Nicola Orsini

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Generation: 1

  1. 1.  Nicola Orsini

    Nicola — Jeanne de Sabran. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. 2. Sueva Orsini  Descendancy chart to this point


Generation: 2

  1. 2.  Sueva Orsini Descendancy chart to this point (1.Nicola1)

    Sueva — Francesco del Balso. (son of Bertrand del Balzo, III and Marguerite d'Aulnay) [Group Sheet]

    Sueva — Francis of Baux. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. 3. Margaret of Baux  Descendancy chart to this point


Generation: 3

  1. 3.  Margaret of Baux Descendancy chart to this point (2.Sueva2, 1.Nicola1)

    Margaret — Peter I, Count of Saint-Pol. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. 4. Jacquetta of Luxembourg, Countess Rivers  Descendancy chart to this point was born 1415-1416, Palace of Westminster, London, England; died 30 May 1472.


Generation: 4

  1. 4.  Jacquetta of Luxembourg, Countess RiversJacquetta of Luxembourg, Countess Rivers Descendancy chart to this point (3.Margaret3, 2.Sueva2, 1.Nicola1) was born 1415-1416, Palace of Westminster, London, England; died 30 May 1472.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Duchess of Bedford

    Notes:

    Jacquetta of Luxembourg, Countess Rivers (1415/1416 – 30 May 1472) was the eldest daughter of Peter I of Luxembourg, Count of Saint-Pol, Conversano and Brienne and his wife Margaret of Baux (Margherita del Balzo of Andria). She was a prominent, though often overlooked, figure in the Wars of the Roses. Through her short-lived first marriage to the Duke of Bedford, brother of King Henry V, she was firmly allied to the House of Lancaster. However, following the emphatic Lancastrian defeat at the Battle of Towton, she and her second husband Richard Woodville sided closely with the House of York. Three years after the battle and the accession of Edward IV of England, Jacquetta's eldest daughter Elizabeth Woodville married him and became Queen consort of England. Jacquetta bore Woodville 14 children and stood trial on charges of witchcraft, for which she was exonerated.

    Family and ancestry

    Her father Peter of Luxembourg, Count of Saint-Pol, was also the hereditary Count of Brienne from 1397 until his death in 1433.

    Peter had succeeded his father John of Luxembourg, Lord of Beauvoir, and mother Marguerite of Enghien. They had co-reigned as Count and Countess of Brienne from 1394 to her death in 1397. John had been a fourth-generation descendant of Waleran I of Luxembourg, Lord of Ligny, second son of Henry V of Luxembourg and Margaret of Bar. This cadet line of the House of Luxembourg reigned in Ligny-en-Barrois.

    Jacquetta's paternal great-grandmother, Mahaut of Chãatillon, was descended from Beatrice of England, daughter of King Henry III of England and Eleanor of Provence.[1] Jacquetta's mother, Margherita del Balzo, was a daughter of Francesco del Balzo, 1st Duke of Andria, and Sueva Orsini.[2] Sueva descended from Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester and Eleanor of England, the youngest child of King John of England and Isabella of Angoulãeme.[2]

    The Luxembourgs claimed to be descended from the water deity Melusine through their ancestor Siegfried of Luxembourg (AD 922-998).[3] Jacquetta was a fourth cousin twice removed of Sigismund of Luxembourg, the reigning Holy Roman Emperor and king of Bohemia and Hungary.

    Early life

    Most of Jacquetta's early life is a mystery. She was born as the Lancastrian phase of the Hundred Years War began. Her uncle, John II of Luxembourg, Count of Ligny, was the head of the military company that captured Joan of Arc. John held Joan prisoner at Beauvoir and later sold her to the English.

    First marriage

    On 22 April 1433 at age 17, Jacquetta married John of Lancaster, 1st Duke of Bedford at Therouenne. The Duke was the third son of King Henry IV of England and Mary de Bohun, and thus the grandson of John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster, himself the third son of Edward III. The marriage was childless and the Duke died on 15 September 1435 at Rouen. As was customary at the time, after her second marriage Jacquetta retained the title of her first husband and was always known as the Duchess of Bedford, this being a higher title than that of countess. Jacquetta inherited one-third of the Duke's main estates as her widow's share.[4]

    Second marriage

    Sir Richard Woodville, son of Sir Richard Wydevill, who had served as the late Duke's chamberlain, was commissioned by Henry VI of England to bring Bedford's young widow to England. During the journey, the couple fell in love and married in secret (before 23 March 1437), without seeking the king's permission. Jacquetta had been granted dower lands following her first husband's death on condition that she did not remarry without a royal licence. On learning of the marriage, Henry VI refused to see them, but was mollified by the payment of a fine of ¹1000. The marriage was long and very fruitful: Jacquetta and Richard had fourteen children, including the future Queen Consort Elizabeth Woodville. She lost her first-born son Lewis to a fever when he was 12 years old. A daughter also named Jacquetta (Woodville) married John le Strange, 8th Baron Strange.

    By the mid-1440s, the Woodvilles were in a powerful position. Jacquetta was related to both King Henry and Queen Margaret by marriage. Her sister, Isabelle de Saint Pol, married Margaret's uncle Charles du Maine while Jacquetta was the widow of Henry VI's uncle. She outranked all ladies at court with the exception of the queen. As a personal favourite, she also enjoyed special privileges and influence at court. Margaret influenced Henry to create Richard Woodville Baron Rivers in 1448, and he was a prominent partisan of the House of Lancaster as the Wars of the Roses began.[3]

    Wars of the Roses

    The Yorkists crushed the Lancastrians at the Battle of Towton on 29 March 1461, and Edward IV, the first king from the House of York, took the throne. The husband of Jacquetta's oldest daughter Elizabeth (Sir John Grey) had been killed a month before at the Second Battle of St. Albans, a Lancastrian victory under the command of Margaret of Anjou. At Towton, however, the tables turned in favour of the Yorkists.

    Edward IV met and soon married the widowed Elizabeth Woodville in secret; though the date is not accepted as exactly accurate, it is traditionally said to have taken place (with only Jacquetta and two ladies in attendance) at the Woodvile family home in Northamptonshire on 1 May 1464.[5] Elizabeth was crowned queen on 26 May 1465, the Sunday after Ascension Day. The marriage, once revealed, ruined the plans of Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick, Edward's cousin, who had been negotiating a much-needed alliance with France via a political marriage for Edward.

    With Elizabeth now Queen of England, the Woodvilles rose to great prominence and power. Jacquetta's husband Richard was created Earl Rivers and appointed Lord High Treasurer in March 1466. Jacquetta found rich and influential spouses for her children and helped her grandchildren achieve high posts.[6] She arranged for her 20-year-old son, John, to marry the widowed and very rich Katherine Neville, Duchess of Norfolk, who was at least 45 years older than John. The rise of the Woodvilles created widespread hostility among the Yorkists, including Warwick and the king's brothers George and Richard, who were being displaced in the king's favour by the former Lancastrians.

    In 1469, Warwick openly broke with Edward IV and temporarily deposed him. Earl Rivers and his son John were captured and executed by Warwick on 12 August at Kenilworth. Jacquetta survived her husband by three years and died in 1472, at about 56 years of age.

    Witchcraft accusations

    Shortly after her husband's execution by Warwick, Thomas Wake, a follower of Warwick’s, accused Jacquetta of witchcraft. Wake brought to Warwick Castle a lead image “made like a man-of-arms . . . broken in the middle and made fast with a wire,“ and alleged that Jacquetta had fashioned it to use for witchcraft and sorcery. He claimed that John Daunger, a parish clerk in Northampton, could attest that Jacquetta had made two other images, one for the king and one for the queen. The case fell apart when Warwick released Edward IV from custody, and Jacquetta was cleared by the king’s great council of the charges on February 21, 1470.[7] In 1484 Richard III in the act known as Titulus Regius[8] revived the allegations of witchcraft against Jacquetta when he claimed that she and Elizabeth had procured Elizabeth's marriage to Edward IV through witchcraft; however, Richard never offered any proof to support his assertions.

    Heritage

    Through her daughter Elizabeth, Jacquetta was the maternal grandmother of Elizabeth of York, wife and queen of Henry VII, and therefore an ancestor of all subsequent English monarchs.

    Children

    Elizabeth Woodville, Queen consort of England (c. 1437 – 8 Jun. 1492), married first Sir John Grey, second Edward IV of England.
    Lewis Woodville (c. 1438), died in childhood.
    Anne Woodville (1438/9 – 30 Jul. 1489). Married first William Bourchier, Viscount Bourchier, second Sir Edward Wingfield, third George Grey, 2nd Earl of Kent.
    Anthony Woodville, 2nd Earl Rivers (c. 1440 – 25 Jun. 1483), married first Elizabeth Scales, 8th Baroness Scales, second Mary Fitzlewis; not married to Gwentlian Stradling, the mother of Margaret.
    John Woodville (c. 1444 – 12 Aug. 1469), married Catherine Neville, Dowager Duchess of Norfolk.
    Jacquetta Woodville (1445–1509), married John le Strange, 8th Baron Strange of Knockin.
    Lionel Woodville, Bishop of Salisbury (c. 1446 – Jun. 1484).
    Eleanor Woodville (d. c. 1512), married Sir Anthony Grey.
    Margaret Woodville (c. 1450 – 1490/1), married Thomas Fitzalan, 17th Earl of Arundel.
    Martha Woodville (d. c. 1500), married Sir John Bromley.
    Richard Woodville, 3rd Earl Rivers (1453 – Mar. 1491).
    Edward Woodville, Lord Scales (1454/8 – 28 Jul. 1488).
    Mary Woodville (c. 1456 – 1481), married William Herbert, 2nd Earl of Pembroke.
    Catherine Woodville (c. 1458 – 18 May 1497), married first Henry Stafford, 2nd Duke of Buckingham, second Jasper Tudor, Duke of Bedford.[9]
    I
    end of biography

    Jacquetta married Richard Woodville, Knight, 1st Earl Rivers Bef 23 Mar 1437. Richard (son of Richard Wydeville, Duke of Bedford and Joan Bittlesgate) was born 0___ 1405, Maidstone, Kent, England; died 12 Aug 1469, Kenilworth, Warwickshire, England. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. 5. Elizabeth Lucy Wydeville, Queen of England  Descendancy chart to this point was born ~ 1437, Grafton Regis, Northampton, England; died 8 Jun 1492, Bermondsey, London, England; was buried St. George's Chapel, Windsor, England.
    2. 6. Anne Woodville, Viscountess Bourchier  Descendancy chart to this point was born ~ 1438, Grafton Regis, Northampton, England; died 30 Jul 1489; was buried St. Leonard Churchyard, Warden, Bedfordshire, England.
    3. 7. Mary Woodville, Countess of Pembroke  Descendancy chart to this point was born ~ 1456; died 0___ 1481.
    4. 8. Katherine Woodville, Duchess of Buckingham  Descendancy chart to this point was born ~ 1458, (Maidstone, Kent, England); died 18 May 1497.


Generation: 5

  1. 5.  Elizabeth Lucy Wydeville, Queen of EnglandElizabeth Lucy Wydeville, Queen of England Descendancy chart to this point (4.Jacquetta4, 3.Margaret3, 2.Sueva2, 1.Nicola1) was born ~ 1437, Grafton Regis, Northampton, England; died 8 Jun 1492, Bermondsey, London, England; was buried St. George's Chapel, Windsor, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Dame Elizabeth Grey
    • Also Known As: Elizabeth Widvile
    • Also Known As: Elizabeth Woodville
    • Also Known As: Elizabeth Wydville

    Notes:

    Elizabeth Woodville (also spelled Wydville, Wydeville, or Widvile;[nb 1] c. 1437[1] - 8 June 1492) was Queen consort of England as the spouse of King Edward IV from 1464 until his death in 1483. At the time of her birth, her family was mid-ranked in the English aristocracy. Her first marriage was to a minor supporter of the House of Lancaster, Sir John Grey of Groby; he died at the Second Battle of St Albans, leaving Elizabeth a widowed mother of two sons. Her second marriage, to Edward IV, was a cause câeláebre of the day, thanks to Elizabeth's great beauty and lack of great estates. Edward was only the second king of England since the Norman Conquest to have married one of his subjects, and Elizabeth was the first such consort to be crowned queen.[nb 2] Her marriage greatly enriched her siblings and children, but their advancement incurred the hostility of Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick, 'The Kingmaker', and his various alliances with the most senior figures in the increasingly divided royal family.

    This hostility turned into open discord between King Edward and Warwick, leading to a battle of wills that finally resulted in Warwick switching allegiance to the Lancastrian cause. Elizabeth remained politically influential even after her son, briefly proclaimed King Edward V of England, was deposed by her brother-in-law, Richard III, and she would play an important role in securing the accession of Henry VII to the throne in 1485, which ended the Wars of the Roses. After 1485, however, she was forced to yield pre-eminence to Henry's mother, Lady Margaret Beaufort, and her influence on events in these years, and her eventual departure from court into retirement, remains obscure.[2][3]

    Early life and first marriage

    Elizabeth Woodville - illustration by Percy Anderson for Costume Fanciful, Historical and Theatrical, 1906
    Elizabeth Woodville was born about 1437, possibly in October,[nb 3][4] at Grafton Regis, Northamptonshire. She was the first-born child of a socially unequal marriage that had briefly scandalised the English court. Her father, Sir Richard Woodville, was merely a knight at the time of her birth. The Woodvilles, though an old and respectable family, were genteel rather than noble; a landed and wealthy family that had previously produced commissioners of the peace, sheriffs, and MPs rather than peers of the realm. Sir Richard's own father had made a good career in royal service, rising to become chamberlain to the Duke of Bedford. Sir Richard followed his father into service with the duke, and so first met his wife Jacquetta of Luxembourg. The daughter of Peter of Luxembourg, Count of Saint-Pol, and Margaret de Baux, she had been married to the Duke of Bedford in 1433 at the age of 17. The duke was significantly older than Jacquetta of Luxembourg, his second wife, and he was in ill health. He died in 1435, leaving Jacquetta of Luxembourg a childless, wealthy widow. She was required to seek permission from King Henry VI before she could remarry. But in March 1437, it was revealed that she had secretly married Sir Richard Woodville, who was far below her in rank and not considered a suitable husband for the lady still honoured as the king's aunt. The couple was fined ¹1000, but this was remitted in October of the same year.

    Despite this inauspicious start, the married couple soon prospered, thanks mainly to Jacquetta's continuing prominence within the royal family. She retained her rank and dower as Duchess of Bedford, the latter initially providing an income of between ¹7000 and ¹8000 per year. Over the years, this income would diminish due to territorial losses in France and collapsing royal finances in England. Sir Richard was honoured with military ranks, in which he proved himself a capable soldier. Further honours for both came when Henry VI married Margaret of Anjou, whose uncle was Jacquetta's brother-in-law (Jacquetta's sister Isabelle married Margaret of Anjou's paternal uncle Charles du Maine). The Woodvilles were among those chosen to escort the bride to England, and the family benefited further through this double connection to the royal family. Sir Richard was raised to the rank of Baron Rivers in 1448. Their children therefore would grow up enjoying considerable privilege and material comfort.

