Uctred FitzWaltheof

Male Aft 1070 - 1152  (~ 81 years)


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  • Name Uctred FitzWaltheof 
    Born Aft 1070  Tynedale, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Gender Male 
    Died 1152  Johnstone, Dumfries-shire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Person ID I53812  The Hennessee Family
    Last Modified 26 Sep 2019 

    Father Waltheof Huntington, Earl of Northumbria,   d. 31 May 1076, St. Giles Hill, Winchester, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Mother Judith of Lens, Countess of Northumberland,   b. 1054-1055, Lens, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. ~1090, Fotheringay, Northamptonshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 35 years) 
    Married Aft Jan 1070  [1, 2
    Family ID F19044  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Bethoc Dunkeld,   b. 1098, Tynedale, Moray, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1160, Perth, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 62 years) 
    Married 1120  Northumberland, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Children 
     1. Hextilda of Tynedale,   b. 1112-1122, (East Lothian, Scotland) Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1149-1189  (Age 67 years)
    Last Modified 21 Nov 2019 
    Family ID F20177  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - Aft 1070 - Tynedale, Scotland Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 1120 - Northumberland, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 1152 - Johnstone, Dumfries-shire, Scotland Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Notes 
    • Biography

      Uctred[1] or Huctred son of Waldef[2] or Huctred of Tynedale[3] (or Gothric[4]) or Uchtred FitzWaltheof[5] (FitzWaldeve)[6] of Tynedale[7]

      b. after 1070[7]

      Parents
      Uctred was the son of Walleof[1] or Waldef.[2]

      Disputed Parents
      There is no evidence for the statement in the City of Sheffield that Uctred was the son of Waltheof who married Judith of Lens in 1070.[7] Waltheof, earl of Northumbria, and also anachronistically called earl of Huntingdon, (born circa 1050-died 1076), was the second son of the Dane, Siward, earl of Northumbria (d. 1055), and his first wife, ¥lfflµd, daughter of Earl Ealdred, son of Earl Uhtred, and he married Judith, the niece of William I, king of England and duke of Normandy,[8] Waltheof and Judith had two daughters:

      Maud, born between 1070 and 1076, married 1) Simon (I) de Senlis, earl of Northampton and of Huntingdon and 2) David, later king of Scots;[8]
      Alice, also known as Judith, born between 1070 and 1076, married Ralph de Tosny[8] or Adelise married Raoul III of Tosny;
      Some sources state Waltheof and Judith had a third daughter.[7]

      In 1086, Waltheof's widow, Judith, owned some 200 rural manors mainly scattered between Lincoln, Leicester, Northampton, Bedford, and Cambridge, with houses in several east midland towns.[8]

      At the end of 1113 David, who was to become Davide I, king of Scotland, was given by Henry I, king of England, the rich, highly born heiress, Maud or Matilda de Senlis (d. 1131), the daughter of Waltheof, earl of Northumbria, and Judith (died in or after 1086), the widow of Simon (I) de Senlis (or St Liz, died 1111-3), who would have been approaching forty when she married David. Through this marriage, David acquired property stretching from south Yorkshire to Middlesex, but mainly in the shires of Northampton, Huntingdon, Cambridge, and Bedford, which formed what came to be known as the ‘honour of Huntingdon’. King Henry I also granted him an earldom, but to assign the names Huntingdon or Northampton to this estate before the mid-twelfth century is anachronistic. When the Senlis family and the Scottish royal house vied for control of the honour, which was never partitioned, the former preferred the title earl of Northampton (given by Stephen), while the Scots simply spoke of the honour of Huntingdon without using any territorial style.[9]

      If Huctred was the son of Waltheof and Judith, he would have inherited these estates, not their daughters.

      Marriage and Children
      Uctred married Bethâoc circa 1085.[4] Bethâoc was the only child of Donald III [Domnall Bâan, Donalbane], king of Scots.[10]

      Uctred married Bethâoc had children:

      Hestilla or Hextilda, who married Richard Comyn/Cumyn,[2] circa 1105.[4] John Comyn (died 1302)[10] of Tynedale and Badenoch who was a Competitor on 3rd August 1291 for the throne of Scotland, was their great-great-grandson. John married Alianora, the sister of John Balliol, king of Scotland.[4]
      https://archive.org/stream/scottishkingsre00dunbuoft#page/282/mode/2up

      Records referring to "Uctred son of Walleof", "Uchtred son of Waldef" and "Huctred son of Waldef"
      In 1130-1, at Northumberland, Uctred, son of Walleof, rendered an account for 20 marks of silver, three palfreys, and three coursers for the liberties of soc and sac which the king, Henry I of England [reigned 1100-1135], had granted him. He paid to the Treasury 5 marks of silver and still owes 15 marks of silver, three palfreys, and three coursers.[1]

      'Uchtred filius Waldef was a juror in the Inquisitio per David Principem Cumbrensen de terris Ecclesiae Glasguensi pertinentibus facta which was witness by, among others, Cospatric frater Dalfin, Waldef frater suus. Cospatric filius Uctred, Uhctred filius Scot.[11] Laurie, in his notes regarding this charter, remarks that the writer of the charter added a list of witnesses that included the leading people associated with David when he was an earl, which he probably made up because there was no grant or act to attest; that the jurors, in the opinion of Dr Prescott were Cumbrenses judices, although he doesn't agree that Uchtred was as he doesn.[12]

      On 8 February 1261/2, Henry III, king of England, confirmed to John Comyn the grant by David king of Scotland and his son, Earl Henry [died 1152, earl of Huntingdon from 1136, earl of Northumberland from 1139] , to Richard Comyn, John's great-grandfather, and his wife Histilla, and their heirs, lands in Tindale, viz Wallewie, Thornton, Staincroft and Hethingishale, which was the heritage of Histilla's father, Huctred, son of Waldef, just as King Henry's grandfather, King Henry [II], had previously confirmed the grant by charter to Richard and Hestilla.[2]

