 Jan 1240, Berkhamsted Castle, Berkhamsted, Hertforshire, England.
    4. Sybil Marshal was born ~ 1201, (Pembroke Castle, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales); died 0Apr 1245.
    5. Eva Marshal, Countess of Abergavenny was born 0___ 1203, Pembroke Castle, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales; died 0___ 1246.
    6. Joan Marshal was born 0___ 1210, (England); died 0___ 1234, (England).


Generation: 7

  1. 100.  Hugh de Mortimer died 26 Feb 1181.

    Hugh — Matilda Le Meschin. [Group Sheet]


  2. 101.  Matilda Le Meschin
    Children:
    1. 50. Roger de Mortimer was born Bef 1153; died Bef 1215.

  3. 102.  Walchelin de Ferriers died 0___ 1201.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Walchelin de Ferrers

    Notes:

    Walchelin de Ferrieres (or Walkelin de Ferrers) (died 1201) was a Norman baron and principal captain of King Richard I of England.

    The Ferriers family hailed from the southern marches of Normandy and had previously protected the duchy from the hostility of the counts of Maine and Anjou. With the union of the domains of Anjou and Normandy in 1144, and the investment of Geoffrey V Plantagenet as duke of Normandy, most of this land lost its strategic importance.

    Walchelin was the son of Henry de Ferrieres, a nephew of Robert de Ferrers, 1st Earl of Derby. His father Henry was son of either Enguenulf or William. Like his father, Walchelin held the castles of Ferriáeres-Saint-Hilaire and Chambray for the service of 5 knights. He had 42 and 3/4 in his service, enfeoffed in his lands. In England, Walchelin held the manors of Oakham in Rutland and Lechlade in Gloucestershire. He is known to have held this land since at least 1172.

    During the Third Crusade, he and his son and heir, Henry, served in the force of Richard I of England. A John de Ferrieres, believed to be a nephew, was also present. Walchelin had stayed with the King in Sicily. It is apparent that Walchelin was close in the counsel of the king. He and his knights arrived at Saint-Jean d'Acre sometime in April or June 1191. Some months previously, his second cousin, William de Ferrers, 3rd Earl of Derby had been killed at the siege.

    After the conclusion of the siege, Richard of England and Hugh III of Burgundy marched their forces south to the city of Jaffa. Along the road, several skirmishes broke out between the marching crusaders and the Saracen army marching parallel under Saladin. On 7 September 1191, the great battle of Arsuf was fought. Richard had made Walchelin a commander of one of the elite bodies of knights according to the chronicle attributed to Geoffrey de Vinsauf.

    Later, in 1194, Richard was imprisoned in Germany. Walchelin brought the treasure of Normandy to Speyer and gave himself as a hostage (along with many others) to the Western Emperor Henry VI. He was freed from captivity around 1197. His sons Henry and Hugh managed his estates during the years he spent in prison. Sometime prior to his death, the younger son, Hugh was granted lordship of the manor of Lechlade.

    Walchelin died in 1201 and was succeeded by his son, Henry. Henry sided with John of England over King Philip II of France until December 1203 when John left Normandy, never to return. At this point, Henry did Philip homage for his Norman lands. Hugh had left England and the care of Lechlade and Oakham went to their sister, Isabella, who was married to Roger de Mortimer of Wigmore. After her death, the land was escheated to the crown as Terra Normanorum.

    Walchelin — unnamed spouse. [Group Sheet]


  4. 103.  unnamed spouse
    Children:
    1. 51. Isabel de Ferrers was born Oakham Castle, Rutland, England.

  5. 108.  Roger de Beaumont was born 0___ 1102 (son of Henry de Beaumont, Knight, 1st Earl of Warwick and Margaret of Perche); died 12 Jun 1153.

    Notes:

    Roger de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Warwick (1102 – 12 June 1153) was the elder son of Henry de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Warwick and Marguerite, daughter of Geoffrey II of Perche and Beatrix of Montdidier. He was also known as Roger de Newburg.

    He was generally considered to have been a devout and pious man; a chronicle of the period, the Gesta Regis Stephani, speaks of him as a "man of gentle disposition". The borough of Warwick remembers him as the founder of the Hospital of S. Michael for lepers which he endowed with the tithes of Wedgnock, and other property; he also endowed the House of the Templars beyond the bridge. In the reign of Stephen he founded a priory dedicated to S. Cenydd at Llangennith, Co. Glamorgan and he attached it as a cell to the Abbey of S. Taurinus at Evreux in Normandy.

    Family and children

    He married 1130 Gundred de Warenne, daughter of William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey and Elizabeth de Vermandois and had children:

    William de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Warwick.
    Waleran de Beaumont, 4th Earl of Warwick (1153 – 12 December 1204).
    Henry de Beaumont, was Dean of Salisbury in 1205.
    Agnes de Beaumont, married Geoffrey de Clinton, Chamberlain to the King and son of Geoffrey de Clinton, the founder of Kenilworth Castle and Priory.
    Margaret de Beaumont.
    Gundred de Beaumont (c.1135–1200), married: Hugh Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk; Roger de Glanville.

    end

    Roger married Gundred de Warenne 0___ 1130. [Group Sheet]


  6. 109.  Gundred de Warenne (daughter of William de Warenne, Knight, 2nd Earl of Surrey and Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester).

    Notes:

    Gundred de Warenne,[22] who married first Roger de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Warwick[23] and second William, lord of Kendal, and is most remembered for expelling king Stephen's garrison from Warwick Castle.

    *

    Children:
    1. 54. Waleran de Newburgh, Knight, 4th Earl of Warwick was born 0___ 1153; died 12 Dec 1204.
    2. Gundreda de Beaumont was born ~ 1135; died 0___ 1200.

  7. 116.  Richard Fitz Gilbert de Clare was born Clare, Suffolk, England (son of Gilbert Fitz Richard, Knight, 2nd Lord of Clare and Adeliza de Claremont); died 15 Apr 1136, Abergavenny, Monmouthshire, Wales.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: 3rd Lord of Clare
    • Also Known As: Earl of Brionne
    • Also Known As: Earl of Hertford
    • Also Known As: Gilbert Fitz Richard

    Notes:

    Richard fitz Gilbert de Clare (died 15 April 1136) 3rd Lord of Clare, was an Anglo-Norman nobleman. A marcher lord in Wales, he was also the founder of Tonbridge Priory in Kent.

    Life

    Richard was the eldest son of Gilbert Fitz Richard de Clare and Adeliza de Claremont.[1] Upon his father's death, he inherited his lands in England and Wales.

    He is commonly said to have been created Earl of Hertford by either Henry I or Stephen, but no contemporary reference to him, including the record of his death, calls him by any title, while a cartulary states that a tenant had held "de Gilleberto, filio Richardi, et de Ricardo, filio ejus, et postea, de Comite Gilleberto, filio Richardi" ("of Gilbert Fitz Richard, and his son Richard, and then of Earl Gilbert Fitz Richard"), again failing to call Richard 'Earl' while giving that title to his son. Thus his supposed creation as earl is without merit, although his status and wealth made him a great magnate in England.[1] There is an old photo document on the wikipedia page for Tonbridge priory which states that the priory was founded by Richard de Clare EARL of (B.. illegible) and Hertfordshire.

    Directly following the death of Henry I, hostilities increased significantly in Wales and a rebellion broke out.[2] Robert was a strong supporter of King Stephen and in the first two years of his reign Robert attested a total of twenty-nine of that king's charters.[3] He was with King Stephen when he formalized a treaty with King David I of Scotland and was a royal steward at Stephen's great Easter court in 1136.[3] He was also with Stephen at the siege of Exeter that summer and was in attendance on the king on his return from Normandy. At this point, Richard apparently demanded more land in Wales, which Stephen was not willing to give him.[3]

    In 1136, Richard had been away from his lordship in the early part of the year. He returned to the borders of Wales via Hereford in the company of Brian Fitz Count, but on their separating, Richard ignored warnings of the danger and pressed on toward Ceredigion with only a small force.[4] He had not gone far when, on 15 April, he was ambushed and killed by the men of Gwent under Iorwerth ab Owain and his brother Morgan, grandsons of Caradog ap Gruffydd, in a woody tract called "the ill-way of Coed Grano", near Llanthony Abbey, north of Abergavenny.[5] Today the spot is marked by the 'garreg dial' (the stone of revenge).[6] He was buried in Tonbridge Priory,[7] which he founded.[1]

    Aftermath

    The news of Richard's death induced Owain Gwynedd, son of Gruffudd ap Cynan, king of Gwynedd to invade his lordship. In alliance with Gruffydd ap Rhys of Deheubarth, he won a crushing victory over the Normans at the Battle of Crug Mawr, just outside Cardigan. The town of Cardigan was taken and burnt, and Richard's widow, Alice, took refuge in Cardigan Castle, which was successfully defended by Robert fitz Martin. She was rescued by Miles of Gloucester, who led an expedition to bring her to safety in England

    Family

    Richard married Alice, sister of Ranulf de Gernon, 4th Earl of Chester,[1] by her having:

    Gilbert Fitz Richard de Clare, d. 1153 (without issue), 1st Earl of Hertford.[8]
    Roger de Clare, d. 1173, 2nd Earl of Hertford.[8]
    Alice de Clare (Adelize de Tonbridge), m. (1) about 1133, Sir William de Percy, Lord of Topcliffe, son of Alan de Percy and Emma de Gant; (2) Cadwaladr ap Gruffydd, brother of Owain Gwynedd
    Robert Fitz Richard de Clare, perhaps died in childhood
    Rohese de Clare, m. Gilbert de Gant, Earl of Lincoln.[9]

    end

    Richard — Alice de Gernon. [Group Sheet]


  8. 117.  Alice de Gernon (daughter of Ranulf Meschin, Knight, 3rd Earl of Chester and Lucy of Bolingbroke).
    Children:
    1. 58. Roger de Clare, Knight, 3rd Earl of Hertford was born 0___ 1116, Tonbridge Castle, Kent, England; died 0___ 1173, Oxfordshire, England.
    2. Alice de Clare was born Tonbridge Castle, Kent, England.
    3. Rohese de Clare was born Tonbridge Castle, Kent, England.

  9. 120.  Hugh Bigod, Knight, 1st Earl of Norfolk was born 0___ 1095, Belvoir Castle, Belvoir, Leicestershire, England (son of Roger Bigod, Knight and Adeliza de Tosny); died 0___ 1177, Israel.

    Notes:

    Hugh Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk (109-1177) was the second son of Roger Bigod (also known as Roger Bigot) (d. 1107), sheriff of Norfolk and royal advisor, and Adeliza, daughter of Robert de Tosny.

    Early Years

    After the death of his elder brother William, who perished without issue in the sinking of the White Ship on 26 November 1120, Hugh was allowed to inherit his brother's office of royal steward and many estates in East Anglia. He also succeeded his aunt Albreda, heiress of her brother Berengar de Tosny, with lands in Yorkshire and in Normandy.[1] Hugh became Constable of Norwich Castle in 1122.

    During King Stephen's reign

    Hugh initially supported Stephen of Blois as king of England. On the death of Henry I in 1135, his nephew Stephen usurped the throne, despite the oath Stephen and the barons had sworn to accept Henry's daughter Empress Matilda as his successor. It was Bigod who asserted that, in his last days, Henry I had named Stephen to become king at the expense of his daughter Matilda.[2] Civil war resulted when, in 1139 Matilda, commanded the military strength necessary to challenge Stephen within his own realm.

    King Stephen had the initial support of the English barons, but in 1136 he was stricken with sickness and the report of his death was quickly spread abroad. Hugh Bigod seized and held Norwich castle. Stephen, quickly recovering, laid siege to the city and Hugh was compelled to surrender.[3] In February 1141 Bigod fought on Stephen's side in the First Battle of Lincoln, after which the Earl deserted the captured king. In July of that year he was granted the earldom of Norfolk by the Empress Matilda but he appears to have assumed a position of armed neutrality during the civil war, rather than actively siding with the supporters of the empress.[4]

    He supported his first wife's brother-in-law, Geoffrey de Mandeville, 1st Earl of Essex, during his rebellion against King Stephen in 1143-44.[5] During the disagreement between King Stephen and Archbishop Theobald in 1148, Hugh Bigod sided with the archbishop and received him in his stronghold, Castle of Framlingham, but joined with others in negotiating a reconciliation between the king and archbishop.

    Rise of King Henry II

    Five years later, in 1153, when Henry, Duke of Normandy, soon to be King Henry II (r. 1154–89), landed in England to assert his claim to the throne, Bigod held out in Ipswich against Stephen's forces, while Henry II, on the other side, laid siege to Stamford. Both places fell to Stephen. In the critical state of his fortunes, however, Stephen was in no position to punish the rebel earl. Negotiations between the two parties resulted in Henry's recognition as Stephen's heir and Hugh eluded retaliation.

    On Henry II's accession in December 1154, Bigod received confirmation of the possession of his earldom and office of royal steward by a charter issued apparently in January of the next year. The first years of the new reign were spent in restoring order to the shattered kingdom, and in breaking the power of the independent barons, which had grown out of control during King Stephen's reign.

    It was not before long that Bigod became agitated under the rule of law initiated by Henry. He grew restless with measures such as the scutage, a fee paid by vassals in lieu of military service, which became the central feature of Henry II's military system of operation by 1159. The Earl showed signs of resistance, but was at once put down. In 1157 Henry II marched into the eastern counties and received the earl's submission.

    After this incident Hugh Bigod makes no significant appearances in the chronicles for some time; he is named among those who had been excommunicated by Becket, in consequence of his retention of lands belonging to the monastery of Pentney in Norfolk.

    The revolt of 1173
    Main article: Revolt of 1173–1174

    In 1173 the young Crown Prince Henry (also known as Henry the Young King), raised a revolt against his father, Henry II. This gave Hugh Bigod yet another chance for rebellion, along with the league of the English barons and the kings of France and Scotland in his favour. He at once became a leader in the cause, perhaps eager to revive the feudal power, which Henry II had curtailed. In addition to the fact that the inevitable conflict, as far as England was concerned, centred round his possessions. The custody of Norwich Castle was promised by the young prince as his reward.

    The king's energy and good fortune were equal to the occasion. While he held in check his rebel vassals in France, the loyal barons in England defeated his enemies there. Robert de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester (d.1190) landed at Walton, in Suffolk, on 29 September 1173 and marched to Framlingham, joining forces with Hugh. Together they besieged and took the castle of Hagenet in Suffolk on 13 October, held by Randal de Broc for the crown. But the Earl of Leicester was defeated and taken prisoner setting out from Framlingham at the Battle of Fornham, near Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, by the justiciar, Richard de Luci and other barons. These then turned their arms against Earl Hugh, who, not being strong enough to fight, opened negotiations with his assailants. It is said he bought them off, and at the same time secured a safe passage home for the Flemings in his service.

    Final days

    Though defeated and compelled to surrender his castles, Bigod kept his lands and his earldom, and lived at peace with Henry II until his death reportedly in 1177 in Palestine.[6]

    It should be noted, however, that on 1 March 1177, his son Roger Bigod appealed to the king on a dispute with his stepmother. Hugh being dead at the time of Roger's appeal, the date of his father's death is fixed 'ante caput jejunii', (i.e. before 9 March). If, then, he died in Palestine, his death must have taken place in the preceding year, 1176, to allow time for the arrival of the news in England. Henry II took advantage of Roger's appeal to seize upon the late Earl's treasure. Earl Hugh had possessed vast estates, which he inherited, and was also the recipient of the third penny of judicial fines levied in the county of Norfolk by right of his earldom.

    Marriage and family

    Bigod married firstly to Juliane de Vere (died c. 1199). She was the daughter of Aubrey de Vere II and Adeliza de Clare, the daughter of Gilbert Fitz Richard de Clare, 2nd Earl of Clare. The marriage was dissolved before 1156. They had one son:

    Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk (born c. 1144-5). He married Ida de Tosny, had issue.
    Bigod married secondly Gundreda (c.1135-1200), daughter of Roger de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Warwick. They had two children:

    Hugh Bigod (b. c. 1156)
    William Hugh Bigod (b. 1168)

    end

    Died:
    State of Palestine

    Hugh — Juliane de Vere, Countess of Norfolk. Juliane (daughter of Aubrey de Vere, II and Adeliza de Clare) was born ~ 1116, Castle Hedingham, Essex, England; died ~ 1199. [Group Sheet]


  10. 121.  Juliane de Vere, Countess of Norfolk was born ~ 1116, Castle Hedingham, Essex, England (daughter of Aubrey de Vere, II and Adeliza de Clare); died ~ 1199.
    Children:
    1. 60. Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk was born 1144-1150, Norfolk, England; died 0___ 1221, (Norfolk, England); was buried Thetford, Norfolk, England.

  11. 122.  Ralph de Tosny, V, Knight, Earl was born ~1140, Flamstead, Hertfordshire, England (son of Roger Toeni, Lord of Flamstead and Ida Hainault); died 0___ 1162, Flamstead, Hertfordshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Ralph V de Toeni
    • Also Known As: Raoul IV

    Notes:

    Sir Ralph de Tony formerly Toeni aka de Conches, de Tosny
    Born about 1140 in Flamstead, Hertfordshire

    ANCESTORS ancestors

    Son of Roger (Toeni) de Toeni and Ida (Hainault) de Toeni
    Brother of Godehaut (Toeni) de Mohun, Roger (Toeni) de Toeni IV, Baldwin (Toeni) de Toeni, Geoffrey (Toeni) de Toeni and Goda (Toeni) de Ferrers

    Husband of Marguerite (Beaumont) de Tosny — married after 1155 in Leicester, England

    DESCENDANTS descendants

    Father of Roger (Toeni) de Tony and Ida (Toeni) le Bigod
    Died 1162 in Flamstead, Hertfordshire, Englandmap
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    Toeni-45 created 10 May 2012 | Last modified 9 May 2017
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    Categories: House of Tosny.