    In about 1452, Elizabeth Woodville married Sir John Grey of Groby, the heir to the Barony Ferrers of Groby. He was killed at the Second Battle of St Albans in 1461, fighting for the Lancastrian cause. This would become a source of irony, since Elizabeth's future husband Edward IV was the Yorkist claimant to the throne. Elizabeth Woodville's two sons from this first marriage were Thomas (later Marquess of Dorset) and Richard.

    Elizabeth Woodville was called "the most beautiful woman in the Island of Britain" with "heavy-lidded eyes like those of a dragon."[5]

    Queen consort

    Illuminated miniature depicting the marriage of Edward IV and Elizabeth Woodville, Anciennes Chroniques d'Angleterre by Jean de Wavrin, 15th century

    Elizabeth as queen, with Edward and her oldest son
    Edward IV had many mistresses, the best known of them Jane Shore, and he did not have a reputation for fidelity. His marriage to the widowed Elizabeth Woodville took place secretly and, though the date is not known, it is traditionally said to have taken place at her family home in Northamptonshire on 1 May 1464.[6] Only the bride's mother and two ladies were in attendance. Edward married her just over three years after he had assumed the English throne in the wake of his overwhelming victory over the Lancastrians at the Battle of Towton, which resulted in the displacement of King Henry VI. Elizabeth Woodville was crowned queen on 26 May 1465, the Sunday after Ascension Day.

    In the early years of his reign, Edward IV's governance of England was dependent upon a small circle of supporters, most notably his cousin, Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick. At around the time of Edward IV's secret marriage, Warwick was negotiating an alliance with France in an effort to thwart a similar arrangement being made by his sworn enemy Margaret of Anjou, wife of the deposed Henry VI. The plan was that Edward IV should marry a French princess. When his marriage to Elizabeth Woodville, who was both a commoner and from a family of Lancastrian supporters, became public, Warwick was both embarrassed and offended, and his relationship with Edward IV never recovered. The match was also badly received by the Privy Council, who according to Jean de Waurin told Edward with great frankness that "he must know that she was no wife for a prince such as himself".

    With the arrival on the scene of the new queen came many relatives, some of whom married into the most notable families in England.[7] Three of her sisters married the sons of the earls of Kent, Essex and Pembroke. Another sister, Catherine Woodville, married the queen's 11-year-old ward Henry Stafford, 2nd Duke of Buckingham, who later joined Edward IV's brother Richard, Duke of Gloucester, in opposition to the Woodvilles after the death of Edward IV. Elizabeth's 20-year-old brother John married Katherine, Duchess of Norfolk. The Duchess had been widowed three times and was probably in her sixties, which created a scandal at court. Elizabeth's son from her first marriage, Thomas Grey, married Cecily Bonville, 7th Baroness Harington.


    Elizabeth Woodville's arms as queen consort, the royal arms of England impaling Woodville (Quarterly, first argent, a lion rampant double queued gules, crowned or (Luxembourg, her mother's family), second quarterly, I and IV, gules a star of eight points argent; II and III, azure, semâee of fleurs de lys or; third, barry argent and azure, overall a lion rampant gules; fourth, gules, three bendlets argent, on a chief of the first, charged with a fillet in base or, a rose of the second (here shown in inverse: the rose should be argent on a chief gules); fifth, three pallets vairy, on a chief or a label of five points azure, and sixth, argent a fess and a canton conjoined gules (Woodville))[8][9]
    When Elizabeth Woodville's relatives, especially her brother Anthony Woodville, 2nd Earl Rivers, began to challenge Warwick's pre-eminence in English political society, Warwick conspired with his son-in-law George, Duke of Clarence, the king's younger brother. One of his followers accused Elizabeth Woodville's mother, Jacquetta of Luxembourg, of practising witchcraft. She was acquitted the following year.[10] Warwick and Clarence twice rose in revolt and then fled to France. Warwick formed an uneasy alliance with the Lancastrian Queen Margaret of Anjou and restored her husband Henry VI to the throne in 1470, but, the following year, Edward IV returned from exile and defeated Warwick at the Battle of Barnet and the Lancastrians at the Battle of Tewkesbury. Henry VI was killed soon afterwards.

    Following her husband's temporary fall from power, Elizabeth Woodville sought sanctuary in Westminster Abbey, where she gave birth to a son, Edward (later King Edward V of England). Her marriage to Edward IV produced a total of ten children, including another son, Richard, Duke of York, who would later join his brother as one of the Princes in the Tower.[4] Five daughters also lived to adulthood.

    Elizabeth Woodville engaged in acts of Christian piety in keeping with conventional expectations of a medieval queen consort. Her acts included making pilgrimages, obtaining a papal indulgence for those who knelt and said the Angelus three times per day, and founding the chapel of St. Erasmus in Westminster Abbey.[11]

    Queen dowager

    Following Edward IV's sudden death, possibly from pneumonia, in April 1483, Elizabeth Woodville became queen dowager. Her young son, Edward V, became king, with his uncle, Richard, Duke of Gloucester, acting as Lord Protector. In response to the Woodvilles attempt to monopolise power, Gloucester quickly moved to take control of the young king and had Anthony Woodville, 2nd Earl Rivers, and Richard Grey, brother and son to Elizabeth, arrested. The young king was transferred to the Tower of London to await the coronation. With her younger son and daughters, Elizabeth again sought sanctuary. Lord Hastings, the late king's leading supporter in London, initially endorsed Gloucester's actions, but Gloucester then accused him of conspiring with Elizabeth Woodville against him. Hastings was summarily executed. Whether any such conspiracy really occurred is not known.[12] Richard accused Elizabeth of plotting to "murder and utterly destroy" him.[13]

    On 25 June 1483 Gloucester had Elizabeth Woodville's son and brother executed in Pontefract Castle, Yorkshire. By an act of Parliament, the Titulus Regius (1 Ric. III), it was declared that Edward IV's children with Elizabeth illegitimate on the grounds that Edward IV had a precontract with the widow Lady Eleanor Butler, which was considered a legally binding contract that rendered any other marriage contract invalid. One source, the Burgundian chronicler Philippe de Commines, says that Robert Stillington, Bishop of Bath and Wells, carried out an engagement ceremony between Edward IV and Lady Eleanor.[14] The act also contained charges of witchcraft against Elizabeth, but gave no details and had no further repercussions. As a consequence, the Duke of Gloucester and Lord Protector was offered the throne and became King Richard III. Edward V, who was no longer king, and his brother Richard, Duke of York, remained in the Tower of London. There are no surviving sightings of them after the summer of 1483.

    Life under Richard III

    Now referred to as Dame Elizabeth Grey,[4] she and the Duke of Buckingham (a former close ally of Richard III and now probably seeking the throne for himself) now allied themselves with Lady Margaret Stanley (nâee Beaufort) and espoused the cause of Margaret's son Henry Tudor, a great-great-great-grandson of King Edward III,[15] the closest male heir of the Lancastrian claim to the throne with any degree of validity.[nb 4] To strengthen his claim and unite the two feuding noble houses, Elizabeth Woodville and Margaret Beaufort agreed that the latter's son should marry the former's eldest daughter, Elizabeth of York, who upon the death of her brothers became the heiress of the House of York. Henry Tudor agreed to this plan and in December 1483 publicly swore an oath to that effect in the cathedral in Rennes, France. A month earlier, an uprising in his favour, led by Buckingham, had been crushed.

    Richard III's first Parliament of January 1484 stripped Elizabeth of all the lands given her during Edward IV's reign.[16] On 1 March 1484, Elizabeth and her daughters came out of sanctuary after Richard III publicly swore an oath that her daughters would not be harmed or molested and that they would not be imprisoned in the Tower of London or in any other prison. He also promised to provide them with marriage portions and to marry them to "gentlemen born". The family returned to Court, apparently reconciled to Richard III. After the death of Richard III's wife Anne Neville in March 1485, vicious rumours arose that the newly widowed king was going to marry his beautiful and young niece Elizabeth of York.[17] Richard III was horrified enough to issue a full denial.

    Life under Henry VII

    In 1485, Henry Tudor invaded England and defeated Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth Field. As King, Henry VII married Elizabeth of York and had the Titulus Regius revoked and suspiciously all found copies destroyed.[18] Elizabeth Woodville was accorded the title and honours of a queen dowager.[19]

    Scholars differ about why Dowager Queen Elizabeth spent the last five years of her life living at Bermondsey Abbey, to which she retired on 12 February 1487. Among her modern biographers, David Baldwin believes that Henry VII forced her retreat from the Court, while Arlene Okerlund presents evidence from July 1486 that she was already planning her retirement from court to live a religious, contemplative life at Bermondsey Abbey.[20] A more likely suggestion is that her retreat to Bermondsey was forced on her because she was in some way involved in the 1487 Yorkist rebellion of Lambert Simnel, or at least was seen as a potential ally of the rebels, a curious role for her to take if she was convinced that both her sons had died in 1483.[21]

    At Bermondsey Abbey, Elizabeth was treated with all the respect due a queen dowager. She lived a regal life and received a pension of ¹400 and small gifts from Henry VII.[citation needed] She was present at the birth of her granddaughter Margaret at Westminster Palace in November 1489 and at the birth of her grandson, the future Henry VIII, at Greenwich Palace in June 1491. Her daughter Queen Elizabeth visited her on occasion at Bermondsey, although another one of her other daughters, Cecily of York, visited her more often.

    Henry VII briefly contemplated marrying his mother-in-law off to King James III of Scotland, when James III's wife, Margaret of Denmark, died in 1486.[22] However, James III was killed in battle in 1488, rendering these plans moot.

    Elizabeth Woodville died at Bermondsey Abbey on 8 June 1492.[4] With the exception of the queen, who was awaiting the birth of her fourth child, and Cecily of York, her daughters attended the funeral at Windsor Castle: Anne of York (the future wife of Thomas Howard), Catherine of York (the future Countess of Devon) and Bridget of York (a sister at Dartford Priory). Elizabeth's will specified a simple ceremony.[23] The surviving accounts of her funeral on 12 June 1492 suggest that at least one source "clearly felt that a queen's funeral should have been more splendid" and may have objected that "Henry VII had not seen fit to arrange a more queenly funeral for his mother-in-law", despite the fact that the simplicity was the queen dowager's own wish.[23] Elizabeth was laid to rest in the same chantry as her husband King Edward IV in St George's Chapel in Windsor Castle.[4]

    Ancestry


    [show]Ancestors of Elizabeth Woodville

    Issue of Elizabeth Woodville

    By Sir John Grey

    Thomas Grey, Earl of Huntingdon, Marquess of Dorset and Lord Ferrers de Groby (1455 - 20 September 1501), married firstly Anne Holland, but she died young without issue; he married secondly on 18 July 1474, Cecily Bonville, suo jure Baroness Harington and Bonville, by whom he had fourteen children. The disputed queen Lady Jane Grey is a direct descendant from this line.[24]
    Richard Grey (1457 - 25 June 1483)

    By King Edward IV

    Elizabeth of York (11 February 1466 - 11 February 1503), Queen consort of England
    Mary of York (11 August 1467 - 23 May 1482), buried in St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle
    Cecily of York (20 March 1469 - 24 August 1507), Viscountess Welles
    Edward V of England (2 November 1470 - c. 1483), one of the Princes in the Tower
    Margaret of York (10 April 1472 - 11 December 1472), buried in Westminster Abbey
    Richard, Duke of York (17 August 1473 - c. 1483), one of the Princes in the Tower
    Anne of York (2 November 1475 - 23 November 1511), Lady Howard
    George, Duke of Bedford (March 1477 - March 1479), buried in St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle
    Catherine of York (14 August 1479 - 15 November 1527), Countess of Devon
    Bridget of York (10 November 1480 - 1517), nun at Dartford Priory, Kent

    In literature

    Non-fiction

    Elizabeth Woodville: Mother of the Princes in the Tower (2002) by David Baldwin
    Elizabeth Wydeville: The Slandered Queen (2005) by Arlene Okerlund
    Elizabeth Woodville (2013) by David MacGibbon
    Edward IV and Elizabeth Woodville: A True Romance" (2016) by Amy Licence
    Fiction[edit]
    Edward IV's love for his wife is celebrated in sonnet 75 of Philip Sidney's Astrophel and Stella.[25] (written by 1586, first pub. 1591). She is a character in Shakespeare's Henry VI Part 3 (written by 1592) and Richard III. (written approx. 1592)

    Novels that feature Elizabeth Woodville as a character include:

    The Last of the Barons by Edward Bulwer-Lytton Available online.
    Dickon (1929) by Marjorie Bowen.
    The Daughter of Time (1951), Josephine Tey's classic mystery.
    The White Rose (1969) by Jan Westcott.
    The King's Grey Mare (1972) by Rosemary Hawley Jarman, a fictionalised biography of Elizabeth Woodville.
    The Woodville Wench (published in US as The Queen Who Never Was) (1972) by Maureen Peters.
    The Four Queens (1977) (also known as The Royal Consorts (1978) or Queen's Ransom (1986)) by Anne Powers, which links Elizabeth Woodville's life with those of Margaret of Anjou, Anne Neville and Elizabeth of York.
    The Sunne in Splendour (1982) by Sharon Kay Penman.
    The Sun in Splendour (1982) by Jean Plaidy.
    A Secret Alchemy (2009) by Emma Darwin.
    The White Queen (2009) by Philippa Gregory, which borrows Rosemary Hawley Jarman's supernatural elements from The King's Grey Mare. Elizabeth Woodville also appears in other novels in Gregory's Cousins' War series.
    Das Spiel der Kèonige, a historical novel in German by Rebecca Gablâe.
    Bloodline (2015) and Ravenspur (2016), in the "War of Roses" series by Conn Iggulden
    Screen portrayals[edit]

    Film

    Richard III (1911): Woodville was played by Violet Farebrother
    Richard III (1912): Woodville was played by Carey Lee.
    In the French film, Les enfants d'âEdouard (1914), Woodville was played by Jeanne Delvair.
    Jane Shore (1915): Woodville was played by Maud Yates.
    Tower of London (1939): Woodville was played by Barbara O'Neil.
    Richard III (1955): Woodville was portrayed by Mary Kerridge.
    In the Hungarian TV movie III. Richâard (1973) Woodville was played by Rita Bâekâes.
    Richard III (1995): Woodville was played by Annette Bening, who is descended from Elizabeth Woodville via Elizabeth's daughter Cecily.[26][27]
    Looking For Richard (1996): Woodville was played by Penelope Allen.
    Richard III (2005): Woodville was played by Caroline Burns Cooke.
    Richard III (2008): Woodville was played by Marâia Conchita Alonso.

