Sir Stephen Scrope, Knight

Male 1321 - Aft 1359  (~ 39 years)


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Generation: 1

  1. 1.  Sir Stephen Scrope, Knight was born ~ 1321, Masham, Yorkshire, England (son of Geoffrey le Scrope, Knight and Ivette de Ros); died Aft 1359.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Stephen le Scrope

    Notes:

    Biography

    Stephen le Scrope, Knt. of Thornton, Stertwhayt, and Danby super Yore, Yorkshire[1]

    Family

    Parents: Geoffrey and Ivette (de Roos) le Scrope[1]
    Born: 1321 (age 40 in 1361), Masham, Yorkshire[citation needed]; fourth son[1]
    Wife: Isabel ______, presumably widow of Humphrey Stordey.[1]
    Child: Stephen and Isabel had one daughter Joan, sole heiress, who married (1) William Pert and (2) Sir Roger de Swillington.[1]
    Life and Death

    Sir Stephen "fought at the Battle of Crâecy in 1346 and also at the siege of Calais from September 1346 to August 1347. In 1356 he served at the recapture of Berwick In 1359, he accompanied the king into France."[1]
    Died: Both Stephen and his wife Isabel were living August 11, 1359.[1]
    Magna Carta Connections

    Descendant of Magna Carta surety baron Robert de Roos, Sir Stephen le Scrope and his wife Isabel are the ancestors of William Asfordby, George & Nehemiah Blakiston, Joseph Bolles, George & Robert Brent, Henry Corbin, Elizabeth & John Harleston, Henry Isham, Anne Mauleverer, Robert Peyton, George Reade, Richard Saltonstall, Diana and Grey Skipwith (Magna Carta Gateway Ancestors).[2]
    Sources

    ? 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 5 vols., ed. Kimball G. Everingham, (Salt Lake City, Utah: the author, 2013), Vol. III, p 312 HOPTON #9 Stephen le Scrope; Vol. IV, pp 601-602 SCROPE #8 Ivette de Roos
    ? Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, Royal Ancestry series, 2nd edition, 4 vols., ed. Kimball G. Everingham, (Salt Lake City, Utah: the author, 2011), Vol IV, p 7 SCROPE #4ii Stephen le Scrope, Knt.
    Sir Stephen le Scrope, "Our Royal, Titled, Noble, and Commoner Ancestors and Cousins" (website, compiled by Mr. Marlyn Lewis, Portland, OR; accessed October 1, 2015)
    Not shown by MedLands (#MedLands)
    Background: Martini, S. (1328). The Knight of Sienna. Accessed: 15 Mar 2015. Digital image. Retrieved from Flemish Tapestry Wall Hangings (jpg) - from a fresco by Simone Martini (1284-1334) in the Palazzo Publico in Sienna. First equestrian portrait in Western painting; is of Captain Guido Riccio de Fogliani.

    end of biography

    Stephen — Isabel LNU. Isabel died Aft 1359. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. Joan Scrope

Generation: 2

  1. 2.  Geoffrey le Scrope, Knight was born 0___ 1280, (Masham, Yorkshire, England) (son of William le Scrope and Constance Newsham); died 2 Dec 1340, Ghent, Belgium; was buried Coverham Abbey, North Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: 18th Lord Chief Justice of England
    • Occupation: Soldier, Diplomat & Lawyer
    • Alt Birth: 0___ 1285

    Notes:

    Sir Geoffrey le Scrope (1285 – 2 December 1340) was an English lawyer, and Chief Justice of the King's Bench for four periods between 1324 and 1338.

    He was the son of Sir William le Scrope, who was bailiff to the earl of Richmond in Richmondshire. Geoffrey's older brother Henry was also a lawyer, and served as Chief Justice twice, 1317–23 and 1329–30. His mother was Constance, daughter and heiress of Thomas, son of Gillo de Newsham, variously described as of Newsham-on-Tees and of Newsham-on-Tyne. Geoffrey Scrope certainly had an estate at Whalton, near Morpeth, a few miles south-east of which there is a Newsham, but it is not upon the Tyne.[1]

    Like his brother, Scrope adopted the profession of the law, and by 1316 he was king's serjeant. He is also called 'valettus regis.' He was summoned to councils and parliaments, and occasionally sat on judicial commissions.[1] In the baronial conflicts of the reign of Edward II he was a loyal adherent of the crown. He was involved in the proceedings both against Thomas of Lancaster and Andrew Harclay. He was knighted in 1323, and became Chief Justice for the first time on 21 March 1324. He managed, however, to survive politically the overthrow both of Edward II in 1326 and of Roger Mortimer in 1330.

    After retiring as a justice, he campaigned with Edward III in Flanders, and distinguished himself as a soldier. He was also one of the instigators behind the king's actions against Archbishop Stratford in 1340. The small estate he held as early as 1312 in Coverdale, south of Wensleydale, he augmented before 1318, by the acquisition of the manor of Clifton on Ure at the entrance of the latter dale, where he obtained a license to build a castle in that year. Early in the next reign he purchased the neighbouring manor of Masham from the representatives of its old lords, the Wautons, who held it from the Mowbrays by the service of an annual barbed arrow. Eltham Mandeville and other Vesci lands in Kent had passed into his hands by 1318. One of Edward II's last acts was to invest him with the great castle and honour of Skipton in Craven forfeited by Roger, lord Clifford. So closely was he identified with the court party that Mortimer was alleged to have projected the same fate for him as for the Despensers. But though Edward's deposition was followed by Scrope's removal from office, he received a pardon in February 1328, and was reinstated as chief justice.[1]

    He was a soldier and diplomatist as well as a lawyer, and his services in the former capacities were in such request that his place had frequently to be supplied by substitutes, one of whom was his brother Henry, and for a time (1334–7) he seems to have exchanged his post for the (nominal) second justiceship of the common pleas. Again chief justice in 1338, he finally resigned the office before October in that year on the outbreak of the French war.[1]

    In the tournaments of the previous reign, at one of which he was knighted, Scrope had not disgraced the azure bend or of his family, which he bore with a silver label for difference, and in the first months of Edward III's rule he was with the army which nearly joined battle with the Scots at Stanhope Park in Weardale. But it was in diplomatic business that Edward III found Scrope most useful. He took him to France in 1329. In 1331 and 1333, he was entrusted with important foreign missions. He had only just been designated (1334) one of the deputies to keep a watch over John Baliol when he was sent on an embassy to Brittany and France. In 1335 and again in 1337, Scottish affairs engaged his attention.[1]

    Just before crossing to Flanders in 1338 Edward III sent Scrope with the Earl of Northampton to his ally the emperor, and later in the year he was employed in the negotiations opened at the eleventh hour with Philip VI. He had at least six knights in his train, and took the field in the campaign which ended bloodlessly at Buironfosse (1339). Galfrid le Baker (p. 65) relates the well-known anecdote of Scrope's punishing Cardinal Bernard de Montfavence's boasts of the inviolability of France by taking him up a high tower and showing him her frontiers all in flames.[1]

    He now appears with the formal title of king's secretary, and spent the winter of 1339–40 in negotiating a marriage between the heir of Flanders and Edward's daughter Isabella. Returning to England with the King in February, he was granted two hundred marks a year to support his new dignity of banneret. Going back to Flanders in June, he took part in the siege of Tournay, and about Christmas died at Ghent. His body was carried to Coverham Abbey, to which he had given the church of Sadberge. Jervaulx and other monasteries had also experienced his liberality. Besides his Yorkshire and Northumberland estates, he left manors in five other counties. Scrope was the more distinguished of the two notable brothers whose unusual fortune it was to found two great baronial families within the limits of a single Yorkshire dale.[1]

    Family

    Geoffrey and his wife Ivette (de Ros) had five sons. Their eldest son, Henry (whose daughter Joan married Henry Fitzhugh), became the first Baron Scrope of Masham.[1]

    Scrope married Ivetta, in all probability daughter of Sir William de Roos of Ingmanthorpe, near Wetherby. A second marriage with Lora, daughter of Gerard de Furnival of Hertfordshire and Yorkshire, and widow of Sir John Ufflete or Usflete, has been inferred from a gift of her son, Gerard Ufflete, to Scrope and his mother jointly in 1331; but Ivetta is named as Scrope's wife in 1332.[1]

    By the latter he had five sons and three daughters. The sons were:

    Henry, first baron Scrope of Masham;
    Thomas, who predeceased his father;
    William (1325?–1367), who fought at the Battle of Crâecy, Poitiers, and Najara, and died in Spain;
    Stephen, who was at the Battle of Crâecy and the siege of Berwick (1356);
    Geoffrey (died 1383), LL.B. (probably of Oxford), prebendary of Lincoln, London, and York.
    The daughters were Beatrice and Constance, who married respectively Sir Andrew and Sir Geoffrey Luttrell of Lincolnshire; and Ivetta, the wife of John de Hothom.[1]

    Notes

    ^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h i j Tair 1897.

    References

    Attribution

    This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Tait, James (1897). "Scrope, Geoffrey le". In Lee, Sidney. Dictionary of National Biography. 51. London: Smith, Elder & Co.

    Sources

    E.L.G. Stones, 'Sir Geoffrey le Scrope (c.1285–1340), chief justice of the king's bench', English Historical Review, 69 (1954), pp. 1–17.
    Brigette Vale (2004). "Scrope, Sir Geoffrey (d. 1340)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford University Press. Retrieved 7 August 2006.

    *

    Geoffrey le Scrope (d. 1340)

    Sir Geoffrey le Scrope (died 1340), chief justice of the kings bench as mentioned above, uncle of the first Baron Scrope of Bolton, had a son Henry, who in 1350 was summoned to parliament by writ as Baron Scrope, the designation of Masham being added in the time of his grandson to distinguish the title from that held by the elder branch of the family.

    Henry's fourth son was Richard le Scrope (c. 1350 – 1405), Archbishop of York, who took part with the Percies in opposition to Henry IV, and was beheaded for treason in June 1405.

    Despite this, Henry Scrope, 3rd Baron Scrope of Masham (c. 1376 – 1415), became a favorite of Henry V, by whom he was made treasurer in 1410 and employed on diplomatic missions abroad. However, in 1415 he was involved in a conspiracy to assassinate Henry (along with the King's cousin Richard of Conisburgh, 3rd Earl of Cambridge) and was ignominiously executed at Southampton. His title was forfeited. It was, however, restored to his brother John in 1455; and it fell into abeyance on the death, in 1517, of Geoffrey, 11th Baron Scrope of Masham, without male heirs.

    Occupation:
    In office 21 March 1324 - 1 May 1329

    Buried:
    Photo & History ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coverham_Abbey

    Geoffrey married Ivette de Ros 0___ 1306, Masham, Yorkshire, England. Ivette (daughter of William de Ros, Knight and Eustache FitzRalph) was born 0___ 1285, Ingmanthorpe, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1331; was buried Coverham Abbey, Coverham, Richmondshire, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 3.  Ivette de Ros was born 0___ 1285, Ingmanthorpe, Yorkshire, England (daughter of William de Ros, Knight and Eustache FitzRalph); died 0___ 1331; was buried Coverham Abbey, Coverham, Richmondshire, Yorkshire, England.

    Notes:

    Birth: 1285
    North Yorkshire, England
    Death: 1331
    North Yorkshire, England

    Born in 1285 in Ingmanthrope, Yorkshire, England to Baroness Eustace FitzRalph and Sir William de Ros. Married Knight Geoffrey I de SCROPE in 1306 in Masham, Yorkshire, England. Mother of John born in Masham, Yorkshire and Henry and Geoffrey Scrope.

    Family links:
    Parents:
    William de Ros (____ - 1310)
    Eustache FitzRalph Ros

    Spouse:
    Geoffrey Scrope (1280 - 1340)

    Children:
    Henry Scrope (1312 - 1392)*
    Ivetta Scrope (1327 - 1391)*

    *Calculated relationship

    Burial:
    Coverham Abbey
    Coverham
    Richmondshire District
    North Yorkshire, England

    Created by: Kaaren Crail Vining
    Record added: Jan 24, 2014
    Find A Grave Memorial# 124086009

    Buried:
    Picture & History ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coverham_Abbey

    Children:
    1. Henry le Scrope, Knight, 1st Baron Scrope of Masham was born 29 Sep 1312, Masham, Yorkshire, England; died 31 Jul 1391, Ghent, Belgium; was buried Coverham Abbey, Coverham, Yorkshire, England.
    2. Thomas Scrope died Bef 1340.
    3. William Scrope was born ~ 1325, Masham, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1367, Spain.
    4. 1. Stephen Scrope, Knight was born ~ 1321, Masham, Yorkshire, England; died Aft 1359.
    5. Geoffrey Scrope was born 0___ 1319, Masham, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1383.
    6. Beatrice Scrope
    7. Constance Scrope


Generation: 3

  1. 4.  William le Scrope was born ~ 1259, Bolton, North Yorkshire, England; died ~ 1311.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Bailiff

    Notes:

    The great-great-great-grandson of Hugh was Sir William le Scrope (c.1259 – c. 1311) of Bolton, in Wensleydale, Yorkshire, who had two sons, Henry le Scrope (died 1336) and Geoffrey le Scrope (died 1340), both of whom were in succession chief justice of the king's bench and prominent supporters of the court in the reign of King Edward II of England.

    William — Constance Newsham. Constance (daughter of Thomas Newsham and Lucy FitzPeter, Baroness de Ros) was born 0___ 1249; died 0Dec 1320, Bracewell, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 5.  Constance Newsham was born 0___ 1249 (daughter of Thomas Newsham and Lucy FitzPeter, Baroness de Ros); died 0Dec 1320, Bracewell, Yorkshire, England.

    Notes:

    His mother was Constance, daughter and heiress of Thomas, son of Gillo de Newsham, variously described as of Newsham-on-Tees and of Newsham-on-Tyne.

    Children:
    1. Henry le Scrope, Knight was born Bef 1268, (Masham, Yorkshire, England); died 7 Sep 1336; was buried St Agatha's Abbey, Easby, Yorkshire, England.
    2. 2. Geoffrey le Scrope, Knight was born 0___ 1280, (Masham, Yorkshire, England); died 2 Dec 1340, Ghent, Belgium; was buried Coverham Abbey, North Yorkshire, England.