    European Aristocracy
    Ralph (Toeni) de Tony is a member of royalty, nobility or aristocracy in the British Isles.
    Join: British Isles Royals and Aristocrats 742-1499 Project
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    Contents
    [hide]
    1 Biography
    2 Ralph V of Tosny
    2.1 Marriage
    3 Sources
    4 Acknowledgements
    Biography
    Title of Ralph de Tony (Royal Ancestry):

    Seigneur of Toeni (now Tosny) in Normandy
    Ralph V of Tosny
    RAOUL [V] de Tosny (-1162). The Chronicon Hanoniense names (in order) "Radulphum primum [filium Rogerum], Rogerum secundum et Balduinum tercium et Gaufridum quartum clericum" as the children of "[Rogerum] domino de Thoenio" & his wife[99]. Robert of Torigny records the death in 1162 of "Radulfus de Toene"[100].
    m (after 1155) MARGUERITE de Beaumont, daughter of ROBERT [II] Earl of Leicester & his wife Amice de Gačel ([1125]-after 1185). Robert of Torigny refers to the wife of "Radulfus de Toene" as "filia Roberti comitis Leccestriµ" but does not name her[101]. The 1163/64 Pipe Roll records "Margareta uxor Rad de Toeni" making payment "de Suppl de Welcumesto" in Essex/Hertfordshire[102]. The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Margareta de Tony…lx annorum” and her land “in Welcumestowe". Raoul [V] & wife had [two] children:
    ROGER [IV] de Tosny (-after 29 Dec 1208). Robert of Torigny records that "parvulo filio" succeeded in 1162 on the death of his father "Radulfus de Toene" but does not name him[104]. Seigneur de Tosny. The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], names "Rogerus de Tony" paying "xl s" in Sussex[105].
    [RALPH de Tosny of Holkham, co Norfolk (-before 1184). The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Radulfus de Tonay ii m" in Sussex in [1167/68][106].] m ADA de Chaumont, daughter of ROBERT de Chaumont & his wife -- (-aft 1184). Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “in Holkham…de feodo Rogeri de Tony” held by “Ade de Tony…fuit Roberti de Chaumunt”, adding that she has “i filium Baldewinum…xv annorum et…v filias”. A charter dated 25 Sep 1188 confirms the foundation of Dodnash Priory, Suffolk by "Baldewin de Toeni et dna Alda mr sua".
    Marriage
    Husband: Ralph de TOENI
    Wife: Margaret de BEAUMONT
    Child: Roger de TOENI
    Marriage: AFT 1155[1]
    Sources
    "Royal Ancestry" 2013 by Douglas Richardson Vol. I page 40
    Illegitimate child of Henry II, by a mistress, Ida de Tony, daughter of Ralph de Tony (died 1162), by Margaret, daughter of Robert, 2nd Earl of Leicester. Ida later became the wife of Roger le Bigod, Earl of Norfolk (died 1221).

    "Royal Ancestry" 2013 D. Richardson Vol. V p. 171-172
    Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XI, p. 55.
    Gallia Christiana, XI, Instrumenta, V, col. 128.
    Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Christ Church, Aldgate, London, VI, p. 152. Actes Henri II, Tome I, CCCCXXIII, p. 550.
    Hunter, J. (ed.) (1844) The Great Rolls of the Pipe for the second, third and fourth years of the reign of King Henry II 1155-1158 (London) ("Pipe Roll") 4 Hen II (1157), Norfolk and Suffolk, p. 125.
    Gisleberti Chronicon Hanoniense, MGH SS XXI, pp. 505 and 506.
    Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 134.
    Gisleberti Chronicon Hanoniense, MGH SS XXI, pp. 505 and 506.
    Chronique de Robert de Torigny I, 1162, p. 339.
    Chronique de Robert de Torigny I, 1162, p. 339.
    Pipe Roll Society, Vol. VII (1886) The Great Roll of the Pipe for the 10th year of King * Henry II (London) ("Pipe Roll 10 Hen II (1163/64)"), p. 38.
    Rotuli Dominabus, Rotuli VIII, Essex, p. 41.
    Chronique de Robert de Torigny I, 1162, p. 339.
    Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno VI regis Ricardi, ad redemptionem eius, scutagium ad XXs, p. 92.
    Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Knights fees, p. 47.
    Rotuli Dominabus, Rotuli V, Norffolk, p. 27.
    Ancient Charters (Round), Part I, 53, p. 87.
    Rotuli Dominabus, Rotuli V, Norffolk, p. 27.
    Ancient Charters (Round), Part I, 53, p. 87.
    Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, p. 499.
    Rotuli Dominabus, Rotuli V, Norffolk, p. 27.
    Gisleberti Chronicon Hanoniense, MGH SS XXI, pp. 505 and 506.
    Magna Carta Ancestry, Fenwick Allied Ancestry, Sellers. Teacher Genealogist Bond 007. http://fmg.ac/
    Jean Maunder Long Bio/Time, etc...
    Geni. Sources and discussion.

    end of biography

    History of the House of Tosny: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_of_Tosny

    Ralph married Margaret de Beaumont <1155, Leicester, Leicestershire, England. Margaret (daughter of Robert de Beaumont, Knight, 2nd Earl of Leicester and Amice de Montfort, Countess of Leicester) was born 0___ 1125, (Leicestershire, England); died Aft 1185. [Group Sheet]


  12. 123.  Margaret de Beaumont was born 0___ 1125, (Leicestershire, England) (daughter of Robert de Beaumont, Knight, 2nd Earl of Leicester and Amice de Montfort, Countess of Leicester); died Aft 1185.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Marguerite of Leicester

    Children:
    1. 61. Ida de Tosny, Countess of Norfolk was born <1160, Flamstead, Hertfordshire, England; died Aft 1185.

  13. 124.  John FitzGilbert was born 26 Nov 1105, (Wiltshire) England (son of Gilbert Giffard, Royal Serjeant and Mary Margarite De Venuz); died 29 Sep 1165, Rockley, Marlborough, Wiltshire, England; was buried Bradenstoke, Wiltshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: John Marshal
    • Also Known As: The Marshal of the Horses
    • Alt Birth: ~ 1105
    • Alt Death: 0___ 1165

    Notes:

    John FitzGilbert the Marshal of the Horses (c. 1105 – 1165) was a minor Anglo-Norman nobleman during the reign of King Stephen, and fought in the 12th century civil war on the side of Empress Matilda. Since at least 1130 and probably earlier, he had been the royal marshal to King Henry I. When Henry died, John FitzGilbert swore for Stephen and was granted the castles of Marlborough and Ludgershall, Wiltshire during this time. Along with Hamstead Marshal, this gave him control of the valley of the River Kennet in Wiltshire. Around 1139, John changed sides and swore for the Empress Matilda. In September 1141, Matilda fled the siege of Winchester and took refuge in the Marshal's castle at Ludgershall. While covering her retreat from Winchester, John Marshal was forced to take refuge at Wherwell Abbey. The attackers set fire to the building, and John lost an eye to dripping lead from the melting roof.

    In 1152, John had a celebrated confrontation with King Stephen, who had besieged him at Newbury Castle. After John had broken an agreement to surrender, Stephen threatened to kill his son, whom John had given as a hostage. John refused, saying he could make more sons, but Stephen apparently took pity on the young boy and did not kill him. The boy grew up to be William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke, a legendary figure in medieval lore, and one of the most powerful men in England.

    The office of Lord Marshal, which originally related to the keeping of the King's horses, and later, the head of his household troops, was won as a hereditary title by John, and was passed to his eldest son, and later claimed by William. John also had a daughter, Margaret Marshal, who married Ralph de Somery, son of John de Somery and Hawise de Paynell.

    Family

    John was the son of Gilbert, Royal Serjeant and Marshal to Henry I, and his wife Margaret. After his father died in 1129 John inherited the title of the king's marshal. John married Aline Pipard whose father Walter Pipard had been a friend of John's father. John arranged an annulment of his marriage to Aline Pipard in order to marry Sibyl of Salisbury, the sister of Patrick of Salisbury, who had been a local rival of his, and a supporter of King Stephen, up to that point. John had two sons by Aline - Gilbert (d. 1166) and Walter (d. bef.1165). Walter predeceased his father and Gilbert died shortly after inheriting his father's lands.

    John's eldest son by Sibyl of Salisbury, also called John Marshal (1145-1194), inherited the title of Marshal, which he held until his death. The title was then granted by King Richard the Lionheart to his second son by Sybilla, William (1147-1219), who made the name and title famous. Though he had started out as a younger son without inheritance, by the time he actually inherited the title his reputation as a soldier and statesman was unmatched across Western Europe. John Marshal had four sons in total by his second wife. As well as John and William, there was Henry (1150-1206), who went on to become Bishop of Exeter, and Ancel, who served as a knight in the household of his kinsman, Rotrou, Count of Perche. There were also two daughters Sybilla and Margaret.

    References

    Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis, Lines 55-28, 66-27, 81-28, 122A-29
    Barlow, Frank. The Feudal Kingdom of England 1042-1216 London: Longman Group Limited, 1961. ISBN 0-582-48237-2
    William Marshal, Knighthood, War and Chivalry 1147-1219 Longman 2002 ISBN 0-582-77222-2

    end of biography

    Biography

    John Fitz-Gilbert, also called John Marshal, was the son of Gilbert Giffard, who was like John an hereditary marshal of the household of King Henry I. John and his father Gilbert, it was noted several generations later by King John, had successfully claimed the right to being "chief" marshall against competing claims from Robert de Venoix and William de Hasings.[1] By the time of John's children, the surname was being used as an early example of a surname, not only by his son and heir, but also by his younger sons.

    John's career coincided with a dark 19-year period in Anglo-Norman history, called "The Anarchy" (1135-1164). It was an interregnum following King Henry I's death with no clear male heir (his legitimate son had been lost at sea in 1620). Henry I's illegitimate son, Stephen, seized the throne, opposed by Henry's daughter-in-law, Empress Matilda, fighting for her (legitimate) son's rights (he became King Henry II in 1164). The Anglo-Norman nobility nearly wrecked the country in a lengthy civil war.[2]

    John's marriage to Aline Pipard was a casualty of this conflict. From 1135 to 1140 John loyally served King Stephen as Marshal of England, managing the Army's supplies and accompanying the King when he secured Normandy to his cause. John received three important castles in Wiltshire as his reward. With Hamstead Marshal, this gave him control of Wiltshire's strategic Kennet River valley. He was bitterly opposed by Patrick de Salisbury (also in Wiltshire), who supported Empress Matilda.[3].

    In February 1141, Stephen's army was defeated at Lincoln and the King taken prisoner, temporarily. John, who may have opposed Stephen's questionable military strategy, decided to change sides. Later that year, with great bravery, he helped Empress Matilda escape an ambush in Wiltshire, loosing an eye and being left for dead in the process. At the same time he came to a political/family agreement with his local enemy, the Patrick of Salisbury, by arranging to annul his first marriage to his distant cousin Aline Pipard (for "consanguinity" an often-used excuse by Medieval nobles at a time when divorce was impossible) and marry Patrick's spinster sister, Sybil.[4]

    Aline's sons' rights were maintained but they both died within a year of their father, leaving John's lands, and the "Marshal of England" office, to John's third son (first son by Sibyl), John Marshal, who exercised it under King Henry II until his death in 1192. King Richard (Lionheart) then passed the office to his younger brother, William, who had gone to Normandy as squire to his cousin William de Tancarville, High Chamberlain of Normandy. Though William had started out as a fourth son without any inheritance, by the time he became the Marshal of England, his reputation as a soldier and statesman was unmatched. He expanded the powers of the Marshal's office and was later Regent for Henry III when he inherited the throne as a boy[5].

    John Fitz-Gilbert Marshal was a ruthless Anglo-Norman baron with considerable daring, energy, and ambition. His abilities as a soldier and his love of military stratagy were well recorded as was his political savvy. Despite what some detractors wrote, he was also quite loyal by contemporary standards. During the Anarchy he only changed sides once, remaining faithful to Matilda and her son after 1141 and defending them skillfully and at his own peril. His son William inherited his father's skills, reportedly rescuing Queen Eleanor (of Aquitaine), Henry II's wife, after an ambush near Lusignan Castle in France in 1167. After his brother's death without issue opened the way for him to become Marshal of England, he also showed great political skills, including helping implement the Magna Carta of 1215 between King John and the Barons. Between them, this father and son, from a relatively-minor Norman house, marked their century and influenced the course of English history.[6]

    Burial: Bradenstoke Priory, Wiltshire

    John FitzGilbert the Marshal (Marechal) (c. 1105 - 1165) was a minor Anglo-Norman nobleman during the reign of King Stephen, and fought in the 12th century civil war on the side of the Empress Matilda. Since at least 1130 and probably earlier, he had been the royal marshal to King Henry I. When Henry died, John FitzGilbert swore for Stephen and was granted the castles of Marlborough and Ludgershall, in Wiltshire. Along with Hamstead Marshal, this gave him control of the valley of the River Kennet in Wiltshire.

    Around 1139, John changed sides and swore for the Empress Matilda. In September 1141, Matilda fled the siege of Winchester and took refuge in the Marshal's castle at Ludgershall. While covering her retreat from Winchester, John Marshal was forced to take refuge at Wherwell Abbey. The attackers set fire to the building, and John lost an eye to dripping lead from the melting roof.

    In 1152, John had a legendary confrontation with King Stephen, who had besieged him at Newbury Castle. After John had broken an agreement to surrender, Stephen threatened to kill his son, whom John had given as a hostage. John refused, saying he could make more sons, but Stephen apparently took pity on the young boy and did not kill him. The boy grew up to be William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke, a legendary figure in medieval lore, and one of the most powerful men in England.

    The office of Lord Marshal, was an a hereditary title held by John's father, Gilbert Giffard, King's Marshal [7] and was passed to John, his eldest son, and then to John's eldest son also named John, who died in 1192. John's younger brother William (later Regent of England) then inherited the title.

    John the son of Gilbert, also had a daughter, Margaret Marshal, who married Ralph de Somery, son of John de Somery and Hawise de Paynell.

    John was the son of Gilbert Giffard (Royal Serjeant and Marshal to Henry I). In 1141, John arranged an annulment of his marriage to Aline Pipard in order to marry Sibyl of Salisbury, the sister of Patrick of Salisbury, [8] who had been a local rival of his, and a supporter of King Stephen, up to that point. John had two sons by Aline - Gilbert and Walter. Walter predeceased his father and Gilbert died shortly after inheriting his father's lands.

    John's eldest son by Sybilla of Salisbury, also called John Marshal (died 1194), inherited the title of Marshal, which he held until his death. The title was then granted by King Richard the Lionheart to John's second son by Sybilla, William, who made the name and title famous. Though William had started out as a younger son without inheritance, by the time he actually inherited the title of Marshal his reputation as a soldier and statesman was unmatched across Western Europe. John Marshal had four sons in total by his second wife. As well as John and William, there was Henry, who went on to become Bishop of Exeter, and Ancel, who served as a knight in the household of his kinsman, Rotrou, Count of Perche.
    Title of "Marshal"

    "Mareschal" is "Marshal" in from old French, the common language of the Anglo-Norman nobility of Medieval England. The title, which in Carolingian times had meant "horse servant". The position evolved into an official position and was imported from Normandy to England. John's father, Gilbert Fitz-Robert, was a marshal of King Henry I.

    Marshal was the title of the person in the king's household who maintained discipline at court; supplied receipts for payments, gifts and liveries from the king. He was over all servants of the court connected with the royal sports; over the king's bodyguard, and in charge of the horses. He was required to witness writs. It was an hereditary office. The Marshal took part in the ceremony of coronation. His sign of office was a baton bestowed by the king. [9]
    The Marshal, under the Royal Constable, was responsible for keeping order at the royal court, making billeting arrangements, tallying the household's expenditures, monitoring knights performing military service for the King, and insuring the imprisonment of debtors. Under John's son William, who was often simply called "The Marshal" the office became "Earl Marshal" and is still the seventh of the eight "great Officers of State" of the British monarchy, just below the Lord High Constable and above the Lord High Admiral.[10]


    Sources

    ? Round, J. H. (1911), The King's Serjeants & Officers of State with their Coronation Services. https://archive.org/stream/kingsserjeantsof00rounuoft#page/88/mode/2up
    ? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Anarchy
    ? http://www.geni.com/people/Aline-de-Pipard/6000000004382755262?through=6000000001353952871 and "John Fitz-Gilbert, the Marshal," © 1999 by Catherine Armstrong, at: http://www.castlewales.com/jf_gilbt.html
    ? See preceding note.
    ? "John Fitz-Gilbert, the Marshal," © 1999 by Catherine Armstrong, at: http://www.castlewales.com/jf_gilbt.html
    ? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Marshal,_1st_Earl_of_Pembroke and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Marshal_(Marshal_of_England)
    ? Medieval Lands
    ? Medieval Lands
    ? Dictionary of Medieval Knighthood and Chivalry page 326
    ? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earl_Marshal#Lords_Marshal_of_England.2C_1135.E2.80.931397
    http://www.castlewales.com/jf_gilbt.html - excellent narrative; well researched short biography, (c) 1999 by Catherine Armstrong.
    http://www.geni.com/people/John-FitzGilbert-The-Marshal-of-England/6000000006265484751?through=6000000002459854209
    Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis, Lines 55-28, 66-27, 81-28, 122A-29
    Barlow, Frank, The Feudal Kingdom of England 1042-1216 (London: Longman Group Limited, 1961). ISBN 0-582-48237-2
    William Marshal, Knighthood, War and Chivalry 1147-1219, Longman, 2002, ISBN 0 582 77222 2
    Richardson, Douglas, and Kimball G. Everingham. 2013. Royal ancestry: a study in colonial and medieval families. Salt Lake City, UT.: Douglas Richardson. Vol IV, page 34-35, cited by Mr. Marlyn Lewis, Our Royal, Titled, Noble, and Commoner Ancestors & Cousins, database online, Portland, Oregon.
    Medieval Lands, database online, author Charles Cawley, (Foundation for Medieval Genealogy, 2006-2013), England, earls created 1138-1143, Chapter 10, Pembroke: B. Earls of Pembroke 1189-1245 (MARSHAL), 1. John FitzGilbert "the Marshal"

    See also:

    Dictionary of Medieval Knighthood and Chivalry, Bradford B. Broughton, (Westport, Connecticut, Greenwood Press, Inc., 1986).

    end of biography

    Buried:
    Bradenstoke Priory is a medieval priory in the village of Bradenstoke, Wiltshire, England. It is noted today for some of its structures having been used by William Randolph Hearst for the renovation of St Donat's Castle, near Llantwit Major, Wales, in the 1930s. ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bradenstoke_Priory

    John married Sibyl of Salisbury 0___ 1142, Wooten Basset, Wiltshire, England. Sibyl (daughter of Walter of Salisbury and Sibilla de Chaworth) was born 27 Nov 1126; died 0___ 1176, Old Sarum (Salisbury), Wiltshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  14. 125.  Sibyl of Salisbury was born 27 Nov 1126 (daughter of Walter of Salisbury and Sibilla de Chaworth); died 0___ 1176, Old Sarum (Salisbury), Wiltshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Sybilla Evreux

    Children:
    1. 62. William Marshal, Templar Knight, 1st Earl Pembroke was born 1146-1147, (Berkshire, England); died 14 Apr 1219, Caversham, Berkshire, England; was buried Temple Church, London, Middlesex, England.
    2. FNU Marshal was born ~ 1150.