      Research Notes
      Robertson's statement "Uchred the son of Waltheof was slain in the time of Canute, and his brother Eadulf Cudel only succeeded to the hereditary dominions beyond the Tyne;"[13] does not refer to Histilla's father, Huctred, son of Waldef, because Cnut died in 1035.[14] Uhtred, earl of Bamburgh, son of Waltheof, was murdered in 1016 after which his brother, Eadulf Cudel, succeeded to the earldom.[15] Histilla and her first husband, Richard Comyn, were granted the heritage of her father Huctred, son of Waldef, by King Henry II, who reigned from 1154 until 1189. If Histilla was the daughter of Uchred who was slain in the time of Canute, she would have been 138 years old at the beginning of Henry II's reign.[2]

      Line 121A Nos 23-25 in Weis' Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists,[16] calls him Huctred of Tyndale, son of Waldef citing The Scots Peerage, I:504-555 (a typo for 504-5 IMHO Thompson-14289 20:42, 13 September 2017 (EDT)],[3] which cites Bain's Calendar of Documents relating to Scotland both of which are referenced above.[2]

      Sources
      ? 1.0 1.1 1.2 Joseph Bain, ed, Calendar of Documents relating to Scotland Preserved in Her Majesty's Public Record Office, London. (Edinburgh: H M General Register House, 1881), I:3, Digital Image Internet Archive (https://archive.org/stream/calendarofdocume01edin#page/2/mode/2up accessed 12 September 2017). No 13.
      ? 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 Joseph Bain, ed, Calendar of Documents relating to Scotland, I:449, No 2287.
      ? 3.0 3.1 James Balfour Paul, ed., The Scots Peerage: Founded on Wood's Edition of Sir Robert Douglas's Peerage of Scotland, containing an Historical and Genealogical Account of the Nobility of that Kingdom, 9 vols (Edinburgh: David Douglas, 1907), I:504-5, Digital Image Internet Archive (https://archive.org/stream/scotspeeragefoun01paul#page/504/mode/2up accessed accessed 12 September 2017).
      ? 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 Sir Archibald H Dunbar, Bart, Scottish Kings: A Revised Chronology of Scottish History 1005-1625 with Notices of the Principal Events Tables of Regnal Years, Pedigrees, Calendars, etc., (Edinburgh: David Douglas, 1899), 43, Digital Image Internet Archive (https://archive.org/stream/scottishkingsre00dunbuoft#page/42/mode/2up accessed 12 September 2017).
      ? Robertson, 1862
      ? Goldsborough, Feist & Feist, 2011
      ? 7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3 Wikipedians, n.d.
      ? 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 C. P. Lewis, ‘Waltheof, earl of Northumbria (c.1050–1076)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 (http://www.oxforddnb.com.rp.nla.gov.au/view/article/28646, accessed 13 Sept 2017). Waltheof (c.1050–1076): doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/28646.
      ? G. W. S. Barrow, ‘David I (c.1085–1153)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004; online edn, Jan 2006 (http://www.oxforddnb.com.rp.nla.gov.au/view/article/7208, accessed 14 Sept 2017).
      ? 10.0 10.1 A. A. M. Duncan, ‘Donald III (b. in or before 1040, d. 1099?)’, rev. Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 (http://www.oxforddnb.com.rp.nla.gov.au/view/article/37366, accessed 13 Sept 2017). Donald III (b. in or before 1040, d. 1099?): doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/37366.
      ? 46. Digital Image Internet Archive (https://archive.org/stream/earlyscottishcha00lawruoft#page/46/mode/2up/, accessed 13 Sept 2017). Charter L.
      ? 299, 304. Digital Image Internet Archive (https://archive.org/stream/earlyscottishcha00lawruoft#page/298/mode/2up/, accessed 13 Sept 2017). Charter L.
      ? Eben William Robertson, Scotland Under Her Early Kings: A History of the Kingdom to the Close of the Thirteenth Century, (Edmonston and Douglas, 1862), I:442; Digital Image Internet Archive, .
      ? M. K. Lawson, ‘Cnut (d. 1035)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004; online edn, Jan 2013 (http://www.oxforddnb.com.rp.nla.gov.au/view/article/4579, accessed 15 Sept 2017).
      ? William M. Aird, ‘Uhtred, earl of Bamburgh (d. 1016)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 (http://www.oxforddnb.com.rp.nla.gov.au/view/article/27981, accessed 15 Sept 2017).
      ? Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists who Came to America Before 1700: The Lineage of Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Some of Their Descendants, Genealogical Publishing Com, 1992 108
      See also:

      Goldsborough, E., Feist, P. & Feist, M.W., (2011). The House of Goldsborough: Goldsborough: From 6th Century England to Colonial America, (pp.261). Google Books
      Robertson, Eben William. (1862). Scotland Under Her Early Kings: A History of the Kingdom to the Close of the Thirteenth Century, (Vol.1, pp.442). Edmonston and Douglas. Google eBook.
      Wikipedians, (n.d.). City of Sheffield (Part 1 of 3, pp.66). Pedia Press. Google Books.

      end of this biography

  • Sources 
    1. [S14615] "Richard Comyn (1190-1244)", Biography, Ancestors & Descendants, to view source information, select tab, "Ancestors", ht.

    2. [S9980] "Maud, Countess of Huntingdon" biography, accessed & downloaded Thurssday, November 17th, 2016 by David A. Hennessee, ht.