    Television

    An Age of Kings (1960): Woodville was portrayed by Jane Wenham.
    Wars of the Roses (1965): Woodville was played by Susan Engel.
    The Shadow of the Tower (1972): Woodville was played by Stephanie Bidmead
    The Third Part of Henry the Sixth and The Tragedy of Richard III (1983): Woodville was played by Rowena Cooper.
    The White Queen (2013): Woodville was portrayed by Rebecca Ferguson.
    The Hollow Crown, Henry VI and Richard III: Woodville is played by Keeley Hawes.
    Schools named after Elizabeth Woodville[edit]
    Elizabeth Woodville Primary School, Groby, Leicestershire (1971).[28]
    Elizabeth Woodville Secondary School, Northamptonshire (2011).[29]

    Notes

    Jump up ^ Although spelling of the family name is usually modernised to "Woodville", it was spelled "Wydeville" in contemporary publications by Caxton and her tomb at St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle is inscribed thus; "Edward IV and his Queen Elizabeth Widvile".
    Jump up ^ John's marriage to Isabel of Gloucester was annulled shortly after his accession, and she was never crowned; Henry IV's first wife Mary de Bohun died before he became king.
    Jump up ^ No record of Elizabeth's birth survives. However, her parents were pardoned for marrying without royal permission on 24 October 1437, and David Baldwin conjectures that the pardon may have coincided with the birth of Elizabeth Woodville, the couple's first-born child. See Baldwin, David, Elizabeth Woodville: The Mother of the Princes in the Tower
    Jump up ^ Henry Tudor's claim to the throne was weak due to a declaration of Henry IV that barred the accession to the throne of any heirs of the legitimised offspring of his father John of Gaunt by his third wife Katherine Swynford. The original act legitimizing the children of John of Gaunt and Katherine Swynford passed by Parliament and the bull issued by the Pope in the matter legitimised them fully, which made the legality of Henry IV's declaration questionable.

    References[edit]

    Jump up ^ Karen Lindsey, Divorced, Beheaded, Survived, xviii, Perseus Books, 1995
    Jump up ^ "Women in Medieval England". google.co.uk.
    Jump up ^ Baldwin, David, Elizabeth Woodville: Mother of the Princes in the Tower
    ^ Jump up to: a b c d e Hicks, Michael (2004). "Elizabeth (c.1437-1492)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/8634. Retrieved 25 September 2010 (subscription required)
    Jump up ^ Jane Bingham, The Cotswolds: A Cultural History, (Oxford University Press, 2009), 66
    Jump up ^ Robert Fabian, The New Chronicles of England and France, ed. Henry Ellis (London: Rivington, 1811), 654; "Hearne's Fragment of an Old Chronicle, from 1460-1470," The Chronicles of the White Rose of York. (London: James Bohn, 1845), 15-16.
    Jump up ^ Ralph A. Griffiths, "The Court during the Wars of the Roses". In Princes Patronage and the Nobility: The Court at the Beginning of the Modern Age, cc. 1450-1650. Edited by Ronald G. Asch and Adolf M. Birke. New York: Oxford University Press, 1991. ISBN 0-19-920502-7. 59-61.
    Jump up ^ Boutell, Charles (1863). "A Manual of Heraldry, Historical and Popular". London: Winsor & Newton: 277
    Jump up ^ Blazon of Woodville quoted from: [1], The House of York
    Jump up ^ Calendar of Patent Rolls, 1467-77, pg. 190.
    Jump up ^ Sutton and Visser-Fuchs, "A 'Most Benevolent Queen;'"Laynesmith, pp. 111, 118-19.
    Jump up ^ C. T. Wood, "Richard III, William, Lord Hastings and Friday the Thirteenth", in R. A. Griffiths and J. Sherborne (eds.), Kings and Nobles in the Later Middle Ages, New York, 1986, 156-61.
    Jump up ^ Charles Ross, Richard III, University of California Press, 1981 p81.
    Jump up ^ Philipe de Commines, The memoirs of Philip de Commines, lord of Argenton, Volume 1, H.G. Bohn, 1855, pp.396-7.
    Jump up ^ Genealogical Tables in Morgan, (1988), p. 709.
    Jump up ^ "Parliamentary Rolls Richard III". Rotuli Parliamentorum A.D. 1483 1 Richard III Cap XV.
    Jump up ^ Richard III and Yorkist History Server
    Jump up ^ "Rotuli Parliamentorum A.D. 1485 1 Henry VII - Annullment of Richard III's Titulus Regius".
    Jump up ^ "Rotuli Parliamentorum A.D. 1485 1 Henry VII - Restitution of Elizabeth Queen of Edward IV".
    Jump up ^ Arlene Okerlund, Elizabeth: England's Slandered Queen. Stroud: Tempus, 2006, 245.
    Jump up ^ Bennett, Michael, Lambert Simnel and the Battle of Stoke, New York, St. Martin's Press, 1987, pp.42; 51; Elston, Timothy, "Widowed Princess or Neglected Queen" in Levin & Bucholz (eds), Queens and Power in Medieval and Early Modern England, University of Nebraska Press, 2009, p.19.
    Jump up ^ "Margaret of Denmark Facts, information, pictures". Encyclopedia.com. Retrieved 5 September 2016.
    ^ Jump up to: a b J. L. Laynesmith, The Last Medieval Queens: English Queenship 1445-1503, Oxford University Press, New York, 2004, pp.127-8.
    Jump up ^ Richardson, Douglas (2011). Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, ed. Kimball G. Everingham II (2nd ed.). Salt Lake City. ISBN 1449966381, pp 304-7
    Jump up ^ "Astrophel and Stella: 75". utoronto.ca.
    Jump up ^ "Annette Carol Bening - Family tree Tim Dowling - Geneanet". geneanet.org.
    Jump up ^ "Cecily Plantagenet - Family tree Tim Dowling - Geneanet". geneanet.org.
    Jump up ^ "Elizabeth Woodville Primary School". Elizabethwoodvilleprimaryschool.co.uk. Retrieved 5 September 2016.
    Jump up ^ "The Elizabeth Woodville School". Ewsacademy.org. Retrieved 5 September 2016.

    Further reading

    David Baldwin, Elizabeth Woodville (Stroud, 2002) [2]
    Christine Carpenter, The Wars of the Roses (Cambridge, 1997) [3]
    Philippa Gregory, David Baldwin, Michael Jones, The Women of the Cousins' War (Simon & Schuster, 2011)
    Michael Hicks, Edward V (Stroud, 2003) [4]
    Rosemary Horrox, Richard III: A Study of Service (Cambridge, 1989) [5]
    J.L. Laynesmith, The Last Medieval Queens (Oxford, 2004) [6]
    A. R. Myers, Crown, Household and Parliament in Fifteenth-Century England (London and Ronceverte: Hambledon Press, 1985)
    Arlene Okerlund, Elizabeth Wydeville: The Slandered Queen (Stroud, 2005); Elizabeth: England's Slandered Queen (paper, Stroud, 2006) [7]
    Charles Ross, Edward IV (Berkeley, 1974) [8]
    George Smith, The Coronation of Elizabeth Wydeville (Gloucester: Gloucester Reprints, 1975; originally published 1935)
    Anne Sutton and Livia Visser-Fuchs, "'A Most Benevolent Queen': Queen Elizabeth Woodville's Reputation, Her Piety, and Her Books", The Ricardian, X:129, June 1995. PP. 214-245.

    end of record

    Elizabeth was called "the most beautiful woman in the Island of Britain" with "heavy-lidded eyes like those of a dragon."


    Queen Elizabeth's biography ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elizabeth_Woodville

    Issue of Elizabeth Woodville

    By Sir John Grey

    Thomas Grey, Earl of Huntingdon, Marquess of Dorset and Lord Ferrers de Groby (1455 – 20 September 1501), married firstly Anne Holland, but she died young without issue; he married secondly on 18 July 1474, Cecily Bonville, suo jure Baroness Harington and Bonville, by whom he had fourteen children. The disputed queen Lady Jane Grey is a direct descendant from this line.[24]
    Richard Grey (1457 – 25 June 1483)

    By King Edward IV

    Elizabeth of York (11 February 1466 – 11 February 1503), Queen consort of England
    Mary of York (11 August 1467 – 23 May 1482), buried in St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle
    Cecily of York (20 March 1469 – 24 August 1507), Viscountess Welles
    Edward V of England (2 November 1470 – c. 1483), one of the Princes in the Tower
    Margaret of York (10 April 1472 – 11 December 1472), buried in Westminster Abbey
    Richard, Duke of York (17 August 1473 – c. 1483), one of the Princes in the Tower
    Anne of York (2 November 1475 – 23 November 1511), Lady Howard
    George, Duke of Bedford (March 1477 – March 1479), buried in St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle
    Catherine of York (14 August 1479 – 15 November 1527), Countess of Devon
    Bridget of York (10 November 1480 – 1517), nun at Dartford Priory, Kent

    end of biography

    Elizabeth married John Grey, 1st Baron Grey of Groby ~ 1454. John (son of Edward Grey and Elizabeth de Ferrers, Baroness Gerrers of Groby) was born 0___ 1432, Groby, Leicestershire, England; died 17 Feb 1461, St. Albans, Hertfordshire, England. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. 9. Thomas Grey, KG, 1st Earl of Huntingdon  Descendancy chart to this point was born 0___ 1455, Groby, Leicestershire, England; died 20 Sep 1501, London, England.

    Elizabeth married Edward IV, King of England 1 May 1464, Grafton Regis, Northampton, England. Edward (son of Richard of York, 3rd Duke of York and Cecily Neville, Duchess of York) was born 28 Apr 1442, Rouen, Normandy, France; died 9 Apr 1483, Westminster Palace, Westminster, London, Middlesex, England; was buried St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle, Windsor, Berkshire, England. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. 10. Elizabeth of York, Queen of England  Descendancy chart to this point was born 11 Feb 1465, Westminster Palace, Westminster, London, Middlesex, England; died 11 Feb 1503, Tower Hill, London, England; was buried Westminster Abbey, 20 Deans Yd, London SW1P 3PA, United Kingdom.

  2. 6.  Anne Woodville, Viscountess Bourchier Descendancy chart to this point (4.Jacquetta4, 3.Margaret3, 2.Sueva2, 1.Nicola1) was born ~ 1438, Grafton Regis, Northampton, England; died 30 Jul 1489; was buried St. Leonard Churchyard, Warden, Bedfordshire, England.

    Notes:

    Anne Woodville, Viscountess Bourchier (c. 1438 – 30 July 1489) was an English noblewoman. She was a younger sister of Queen consort Elizabeth Woodville to whom she served as a lady-in-waiting. Anne was married twice;[1] first to William Bourchier, Viscount Bourchier, and secondly to George Grey, 2nd Earl of Kent. Anne was the grandmother of the disinherited adulteress Anne Bourchier, 7th Baroness Bourchier, and an ancestress of Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex.

    Family

    Anne was born in about 1439 at Grafton Regis, Northamptonshire, the second eldest daughter, and one of the fourteen children of Richard Woodville, 1st Earl Rivers and Jacquetta of Luxembourg. Her elder sister was Elizabeth Woodville who would become Queen consort of King Edward IV of England.

    Anne's paternal grandparents were Sir Richard Wydeville and Joan Bedlisgate, and her maternal grandparents were Peter I of Luxembourg, Count of Saint-Pol, Conversano and Brienne, and Margaret de Baux.

    In 1466, two years after her sister Elizabeth's secret marriage to King Edward, and one year after her coronation, Anne became one of Queen Elizabeth's ladies-in-waiting, receiving forty pounds a year for her services.[2]

    Marriages and issue

    Sometime before 15 August 1467, Anne married William Bourchier, Viscount Bourchier, the son and heir of Henry Bourchier, 1st Earl of Essex, and Isabel of York.

    Anne's was just one of the many advantageous marriages Queen Elizabeth shrewdly arranged for her numerous siblings with eligible scions of the most aristocratic families in the realm; a scheme which was done with the purpose of augmenting her family's power, prestige, and wealth. This blatantly ambitious, self-seeking policy of the Queen consort deeply antagonised the old nobility and House of Commons against the entire Woodville family.[3] One of the most formidable enemies of the Woodvilles was Richard Neville, 16th Earl of Warwick, a former Yorkist supporter who switched his allegiance to the Lancastrians following King Edward's marriage to Elizabeth. In 1469, Warwick ordered the execution of Anne's father, Earl Rivers and her brother, John. They had both been taken prisoner when the King's army was defeated by Warwick's forces at the Battle of Edgecote Moor.

    William and Anne received lands worth one hundred pounds a year.[4] Anne was briefly the owner of the manors of Nether Hall and Over Hall in the county of Suffolk. These had previously belonged to James Butler, 5th Earl of Ormond, a staunch supporter and favourite of Queen Margaret of Anjou. He was beheaded in 1461 following the crushing Lancastrian defeat at the Battle of Towton, and his properties were subsequently forfeited to the victorious Yorkist king, Edward IV.

    On 14 April 1471, William fought at the Battle of Barnet on the side of the Yorkists who won a decisive victory.

    Anne had three children by her first husband William:

    Henry Bourchier, 2nd Earl of Essex, 6th Baron Bourchier, Viscount Bourchier, 2nd Count of Eu (died 13 March 1540), married Mary Say, by whom he had one daughter, Anne Bourchier, suo jure 7th Baroness Bourchier who was the sole heiress to his titles and estates. She was the first wife of William Parr, 1st Marquess of Northampton whom she deserted to elope with her lover, thus creating a scandal which resulted in the forfeiture of her estates and most of her titles.
    Cecily Bourchier (died 1493), married John Devereux, 8th Baron Ferrers of Chartley, by whom she had a son, Walter Devereux, 1st Viscount Hereford, and a daughter, Anne Devereux. Robert Devereux, Earl of Essex (1565–1601) was a notable descendant of Walter who in his turn had married Mary Grey, the daughter of Thomas Grey, 1st Marquess of Dorset and Cecily Bonville.
    Isabel Bourchier (1477- after 1500), died unmarried.
    William died on 26 June 1480. Shortly afterwards, Anne married George Grey, son and heir of Edmund Grey, 1st Earl of Kent. As George did not succeed to the title of Earl of Kent until 1490, Anne was never styled Countess of Kent, due to her death in 1489.

    The marriage produced one son:

    Richard Grey, 3rd Earl of Kent (1481- 3 May 1524), he died heavily in debt, and without legitimate issue.

    Downfall of the Woodvilles

    In 1483, the Woodville family fortunes took a downward spiral with the death of King Edward IV in April. Anne's sister, Elizabeth, as the mother of the new young king Edward V, became the Queen Mother; however in June 1483 her marriage to the late King was judged to have been invalid because Edward had been pre-contacted to Lady Eleanor Talbot. King Edward IV's younger brother Richard, Duke of Gloucester and Lord Protector claimed the crown for himself on 22 June; this claim was supported by an Act of Parliament known as Titulus Regius which declared King Edward V and his siblings illegitimate. Elizabeth, now styled as Dame Grey, was forced to seek sanctuary with her daughters, while her two sons, the "Princes in the Tower" were kept in the Tower of London by the orders of King Richard III. On 25 June 1483, King Richard also ordered the executions of Anne and Elizabeth's brother Anthony Woodville, Earl Rivers, and Richard Grey who was Elizabeth's younger son by her first marriage to Sir John Grey of Groby.

    Death

    Anne Woodville, Viscountess Bourchier, died on 30 July 1489, at the age of about fifty-one years. Her death occurred almost four years after the Battle of Bosworth when King Richard was slain by Henry Tudor who married Anne's niece Elizabeth of York. Anne was buried in Warden, Bedfordshire.[5]

    A year after Anne's death, her husband George married secondly Catherine Herbert, daughter of William Herbert, 1st Earl of Pembroke and Anne Devereux, by whom he had four more children.