  15. 126.  Richard de Clare, Knight, 2nd Earl Pembroke was born 0___ 1125, Tonbridge, Kent, England (son of Gilbert de Clare, Knight, 1st Earl of Pembroke and Isabel de Beaumont); died 20 Apr 1176, Dublin, Leinster, Ireland.

    Richard married Eva Aoife Mac Murchada, Countess Pembroke 26 Aug 1171, Waterford, Ireland. Eva (daughter of Dermot Dairmait Mac Murchada, King of Leinster and Mor Tauthail Moringen Murchertaig O'Toole, Queen of Ireland) was born 26 Apr 1141, Dublin, Leinster, Ireland; died 0___ 1188, Waterford, Ireland; was buried Tintern, Monmouthshire, Wales. [Group Sheet]


  16. 127.  Eva Aoife Mac Murchada, Countess Pembroke was born 26 Apr 1141, Dublin, Leinster, Ireland (daughter of Dermot Dairmait Mac Murchada, King of Leinster and Mor Tauthail Moringen Murchertaig O'Toole, Queen of Ireland); died 0___ 1188, Waterford, Ireland; was buried Tintern, Monmouthshire, Wales.
    Children:
    1. Richard de Clare, Knight, 3rd Earl of Hertford was born ~ 1153, Tonbridge Castle, Kent, England; died 28 Nov 1217.
    2. 63. Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke was born 0___ 1172, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales; died 14 Oct 1217, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales; was buried Tintern Abbey, Tintern, Monmouthshire, Wales.


Generation: 8

  1. 216.  Henry de Beaumont, Knight, 1st Earl of Warwick was born ~ 1050, (Meulan) Normandy, France (son of Roger de Beaumont and Adeline of Meulan); died 20 Jun 1119; was buried Les Preaux, Normandy, France.

    Other Events:

    • Possessions: Llanrhidian, Wales
    • Possessions: Penrhys, Wales
    • Possessions: Swansea, Wales
    • Also Known As: Henry de Newburgh

    Notes:

    Henry de Beaumont, (alias de Newburgh), 1st Earl of Warwick (died 20 June 1119) was a Norman nobleman who rose to great prominence in England.

    Origins

    Henry was a younger son of Roger de Beaumont by Adeline of Meulan, daughter of Waleran III, Count of Meulan, and Oda de Conteville.

    Granted lordship of Le Neubourg[edit]
    He was given by his father the modest lordship of Le Neubourg, in central Normandy, 12 km NE of his father's caput of Beaumont-le-Roger on the River Risle. From this lordship he adopted for himself and his descendants the surname Anglicised to "de Newburgh", frequently Latinised to de Novo Burgo (meaning "from the new borough/town").

    Career

    Henry was said, by Orderic Vitalis the Norman monk historian, to have been with William the Conqueror on his 1068 campaign in the Midlands when he was supposedly given charge of Warwick Castle, but there is no supporting evidence for this late source. Little is in fact known of his career before 1088. However he took a leading role in reconciling the Conqueror with his eldest son Robert Curthose in 1081 so he stood high in the Conqueror's favour. In 1088 he was a royal agent in the arrest and trial of the traitorous bishop of Durham, William de Saint-Calais.

    Created 1st Earl of Warwick

    In due course he acquired a much greater land-holding in England when, in reward for help in suppressing the Rebellion of 1088, King William II made him Earl of Warwick in 1088. The lands of the earldom were put together from several sources. The bulk was provided by the majority of the lands in Warwickshire and elsewhere recorded as those of his elder brother Robert, Count of Meulan in the Domesday Survey of 1086. He also received large royal estates in Rutland and the royal forest of Sutton, which became Sutton Chase. The complicated arrangement to endow his earldom is unprecedented, and must have been the result of a three way arrangement between his father, his brother and the king.

    Supporter of Henry I

    Henry became the companion and friend of King Henry I, William II's successor. When in 1100 a division took place amongst the barons, who had gathered together in the aftermath of the king's sudden death to choose a successor to William II, it was mainly owing to his advice that Henry, the conqueror's fourth son, was selected. However, in the following year most of the barons were openly or secretly disloyal and favoured the attempt of Duke Robert to gain the Crown. Henry de Beaumont and his brother were amongst the few that remained faithful to the King.

    Acquires lordship of Gower

    He acquired the lordship of Gower in Wales around 1107 from the favour of King Henry and built a castle at Swansea, which was unsuccessfully attacked by the Welsh in 1113; he also captured the Gower Peninsula in south west Glamorgan. He or his barons built other castles at Penrhys, Llanrhidian and Swansea in 1120, together with the others at Oystermouth and Loughor, the only remains of the latter are a mound and a keep.[1][2][2]

    Marriage & progeny

    He married before 1100 Margaret, daughter of Geoffrey II of Perche and Beatrix of Montdidier, daughter of Hilduin IV, Count of Montdidier, and had the following children:

    Roger de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Warwick (c.1102-1153), who succeeded him as Earl of Warwick.
    Robert de Neubourg (d.1159), who inherited Henry's Norman lands and was Steward of Normandy. His eldest son Henry de Neubourgh (c. 1130 - 1214) inherited his lands in Normandy, while his younger son Roger de Newburgh (c. 1135 - 1192) inherited his lands in Dorset.
    Rotrou (died 27 November 1183), who was Bishop of âEvreux subsequently Archbishop of Rouen, and Chief Justiciar and Steward of Normandy.
    Geoffrey de Neubourg. He moved to England at the end of 1137 and resided thereafter with his eldest brother Earl Roger of Warwick. He made a number of appearances in Earl Roger's charters as "Geoffrey the earl's brother." When Roger died in 1153 and was succeeded by his son, Earl William, "Geoffrey the earl's uncle" continued to live in the Warwick household. He appears as a ducal justice in Normandy in his later years. See Haskins Society Journal 13 (2004): 50.
    Henry de Neubourg, otherwise known as "Henry of Gower", who re-conquered the family's Welsh estates in around 1136, holding the lordship of Gower throughout the reign of King Stephen.

    Death & burial

    He entered the abbey of St Peter of Les Prâeaux before his death and died as a monk there on 20 June 1119. An eighteenth-century woodcut of his tomb in the chapter house, with those of his brother and father beside him, survives, though the abbey is long ruined.

    end

    Henry married Margaret of Perche Bef 1100. [Group Sheet]


  2. 217.  Margaret of Perche
    Children:
    1. 108. Roger de Beaumont was born 0___ 1102; died 12 Jun 1153.

  3. 218.  William de Warenne, Knight, 2nd Earl of Surrey was born 0___ 1065, East Sussex, England (son of William de Warenne, Knight, 1st Earl of Surrey and Gundred of Flanders, Countess of Surrey); died 11 May 1138; was buried Lewes Priory, Sussex, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Earl of Warenne
    • Also Known As: Earl Warenne

    Notes:

    William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey (died 11 May 1138) was the son of William de Warenne, 1st Earl of Surrey and his first wife Gundred. He was more often referred to as Earl Warenne or Earl of Warenne than as Earl of Surrey.[1]

    Life

    His father, the 1st Earl, was one of the Conqueror's most trusted and most rewarded barons who, at his death in 1088, was the 3rd or 4th richest magnate in England.[2] In 1088 William II inherited his father's lands in England and his Norman estates including the castles of Mortemer and Bellencombre in Haute-Normandy. But William II was not as disposed to serve the king as his father was.[2] In January 1091, William assisted Hugh of Grantmesnil (d.1094) in his defense of Courcy against the forces of Robert de Belleme and Duke Robert of Normandy.[3] In 1093 he attempted to marry Matilda (or Edith), daughter of king Malcolm III of Scotland.[4] She instead married Henry I of England, and this may have been the cause of William's great dislike of Henry I, which motivated him in the following years.[5]

    When Robert Curthose, Duke of Normandy invaded England 1101 William joined him.[6] But when Curthose promptly surrendered to Henry I, William lost his English lands and titles and was exiled to Normandy.[6] There he complained to Curthose that he had expended great effort on the duke's behalf and in return lost all of his English possessions. Curthose's return to England in 1103 was apparently made to convince his brother, the king, to restore William's earldom. This was successful, though Curthose had to give up his 3000 mark annual pension he had received after the 1101 invasion, after which William's lands and titles were restored to him.[5]

    To further insure William's loyalty Henry considered marrying him to one of his many illegitimate daughters. Archbishop Anselm of Canterbury forbade the marriage based on the couple being related in the 4th generation on one side, and in the 6th generation on the other.[7] William was one of the commanders on Henry's side (against Robert Curthose) at the Battle of Tinchebray in 1106. Afterwards, with his loyalty thus proven, he became more prominent in Henry's court.[1]

    In 1110, Curthose's son William Clito escaped along with Helias of Saint-Saens, and afterwards Warenne received the forfeited Saint-Saens lands, which were very near his own in upper Normandy. In this way king Henry further assured his loyalty, for the successful return of Clito would mean at the very least Warenne's loss of this new territory.[1][8] He fought for Henry I at the Battle of Bremule in 1119.[1][9] William, the second Earl of Surrey was present at Henry's deathbed in 1135.[1][10] After the king's death disturbances broke out in Normandy and William was sent to guard Rouen and the Pays de Caux.[1][11]

    William's death is recorded as 11-May-1138 in the register of Lewes Priory and he was buried at his father's feet at the Chapter house there.[12] His wife, the countess Elizabeth, survived him, dying before July 1147.[12]

    Family

    In 1118 William finally acquired the royal-blooded bride he desired when he married Elizabeth de Vermandois.[13] She was a daughter of count Hugh of Vermandois, a granddaughter of Henry I, King of France, and was the widow of Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Leicester.[14]

    By Elizabeth his wife he had three sons and two daughters:

    William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey[15][16]
    Reginald de Warenne, who inherited his father's property in upper Normandy, including the castles of Bellencombre and Mortemer.[16] He married Adeline or Alice, daughter of William, lord of Wormgay in Norfolk, by whom he had a son William (founder of the priory of Wormegay),[16] whose daughter and sole heir, Beatrice married first Doun, lord Bardolf, and secondly Hubert de Burgh.[17][18] Reginald was one of the persecutors of Archbishop Thomas in 1170.
    Ralph de Warenne[19]
    Gundred de Warenne,[19] who married first Roger de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Warwick[20] and second William, lord of Kendal, and is most remembered for expelling king Stephen's garrison from Warwick Castle.
    Ada de Warenne, who married Henry of Scotland, 3rd Earl of Huntingdon, the mother of two Scottish kings,[21] she made many grants to the priory of Lewes.[22]
    Ancestry[edit]
    [show]Ancestors of William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey
    References[edit]
    ^ Jump up to: a b c d e f G. E. Cokayne, The Complete Peerage, Vol. XII/1 (The St. Catherine Press, London, 1953) p. 495
    ^ Jump up to: a b C. Warren Hollister, 'The Taming of a Turbulent Earl: Henry I and William of Warenne', Historical Reflections, Vol. 3 (1976), p. 87
    Jump up ^ The Ecclesiastical History of Orderic Vitalis, ed. Marjorie Chibnall, Vol. 2 (Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1990)p. 692
    Jump up ^ C. Warren Hollister, Henry I (Yale University Press, New Haven & London, 2003)p. 340
    ^ Jump up to: a b C. Warren Hollister, 'The Taming of a Turbulent Earl: Henry I and William of Warenne', Historical Reflections. Vol. 3 (1976) p. 87
    ^ Jump up to: a b The Ecclesiastical History of Orderic Vitalis, ed. Marjorie Chibnall, Vol. 2 (Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1990), p.785
    Jump up ^ Edmund Chester Waters, 'Gundrada de Warenne', Archaeological Journal, Vol. XLI (1884), p. 303
    Jump up ^ C. Warren Hollister, 'The Taming of a Turbulent Earl: Henry I and William of Warenne', Historical Reflections, Vol. 3 (1976) p. 89
    Jump up ^ Orderic Vitalis, The Ecclesiastical History of England and Normandy, trans. Thomas Forester, Vol. III (Henry G. Bohn, London, 1854) pp. 481-2
    Jump up ^ Orderic Vitalis, The Ecclesiastical History of England and Normandy, trans. Thomas Forester, Vol. IV (Henry G. Bohn, London, 1856) p. 150
    Jump up ^ C. Warren Hollister, Henry I (Yale University Press, New Haven & London, 2003)p. 375
    ^ Jump up to: a b G. E. Cokayne, The Complete Peerage, Vol. XII/1 (The St. Catherine Press, London, 1953) p. 496
    Jump up ^ C. Warren Hollister, 'The Taming of a Turbulent Earl: Henry I and William of Warenne', Historical Reflections, Vol. 3 (1976) p. 90 n. 36
    Jump up ^ Detlev Schwennicke, Europčaische Stammtafeln: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europčaischen Staaten, Neue Folge, Band III Teilband 1, Herzogs und Grafenhčauser des Heiligen Rčomischen Reiches Andere Europčaiche Fčurstenhčauser (Marburg, Germany: Verlag von J. A. Stargardt, 1984), Tafel 55
    Jump up ^ G. E. Cokayne, The Complete Peerage, Vol. XII/1 (The St. Catherine Press, London, 1953) p. 500
    ^ Jump up to: a b c Early Yorkshire Charters, Vol. VIII - The Honour of Warenne (The Yorkshire Archaeological Society, 1949) pp. 27-8
    Jump up ^ G.E.Cokayne, The Complete Peerage, Vol. VII (The St. Catherine Press, 1929), p. 142, footnote (a)
    Jump up ^ Early Yorkshire Charters, Vol. VIII - The Honour of Warenne (The Yorkshire Archaeological Society, 1949) pp. 33-4
    ^ Jump up to: a b Early Yorkshire Charters, Vol. VIII - The Honour of Warenne (The Yorkshire Archaeological Society, 1949) pp. 10-11
    Jump up ^ Elisabeth van Houts, 'The Warenne View of the Past 1066-1203', Anglo-Norman Studies XXVI, Proceedings of the Battle Conference 2003, ed. John Gillingham (Boydell Press, Woodbridge. 2004), p. 109 n. 49
    Jump up ^ The Scots Peerage, Founded on Wood's Edition of Sir Robert Douglas's Peerage of Scotland, ed. Sir James Balfour Paul, Lord Lyon King of Arms, Vol. I (Edinburgh: David Douglas, 1904, p. 4
    Jump up ^ Early Yorkshire Charters, ed: William Farrer, Charles Travis Clay, Volume VIII - The Honour of Warenne (The Yorkshire Archaeological Society, 1949), p. 11

    External links

    "Warenne, William de (d.1138)". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900.
    The Ecclesiastical History of Orderic Vitalis, ed. M. Chibnall, vol. 2, p. 264 (Oxford, 1990)

    William — Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester. Isabel (daughter of Hugues de France and Adelaide of Vermandois) was born 0___ 1081, Basse-Normandie, France; died 17 Feb 1131, France; was buried Lewes Priory, Southover, Sussex, England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 219.  Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester was born 0___ 1081, Basse-Normandie, France (daughter of Hugues de France and Adelaide of Vermandois); died 17 Feb 1131, France; was buried Lewes Priory, Southover, Sussex, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Elizabeth de Vermandois

    Notes:

    Birth: 1081
    Basse-Normandie, France
    Death: Feb. 17, 1131, France

    Countess of Leicester, Countess of Surrey

    Third daughter of Hugh Magnus and Adelaide of Vermandois, granddaughter of King Henry I of France and Anne of Kiev, Herbert IV, Count of Vermandois, and Adele of Valois. She was the heiress of the county of Vermandois and descendant of Charlemagne.

    Wife of Sir Robert de Beaumont, Count of Meulan, the son of Roger de Beaumont and Adeline of Meulan; Isabel became the Countess of Leicester. They married about 1096 and had three sons and at least five daughters:
    * Emma b 1101, probably died young
    * Waleran IV de Beaumont, Count of Meulan, twin
    * Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester, twin
    * Hugh de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Bedford
    * Adeline, wife of Hugh Montfort & Richard de Granville
    * Aubree, wife of Hugh II of Chăateauneuf-en-Thimerais
    * Maud, wife of William Lovel
    * Isabel, mistress of King Henry I, wife of Gilbert de Clare and mother of Richard Strongbow & wife of Hervâe de Montmorency

    Secondly, the wife of William de Warenne, son of William de Warenne, 1st Earl of Surrey and his first wife Gundred; Isabel became the Countess of Surrey. They married in 1118 and had three sons and two daughters:
    * William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey
    Ralph de Warenne
    * Reginald de Warenne
    * Gundrada de Warenne, wife of Roger de Beaumont& William de Lancaster
    * Ada de Warenne, wife of Henry of Scotland, 3rd Earl of Huntingdon, mother King Malcolm IV and King William I 'the Lion'

    Sir Robert de Beaumont, described as being "the wisest man in his time between London and Jerusalem", and aged over fifty was determined to marry Isabel, aged about eleven. Bishop Ivo dismissed their request based on their being within a few degrees of kindred. Isabel's father was able to sway Bishop Ivo, and saw his daughter married by April of 1096 when he left on a crusade.