  3. 6.  William de Ros, Knight was born ~ 1244, (Yorkshire) England (son of William de Ros, Knight and Lucy FitzPeter, Baroness de Ros); died 0May 1310, (Yorkshire) England; was buried Greyfriars Abbey Church, King's Straith, York, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Residence: Ingmanthorpe, Yorkshire, England
    • Residence: Scotland
    • Residence: Gascony, France
    • Also Known As: Baron Ingmanthorpe
    • Also Known As: William de Roos

    Notes:

    Birth: unknown, England
    Death: May, 1310, England

    Knight of Ingmanthorpe in Kirk Deighton, Yorkshire, in right of his wife, of Greasley, Nottinghamshire, Ilkeston, Derbyshire.

    Third son of Sir William de Ros and Lucy FitzPeter, grandson of Sir Robert de Ros and Isabel of Scotland, Peter FitzHubert and Alice FitzRoger.

    Husband of Eustache FitzEalph, daughter and heiress of Sir Ralph FitzHugh of Greasley and the daughter of Sir John de la Haye, widow of Sir Nicholas de Cantelowe of Buckinghamshire. They married in 1268 and had one son and five daughters:
    * Sir William
    * Lucy
    * Isabel
    * Margaret
    * Ivette
    * Mary, the Prioress of Rosedale Priory

    Sir William served in Scotland 1257 and 1258, Gascony in 1294 and then Scotland in 1296. Sir William died shortly before May 28 1310, the date of his burial, and was buried beside his wife who died previously.

    The family surname is found both Ros and Roos.

    Family links:
    Parents:
    William de Ros (1192 - 1264)
    Lucy FitzPiers de Ros (1207 - 1267)

    Spouse:
    Eustache FitzRalph Ros

    Children:
    Ivetta De Ros Scrope (1285 - 1331)*

    Siblings:
    William de Ros (____ - 1310)
    Alice de Ros (____ - 1286)*
    Robert de Ros (1223 - 1285)*
    Lucy de Ros de Kyme (1230 - ____)*

    *Calculated relationship

    Burial:
    Greyfriars Abbey Church (Defunct)
    York
    York Unitary Authority
    North Yorkshire, England

    Created by: Anne Shurtleff Stevens
    Record added: Apr 02, 2013
    Find A Grave Memorial# 107743856

    Buried:
    Greyfriars Abbey Church (Defunct)

    William married Eustache FitzRalph 0___ 1268. Eustache was born England; died Bef 1310, England; was buried Greyfriars Abbey Church, King's Straith, York, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 7.  Eustache FitzRalph was born England; died Bef 1310, England; was buried Greyfriars Abbey Church, King's Straith, York, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Eustace FitzHugh

    Notes:

    Birth: unknown, England
    Death: unknown, England

    Eustache FitzHugh de Cantelowe de Ros

    Daughter and heiress of Sir Ralph FitzHugh of Greasley and the daughter of Sir John de la Haye. Of her own right of Greasley, Nottinghamshire, and of Ilkeston, Derbyshire.

    She was the wife of Sir Nicholas de Cantelowe of Buckinghamshire, who died after May 1262.

    Secondly wife of Sir William de Ros, third son of Sir William de Ros and Lucy FitzPeter. They married in 1268 and had one son and five daughters;
    * Sir William
    * Lucy
    * Isabel
    * Margaret
    * Ivette
    * Mary, the Prioress of Rosedale Priory

    Eustace was also the heir to her kinsman, Peter de la Haye of Arlington, Sussex. She died before her husband who died in May of 1310. They were buried together at GreyFriars, York.

    The family surname is found both Ros and Roos.

    Family links:
    Spouse:
    William de Ros (____ - 1310)*

    Children:
    Ivetta De Ros Scrope (1285 - 1331)*

    *Calculated relationship

    Burial:
    Greyfriars Abbey Church (Defunct)
    York
    York Unitary Authority
    North Yorkshire, England

    Created by: Anne Shurtleff Stevens
    Record added: Apr 03, 2013
    Find A Grave Memorial# 107756207

    Buried:
    Greyfriars Abbey Church (Defunct)

    Children:
    1. Lucia Ros was born ~ 1272; died ~ 1362.
    2. Isabel de Ros was born ~ 1276, Helmsley Castle, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1318, Cleveland, Yorkshire, England.
    3. 3. Ivette de Ros was born 0___ 1285, Ingmanthorpe, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1331; was buried Coverham Abbey, Coverham, Richmondshire, Yorkshire, England.


Generation: 4

  1. 10.  Thomas Newsham was born ~ 1223, Yorkshire, England (son of Gillo de Newsham and unnamed spouse); died 0___ 1264, Yorkshire, England.

    Thomas — Lucy FitzPeter, Baroness de Ros. Lucy (daughter of Peter FitzHerbert, Lord of Brecknock and Alice FitzRoger) was born 1207-1210, Forest Dean, Gloucestershire, England; died 0___ 1267, North Yorkshire, England; was buried Kirkham Priory, Kirkham, North Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 11.  Lucy FitzPeter, Baroness de Ros was born 1207-1210, Forest Dean, Gloucestershire, England (daughter of Peter FitzHerbert, Lord of Brecknock and Alice FitzRoger); died 0___ 1267, North Yorkshire, England; was buried Kirkham Priory, Kirkham, North Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Lucia of Brecknock FitzPiers
    • Also Known As: Lucy FitzPiers

    Notes:

    Lucy FitzPiers
    Also Known As: "Lucia", "Lucy;de;ros; Lucy", "FITZ", "PETER", "ros"
    Birthdate: circa 1210
    Birthplace: Forest Dean, Gloucestershire, England, (Present UK)
    Death: Died 1247 in Yorkshire, England, (Present UK)
    Immediate Family:
    Daughter of Piers FitzHerbert, Lord of Brecknock and Alice Fitzpiers
    Wife of Thomas de Newsom and Sir William de Ros
    Mother of Constance Scrope (de Newsom); Sir Alexander de Braose; Sir Herbert de Braose; Alicia de Ros, of Helmsley; Robert de Ros and 10 others
    Sister of Beatrix Fitzpiers; Reginald FitzPiers, Lord of Blaen Llyfni and Herbert Fitzpiers, Sheriff Hampshire
    Half sister of Joan de Verdun

    The de Ros family, from Scottish Kings to English Gentry

    Lucy FitzPiers
    Also Known As: "Lucia", "Lucy;de;ros; Lucy", "FITZ", "PETER", "ros"
    Birthdate: circa 1210
    Birthplace: Forest Dean, Gloucestershire, England, (Present UK)
    Death: Died 1247 in Yorkshire, England, (Present UK)
    Immediate Family:
    Daughter of Piers FitzHerbert, Lord of Brecknock and Alice Fitzpiers
    Wife of Thomas de Newsom and Sir William de Ros
    Mother of Constance Scrope (de Newsom); Sir Alexander de Braose; Sir Herbert de Braose; Alicia de Ros, of Helmsley; Robert de Ros and 10 others
    Sister of Beatrix Fitzpiers; Reginald FitzPiers, Lord of Blaen Llyfni and Herbert Fitzpiers, Sheriff Hampshire
    Half sister of Joan de Verdun
    Managed by: James Fred Patin, Jr.
    Last Updated: April 1, 2016
    View Complete Profile
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    Immediate Family

    Thomas de Newsom
    husband

    Constance Scrope (de Newsom)
    daughter

    Sir Alexander de Braose
    son

    Sir Herbert de Braose
    son

    Sir William de Ros
    husband

    Alicia de Ros, of Helmsley
    daughter

    Robert de Ros
    son

    Lucy de Ros
    daughter

    Robert de Ros, Lord of Belvoir
    son

    Alexander de Ros
    son

    Peter de Ros
    son

    Mary de Ros
    daughter
    About Lucy FitzPiers, Baroness de Ros
    Individual Record FamilySearch™ Pedigree Resource File

    Search Results | Print

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    Lucia of Brecknock FitzPiers Compact Disc #41 Pin #277411 Pedigree

    Sex: F
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Event(s)

    Birth: abt 1196
    Helmsley,Yorkshire,England
    Death: aft 1266
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Parents

    Father: Piers FitzHerbert Disc #41 Pin #283090
    Mother: Alice de Warkworth FitzRobert Disc #41 Pin #283089
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Marriage(s)

    Spouse: Sir William I of Hamlake de Ros Disc #41 Pin #277410
    Marriage:
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Notes and Sources

    Notes: None
    Sources: Available on CD-ROM Disc# 41
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Submitter

    Kathy LONGHURST
    1175 S. 180 W. Hurricane Utah

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    Lucia FITZPIERS Pedigree

    Female Family
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Event(s):

    Birth: 1195
    Christening:
    Death:
    Burial:
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Parents:

    Father: Herbert FITZHERBERT Family
    Mother: Alice FITZ ROGER
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Marriages:

    Spouse: William De ROSS Family
    Marriage: About 1259 Of Igmanthorpe, , Yorkshire, England
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Messages:

    Record submitted after 1991 by a member of the LDS Church. No additional information is available. Ancestral File may list the same family and the submitter.
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    No source information is available.
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    © 2008 Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved. Conditions of Use Privacy Policy 26 http://www.familysearch.org v.2.5.0

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    Lucy FITZPIERS (-1266) [Pedigree]

    Daughter of Piers FITZHERBERT (-1235) and Alice de WARKWORTH (-1225)

    b. of Brecknock, Wales
    d. AFT 1266
    Married Sir William de ROS (1193-1264)

    Children: [listed under entry for William de ROS]

    References:

    1. "Magna Charta Sureties, 1215",

    F. L. Weis,
    4th Ed..
    2. "Burke's Peerage, 1938".

    3. "Presidents GEDCOM File",

    Otto-G. Richter, Brian Tompsett.
    4. "Ancestral roots of certain American colonists who came

    to America before 1700",
    Frederick Lewis Weis, 1992, seventh edition.
    The earlier editions were called: "Ancestral roots of
    sixty colonists who came to New England 1623-1650"
    Lucy FitzPiers

    (say 1195 - )

    Lucy FitzPiers|b. s 1195|p317.htm#i18533|Reginald or Piers FitzPeirs or FitzHerbert||p317.htm#i14306||||||||||||||||

    Lucy FitzPiers married Sir William de Ros, son of Sir Robert de Ros Fursan and Isabel Avenal of Scotland. Rosie Bevan wrote: That William de Ros of Helmsley was married to Lucy fitz Piers identified, ( CP (XI : 94) as you say, citing Dugdale), as daughter of Piers fitz Herbert, lord of Brecknock, would appeare to be borne out by the names of their children - Robert, William, Alexander, Herbert, John, Piers, Lucy and Alice, as listed in CP XI p. 94 note (l) and supported by about ten references. Lucy FitzPiers was born say 1195 at Wales. Dugdale citing Glover, Somerset Herald, stated that she was the daughter of Reginald FitzPiers of Blewlebeny in Wales. If she belonged to this family, she was presumably sister of Herbert Fitzpiers and of his brother and heir Reynold FitzPiers, and daughter of Piers FitzHerbert, lords of the Honour of Brecknock, whose castle was built at Blaenllyfni. She was the daughter of Reginald or Piers FitzPeirs or FitzHerbert.
    She was living at Michaelmas 1266, when there is a record of her claim for dower in Ulceby, Lincs, against Alice de Ros, and in a manor in Yorks against Piers de Ros.
    Children of Lucy FitzPiers and Sir William de Ros

    * Sir William de Ros (of Ingmanthorpe)+ d. b 28 May 1310
    * Sir Alexander de Ros
    * Sir Herbert de Ros
    * Sir John de Ros
    * Piers de Ros
    * Sir Robert de Ros 1st Baron+ b. bt 1220 - 1223, d. 17 May 1285
    * Lucy de Ros+ b. s 1230, d. a 1279
    * Alice de Ros d. 29 Apr 1286
    Lucy FitzPiers1

    F, #176196

    Lucy FitzPiers||p17620.htm#i176196|Piers FitzHerbert||p36888.htm#i368871||||||||||||||||

    Last Edited=13 Jun 2009

    Lucy FitzPiers is the daughter of Piers FitzHerbert.2 She married Sir William de Ros, son of Robert de Ros, 1st Lord Ros of Helmsley and Isabella (?).1
    Children of Lucy FitzPiers and Sir William de Ros

    * Sir Robert de Ros+ d. 17 Mar 12852
    * Sir William de Ros+ d. 28 May 13101
    * Piers Ros 2
    Citations

    1. [S1545] Mitchell Adams, "re: West Ancestors," e-mail message from (Australia) to Darryl Roger Lundy, 6 December 2005 - 19 June 2009. Hereinafter cited as "re: West Ancestors".
    2. [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke's Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke's Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 1, page 1107. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
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    William De ROSS Pedigree

    Male Family
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Event(s):

    Birth:
    Christening:
    Death:
    Burial:
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Marriages:

    Spouse: Lucia FITZPIERS Family
    Marriage: About 1259 Of Igmanthorpe, , Yorkshire, England
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Messages:

    Record submitted after 1991 by a member of the LDS Church. No additional information is available. Ancestral File may list the same family and the submitter.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Source Information:

    No source information is available.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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    Lucy[1,2,3]

    - 1266
    Sex Female

    Lived In Scotland

    Complete *

    Died Aft 1265

    Person ID I00113893 Leo

    Last Modified 22 Aug 1997

    Father Piers FitzHerbert

    Mother Alice

    Family ID F00119593 Group Sheet

    Family Sir William de Ros, of Helmsley

    Children

    1. Sir Robert de Ros, of Helmsley, b. est 1235

    2. Sir William de Ros, of Ingmanthorpe, b. est 1240

    3. Alexander de Ros
    4. Herbert de Ros
    5. John de Ros
    6. Piers de Ros
    7. Lucy de Ros
    8. Alice de Ros
    Last Modified 22 Aug 1997

    Family ID F00049669 Group Sheet

    Sources 1. [S00058] The Complete Peerage, 1936 , Doubleday, H.A. & Lord Howard de Walden, Reference: XI Ros 94n

    2. [S01336] Descendants of Leofric of Mercia 2002 , Ravilious, John & Rosie Bevan

    3. [S00123] ~Living descendants of Blood Royal in America , Angerville, Count d', Reference: 54

    "Of Brecknock, Wales"

    Children:
    1. 5. Constance Newsham was born 0___ 1249; died 0Dec 1320, Bracewell, Yorkshire, England.