    *

    Anne married William Bourchier, Viscount Bourchier Bef 15 Aug 1467. William (son of Henry Bourchier, KG, 1st Earl of Essex and Isabel of York, Countess of Essex) was born Great Totham, Essex, England; died 26 Jun 1480. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. 11. Henry Bourchier, 2nd Earl of Essex  Descendancy chart to this point
    2. 12. Cecily Bourchier  Descendancy chart to this point was born (England); died 0___ 1493.

    Anne — George Grey, 2nd Earl of Kent. [Group Sheet]


  3. 7.  Mary Woodville, Countess of Pembroke Descendancy chart to this point (4.Jacquetta4, 3.Margaret3, 2.Sueva2, 1.Nicola1) was born ~ 1456; died 0___ 1481.

    Notes:

    Mary Woodville, Countess of Pembroke (c. 1456–1481) was a sister of Edward IV's Queen consort, Elizabeth Woodville, and of Anthony Woodville, 2nd Earl Rivers. She later became the first wife of William Herbert, 2nd Earl of Pembroke, by whom she had one daughter.

    Countess of Pembroke
    Born 1456
    Died 1481 (aged 24-25)
    Spouse(s) William Herbert, 2nd Earl of Pembroke
    Issue
    Elizabeth Herbert, 3rd Baroness Herbert
    Father Richard Woodville, 1st Earl Rivers
    Mother Jacquetta of Luxembourg

    Biography

    She was born in about 1456 to Richard Woodville, 1st Earl Rivers and his wife, Jacquetta of Luxembourg. After King Edward IV's public recognition of Elizabeth Woodville as his wife, the new queen sought to raise her family's standing by arranging a series of advantageous marriages for her five brothers and seven unwed sisters. In September 1466, Mary was betrothed to William Herbert, the eldest son and heir of the first Earl of Pembroke. Lord Herbert had been Henry VII's guardian. The young William was recognized as Lord Dunster in view of his approaching marriage (a grant of the lordship of Dunster and all the possessions of its attainted lord, James Luttrell, in Somerset, Devon and Suffolk, had been secured by his father in June 1463).

    In January 1467, Mary Woodville was married to Lord Dunster at St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle "amid profuse magnificence."[citation needed] The bride was about ten or eleven years old; her groom, aged fifteen.

    Two years later, Lord Dunster's father, the first Earl of Pembroke, was executed on the orders of Richard Neville, the Earl of Warwick. Nothing seems to have aggravated Warwick more than the marriage of the Lady Mary, the Queen's sister, to Herbert's eldest son. Dunster became the second Earl of Pembroke following the death of his father in 1469 and henceforth Mary was styled Countess of Pembroke.

    Pembroke proved rather ineffectual in governing South Wales. Mary's death in 1481 considerably weakened her husband's links with the Prince of Wales's associates, and he was forced to give up the earldom of Pembroke for that of Huntingdon, and a less valuable endowment in Somerset and Dorset. In 1484, he took as his second wife, Katherine Plantagenet, the illegitimate daughter of King Richard III; however, this marriage failed to produce offspring.

    Ultimately, Herbert only had one child, a daughter by his first marriage, Elizabeth Herbert, 3rd Baroness Herbert, who later married Charles Somerset, later Earl of Worcester. Elizabeth was of great importance to the Somerset family, as she brought to them wealth and a legitimate relationship to royalty.[citation needed] The barony of Herbert was created by patent in favour of her husband, although during her lifetime she held the barony of Herbert in her own right.

    Mary married William Herbert, 2nd Earl of Pembroke 0Jan 1467, St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle, Windsor, Berkshire, England. William (son of William Herbert, 1st Earl of Pembroke and Anne Devereux) was born 5 Mar 1451; died 0___ 1490. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. 13. Elizabeth Herbert, 3rd Baroness Herbert  Descendancy chart to this point was born ~ 1476; died 27 Aug 1507; was buried St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle, Windsor, Berkshire, England.

  4. 8.  Katherine Woodville, Duchess of Buckingham Descendancy chart to this point (4.Jacquetta4, 3.Margaret3, 2.Sueva2, 1.Nicola1) was born ~ 1458, (Maidstone, Kent, England); died 18 May 1497.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Catherine
    • Also Known As: Duchess Bedford

    Notes:

    Catherine Woodville (or Wydeville; c. 1458[1] – 18 May 1497[2]) was an English medieval noblewoman. She was the sister-in-law of King Edward IV of England and gave birth to several illustrious children. Catherine was the daughter of Richard Woodville, 1st Earl Rivers, and Jacquetta of Luxembourg. When her sister Elizabeth married King Edward IV, the King elevated and promoted many members of the Woodville family. Elizabeth Woodville's household records for 1466/67 indicate that Catherine was being raised in the queen's household.

    Sometime before the coronation of Elizabeth in May 1465, Catherine was married to Henry Stafford, 2nd Duke of Buckingham; both were still children. A contemporary description of Elizabeth Woodville's coronation relates that Catherine and her husband were carried on squires' shoulders due to their youth. According to Dominic Mancini, Buckingham resented his marriage to a woman of inferior birth. However, the couple had four children:

    Edward Stafford, 3rd Duke of Buckingham (3 February 1478 – 17 May 1521)
    Elizabeth Stafford, Countess of Sussex (ca. 1479 – 11 May 1532)
    Henry Stafford, 1st Earl of Wiltshire (c. 1479 – 6 April 1523)
    Anne Stafford, Countess of Huntingdon (c. 1483–1544)
    In 1483, Buckingham first allied himself to the Richard, Duke of Gloucester, helping him succeed to the throne as Richard III, and then to Henry Tudor, leading an unsuccessful rebellion in his name. Buckingham was executed for treason on 2 November 1483.

    After Richard III was defeated by Henry Tudor at Bosworth in 1485, Catherine married the new king's uncle Jasper Tudor on 7 November 1485.

    After Jasper's death in 1495 - not later than 24 February 1496,[3] - Catherine married Richard Wingfield, who outlived her.

    Depiction in fiction

    Catherine is the main protagonist in Susan Higginbotham's 2010 historical novel The Stolen Crown. She is briefly mentioned in Philippa Gregory's historical novels The White Queen (2009), The Red Queen (2010), and The White Princess (2013).

    end of biography

    Catherine Woodville was born in 1458. She died on 18 May 1497. She married Henry Stafford, son of Humphrey Stafford and Margaret Beaufort (a different Margaret Beaufort than the mother of Henry VII). Henry Stafford was born on 04 Sep 1455. He was executed for treason by Richard III on 02 Nov 1483.

    Catherine Woodville and Henry Stafford had four children, two sons and two daughters.

    Catherine Woodville then married Jasper Tudor, son of Owen Tudor and Catherine of Valois (and half-brother to Henry VI).

    She then married Richard Wingfield, son of John Wingfield and Elizabeth FitzLewis. He died on 22 Jul 1525.

    end of biography

    Katherine — Henry Stafford, 2nd Duke of Buckingham. Henry (son of Humphrey Stafford, Earl of Stafford and Margaret Beaufort, Countess of Stafford) was born 4 Sep 1455, Abergavenny, Monmouthshire, Wales; died 2 Nov 1483, Salisbury, Wiltshire, England. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. 14. Anne Stafford, Countess of Huntingdon  Descendancy chart to this point was born ~ 1483; died 0___ 1544; was buried Stoke Poges, Buckinghamshire, England.

    Katherine — Jasper Tudor, 1st Duke of Bedford. Jasper (son of Owen Tudor and Catherine of Valois, Queen consort of England) was born 0Nov 1431, Hatfield, Hertfordshire, England; died 21 Dec 1495, Thornbury Castle, Gloucestershire, England; was buried Keynsham Abbey, Somerset, England. [Group Sheet]

    Katherine married Richard Wingfield (England). Richard (son of John Wingfield and Elizabeth FitzLewis) was born (England); died 22 Jul 1525, (England). [Group Sheet]



Generation: 6

  1. 9.  Thomas Grey, KG, 1st Earl of HuntingdonThomas Grey, KG, 1st Earl of Huntingdon Descendancy chart to this point (5.Elizabeth5, 4.Jacquetta4, 3.Margaret3, 2.Sueva2, 1.Nicola1) was born 0___ 1455, Groby, Leicestershire, England; died 20 Sep 1501, London, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: 1st Marquess of Dorset
    • Also Known As: 7th Baron Ferrers of Groby
    • Also Known As: Lord Astley
    • Also Known As: Lord Ferrers de Groby
    • Also Known As: Lord Harington and Bonville
    • Alt Birth: 22 Jun 1457

    Notes:

    Thomas Grey, 1st Marquess of Dorset, 1st Earl of Huntingdon and 7th Baron Ferrers of Groby KG (1455 – 20 September 1501),[1][2] was an English nobleman, courtier and the eldest son of Elizabeth Woodville and her first husband Sir John Grey of Groby. Her second marriage to King Edward IV made her queen consort of England, thus elevating Grey's status at court and in the realm as the stepson of the King.[3] Through his mother's assiduous endeavours, he made two materially advantageous marriages to wealthy heiresses - his first wife being Anne Holland (daughter of the King's sister, Anne of York, Duchess of Exeter), and his second wife, Cecily Bonville, 7th Baroness Harington. By the latter he had 14 children.

    Family

    Thomas Grey was born in 1455 close to Westminster on the north bank of the Thames. He was the elder son of Sir John Grey and his wife Elizabeth Woodville, who later became queen consort to Edward IV of England. His younger full brother, Sir Richard Grey (1457-1483), was arrested by Richard, Duke of Gloucester on 30 April 1483, after being accused of plotting to take the throne. Gloucester's forces later executed Richard Grey at Pontefract Castle. The Grey brothers had ten half-siblings by their mother's marriage to Edward IV.

    Career

    His mother endeavoured to improve his estates by the conventional methods of their class and time, through his marriages and purchase of wardships.

    On the death of his stepfather, Edward IV, and his 12-year-old half-brother, Edward V's, accession to the throne on 9 April 1483, Grey proved unable to maintain his family's position. It was not possible to arrange a Woodville regency. Internal fighting, particularly the long-established battle for ascendancy in Leicestershire between the Grey and Hastings families, now on the national stage, allowed Gloucester to seize power and usurp the throne. On 25 June 1483, an assembly of Parliament declared Richard III to be the legitimate king, and Thomas's uncle and brother, Anthony Woodville, 2nd Earl Rivers and Richard Grey respectively, were executed. Later in the summer, learning of the apparent murder of both his young half-brothers, Grey joined the Duke of Buckingham's rebellion against Richard III. When the rebellion failed he fled to Brittany to join Henry Tudor, the future Henry VII, who pledged to marry Grey's half-sister Elizabeth of York and heal the Yorkist/Lancastrian division.

    However, just before Henry and the Lancastrian army left to launch their ultimately successful invasion of England in August 1485, Grey heard rumours from England that his mother had come to terms with Richard III, and he was persuaded to desert Henry Tudor. He was intercepted at Compiáegne on his way to England, and played no part in the invasion or subsequent overthrow of Richard III. Grey was instead confined to Paris, as security for the repayment of a loan made to Henry Tudor by the French government, unable to return home until Henry VII was safely installed as king of England.

    Thereafter Henry VII took good care to keep his Queen's half-brother under control and Grey was not permitted to recover his former influence. Thomas Grey was confined in the Tower in 1487 during Lambert Simnel's rising and not released until after the House of Tudor victory in the Battle of Stoke Field. Though he accompanied the King on his expedition to France in 1492, he was obliged to commit himself in writing to ensure he did not commit treason. He was permitted to assist in suppression of the Cornish rising in 1497.

    Thomas Grey, Marquess of Dorset, died in London on 20 September 1501, aged about 48, and was buried in the collegiate church of Astley, Warwickshire. His wife survived him and married Grey's cousin, Henry Stafford, later Earl of Wiltshire.

    Marriages and issue

    His mother sought to make provision for him by marriage to wealthy heiresses. He married firstly, at Greenwich in October 1466, Lady Anne Holland (1461[4]-c.1474), the only daughter of Henry Holland, 3rd Duke of Exeter, and Anne of York. His mother-in-law was the second child and eldest surviving daughter of Richard Plantagenet, 3rd Duke of York, and Cecily Neville, thus sister to his mother's second husband King Edward IV.

    After Anne Holland died young without issue, Thomas married secondly, by papal dispensation 5 September 1474,[5] Cecily Bonville, 7th Baroness Harington of Aldingham and 2nd Baroness Bonville, the wealthiest heiress in England.[6] Cecily Bonville, born in 1461, was the daughter and heiress of William Bonville, 6th Baron Harington, by his wife Katherine Neville, daughter of Richard Neville, 5th Earl of Salisbury.[5] Katherine was sister to the late Earl of Warwick and thus aunt to his daughters.

    By his second wife Grey had seven sons and seven daughters:[5]

    Lord Edward Grey, eldest son and heir, who predeceased his father, and was buried in the church of St Clement Danes, London. He married Anne (nâee Jerningham), daughter of Sir Edward Jerningham (d. 6 January 1515) of Somerleyton, Suffolk, by Margaret Bedingfield (d. 24 March 1504), by whom he had no issue. After his death she remarried four times, firstly to a husband surnamed Berkeley; secondly to Henry Barley (d. 12 November 1529) of Albury, Hertfordshire;[7] thirdly to Sir Robert Drury; and fourthly to Sir Edmund Walsingham.[8][9][10][11][3][12]

    Anthony Grey, who predeceased his father.

    Thomas Grey, 2nd Marquess of Dorset (22 June 1477 – 22 June 1530), who married firstly Eleanor St John, by whom he had no issue, and secondly Margaret Wotton, widow of William Medley, esquire, and daughter of Sir Robert Wotton by Anne Belknap, daughter of Henry Belknap esquire, by whom he had four sons, including Henry Grey, 1st Duke of Suffolk, father of Lady Jane Grey, and four daughters.[13]

    Sir Richard Grey, who married Florence Pudsey. He is mentioned in the will of his brother, Sir John Grey.[5][14]

    Sir John Grey, who married firstly Elizabeth Catesby, widow of Roger Wake (d. 16 May 1504) of Blisworth, Northamptonshire, and daughter of Sir William Catesby, and secondly Anne Barley or Barlee (d. 1557 or 1558), widow of Sir Robert Sheffield of Butterwick, Lincolnshire, Speaker of the House of Commons. Grey apparently had no issue by either of his wives, as his will dated 3 March 1523 makes no mention of children. After Grey's death his widow, Anne, married Sir Richard Clement of Ightham Mote, Kent.[15][16]

    Leonard Grey, 1st Viscount Grane (c.1490 – 28 June 1541),[17] According to Richardson, Grey married firstly Elizabeth Arundel, widow of Sir Giles Daubeney, and secondly Eleanor Sutton, daughter of Edward Sutton, 2nd Baron Dudley by Cecily Willoughby, daughter and coheiress of Sir William Willoughby; however according to Lyons it is unclear whether Grey ever married.[15][18][19] He is mentioned in the will of his brother, Sir John Grey.[14] He served as Lord Lieutenant of Ireland.