    In 1115, Isabel was either carried away or willingly abducted by William de Warrene, revealing they had been lovers for some time. They were unable to marry until the death of Sir Robert, which occurred in 1118.

    The Beaumont sons were on opposite sides of support for King Stephen and Queen Matilda, but were not enemies.

    Sources vary on her death, reported as 1131 to outliving William who died in 1138.

    Family links:
    Parents:
    Hugues de France (1057 - 1102)

    Spouses:
    Robert de Beaumont (1049 - 1118)
    William II de Warenne (1065 - 1138)

    Children:
    Waleran de Beaumont (1104 - 1166)*
    Robert de Beaumont (1104 - 1168)*
    Reginald de Warenne (1113 - 1179)*
    William de Warenne (1118 - 1148)*
    Ada De Warenne De Huntingdon (1120 - 1178)*

    Sibling:
    Isabel Of Vermandois Beaumont de Warenne (1081 - 1131)
    Raoul I de Vermandois (1094 - 1152)*

    *Calculated relationship

    Burial:
    Lewes Priory
    Lewes
    Lewes District
    East Sussex, England

    end

    Children:
    1. William de Warenne, Knight, 3rd Earl of Surrey was born 0Jun 1118, East Sussex, England; died 6 Jan 1148, Turkey.
    2. Ada de Warenne was born ~ 1120, Surry, England; died 0___ 1178, England.
    3. 109. Gundred de Warenne

  5. 232.  Gilbert Fitz Richard, Knight, 2nd Lord of Clare was born > 1066, Clare, Suffolk, England; died 0___ 1117; was buried Tonbridge Priory, Kent, England.

    Notes:

    Gilbert Fitz Richard (c.?1066–c.?1117), was styled de Clare, de Tonbridge, and Lord of Clare. He was a powerful Anglo-Norman baron who was granted the Lordship of Cardigan, in Wales c.?1107-1111.

    Life

    Gilbert, born before 1066, was the second son and an heir of Richard Fitz Gilbert of Clare and Rohese Giffard.[1] He succeeded to his father's possessions in England in 1088 when his father retired to a monastery;[2] his brother, Roger Fitz Richard, inherited his father's lands in Normandy.[3] That same year he, along with his brother Roger, fortified his castle at Tonbridge against the forces of William Rufus. But his castle was stormed, Gilbert was wounded and taken prisoner.[4] However he and his brother were in attendance on king William Rufus at his death in August 1100.[4] He was with Henry I at his Christmas court at Westminster in 1101.[4]

    It has been hinted, by modern historians, that Gilbert, as a part of a baronial conspiracy, played some part in the suspicious death of William II.[5] Frank Barlow points out that no proof has been found he had any part in the king's death or that a conspiracy even existed.[5]

    In 1110, King Henry I took Cardigan from Owain ap Cadwgan, son of Cadwgan ap Bleddyn as punishment for a number of crimes including that of the abduction of Nest, wife of Gerald de Windsor.[6] In turn Henry gave the Lordship of Cardigan, including Cardigan Castle to Gilbert Fitz Richard.[7] He founded the Clunic priory at Stoke-by-Clare, Suffolk.[7] Gilbert died in or before 1117.[7][8]

    Family

    About 1088,[9] Gilbert married Adeliza/Alice de Claremont, daughter of Hugh, Count of Clermont, and Margaret de Roucy.[8] Gilbert and Adeliza had at least eight children:

    Richard Fitz Gilbert de Clare, d. 1136.[10]
    Gilbert Fitz Gilbert de Clare, d. 1148, 1st Earl of Pembroke.[10]
    Baldwin Fitz Gilbert de Clare, d. 1154, m. Adeline de Rollos.[11]
    Adelize/Alice de Clare, d. 1163, m. (ca. 1105), Aubrey II de Vere, son of Aubrey I de Vere and Beatrice.[12] She had 9 children and in her widowhood was a corrodian at St. Osyth's, Chich, Essex.
    Hervey de Clare, Lord of Montmorency.[13]
    Walter de Clare, d. 1149.[14]
    Margaret de Clare, d. 1185, m. (ca. 1108), Sir William de Montfitchet, Lord of Stansted Mountfitchet.[15]
    Rohese de Clare, d. 1149, m. (ca. 1130), Baderon of Monmouth[16]

    end

    Gilbert — Adeliza de Claremont. [Group Sheet]


  6. 233.  Adeliza de Claremont

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Adeliza de Breteuil

    Children:
    1. 116. Richard Fitz Gilbert de Clare was born Clare, Suffolk, England; died 15 Apr 1136, Abergavenny, Monmouthshire, Wales.
    2. Adeliza de Clare died 0___ 1163.
    3. Agnes Clare was born ~ 1091, Clare, Suffolk, England; died 1115.
    4. Gilbert de Clare, Knight, 1st Earl of Pembroke was born ~ 1100, Tonbridge, Kent, England; died 6 Jan 1148.

  7. 234.  Ranulf Meschin, Knight, 3rd Earl of Chester was born 0___ 1070, (Bayeux, Normandy, France); died 0Jan 1129; was buried Chester Abbey, Cheshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Lord of Cumberland

    Notes:

    Biography

    Family and origins

    Ranulf le Meschin's father and mother represented two different families of viscounts in Normandy, and both of them were strongly tied to Henry, son of William the Conqueror.[1] His father was Ranulf de Briquessart, and likely for this reason the former Ranulf was styled le Meschin, "the younger".[2] Ranulf's father was viscount of the Bessin, the area around Bayeux.[3] Besides Odo, bishop of Bayeux, Ranulf the elder was the most powerful magnate in the Bessin region of Normandy.[4] Ranulf le Meschin's great-grandmother may even have been from the ducal family of Normandy, as le Meschin's paternal great-grandfather viscount Anschitil is known to have married a daughter of Duke Richard III.[5]

    Ranulf le Meschin's mother, Margaret, was the daughter of Richard le Goz, Viscount of Avranches.[1] Richard's father Thurstan Goz had become viscount of the Hiâemois between 1017 and 1025,[6] while Richard himself became viscount of the Avranchin in either 1055 or 1056.[7] Her brother (Richard Goz's son) was Hugh d'Avranches "Lupus" ("the Wolf"), viscount of the Avranchin and Earl of Chester (from c. 1070).[8] Ranulf was thus, in addition to being heir to the Bessin, the nephew of one of Norman England's most powerful and prestigious families.[9]

    We know from an entry in the Durham Liber Vitae, c. 1098 x 1120, that Ranulf le Meschin had an older brother named Richard (who died in youth), and a younger brother named William.[10] He had a sister called Agnes, who later married Robert de Grandmesnil (died 1136).[2]

    Early career

    Historian C. Warren Hollister thought that Ranulf's father Ranulf de Briquessart was one of the early close companions of Prince Henry, the future Henry I.[4] Hollister called Ranulf the Elder "a friend from Henry's youthful days in western Normandy",[11] and argued that the homeland of the two Ranulfs had been under Henry's overlordship since 1088, despite both ducal and royal authority lying with Henry's two brothers.[12] Hollister further suggested that Ranulf le Meschin may have had a role in persuading Robert Curthose to free Henry from captivity in 1089.[13]

    The date of Ranulf senior's death, and succession of Ranulf junior, is unclear, but the former's last and the latter's earliest appearance in extant historical records coincides, dating to 24 April 1089 in charter of Robert Curthose, Duke of Normandy, to Bayeux Cathedral.[14] Ranulf le Meschin appears as "Ranulf son of Ranulf the viscount".[14]

    In the foundation charter of Chester Abbey granted by his uncle Hugh Lupus, earl of Chester, and purportedly issued in 1093, Ranulf le Meschin is listed as a witness.[15] His attestation to this grant is written Signum Ranulfi nepotis comitis, "signature of Ranulf nephew of the earl".[16] However, the editor of the Chester comital charters, Geoffrey Barraclough, thought this charter was forged in the period of Earl Ranulf II.[17] Between 1098 and 1101 (probably in 1098) Ranulf became a major English landowner in his own right when he became the third husband of Lucy, heiress of the honour of Bolingbroke in Lincolnshire.[18] This acquisition also brought him the lordship of Appleby in Westmorland, previously held by Lucy's second husband Ivo Taillebois.[2]

    Marriage to a great heiress came only with royal patronage, which in turn meant that Ranulf had to be respected and trusted by the king. Ranulf was probably, like his father, among the earliest and most loyal of Henry's followers, and was noted as such by Orderic Vitalis.[19] Ranulf was however not recorded often at the court of Henry I, and did not form part of the king's closest group of administrative advisers.[20] He witnessed charters only occasionally, though this became more frequent after he became earl.[21] In 1106 he is found serving as one of several justiciars at York hearing a case about the lordship of Ripon.[22] In 1116 he is recorded in a similar context.[2]

    Ranulf was, however, one of the king's military companions. When, soon after Whitsun 1101 Henry heard news of a planned invasion of England by his brother Robert Curthose, he sought promises from his subjects to defend the kingdom.[23] A letter to the men of Lincolnshire names Ranulf as one of four figures entrusted with collecting these oaths.[24] Ranulf was one of the magnates who accompanied King Henry on his invasion of Duke Robert's Norman territory in 1106.[25] Ranulf served under Henry as an officer of the royal household when the latter was on campaign; Ranulf was in fact one of his three commanders at the Battle of Tinchebrai.[26] The first line of Henry's force was led by Ranulf, the second (with the king) by Robert of Meulan, and third by William de Warrene, with another thousand knights from Brittany and Maine led by Helias, Count of Maine.[27] Ranulf's line consisted of the men of Bayeux, Avranches and Coutances.[28]

    Lord of Cumberland

    The gatehouse of Wetheral Priory, founded by Ranulf c. 1106.
    A charter issued in 1124 by David I, King of the Scots, to Robert I de Brus cited Ranulf's lordship of Carlisle and Cumberland as a model for Robert's new lordship in Annandale.[29] This is significant because Robert is known from other sources to have acted with semi-regal authority in this region.[2] A source from 1212 attests that the jurors of Cumberland remembered Ranulf as quondam dominus Cumberland ("sometime Lord of Cumberland").[30] Ranulf possessed the power and in some respects the dignity of a semi-independent earl in the region, though he lacked the formal status of being called such. A contemporary illustration of this authority comes from the records of Wetheral Priory, where Ranulf is found addressing his own sheriff, "Richer" (probably Richard de Boivill, baron of Kirklinton).[31] Indeed, no royal activity occurred in Cumberland or Westmorland during Ranulf's time in charge there, testimony to the fullness of his powers in the region.[32]

    Ivo Taillebois, when he married Ranulf's future wife Lucy, had acquired her Lincolnshire lands but sometime after 1086 he acquired estates in Kendal and elsewhere in Westmorland. Adjacent lands in Westmorland and Lancashire that had previously been controlled by Earl Tostig Godwinson were probably carved up between Roger the Poitevin and Ivo in the 1080s, a territorial division at least partially responsible for the later boundary between the two counties.[33] Norman lordship in the heartland of Cumberland can be dated from chronicle sources to around 1092, the year King William Rufus seized the region from its previous ruler, Dolfin.[34] There is inconclusive evidence that settlers from Ivo's Lincolnshire lands had come into Cumberland as a result.[35]

    Between 1094 and 1098 Lucy was married to Roger fitz Gerold de Roumare, and it is probable that this marriage was the king's way of transferring authority in the region to Roger fitz Gerold.[36] Only from 1106 however, well into the reign of Henry I, do we have certain evidence that this authority had come to Ranulf.[2] The "traditional view", held by the historian William Kapelle, was that Ranulf's authority in the region did not come about until 1106 or after, as a reward for participation in the Battle of Tinchebrai.[37] Another historian, Richard Sharpe, has recently attacked this view and argued that it probably came in or soon after 1098. Sharpe stressed that Lucy was the mechanism by which this authority changed hands, and pointed out that Ranulf had been married to Lucy years before Tinchebrai and can be found months before Tinchebrai taking evidence from county jurors at York (which may have been responsible for Cumbria at this point).[38]

    Ranulf likewise distributed land to the church, founding a Benedictine monastic house at Wetheral.[39] This he established as a daughter-house of St Mary's Abbey, York, a house that in turn had been generously endowed by Ivo Taillebois.[30] This had occurred by 1112, the year of the death of Abbot Stephen of St Mary's, named in the foundation deed.[40] In later times at least, the priory of Wetheral was dedicated to St Mary and the Holy Trinity, as well as another saint named Constantine.[41] Ranulf gave Wetheral, among other things, his two churches at Appleby, St Lawrences (Burgate) and St Michaels (Bongate).[42]

    As an incoming regional magnate Ranulf would be expected to distribute land to his own followers, and indeed the record of the jurors of Cumberland dating to 1212 claimed that Ranulf created two baronies in the region.[43] Ranulf's brother-in-law Robert de Trevers received the barony of Burgh-by-Sands, while the barony of Liddel went to Turgis Brandos.[30] He appears to have attempted to give the large compact barony of Gilsland to his brother William, but failed to dislodge the native lord, the eponymous "Gille" son of Boite; later the lordship of Allerdale (including Copeland), even larger than Gilsland stretching along the coast from the River Ellen to the River Esk, was given to William.[44] Kirklinton may have been given to Richard de Boivill, Ranulf's sheriff.[2]

    Earl of Chester

    Chester Cathedral today, originally Chester Abbey, where Ranulf's body was buried.
    1120 was a fateful year for both Henry I and Ranulf. Richard, earl of Chester, like Henry's son and heir William Adeling, died in the White Ship Disaster near Barfleur on 25 November.[2] Only four days before the disaster, Ranulf and his cousin Richard had witnessed a charter together at Cerisy.[2]

    Henry probably could not wait long to replace Richard, as the Welsh were resurgent under the charismatic leadership of Gruffudd ap Cynan. According to the Historia Regum, Richard's death prompted the Welsh to raid Cheshire, looting, killing, and burning two castles.[45] Perhaps because of his recognised military ability and social strength, because he was loyal and because he was the closest male relation to Earl Richard, Henry recognized Ranulf as Richard's successor to the county of Chester.[46]

    In 1123, Henry sent Ranulf to Normandy with a large number of knights and with his bastard son, Robert, Earl of Gloucester, to strengthen the garrisons there.[47] Ranulf commanded the king's garrison at âEvreux and governed the county of âEvreux during the 1123-1124 war with William Clito, Robert Curthose's son and heir.[48] In March 1124 Ranulf assisted in the capture of Waleran, Count of Meulan.[49] Scouts informed Ranulf that Waleran's forces were planning an expedition to Vatteville, and Ranulf planned an to intercept them, a plan carried out by Henry de Pommeroy, Odo Borleng and William de Pont-Authou, with 300 knights.[50] A battle followed, perhaps at Rougemontier (or Bourgthâeroulde), in which Waleran was captured.[51]

    Although Ranulf bore the title "earl of Chester", the honour (i.e., group of estates) which formed the holdings of the earl of Chester were scattered throughout England, and during the rule of his predecessors included the cantref of Tegeingl in Perfeddwlad in north-western Wales.[52] Around 1100, only a quarter of the value of the honour actually lay in Cheshire, which was one of England's poorest and least developed counties.[53] The estates elsewhere were probably given to the earls in compensation for Cheshire's poverty, in order to strengthen its vulnerable position on the Anglo-Welsh border.[54] The possibility of conquest and booty in Wales should have supplemented the lordship's wealth and attractiveness, but for much of Henry's reign the English king tried to keep the neighboring Welsh princes under his peace.[55]

    Ranulf's accession may have involved him giving up many of his other lands, including much of his wife's Lincolnshire lands as well as his lands in Cumbria, though direct evidence for this beyond convenient timing is lacking.[56] That Cumberland was given up at this point is likely, as King Henry visited Carlisle in December 1122, where, according to the Historia Regum, he ordered the strengthening of the castle.[57]

    Hollister believed that Ranulf offered the Bolingbroke lands to Henry in exchange for Henry's bestowal of the earldom.[13] The historian A. T. Thacker believed that Henry I forced Ranulf to give up most of the Bolingbroke lands through fear that Ranulf would become too powerful, dominating both Cheshire and the richer county of Lincoln.[58] Sharpe, however, suggested that Ranulf may have had to sell a great deal of land in order to pay the king for the county of Chester, though it could not have covered the whole fee, as Ranulf's son Ranulf de Gernon, when he succeeded his father to Chester in 1129, owed the king ą1000 "from his father's debt for the land of Earl Hugh".[59] Hollister thought this debt was merely the normal feudal relief expected to be paid on a large honour, and suggested that Ranulf's partial non-payment, or Henry's forgiveness for non-payment, was a form of royal patronage.[60]

    Ranulf died in January 1129, and was buried in Chester Abbey.[2] He was survived by his wife and countess, Lucy, and succeeded by his son Ranulf de Gernon.[2] A daughter, Alicia, married Richard de Clare, a lord in the Anglo-Welsh marches.[2] One of his offspring, his fifth son, participated in the Siege of Lisbon, and for this aid was granted the Lordship of Azambuja by King Afonso I of Portugal.[2]

    That his career had some claim on the popular imagination may be inferred from lines in William Langland's Piers Plowman (c. 1362–c. 1386) in which Sloth, the lazy priest, confesses: "I kan [know] not parfitly [perfectly] my Paternoster as the preest it singeth,/ But I kan rymes of Robyn Hood and Randolf Erl of Chestre."[61]

    end

    Ranulf — Lucy of Bolingbroke. [Group Sheet]


  8. 235.  Lucy of Bolingbroke
    Children:
    1. Ranulf de Gernon, II, Knight, 4th Earl of Chester was born 0___ 1099, Guernon Castle, Calvados, France; died 16 Dec 1153, Cheshire, England.
    2. 117. Alice de Gernon

  9. 240.  Roger Bigod, Knight was born Normandy, France; died 9 Sep 1107, (Norfolkshire, England); was buried Norwich, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Roger Bigod of Norfolk

    Notes:

    Roger Bigod (died 1107) was a Norman knight who travelled to England in the Norman Conquest. He held great power in East Anglia, and five of his descendants were earls of Norfolk. He was also known as Roger Bigot, appearing as such as a witness to the Charter of Liberties of Henry I of England.