  3. 12.  William de Ros, Knight was born 0___ 1192, Helmsley, Yorkshire, England (son of Robert de Ros, Knight and Isabella Mac William); died 1264-1265, England; was buried Kirkham Priory, Kirkham, North Yorkshire, England.

    Notes:

    Birth: 1192
    Helmsley
    North Yorkshire, England
    Death: 1264, England

    Knight of Helmsley and Hunsingore, Yorkshire

    Son and heir to Robert de Ros and Isabel of Scotland, grandson of Everard de Ros and Roese Trussebut, William the Lion, King of Scotland and a mistress Avenel. Sir Robert was born before 1200.

    Husband of Lucy FitzPeter, daughter of Peter FitzHerbert of Blaen Llyfni, Breconshire, Wales and Alice FitzRobert, daughter of Robert FitzRoger of Warkworth, Northumbria. They were married before 24 Jan 1234 and had six sons and two daughters;

    * Sir Robert
    * Sir Peter
    * Sir William
    * Sir Alexander
    * Herbert
    * John
    * Lucy
    * Alice

    William was excommunicated with his father by Pope Innocent III on 16th of December 1215. He was taken as prisoner at the Battle of Lincoln on 20 May 1217, released on sureties 26 Oct 1217. He took no part in the Baron's war and was apparently faithful to the king. Sir William was the benefactor of the monasteries of Kirkham, Rievaulx, Meaux and of the Templars.

    Sir William died 1258 or 1264, buried at Kirkham. His widow, Lucy, was alive Michaelmas 1266.

    Sir William's name is spelled both Ros and Roos.

    Family links:
    Parents:
    Robert De Ros (1170 - 1226)
    Isabella nic William de Ros (1175 - 1240)

    Spouse:
    Lucy FitzPiers de Ros (1207 - 1267)*

    Children:
    Alice de Ros (____ - 1286)*
    William de Ros (____ - 1310)*
    Robert de Ros (1223 - 1285)*
    Lucy de Ros de Kyme (1230 - ____)*

    Sibling:
    William de Ros (1192 - 1264)
    Robert de Ros (1195 - 1269)*

    *Calculated relationship

    Burial:
    Kirkham Priory
    Kirkham
    Ryedale District
    North Yorkshire, England

    Maintained by: Anne Shurtleff Stevens
    Originally Created by: Jerry Ferren
    Record added: May 25, 2011
    Find A Grave Memorial# 70352904

    William — Lucy FitzPeter, Baroness de Ros. Lucy (daughter of Peter FitzHerbert, Lord of Brecknock and Alice FitzRoger) was born 1207-1210, Forest Dean, Gloucestershire, England; died 0___ 1267, North Yorkshire, England; was buried Kirkham Priory, Kirkham, North Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 13.  Lucy FitzPeter, Baroness de Ros was born 1207-1210, Forest Dean, Gloucestershire, England (daughter of Peter FitzHerbert, Lord of Brecknock and Alice FitzRoger); died 0___ 1267, North Yorkshire, England; was buried Kirkham Priory, Kirkham, North Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Lucia of Brecknock FitzPiers
    • Also Known As: Lucy FitzPiers

    Notes:

    Lucy FitzPiers
    Also Known As: "Lucia", "Lucy;de;ros; Lucy", "FITZ", "PETER", "ros"
    Birthdate: circa 1210
    Birthplace: Forest Dean, Gloucestershire, England, (Present UK)
    Death: Died 1247 in Yorkshire, England, (Present UK)
    Immediate Family:
    Daughter of Piers FitzHerbert, Lord of Brecknock and Alice Fitzpiers
    Wife of Thomas de Newsom and Sir William de Ros
    Mother of Constance Scrope (de Newsom); Sir Alexander de Braose; Sir Herbert de Braose; Alicia de Ros, of Helmsley; Robert de Ros and 10 others
    Sister of Beatrix Fitzpiers; Reginald FitzPiers, Lord of Blaen Llyfni and Herbert Fitzpiers, Sheriff Hampshire
    Half sister of Joan de Verdun

    The de Ros family, from Scottish Kings to English Gentry

    Lucy FitzPiers
    Also Known As: "Lucia", "Lucy;de;ros; Lucy", "FITZ", "PETER", "ros"
    Birthdate: circa 1210
    Birthplace: Forest Dean, Gloucestershire, England, (Present UK)
    Death: Died 1247 in Yorkshire, England, (Present UK)
    Immediate Family:
    Daughter of Piers FitzHerbert, Lord of Brecknock and Alice Fitzpiers
    Wife of Thomas de Newsom and Sir William de Ros
    Mother of Constance Scrope (de Newsom); Sir Alexander de Braose; Sir Herbert de Braose; Alicia de Ros, of Helmsley; Robert de Ros and 10 others
    Sister of Beatrix Fitzpiers; Reginald FitzPiers, Lord of Blaen Llyfni and Herbert Fitzpiers, Sheriff Hampshire
    Half sister of Joan de Verdun
    Managed by: James Fred Patin, Jr.
    Last Updated: April 1, 2016
    View Complete Profile
    Matching family tree profiles for Lucy FitzPiers, Baroness de Ros view all matches ›

    Lucy De Ros (born Fitzpiers) in MyHeritage family trees (Maynard, Jr. Web Site)

    Lucy (Lucia) De Ross (born Fitzpiers) in MyHeritage family trees (Keefe Web Site)

    Lucy De Ros (born Fitzpiers) in MyHeritage family trees (Carter Family Website)

    Lucy Ross (born Fitzpiers) in MyHeritage family trees (Martens Web Site)
    view all 31
    Immediate Family

    Thomas de Newsom
    husband

    Constance Scrope (de Newsom)
    daughter

    Sir Alexander de Braose
    son

    Sir Herbert de Braose
    son

    Sir William de Ros
    husband

    Alicia de Ros, of Helmsley
    daughter

    Robert de Ros
    son

    Lucy de Ros
    daughter

    Robert de Ros, Lord of Belvoir
    son

    Alexander de Ros
    son

    Peter de Ros
    son

    Mary de Ros
    daughter
    About Lucy FitzPiers, Baroness de Ros
    Individual Record FamilySearch™ Pedigree Resource File

    Search Results | Print

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Lucia of Brecknock FitzPiers Compact Disc #41 Pin #277411 Pedigree

    Sex: F
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Event(s)

    Birth: abt 1196
    Helmsley,Yorkshire,England
    Death: aft 1266
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Parents

    Father: Piers FitzHerbert Disc #41 Pin #283090
    Mother: Alice de Warkworth FitzRobert Disc #41 Pin #283089
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Marriage(s)

    Spouse: Sir William I of Hamlake de Ros Disc #41 Pin #277410
    Marriage:
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Notes and Sources

    Notes: None
    Sources: Available on CD-ROM Disc# 41
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Submitter

    Kathy LONGHURST
    1175 S. 180 W. Hurricane Utah

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Submission Search: 1606834-0220102210938

    URL:
    CD-ROM: Pedigree Resource File - Compact Disc #41
    CD-ROM Features: Pedigree View, Family View, Individual View, Reports, Downloadable GEDCOM files, Notes and Sources.
    Order Pedigree Resource File CD-ROMS
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    About FamilySearch Pedigree Resource File

    The Pedigree Resource File is a new lineage linked database of records available on compact disc containing family history records submitted by individuals through FamilySearch Internet Genealogy Service. Family information is organized in family groups and pedigrees and includes submitted notes and sources. Many charts and reports can be printed from this data. Each disc contains about 1.1 million names. With the publication of every five discs, a master index for those discs will be published and packaged with that set of discs. With the publication of every 25 discs, a master index for those discs will also be published and packaged with that volume of discs. Discs may be purchased as sets or volumes.
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    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Lucia FITZPIERS Pedigree

    Female Family
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Event(s):

    Birth: 1195
    Christening:
    Death:
    Burial:
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Parents:

    Father: Herbert FITZHERBERT Family
    Mother: Alice FITZ ROGER
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Marriages:

    Spouse: William De ROSS Family
    Marriage: About 1259 Of Igmanthorpe, , Yorkshire, England
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Messages:

    Record submitted after 1991 by a member of the LDS Church. No additional information is available. Ancestral File may list the same family and the submitter.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Source Information:

    No source information is available.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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    Lucy FITZPIERS (-1266) [Pedigree]

    Daughter of Piers FITZHERBERT (-1235) and Alice de WARKWORTH (-1225)

    b. of Brecknock, Wales
    d. AFT 1266
    Married Sir William de ROS (1193-1264)

    Children: [listed under entry for William de ROS]

    References:

    1. "Magna Charta Sureties, 1215",

    F. L. Weis,
    4th Ed..
    2. "Burke's Peerage, 1938".

    3. "Presidents GEDCOM File",

    Otto-G. Richter, Brian Tompsett.
    4. "Ancestral roots of certain American colonists who came

    to America before 1700",
    Frederick Lewis Weis, 1992, seventh edition.
    The earlier editions were called: "Ancestral roots of
    sixty colonists who came to New England 1623-1650"
    Lucy FitzPiers

    (say 1195 - )

    Lucy FitzPiers|b. s 1195|p317.htm#i18533|Reginald or Piers FitzPeirs or FitzHerbert||p317.htm#i14306||||||||||||||||

    Lucy FitzPiers married Sir William de Ros, son of Sir Robert de Ros Fursan and Isabel Avenal of Scotland. Rosie Bevan wrote: That William de Ros of Helmsley was married to Lucy fitz Piers identified, ( CP (XI : 94) as you say, citing Dugdale), as daughter of Piers fitz Herbert, lord of Brecknock, would appeare to be borne out by the names of their children - Robert, William, Alexander, Herbert, John, Piers, Lucy and Alice, as listed in CP XI p. 94 note (l) and supported by about ten references. Lucy FitzPiers was born say 1195 at Wales. Dugdale citing Glover, Somerset Herald, stated that she was the daughter of Reginald FitzPiers of Blewlebeny in Wales. If she belonged to this family, she was presumably sister of Herbert Fitzpiers and of his brother and heir Reynold FitzPiers, and daughter of Piers FitzHerbert, lords of the Honour of Brecknock, whose castle was built at Blaenllyfni. She was the daughter of Reginald or Piers FitzPeirs or FitzHerbert.
    She was living at Michaelmas 1266, when there is a record of her claim for dower in Ulceby, Lincs, against Alice de Ros, and in a manor in Yorks against Piers de Ros.
    Children of Lucy FitzPiers and Sir William de Ros

    * Sir William de Ros (of Ingmanthorpe)+ d. b 28 May 1310
    * Sir Alexander de Ros
    * Sir Herbert de Ros
    * Sir John de Ros
    * Piers de Ros
    * Sir Robert de Ros 1st Baron+ b. bt 1220 - 1223, d. 17 May 1285
    * Lucy de Ros+ b. s 1230, d. a 1279
    * Alice de Ros d. 29 Apr 1286
    Lucy FitzPiers1

    F, #176196

    Lucy FitzPiers||p17620.htm#i176196|Piers FitzHerbert||p36888.htm#i368871||||||||||||||||

    Last Edited=13 Jun 2009

    Lucy FitzPiers is the daughter of Piers FitzHerbert.2 She married Sir William de Ros, son of Robert de Ros, 1st Lord Ros of Helmsley and Isabella (?).1
    Children of Lucy FitzPiers and Sir William de Ros

    * Sir Robert de Ros+ d. 17 Mar 12852
    * Sir William de Ros+ d. 28 May 13101
    * Piers Ros 2
    Citations

    1. [S1545] Mitchell Adams, "re: West Ancestors," e-mail message from (Australia) to Darryl Roger Lundy, 6 December 2005 - 19 June 2009. Hereinafter cited as "re: West Ancestors".
    2. [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke's Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke's Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 1, page 1107. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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    William De ROSS Pedigree

    Male Family
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Event(s):

    Birth:
    Christening:
    Death:
    Burial:
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Marriages:

    Spouse: Lucia FITZPIERS Family
    Marriage: About 1259 Of Igmanthorpe, , Yorkshire, England
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Messages:

    Record submitted after 1991 by a member of the LDS Church. No additional information is available. Ancestral File may list the same family and the submitter.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Source Information:

    No source information is available.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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    Lucy[1,2,3]

    - 1266
    Sex Female

    Lived In Scotland

    Complete *

    Died Aft 1265

    Person ID I00113893 Leo

    Last Modified 22 Aug 1997

    Father Piers FitzHerbert

    Mother Alice

    Family ID F00119593 Group Sheet

    Family Sir William de Ros, of Helmsley

    Children

    1. Sir Robert de Ros, of Helmsley, b. est 1235

    2. Sir William de Ros, of Ingmanthorpe, b. est 1240

    3. Alexander de Ros
    4. Herbert de Ros
    5. John de Ros
    6. Piers de Ros
    7. Lucy de Ros
    8. Alice de Ros
    Last Modified 22 Aug 1997

    Family ID F00049669 Group Sheet

    Sources 1. [S00058] The Complete Peerage, 1936 , Doubleday, H.A. & Lord Howard de Walden, Reference: XI Ros 94n

    2. [S01336] Descendants of Leofric of Mercia 2002 , Ravilious, John & Rosie Bevan

    3. [S00123] ~Living descendants of Blood Royal in America , Angerville, Count d', Reference: 54

    "Of Brecknock, Wales"

    Children:
    1. Robert de Ros, Knight was born ~ 1223, Helmsley Castle, Yorkshire, England; died 17 May 1285; was buried Kirkham Priory, Kirkham, North Yorkshire, England.
    2. Peter de Ros was born (Yorkshire, England).
    3. Alexander de Ros was born (Yorkshire, England).
    4. Herbert de Ros was born (Yorkshire, England).
    5. 6. William de Ros, Knight was born ~ 1244, (Yorkshire) England; died 0May 1310, (Yorkshire) England; was buried Greyfriars Abbey Church, King's Straith, York, Yorkshire, England.
    6. Anne de Ros was born ~ 1246, Helmsley, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1290.


Generation: 5

  1. 20.  Gillo de Newsham was born ~ 1191, Newsome, England.

