John Anne

Male 1434 - 1490  (~ 55 years)


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  • Name John Anne 
    Born ~28 Aug 1434  London, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Gender Male 
    Also Known As John Aune  [1
    Died ~1490  North Aston, Oxfordshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Person ID I51742  The Hennessee Family
    Last Modified 18 Aug 2018 

    Family Alice Aston,   b. ~1433, Somerton, Oxfordshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Oxfordshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married 1452  [1
    Children 
     1. Alice Anne,   b. ~1453, North Aston, Oxfordshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 5 Aug 1487, Great Tew, Oxfordshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 34 years)
    Last Modified 14 Dec 2018 
    Family ID F19310  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - ~28 Aug 1434 - London, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - ~1490 - North Aston, Oxfordshire, England Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Notes 
    • Biography
      John Anne or Aune appears in the 1451 will of his brother, William Anne, gentleman of North Aston, Oxfordshire, as brother and executor.[1] William was the son of Alexander Anne[2] so one would presume that John was Alexander's son as well. William's will also gives a small monetary legacy to Alice Aston, probably John's future wife.

      John was a minor at the time of his father's death in 1439 (so he was born after 1418), and he was made a ward and apprentice of a London Grocer, John Rokesle.[3]

      John "son of Alexander Anne" came of age on 28 Aug 1455, which allows us to estimate his birthdate with good accuracy.[4]

      Since John's father's only known wife Alice appears to have married Alexander by 1422, it's fairly certain that he was her son.

      John was named the escheator of Oxfordshire and Berkshire on 7 Nov 1458 under Henry VI.[5] He is probably thus the John Aune Esq. of "Northaston" who was issued a general pardon on 9 May 1461 by Edward IV (just after his accession to the Crown).[6] He seems to have lost the office at about the same time but gained it back in the late 1460s. Escheatry accounts in his name are extant at least up to 1475.[7] His father Alexander Anne had been the escheator for Middlesex and Kent at one point in his career.[8]

      John was named a Justice of the Peace (again, like his father Alexander) for Oxfordshire once in 1462.[9]

      He leased land in 1484, along with an Alexander Anne (perhaps a younger son), from the Priory of Bradenstoke, which was the subject of several later legal actions against his son and heir William Anne and William's son and heir John Anne.[10] This is currently the latest known record of him, and his son William seems to have been involved in legal actions dealing with the estate in the 1490s, so he probably died sometime between 1484 and 1495. An effigy in the church of North Aston is traditionally attributed to a John Anne, which may be the present individual.

      Marriage and Children
      Spouse: Alice Aston b. c 1433
      Children:
      William Anne, primogenitor heir (d. ca. 1508)
      Alice Anne b. c 1453
      (maybe) Alexander Anne (d. 1526)
      He married Alice Aston, daughter of Thomas Aston and Elizabeth Giffard, circa 1452.[11] A manuscript pedigree in the Harleian collection, of uncertain origin though probably dating from the early 17th century, indicates that John married twice, first to Alice Aston and second to Alice Gifford.[12] Some modern secondary sources seem to have split John Anne up into two generations, with the John Anne father of the present John Anne marrying the Gifford, but the reason for this is unclear and never explained.
      According to Lewis, Richardson estimated that John Anne, Esq. died circa 1461,[13] but there is ample evidence that he lived well past that date, probably into the mid 1490s (see notes below). It is also not clear that Richardson actually made this claim and it may have been falsely attributed.
      Research Notes
      A John Anne or Aune seems to have been the escheator for Oxfordshire and Berkshire off and on from 1458 to 1475. The Victoria history of Oxon estimates that John lived around 1485.[14] In the 1490s, a William Aune Esq., son and heir of John Aune, sued William Harecourt, esquire, and John Aune over some detained deeds in North Aston.[15] A few years later (1502/3), William Anne sued Harecourt again over the same issue, though without John Anne as a codefendant.[16] Altogether, this would suggest that John died sometime around 1490. Usually, these sorts of lawsuits proceed out of handling of the father's estate, and typically come within a year or two. Combined with the evidence of John Anne acting as the county escheator through the mid-century, and the Victoria history's floruit estimate, Richardson's death year estimate is difficult to credit. This make the birth year estimate of 1400 similarly dubious. Legal evidence shows that it must have been 1434.