    George Grey, in holy orders. He is mentioned in the will of his brother, Sir John Grey.[5][14]

    Cecily Grey (d. 28 April 1554),[citation needed] who married John Sutton, 3rd Baron Dudley.[15]

    Bridget Grey,[5] believed to have died young.

    Dorothy Grey (1480–1552),[citation needed] who married firstly Robert Willoughby, 2nd Baron Willoughby de Broke, by whom she had issue, and secondly William Blount, 4th Baron Mountjoy.[15]

    Elizabeth Grey, who married Gerald FitzGerald, 9th Earl of Kildare.[5]

    Margaret Grey, who married Richard Wake, esquire,[5] She is mentioned, as 'Margaret Grey', in the will of her brother, Sir John Grey.[5][14]

    Eleanor Grey (or "Elizabeth"[20]) Grey (d. by December 1503) who married, as his first wife, Sir John Arundell (1474–1545) of Lanherne, Cornwall, Receiver General of the Duchy of Cornwall and "the most important man in the county",[21] by whom she was the mother of two sons and a daughter:

    Sir John Arundell (c.1500 – 1557), eldest son and heir, MP for Cornwall in 1554;

    Thomas Arundell, MP for Dorset, of Wardour Castle, who married Margaret Howard, daughter and coheiress of Lord Edmund Howard, and sister of Catherine Howard, fifth wife of King Henry VIII;

    Elizabeth Arundel, who married Sir Richard Edgecombe;[22][15]

    Mary Grey (1493 – 22 February 1538),[citation needed] who married Walter Devereux, 1st Viscount Hereford.[5]

    Titles

    Lord Astley, 1461–, inherited on the death of his father
    Earl of Huntingdon, 1471–1475, created for him but after acquiring the next it was surrendered to the King so the King might be able to give it to the Earl of Pembroke whose title the King wanted for his own son
    Lord Harington and Bonville in right of his (second) wife, 1474, his wife being unable to sit in Parliament
    Marquess of Dorset, 1475–, created for Thomas Grey 14 May 1475 (Whitsunday) in place of the re-possessed earldom of Huntingdon
    Lord Ferrers of Groby, 1483–, inherited on the death of his grandmother Elizabeth Ferrers.
    Attainted 1484 following the bid to oust Richard III

    After reversal of his attainder by Henry VII, styled himself marquess of Dorset, lord Ferrers of Groby, Bonville, and Harington

    *

    Birth:
    in Groby Old Hall

    Thomas married Cecily Bonville, 7th Baroness Harington 5 Sep 1474. Cecily (daughter of William Bonville, 6th Baron Harington and Katherine Neville, 2nd Baroness Hastings) was born 30 Jun 1460, Axminster, Devon, England; died 12 May 1529; was buried Collegiate Church of St. Mary the Virgin, Astley, Warwickshire, England. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. 15. Thomas Grey, 2nd Marquess of Dorset  Descendancy chart to this point was born 22 Jun 1477, (Groby, Leicestershire, England); died 22 Jun 1530.
    2. 16. Dorothy Grey  Descendancy chart to this point was born 0___ 1480, (Groby, Leicestershire, England); died Aft 4 Apr 1552, Groby, Leicestershire, England.
    3. 17. Mary Grey  Descendancy chart to this point was born 0___ 1491, (Groby, Leicestershire, England); died 22 Feb 1538.

  2. 10.  Elizabeth of York, Queen of EnglandElizabeth of York, Queen of England Descendancy chart to this point (5.Elizabeth5, 4.Jacquetta4, 3.Margaret3, 2.Sueva2, 1.Nicola1) was born 11 Feb 1465, Westminster Palace, Westminster, London, Middlesex, England; died 11 Feb 1503, Tower Hill, London, England; was buried Westminster Abbey, 20 Deans Yd, London SW1P 3PA, United Kingdom.

    Notes:

    Elizabeth of York (11 February 1466 – 11 February 1503) was queen consort of England from 1486 until her death. As the wife of Henry VII, she was the first Tudor queen. She was the daughter of Edward IV, niece of Richard III and married the king following Henry's victory at the Battle of Bosworth which ended the Wars of the Roses. She was the mother of Henry VIII.

    The period between her father's death in 1483, when she was 17, and her marriage in 1486 was a violent and anxious interlude in what was mostly a peaceful life. Her two brothers, the "Princes in the Tower" disappeared, presumably murdered by her uncle, Richard III of England, who also executed most of her male relations on her mother's side. As a Yorkist princess, the final victory of the Lancastrian faction in the War of the Roses may have seemed a further disaster, but Henry Tudor was keen to heal wounds and had already promised to marry her before he invaded; this was an important move that gained him Yorkist support.

    Her marriage seems to be a successful one, though her eldest son Arthur, Prince of Wales died at 15 in 1502, and three other children died young. She seems to have played little part in politics. Her surviving children became a King of England, and queens of France and Scotland; it is through the Scottish Stuart dynasty that her many modern royal descendents trace their descent from her.

    Read more: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elizabeth_of_York

    Elizabeth married Henry VII, King of England 18 Jan 1485, Westminster Abbey, 20 Deans Yd, London SW1P 3PA, United Kingdom. Henry (son of Edmund Tudor, 1st Earl of Richmond and Margaret Beaufort, Countess of Richmond and Derby) was born 28 Jan 1457, Pembroke Castle, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales; died 22 Apr 1509, Shere, Surrey, England; was buried Westminster Abbey, 20 Deans Yd, London SW1P 3PA, United Kingdom. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. 18. Margaret Tudor, Queen of Scots  Descendancy chart to this point was born 28 Nov 1489, Westminster Palace, Westminster, London, Middlesex, England; died 18 Oct 1541, Methven Castle, Perthshire, Kingdom of Scotland; was buried Priory of St John, Perthshire, Kingdom of Scotland.
    2. 19. Henry VIII, King of England  Descendancy chart to this point was born 28 Jun 1491, Greenwich Palace, Greenwich, England; was christened Observant Friars, Greenwich, Kent, England; died 28 Jan 1547, Palace of Whitehall, Wesminster, England; was buried 16 Feb 1547, Saint Georges Church, Windsor, Berkshire, England.
    3. 20. Mary Tudor  Descendancy chart to this point was born 18 Mar 1496, Richmond Palace, London, England; died 25 Jun 1533, Westhorpe Hall, Westhorpe, Suffolk, Kingdom of England; was buried St. Mary's Church, Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk, Kingdom of England.

  3. 11.  Henry Bourchier, 2nd Earl of Essex Descendancy chart to this point (6.Anne5, 4.Jacquetta4, 3.Margaret3, 2.Sueva2, 1.Nicola1)

  4. 12.  Cecily Bourchier Descendancy chart to this point (6.Anne5, 4.Jacquetta4, 3.Margaret3, 2.Sueva2, 1.Nicola1) was born (England); died 0___ 1493.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Cicely

    Cecily — John Devereux, 8th Baron Ferrers of Chartley. John (son of Walter Devereux, KG, 7th Baron Ferrers of Chartley and Anne de Ferrers, 7th Baroness Ferrers of Chartley) was born 0___ 1463, Chartley, Staffordshire, England; died 3 May 1501. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. 21. Walter Devereux, 1st Viscount Hereford  Descendancy chart to this point was born 0___ 1488, Chartley, Staffordshire, England; died 17 Sep 1558, Chartley, Staffordshire, England; was buried Stowe Church, Chartley, Staffordshire, England.

  5. 13.  Elizabeth Herbert, 3rd Baroness Herbert Descendancy chart to this point (7.Mary5, 4.Jacquetta4, 3.Margaret3, 2.Sueva2, 1.Nicola1) was born ~ 1476; died 27 Aug 1507; was buried St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle, Windsor, Berkshire, England.

    Notes:

    Elizabeth Herbert, 3rd Baroness Herbert (c. 1476 – 27 August 1507) was the sole heir and daughter of William Herbert, 2nd Earl of Pembroke, and his first wife, Mary Woodville.

    Her father died in 1490, and she inherited extensive lands in Wales. As her father had no sons, she succeeded to his barony, but could not succeed to the earldom, which was restricted to the male line. She was made a ward of King Henry VII of England, and married Charles Somerset, 1st Earl of Worcester on 2 June 1492. Their only son, Henry, was born in around 1496. In 1504, Somerset was created Baron Herbert.

    Elizabeth died on 27 August 1507, and was buried in St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle. The following month, further estates, including the lease of Caldicot Castle, devolved on Elizabeth's husband on the death of her uncle, Sir Walter Herbert. The addition of Herbert's estate made Somerset the most powerful landowner in South Wales. He had married for a second time by 1511, and was made Earl of Worcester in 1514.

    Born c. 1476
    Died 27 August 1507
    Spouse(s) Charles Somerset, 1st Earl of Worcester
    Issue
    Henry Somerset, 2nd Earl of Worcester
    Elizabeth Somerset
    Father William Herbert, 2nd Earl of Pembroke
    Mother Mary Woodville

    Elizabeth — Charles Somerset, 1st Earl of Worchester. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. 22. Henry Somerset, 2nd Earl of Worcester  Descendancy chart to this point was born ~ 1496, (England); died 26 Nov 1549, (England).
    2. 23. Elizabeth Somerset  Descendancy chart to this point

  6. 14.  Anne Stafford, Countess of HuntingdonAnne Stafford, Countess of Huntingdon Descendancy chart to this point (8.Katherine5, 4.Jacquetta4, 3.Margaret3, 2.Sueva2, 1.Nicola1) was born ~ 1483; died 0___ 1544; was buried Stoke Poges, Buckinghamshire, England.

    Notes:

    Anne Hastings, Countess of Huntingdon (nâee Lady Anne Stafford) (c. 1483–1544) was the daughter of Henry Stafford, 2nd Duke of Buckingham, and Lady Katherine Woodville. She was the wife of Sir Walter Herbert, and George Hastings, 1st Earl of Huntingdon, and served in the household of King Henry VIII's daughter, Princess Mary, the future Queen Mary I.

    Family

    Lady Anne Stafford, born around 1483, the year her father was executed for treason by order of King Richard III, was the daughter of Henry Stafford, 2nd Duke of Buckingham, and Katherine Woodville, sister to Elizabeth Woodville, queen consort of King Edward IV.[1]

    By her father's marriage to Katherine Woodville, Anne Stafford had two brothers, Edward Stafford, 3rd Duke of Buckingham,[2] and Henry Stafford, 1st Earl of Wiltshire, and a sister, Elizabeth, who married Robert Radcliffe, 1st Earl of Sussex.[3]

    After the execution of the 2nd Duke of Buckingham, his widow, Katherine Woodville, married Jasper Tudor, uncle of King Henry VII. Katherine Woodville died on 18 May 1497. Her mother cared for Anne until her marriage in 1503.[citation needed]

    When Anne's first husband, Sir Walter Herbert, died in 1507, Anne, then only 20 years of age, turned over control of her jointure, which included Raglan Castle in Wales, to her brother, Edward Stafford, 3rd Duke of Buckingham. Anne resided in her brother's household at Thornbury until her second marriage to George Hastings in 1509.[4]

    In 1510, shortly after her second marriage, Anne was the subject of scandal when her brother, Edward Stafford, 3rd Duke of Buckingham, after hearing rumours concerning Anne and Sir William Compton, found Compton in Anne's room. Compton was forced to take the sacrament to prove that he and Anne had not committed adultery, and Anne's husband, the Earl of Huntingdon, sent Anne away to a convent 60 miles distant from the court. There is no extant evidence establishing that Anne and Sir William Compton were guilty of adultery. However, in 1523 Compton took the unusual step of bequeathing land to Anne in his will, and directing his executors to include her in the prayers for his kin for which he had made provision in his will.[5]

    Despite this scandal, Anne and her second husband, the Earl of Huntingdon, appear to have enjoyed a close and loving relationship, as evidenced by a letter written to Anne by the Earl in 1525 which has been described as 'one of the most affectionate and charming letters of the period'.[6]

    Marriages and issue

    Anne Stafford married firstly, in 1503,[citation needed] Sir Walter Herbert (d. 16 September 1507),[7] an illegitimate[8] son of William Herbert, 1st Earl of Pembroke.[9] The marriage was childless.

    She married secondly, in December 1509,[citation needed] George Hastings, 1st Earl of Huntingdon. They had five sons and three daughters:[10]

    Francis Hastings, 2nd Earl of Huntingdon, who married Katherine Pole (d. 23 September 1576), elder daughter of Henry Pole, 1st Baron Montagu, and by her had six sons, including Henry Hastings, 3rd Earl of Huntingdon, and George Hastings, 4th Earl of Huntingdon, and five daughters, including Frances, wife of Henry Compton, 1st Baron Compton.[11]
    Sir Thomas Hastings, who married, before October 1553, Winifred Pole (d. 22 February 1602), daughter of Henry Pole, 1st Baron Montagu, and Jane Neville, daughter of George Neville, 4th Baron Bergavenny. There were no issue of the marriage. After Sir Thomas Hastings' death, Winifred Pole married Sir Thomas Barrington (d.1581).[12]
    Edward Hastings, 1st Baron Hastings of Loughborough.
    Henry Hastings.
    William Hastings.
    Lady Dorothy Hastings, who married Sir Richard Devereux (d.1548), second son of Walter Devereux, 1st Viscount Hereford, and Mary Grey, the daughter of Thomas Grey, 1st Marquess of Dorset. The eldest son of Walter Devereux, 1st Viscount Hereford, predeceased him, as did his second son, Sir Richard Devereux (d.1548). However Sir Richard Devereux and Dorothy Hastings had a son, Walter Devereux, 1st Earl of Essex, who was his grandfather's heir.[13]
    Lady Mary Hastings, who married Thomas Berkeley, 6th Baron Berkeley.[14]
    Lady Katherine Hastings.

    *

    Anne married George Hastings, Knight, 1st Earl of Huntingdon 0Dec 1509. George (son of Edward Hastings, 2nd Baron Hastings and Mary Hungerford, 4th Baroness Hungerford) was born 0___ 1488, Ashby-de-La-Zouch, Leicestershire, England; died 24 Mar 1544. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. 24. Dorothy Hastings  Descendancy chart to this point was born (Leicestershire, England).


Generation: 7

  1. 15.  Thomas Grey, 2nd Marquess of Dorset Descendancy chart to this point (9.Thomas6, 5.Elizabeth5, 4.Jacquetta4, 3.Margaret3, 2.Sueva2, 1.Nicola1) was born 22 Jun 1477, (Groby, Leicestershire, England); died 22 Jun 1530.

    Thomas — Margaret Wotton, Marchioness of Dorset. Margaret (daughter of Richard Wotton and Anne Belknap) was born 1487, Boughton Malherbe, Kent, England; died 1541. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. 25. Henry Grey, 1st Duke of Suffolk  Descendancy chart to this point was born 17 Jan 1517; died 23 Feb 1554, Tower Hill, London, England.