    Gillo married unnamed spouse (Yorkshire, England). [Group Sheet]


  2. 21.  unnamed spouse
    Children:
    1. 10. Thomas Newsham was born ~ 1223, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1264, Yorkshire, England.

  3. 22.  Peter FitzHerbert, Lord of Brecknock was born 0___ 1163, Wales; died 1 Jun 1235, Reading, Berkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Baron of Barnstable in Devonshire
    • Also Known As: Piers FitzHerbert
    • Also Known As: Piers FitzHerbert, Lord of Brecknock

    Notes:

    About Piers FitzHerbert, Lord of Brecknock


    Peter Fitz-Herbert, Baron of Barnstable in Devonshire, the honor of which he obtained from King John with fifteen knight's fees, part of the lands of William de Braose, and he was made Governor of Pickering Castle in Yorkshire, and Sheriff of that county by the same monarch.


    This Peter was one of the barons named in Magna Carta and, by his signature, fourth in rank amongst the barons. He m. first, Alice, dau. of Robert Fitz Roger, a great baron in Northumberland, Lord of Warkworth and Clavering, and sister of John, to whom Edward I gave the surname of Clavering, Lord of Callaly in Northumberland. By this lady he had a son and heir, Reginald Fitz Peter.


    He m. secondly, Isabel, dau. and coheir of William de Braose, and widow of David Llewellin, Prince of Wales, and by the alliance acquired the lordships and castle of Blenlevenny and Talgarth in the county of Brecknock, with other possessions in Wales. He fortified his castle of Blenlevenny, and, dying in 1235, was s. by his son, ReginaldFitzPeter, Lord of Blenlevenny, [John Burke, History of the Commoners of Great Britain and Ireland, Vol. IV, R. Bentley,London, 1834, p. 728, Jones, of Llanarth]

    Piers FITZHERBERT (-1235) [Pedigree]

    Son of Herbert FITZHERBERT (-1204) and Lucy of Hereford (-1220)

    r. Blaen Llyfni, Wales
    d. 1 Jun 1235
    d. BEF 6 Jun 1235
    bur. Reading, Eng.
    Married first Alice de WARKWORTH (-1225)

    Children:

    1. Lucy FITZPIERS (-1266) m. Sir William de ROS (1193-1264)
    2. Herbert FITZPETER Sheriff of Hampshire (-1248)
    3. Sir Reginald (Rynold) FitzPiers (-1286) m(1) Alice (-1264)

    Married second Isabel de FERRERS (1166-1252)

    Married third Sibyl de DINHAM

    References:

    1. "Ancestral roots of certain American colonists who came to America before 1700",
    Frederick Lewis Weis, 1992, seventh edition. The earlier editions were called: "Ancestral roots of sixty colonists who came to New England 1623-1650"

    2. "The Complete Peerage", Cokayne.

    3. "Ancestors of Deacon Edward Converse".

    4. "Plantagenet Ancestry", Turton.

    5. "Burke's Peerage, 1938".

    6. "Presidents GEDCOM File", Otto-G. Richter, Brian Tompsett.

    7. "Ancestral Roots of Sixty Colonists Who Came to New England 1623-1650", Weis, Editions 1-6. The latest edition (7) of this book is titled: "Ancestral roots of certain American colonists who came to America before 1700" by Weis, 1992, 7th edition. Information which has been checked in the latest edition usually has the reference key "AR7", while information from earlier editions (1-6) will have the reference key "Weis1".

    8. "Some Early English Pedigrees", Vernon M. Norr. Piers FitzHerbert1 M, #368871

    Last Edited=13 Jun 2009

    Piers FitzHerbert gained the title of Lord of the Honour of Brecknock [England by writ].1

    Child of Piers FitzHerbert

    * Lucy FitzPiers+ 1

    Citations

    1. [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke's Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke's Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 1, page 1107. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    Piers was also called Lord of Blaen Llynfi county Brecknock; and also called Peter.

    A settlement for the marriage Piers FitzHerbert, Lord Blaen Llynfi, and Alice de Warkworth was made on 28 November 1203.

    Piers was "seen" in 1204.

    He was was present in support of King John at the signing of the Magna Carta on 15 June 1215 at Runnymede, between Windsor and Staines, in Surrey.

    Piers inherited, through his mother, a 1/3 interest in the barony of Miles Fitz Walter of Gloucester in 1219.

    He married Isabel de Ferrers, daughter of William I, 3rd Earl of Derby, and Goda de Tosny, before 1225.

    Piers died before 6 June 1235.

    See "My Lines"

    ( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/p391.htm#i7189 )

    from Compiler: R. B. Stewart, Evans, GA

    ( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/index.htm )

    view all 18

    Piers FitzHerbert, Lord of Brecknock's Timeline
    1163
    1163
    Birth of Piers
    Blewleveny Castle, Blaen Llyfni, Brecknockshire, Wales
    1183
    1183
    Age 20
    Birth of Joan de Verdun
    Blaen Llyfni, , Brecknockshire, Wales
    1206
    1206
    Age 43
    Birth of Reginald FitzPiers, Lord of Blaen Llyfni
    Blaen, Llyfni, Brecknock, Wales
    1206
    Age 43
    Birth of Beatrix Fitzpiers
    1207
    1207
    Age 44
    Birth of Herbert Fitzpiers, Sheriff Hampshire
    1210
    1210
    Age 47
    Birth of Lucy FitzPiers, Baroness de Ros
    Forest Dean, Gloucestershire, England, (Present UK)
    1235
    June 1, 1235
    Age 72
    Death of Piers at Reading, Berkshire, England
    Reading, Berkshire, England

    Birth:
    Blaenllyfni Castle (Welsh: Castell Blaenllynfi) is a privately-owned ruinous stone castle near the village of Bwlch in southern Powys, Wales. It was probably built in the early thirteenth century. It was captured several times during the rest of the century and apparently was never fully repaired afterwards and fell into ruins. It is a Scheduled Ancient Monument.

    Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blaenllynfi_Castle

    Peter married Alice FitzRoger 28 Nov 1203, (Warkworth, Northumberland, England). Alice (daughter of Robert FitzRoger, Knight, 2nd Baron of Warkworth and Margaret de Cheney) was born 1184-1185, (Warkworth, Northumberland, England); died 0___ 1225, (Reading, Berkshire, England). [Group Sheet]


  4. 23.  Alice FitzRoger was born 1184-1185, (Warkworth, Northumberland, England) (daughter of Robert FitzRoger, Knight, 2nd Baron of Warkworth and Margaret de Cheney); died 0___ 1225, (Reading, Berkshire, England).

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Alice De Warkworth FitzRoger

    Notes:

    My Lines
    Person Page - 397

    Alice de Warkworth1
    b. circa 1184, d. before 1255

    Father Robert fitz Roger, 2nd Baron of Warkworth1,2 b. circa 1161, d. 1214
    Mother Margaret de Cheney1 b. circa 1162, d. after 1214
    Also called Alice FitzRoger.3 Alice de Warkworth was born circa 1184.1 She was the daughter of Robert fitz Roger, 2nd Baron of Warkworth and Margaret de Cheney.1,2 A settlement for the marriage Alice de Warkworth and Piers FitzHerbert, Lord Blaen Llynfi was made on 28 November 1203; His 1st.4,5 Alice de Warkworth died before 1255.

    Family

    Piers FitzHerbert, Lord Blaen Llynfi b. circa 1172, d. before 6 June 1235

    Children

    Lucy fitz Piers+ b. c 1207, d. a 1266
    Reynold fitz Piers, Lord of Blaen Llynfi+ b. c 1210?, d. c 5 May 12863

    Citations

    [S206] With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr. and assisted by David Faris Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis: AR 7th ed., 246D-28.
    [S206] With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr. and assisted by David Faris Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis: AR 7th ed., Line 262.29.
    [S206] With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr. and assisted by David Faris Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis: AR 7th ed., Line 261.32.
    [S206] With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr. and assisted by David Faris Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis: AR 7th ed., Line 261.32, 262.29.
    [S1191] Esq. John Burke B:C of GB&I, IV:728.

    Children:
    1. 13. Lucy FitzPeter, Baroness de Ros was born 1207-1210, Forest Dean, Gloucestershire, England; died 0___ 1267, North Yorkshire, England; was buried Kirkham Priory, Kirkham, North Yorkshire, England.

  5. 24.  Robert de Ros, KnightRobert de Ros, Knight was born 1170-1172, (Yorkshire) England; died 0___ 1227; was buried Temple Church, London, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Sheriff of Cumbria
    • Also Known As: Baron of Helmsley
    • Also Known As: Lord of Hamlake

    Notes:

    Sir Robert de Ros, or de Roos of Helmsley, (ca. 1170/1172 – 1227[1]), was the grandfather and ancestor of the Barons Ros of Helmsley that was created by writ in 1264. In 1215, Ros joined the confederation of the barons at Stamford. He was one of the twenty-five barons to guarantee the observance of Magna Carta, sealed by King John on 15 Jun 1215.[1]

    Life

    He was the son of Everard de Ros, Baron of Helmsley and Rohese Trusbut, daughter of William Trusbut of Wartre. In 1191, aged fourteen, he paid a thousand marks fine for livery of his lands to King Richard I of England. In 1197, while serving King Richard in Normandy, he was arrested for an unspecified offence, and was committed to the custody of Hugh de Chaumont, but Chaumont entrusted his prisoner to William de Spiney, who allowed him to escape from the castle of Bonville, England. King Richard thereupon hanged Spiney and collected a fine of twelve hundred marks from Ros' guardian as the price of his continued freedom.[2]

    When King John came to the throne, he gave Ros the barony of his great-grandmother's father, Walter d'Espec. Soon afterwards he was deputed one of those to escort William the Lion, his father-in-law, into England, to swear fealty to King John. Some years later, Robert de Ros assumed the habit of a monk, whereupon the custody of all his lands and Castle Werke (Wark), in Northumberland, were committed to Philip d'Ulcote, but he soon returned and about a year later he was High Sheriff of Cumberland.[2]

    When the struggle of the barons for a constitutional government began, de Ros at first sided with King John, and thus obtained some valuable grants from the crown, and was made governor of Carlisle; but he subsequently went over to the barons and became one of the celebrated twenty-five "Sureties" appointed to enforce the observance of Magna Carta, the county of Northumberland being placed under his supervision. He gave his allegiance to King Henry III and, in 1217–18, his manors were restored to him. Although he was witness to the second Great Charter and the Forest Charter, of 1224, he seems to have remained in royal favour.[2]

    Marriage and issue

    In early 1191, in Haddington, East Lothian, Scotland, Ros married Isabella Mac William (Isibâeal nic Uilliam), widow of Robert III de Brus. Isabella was the illegitimate daughter of William the Lion, King of Scots by the daughter of Richard Avenel.[1][3]

    Issue with Isabella:

    Sir William de Ros (b. before 1200 – d. ca. 1264/1265), father of Robert de Ros, 1st Baron de Ros.[1] and Sir William de Roos of Helmsley, Yorkshire (whose daughter, Ivette de Roos, married Sir Geoffrey le Scrope, K.B. of Masham, Yorkshire.[4]
    Sir Robert de Ros[1] (ca. 1223 – 13 May 1285), was Chief Justice of the Kings Bench. He married Christian Bertram; from which Elizabeth Ros (d.1395), wife of Sir William Parr of Kendal (1350 – c.1404) descended. The two were ancestors of Queen consort Catherine Parr.
    Sir Alexander de Ros (d. ca. 1306), he fathered one child with an unknown wife, William.[1]
    Peter de Ros[1]
    He erected Helmsley or Hamlake Castle in Yorkshire, and of Wark Castle in Northumberland. Sir Robert is buried at the Temple Church under a magnificent tomb.[1]

    Controversy

    While "Fursan" is given as a location for Robert de Ros (sometimes also Roos) most use the term "furfan" to designate a title within the Templars essentially equivalent to grandmaster or head priest. This title also further refers to the resulting aura resembling a "fan" / "Furry fan". Some would also use the term "Kingmaker".[citation needed]

    References

    ^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h Douglas Richardson, Kimball G. Everingham. Magna Carta ancestry: a study in colonial and medieval families, Genealogical Publishing Company, 2005. pg 699. Google eBook
    ^ Jump up to: a b c "Ros, Robert de (d.1227)". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900.
    Jump up ^ Chronicle of Melrose
    Jump up ^ Douglas Richardson, , Kimball G. Everingham, (2011). Magna Carta ancestry : a study in colonial and medieval families, Volume II (2nd ed.). Salt Lake City, UT.: Douglas Richardson. p. 198. ISBN 9781449966386.

    Buried:
    View a gallery of pictures, history & source for Temple Church ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Temple_Church

    Robert married Isabella Mac William 0___ 1191, Haddington, East Lothian, Scotland. Isabella (daughter of William, I, King of the Scots and Isabel d'Avenel) was born ~ 1165, (Scotland). [Group Sheet]


  6. 25.  Isabella Mac William was born ~ 1165, (Scotland) (daughter of William, I, King of the Scots and Isabel d'Avenel).

    Notes:

    Isabella mac William (ca. 1165 - ) (Gaelic:Isibâeal nic Uilliam) was the illegitimate daughter of William the Lion King of Scots by a daughter of Robert Avenel. She married Robert III de Brus in 1183. They had no children. After his death in 1191, Isabella was married to Robert de Ros, Baron Ros of Wark, (died 1227). They had the following children:

    Sir William de Ros (b. before 1200 – d. ca. 1264/1265), father of Robert de Ros, 1st Baron de Ros.[1] and Sir William de Roos of Helmsley, Yorkshire (whose daughter, Ivette de Roos, married Sir Geoffrey le Scrope, K.B. of Masham, Yorkshire.[2]
    Sir Robert de Ros[2] (ca. 1223 – 13 May 1285), was Chief Justice of the Kings Bench. He married Christian Bertram; from which Elizabeth Ros (d.1395), wife of Sir William Parr of Kendal (1350 – ca. 1404) descended. The two were ancestors of Queen consort Catherine Parr.
    Sir Alexander de Ros (d. ca. 1306), who fathered one child, William, with an unknown wife.[2]
    Peter de Ros.[2]

    References

    Jump up ^ Douglas Richardson, Kimball G. Everingham. Magna Carta ancestry: a study in colonial and medieval families, Genealogical Publishing Company, 2005. pg 699. Google eBook
    ^ Jump up to: a b c d Douglas Richardson, , Kimball G. Everingham, (2011). Magna Carta ancestry : a study in colonial and medieval families, Volume II (2nd ed.). Salt Lake City, UT.: Douglas Richardson. p. 198. ISBN 9781449966386.