    Biography

    Roger came from a fairly obscure family of poor knights in Normandy. Robert le Bigot, certainly a relation of Roger's, possibly his father, acquired an important position in the household of William, Duke of Normandy (later William I of England), due, the story goes, to his disclosure to the duke of a plot by the duke's cousin William Werlenc.[1]

    Both Roger and Robert may have fought at the Battle of Hastings, and afterwards they were rewarded with a substantial estate in East Anglia. The Domesday Book lists Roger as holding six lordships in Essex, 117 in Suffolk and 187 in Norfolk.

    Bigod's (Bigot) base was in Thetford, Norfolk, then the see of the bishop, where he founded a priory later donated to the abbey at Cluny. In 1101 he further consolidated his power when Henry I granted him licence to build a castle at Framlingham, which became the family seat of power until their downfall in 1307. Another of his castles was Bungay Castle, also in Suffolk.

    In 1069 he, Robert Malet and Ralph de Gael (then Earl of Norfolk), defeated Sweyn Estrithson (Sweyn II) of Denmark near Ipswich. After Ralph de Gael's fall in 1074, Roger was appointed sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk, and acquired many of the dispossessed earl's estates. For this reason he is sometimes counted as Earl of Norfolk, but he probably was never actually created earl. (His son Hugh acquired the title earl of Norfolk in 1141.) He acquired further estates through his influence in local law courts as sheriff and great lord of the region.

    In the Rebellion of 1088 he joined other barons in England against William II, whom they hoped to depose in favour of Robert Curthose, Duke of Normandy. He seems to have lost his lands after the rebellion had failed, but regained them after reconciling with the king.

    In 1100, Robert Bigod (Bigot) was one of the witnesses recorded on the Charter of Liberties, King Henry I's coronation promises later to influence the Magna Carta of 1215.

    In 1101 there was another attempt to bring in Robert of Normandy by removing King Henry, but this time Roger Bigod stayed loyal to the king.

    He died on 9 September 1107 and is buried in Norwich. Upon his death there was a dispute over his burial place between the Bishop of Norwich, Herbert Losinga, and the monks at Thetford Priory, founded by Bigod. The monks claimed Roger's body, along with those of his family and successors, had been left to them by Roger for burial in the priory in Roger's foundation charter (as was common practice at the time). The bishop of Norwich stole the body in the middle of the night and had him buried in the new cathedral he had built in Norwich.

    For some time he was thought to have two wives, Adelaide/Adeliza and Alice/Adeliza de Tosny. It is now believed these were the same woman, Adeliza (Alice) de Tosny (Toeni, Toeny). She was the sister and coheiress of William de Tosny, Lord of Belvoir.

    He was succeeded by his eldest son, William Bigod, and, after William drowned in the sinking of the White Ship, by his second son, Hugh Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk. He also had three daughters: Gunnor, who married Robert fitz Swein of Essex, Lord of Rayleigh; Cecily, who married William d'Aubigny "Brito"; and Maud, who married William d'Aubigny "Pincerna", and was mother to William d'Aubigny, 1st Earl of Arundel.[2]

    end

    Roger — Adeliza de Tosny. [Group Sheet]


  10. 241.  Adeliza de Tosny
    Children:
    1. 120. Hugh Bigod, Knight, 1st Earl of Norfolk was born 0___ 1095, Belvoir Castle, Belvoir, Leicestershire, England; died 0___ 1177, Israel.
    2. Maud Bigod was born (Belvoir Castle, Belvoir, Leicestershire, England).

  11. 242.  Aubrey de Vere, II was born ~ 1085, (Normandy, France) (son of Aubrey de Vere, I and Beatrice LNU); died 0May 1141, (Thrapston, Northamptonshire, England).

    Notes:

    Aubrey de Vere (c. 1085 – May 1141) — also known as "Alberic[us] de Ver" and "Albericus regis camerarius" (the king's chamberlain)— was the second of that name in England after the Norman Conquest, being the eldest surviving son of Aubrey de Vere and his wife Beatrice.

    Aubrey II served as one of the king's chamberlains and as a justiciar under kings Henry I and Stephen.[1] Henry I also appointed him as sheriff of London and Essex and co-sheriff with Richard Basset of eleven counties. In June 1133, that king awarded the office of master chamberlain to Aubrey and his heirs. A frequent witness of royal charters for Henry I and Stephen, he appears to have accompanied Henry to Normandy only once. The chronicler William of Malmesbury reports that in 1139, Aubrey was King Stephen's spokesman to the church council at Winchester, when the king had been summoned to answer for the seizure of castles held by Roger, Bishop of Salisbury and his nephews, the bishops of Ely and Lincoln.[2] In May 1141, during the English civil war, Aubrey was killed by a London mob and was buried in the family mausoleum at Colne Priory, Essex.

    The stone tower at Hedingham, in Essex, was most likely begun by Aubrey and completed by his son and heir, Aubrey de Vere, 1st Earl of Oxford. In addition to his patronage of Colne Priory, the new master chamberlain either founded a cell of the Benedictine abbey St. Melanie in Rennes, Brittany, at Hatfield Broadoak or Hatfield Regis, Essex, or took on the primary patronage of that community soon after it was founded.

    His eldest son, another Aubrey de Vere, was later created Earl of Oxford, and his descendants held that title and the office that in later centuries was known as Lord Great Chamberlain until the extinction of the Vere male line in 1703.[3]

    His wife Adeliza, daughter of Gilbert fitz Richard of Clare, survived her husband for twenty-two years. For most of that time she was a corrodian at St. Osyth's Priory, Chich, Essex.[4]

    Their known children are:

    Aubrey de Vere, 1st Earl of Oxford (married 1. Beatrice, countess of Guisnes, 2. Eufemia, 3. Agnes of Essex)
    Rohese de Vere, Countess of Essex (married 1. Geoffrey de Mandeville, 1st Earl of Essex, 2. Payn de Beauchamp)
    Robert (married 1. Matilda de Furnell, 2. Margaret daughter of Baldwin Wake)
    Alice "of Essex" (married 1. Robert of Essex, 2. Roger fitz Richard)
    Geoffrey (married 1. widow of Warin fitz Gerold, 2. Isabel de Say)
    Juliana Countess of Norfolk (married 1. Hugh Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk, 2. Walkelin Maminot)
    William de Vere, Bishop of Hereford (1186-1198)
    Gilbert, prior of the Knights Hospitaller in England (1195-1197)
    a daughter (name unknown) who married Roger de Ramis.

    end of biography

    Aubrey married Adeliza de Clare ~ 1105. Adeliza (daughter of Gilbert Fitz Richard, Knight, 2nd Lord of Clare and Adeliza de Claremont) died 0___ 1163. [Group Sheet]


  12. 243.  Adeliza de Clare (daughter of Gilbert Fitz Richard, Knight, 2nd Lord of Clare and Adeliza de Claremont); died 0___ 1163.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Alice de Clare

    Children:
    1. 121. Juliane de Vere, Countess of Norfolk was born ~ 1116, Castle Hedingham, Essex, England; died ~ 1199.
    2. Aubrey de Vere, III, Knight, 1st Earl of Oxford was born ~ 1115; died 26 Dec 1194.
    3. Robert de Vere, Lord of Twywell was born 0___ 1124, Thrapston, Northamptonshire, England; died 26 Dec 1194, Thrapston, Northamptonshire, England.

  13. 244.  Roger Toeni, Lord of Flamstead was born ~1104, Hertfordshire, England; died >1162, Flamstead, Hertfordshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: de Conches, de Tosny

    Notes:

    Roger "Lord of Flamstead" de Toeni formerly Toeni aka de Conches, de Tosny
    Born about 1104 in Hertfordshire, England

    ANCESTORS ancestors

    Son of Radulph (Toeni) de Tony and Adelise (Huntingdon) de Tony
    Brother of Godechilde (Toeni) de Neufbourg, Simon Toeni, Robert Toeni, Isabel Toeni, Hugh Toeni and Margaret (Toeni) de Clifford
    Husband of Ida (Hainault) de Toeni — married before 1135 [location unknown]

    DESCENDANTS descendants

    Father of Godehaut (Toeni) de Mohun, Roger (Toeni) de Toeni IV, Baldwin (Toeni) de Toeni, Geoffrey (Toeni) de Toeni, Goda (Toeni) de Ferrers and Ralph (Toeni) de Tony
    Died before 1162 in Flamstead, Hertford, Englandmap
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    Toeni-2 created 14 Sep 2010 | Last modified 2 Mar 2017
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    Categories: House of Tosny.

    European Aristocracy

    Roger (Toeni) de Toeni is a member of royalty, nobility or aristocracy in the British Isles.
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    Contents

    1 Biography
    1.1 Chronology for Roger de Toeni and Ida of Hainault
    1.2 Early Life
    1.3 Family
    1.4 Roger III & wife had four children
    1.4.1 Raoul [V] & his wife had [two] children
    1.5 Ralph & his wife had one child
    2 Roger de Tosney 1104-1158
    3 Sources
    Biography
    Title of Roger de Tony (Royal Ancestry):

    Seigneur of Conches and Nogent-le-Roi (in France)

    Chronology for Roger de Toeni and Ida of Hainault
    ... [1]


    8/2/1100: Henry I crowned.
    ~1104 Roger born in England, s/o Sir Ralph IV de Tony and Alice of Northumberland.[2][3]
    8/3/1108 Louis VI crowned King of France.
    ~1110: Ida born in Hainaut, d/o Baldwin III Count of Hainaut and Yolende of Gueldre.
    1126: Roger’s father died; mother remarried.
    1129-35: Confirmation of gifts made by Robert de Brus to canons of Guisborough, co. York … signatories .. king, … Roger de Toeni, … (S) English Historical Review, V34, 1919, P561.
    1130 Roger founds Conches abbey, “Rogerus de Totteneio filius Radulphi junioris” made donation. (S) FMG.[4]
    1130s Roger de Tosny wages war against neighbor Hugh de Chateauneuf who attacked Nogent.
    1131-33 Henry I forces occupy Conches when Roger de Toeny, with William Talvas, don't show up court.[5]
    1132: Hughes II[6] fights Roger Tosny against William Monvoisin, seigneur de Rosny.
    By 1135: Confirmation of various grant of alms made to monaster of St. Ouen, Conches, by Roger de Toesni the elder and others.[7]
    1135: Roger de Tosny supports Geoffrey of Anjou in conflict w/ king of France.[8]
    22 Dec 1135: Stephen crowned.
    1135-54: Roger de Tany tenant of honour of Boulogne.[9]
    May 1136: Roger de Tosny sized ducal castle of Vaudreuil, widening local conflict. Roger driven out by earl of Mellent.[10]
    5/12/1136: Roger excutes reprisals agains Count of Mellant for buring of Acuigni the previous day.
    Jun 1136: Theobald, count of Blois, began to prosecute war against Roger de Tosny ; while Earls of Mellent and Leicester [Beaumont brothers] pillaged his lands. [11]
    Oct 1136: Roger de Conches ravages diocese of Lisieux, pillaging abbey of Croix-Saint-Leufroi, and burning church of St. Stephen at Vauvai. Robert of Gloucester captured Roger de Tosny.
    Imprisoned.[12]
    May 1137 Stephen of England liberats Roger de Conches.
    8/1/1137 Louis VII succeeds as king of France.
    1138: Baldwin, count of Hainault, rides 150 miles across northern France to support Roger and Ida in war with Earl of Leicester.
    9/7/1138 Roger de Toeni burns down Bretueil.
    1138 Roger reconciles with the earls of Leicester and Mellent, and King Stephen. Settlement: Margaret, dau of Earl Robert Beaument, m. Roger’s son [Ralph].
    1140 Vincent abbey gives a palfrey to Roger Tossny and two ounces of gold to Ida, wife of latter, in exchange for donations in England.[13]
    1140: Raoul du Fresne and bros. Girelme, witness charter of Roger de Tosny.
    By 1142: Pont St-Pierre given back to Roger de Tosny [previously held by Robert of Leicester].
    1142: Roger's confirmation to Lyre abbey at Pont St-Pierre. (S) Beaumont Twins, Crouch, 2008, P55.
    1144: Roger de Conches named as a lord in Normandy of Count of Anjou's army
    1145: Robert de Mesnil witness charter of Roger de Tosny associated with Mesnil-Vicomte.
    1147: Roger de Tosny, fils de Raoul le Jeune, decharge l’abbe Vincent de l’obligation de reparer ou de refaire la chaussee de l’etang de Fontaine.[14]
    19 Dec 1154: Henry II crowned.
    1155: Roger de Conches granted charter in case of forteiture of citizens of Plessis-Mahiel; witnessed by Robert de Mesnil.
    1156: Roger gave abbey of Bernay 5 acres of land and vine at Tosny.
    1157: Rogo de Toeni in Norfolk and Suffolk, ‘in Holcha’. (S) FMG.[15]
    1157-62: Roger granted charter to Bec concerning Norfolk manor of East Wretham “to all his men either French or Normans and English.”
    9/29/1158: Roger living.
    1160: Louis VII takes possession of Nogent from Roger [returns it later that year.]
    1162: Roger de Tony, lord of Flamsted, Herts, dies.[3]
    1165: Henry II King of England confirms property of Conches abbey.[16]
    Family notes: Conches about 4 leagues southwest of Everux.
    Early Life
    Roger /de TOENI (DE CONCHES)/ [17][18][3]
    Taking de TOENI as the last name from de TOENI (DE CONCHES).

    Roger 'The Spaniard' de Toeni[19]

    p. Ralph de TOENI m. Alice (Adeliza) Huntingdon 1104-aft 29 Sep 1158[20][21]
    Roger de TOENI
    Simon de TOENI
    Isabel de TOENI
    Hugh de TOENI
    Family
    m (before 9 Aug 1138) GERTRUDE [Ida] de Hainaut dau of BAUDOUIN III count of Hainaut & Yolande van Geldern.[22][23]
    The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that Henry I King of England had granted "xx libratas terre in Bercolt" in Norfolk to "Rogero de Tooni…in maritagio cum filia comitis de Henou"[98].

    Roger III & wife had four children
    RAOUL [V] de Tosny (-1162). Chronicon Hanoniense names (in order) "Radulphum primum [filium Rogerum], Rogerum secundum et Balduinum tercium et Gaufridum quartum clericum" as the children of "[Rogerum] domino de Thoenio" & his wife[99]. Robert of Torigny records the death in 1162 of "Radulfus de Toene"[100]. m (after 1155) MARGUERITE de Beaumont, daughter of ROBERT [II] Earl of Leicester & his wife Amice de Gačel ([1125]-after 1185). Robert of Torigny refers to the wife of "Radulfus de Toene" as "filia Roberti comitis Leccestriµ" but does not name her[101]. The 1163/64 Pipe Roll records "Margareta uxor Rad de Toeni" making payment "de Suppl de Welcumesto" in Essex/Hertfordshire[102]. The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Margareta de Tony…lx annorum” and her land “in Welcumestowe"[103].
    Raoul [V] & his wife had [two] children
    ROGER [IV] de Tosny (-after 29 Dec 1208). Robert of Torigny records that "parvulo filio" succeeded in 1162 on the death of his father "Radulfus de Toene" but does not name him[104]. Seigneur de Tosny. The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], names "Rogerus de Tony" paying "xl s" in Sussex[105].
    [RALPH de Tosny of Holkham, co Norfolk (-before 1184). The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Radulfus de Tonay ii m" in Sussex in [1167/68][106].] m ADA de Chaumont, daughter of ROBERT de Chaumont & his wife --- (-after 1184). The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “in Holkham…de feodo Rogeri de Tony” held by “Ade de Tony…fuit Roberti de Chaumunt”, adding that she has “i filium Baldewinum…xv annorum et…v filias”[107]. A charter dated 25 Sep 1188 confirms the foundation of Dodnash Priory, Suffolk by "Baldewin de Toeni et dna Alda mr sua"[108].

    Ralph & his wife had one child
    BALDWIN de Tosny ([1169]-after 1210). The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “in Holkham…de feodo Rogeri de Tony” held by “Ade de Tony…fuit Roberti de Chaumunt”, adding that she has “i filium Baldewinum…xv annorum et…v filias”[109]. A charter dated 25 Sep 1188 confirms the foundation of Dodnash Priory, Suffolk by "Baldewin de Toeni et dna Alda mr sua"[110]. m --- Bardolf, daughter of THOMAS BARDOLF of Bradwell, Essex & his wife ---. The Red Book of the Exchequer records that "Willelmus frater regis H[enrici]" gave land at "Bradewelle" in Essex to "Thomas Bardulf" who gave three parts thereof with "tres filiabus suis in maritagio…Roberto de Sancto Remigio et Willelmo Bacun et Baldewino de Tony", which "Baldewinus de Thony" still held in [1210/12][111]. Baldwin & his wife had one child:
    ROGER
    5 dau. Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “in Holkham…de feodo Rogeri de Tony” held by “Ade de Tony…fuit Roberti de Chaumunt”, adding that she has “i filium Baldewinum…xv annorum et…v filias”[112].
    ROGER de Tosny . Chronicon Hanoniense names (in order) "Radulphum primum [filium Rogerum], Rogerum secundum et Balduinum tercium et Gaufridum quartum clericum" as the children of "[Rogerum] domino de Thoenio" & his wife[113].
    BAUDOUIN de Tosny (-1170). Chronicon Hanoniense names (in order) "Radulphum primum [filium Rogerum], Rogerum secundum et Balduinum tercium et Gaufridum quartum clericum" as the children of "[Rogerum] domino de Thoenio" & his wife[114]. He had descendants in Hainaut[115].
    GEOFFROY de Tosny . Chronicon Hanoniense names (in order) "Radulphum primum [filium Rogerum], Rogerum secundum et Balduinum tercium et Gaufridum quartum clericum" as the children of "[Rogerum] domino de Thoenio" & his wife[116]. Monk.
    Roger de Tosney 1104-1158
    ROGER [III] de Tosny, son of RAOUL [IV] Seigneur de Tosny & his wife Adelisa of Huntingdon ([1104]-after 29 Sep 1158). His parentage is recorded by Orderic Vitalis[91]. Henry I King of England confirmed the foundation of Conches by "Rogerius senior de Toenio et filius eius Radulphus senex et Radulphus juvenis filius prµdicti Radulphi senis et Rogerius filius Radulphi juvenis", quoting the donation by "Rogerus de Totteneio filius Radulphi junioris", dated to [1130][92]. In prison 1136/37. “Aliz de Toeni” donated "ecclesiam de Welcomstowe" to “ecclesiµ S. Trinitatis Lond.”, for the soul of “…et pro incolumitate filiorum meorum Rogeri de Toeni et Simonis et filiµ meµ Isabellµ", by undated charter[93]. Henry II King of England confirmed the property of Conches abbey, including donations by "Rogeris senior de Toenio et filius eius Radulfus senex et Radulphus juvenis filius predicti Radulphi senex et Roger filius Radulphi juvenis", by charter dated 1165 or [1167/73][94].