  2. 16.  Dorothy Grey Descendancy chart to this point (9.Thomas6, 5.Elizabeth5, 4.Jacquetta4, 3.Margaret3, 2.Sueva2, 1.Nicola1) was born 0___ 1480, (Groby, Leicestershire, England); died Aft 4 Apr 1552, Groby, Leicestershire, England.

    Dorothy — Robert Willoughby. (son of Robert Willoughby, Knight and Blanche Champernon) [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. 26. Anne Willoughby  Descendancy chart to this point was born Aft 1514; died ~ 1545.

  3. 17.  Mary Grey Descendancy chart to this point (9.Thomas6, 5.Elizabeth5, 4.Jacquetta4, 3.Margaret3, 2.Sueva2, 1.Nicola1) was born 0___ 1491, (Groby, Leicestershire, England); died 22 Feb 1538.

    Mary married Walter Devereux, 1st Viscount Hereford Bef 15 Dec 1503. Walter (son of John Devereux, 8th Baron Ferrers of Chartley and Cecily Bourchier) was born 0___ 1488, Chartley, Staffordshire, England; died 17 Sep 1558, Chartley, Staffordshire, England; was buried Stowe Church, Chartley, Staffordshire, England. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. 27. Richard Devereux, Knight  Descendancy chart to this point was born ~ 1513; died 13 Oct 1547; was buried London, Middlesex, England.

  4. 18.  Margaret Tudor, Queen of ScotsMargaret Tudor, Queen of Scots Descendancy chart to this point (10.Elizabeth6, 5.Elizabeth5, 4.Jacquetta4, 3.Margaret3, 2.Sueva2, 1.Nicola1) was born 28 Nov 1489, Westminster Palace, Westminster, London, Middlesex, England; died 18 Oct 1541, Methven Castle, Perthshire, Kingdom of Scotland; was buried Priory of St John, Perthshire, Kingdom of Scotland.

    Other Events:

    • Baptism: St. Margaret's Church, Westminster, London, England

    Notes:

    Margaret Tudor (28 November 1489 - 18 October 1541) was Queen of Scots from 1503 until 1513 as the wife of King James IV of Scotland and then Regent for their son King James V.

    She was born at Westminster Palace as the elder surviving daughter of King Henry VII of England and Elizabeth of York. As Queen Dowager (Queen Mother) she married Archibald Douglas, 6th Earl of Angus.

    Through her first and second marriages, respectively, Margaret was the grandmother of both Mary, Queen of Scots, and Mary's second husband, Lord Darnley.

    Margaret's marriage to James IV foreshadowed the Union of the Crowns – their great-grandson, King James VI of Scotland, the child of Mary and Darnley, became King James I of England and Ireland on the death of Margaret's fraternal niece, Queen Elizabeth I of England in 1603.

    Read more: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Margaret_Tudor

    Margaret — James IV of Scotland, King of Scots. James (son of James III of Scotland, King of Scots and Margaret of Denmark) was born 17 Mar 1473, Stirling Castle, Stirling, Stirlingshire, Scotland; died 9 Sep 1513, Battle of Flodden, Northumberland, England. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. 28. James of Scotland, V, King of Scots  Descendancy chart to this point was born 10 Apr 1512, Linlithgow Palace, Linlithgow, Scotland; died 14 Dec 1542, Falkland Palace, Fife, Scotland.

  5. 19.  Henry VIII, King of EnglandHenry VIII, King of England Descendancy chart to this point (10.Elizabeth6, 5.Elizabeth5, 4.Jacquetta4, 3.Margaret3, 2.Sueva2, 1.Nicola1) was born 28 Jun 1491, Greenwich Palace, Greenwich, England; was christened Observant Friars, Greenwich, Kent, England; died 28 Jan 1547, Palace of Whitehall, Wesminster, England; was buried 16 Feb 1547, Saint Georges Church, Windsor, Berkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Henry VIII, King of England

    Notes:

    Besides his six marriages, Henry VIII is known for his role in the separation of the Church of England from the Roman Catholic Church.

    His disagreements with the Pope led to his separation of the Church of England from papal authority, with himself, as king, as the Supreme Head of the Church of England and to the Dissolution of the Monasteries. Because his principal dispute was with papal authority, rather than with doctrinal matters, he remained a believer in core Catholic theological teachings despite his excommunication from the Roman Catholic Church.

    Henry oversaw the legal union of England and Wales with the Laws in Wales Acts 1535 and 1542. He is also well known for a long personal rivalry with both Francis I of France and the Habsburg monarch Emperor Charles V of the Holy Roman Empire (King Charles I of Spain), his contemporaries with whom he frequently warred.

    Biography, more photos & history, go to: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_VIII_of_England


    Henry VIII is related to the grandchildren of Vernia Elvira Swindell "Ma" Byars:

    http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=I824&secondpersonID=&maxrels=6&disallowspouses=0&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I42420

    The Six Wives of Henry VIII.

    Five of whom are cousins several times over to the grandchildren of Vernia Elvira Swindell "Ma" Byars. I've based the relationships on cousins Deawn and Karen's lineages as some of us have additional relationships to Henry VIII through other lines;

    1. Catherine of Aragon:

    http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=I824&secondpersonID=&maxrels=6&disallowspouses=0&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I47340


    2. Ann Boleyn:

    http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=I824&secondpersonID=&maxrels=6&disallowspouses=0&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I42403


    3. Jane Seymour:

    http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=I824&secondpersonID=&maxrels=6&disallowspouses=0&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I26607


    4. Anne Cleves

    5. Catherine Howard:

    http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=I824&secondpersonID=&maxrels=6&disallowspouses=0&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I10250


    6. Catherine Parr:

    http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=I824&secondpersonID=&maxrels=6&disallowspouses=0&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I47340

    Birth:
    aka "Palace of Placentia"...

    Henry — Catherine of Aragon, Queen of England. Catherine (daughter of Ferdinand II of Aragon and Isabella I of Castile) was born 16 Dec 1485, Castile, Spain; died 7 Jan 1536, Kimbolton Castle, England; was buried Peterborough Cathedral, Peterborough, England. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. 29. Mary I, Queen of England & Ireland  Descendancy chart to this point was born 18 Feb 1516, Greenwich Palace, Greenwich, England; died 17 Nov 1558, St James's Palace, London, England; was buried Westminster Abbey, 20 Deans Yd, London SW1P 3PA, United Kingdom.

    Henry — Anne Boleyn, Queen of England. Anne (daughter of Thomas Boleyn, 1st Earl of Wiltshire and Elizabeth Howard, Countess of Wiltshire) was born 0___ 1501, Blickling Hall, Blickling, Norfolk, England; died 19 May 1536, Tower Hill, London, England. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. 30. Elizabeth I, Queen of England  Descendancy chart to this point was born 7 Sep 1533, Greenwich Palace, Greenwich, England; died 24 Mar 1603, Richmond Palace, London, England; was buried 28 Apr 1603, Westminster Abbey, 20 Deans Yd, London SW1P 3PA, United Kingdom.

    Henry married Jane Seymour, Queen of England 30 May 1536, Whitehall, Westminster, England. Jane (daughter of John Seymour, IV, Knight and Margery Wentworth) was born 1517-1518, Wolf Hall, Burbage, Wiltshire, England; died 24 Oct 1537, Hampton Court, Middlesex, England; was buried 12 Nov 1537, Saint Georges Church, Windsor, Berkshire, England. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. 31. Edward VI, King of England  Descendancy chart to this point was born 12 Oct 1537, Hampton Court, Middlesex, England; died 6 Jul 1553, Greenwich Palace, Greenwich, England; was buried Westminster Abbey, 20 Deans Yd, London SW1P 3PA, United Kingdom.

    Henry — Anne of Cleves, Queen of England & Ireland. [Group Sheet]

    Henry married Catherine Howard, Queen of England 28 Jul 1540, Greenwich Palace, Greenwich, England. Catherine (daughter of Edmund Howard, Knight and Joyce Colepepper) was born 1523-1525, Lambeth, Surrey, England; died 13 Feb 1542, Tower Hill, London, England; was buried Royal Chapel, London, England. [Group Sheet]

    Henry married Catherine Parr, Queen Consort of England & Ireland 12 Jul 1543, Hampton Court, Middlesex, England. Catherine (daughter of Thomas Parr, Knight and Maud Green) was born 0___ 1512, Blackfriars, London, England; died 5 Sep 1548, Sudeley Castle, Gloucestershire, England. [Group Sheet]


  6. 20.  Mary TudorMary Tudor Descendancy chart to this point (10.Elizabeth6, 5.Elizabeth5, 4.Jacquetta4, 3.Margaret3, 2.Sueva2, 1.Nicola1) was born 18 Mar 1496, Richmond Palace, London, England; died 25 Jun 1533, Westhorpe Hall, Westhorpe, Suffolk, Kingdom of England; was buried St. Mary's Church, Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk, Kingdom of England.

    Other Events:

    • Religion: Roman Catholic

    Notes:

    Mary Tudor (/'tju?d?r/; 18 March 1496 – 25 June 1533), the third daughter of Henry VII of England and Elizabeth of York, was an English princess. Mary became the third wife of Louis XII of France, more than 30 years her senior. Following his death, she married Charles Brandon, 1st Duke of Suffolk. The marriage, which was performed secretly in France, took place during her brother's reign and without his consent. This necessitated the intervention of Thomas Wolsey and although the couple were eventually pardoned by Henry VIII, they were forced to pay a large fine.

    Mary's second marriage produced four children; and through her eldest daughter Frances, Mary was the maternal grandmother of Lady Jane Grey, who was the de facto monarch of England for a little over a week in July 1553.

    First marriage: Queen of France

    Mary was the fourth child of Henry VII of England and Elizabeth of York, and the youngest to survive infancy. She was born at Sheen Palace, "most probably" in March 1496. A privy seal bill dated from midsummer 1496 authorizes a payment of fifty shillings to her nurse, Anne Skeron. Also, Erasmus stated that she was four years old when he visited the Royal nursery in 1499–1500.[1] At age six, she was given her own household, complete with "a staff of gentlewomen assigned to wait upon her," a schoolmaster, and a physician. She was given instruction in French, Latin, music, dancing, and embroidery.[1]

    As children, Mary and her brother, the future King Henry VIII, shared a close friendship. He would name his first surviving child, the future Queen Mary I, in her honour. They lost their mother when Mary was just seven, and given the number of bills paid to her apothecary between 1504 and 1509, it would appear that Mary's own health was fragile.[1]


    A sketch of Mary during her brief period as Queen of France
    Known in her youth as one of the most beautiful princesses in Europe,[1] Erasmus said of her that "Nature never formed anything more beautiful."[2]

    In 1506, during a visit from Philip I of Castile, Mary was called upon to entertain the guests, dancing, and playing the lute and clavicord. The following year, King Philip died, and on 21 December 1507, Mary was betrothed to his son Charles, later Holy Roman Emperor. The betrothal was called off in 1513.[1]

    Instead, Cardinal Wolsey negotiated a peace treaty with France, and on 9 October 1514, at the age of 18, Mary married the 52-year-old King Louis XII of France at Abbeville. One of the Maids of Honour who attended her in France was Anne Boleyn. Despite two previous marriages, Louis had no living sons, and sought to produce an heir; but he died on 1 January 1515, less than three months after marrying Mary, reputedly worn out by his exertions in the bedchamber, but more likely from the effects of gout.[3] Their union produced no children. Following Louis' death, the new King Francis I made attempts to arrange a second marriage for the beautiful widow.[1]

    Second marriage: Duchess of Suffolk

    Mary had been unhappy with her marriage of state to Louis, as at this time she was almost certainly already in love with Charles Brandon, 1st Duke of Suffolk. Henry was aware of his sister's feelings; letters from 1515 indicate that Mary agreed to wed Louis only on condition that "if she survived him, she should marry whom she liked."[4] However, Henry wanted any future marriage to be to his advantage. The King's council, not wishing to see Brandon gain further power at Court, were also opposed to the match. Meanwhile, rumours swirled in France that she would wed either the Duke of Lorraine or the Duke of Savoy. A pair of French friars actually went so far as to warn Mary that she must not wed Brandon, because he "had traffickings with the devil."[1]


    Mary Tudor and Charles Brandon
    When Henry sent Brandon to bring Mary back to England in late January 1515, he made the Duke promise that he would not propose to her.[5] Once in France, Mary persuaded Brandon to abandon this pledge. The couple wed in secret at the Hotel de Clugny on 3 March 1515, in the presence of just ten people, among them the young King Francis.[6] Technically this was treason, as Brandon had married a Royal Princess without Henry's consent.[7] The King was outraged, and the Privy Council urged that Brandon should be imprisoned or executed. Because of the intervention of Thomas Wolsey, and Henry's affection for both his sister and Brandon, the couple were let off with a heavy fine.[8][9] The fine of ¹24,000 – approximately equivalent to ¹7,200,000 today – was later reduced by Henry.[10] They officially married on 13 May 1515 at Greenwich Palace in the presence of Henry and his courtiers.[1]

    Mary was Brandon's third wife, and he had two daughters, Anne and Mary by his second marriage to Anne Browne. She had died in 1511. Mary would raise the girls alongside her own children. Even after her second marriage, Mary was normally referred to at the English Court as "the French Queen", and was not known as "the Duchess of Suffolk" in her lifetime,[11] despite being legally allowed to be. Mary spent most of her time at the Duke's country seat of Westhorpe Hall in Suffolk.[12]

    In the late 1520s, relations between Henry VIII and Mary were strained when she opposed the King's attempt to obtain an annulment of his marriage to Catherine of Aragon, whom Mary had known for many years. Mary developed a strong dislike for Anne Boleyn,[13] whom she had first encountered in France.[1] Anne and her sister Mary were among the Maids of Honour in the entourage that had accompanied Mary to France for her wedding to King Louis.[14]

    Death

    English Royalty
    House of Tudor
    Coat of Arms of Henry VII of England (1485-1509).svg
    Royal Coat of Arms
    Henry VII
    Arthur, Prince of Wales
    Margaret, Queen of Scots
    Henry VIII
    Mary, Queen of France
    v t e
    Mary died at Westhorpe, Suffolk, on 25 June 1533, and was first interred "with much heraldic ceremony" at Bury St Edmunds Abbey. Five years later, when the monastery was dissolved, Mary's body was removed to nearby St Mary's Church, Bury St. Edmunds. In 1784, her remains were disinterred, her coffin opened, and locks of her hair were taken by Horace Walpole, the Duchess of Portland, and several others.[1]

    Mary's widower would later marry their son's betrothed, who was also his ward, the fourteen-year-old Catherine Willoughby, by whom he had two sons.[15]

    Issue

    Mary and Brandon had four children, two daughters and two sons:

    Henry Brandon (11 March 1516 – 1522)
    Lady Frances Brandon (16 July 1517 – 20 November 1559), who married Henry Grey, 3rd Marquess of Dorset, and was the mother of Lady Jane Grey
    Lady Eleanor Brandon (1519 – 27 September 1547), who married Henry Clifford, 2nd Earl of Cumberland.
    Henry Brandon, 1st Earl of Lincoln (c. 1523 – March 1534).
    Mary and Charles's two sons, both named Henry, are commonly mistaken for being the same son. Both boys died when they were children.