    Birth:
    Isabella was the illegitimate daughter of William the Lion, King of Scots by the daughter of Richard Avenel...

    Notes:

    Residence (Family):
    View image, ready history & source for Helmsley Castle ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helmsley_Castle

    Children:
    1. 12. William de Ros, Knight was born 0___ 1192, Helmsley, Yorkshire, England; died 1264-1265, England; was buried Kirkham Priory, Kirkham, North Yorkshire, England.


Generation: 6

  1. 46.  Robert FitzRoger, Knight, 2nd Baron of Warkworth was born ~ 1161, (Warkworth, Northumberland, England); died 0___ 1214, (Warkworth, Northumberland, England).

    Notes:

    Robert fitzRoger was an Anglo-Norman nobleman and Sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk.

    FitzRoger was the son of Roger fitzRichard, who held Warkworth and was lord of Clavering, Essex. FitzRoger was sheriff of Norfolk from Michaelmas in 1190 to Easter 1194 and then again from Michaelmas 1197 to Easter 1200.[1] FitzRoger's first appointment as sheriff was due to the influence of William de Longchamp, who was Lord Chancellor. Longchamp's influence also secured custody of Orford Castle for fitzRoger.[2] Longchamp also arranged for fitzRoger to have custody of Eye Castle in Suffolk.[3] When Longchamp fell from royal favour and was replaced by Walter of Coutances, fitzRoger was one of the few of Longchamp's appointments to retain his office of sheriff.[4]

    FitzRoger had confirmation of his ownership of Warkworth in 1199 and in 1205 was granted Newburn and the barony of Whalton in Northumberland. Warkworth and Newburn occasionally were considered baronies, but not consistently.[5] FitzRoger also held Clavering from Henry of Essex for one knight's fee.[6][a] FitzRoger's holdings were extensive enough that he was considered a baron during the reigns of King Richard I[7] and King John of England.[8]

    FitzRoger married Margaret,[9] one of the daughters and heiresses of William de Chesney, the founder of Sibton Abbey.[10] Margaret was one of three daughters, but she inherited the bulk of her father's estates.[11] Margaret was the widow of Hugh de Cressy.[b] Through Margaret, Roger gained the barony of Blythburgh in Suffolk.[13] He also acquired lands at Rottingdean in Sussex from Margaret.[14]

    FitzRoger died in 1214, and his heir was his son John fitzRobert, by his wife Margaret.[5][13] Margaret survived fitzRoger and paid a fine of a thousand pounds to the king for the right to administer her lands and dower properties herself.[1]

    Notes

    Jump up ^ Robert fitzRoger who held Clavering should not be confused with a separate Robert fitzRoger who held lands around Calthorpe in Norfolk.[6]
    Jump up ^ Although Margaret was the eldest daughter, she received the bulk of her father's estates as a reward for de Cressy from King Henry II of England. The king arranged Margaret's first marriage as well as ensuring that most of her father's lands went to her.[12]

    Citations

    ^ Jump up to: a b Round "Early Sheriffs of Norfolk" English Historical Review pp. 491–494
    Jump up ^ Turner and Heiser Reign of Richard Lionheart p. 116
    Jump up ^ Heiser "Castles, Constables, and Politics" Albion p. 34
    Jump up ^ Turner and Heiser Reign of Richard Lionheart p. 132
    ^ Jump up to: a b Sanders English Baronies p. 150
    ^ Jump up to: a b Keats-Rohan Domesday Descendants p. 953
    Jump up ^ Turner and Heiser Reign of Richard Lionheart p. 103
    Jump up ^ Russell "Social Status" Speculum p. 324
    Jump up ^ Keats-Rohan Domesday Descendants p. 416
    Jump up ^ Keats-Rohan Domesday Descendants p. 370
    Jump up ^ Green Aristocracy of Norman England p. 380
    Jump up ^ Waugh "Women's Inheritance" Nottingham Medieval Studies p. 82
    ^ Jump up to: a b Sanders English Baronies p. 16
    Jump up ^ Loyd Origins of Some Anglo-Norman Families p. 35

    References

    Green, Judith A. (1997). The Aristocracy of Norman England. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-52465-2.
    Heiser, Richard R. (Spring 2000). "Castles, Constables, and Politics in Late Twelfth-Century English Governance". Albion. 32 (1): 19–36. doi:10.2307/4053985. JSTOR 4053985.
    Keats-Rohan, K. S. B. (1999). Domesday Descendants: A Prosopography of Persons Occurring in English Documents, 1066–1166: Pipe Rolls to Cartae Baronum. Ipswich, UK: Boydell Press. ISBN 0-85115-863-3.
    Loyd, Lewis Christopher (1975) [1951]. The Origins of Some Anglo-Norman Families (Reprint ed.). Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Company. ISBN 0-8063-0649-1.
    Round, J. H. (1920). "The Early Sheriffs of Norfolk". The English Historical Review. 35 (140): 481–496. doi:10.1093/ehr/xxxv.cxl.481. JSTOR 552094.
    Russell, Josiah Cox (July 1937). "Social Status at the Court of King John". Speculum. 12 (3): 319–329. doi:10.2307/2848628. JSTOR 2848628.
    Sanders, I. J. (1960). English Baronies: A Study of Their Origin and Descent 1086–1327. Oxford, UK: Clarendon Press. OCLC 931660.
    Turner, Ralph V.; Heiser, Richard R. (2000). The Reign of Richard Lionheart: Ruler of the Angevin Empire 1189–1199. The Medieval World. Harlow, UK: Longman. ISBN 0-582-25660-7.
    Waugh, Scott L. (1990). "Women's Inheritance and the Growth of Bureaucratic Monarchy in Twelfth- and Thirteenth-Century England". Nottingham Medieval Studies. 34: 71–92. doi:10.1484/J.NMS.3.182.

    Robert — Margaret de Cheney. Margaret (daughter of William de Chesney, Knight, Baron of Horsford and Gilla LNU) was born ~ 1162, (Horsford, Norfolkshire, England); died Aft 1214. [Group Sheet]


  2. 47.  Margaret de Cheney was born ~ 1162, (Horsford, Norfolkshire, England) (daughter of William de Chesney, Knight, Baron of Horsford and Gilla LNU); died Aft 1214.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Margaret de Chesney

    Children:
    1. 23. Alice FitzRoger was born 1184-1185, (Warkworth, Northumberland, England); died 0___ 1225, (Reading, Berkshire, England).

  3. 50.  William, I, King of the Scots was born ~ 1143, (Scotland) (son of Henry of Scotland and Ada de Warenne); died 4 Dec 1214, Stirling, Scotland; was buried Arbroath Abbey, Scotland.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Uilliam mac Eanric (i.e. William, son of Henry)
    • Also Known As: William the Lion

    Notes:

    William the Lion (Mediaeval Gaelic: Uilliam mac Eanric; Modern Gaelic: Uilleam mac Eanraig), sometimes styled William I, also known by the nickname Garbh, "the Rough",[1] (c. 1143 – 4 December 1214) reigned as King of the Scots from 1165 to 1214. He had the second-longest reign in Scottish history before the Act of Union with England in 1707. James VI (reigned 1567–1625) would have the longest.

    Life

    He became king following his brother Malcolm IV's death on 9 December 1165 and was crowned on 24 December 1165.

    In contrast to his deeply religious, frail brother, William was powerfully built, redheaded, and headstrong. He was an effective monarch whose reign was marred by his ill-fated attempts to regain control of Northumbria from the Normans.

    Traditionally, William is credited with founding Arbroath Abbey, the site of the later Declaration of Arbroath.

    He was not known as "The Lion" during his own lifetime, and the title did not relate to his tenacious character or his military prowess. It was attached to him because of his flag or standard, a red lion rampant with a forked tail (queue fourchâee) on a yellow background. This (with the substitution of a 'double tressure fleury counter-fleury' border instead of an orle) went on to become the Royal standard of Scotland, still used today but quartered with those of England and of Ireland. It became attached to him because the chronicler John of Fordun called him the "Lion of Justice".

    William was grandson of David I of Scotland. He also inherited the title of Earl of Northumbria in 1152 from his father, Henry of Scotland. However he had to give up this title to King Henry II of England in 1157. This caused trouble after William became king, since he spent a lot of effort trying to regain Northumbria.

    William was a key player in the Revolt of 1173–1174 against Henry II. In 1174, at the Battle of Alnwick, during a raid in support of the revolt, William recklessly charged the English troops himself, shouting, "Now we shall see which of us are good knights!" He was unhorsed and captured by Henry's troops led by Ranulf de Glanvill and taken in chains to Newcastle, then Northampton, and then transferred to Falaise in Normandy. Henry then sent an army to Scotland and occupied it. As ransom and to regain his kingdom, William had to acknowledge Henry as his feudal superior and agree to pay for the cost of the English army's occupation of Scotland by taxing the Scots. The church of Scotland was also subjected to that of England. This he did by signing the Treaty of Falaise. He was then allowed to return to Scotland. In 1175 he swore fealty to Henry II at York Castle.

    The humiliation of the Treaty of Falaise triggered a revolt in Galloway which lasted until 1186, and prompted construction of a castle at Dumfries. In 1179, meanwhile, William and his brother David personally led a force northwards into Easter Ross, establishing two further castles, and aiming to discourage the Norse Earls of Orkney from expanding beyond Caithness.

    A further rising in 1181 involved Donald Meic Uilleim, descendant of King Duncan II. Donald briefly took over Ross; not until his death (1187) was William able to reclaim Donald's stronghold of Inverness. Further royal expeditions were required in 1197 and 1202 to fully neutralise the Orcadian threat.

    The Treaty of Falaise remained in force for the next fifteen years. Then the English king Richard the Lionheart, needing money to take part in the Third Crusade, agreed to terminate it in return for 10,000 silver marks, on 5 December 1189.

    William attempted to purchase Northumbria from Richard in 1194, as he had a strong claim over it. However, his offer of 15,000 marks was rejected due to wanting the castles within the lands, which Richard was not willing to give.[2]

    Despite the Scots regaining their independence, Anglo-Scottish relations remained tense during the first decade of the 13th century. In August 1209 King John decided to flex the English muscles by marching a large army to Norham (near Berwick), in order to exploit the flagging leadership of the ageing Scottish monarch. As well as promising a large sum of money, the ailing William agreed to his elder daughters marrying English nobles and, when the treaty was renewed in 1212, John apparently gained the hand of William's only surviving legitimate son, and heir, Alexander, for his eldest daughter, Joan.

    Despite continued dependence on English goodwill, William's reign showed much achievement. He threw himself into government with energy and diligently followed the lines laid down by his grandfather, David I. Anglo-French settlements and feudalization were extended, new burghs founded, criminal law clarified, the responsibilities of justices and sheriffs widened, and trade grew. Arbroath Abbey was founded (1178), and the bishopric of Argyll established (c.1192) in the same year as papal confirmation of the Scottish church by Pope Celestine III.

    According to legend, "William is recorded in 1206 as curing a case of scrofula by his touching and blessing a child with the ailment whilst at York.[3] William died in Stirling in 1214 and lies buried in Arbroath Abbey. His son, Alexander II, succeeded him as king, reigning from 1214 to 1249.

    Marriage and issue

    Due to the terms of the Treaty of Falaise, Henry II had the right to choose William's bride. As a result, William married Ermengarde de Beaumont, a great-granddaughter of King Henry I of England, at Woodstock Palace in 1186. Edinburgh Castle was her dowry. The marriage was not very successful, and it was many years before she bore him an heir. William and Ermengarde's children were:

    Margaret (1193–1259), married Hubert de Burgh, 1st Earl of Kent.
    Isabel (1195–1253), married Roger Bigod, 4th Earl of Norfolk and Robert "of Fur Fan" De Ros, Sir Knight and had issue.
    Alexander II of Scotland (1198–1249).
    Marjorie (1200 – 17 November 1244),[4] married Gilbert Marshal, 4th Earl of Pembroke.
    Out of wedlock, William I had numerous children, their descendants being among those who would lay claim to the Scottish crown.

    By an unnamed daughter of Adam de Hythus:

    Margaret, married Eustace de Vesci, Lord of Alnwick.[5]

    By Isabel d'Avenel:

    Robert de London[6]
    Henry de Galightly, father of Patrick Galightly one of the competitors to the crown in 1291[7]
    Ada Fitzwilliam (c.1146-1200), married Patrick I, Earl of Dunbar (1152–1232)[7]
    Aufrica, married William de Say, and whose grandson Roger de Mandeville was one of the competitors to the crown in 1291[7]
    Isabella Mac William married Robert III de Brus then Robert de Ros (died 1227), Magna Carta Suretor[8]

    Buried:
    Arbroath Abbey, in the Scottish town of Arbroath, was founded in 1178 by King William the Lion for a group of Tironensian Benedictine monks from Kelso Abbey. It was consecrated in 1197 with a dedication to the deceased Saint Thomas Becket, whom the king had met at the English court. It was William's only personal foundation — he was buried before the high altar of the church in 1214.[1]

    The last Abbot was Cardinal David Beaton, who in 1522 succeeded his uncle James to become Archbishop of St Andrews. The Abbey is cared for by Historic Scotland and is open to the public throughout the year (entrance charge). The distinctive red sandstone ruins stand at the top of the High Street in Arbroath.

    Image & History ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arbroath_Abbey

    William — Isabel d'Avenel. Isabel (daughter of Robert Avenel, Lord of Eskdale and Sibyl LNU) was born ~ 1143; died 0___ 1234, Castle Stirling, Stirling, Stirlingshire, Scotland. [Group Sheet]


  4. 51.  Isabel d'Avenel was born ~ 1143 (daughter of Robert Avenel, Lord of Eskdale and Sibyl LNU); died 0___ 1234, Castle Stirling, Stirling, Stirlingshire, Scotland.