    Henry II King of England confirmed the property of Conches abbey, including donations by "Rogeris senior de Toenio et filius eius Radulfus senex et Radulphus juvenis filius predicti Radulphi senex et Roger filius Radulphi juvenis", by charter dated 1165 or [1167/73][95]. The 1157 Pipe Roll records "Rogo de Toeni" in Norfolk and Suffolk, "in Holcha"[96]. m (before 9 Aug 1138) GERTRUDE [Ida] de Hainaut, daughter of BAUDOUIN III Comte de Hainaut & his wife Yolande van Geldern. The Chronicon Hanoniense refers to one of the daughters of "Balduinus comes Hanoniensis" & his wife as wife of "domino de Thoenio", in a later passage naming their children "Radulphum primum [filium Rogerum], Rogerum secundum et Balduinum tercium et Gaufridum quartum clericum"[97]. The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that Henry I King of England had granted "xx libratas terre in Bercolt" in Norfolk to "Rogero de Tooni…in maritagio cum filia comitis de Henou"[98]. The primary source which confirms her name has not yet been identified.

    Roger [III] & his wife had four children: 1. RAOUL [V] de Tosny (-1162). The Chronicon Hanoniense names (in order) "Radulphum primum [filium Rogerum], Rogerum secundum et Balduinum tercium et Gaufridum quartum clericum" as the children of "[Rogerum] domino de Thoenio" & his wife[99]. Robert of Torigny records the death in 1162 of "Radulfus de Toene"[100].

    m (after 1155) MARGUERITE de Beaumont, daughter of ROBERT [II] Earl of Leicester & his wife Amice de Gačel ([1125]-after 1185). Robert of Torigny refers to the wife of "Radulfus de Toene" as "filia Roberti comitis Leccestriµ" but does not name her[101]. The 1163/64 Pipe Roll records "Margareta uxor Rad de Toeni" making payment "de Suppl de Welcumesto" in Essex/Hertfordshire[102]. The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Margareta de Tony…lx annorum” and her land “in Welcumestowe"[103]. Raoul [V] & his wife had [two] children:

    a) ROGER [IV] de Tosny (-after 29 Dec 1208). Robert of Torigny records that "parvulo filio" succeeded in 1162 on the death of his father "Radulfus de Toene" but does not name him[104]. Seigneur de Tosny. The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], names "Rogerus de Tony" paying "xl s" in Sussex[105]. - see below. b) [RALPH de Tosny of Holkham, co Norfolk (-before 1184). The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Radulfus de Tonay ii m" in Sussex in [1167/68][106].] m ADA de Chaumont, daughter of ROBERT de Chaumont & his wife --- (-after 1184). The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “in Holkham…de feodo Rogeri de Tony” held by “Ade de Tony…fuit Roberti de Chaumunt”, adding that she has “i filium Baldewinum…xv annorum et…v filias”[107]. A charter dated 25 Sep 1188 confirms the foundation of Dodnash Priory, Suffolk by "Baldewin de Toeni et dna Alda mr sua"[108]. Ralph & his wife had one child: i) BALDWIN de Tosny ([1169]-after 1210). The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “in Holkham…de feodo Rogeri de Tony” held by “Ade de Tony…fuit Roberti de Chaumunt”, adding that she has “i filium Baldewinum…xv annorum et…v filias”[109]. A charter dated 25 Sep 1188 confirms the foundation of Dodnash Priory, Suffolk by "Baldewin de Toeni et dna Alda mr sua"[110]. m --- Bardolf, daughter of THOMAS BARDOLF of Bradwell, Essex & his wife ---. The Red Book of the Exchequer records that "Willelmus frater regis H[enrici]" gave land at "Bradewelle" in Essex to "Thomas Bardulf" who gave three parts thereof with "tres filiabus suis in maritagio…Roberto de Sancto Remigio et Willelmo Bacun et Baldewino de Tony", which "Baldewinus de Thony" still held in [1210/12][111]. Baldwin & his wife had one child: (a) ROGER . ii) five daughters . The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “in Holkham…de feodo Rogeri de Tony” held by “Ade de Tony…fuit Roberti de Chaumunt”, adding that she has “i filium Baldewinum…xv annorum et…v filias”[112]. 2. ROGER de Tosny . The Chronicon Hanoniense names (in order) "Radulphum primum [filium Rogerum], Rogerum secundum et Balduinum tercium et Gaufridum quartum clericum" as the children of "[Rogerum] domino de Thoenio" & his wife[113]. 3. BAUDOUIN de Tosny (-1170). The Chronicon Hanoniense names (in order) "Radulphum primum [filium Rogerum], Rogerum secundum et Balduinum tercium et Gaufridum quartum clericum" as the children of "[Rogerum] domino de Thoenio" & his wife[114]. He had descendants in Hainaut[115]. 4. GEOFFROY de Tosny . The Chronicon Hanoniense names (in order) "Radulphum primum [filium Rogerum], Rogerum secundum et Balduinum tercium et Gaufridum quartum clericum" as the children of "[Rogerum] domino de Thoenio" & his wife[116]. Monk.

    Sources
    Royal Ancestry 2013 D. Richardson Vol. V p. 170-171
    ?
    Parochial and Family History of the Parish of Blisland, Maclean, 1868, P65. Norman Frontier, Power, 2004, P295.
    Dictionnaire Historique de Toutes Les Communes, Charpillon, 1868 & 1879. Ecclesiastical History of England, Vitalis, 1856.
    [91] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XI, p. 55.
    [92] Gallia Christiana, XI, Instrumenta, V, col. 128.
    [93] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Christ Church, Aldgate, London, VI, p. 152.
    [94] Actes Henri II, Tome I, CCCCXXIII, p. 550.
    [95] Actes Henri II, Tome I, CCCCXXIII, p. 550.
    [96] Hunter, J. (ed.) (1844) The Great Rolls of the Pipe for the second, third and fourth years of the reign of King Henry II 1155-1158 (London) ("Pipe Roll") 4 Hen II (1157), Norfolk and Suffolk, p. 125.
    [97] Gisleberti Chronicon Hanoniense, MGH SS XXI, pp. 505 and 506.
    [98] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 134.
    [99] Gisleberti Chronicon Hanoniense, MGH SS XXI, pp. 505 and 506.
    [100] Chronique de Robert de Torigny I, 1162, p. 339.
    [101] Chronique de Robert de Torigny I, 1162, p. 339.
    [102] Pipe Roll Society, Vol. VII (1886) The Great Roll of the Pipe for the 10th year of King Henry II (London) ("Pipe Roll 10 Hen II (1163/64)"), p. 38.
    [103] Rotuli Dominabus, Rotuli VIII, Essex, p. 41.
    [104] Chronique de Robert de Torigny I, 1162, p. 339.
    [105] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno VI regis Ricardi, ad redemptionem eius, scutagium ad XXs, p. 92.
    [106] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Knights fees, p. 47.
    [107] Rotuli Dominabus, Rotuli V, Norffolk, p. 27.
    [108] Ancient Charters (Round), Part I, 53, p. 87.
    [109] Rotuli Dominabus, Rotuli V, Norffolk, p. 27.
    [110] Ancient Charters (Round), Part I, 53, p. 87.
    [111] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, p. 499.
    [112] Rotuli Dominabus, Rotuli V, Norffolk, p. 27.
    [113] Gisleberti Chronicon Hanoniense, MGH SS XXI, pp. 505 and 506.
    ? Acrossthepond.ged on 21 Feb 2011. User: AA428DBB1CB84E3B845C44BBBBCF47ABEC7F. Note: Birth: ABT 1104 Flamsted, Hertfordshire
    ? 3.0 3.1 3.2 De TOENI-68 on Jun 20, 2011 by Michael Stephenson. hofundssonAnces.ged
    ? Henry I confirmed foundation of Conches by "Rogerius senior de Toenio et filius eius Radulphus senex et Radulphus juvenis filius prµdicti Radulphi senis et Rogerius filius Radulphi juvenis", quoting the donation by "Rogerus de Totteneio filius Radulphi junioris", dated to 1130.
    ? (S) History of Normandy, V4, P562.
    ? son of Gervais
    ? signatories : king and Queen Adelaide, Hugh archbishop of rouen, Auding bishop of Evreux, William earl of Warenne, Amaury count of Everux, Hugh [king’s sewer], … (S) English Historical Review, V34, 1919, P561.
    ? (S) Norman Frontier, Power, 2004, P382.
    ? (S) Families, Friends, Allies : Boulogne, Tanner, 2004, P340.
    ? (S) Reign of King Stephen, Longman, 2000, P60.
    ? (S) Reign of King Stephen, Longman, 2000, P61.
    ? “Aliz de Toeni” donated "ecclesiam de Welcomstowe" to “ecclesiµ S. Trinitatis Lond.”, for the soul of “…et pro incolumitate filiorum meorum Rogeri de Toeni et Simonis et filiµ meµ Isabellµ", by undated charter[93].
    ? (S) Prosopographie des Abbes Benedictins, Gazeau, 2007, P71.
    ? (S) Prosopographie des Abbes Benedictins, Gazeau, 2007, P71.
    ? 1157 Pipe Roll records "Rogo de Toeni" in Norfolk and Suffolk, "in Holcha"[96].
    ? including donations by "Rogeris senior de Toenio et filius eius Radulfus senex et Radulphus juvenis filius predicti Radulphi senex et Roger filius Radulphi juvenis", by charter dated 1165 or [1167/73][94]. Henry II King of England confirmed the property of Conches abbey, including donations by "Rogeris senior de Toenio et filius eius Radulfus senex et Radulphus juvenis filius predicti Radulphi senex et Roger filius Radulphi juvenis", by charter dated 1165 or [1167/73][95].
    ? De TOENI-68 on Jun 20, 2011 by Michael Stephenson. Pedigree Resource File CD 49: (Salt Lake City, UT: Intellectual Reserve, Inc., 2002)
    ? De TOENI-68 on Jun 20, 2011 by Michael Stephenson. Ancestral File. Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day SAINTS Publication: June 1998
    ? #S96
    ? Orderic Vitalis.
    ? Alias: RAOUL [IV] Seigneur de Tosny & Adelisa of Huntingdon
    ? Issue: Chronicon Hanoniense refers to one of the daughters of "Balduinus comes Hanoniensis" & his wife as wife of "domino de Thoenio", in a later passage naming their children "Radulphum primum [filium Rogerum], Rogerum secundum et Balduinum tercium et Gaufridum quartum clericum"[97].
    ? ~1130: Child of Roger and Ida: Ralph de Tony born in England.

    end of biography

    Roger married Ida Hainault >1135. Ida was born ~1109; died 9 Aug 1138. [Group Sheet]


  14. 245.  Ida Hainault was born ~1109; died 9 Aug 1138.
    Children:
    1. 122. Ralph de Tosny, V, Knight, Earl was born ~1140, Flamstead, Hertfordshire, England; died 0___ 1162, Flamstead, Hertfordshire, England.

  15. 246.  Robert de Beaumont, Knight, 2nd Earl of Leicester was born 0___ 1104, (Meulan, France) (son of Robert de Beaumont, Knight, 1st Earl of Leicester and Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester); died 5 Apr 1168, Brackley, Northamptonshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Justiciar of England, 1155-1168
    • Also Known As: Earl of Hereford
    • Military: The Anarchy

    Notes:

    Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester (1104 - 5 April 1168) was Justiciar of England 1155-1168.

    The surname "de Beaumont" is given him by genealogists. The only known contemporary surname applied to him is "Robert son of Count Robert". Henry Knighton, the fourteenth-century chronicler notes him as Robert "Le Bossu" (meaning "Robert the Hunchback" in French).

    Early life and education

    Robert was an English nobleman of Norman-French ancestry. He was the son of Robert de Beaumont, Count of Meulan and 1st Earl of Leicester, and Elizabeth de Vermandois, and the twin brother of Waleran de Beaumont. It is not known whether they were identical or fraternal twins, but the fact that they are remarked on by contemporaries as twins indicates that they were probably identical.

    The two brothers, Robert and Waleran, were adopted into the royal household shortly after their father's death in June 1118 (upon which Robert inherited his father's second titles of Earl of Leicester). Their lands on either side of the Channel were committed to a group of guardians, led by their stepfather, William, Earl of Warenne or Surrey. They accompanied King Henry I to Normandy, to meet with Pope Callixtus II in 1119, when the king incited them to debate philosophy with the cardinals. Both twins were literate, and Abingdon Abbey later claimed to have been Robert's school, but though this is possible, its account is not entirely trustworthy. A surviving treatise on astronomy (British Library ms Royal E xxv) carries a dedication "to Earl Robert of Leicester, that man of affairs and profound learning, most accomplished in matters of law" who can only be this Robert. On his death he left his own psalter to the abbey he founded at Leicester, which was still in its library in the late fifteenth century. The existence of this indicates that like many noblemen of his day, Robert followed the canonical hours in his chapel.

    Career at the Norman court

    In 1120 Robert was declared of age and inherited most of his father's lands in England, while his twin brother took the French lands. However in 1121, royal favour brought Robert the great Norman honors of Breteuil and Pacy-sur-Eure, with his marriage to Amice de Gael, daughter of a Breton intruder the king had forced on the honor after the forfeiture of the Breteuil family in 1119. Robert spent a good deal of his time and resources over the next decade integrating the troublesome and independent barons of Breteuil into the greater complex of his estates. He did not join in his brother's great Norman rebellion against King Henry I in 1123–24. He appears fitfully at the royal court despite his brother's imprisonment until 1129. Thereafter the twins were frequently to be found together at Henry I's court.

    Robert held lands throughout the country. In the 1120s and 1130s he tried to rationalise his estates in Leicestershire. Leicestershire estates of the See of Lincoln and the Earl of Chester were seized by force. This enhanced the integrity of Robert's block of estates in the central midlands, bounded by Nuneaton, Loughborough, Melton Mowbray and Market Harborough.

    In 1135, the twins were present at King Henry's deathbed. Robert's actions in the succession period are unknown, but he clearly supported his brother's decision to join the court of the new king Stephen before Easter 1136. During the first two years of the reign Robert is found in Normandy fighting rival claimants for his honor of Breteuil. Military action allowed him to add the castle of Pont St-Pierre to his Norman estates in June 1136 at the expense of one of his rivals. From the end of 1137 Robert and his brother were increasingly caught up in the politics of the court of King Stephen in England, where Waleran secured an ascendancy which lasted till the beginning of 1141. Robert participated in his brother's political coup against the king's justiciar, Roger of Salisbury (the Bishop of Salisbury).

    Civil war in England

    The outbreak of civil war in England in September 1139 brought Robert into conflict with Earl Robert of Gloucester, the bastard son of Henry I and principal sponsor of the Empress Matilda. His port of Wareham and estates in Dorset were seized by Gloucester in the first campaign of the war. In that campaign the king awarded Robert the city and castle of Hereford as a bid to establish the earl as his lieutenant in Herefordshire, which was in revolt. It is disputed by scholars whether this was an award of a second county to Earl Robert. Probably in late 1139, Earl Robert refounded his father's collegiate church of St Mary de Castro in Leicester as a major Augustinian abbey on the meadows outside the town's north gate, annexing the college's considerable endowment to the abbey.

    The battle of Lincoln on 2 February 1141 saw the capture and imprisonment of King Stephen. Although Count Waleran valiantly continued the royalist fight in England into the summer, he eventually capitulated to the Empress and crossed back to Normandy to make his peace with the Empress's husband, Geoffrey of Anjou. Earl Robert had been in Normandy since 1140 attempting to stem the Angevin invasion, and negotiated the terms of his brother's surrender. He quit Normandy soon after and his Norman estates were confiscated and used to reward Norman followers of the Empress. Earl Robert remained on his estates in England for the remainder of King Stephen's reign. Although he was a nominal supporter of the king, there seems to have been little contact between him and Stephen, who did not confirm the foundation of Leicester Abbey till 1153. Earl Robert's principal activity between 1141 and 1149 was his private war with Ranulf II, Earl of Chester. Though details are obscure it seems clear enough that he waged a dogged war with his rival that in the end secured him control of northern Leicestershire and the strategic Chester castle of Mountsorrel. When Earl Robert of Gloucester died in 1147, Robert of Leicester led the movement among the greater earls of England to negotiate private treaties to establish peace in their areas, a process hastened by the Empress's departure to Normandy, and complete by 1149. During this time the earl also exercised supervision over his twin brother's earldom of Worcester, and in 1151 he intervened to frustrate the king's attempts to seize the city.