      It should be noted that a death in the 1490s would make it most likely that this is the John Anne whose effigy is in the church at North Aston (see wikimedia photos). If one notes that John Anne, Esq., who had held the escheatry for two counties for a decade or more, must have been a particularly wealthy and influential person, the noted lavishness of the North Aston monument makes considerably more sense with him in it. Other theories hold that it belonged to a shadowy previous John Anne, who may or may not have existed, or to another son who died in the 1490s and left William as the heir, but a 1490ish date is perfectly consistent with the tomb's style and it seems unlikely that such an expense would have been dedicated to one of the more obscure members of the family. The monument also impales the arms of Gifford with Anne, so presumably the couple entombed there must be John Anne and Alice Gifford. If she was the second wife, as, again, is attested by the only known source for the marriage, then this would be exactly as expected.

      According to Lewis, Richardson estimated that John Anne, Esq. was born circa 1400 at of Twyford, Buckinghamshire, England.[17] and the son of "Sir John Anne" and Alice Giffard. This is, however, very unlikely, and most primary source data would suggest he was born in 1434, as well as being the son of different parents. Lewis also made him the son of "Sir" John Anne and Alice Giffard, citing the authority of Richardson; however, Richardson does not appear to make this claim. There are no records of a John Anne in this period having a knighthood, so Lewis' data appear to be spurious.

      An inquisition post mortem of William Aston dated 21 Henry VII (1505/6, died the previous year) stated that John Anne aged 24 years (b. ca. 1481) was his kinsman.[18] This is certainly a close relation of one of the present John Annes (perhaps the one who died in 1554[19]) and gives a valuable date point. This William Aston was a son of John Aston of Somerton (d. 1459) and nephew of the Alice Aston who married John Anne. John Anne also witnessed the will of John Aston, which helps corroborate the idea that they were brothers-in-law.[20]

      A 1526 monument to a priest named Alexander Anne engraved with the Gifford arms is in the Giffard Chapel, Church of All Saints, Middle Claydon, Buckinghamshire. This confirms that at least one of the Annes was a Gifford descendant. His 1526 will names Roger Gifford (his executor, with wife Mary Gifford), Mary Darell, and Anne Verney as cousins.[21]

      A William Anne of North Aston died in 1451. By an enormous stroke of luck, the inscription of William Anne's now-lost tomb in London has been preserved, showing that his father was Alexander Anne, recorder of London [22] (who was actually the original purchaser of the North Aston estate and 3-time MP for Middlesex[23]). The Victoria history entry for North Aston asserts (probably based on William's 1451 will) that John Anne Esq. was William's younger brother and heir, so it would appear that they were both sons of this Alexander Anne. This would make sense from the point of view of the rather constrained real estate inheritance in the 15th century, which should follow the heirs male of the original purchaser. It also jibes with the idea that the present John Anne named a son Alexander, which in this scenario would be the name of his father. Alexander's only known wife was named Alice, so this paternity would have John naming his three apparent children after his elder brother, his mother, and his father. At the very least, the recurrence of the Alexander name in the late 15th century generation is a strong indicator that the previous Alexander Anne was indeed an ancestor.