    Notes:

    Isabel d'Avenel (Avenel), Mistress of King William
    Also Known As: "Isobel Avenel", "12237", "Sybil Avenell"
    Birthdate: circa 1143
    Birthplace: Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland
    Death: Died 1234 in Castle Stirling, Stirling, Stirlingshire, Scotland
    Immediate Family:
    Daughter of Robert Avenel and Sybil Avenel
    Partner of William "The Lion", King of Scots
    Mother of ... nic Uilliam; Ada of Scotland; Henry de Galightly; Robert 'de London' de Lundin; Isabel of Scotland and 1 other
    Managed by: Private User
    Last Updated: July 30, 2016

    Died:
    Stirling Castle, located in Stirling, is one of the largest and most important castles, both historically and architecturally, in Scotland. The castle sits atop Castle Hill, an intrusive crag, which forms part of the Stirling Sill geological formation. It is surrounded on three sides by steep cliffs, giving it a strong defensive position.

    Images, map & more history ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stirling_Castle

    Children:
    1. 25. Isabella Mac William was born ~ 1165, (Scotland).
    2. Aufrica of Scotland was born ~ 1169, Scotland.


Generation: 7

  1. 94.  William de Chesney, Knight, Baron of Horsford was born ~ 1136, Horsford, Norfolkshire, England; died 0___ 1174.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: William de Cheney

    Notes:

    William de Chesney (sometimes William of Norwich or William fitzRobert;[1] died 1174) was a medieval Anglo-Norman nobleman and sheriff. Son of landholder in Norfolk, William inherited after the death of his two elder brothers. He was the founder of Sibton Abbey, as well as a benefactor of other monasteries in England. In 1157, Chesney acquired the honour of Blythburgh, and was sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk during the 1150s and 1160s. On Chesney's death in 1174, he left three unmarried daughters as his heirs.

    Early life

    Chesney was the son of Robert fitzWalter and Sybil de Chesney, and a younger brother of John de Chesney.[2] Sybil was the daughter of Ralph de Chesney.[3] Robert fitzWalter was lord of Horsford in Norfolk,[2] which was originally held by Walter de Caen, Robert's father. The barony was assessed at 10 knight's fees.[4][a]

    Roger was the eldest brother of William, but died childless during their father's lifetime.[6] The next son, John, inherited the family lands, but died around 1149[2] without children.[7] William then inherited the lands.[2] John and William had a sister called Margaret, who was the wife of Haimo de St Clair.[7] Their father married a second time, and had a son named Simon by that marriage. William took his surname from his mother's family, as did his half-brother Simon, who was not related to the Chesney family except by marriage.[8] Two further children of Robert's, Elias and Peter, are known, but whether they were the children of the first marriage or the second is unclear.[9] Chesney should be distinguished from another William de Chesney,[2] who controlled the town of Oxford and its castle as well as the town of Deddington and its castle in the same time period.[10][b]

    Career

    Chesney founded Sibton Abbey,[2] and after his brother John's death he confirmed the foundation of that Cistercian monastery,[7] which was the only Cistercian house in Suffolk.[1] Besides founding that monastery, he also gave lands or other gifts to Colne Priory, Essex, Thetford Priory, Castle Acre Priory, St John's Abbey, Stoke-by-Clare Priory, and Blythburgh Priory.[12]

    Chesney acquired the barony of Blythburgh in Suffolk in 1157.[2] These lands were recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086 as being held by the king, and when Chesney was granted them they were assessed at one knight's fee in feudal service.[13] Besides Blythburgh, Chesney also acquired lands in Norfolk and Essex which he added to the family lands in Norfolk and Suffolk.[14]

    In 1153 or 1154, Chesney was the recipient of the lordship of a hundred and a half in Norfolk,[c] possibly in compensation for the loss of the manor of Mileham. Chesney likely lost Mileham to another noble family, the fitzAlans, as part of the settlement resulting from the Treaty of Wallingford which settled the civil war in England.[16] Both William's father Robert and his elder brother John had held these offices before him.[9]

    Chesney was Sheriff of Norfolk in the late 1140s and the 1150s, being recorded as holding that office in two documents – one dated to between 1146 and 1149 and the other dated to between 1146 and 1153.[17] The same documents record him as holding the office of Sheriff of Suffolk at concurrent times.[18] He held both offices again between 1156 and 1163.[2]

    Death and legacy

    Chesney died in 1174, having had three daughters with his wife Gilla.[2] Her ancestry is unknown, and it is possible that William married another time, to Aubrey de Poynings, because a Lewes Priory charter dated to around 1165 names a William de Chesney and Aubrey his wife, but it is not clear whether this charter is referring to William de Chesney the sheriff or to another William.[8] William and Gilla's daughters were Margaret, Clemence, and Sara,[2] all of whom were unmarried at the time of their father's death.[19] Margaret married twice – first to Hugh de Cressy and second to Robert fitzRoger. Clemence married Jordan de Sackville, and Sara married Richard Engaine.[2] Margaret inherited the majority of her father's estates.[20]

    At his death, Chesney had outstanding debts, both to the king and to Jewish moneylenders. In 1214, his daughter Margaret was exempted from repaying any of her father's debts to those moneylenders by a royal grant.[14]

    Notes

    Jump up ^ A knight's fee was the amount of land that was granted to someone in exchange for a knight's military service of 40 days per year.[5]
    Jump up ^ Sybil was the daughter of Ralph de Chesney,[3] The other William was the son of Roger de Chesney and Alice de Langetot,[2] who were the parents of Ralph de Chesney,[11] who was Sybil's father, making William de Chesney of Oxford the great-uncle of William de Chesney the sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk.[3]
    Jump up ^ A hundred was a sub-division of a county.[15]

    Citations

    ^ Jump up to: a b Brown "Introduction" Sibton Abbey Cartularies p. 1
    ^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h i j k l Keats-Rohan Domesday Descendants p. 370
    ^ Jump up to: a b c Keats-Rohan Domesday Descendants p. 369
    Jump up ^ Brown "Introduction" Sibton Abbey Cartularies p. 7
    Jump up ^ Coredon Dictionary of Medieval Terms & Phrases p. 170
    Jump up ^ Round "Early Sheriffs" English Historical Review p. 483–484
    ^ Jump up to: a b c Keats-Rohan Domesday Descendants pp. 363–364
    ^ Jump up to: a b Brown "Introduction" Sibton Abbey Cartularies p. 13
    ^ Jump up to: a b Brown "Introduction" Sibton Abbey Cartularies pp. 11–12
    Jump up ^ Crouch Reign of King Stephen p. 205
    Jump up ^ Keats-Rohan Domesday Descendants p. 368
    Jump up ^ Brown "Introduction" Sibton Abbey Cartularies p. 16–17
    Jump up ^ Sanders English Baronies p. 16
    ^ Jump up to: a b Brown, "Introduction" to Sibton Abbey Cartularies, pp. 14–16
    Jump up ^ Coredon Dictionary of Medieval Terms & Phrases p. 159
    Jump up ^ Crouch Reign of King Stephen p. 276 footnote 76
    Jump up ^ Green English Sheriffs p. 62
    Jump up ^ Green English Sheriffs p. 77
    Jump up ^ Brown "Introduction" Sibton Abbey Cartularies p. 21
    Jump up ^ Green Aristocracy of Norman England p. 380

    References

    Brown, Philippa (1985). "Introduction". In Brown, Philippa. Sibton Abbey Cartularies and Charters. Suffolk Charters. 7. Woodbridge, UK: Boydell and Brewer for the Suffolk Records Society. ISBN 0-85115-413-1.
    Coredon, Christopher (2007). A Dictionary of Medieval Terms & Phrases (Reprint ed.). Woodbridge: D. S. Brewer. ISBN 978-1-84384-138-8.
    Crouch, David (2000). The Reign of King Stephen: 1135–1154. New York: Longman. ISBN 0-582-22657-0.
    Green, Judith A. (1997). The Aristocracy of Norman England. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-52465-2.
    Green, Judith A. (1990). English Sheriffs to 1154. Public Record Office Handbooks Number 24. London: Her Majesty's Stationery Office. ISBN 0-11-440236-1.
    Keats-Rohan, K. S. B. (1999). Domesday Descendants: A Prosopography of Persons Occurring in English Documents, 1066–1166: Pipe Rolls to Cartae Baronum. Ipswich, UK: Boydell Press. ISBN 0-85115-863-3.
    Round, J. H. (October 1920). "Early Sheriffs of Norfolk". The English Historical Review. 35 (140). doi:10.1093/ehr/XXXV.CXL.481. JSTOR 552094.
    Sanders, I. J. (1960). English Baronies: A Study of Their Origin and Descent 1086–1327. Oxford, UK: Clarendon Press. OCLC 931660.

    *

    Baron of Horsford William de Cheney
    b. circa 1136
    Pop-up Pedigree
    Father Robert fitz Walter de Cheney b. circa 1110
    Mother Sibyl (?) b. circa 1113
    Baron of Horsford William de Cheney was a witness where Margaret de Cheney only child and heiress of William de Cheney.1 Also called William Cayneto. Baron of Horsford William de Cheney was born circa 1136 at Horsford, Norfolk, England. He was the son of Robert fitz Walter de Cheney and Sibyl (?). Baron of Horsford at Norfolk circa 1162.1
    Family
    Child
    Margaret de Cheney+ b. c 1162, d. a 12142

    Citations

    [S603] C.B., LL.D., Ulster King of Arms Sir Bernard Burke, B:xP, pg. 121.
    [S1191] Esq. John Burke B:C of GB&I, I:238.

    William — Gilla LNU. [Group Sheet]


  2. 95.  Gilla LNU
    Children:
    1. 47. Margaret de Cheney was born ~ 1162, (Horsford, Norfolkshire, England); died Aft 1214.

  3. 100.  Henry of Scotland was born 0___ 1114, (Scotland) (son of David of Scotland, I, King of the Scots and Maud of Huntingdon, Queen Consort of Scotland); died 12 Jun 1152; was buried Kelso Abbey, Scotland.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: 3rd Earl of Huntingdon
    • Also Known As: Earl of Northumbria

    Notes:

    Henry of Scotland (Eanric mac Dabâid, 1114 – 12 June 1152[1]) was heir apparent to the Kingdom of Alba. He was also the 3rd Earl of Northumberland and the 3rd Earl of Huntingdon. He was the son of King David I of Scotland and Queen Maud, 2nd Countess of Huntingdon.[2] Henry was named after his uncle, King Henry I of England, who had married his paternal aunt Edith.

    Earldom

    David, Henry's father, invaded England in 1136. His army was met by Stephen of Blois at Carlisle. Instead of battle, there was a negotiated settlement that included Henry performing homage to Stephen for Carlisle and the Earldom of Huntingdon.[3] Henry's journey to Stephen's court for Easter (1136) was met with resentment, including an accusation of treason,[4] which brought about his return at his father's insistence.[4]

    After another invasion by his father, Henry was finally invested with the Earldom of Northumberland in 1139.[5] Later in the year, Henry met with Stephen at Nottingham, where he was also reinvested with Carlisle and Cumberland.[5] At which time Henry paid homage to Stephen for his Earldom.[5]

    Henry's inclusion into King Stephen's inner circle was highlighted by his arranged marriage to Ada de Warenne.[6] This marriage secured Henry's place within Stephen's kingdom.[6] Following Stephen's capture by forces of Empress Matilda, Henry held the Earldom of Northumberland as a Scottish fief.[7]

    On Henry's death, the Earldom passed to his half-brother Simon II de Senlis.

    Family

    In 1139, Henry married Ada de Warenne,[1] the daughter of William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey (died 1138), and Elizabeth of Vermandois, daughter of Hugh of Vermandois.

    Ada of Huntingdon (1139–1206), married in 1161, Floris III, Count of Holland.[2]
    Margaret of Huntingdon (1145–1201)
    Married [1] in 1160 Conan IV, Duke of Brittany, (died 1171)[8]
    Married [2] Humphrey III de Bohun, Lord of Trowbridge.
    Married [3] Sir William fitz Patrick de Hertburn
    Malcolm IV of Scotland.[2]
    William I of Scotland.[2]
    David of Scotland, 8th Earl of Huntingdon.[2]
    Matilda of Huntingdon, born and died 1152.
    Marjorie of Huntingdon, married Gille Crâist, Earl of Angus.

    end of biography

    Henry married Ada de Warenne 0___ 1139, England. Ada (daughter of William de Warenne, Knight, 2nd Earl of Surrey and Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester) was born ~ 1120, Surry, England; died 0___ 1178, England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 101.  Ada de Warenne was born ~ 1120, Surry, England (daughter of William de Warenne, Knight, 2nd Earl of Surrey and Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester); died 0___ 1178, England.

    Notes:

    Ada de Warenne (or Adeline de Varenne) (c. 1120 – 1178) was the Anglo-Norman wife of Henry of Scotland, Earl of Northumbria and Earl of Huntingdon. She was the daughter of William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey by Elizabeth of Vermandois, and a great-granddaughter of Henry I of France. She became mother to two Kings of Scots, Malcolm the Maiden and William the Lion.

    Marriage and motherhood

    Ada and Henry were married in England in 1139.[1] They had seven children:

    Malcolm IV, King of Scots.
    William the Lion, King of Scots
    Margaret of Huntingdon married 1) Conan IV, Duke of Brittany and 2) Humphrey III de Bohun.[2]
    David of Scotland, Earl of Huntingdon married Mathilda (Maud) of Chester. Through their daughter, Isobel, they were the direct ancestors of the renowned Scottish King, Robert the Bruce.
    Matilda of Huntingdon, born and died 1152.
    Marjorie of Huntingdon, married Gille Crâist, Earl of Angus.
    Ada of Huntingdon, married Count Floris III of Holland.
    As part of her marriage settlement, the new Countess Ada was granted the privileges of Haddington, amongst others in East Lothian. Previously the seat of a thanage Haddington is said to be the first Royal burgh in Scotland, created by Countess Ada's father-in-law, David I of Scotland, who held it along with the church and a mill.[3]

    In close succession both her husband and King David died, in 1152 and 1153 respectively. Following the death of Henry, who was buried at Kelso Abbey, King David arranged for his grandson to succeed him, and at Scone on 27 May 1153, the twelve-year-old was declared Malcolm IV, King of Scots. Following his coronation, Malcolm installed his brother William as Earl of Northumbria (although this county was "restored" to King Henry II of England by Malcolm in 1157[4]), and the young dowager-Countess retired to her lands at Haddington.