    Earl Robert and Henry Plantagenet

    The arrival in England of Duke Henry, son of the Empress Mathilda, in January 1153 was a great opportunity for Earl Robert. He was probably in negotiation with Henry in that spring and reached an agreement by which he would defect to him by May 1153, when the duke restored his Norman estates to the earl. The duke celebrated his Pentecost court at Leicester in June 1153, and he and the earl were constantly in company till the peace settlement between the duke and the king at Winchester in November 1153. Earl Robert crossed with the duke to Normandy in January 1154 and resumed his Norman castles and honors. As part of the settlement his claim to be chief steward of England and Normandy was recognised by Henry.

    Earl Robert began his career as chief justiciar of England probably as soon as Duke Henry succeeded as King Henry II in October 1154.[1] The office gave the earl supervision of the administration and legal process in England whether the king was present or absent in the realm. He appears in that capacity in numerous administrative acts, and had a junior colleague in the post in Richard de Luci, another former servant of King Stephen. The earl filled the office for nearly fourteen years until his death,[1] and earned the respect of the emerging Angevin bureaucracy in England. His opinion was quoted by learned clerics, and his own learning was highly commended.

    He died on 5 April 1168,[1] probably at his Northamptonshire castle of Brackley, for his entrails were buried at the hospital in the town. He was received as a canon of Leicester on his deathbed, and buried to the north of the high altar of the great abbey he had founded and built. He left a written testament of which his son the third earl was an executor, as we learn in a reference dating to 1174.

    Church patronage

    Robert founded and patronised many religious establishments. He founded Leicester Abbey and Garendon Abbeyin Leicestershire, the Fontevraldine Nuneaton Priory in Warwickshire, Luffield Abbey in Buckinghamshire, and the hospital of Brackley, Northamptonshire. He refounded the collegiate church of St Mary de Castro, Leicester, as a dependency of Leicester abbey around 1164, after suppressing it in 1139. Around 1139 he refounded the collegiate church of Wareham as a priory of his abbey of Lyre, in Normandy. His principal Norman foundations were the priory of Le Dâesert in the forest of Breteuil and a major hospital in Breteuil itself. He was a generous benefactor of the Benedictine abbey of Lyre, the oldest monastic house in the honor of Breteuil. He also donated land in Old Dalby, Leicestershire to the Knights Hospitallers who used it to found Dalby Preceptory.

    Family and children

    He married after 1120 Amice de Montfort, daughter of Raoul II de Montfort, himself a son of Ralph de Gael, Earl of East Anglia. Both families had lost their English inheritances through rebellion in 1075. They had four children:

    Hawise de Beaumont, who married William Fitz Robert, 2nd Earl of Gloucester and had descendants.
    Robert de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester who married Petronilla de Grandmesnil and had descendants.
    Isabel, who married: Simon de St. Liz, Earl of Huntingdon and had descendants.
    Margaret, who married Ralph V de Toeni and had descendants through their daughter, Ida de Tosny.

    Occupation:
    In medieval England and Scotland the Chief Justiciar (later known simply as the Justiciar) was roughly equivalent to a modern Prime Minister[citation needed] as the monarch's chief minister. Similar positions existed on the European Continent, particularly in Norman Italy. The term is the English form of the medieval Latin justiciarius or justitiarius ("man of justice", i.e. judge).

    source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Justiciar

    Military:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Anarchy

    Robert married Amice de Montfort, Countess of Leicester Aft 1120, Brittany, France. Amice was born 0___ 1108, Norfolk, England; died 31 Aug 1168, Nuneaton, Warwickshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  16. 247.  Amice de Montfort, Countess of Leicester was born 0___ 1108, Norfolk, England; died 31 Aug 1168, Nuneaton, Warwickshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Amicia de Gael

    Notes:

    Click this link to view 5 generations of her issue ... http://www.wikitree.com/genealogy/Gael-Descendants-3

    Children:
    1. 123. Margaret de Beaumont was born 0___ 1125, (Leicestershire, England); died Aft 1185.
    2. Hawise de Beaumont was born Leicestershire, England.
    3. Robert de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester was born ~ 1120, Leicestershire, England; died 31 Aug 1190, Albania.

  17. 248.  Gilbert Giffard, Royal Serjeant was born ~ 1065, (France); died 0___ 1129, Winterbourne Monkton, Marlborough, Wiltshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: the King's Marshal
    • Alt Birth: 0___ 1075, Axbridge, Somerset, England

    Notes:

    Gilbert Giffard
    Born about 1065 in England or France
    Son of [father unknown] and [mother unknown]
    [sibling(s) unknown]
    [spouse(s) unknown]
    DESCENDANTS descendants
    Father of John (Marshal) FitzGilbert and William (Giffard) Fitz Gilbert
    Died before 1129 in Winterbourne Monkton, Marlborough, Wiltshire, England

    DISPUTED PARENTAGE

    Since his various parentages are all disputed, they have been removed. See the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy's Medieval Lands Index for more information. Also see discussion below.

    Removed these profiles as parents: Rollo Cheddar, Geoffrey Le Mareschal, and Sibyl di Conversano . Please don't attach any parents without first discussing via post on G2G. (Darlene Athey Hill - 26 Sep 2015)

    Biography

    Gilbert Giffard was a tenant of Glastonbury manor in Winterbourne Monkton in Wiltshire, and held a position as a marshal to the King. That Gilbert was the name of the grandfather of William the Marshall was known because William's father was often referred to as John fitz (son of) Gilbert. That Gilbert, John's father, was already involved in the family's tradition of claiming a royal marshalcy was also indicated from a record in the time of King John, although the nature of that marshalcy in his generation is not well understood.[1] However the identification of Gilbert with records for a man normally called Gilbert Giffard (or Gibard) has become widespread since a publication of N. E. Stacy in 1999 concerning Gilbert's landlord.[2] He not only showed that Giffard had a tax exemption, such as his descendants did for their marshalcy, and that his lands were inherited by the Marshals, but also that Gilbert Giffard's son William Giffard or William fitz Gilbert, was presented to the church of Cheddar as "William Giffard, son of Gilbert the king's marshal".

    Concerning his parentage, various theories exist but none are proven. Each tends to start with one known thing, and build from there:

    Starting from the newest known information, the surname Giffard, Crouch for example notes that it was a common descriptive second name meaning "chubby cheeks" and says "It is highly unlikely that Gilbert Giffard was related to the Conqueror's leading follower, Walter Giffard, Earl of Buckingham; it is conceivable on the grounds of proximity, however, that he might have had a connection with the unrelated West Country barons, the Giffards of Brimpsfield." (Traditionally the Giffards of Brimpsfield and Bucks are often linked.[3] Some still suspect there is a link.[4]
    Keats-Rohan has an entry for him in "Domesday People" (p.214) under "Gislebert Gibart", apparently an entry written without reference to Stacey. She adds that "The fee of Robert Gibart is mentioned in Hist. S. Petri Glocs. ii, 230."[5] In her later "Domesday Descendants" she cites Stacey and has him under "Marescal, Gilbert" (p.1029). She suggests he might be the son of "Robert marshal, who occurs in Domesday Wiltshire" (Domesday People p.391). However In footnote g, Appendix G, Complete Peerage says "Gilbert may have been son or grandson of an otherwise unknown Robert, who in 1086 held Cheddar, Somerset, under Roger de Courseulles (Domesday Book, vol i, fol 94; cf note 'h' infra). Robert the Marshal, who in 1086 held Lavington, Wilts, in chief (Idem, vol i, f. 73) has been suggested as the possible progenitor of the family (Davis, op. cit., pp xxvi - xxvii); but this is unlikely as in 1166 Lavington was held by Piers de la Mare (Red Book, p 248)." It therefore appears that Keats-Rohan was following up the lead of CP, seeking for evidence that Robert in Lavington having other land holdings that might correspond to those known for the later Marshall family, specifically in Cheddar. The Robert in Cheddar has an entry in Domesday People called "Robert Herecom" (p.389[6]). According to a summary of this line of thought by Chris Phillips, Keats-Rohan's various entries give "a slightly complicated picture, but maybe worth investigating further".[7]
    Older works speculated based on the longer-known above-mentioned claim to a "chief marshalship" which King John said happened during the time of King Henry I. Gilbert and his son John faced counter claims from two other men, Robert de Venoiz, and William Hastings. And on this basis many authors have speculated that the three families shared a common ancestry. Robert de Venoiz in particular was apparently son and heir to a Norman named Geoffrey who was sometimes referred to as "Marshall" (although in his time this would not normally have been considered a name, just a description). This family's particular tradition of Marshalcy apparently went back to a marshalcy in Venoix in Normandy.[8] Various scenarios have been presented as fact, such as Gilbert being a son of Robert, or of Geoffrey, or that Gilbert married a lady of their family. (And similarly, the Hastings family have sometimes been linked in speculative pedigrees.) But in fact the record of King John does not strongly imply that before the time of Henry I there was one single "chief" marshal. It could well have been a decision made at that time. There were many hereditary "marshalls" in England and Normandy, as discussed by Round in his book on the subject. (The use of a the job as a surname also probably did not start until King Stephen's time.[9])
    A very simple proposal found in the Complete Peerage is that Gilbert's father was also possibly named Gilbert. The reasoning being that the Gilbert of the Domesday book made around 1086 was many decades before the reign of Henry I, when Gilbert the father of John was still alive.[7] Other authorities seem to accept it is the same person though the generations are long.[10]
    Gilbert had two sons:

    John Fitz-Gilbert, who was accepted as being "chief" Marshal of England while his father still lived, in the time of King Henry I. Probably the first of his family to use the job title as a surname. Born about 1105.
    William Giffard or Fitz-Gilbert, born about 1107. He became chancellor to Queen Mathilda.[11]
    As an hereditary marshal of the King, Gilbert was a French speaking Norman (although some Normans married locally and could speak some English) and the old French title Le Mareschal (Latin Marescallus or Marescalcus) which has evolved into modern English "Marshal" was a term going back to Frankish times, originally referring to a function of "horse servant", which is what the word meant in the old language of the Franks. But by his lifetime, this job, like many other household positions, had evolved. According to a treatise of 1136 made for King Stephen, the Master Marshall ("John", Gilbert's son) had duties which "involved the keeping of certain royal records" and the management of "four other lesser marshals, both clerks and knights, assistants called sergeants, the knight ushers and common ushers of the royal hall, the usher of the king's chamber, the watchmen of court, the tent-keeper and the keeper of the king's hearth".[12]

    In Gilbert's family, the evidence is relatively clear that the function became a surname, not in Gilbert's lifetime probably, but during the lifetime of his son John. Crouch (p.226) mentions that while surnames from hereditary offices were not an uncommon innovation in the 12th century, this family is a "rather early" example of a case where not only the heir of the Marshall, but several of John's sons, all used the office as a second name. Richard Brooks suggests that John was the first to use the word as a name, because he is specifically referred to as someone "named" the Marshall, and this was during a period when he had split with King Stephen and could not have been functioning as the King's Marshall.[9]

    Gilbert's grandson, Sir William Marshal, knighted and named 1st Earl of Pembroke, made the office very important during the last decades of the 12th Century and first decades of the 13th. He served under four kings: Henry II, Richard "Lionheart," John "Lackland" and Henry III. As the regent for Henry III, Sir William Marshal became a powerful European statesman, raising his office still further beyond its humble origins. In William's time the Chief Marshal became "Earl Marshal". It is still the seventh of the eight "great officers of state" of the British monarchy, just below the Lord High Constable and above the Lord High Admiral. Since the 13th Century the office has been a hereditary position of the Earls (now Dukes) of Norfolk.[13]


    Sources

    Source S-2024265482 Royal and Noble Genealogical Data, database online, Brian Tompsett, Copyright 1994-2001, Version March 25, 2001, Royal and Noble Genealogical Data, Department of Computer Science, University of Hull, (Hull, United Kingdom, HU6 7RX, B.C.Tompsett@dcs.hull.ac.uk), NS073013
    Richardson, Douglas, and Kimball G. Everingham. 2013. Royal ancestry: a study in colonial and medieval families. Salt Lake City, UT.: Douglas Richardson. Vol IV, page 33, cited by Mr. Marlyn Lewis, Our Royal, Titled, Noble, and Commoner Ancestors & Cousins, database online, Portland, Oregon.
    Medieval Lands, database online, author Charles Cawley, (Foundation for Medieval Genealogy, 2006-2013), England, earls created 1138-1143, Chapter 10, Pembroke: B. Earls of Pembroke 1189-1245 (MARSHAL), Gilbert "the Marshal"
    Dictionary of Medieval Knighthood and Chivalry, Bradford B. Broughton, (Westport, Connecticut, Greenwood Press, Inc., 1986).
    ? Round, J. H. (1911), The King's Serjeants & Officers of State with their Coronation Services. p.88
    ? English Historical Review, Feb. 1999: Henry of Blois and the Lordship of Glastonbury (N. E. Stacy). This article is now cited by newer editions of David Crouch's "William Marshall" and has been discussed online by medieval genealogists such as John Ravilious, Chris Phillips and Douglas Richardson. For example: http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/gen-medieval/2003-01/1042089376.
    ? For example in old editions of Burkes. https://books.google.be/books?id=uo9AAAAAcAAJ&pg=PA207
    ? http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/gen-medieval/2003-01/1042326346
    ? See online here. But the editors believe this is a 12th century document.
    ? So Keats-Rohan equated this Robert with the one in Shearston, with the same overlord as the Robert in Cheddar.
    ? 7.0 7.1 See the post of Chris Phillips: http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/GEN-MEDIEVAL/2003-01/1042105703
    ? Round, J. H. (1911), The King's Serjeants & Officers of State with their Coronation Services. p.90
    ? 9.0 9.1 Richard Brooks, The Knight who saved England.
    ? Ravilious on the generation length: http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/gen-medieval/2003-01/1042297945
    ? See the post of John Ravilious: http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/GEN-MEDIEVAL/2003-01/1042089376
    ? David Crouch, "William Marshall" 2nd ed. 2002, Appendix 2.
    ? Earl_Marshal on Wikipedia

    Gilbert married Mary Margarite De Venuz 0___ 1104, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales. Mary was born 10 Mar 1085, Calvados, Basse-Normandie, France; died 0___ 1119, Pembrokeshire, Wales. [Group Sheet]


  18. 249.  Mary Margarite De Venuz was born 10 Mar 1085, Calvados, Basse-Normandie, France; died 0___ 1119, Pembrokeshire, Wales.

    Notes:

    Mary Margarite De VenuzPrint Family Tree Mary /De Venuz/

    Born 10 March 1085 - Calvados, Basse-Normandie, France
    Deceased in 1119 - Pembrokeshire, Wales , age at death: 34 years old

    Parents
    Geoffrey De Venuz, born in 1066 - France, Deceased in 1157 - East Worldham, Hampshire, England age at death: 91 years old
    Married to
    ? ?

    Spouses, children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren
    Married in 1104, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales, to Gilbert Giffard (Fitzgilbert) (Royal Serjeant and Marshall to Henry I) MARSHALL, born in 1075 - Axbridge, Somerset, England, Deceased in 1130 - Marlborough, Wiltshire, England age at death: 55 years old (Parents : M Robert (Curthose) De (Duke of NORMANDY) NORMANDY 1054-1134 & F Sybilla (Brindisi Of) CONVERSANO 1079-1103) with
    M John (Fitzgilbert) (Earl of Pembroke, Marshall of England) MARSHALL 1105-1165 married, Wiltshire, England, to Aline Pipard
    John (Fitzgilbert) (Earl of Pembroke, Marshall of England) MARSHALL 1105-1165 married in 1143, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales, to Sibilla De SALISBURY 1109-1155 with
    M John MARSHALL 1144-1194 married in 1165, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales, to Alice De Port 1144-1180 with :
    M John Marshall 1185-1235
    M William (SIR - Knight Templar)(Earl Pembroke) MARSHALL 1146-1219 married in August 1189, London, England, to Isabel De CLARE 1172-1217 with :
    F Maud (Countess of Norfolk Countess of Surrey) MARSHALL 1192-1248
    F Eve (Baroness of Abergavenny) MARSHALL 1194-1246
    M Gilbert MARSHALL 1196-1241
    M William (4th Earl of Pembroke/ChiefJusticar of Ireland) MARSHALL 1198-1231
    F Isabel (Fitzgilbert) (Countess MARSHALL) MARSHALL 1200-1239
    F Sibyl MARSHALL ca 1201-1245
    F Joane MARSHALL 1202-1234
    F Margaret (Fitzgilbert) MARSHALL /1155-1242 married in 1181, Wiltshire, England, to Ralph De (Lord Dudley) SOMERY 1151-1210 with :
    F Joan De SOMERY ca 1191-1276
    M Roger De (SIR - Lord Dudley) SOMERY 1208-1273

    Paternal grand-parents, uncles and aunts
    M Ralf De Venuz 1040- married
    F ? ?
    M Geoffrey De Venuz 1066-1157
    married
    1 child


    (hide)

    Timeline
    10 March 1085 : Birth - Calvados, Basse-Normandie, France
    1104 : Marriage (with Gilbert Giffard (Fitzgilbert) (Royal Serjeant and Marshall to Henry I) MARSHALL) - Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales
    1105 : Birth - Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales
    1119 : Death - Pembrokeshire, Wales
    19 July 1119 : Death - Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales


    Sources
    Individual:
    - Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Ancestry Family Trees - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members. - This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created. - Ancestry Family Trees - http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=18829447&pid=9978
    - Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Ancestry Family Trees - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members. - This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created. - Ancestry Family Trees - http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=18829447&pid=9978
    - Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Ancestry Family Trees - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members. - This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created. - Ancestry Family Trees - http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=18829447&pid=9978
    - Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Ancestry Family Trees - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members. - This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created. - Ancestry Family Trees - http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=18829447&pid=9978
    - Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Ancestry Family Trees - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members. - This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created. - Ancestry Family Trees - http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=18829447&pid=9978
    Search the matching civil records

    Family Tree Preview
    Ancestry Chart Descendancy Chart
    _____| 4_ Ralf De Venuz 1040-
    /
    |2_ Geoffrey De Venuz 1066-1157
    | \
    |--1_ Mary Margarite De Venuz 1085-1119
    |3_ ? ?