      Sources
      ? UK National Archives Will of William Anne, Gentleman of North Aston, Oxfordshire, PROB 11/1/230, http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/D967272
      ? Christian Oliver Steer, Burial and commemoration in medieval London, c. 1140-1540, Ph.D. Dissertation University of London, September 2013, p. 57, https://pure.royalholloway.ac.uk/portal/files/19528031/STEER_Burial_and_Commemoration_in_Medieval_London_c_1140_1540.pdf
      ? "Folios 242-250: Sept 1448 - ," in Calendar of Letter-Books of the City of London: K, Henry VI, ed. Reginald R Sharpe (London: His Majesty's Stationery Office, 1911), 325-333. British History Online, accessed July 30, 2018, http://www.british-history.ac.uk/london-letter-books/volk/pp325-333.
      ? "Folios 281-290: July 1455 - ," in Calendar of Letter-Books of the City of London: K, Henry VI, ed. Reginald R Sharpe (London: His Majesty's Stationery Office, 1911), 369-380. British History Online, accessed July 30, 2018, http://www.british-history.ac.uk/london-letter-books/volk/pp369-380.
      ? Calendar of the Fine rolls preserved in the Public Record Office Vol XIX Henry VI A.D. 1452-1461, London: HM Stationery Office, 1939 p. 222, Internet Archive
      ? Calendar of the Patent Rolls Preserved in the Public Record Office. Author: Great Britain Public Record Office
      ? UK National Archives E 153/1527
      ? UK National Archives E 153/1025 http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/C2317730
      ? Great Britain. Public Record Office. Calendar of the Patent Rolls, Preserved In the Public Record Office: Edward IV, 1461-1467. London: Printed for H. M. Stationery off., by Eyre and Spottiswoode, 1897. Hathi Trust
      ? London, Vera C. M.,. The Cartulary of Bradenstoke priory / edited by Vera C.M. London, Wiltshire Record Society Devizes 1979, p. 17, Wiltshire Record Society website
      ? Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. IV, p. 459.
      ? William Harvey, The Visitations of the County of Oxford Taken in the Years 1566, 1574, and in 1634, London: Harleian Society, 1871 Google Books
      ? Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, p. 691.
      ? A P Baggs, Christina Colvin, H M Colvin, Janet Cooper, C J Day, Nesta Selwyn and A Tomkinson. "Parishes: North Aston," in A History of the County of Oxford: Volume 11, Wootton Hundred (Northern Part), ed. Alan Crossley (London: Victoria County History, 1983), 6-21. British History Online, accessed February 6, 2018.
      ? UK National Archives C 1/183/7
      ? UK National Archives C 1/256/23
      ? Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. III, p. 426
      ? Great Britain. Public Record Office, Calendar of inquisitions post mortem and other analogous documents preserved in the Public Record Office. [2d ser.], London, Printed for H. M. Stationery Off. by Eyre and Spottiswoode, printers to the Queen, 1898, p. 93 Internet Archive
      ? A P Baggs, Christina Colvin, H M Colvin, Janet Cooper, C J Day, Nesta Selwyn and A Tomkinson. "Parishes: North Aston," in A History of the County of Oxford: Volume 11, Wootton Hundred (Northern Part), ed. Alan Crossley (London: Victoria County History, 1983), 6-21. British History Online, accessed July 21, 2018,.
      ? James Charles Blomfield, History of the Deanery of Bicester: History of the present deanery of Bicester, Oxon, London, Oxford: Parker and Co.,1882, p. 101 Google Books
      ? George Lipscomb, The History and Antiquities of the County of Buckingham, Volume 1, J. & W. Robins, 1847, p. 192 Google Books
      ? Christian Oliver Steer, Burial and commemoration in medieval London, c. 1140-1540 Ph.D. Dissertation University of London, September 2013, p. 57
      ? Michael A. Hicks, Revolution and Consumption in Late Medieval England, Boydell & Brewer, 2001, p. 92
      Author: Marlyn_Lewis. Our royal, Titled, noble, and commoner ancestors

      end of biography [1]

  • Sources 
    1. [S13084] "Alice (Anne) Raynesford (abt. 1453 - abt. 1487)", Ancestors & Descendants, https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Anne-15, abstr.