    *

    Mary — Charles Brandon, 1st Duke of Suffolk. Charles (son of William Brandon and Elizabeth Bruyn) was born (England). [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. 32. Frances Brandon, Duchess of Suffolk  Descendancy chart to this point was born 16 Jul 1517, Hatfield, Hertfordshire, England; died 20 Nov 1559, London, England.

  7. 21.  Walter Devereux, 1st Viscount Hereford Descendancy chart to this point (12.Cecily6, 6.Anne5, 4.Jacquetta4, 3.Margaret3, 2.Sueva2, 1.Nicola1) was born 0___ 1488, Chartley, Staffordshire, England; died 17 Sep 1558, Chartley, Staffordshire, England; was buried Stowe Church, Chartley, Staffordshire, England.

    Notes:

    Walter DEVEREUX (1° V. Hereford)

    Born: 1488, Chartley, Staffordshire, England

    Acceded: 1550

    Died: 17 Sep 1558, Chartley

    Buried: Stowe Church, Chartley, Staffordshire, England

    Notes: Knight of the Garter. B. Ferrers of Chartley. The Complete Peerage vol.V, pp.326-328. Present at the capture of Boulogne.

    Father: John DEVEREUX (2º B. Ferrers of Chartley)

    Mother: Cecille BOURCHIER (B. Ferrers of Chartley)

    Married 1: Mary GREY BEF 15 Dec 1503

    Children:

    1. Richard DEVEREUX (Sir Knight)

    2. Edward DEVEREUX

    3. William DEVEREUX (Sir)

    4. Catherine DEVEREUX
    5. Henry DEVEREUX

    Married 2: Margaret GARNEYS (V. Hereford) (m.2 William Willoughby, Lord Parham) ABT 1557, England

    Children:
    6. Edward DEVEREUX

    *

    Walter married Mary Grey Bef 15 Dec 1503. Mary (daughter of Thomas Grey, KG, 1st Earl of Huntingdon and Cecily Bonville, 7th Baroness Harington) was born 0___ 1491, (Groby, Leicestershire, England); died 22 Feb 1538. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. 27. Richard Devereux, Knight  Descendancy chart to this point was born ~ 1513; died 13 Oct 1547; was buried London, Middlesex, England.

  8. 22.  Henry Somerset, 2nd Earl of Worcester Descendancy chart to this point (13.Elizabeth6, 7.Mary5, 4.Jacquetta4, 3.Margaret3, 2.Sueva2, 1.Nicola1) was born ~ 1496, (England); died 26 Nov 1549, (England).

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Baron Herbert

    Notes:

    Henry Somerset, 2nd Earl of Worcester (c. 1496 – 26 November 1549) was an English nobleman, son of Charles Somerset, 1st Earl of Worcester and Elizabeth Herbert, 3rd Baroness Herbert. On his father's death on 15 April 1526, he succeeded as the second Earl of Worcester. From his mother, he inherited the title of Baron Herbert.[1]

    Born c.?1496
    Died 26 November 1549 (aged 52–53)
    Noble family Beaufort
    Spouse(s) Margaret Courtenay, Baroness Herbert
    Elizabeth Browne
    Issue
    William Somerset, 3rd Earl of Worcester
    Francis Somerset
    Charles Somerset
    Thomas Somerset
    Anne Somerset
    Lucy Somerset
    Eleanor Somerset
    Joan Somerset
    Father Charles Somerset, 1st Earl of Worcester
    Mother Elizabeth Herbert, 3rd Baroness Herbert


    He married twice:

    Firstly, by papal dispensation dated 15 June 1514, to Lady Margaret Courtenay, daughter of William Courtenay, 1st Earl of Devon, by Catherine of York, daughter of Edward IV, King of England. Margaret died before 15 April 1526. Although many sources say union produced no children[2][3][4] she was probably the mother of Lady Lucy Somerset (1524- 23 February 1583).

    Secondly, before 1527, to Elizabeth Browne, daughter of Anthony Browne,[5] Knt., by Lucy, daughter of John Neville, 1st Marquess of Montagu. Somerset died on 26 November 1549. The children of Henry Somerset and Elizabeth Browne were:

    William Somerset, 3rd Earl of Worcester (d. 21 February 1589). Heir and successor of his father.
    Lady Lucy Somerset (1524- 23 February 1583), who married John Neville, 4th Baron Latimer.
    Francis Somerset (By 1532-22 July 1563), often said to have died at the battle of Pinkie in 1547, but fought at the siege of Leith in 1560, and was Member of Parliament for Monmouthshire, 1558.[6] He was killed in an attack on Le Havre in 1563[7]
    Charles Somerset
    Thomas Somerset.
    Lady Anne Somerset (d. 17 October 1596), married Thomas Percy, 7th Earl of Northumberland. Her husband was beheaded on 22 August 1572. They had four daughters and one son (died young).
    Lady Eleanor Somerset, married Henry Johns
    Lady Joan or "Jane" Somerset married Sir Edward Mansel.

    Henry married Elizabeth Browne, Countess of Worcester Bef 1527, (England). Elizabeth (daughter of Anthony Browne, Knight and Lucy Neville) was born 0___ 1502, Bechworth, Surrey, England; died 0___ 1565, (England); was buried Chepstow, Monmouthshire, Wales. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. 33. Lucy Somerset, Baroness Latimer  Descendancy chart to this point was born ~ 1524; died 23 Feb 1583; was buried London, Middlesex, England.

  9. 23.  Elizabeth Somerset Descendancy chart to this point (13.Elizabeth6, 7.Mary5, 4.Jacquetta4, 3.Margaret3, 2.Sueva2, 1.Nicola1)

    Elizabeth — FNU Savage. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. 34. John Savage, of Rocksavage  Descendancy chart to this point was born (Cheshire, England).

  10. 24.  Dorothy Hastings Descendancy chart to this point (14.Anne6, 8.Katherine5, 4.Jacquetta4, 3.Margaret3, 2.Sueva2, 1.Nicola1) was born (Leicestershire, England).

    Dorothy married Richard Devereux, Knight 1 Jul 1536. Richard (son of Walter Devereux, 1st Viscount Hereford and Mary Grey) was born ~ 1513; died 13 Oct 1547; was buried London, Middlesex, England. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. 35. Walter Devereux, 1st Earl of Essex  Descendancy chart to this point was born 16 Sep 1541, Chartley Lodge, Stafford, England; died 22 Sep 1576.
    2. 36. Elizabeth Devereux  Descendancy chart to this point
    3. 37. George Devereux  Descendancy chart to this point
    4. 38. Ann Devereux  Descendancy chart to this point


Generation: 8

  1. 25.  Henry Grey, 1st Duke of Suffolk Descendancy chart to this point (15.Thomas7, 9.Thomas6, 5.Elizabeth5, 4.Jacquetta4, 3.Margaret3, 2.Sueva2, 1.Nicola1) was born 17 Jan 1517; died 23 Feb 1554, Tower Hill, London, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: 3rd Marquess of Dorset

    Henry — Frances Brandon, Duchess of Suffolk. Frances (daughter of Charles Brandon, 1st Duke of Suffolk and Mary Tudor) was born 16 Jul 1517, Hatfield, Hertfordshire, England; died 20 Nov 1559, London, England. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. 39. Jane Grey, Duchess of Northumberland  Descendancy chart to this point was born 1536-1537, (London, Middlesex, England); died 12 Feb 1554, Tower of London, London, Middlesex, England; was buried St Peter ad Vincula, London, England.

  2. 26.  Anne Willoughby Descendancy chart to this point (16.Dorothy7, 9.Thomas6, 5.Elizabeth5, 4.Jacquetta4, 3.Margaret3, 2.Sueva2, 1.Nicola1) was born Aft 1514; died ~ 1545.

    Anne married Charles Blount, 5th Baron Mountjoy 0Aug 1530. Charles (son of William Blount, KG, 4th Baron Mountjoy and Alice Keble) was born 28 Jun 1516, Tourna, Belgium; died 10 Oct 1544, Hooke, Dorset, England; was buried St Mary Aldermary, London, England. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. 40. James Blount, 6th Baron Mountjoy  Descendancy chart to this point was born 0___ 1533, Derby, Derbyshire, England; died 10 Oct 1582, Hook, Dorsetshire, England.

  3. 27.  Richard Devereux, Knight Descendancy chart to this point (17.Mary7, 9.Thomas6, 5.Elizabeth5, 4.Jacquetta4, 3.Margaret3, 2.Sueva2, 1.Nicola1) was born ~ 1513; died 13 Oct 1547; was buried London, Middlesex, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Member of Parliament
    • Residence: Carmarthenshire, Wales

    Notes:

    Sir Richard Devereux was a rising political figure during the reign of Henry VIII and Edward VI when his career was cut short by his sudden death during the life of his father. His son would complete the family’s ascendency when he was created Earl of Essex.

    Family

    He was born by 1513, the son of Walter Devereux, 1st Viscount Hereford and Mary Grey (1491-22 February 1538).[1]

    His paternal grandparents were John Devereux, 8th Baron Ferrers of Chartley and Cecily Bourchier.[1] His maternal grandparents were Thomas Grey, 1st Marquess of Dorset and his second wife Cecily Bonville, Baroness Harington and Bonville.[1]

    Career

    Richard Devereux lived in Carmarthen, Wales where he was Bailiff from 1534 to 1535, and Mayor in 1536 to 1537.[2] He was Commissioner for the tenths of spiritualities for St. David’s diocese in 1535.[2] He later came out strongly for the canons in their dispute with Bishop Barlow of St. David’s.[2] In 1542 he was a candidate for election to Parliament, and noted for enlivening the town of Camarthen by his encouragement of unruly behavior and resort to force, which prompted his adversary to lodge a complaint.[2] Later in 1546 Devereux would be examined by the Privy Council for comments on religious practices he thought were superstitious.[2]

    He was Deputy steward of the lordships of Arwystli and Cyfeiliog in Montgomeryshire in 1537.[2] He supported his father in his dispute with the 2nd Earl of Worcester, and the borough of New Camarthen.[2]

    In 1543 he served under Sir John Wallop when he led a small force to help the Emperor Charles V in his invasion of France.[2] He was mentioned in a dispatch on this campaign.

    Devereux was Deputy justice and chamberlain of South Wales during the reign of Henry VIII.[2] He was justice of peace for Cardiff and Pembrokeshire in 1543, and Gloucester and Monmouthshire in 1547.[2] He was Custos Rotulorum of Carmarthenshire from 1543 until his death in 1547.[2]

    Richard Devereux was created a Knight of the Bath on 20 February 1547[2] at the coronation of Edward VI of England. Later this year he was made a member of the council in the marches of Wales.[2]

    Parliament

    He was elected to Parliament for Carmarthenshire in 1545, and again just prior to his death in 1547.[2]

    Marriage and Children[edit]
    He married Dorothea Hastings on 1 July 1536, a daughter of George Hastings, 1st Earl of Huntingdon and Anne Stafford.[1]

    They had children:

    Walter Devereux, 1st Earl of Essex[1]
    Elizabeth Devereux. She married Sir John Vernon of Hodnet.[1]
    Sir George Devereux[1]
    Ann Devereux. She married Henry Clifford.[1]
    Death[edit]
    He died on 13 October 1547.[2] He was buried in the parish church of St. Olave Hart Street, London under the inscription 'Richarde Deuereux, sonne and Heyre to the lord Ferrers of Chartley'.[3] His inquisition post-mortem in July 1548 showed possession of Lamphey which was to be held by his wife in her widowhood, and then to his son, George, for life with remainder to his other son, Walter.[2] He also was possessed of the ancestral Devereux manor of Bodenham, Herefordshire.[1]

    Buried:
    He was buried in the parish church of St. Olave Hart Street, London under the inscription 'Richarde Deuereux, sonne and Heyre to the lord Ferrers of Chartley'.

    Richard married Dorothy Hastings 1 Jul 1536. Dorothy (daughter of George Hastings, Knight, 1st Earl of Huntingdon and Anne Stafford, Countess of Huntingdon) was born (Leicestershire, England). [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. 41. Walter Devereux, 1st Earl of Essex  Descendancy chart to this point was born 16 Sep 1541, Chartley Lodge, Stafford, England; died 22 Sep 1576.
    2. 42. Elizabeth Devereux  Descendancy chart to this point
    3. 43. George Devereux  Descendancy chart to this point
    4. 44. Ann Devereux  Descendancy chart to this point

  4. 28.  James of Scotland, V, King of ScotsJames of Scotland, V, King of Scots Descendancy chart to this point (18.Margaret7, 10.Elizabeth6, 5.Elizabeth5, 4.Jacquetta4, 3.Margaret3, 2.Sueva2, 1.Nicola1) was born 10 Apr 1512, Linlithgow Palace, Linlithgow, Scotland; died 14 Dec 1542, Falkland Palace, Fife, Scotland.

    Notes:

    James V (10 April 1512 - 14 December 1542) was King of Scots from 9 September 1513 until his death, which followed the Scottish defeat at the Battle of Solway Moss. His only surviving legitimate child, Mary, succeeded him as Queen when she was just six days old.

    Early life

    James was son of King James IV of Scotland and his queen Margaret Tudor, a daughter of Henry VII of England, and was the only legitimate child of James IV to survive infancy. He was born on 10 April 1512, at Linlithgow Palace, Linlithgowshire and christened the next day, receiving the titles Duke of Rothesay and Prince and Great Steward of Scotland.[1] He became king at just seventeen months old when his father was killed at the Battle of Flodden Field on 9 September 1513.

    James was crowned in the Chapel Royal at Stirling Castle on 21 September 1513. During his childhood, the country was ruled by regents, first by his mother, until she remarried the following year, and then by John Stewart, 2nd Duke of Albany, who was next in line to the Crown after James and his younger brother, the posthumously-born Alexander Stewart, Duke of Ross. Other regents included Robert Maxwell, 5th Lord Maxwell, a member of the Council of Regency who was also bestowed as Regent of Arran, the largest island in the Firth of Clyde. In February 1517, James came from Stirling to Holyroodhouse, Edinburgh, but during an outbreak of plague in the city he was moved to the care of Antoine d'Arces at nearby rural Craigmillar Castle.[2] At Stirling, the 10-year-old James had a guard of 20 footmen dressed in his colours, red and yellow. When he went to the park below the Castle, "by secret and in right fair and soft wedder (weather)," six horsemen would scour the countryside two miles roundabout for intruders.[3] Poets wrote their own nursery rhymes for James and advised him on royal behavior. As a youth, his education was in the care of University of St Andrews poets such as Sir David Lyndsay.[4] William Stewart, in his poem Princelie Majestie, counselled James against ice-skating:

    To princes als it is ane vyce,

    To ryd or run over rakleslie,
    Or aventure to go on yce,
    Accordis nocht to thy majestie

    To view more images, history & commentary, click on this link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_V_of_Scotland

    James married Mary of Guise 0___ 1538. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. 45. Mary Stuart, I, Queen of Scots  Descendancy chart to this point was born 8 Dec 1542, Linlithgow Palace, Linlithgow, Scotland; died 6 Feb 1587, Fotheringay Castle, Northamptonshire, England; was buried Westminster Abbey, 20 Deans Yd, London SW1P 3PA, United Kingdom.