    On Thursday 9 December 1165[5] King Malcolm died at the age of 25 without issue. His mother had at that time been attempting to arrange a marriage between him and Constance, daughter of Conan III, Duke of Brittany, but Malcolm died before the wedding could be celebrated.[6]

    Following his brother's death Ada's younger son William became King of Scots at the age of twenty two. William the Lion was to become the longest serving King of Scots until the Union of the Crowns in 1603.

    Church patroness

    Religious houses were established in Haddington at an early date. They came to include the Blackfriars (who came into Scotland in 1219) and most notably the Church of the Greyfriars, or Minorites (came into Scotland in the reign of Alexander II), which would become famous as "Lucerna Laudoniae"- The Lamp of Lothian, the toft of land upon which it stands being granted by King David I of Scotland to the Prior of St. Andrews (to whom the patronage of the church of Haddington belonged). David I also granted to the monks of Dunfermline "unam mansuram" in Haddington, as well as to the monks of Haddington a full toft "in burgo meo de Hadintun, free of all custom and service."[7]

    Ada devoted her time to good works, improving the lot of the Church at Haddington, where she resided. Countess Ada gave lands to the south and west of the River Tyne near to the only crossing of the river for miles, to found a Convent of Cistercian Nuns ("white nuns"[8]) dedicated to St. Mary, in what was to become the separate Burgh of Nungate, the extant remains are still to be seen in the ruined parish church of St. Martin. The nunnery she endowed with the lands of Begbie, at Garvald and Keith Marischal amongst other temporal lands. Miller, however, states that she only "founded and richly endowed a nunnery at the Abbey of Haddington" and that "Haddington, as demesne of the Crown, reverted to her son William the Lion upon her death".[3]

    Haddington seat

    According to inscriptions within the town of Haddington, Countess Ada's residence was located near the present day County buildings and Sheriff Court. Countess Ada died in 1178[9] and is thought to be buried locally. Her remaining dower-lands were brought back into the Royal desmesne and William the Lion's wife, Ermengarde de Beaumont, is said to have taken to her bed in Countess Ada's house to bear the future Alexander II. Miller states that when the future King was born in Haddington in 1198 it took place "in the palace of Haddington".[10]

    Ancestry

    [show]Ancestors of Ada de Warenne

    Notes

    Jump up ^ Anderson, Alan O., Scottish Annals from English Chroniclers AD500 – 1286, London, 1908: 215.
    Jump up ^ Richardson, Douglas, Magna Carta Ancestry, Baltimore, Md, 2005: 99. ISBN 0-8063-1759-0
    ^ Jump up to: a b Miller, James, The Lamp of Lothian, Haddington, 1900: 2
    Jump up ^ Anderson, Alan O., Scottish Annals from English Chroniclers AD500 – 1286, London, 1908: 239.
    Jump up ^ Anderson, Alan O., Scottish Annals from English Chroniclers AD500 – 1286, London, 1908: 243.
    Jump up ^ Oram, The Canmores, p. 51.
    Jump up ^ Miller, James, The Lamp of Lothian, Haddington, 1900: 173
    Jump up ^ Anderson, Alan O., Scottish Annals from English Chroniclers AD500 – 1286, London, 1908: 327.
    Jump up ^ Dunbar, Archibald Scottish Kings, 1899: 65.
    Jump up ^ Miller, James, The Lamp of Lothian, Haddington, 1900: 4

    References

    The Royal Families of England, Scotland, and Wales, with their descendants, Sovereigns and Subjects, by Messrs. John and John Bernard Burke, London, 1851, vol.2, page xlvii and pedigree XXIX.
    Miscellanea Genealogica et Heraldica, edited by Joseph Jackson Howard, LL.D.,F.S.A., New Series, volume I, London, 1874, p. 337.
    Scottish Kings – A Revised Chronology of Scottish History 1005–1625 by Sir Archibald H. Dunbar, Bt., Edinburgh, 1899, p. 65.
    Oram, Richard, The Canmores: Kings & Queens of the Scots 1040–1290. Tempus, Stroud, 2002. ISBN 0-7524-2325-8
    The Bretons, by Patrick Galliou and Michael Jones, Oxford, 1991, p. 191. ISBN 0-631-16406-5

    Children:
    1. 50. William, I, King of the Scots was born ~ 1143, (Scotland); died 4 Dec 1214, Stirling, Scotland; was buried Arbroath Abbey, Scotland.
    2. David of Scotland, Earl of Huntingdon was born 0___ 1152, (Scotland); died 17 Jun 1219.
    3. Margaret of Huntingdon, Duchess of Brittany was born 0___ 1145; died 0___ 1201.

  5. 102.  Robert Avenel, Lord of Eskdale was born ~ 1115, Normandy, France; died 8 Mar 1185, Langholm, Dumfries, Scotland.

    Notes:

    Name: Robert AVENEL Lord of Eskdale 1 2
    Sex: M
    Birth: ABT 1115 in Normandy
    ALIA: Richard de AVENAL
    Title: Sir
    Death: 08 MAR 1185 in Langholm, Dumfries-shire, Scotland
    Name: Robert AVENEL 3 4
    Birth: ABT 1110 in of Sandhurst, Gloucestershire, England
    Death: AFT 1180 in of Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland



    Marriage 1 SIBYL b: ABT 1120 in Scotland
    Children
    Has Children Unknownl AVENEL b: ABT 1140 in Langholm, Dumfries-shire, Scotland
    Has No Children Cleric Robert Avenel b: ABT 1152 in Langholm, Dumfries-shire, Scotland
    Has Children Gervase AVENEL Lord of Eskdale b: ABT 1150 in Langholm, Dumfries-shire, Scotland
    Has No Children John Avenel b: ABT 1155 in Langholm, Dumfries-shire, Scotland

    Sources:
    Author: Catherine Lucy Wilhilmina Stanhope Powlett
    Title: The Battle Abbey Roll with Some Account of the Norman Lineages
    Publication: Name: 1889 J. Murray;
    Repository:
    Name: Google Book

    Page: 353-354
    Text: n 1169, Robert Avenel witnessed another donation to this Priory, and the foundation charter of Welbeck Abbey.
    Title: John P. Ravilious -soc.genealogy.medieval, at groups - google.com
    Repository:
    Name: soc.genealogy.medieval, at groups - google.com

    Note:
    Source Medium: Internet
    Page: 6/11/2007
    Text:

    First, the relationship of the Avenels of Eskdale, and their Graham descendants, to the Avenel paramour of William 'the Lion', King of Scots (d. 1214) is reflected in the following chart.

    This does not provide any other relationship to the royal house of Scotland (the Comyn ancestry of the Grahams aside), but it does show a near kinship with the de Ros family, of Helmsley, Wark, &c. Sir William de Ros of Helmsley (d. ca. 1264) and his brother, Sir Robert de Ros of Wark, were in fact 2nd cousins of the Avenel wife of Sir Henry de Graham of Dalkeith.

    Robert Avenel = Sibyl [Sibilla] lord of Eskdale I d. 8 Mar 1184/5

    I ________I___________
    I I William ~ NN Gervase Avenel = Sibyl 'the Lion' I lord of Eskdale I K of I d. 1219 I Scots
    I I _____I _________________________I_________
    I I I I I Isabel Gervase Roger Robert William = 1) Sir Robert (dvp) lord of clerk de Brus (dsp) Eskdale = 2) Sir Robert d. 1243 I de Ros I __I______________ I I I I Sir William Sir Robert NN = Sir Henry de Graham de Ros of de Ros I of Dalkeith Helmsley of Wark I d. aft 5 Feb 1283/4 d. ca. 1264 d. 1269 I I I I V V V The other item alluded to above involves the Avenel family and their otherwise unidentified relations.

    On 13 June 1213, King John of England ordered a number of hostages of the King of Scotland be released by their hosts, to be delivered to the King (of England) at Portsmouth.

    One such letter is detailed in Bain's Calendar of Documents Pertaining to Scotland, addressed to Saier de Quincy, Earl of Winchester

    [1]. As Bain wrote, there were " Similar letters written to Robert de Vaux concerning the son of William de Vaux; to William de Mobray concerning Nigel son of Philip de Mobray; to William son of Walkelin concerning the son of Gervase Avenel;.."
    [2] There has been much ink spilt in the past concerning such transactions, and the relationships between the hostages and their appointed hosts. In the case of the 1213 transactions, I have seen no hostage-host relationship that did not also involve a known or discernable kinship, save one: that of the son of Gervase Avenel (likely his eldest son Gervase, who ob.v.p. before 1219) and William fitz Walkelin. William fitz Walkelin was most likely a near kinsman of the family of de Ferrers, earls of Derby. He held lands in Stainsby, Derbyshire, which he had obtained from Henry II in 1170, and is recorded as continuing in his tenure there in 1212
    [3]. He died sometime before 4 April 1218, when Robert (le) Savage, husband of his deceased daughter Hawise, fined to have seisin of her lands in Lincolnshire [4]. One interesting possibility would place Sibyl, the mother of Gervase Avenel 'the elder', as a daughter of William de Ferrers, earl of Derby and his wife Sibyl de Braose. This may be something of a stretch, but the chronology would work. We know that this particular William de Ferrers (d. at Acre before 21 Oct 1190) had a kinsman, Henry son of Robert son of Wakelin, to whom he granted lands of his aunt Letitia de Ferrers in Passenham. Further, Earl William allegedly had a brother Walkelin, the father of Robert fitz Walkelin, ancestor of the Chaundos family (see SGM archives on this).

    The possiblity that William fitz Walkelin was a brother of this Robert would make it chronologically feasible (although not nearly proven) that Gervase Avenel's son - possibly a great-nephew of Earl William (d. 1190) and his brother Walkelin - was being hosted by Earl William's nephew William fitz Walkelin, a first cousin to Gervase Avenel in June 1213. The identifiation of the parentage of William fitz Wakelin, and of his potential kinswoman (presumably Sibyl, mother or wife of Gervase Avenel) would be of great interest to the Graham and Douglas descendants of the Avenels, and also to the Savage descendants of William fitz Wakelin. Should anyone have additional thoughts or documentation that either support or refute the above conjecture, that would be of great interest.

    Cheers, John *

    NOTES [1] Bain, Calendar of Documents Pertaining to Scotland I:100-101, cites Foedera I:113; and Close Roll 15 John, p. 1, m. 4. : ' 574. Concerning the K. of Scotland's hostages. The K. to S[aher] earl of Winchester.
    Title: Society of Genealogists, London-Woodward MSS
    Title: Ancestral Roots by Weis-7th edition-GPC
    Note:
    Source Medium: Book

    Robert — Sibyl LNU. Sibyl was born ~ 1120, Scotland. [Group Sheet]


  6. 103.  Sibyl LNU was born ~ 1120, Scotland.
    Children:
    1. 51. Isabel d'Avenel was born ~ 1143; died 0___ 1234, Castle Stirling, Stirling, Stirlingshire, Scotland.


Generation: 8

  1. 200.  David of Scotland, I, King of the Scots was born 0___ 1085; died 24 May 1154, Carlisle, Scotland; was buried Dunfermline Abbey, Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Dauâid mac Maâil Choluim
    • Also Known As: Prince of the Cumbrians

    Notes:

    David I or Dauâid mac Maâil Choluim (Modern: Daibhidh I mac [Mhaoil] Chaluim;[1] c. 1085 – 24 May 1153) was a 12th-century ruler who was Prince of the Cumbrians (1113–1124) and later King of the Scots (1124–1153). The youngest son of Mâael Coluim III (Malcolm III) and Margaret of Wessex, David spent most of his childhood in Scotland, but was exiled to England temporarily in 1093. Perhaps after 1100, he became a dependent at the court of King Henry I. There he was influenced by the Norman and Anglo-French culture of the court.

    When David's brother Alexander I of Scotland died in 1124, David chose, with the backing of Henry I, to take the Kingdom of Scotland (Alba) for himself. He was forced to engage in warfare against his rival and nephew, Mâael Coluim mac Alaxandair. Subduing the latter seems to have taken David ten years, a struggle that involved the destruction of Óengus, Mormaer of Moray. David's victory allowed expansion of control over more distant regions theoretically part of his Kingdom. After the death of his former patron Henry I, David supported the claims of Henry's daughter and his own niece, the former Empress-consort, Matilda, to the throne of England. In the process, he came into conflict with King Stephen and was able to expand his power in northern England, despite his defeat at the Battle of the Standard in 1138.

    The term "Davidian Revolution" is used by many scholars to summarise the changes which took place in Scotland during his reign. These included his foundation of burghs and regional markets, implementation of the ideals of Gregorian Reform, foundation of monasteries, Normanisation of the Scottish government, and the introduction of feudalism through immigrant French and Anglo-French knights.

    Read more ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_I_of_Scotland

    David — Maud of Huntingdon, Queen Consort of Scotland. Maud was born ~ 1074; died 1130-1131, Scotland; was buried Scone Abbey, Perthshire, Scotland. [Group Sheet]


  2. 201.  Maud of Huntingdon, Queen Consort of Scotland was born ~ 1074; died 1130-1131, Scotland; was buried Scone Abbey, Perthshire, Scotland.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Matilda

    Notes:

    Maud or Matilda (c.1074—1130/31) was the queen consort of King David I of Scotland. She was the great-niece of William the Conqueror and the granddaughter of Earl Siward.

    Biography

    Maud was the daughter of the Waltheof, the Anglo-Saxon Earl of Huntingdon and Northampton, and his Norman wife Judith of Lens. Her father was the last of the major Anglo-Saxon earls to remain powerful after the Norman conquest of England in 1066, and the son of Siward, Earl of Northumbria. Her mother was the niece of William the Conqueror.