    Family Tree owner : Dave BRADLEY (belfast8)

    end of profile

    Children:
    1. 124. John FitzGilbert was born 26 Nov 1105, (Wiltshire) England; died 29 Sep 1165, Rockley, Marlborough, Wiltshire, England; was buried Bradenstoke, Wiltshire, England.

  19. 250.  Walter of Salisbury was born 0___ 1087, Salisbury, Wiltshire, England (son of Edward of Salisbury and Maud Fitz Hurbert); died 0___ 1147, Bradenstoke, Wiltshire, England; was buried Bradenstoke, Wiltshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Lord Salisbury
    • Also Known As: Walter Evreux
    • Also Known As: Walter Fitz Edward
    • Also Known As: Walter the Sheriff

    Notes:

    Birth: 1091
    Salisbury
    Wiltshire Unitary Authority
    Wiltshire, England
    Death: 1147
    Bradenstoke
    Wiltshire Unitary Authority
    Wiltshire, England

    Walter of Salisbury was born to Edward of Salisbury, Earl of Salisbury, Sheriff of Wiltshire and Maud Fitz Hurbert. He was also styled also Walter FitzEdward and Walter the Sheriff. He married Sybil de Chaworth daughter of Patrick De Chaworth and, Matilda de Hesdin. He founded the Priory of Bradenstoke, and was a benefactor to Salisbury Cathedral. His wife, Sybil, preceeded in death, and was buried near the chior in Bradenstoke Priory. Walter took the habit of a canon there, died in 1147, he is buried in the same grave as his wife.


    Family links:
    Parents:
    Edward Of Salisbury

    Spouse:
    Sibilla de Chaworth (1100 - 1140)*

    Children:
    Hawise de Salisbury de Dreux (1118 - 1151)*
    Patrick d' Evereux (1122 - 1168)*
    Sybilla de Salisbury (1126 - 1176)*

    *Calculated relationship

    Burial:
    Bradenstoke Priory
    Bradenstoke
    Wiltshire Unitary Authority
    Wiltshire, England

    Created by: Audrey DeCamp Hoffman
    Record added: Apr 21, 2012
    Find A Grave Memorial# 88928387

    end

    Buried:
    at Bradenstoke Priory...

    The priory was founded in 1142 as the Augustinian priory of Clack, and dedicated to Saint Mary.[1] It was well-sited on a high ridge near a holy well, with further springs nearby; there is some evidence that a chapel of the era of Henry I already existed at the holy well.[1]

    The founder,[2] Walter FitzEdward de Salisbury, was the son of Edward de Salisbury,[3] a High Sheriff of Wiltshire; he gave lands for a priory as a daughter house of St. Mary's Abbey, Cirencester, according to its charter, "to serve God forever!".[4] After the death of his wife, he "took the tonsure and habit of the canons" and on his death in 1147, was buried in the Priory, near the choir.[4] His descendants, the Earls of Salisbury remained closely connected with the priory for many years.[1] In 1190 thirteen of the monks migrated to Cartmel Priory, Cumbria, which had been recently established by William Marshal.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bradenstoke_Priory

    Walter — Sibilla de Chaworth. Sibilla was born 0___ 1100, Kempsford, Gloucestershire, England; died 0___ 1140, Bradenstoke, Wiltshire, England; was buried Bradenstoke, Wiltshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  20. 251.  Sibilla de Chaworth was born 0___ 1100, Kempsford, Gloucestershire, England; died 0___ 1140, Bradenstoke, Wiltshire, England; was buried Bradenstoke, Wiltshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Sybil Chaworth

    Notes:

    Birth: 1100
    Kempsford
    Cotswold District
    Gloucestershire, England
    Death: 1140
    Bradenstoke
    Wiltshire Unitary Authority
    Wiltshire, England

    Sibilla was the daughter of Patrick de Chaources and Matilda Hesdin.
    She married Walter de Salisbury, son of Edward de Salisbury and Matilda Fitz Herbert. (Walter de Salisbury was born about 1087 in Salisbury, Wiltshire, England, died in 1147 in Bradenstoke, Wiltshire, England.
    Both Sibilla and Walter were buried together in the choir in Bradenstoke Priory, Bradenstoke, Wiltshire County, England.
    They had at least three children: Patrick, Sibyl and Harvise (Hedwige)


    Family links:
    Spouse:
    Walter Fitz Edward (1091 - 1147)

    Children:
    Hawise de Salisbury de Dreux (1118 - 1151)*
    Patrick d' Evereux (1122 - 1168)*
    Sybilla de Salisbury (1126 - 1176)*

    *Calculated relationship

    Burial:
    Bradenstoke Priory
    Bradenstoke
    Wiltshire Unitary Authority
    Wiltshire, England
    Plot: Choir with her husband

    Created by: Kat
    Record added: May 15, 2012
    Find A Grave Memorial# 90151726

    end

    Buried:
    at Bradenstoke Priory...

    The priory was founded in 1142 as the Augustinian priory of Clack, and dedicated to Saint Mary.[1] It was well-sited on a high ridge near a holy well, with further springs nearby; there is some evidence that a chapel of the era of Henry I already existed at the holy well.[1]

    The founder,[2] Walter FitzEdward de Salisbury, was the son of Edward de Salisbury,[3] a High Sheriff of Wiltshire; he gave lands for a priory as a daughter house of St. Mary's Abbey, Cirencester, according to its charter, "to serve God forever!".[4] After the death of his wife, he "took the tonsure and habit of the canons" and on his death in 1147, was buried in the Priory, near the choir.[4] His descendants, the Earls of Salisbury remained closely connected with the priory for many years.[1] In 1190 thirteen of the monks migrated to Cartmel Priory, Cumbria, which had been recently established by William Marshal.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bradenstoke_Priory

    Children:
    1. Patrick of Salisbury, Knight, 1st Earl of Salisbury was born 1117-1122, Salisbury, Wiltshire, England; died 27 Mar 1168, Poitiers, France; was buried St. Hilaire Abbey, Poitiers, Vienne, France.
    2. 125. Sibyl of Salisbury was born 27 Nov 1126; died 0___ 1176, Old Sarum (Salisbury), Wiltshire, England.

  21. 252.  Gilbert de Clare, Knight, 1st Earl of Pembroke was born ~ 1100, Tonbridge, Kent, England (son of Gilbert Fitz Richard, Knight, 2nd Lord of Clare and Adeliza de Claremont); died 6 Jan 1148.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Gilbert Fitz Gilbert de Clare

    Notes:

    Gilbert fitz Gilbert de Clare (c.?1100 – 6 January 1148), was created Earl of Pembroke in 1138. He was commonly known as Strongbow.[a]

    Life

    Born at Tonbridge, Gilbert de Clare was a son of Gilbert Fitz Richard de Clare and Alice de Claremont.[1] He started out without land and wealth of his own but was closely related to very powerful men, specifically his uncles Walter de Clare and Roger de Clare.[2]

    In 1136 Gilbert fitz Gilbert led an expedition against Exmes and burned parts of the town, including the church of Notre Dame, but was interrupted by the forces of William III, Count of Ponthieu and escaped the resulting melee only after suffering heavy losses.[3] Gilbert was a Baron, that is, a tenant-in-chief in England, and inherited the estates of his paternal uncles, Roger and Walter, which included the baronies and castles of Bienfaite and Orbec in Normandy. He held the lordship of Nether Gwent and the castle of Striguil (later Chepstow). King Stephen created him Earl of Pembroke, and gave him the rape and castle of Pevensey.

    After Stephen's defeat at Lincoln on 2 February 1141, Gilbert was among those who rallied to Empress Matilda when she recovered London in June, but he was at Canterbury when Stephen was recrowned late in 1141.[4] He then joined Geoffrey's plot against Stephen, but when that conspiracy collapsed, he again adhered to Stephen, being with him at the siege of Oxford late in 1142. In 1147 he rebelled when Stephen refused to give him the castles surrendered by his nephew Gilbert, 2nd Earl of Hertford, whereupon the King marched to his nearest castle and nearly captured him. However, the Earl appears to have made his peace with Stephen before his death the following year.[5]

    Family

    He married Isabel de Beaumont, before 1130, daughter of Sir Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Leicester, Count of Meulan, and Elizabeth de Vermandois.[6] Isabel had previously been the mistress of King Henry I of England.[7]

    By her Gilbert had:

    Richard de Clare, 2nd Earl of Pembroke[b][8]
    Basilia, who married (1) Raymond FitzGerald (Raymond le Gros) and (2) Geoffrey FitzRobert.[9]
    a daughter who married William Bloet.[10]

    end

    Gilbert — Isabel de Beaumont. [Group Sheet]


  22. 253.  Isabel de Beaumont (daughter of Robert de Beaumont, Knight, 1st Earl of Leicester and Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester).
    Children:
    1. 126. Richard de Clare, Knight, 2nd Earl Pembroke was born 0___ 1125, Tonbridge, Kent, England; died 20 Apr 1176, Dublin, Leinster, Ireland.

  23. 254.  Dermot Dairmait Mac Murchada, King of Leinster was born 0___ 1110, Dublin, Ireland (son of Donnchad Enna Mac Murchada and Orlaith Ingen O'Brien, Queen of Leinster); died 1 May 1171, Ireland.

    Notes:

    Dermot Dairmait Mac MURCHADA (King of Leinster)Print Family Tree(Dermot Dairmait Mac MURCHADA)


    Born in 1110 - Dublin, Ireland
    Deceased 1 May 1171 - Ireland , age at death: 61 years old

    Parents
    Donnchad Enna Mac MURCHADA, born in 1085 - Dublin, Dublin, Ireland, Deceased 8 December 1115 - Wexford, Ireland age at death: 30 years old
    Married to
    Orlaith Ingen (Queen of Leinster) O'BRIEN, born in 1080 - Dublin, Ireland, Deceased in 1113 - Dublin, Ireland age at death: 33 years old

    Spouses, children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren
    Married in 1140, Wexford, Ireland, to Mor Tauthail Moringen Murchertaig (Queen of Ireland) O'TOOLE, born in 1114 - Wexford, Ireland, Deceased 1 May 1191 - Wexford, Ireland age at death: 77 years old (Parents : M Mouirchertach (King of Ui Muiredaig) O'TOOLE 1089-1164 & F Cacht Ingen (Princess of Loigsig, Queen of Muiredaig O'Toole) O'MORDA 1094-1149) with
    F Eva Aoife Mac (Countess Pembroke) MURCHADA 1141-1188 married 26 August 1171, Waterford, Waterford, Ireland, to Richard (Strongbow) De ( 2nd Earl Pembroke, Lord Marshall) CLARE 1125-1176 with
    M Richard III De (SIR) CLARE, MAGNA CARTA BARON ca 1153-1217 married in 1180, England, to Amicie De CAEN 1160-1225 with :
    F Matilda De CLARE 1175-1213
    M Gilbert III De (Earl of Gloucester - Hertford) CLARE, MAGNA CARTA BARON ca 1180-1230
    F Maud Matilda De CLARE 1184-1213
    F Isabel De CLARE 1172-1217 married in August 1189, London, England, to William (SIR - Knight Templar)(Earl Pembroke) MARSHALL 1146-1219 with :
    F Maud (Countess of Norfolk Countess of Surrey) MARSHALL 1192-1248
    F Eve (Baroness of Abergavenny) MARSHALL 1194-1246
    M Gilbert MARSHALL 1196-1241
    M William (4th Earl of Pembroke/ChiefJusticar of Ireland) MARSHALL 1198-1231
    F Isabel (Fitzgilbert) (Countess MARSHALL) MARSHALL 1200-1239
    F Sibyl MARSHALL ca 1201-1245
    F Joane MARSHALL 1202-1234
    F Joan De ( Baroness of Gamage) CLARE 1175-1222/ married in 1196, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales, to Godfrey De (Sir) ( Lord of Gamage) GAMAGE 1176-1253 with :
    M Payne De GAMAGE 1211-
    F Elizabeth GAMAGE 1222-1272
    F Urlachen Mac MURCHADA 1154-1200 married in 1171 to Domnall Mor (Ua) (King of Leinster) O'BRIEN 1137-1194 with
    F Mor O'BRIEN 1172-1218 married in 1185, Ireland, to William De (Lord of Connaught) BURGH 1158-1204 with :
    M Richard Mor "The Great", De (1st Earl of Ulster) BURGH 1202-1242
    M Domnall Cairbreach (King of Munster) O'BRIEN 1175-1242 married in 1194 to Sabia O'KENNEDY 1177- with :
    M Connor Conchobar Suidaine (King of Thormond) O'BRIEN 1195-1258

    Paternal grand-parents, uncles and aunts
    M Murchad Macdairmata MURCHADA 1032-1070 married
    F Sadb Ingen Mac BRICC 1020-1070
    M Donnchad Enna Mac MURCHADA 1085-1115
    married
    1 child



    Maternal grand-parents, uncles and aunts
    M Gilla Michil O'BRIEN 1055-1068 married
    F Iuchdelb Hui GARBITA 1062-
    F Orlaith Ingen (Queen of Leinster) O'BRIEN 1080-1113
    married
    1 child



    Notes
    Individual Note
    Source: Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Irish Landed Gentry - Ancestry.com - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2002.Original data - O'Hart, John. Irish Landed Gentry When Cromwell Came to Ireland. Dublin, Ireland: James Duffy and Sons, 1887.Original data: O'Hart, John. Irish Landed Gentry When Crom - 1,6308::0
    http://search.Ancestry.com.au/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=uki1-irish-landed_gnty&h=170&ti=5544&indiv=try&gss=pt 1,6308::170
    Source: Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Millennium File - Heritage Consulting - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2003.Original data - Heritage Consulting. The Millennium File. Salt Lake City, UT, USA: Heritage Consulting.Original data: Heritage Consulting. The Millennium File. Salt Lake City, UT, USA: - 1,7249::0
    http://search.Ancestry.com.au/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=millind&h=105913193&ti=5544&indiv=try&gss=pt Birth date: 1100 Birth place: Leinster, Ireland Death date: 1 May 1171 Death place: Ferns, Wexford, Ire, Ireland 1,7249::105913193
    Source: Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Dictionary of National Biography, Volumes 1-20, 22 - Ancestry.com - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. This collection was indexed by Ancestry World Archives Project contributors.Original data - Stephen, Sir Leslie, ed. Dictionary of National Biography, 1921–1922. London, England: Oxf - 1,1981::0
    http://search.Ancestry.com.au/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=dictnatbiogv1&h=34636&ti=5544&indiv=try&gss=pt Birth date: 1110 Birth place: Death date: 1171 Death place: Ferns 1,1981::34636


    Sources
    Individual:
    - Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Ancestry Family Trees - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members. - This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created. - Ancestry Family Trees - http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=18829447&pid=10182
    - Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Ancestry Family Trees - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members. - This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created. - Ancestry Family Trees - http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=18829447&pid=10182
    - Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Ancestry Family Trees - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members. - This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created. - Ancestry Family Trees - http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=18829447&pid=10182
    Birth, death:
    - Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Millennium File - Heritage Consulting - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2003.Original data - Heritage Consulting. The Millennium File. Salt Lake City, UT, USA: Heritage Consulting.Original data: Heritage Consulting. The Millennium File. Salt Lake City, UT, USA: - 1,7249::0
    Note http://search.Ancestry.com.au/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=millind&h=105913193&ti=5544&indiv=try&gss=pt - Birth date: 1100 Birth place: Leinster, Ireland Death date: 1 May 1171 Death place: Ferns, Wexford, Ire, Ireland - 1,7249::105913193
    - Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Dictionary of National Biography, Volumes 1-20, 22 - Ancestry.com - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. This collection was indexed by Ancestry World Archives Project contributors.Original data - Stephen, Sir Leslie, ed. Dictionary of National Biography, 1921–1922. London, England: Oxf - 1,1981::0
    Note http://search.Ancestry.com.au/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=dictnatbiogv1&h=34636&ti=5544&indiv=try&gss=pt - Birth date: 1110 Birth place: Death date: 1171 Death place: Ferns - 1,1981::34636

    Family Tree Preview
    Ancestry Chart Descendancy Chart Printable Family Tree
    _____| 16_ Donnchad Mâael Na Mbâo (O'CHEINNSELAIG) MURCHADA ca 960-1006
    _____| 8_ Diarmait Macmail Na Mbo (177th High King of Ireland) MURCHADA 974-1072
    _____| 4_ Murchad Macdairmata MURCHADA 1032-1070
    / \ _____| 18_ Donnchad (King of MUNSTER) O'BRIEN 982/-1064
    |2_ Donnchad Enna Mac MURCHADA 1085-1115
    | \ _____| 20_ Brecc (Na Dessi) Mac BRICC 950-1051
    | \ _____| 10_ Muirchertach Mac BRICC 1005-1051
    | \
    |--1_ Dermot Dairmait Mac (King of Leinster) MURCHADA 1110-1171
    | _____| 12_ Echmarcach O'BRIEN 1009-
    | /
    | _____| 6_ Gilla Michil O'BRIEN 1055-1068
    | / \
    |3_ Orlaith Ingen (Queen of Leinster) O'BRIEN 1080-1113
    \
    \ _____| 14_ Cearnachan GAIRBITA 1040-
    \ /
    \

    end of report

    Dermot married Mor Tauthail Moringen Murchertaig O'Toole, Queen of Ireland 0___ 1140, Wexford, Ireland. Mor was born 0___ 1114, Wexford, Ireland; died 1 May 1191, Wexford, Ireland. [Group Sheet]


  24. 255.  Mor Tauthail Moringen Murchertaig O'Toole, Queen of Ireland was born 0___ 1114, Wexford, Ireland; died 1 May 1191, Wexford, Ireland.
    Children:
    1. 127. Eva Aoife Mac Murchada, Countess Pembroke was born 26 Apr 1141, Dublin, Leinster, Ireland; died 0___ 1188, Waterford, Ireland; was buried Tintern, Monmouthshire, Wales.
    2. Orlacan Nâi Murchada was born 0___ 1154, Dublin, Leinster, Ireland; died 0___ 1200, Ireland.