  5. 29.  Mary I, Queen of England & Ireland Descendancy chart to this point (19.Henry7, 10.Elizabeth6, 5.Elizabeth5, 4.Jacquetta4, 3.Margaret3, 2.Sueva2, 1.Nicola1) was born 18 Feb 1516, Greenwich Palace, Greenwich, England; died 17 Nov 1558, St James's Palace, London, England; was buried Westminster Abbey, 20 Deans Yd, London SW1P 3PA, United Kingdom.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Bloody Mary

    Notes:

    Mary I (18 February 1516 – 17 November 1558) was the Queen of England and Ireland from July 1553 until her death. Her executions of Protestants led to the posthumous sobriquet "Bloody Mary".

    She was the only child of Henry VIII and his first wife Catherine of Aragon to survive to adulthood. Her younger half-brother Edward VI (son of Henry and Jane Seymour) succeeded their father in 1547.

    When Edward became mortally ill in 1553, he attempted to remove Mary from the line of succession because of religious differences. On his death their first cousin once removed, Lady Jane Grey, was proclaimed queen. Mary assembled a force in East Anglia and deposed Jane, who was ultimately beheaded. Mary was—excluding the disputed reigns of Jane and the Empress Matilda—the first queen regnant of England. In 1554, Mary married Philip of Spain, becoming queen consort of Habsburg Spain on his accession in 1556.

    Mary is remembered for her restoration of Roman Catholicism after her half-brother's short-lived Protestant reign. During her five-year reign, she had over 280 religious dissenters burned at the stake in the Marian persecutions. After her death in 1558, her re-establishment of Roman Catholicism was reversed by her younger half-sister and successor Elizabeth I, daughter of Henry and Anne Boleyn.


  6. 30.  Elizabeth I, Queen of EnglandElizabeth I, Queen of England Descendancy chart to this point (19.Henry7, 10.Elizabeth6, 5.Elizabeth5, 4.Jacquetta4, 3.Margaret3, 2.Sueva2, 1.Nicola1) was born 7 Sep 1533, Greenwich Palace, Greenwich, England; died 24 Mar 1603, Richmond Palace, London, England; was buried 28 Apr 1603, Westminster Abbey, 20 Deans Yd, London SW1P 3PA, United Kingdom.

    Other Events:

    • Religion: Anglican, Church of England
    • Also Known As: Elizabeth Tudor

    Notes:

    The Virgin Queen, Gloriana or Good Queen Bess, the childless Elizabeth was the fifth and last monarch of the Tudor dynasty.

    Elizabeth was the daughter of Henry VIII by second wife, Anne Boleyn, who was executed two and a half years after Elizabeth's birth. Anne's marriage to Henry VIII was annulled, and Elizabeth was declared illegitimate.

    Her half-brother, Edward VI, ruled until his death in 1553, bequeathing the crown to Lady Jane Grey and ignoring the claims of his two half-sisters, Elizabeth and the Roman Catholic Mary, in spite of statute law to the contrary.

    Edward's will was set aside and Mary became queen, deposing Lady Jane Grey.

    During Mary's reign, Elizabeth was imprisoned for nearly a year on suspicion of supporting Protestant rebels.

    Birth:
    aka "Palace of Placentia"...


  7. 31.  Edward VI, King of England Descendancy chart to this point (19.Henry7, 10.Elizabeth6, 5.Elizabeth5, 4.Jacquetta4, 3.Margaret3, 2.Sueva2, 1.Nicola1) was born 12 Oct 1537, Hampton Court, Middlesex, England; died 6 Jul 1553, Greenwich Palace, Greenwich, England; was buried Westminster Abbey, 20 Deans Yd, London SW1P 3PA, United Kingdom.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Edward Tudor


  8. 32.  Frances Brandon, Duchess of Suffolk Descendancy chart to this point (20.Mary7, 10.Elizabeth6, 5.Elizabeth5, 4.Jacquetta4, 3.Margaret3, 2.Sueva2, 1.Nicola1) was born 16 Jul 1517, Hatfield, Hertfordshire, England; died 20 Nov 1559, London, England.

    Frances — Henry Grey, 1st Duke of Suffolk. Henry (son of Thomas Grey, 2nd Marquess of Dorset and Margaret Wotton, Marchioness of Dorset) was born 17 Jan 1517; died 23 Feb 1554, Tower Hill, London, England. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. 39. Jane Grey, Duchess of Northumberland  Descendancy chart to this point was born 1536-1537, (London, Middlesex, England); died 12 Feb 1554, Tower of London, London, Middlesex, England; was buried St Peter ad Vincula, London, England.

  9. 33.  Lucy Somerset, Baroness Latimer Descendancy chart to this point (22.Henry7, 13.Elizabeth6, 7.Mary5, 4.Jacquetta4, 3.Margaret3, 2.Sueva2, 1.Nicola1) was born ~ 1524; died 23 Feb 1583; was buried London, Middlesex, England.

    Other Events:

    • Will: 16 Nov 1582

    Notes:

    Marriage and issue

    In 1545, she married Queen Catherine Parr's stepson, John Neville, 4th Baron Latimer (c. 1520- 22 April 1577), making her the new Baroness Latimer. After her marriage, Lucy was invited to become lady-in-waiting to Queen Catherine. Lucy became part of the close knit circle around the queen.

    Together they had four daughters who became co-heiresses to John and the barony of Latimer:

    Hon. Catherine Neville (1546- 28 October 1596), married Henry Percy, 8th Earl of Northumberland , by whom she had issue.
    Hon. Dorothy Neville (1547- 23 March 1609), married Thomas Cecil, 1st Earl of Exeter , by whom she had issue.
    Hon. Lucy Neville (Died April 1608), married Sir William Cornwallis of Brome Hall, by whom she had issue.
    Hon. Elizabeth Neville (c.1550- 1630), married firstly Sir John Danvers of Dauntsey, by whom she had issue, she married secondly Sir Edmund Carey.

    All of the their daughter's first marriages above produced children.

    Lord Latimer died without sons in 1577; his four daughters became his joint heiresses. The barony became abeyant until 1913, when its abeyance was terminated in favour of Latimer's distant descendant Francis Money-Coutts, 5th Baron Latymer .

    Buried:
    in Hackney Borough...

    Lucy married John Neville, 4th Baron Latimer 0___ 1545. John (son of John Neville, 3rd Baron Latimer and Dorothy de Vere) was born 0___ 1520, Snape, North Yorkshire, England; died 22 Apr 1577, (Yorkshire) England. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. 46. Katherine Neville  Descendancy chart to this point was born 0___ 1547, Snape, North Yorkshire, England; died 28 Oct 1596; was buried Westminster Abbey, 20 Deans Yd, London SW1P 3PA, United Kingdom.
    2. 47. Dorothy Neville  Descendancy chart to this point

  10. 34.  John Savage, of Rocksavage Descendancy chart to this point (23.Elizabeth7, 13.Elizabeth6, 7.Mary5, 4.Jacquetta4, 3.Margaret3, 2.Sueva2, 1.Nicola1) was born (Cheshire, England).

    John — Elizabeth Manners. Elizabeth (daughter of Thomas Manners, KG, 1st Earl of Rutland and Eleanor Paston) was born ~1530; died 8 Aug 1570. [Group Sheet]


  11. 35.  Walter Devereux, 1st Earl of Essex Descendancy chart to this point (24.Dorothy7, 14.Anne6, 8.Katherine5, 4.Jacquetta4, 3.Margaret3, 2.Sueva2, 1.Nicola1) was born 16 Sep 1541, Chartley Lodge, Stafford, England; died 22 Sep 1576.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Soldier & Courtier
    • Also Known As: Viscount Hereford

    Notes:

    Walter Devereux, 1st Earl of Essex, KG (16 September 1541 – 22 September 1576), was an English nobleman and general. From 1573 until his death he fought in Ireland in connection with the Plantation of Ulster, where he ordered the massacre of Rathlin Island. He was the father of Elizabeth I's favourite of her later years, Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex.

    Family

    Walter Devereux was the eldest son of Sir Richard Devereux, who was created a Knight of the Bath on 20 February 1547 and died that same year, in the lifetime of his father, Walter Devereux, 1st Viscount Hereford. [1] Walter Devereux's mother was Dorothy Hastings, daughter of George Hastings, 1st Earl of Huntingdon and Anne Stafford, said to have been a mistress of Henry VIII. Through his paternal ancestry he was related to the Bourchier family, to which previous Earls of Essex had belonged:[2][a] John Devereux, son of Walter Devereux who died at the Battle of Bosworth, married Cecily Bourchier, sister of Henry Bourchier, 2nd Earl of Essex.[1]

    Career

    On his grandfather's death, Devereux became on 27 September 1558 the 2nd Viscount Hereford and 10th Baron Ferrers of Chartley.[3] He was entrusted with joint custody of the Queen of Scots in 1568, and appointed Lord Lieutenant of Staffordshire in 1569 (which he held through the end of his life).[3] Devereux provided signal service in suppressing the Northern Rebellion of 1569, serving as high marshal of the field under the Ambrose Dudley, 3rd Earl of Warwick and Lord Clinton.[3] For his zeal in the service of Queen Elizabeth I on this and other occasions, he was made a knight of the Garter on 17 June 1572 and was created Earl of Essex and Ewe, and Viscount Bourchier on 4 May 1572.[2][3][b]

    Eager to give proof of "his good devotion to employ himself in the service of her Majesty," he offered on certain conditions to subdue or colonise, at his own expense, a portion of the Irish province of Ulster. At that time, Ulster was completely under the dominion of the O'Neills, led by Sir Brian MacPhelim and Turlough Luineach, and of the Scots led by Sorley Boy MacDonnell. His offer, with certain modifications, was accepted. He set sail for Ireland in July 1573, accompanied by a number of earls, knights and gentlemen, and with a force of about 1200 men.

    His enterprise had an inauspicious beginning; a storm dispersed his fleet and drove some of his vessels as far as Cork and the Isle of Man. His forces did not all reach the place of rendezvous till late in the autumn, and he was compelled to entrench himself at Belfast for the winter. Here his troops were diminished by sickness, famine and desertion to not much more than 200 men.

    Intrigues of various sorts and fighting of a guerilla type followed, and Essex had difficulties both with his deputy Fitzwilliam and with the Queen. He was in dire straits, and his offensive movements in Ulster took the form of raids and brutal massacres among the O'Neills. In October 1574, he treacherously captured MacPhelim at a conference in Belfast, and after slaughtering his attendants, had MacPhelim, his wife and brother executed at Dublin. He arrested William Piers, who had been active in driving the Scots out of Ulster, and accused him of passing military intelligence to Brian mac Phelim O'Neill. Essex ordered Piers's arrest and detention in Carrickfergus Castle in December 1574, but Piers was freed and he successfully executed Brian mac Phelim O'Neill for treason.[4]

    After encouraging Essex to prepare to attack the Irish chief Turlough Luineach, apparently at the instigation of the earl of Leicester, the queen suddenly commanded him to "break off his enterprise." However, she left him a certain discretionary power, and he took advantage of that to defeat Turlough Luineach and chastise County Antrim. He also massacred several hundreds of Sorley Boy's following, chiefly women and children, who had hidden in the caves of Rathlin Island in the face of an amphibious assault led by Sir Francis Drake and Sir John Norreys.

    He returned to England at the end of 1575, resolved "to live henceforth an untroubled life." He was however persuaded to accept the offer of the queen to make him Earl Marshal of Ireland. He arrived in Dublin in September 1576, but died three weeks later of dysentery. It was suspected that he had been poisoned at the behest of the Earl of Leicester, who married his widow two years later. A post-mortem was carried out and concluded that Essex had died of natural causes. He was succeeded in the Earldom of Essex by his son Robert.

    Marriage and issue

    Dorothy and Penelope Devereux

    In 1561 or 1562, Devereux married Lettice, daughter of Sir Francis Knollys and Catherine Carey. Walter and Lettice had the following children:

    Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex[5] Married Frances Walsingham
    Sir Walter Devereux. Married Margaret, daughter of Arthur Dakyns. He was killed at the siege of Rouen in 1591.[5]
    Penelope Devereux Married Robert Rich, 3rd Baron Rich[5]
    Dorothy Devereux. Married Henry Percy, 9th Earl of Northumberland[5]
    Francis Devereux (died in infancy)[6]

    See also

    Betrayal of Clannabuidhe
    Rathlin Island Massacre

    Notes

    The Bourchier Earldom of Essex and Viscountancy of Bourchier became extinct with the death of Henry Bourchier in 1540. Henry’s daughter, Anne Bourchier, was repudiated by her husband, William Parr, on 17 April 1543 and her children declared bastards and incapable of inheriting. William Parr was created Earl of Essex on 23 December 1543 “with the same place and voice in Parliament as his wife’s [Anne Bourchier’s] father had in his lifetime.” Parr was attainted in 1553 whereby the Earldom of Essex and all his other honors were forfeited. William Parr died 28 October 1570 and Anne Bourchier 28 January 1570/1, and both lacked legitimate heirs causing these titles to become extinct.
    Jump up ^ The titles assumed by the 1st Earl of the Devereux family are attributed to his son in the act of restoration, which recites that “the said Robert, late Earl of Essex, before his said attainder, was lawfully and rightly invested … with the name, state, place, and dignity of Earl of Essex and Ewe, Viscount Hereford and Bourchier, Lord Ferrers of Chartley, and Lord Bourchier and Louvaine.”

    Walter married Lettice Knollys 1561-1562. Lettice (daughter of Francis Knollys, Knight and Catherine Carey) was born 8 Nov 1543, Rotherfield Greys, Oxfordshire, England; died 25 Dec 1634, Drayton Bassett, Staffordshire, England; was buried Collegiate Church of St Mary, Warwick, Warwickshire, England. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. 48. Penelope Devereux  Descendancy chart to this point was born 0Jan 1563, Chartley Castle, Staffordshire, England; died 7 Jul 1607.
    2. 49. Dorothy Devereux, Countess of Northumberland  Descendancy chart to this point was born 0___ 1564, Chartley Lodge, Stafford, England; died 3 Aug 1619; was buried Petworth, Sussex, England.
    3. 50. Robert Devereux, KG, PC, 2nd Earl of Essex  Descendancy chart to this point was born 10 Nov 1565, Bromyard, Herefordshire, England; died 25 Feb 1601, Tower of London, London, Middlesex, England.

  12. 36.  Elizabeth Devereux Descendancy chart to this point (24.Dorothy7, 14.Anne6, 8.Katherine5, 4.Jacquetta4, 3.Margaret3, 2.Sueva2, 1.Nicola1)

    Elizabeth — John Vernon. [Group Sheet]


  13. 37.  George Devereux Descendancy chart to this point (24.Dorothy7, 14.Anne6, 8.Katherine5, 4.Jacquetta4, 3.Margaret3, 2.Sueva2, 1.Nicola1)

  14. 38.  Ann Devereux Descendancy chart to this point (24.Dorothy7, 14.Anne6, 8.Katherine5, 4.Jacquetta4, 3.Margaret3, 2.Sueva2, 1.Nicola1)

    Ann — Henry Clifford. [Group Sheet]