    She was married to Simon de Senlis (or St Liz) in about 1090.[1] Earlier, William had tried to get Maud's mother, Judith, to marry Simon. He received the honour of Huntingdon (whose lands stretched across much of eastern England) probably in right of his wife from William Rufus before the end of the year 1090.[2][3]

    She had three known children by him:[2]

    Matilda of St Liz (Maud) (d. 1140); she married Robert Fitz Richard of Tonbridge; she married secondly Saer De Quincy.
    Simon of St Liz (d. 1153)
    Saint Waltheof of Melrose (c.1100 – 1159/60)
    Her first husband died some time after 1111 and Maud next married David, the brother-in-law of Henry I of England, in 1113.[1][3] Through the marriage, David gained control over his wife's vast estates in England, in addition to his own lands in Cumbria and Strathclyde.[3] They had four children (two sons and two daughters):[1]

    Malcolm (born in 1113 or later, died young)
    Henry (c.1114 – 1152)
    Claricia (died unmarried)
    Hodierna (died young and unmarried)
    In 1124, David became King of Scots. Maud's two sons by different fathers, Simon and Henry, would later vie for the Earldom of Huntingdon.[3]

    She died in 1130 or 1131 and was buried at Scone Abbey in Perthshire, but she appears in a charter of dubious origin dated 1147.[1]

    Depictions in fiction

    Maud of Huntingdon appears as a character in Elizabeth Chadwick's novel The Winter Mantle (2003), as well as Alan Moore's novel Voice of the Fire (1995) and Nigel Tranter's novel David the Prince (1980).

    References

    ^ Jump up to: a b c d Weir, Alison (1995). Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy, Revised Edition. London: Random House. ISBN 0-7126-7448-9. p. 192
    ^ Jump up to: a b Matthew Strickland, "Senlis, Simon (I) de", Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/25091
    ^ Jump up to: a b c d G. W. S. Barrow, "David I (c.1085–1153)", Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, Sept 2004; online edn, Jan 2006 ; Maud (d. 1131): doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/49353

    Buried:
    Scone Abbey (originally Scone Priory) was a house of Augustinian canons located in Scone, Perthshire (Gowrie), Scotland. Dates given for the establishment of Scone Priory have ranged from 1114 A.D. to 1122 A.D. However, historians have long believed that Scone was before that time the center of the early medieval Christian cult of the Culdees (Câeli Dâe in medieval Irish meaning "Companions of God"). Very little is known about the Culdees but it is thought that a cult may have been worshiping at Scone from as early as 700 A.D. Archaeological surveys taken in 2007 suggest that Scone was a site of real significance even prior to 841 A.D., when Kenneth MacAlpin brought the Stone of Destiny, Scotland's most prized relic and coronation stone, to Scone.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scone_Abbey

    Children:
    1. 100. Henry of Scotland was born 0___ 1114, (Scotland); died 12 Jun 1152; was buried Kelso Abbey, Scotland.

  3. 202.  William de Warenne, Knight, 2nd Earl of Surrey was born 0___ 1065, East Sussex, England (son of William de Warenne, Knight, 1st Earl of Surrey and Gundred of Flanders, Countess of Surrey); died 11 May 1138; was buried Lewes Priory, Sussex, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Earl of Warenne
    • Also Known As: Earl Warenne

    Notes:

    William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey (died 11 May 1138) was the son of William de Warenne, 1st Earl of Surrey and his first wife Gundred. He was more often referred to as Earl Warenne or Earl of Warenne than as Earl of Surrey.[1]

    Life

    His father, the 1st Earl, was one of the Conqueror's most trusted and most rewarded barons who, at his death in 1088, was the 3rd or 4th richest magnate in England.[2] In 1088 William II inherited his father's lands in England and his Norman estates including the castles of Mortemer and Bellencombre in Haute-Normandy. But William II was not as disposed to serve the king as his father was.[2] In January 1091, William assisted Hugh of Grantmesnil (d.1094) in his defense of Courcy against the forces of Robert de Belleme and Duke Robert of Normandy.[3] In 1093 he attempted to marry Matilda (or Edith), daughter of king Malcolm III of Scotland.[4] She instead married Henry I of England, and this may have been the cause of William's great dislike of Henry I, which motivated him in the following years.[5]

    When Robert Curthose, Duke of Normandy invaded England 1101 William joined him.[6] But when Curthose promptly surrendered to Henry I, William lost his English lands and titles and was exiled to Normandy.[6] There he complained to Curthose that he had expended great effort on the duke's behalf and in return lost all of his English possessions. Curthose's return to England in 1103 was apparently made to convince his brother, the king, to restore William's earldom. This was successful, though Curthose had to give up his 3000 mark annual pension he had received after the 1101 invasion, after which William's lands and titles were restored to him.[5]

    To further insure William's loyalty Henry considered marrying him to one of his many illegitimate daughters. Archbishop Anselm of Canterbury forbade the marriage based on the couple being related in the 4th generation on one side, and in the 6th generation on the other.[7] William was one of the commanders on Henry's side (against Robert Curthose) at the Battle of Tinchebray in 1106. Afterwards, with his loyalty thus proven, he became more prominent in Henry's court.[1]

    In 1110, Curthose's son William Clito escaped along with Helias of Saint-Saens, and afterwards Warenne received the forfeited Saint-Saens lands, which were very near his own in upper Normandy. In this way king Henry further assured his loyalty, for the successful return of Clito would mean at the very least Warenne's loss of this new territory.[1][8] He fought for Henry I at the Battle of Bremule in 1119.[1][9] William, the second Earl of Surrey was present at Henry's deathbed in 1135.[1][10] After the king's death disturbances broke out in Normandy and William was sent to guard Rouen and the Pays de Caux.[1][11]

    William's death is recorded as 11-May-1138 in the register of Lewes Priory and he was buried at his father's feet at the Chapter house there.[12] His wife, the countess Elizabeth, survived him, dying before July 1147.[12]

    Family

    In 1118 William finally acquired the royal-blooded bride he desired when he married Elizabeth de Vermandois.[13] She was a daughter of count Hugh of Vermandois, a granddaughter of Henry I, King of France, and was the widow of Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Leicester.[14]

    By Elizabeth his wife he had three sons and two daughters:

    William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey[15][16]
    Reginald de Warenne, who inherited his father's property in upper Normandy, including the castles of Bellencombre and Mortemer.[16] He married Adeline or Alice, daughter of William, lord of Wormgay in Norfolk, by whom he had a son William (founder of the priory of Wormegay),[16] whose daughter and sole heir, Beatrice married first Doun, lord Bardolf, and secondly Hubert de Burgh.[17][18] Reginald was one of the persecutors of Archbishop Thomas in 1170.
    Ralph de Warenne[19]
    Gundred de Warenne,[19] who married first Roger de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Warwick[20] and second William, lord of Kendal, and is most remembered for expelling king Stephen's garrison from Warwick Castle.
    Ada de Warenne, who married Henry of Scotland, 3rd Earl of Huntingdon, the mother of two Scottish kings,[21] she made many grants to the priory of Lewes.[22]
    Ancestry[edit]
    [show]Ancestors of William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey
    References[edit]
    ^ Jump up to: a b c d e f G. E. Cokayne, The Complete Peerage, Vol. XII/1 (The St. Catherine Press, London, 1953) p. 495
    ^ Jump up to: a b C. Warren Hollister, 'The Taming of a Turbulent Earl: Henry I and William of Warenne', Historical Reflections, Vol. 3 (1976), p. 87
    Jump up ^ The Ecclesiastical History of Orderic Vitalis, ed. Marjorie Chibnall, Vol. 2 (Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1990)p. 692
    Jump up ^ C. Warren Hollister, Henry I (Yale University Press, New Haven & London, 2003)p. 340
    ^ Jump up to: a b C. Warren Hollister, 'The Taming of a Turbulent Earl: Henry I and William of Warenne', Historical Reflections. Vol. 3 (1976) p. 87
    ^ Jump up to: a b The Ecclesiastical History of Orderic Vitalis, ed. Marjorie Chibnall, Vol. 2 (Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1990), p.785
    Jump up ^ Edmund Chester Waters, 'Gundrada de Warenne', Archaeological Journal, Vol. XLI (1884), p. 303
    Jump up ^ C. Warren Hollister, 'The Taming of a Turbulent Earl: Henry I and William of Warenne', Historical Reflections, Vol. 3 (1976) p. 89
    Jump up ^ Orderic Vitalis, The Ecclesiastical History of England and Normandy, trans. Thomas Forester, Vol. III (Henry G. Bohn, London, 1854) pp. 481-2
    Jump up ^ Orderic Vitalis, The Ecclesiastical History of England and Normandy, trans. Thomas Forester, Vol. IV (Henry G. Bohn, London, 1856) p. 150
    Jump up ^ C. Warren Hollister, Henry I (Yale University Press, New Haven & London, 2003)p. 375
    ^ Jump up to: a b G. E. Cokayne, The Complete Peerage, Vol. XII/1 (The St. Catherine Press, London, 1953) p. 496
    Jump up ^ C. Warren Hollister, 'The Taming of a Turbulent Earl: Henry I and William of Warenne', Historical Reflections, Vol. 3 (1976) p. 90 n. 36
    Jump up ^ Detlev Schwennicke, Europčaische Stammtafeln: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europčaischen Staaten, Neue Folge, Band III Teilband 1, Herzogs und Grafenhčauser des Heiligen Rčomischen Reiches Andere Europčaiche Fčurstenhčauser (Marburg, Germany: Verlag von J. A. Stargardt, 1984), Tafel 55
    Jump up ^ G. E. Cokayne, The Complete Peerage, Vol. XII/1 (The St. Catherine Press, London, 1953) p. 500
    ^ Jump up to: a b c Early Yorkshire Charters, Vol. VIII - The Honour of Warenne (The Yorkshire Archaeological Society, 1949) pp. 27-8
    Jump up ^ G.E.Cokayne, The Complete Peerage, Vol. VII (The St. Catherine Press, 1929), p. 142, footnote (a)
    Jump up ^ Early Yorkshire Charters, Vol. VIII - The Honour of Warenne (The Yorkshire Archaeological Society, 1949) pp. 33-4
    ^ Jump up to: a b Early Yorkshire Charters, Vol. VIII - The Honour of Warenne (The Yorkshire Archaeological Society, 1949) pp. 10-11
    Jump up ^ Elisabeth van Houts, 'The Warenne View of the Past 1066-1203', Anglo-Norman Studies XXVI, Proceedings of the Battle Conference 2003, ed. John Gillingham (Boydell Press, Woodbridge. 2004), p. 109 n. 49
    Jump up ^ The Scots Peerage, Founded on Wood's Edition of Sir Robert Douglas's Peerage of Scotland, ed. Sir James Balfour Paul, Lord Lyon King of Arms, Vol. I (Edinburgh: David Douglas, 1904, p. 4
    Jump up ^ Early Yorkshire Charters, ed: William Farrer, Charles Travis Clay, Volume VIII - The Honour of Warenne (The Yorkshire Archaeological Society, 1949), p. 11

    External links

    "Warenne, William de (d.1138)". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900.
    The Ecclesiastical History of Orderic Vitalis, ed. M. Chibnall, vol. 2, p. 264 (Oxford, 1990)

    William — Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester. Isabel (daughter of Hugues de France and Adelaide of Vermandois) was born 0___ 1081, Basse-Normandie, France; died 17 Feb 1131, France; was buried Lewes Priory, Southover, Sussex, England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 203.  Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester was born 0___ 1081, Basse-Normandie, France (daughter of Hugues de France and Adelaide of Vermandois); died 17 Feb 1131, France; was buried Lewes Priory, Southover, Sussex, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Elizabeth de Vermandois

    Notes:

    Birth: 1081
    Basse-Normandie, France
    Death: Feb. 17, 1131, France

    Countess of Leicester, Countess of Surrey

    Third daughter of Hugh Magnus and Adelaide of Vermandois, granddaughter of King Henry I of France and Anne of Kiev, Herbert IV, Count of Vermandois, and Adele of Valois. She was the heiress of the county of Vermandois and descendant of Charlemagne.

    Wife of Sir Robert de Beaumont, Count of Meulan, the son of Roger de Beaumont and Adeline of Meulan; Isabel became the Countess of Leicester. They married about 1096 and had three sons and at least five daughters:
    * Emma b 1101, probably died young
    * Waleran IV de Beaumont, Count of Meulan, twin
    * Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester, twin
    * Hugh de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Bedford
    * Adeline, wife of Hugh Montfort & Richard de Granville
    * Aubree, wife of Hugh II of Chăateauneuf-en-Thimerais
    * Maud, wife of William Lovel
    * Isabel, mistress of King Henry I, wife of Gilbert de Clare and mother of Richard Strongbow & wife of Hervâe de Montmorency

    Secondly, the wife of William de Warenne, son of William de Warenne, 1st Earl of Surrey and his first wife Gundred; Isabel became the Countess of Surrey. They married in 1118 and had three sons and two daughters:
    * William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey
    Ralph de Warenne
    * Reginald de Warenne
    * Gundrada de Warenne, wife of Roger de Beaumont& William de Lancaster
    * Ada de Warenne, wife of Henry of Scotland, 3rd Earl of Huntingdon, mother King Malcolm IV and King William I 'the Lion'

    Sir Robert de Beaumont, described as being "the wisest man in his time between London and Jerusalem", and aged over fifty was determined to marry Isabel, aged about eleven. Bishop Ivo dismissed their request based on their being within a few degrees of kindred. Isabel's father was able to sway Bishop Ivo, and saw his daughter married by April of 1096 when he left on a crusade.

    In 1115, Isabel was either carried away or willingly abducted by William de Warrene, revealing they had been lovers for some time. They were unable to marry until the death of Sir Robert, which occurred in 1118.

    The Beaumont sons were on opposite sides of support for King Stephen and Queen Matilda, but were not enemies.

    Sources vary on her death, reported as 1131 to outliving William who died in 1138.

    Family links:
    Parents:
    Hugues de France (1057 - 1102)

    Spouses:
    Robert de Beaumont (1049 - 1118)
    William II de Warenne (1065 - 1138)

    Children:
    Waleran de Beaumont (1104 - 1166)*
    Robert de Beaumont (1104 - 1168)*
    Reginald de Warenne (1113 - 1179)*
    William de Warenne (1118 - 1148)*
    Ada De Warenne De Huntingdon (1120 - 1178)*

    Sibling:
    Isabel Of Vermandois Beaumont de Warenne (1081 - 1131)
    Raoul I de Vermandois (1094 - 1152)*

    *Calculated relationship

    Burial:
    Lewes Priory
    Lewes
    Lewes District
    East Sussex, England

    end

    Children:
    1. William de Warenne, Knight, 3rd Earl of Surrey was born 0Jun 1118, East Sussex, England; died 6 Jan 1148, Turkey.
    2. 101. Ada de Warenne was born ~ 1120, Surry, England; died 0___ 1178, England.
    3. Gundred de Warenne