John O'Sheal

Male 1660 - 1736  (76 years)


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  • Name John O'Sheal 
    Born 1660  England Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 2
    Gender Male 
    Occupation Merchant Taylor  [2
    Died 0Apr 1736  Greater London, Middlesex, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 2
    Buried 13 Apr 1736  Saint Martin-in-the-Fields Churchyard, Westminister, London, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Person ID I40403  The Hennessee Family
    Last Modified 4 Jan 2019 

    Father FNU O'Sheal,   b. (1600-1650), Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Mother unnamed spouse 
    Family ID F31  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Alice Apsley,   b. 1666, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1710, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 44 years) 
    Married 5 Jun 1688  Saint Katherine by the Tower, London, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 2
    Children 
     1. David O'Sheal, The Immigrant,   b. 23 Jan 1690, London, Middlesex, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1745, Suffolk, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 54 years)
     2. John O'Sheal,   b. 17 Mar 1697, (London) Middlesex, England Find all individuals with events at this location
     3. Barnard O'Sheal,   b. 16 Jan 1699, (London) Middlesex, England Find all individuals with events at this location
     4. Benjamin O'Sheal,   b. 13 Jul 1705, (London) Middlesex, England Find all individuals with events at this location
    Last Modified 17 Apr 2019 
    Family ID F14053  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 1660 - England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 5 Jun 1688 - Saint Katherine by the Tower, London, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 0Apr 1736 - Greater London, Middlesex, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - 13 Apr 1736 - Saint Martin-in-the-Fields Churchyard, Westminister, London, England Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Notes 
    • Birth: 1660
      Death: Apr., 1736, England

      John O'Sheal was a merchant taylor of St. Martin in the Fields Parish, Middlesex, London, England who married Alice Apsley on 5 June 1688 at St. Katherine by the Tower, London, England. The burial record dated 13 April 1736 for John O'Sheal of St Martin in the Fields Parish, is recorded on page 76 of the Westminster Burials Transcripts. John O'Sheal is the father of Col. David O'Sheal (1690-1745) immigrant to Virginia who settled in Nansemond County, VA. He was a merchant and attorney in Virginia and North Carolina. Sources state he inherited his father John Osheals tumbler (see reference below from the Virginia Gazette when he advertised its loss):

      David Travillion Bunton has transcribed a newspaper entry concerning the family crest and motto of the family and the immigrant David Osheal as follows:

      Virginia Gazette, page 4 column 2, dated Jan 11, 1740

      Lost on the 1st of December last, riding from Major Oshealls Plantation in Nansemond, through the Swamp to Mr. Turners, Inspector at Sleepy-Hole,thence to Mr. Thomas Brickles at Sleepy Hole, and from thence back to Major
      Osheals, a Silver Tumbler of a Seal, engraved on one Side a Lyon Rampant, Or, in a Field Vert, the Motto, Deus nobis haec otta fecit; on another Side, a Crest, a Hand and Arm armed, holding a Mans Head by the Hair; on the third Side, the Letters I O in a Cypher. Whoever returns it to the
      Subcriber, shall be rewarded to the full Value of it.

      Also Strayd from the same Plantation, on the 26th of the same Month, 8 Sheep, of Several Marks, purchasd a few Days before from an Eastern Shore Man, and remarked with a Hole in one Ear, one had a Bell about its neck. Whoever informs what is become of them, shall be reasonably rewarded, by David Osheal.

      Note by David T.Bunton:

      The letters IO in cipher are the latin intials for JO, which in all likelihood refer to John Osheal, the father of David Osheal.

      The family motto appears to have been taken from the writing of the Roman poet Virgil (Eclogue I, written in 37 BC) where it can be translated loosely as God has given us this place of rest, God has provided us this rest,or God has provided this leisure for us. Other families which share this motto include the Boleyn and Bolgur, etc families and the translation is given as God has given us this tranquility.

      The motto can also be found on state seals and city coat of arms. It amuses me that the University of Liverpool has the latin motto Haec otia studia fovent translating as This leisure makes our studies flourish or These days of peace foster learningthis is in answer to the City of Liverpool motto of Deus nobis haec otia fecit.

      John O'Sheal died in 1736, his son David O'Sheal died in 1745, his son Daniel O'Sheal died in 1780, his son Jethro O'Sheal died in 1846, and his daughter Elizabeth O'Sheal Hewitt died in 1873.

      David Travillion Bunton is the author of THE O'SHEAL RECORD, THE COLONIAL HISTORY OF THE O'SHEAL FAMILY.


      Family links:
      Spouse:
      Alice Apsley O'Sheal (1666 - 1710)*

      Children:
      David O'Sheal (1690 - 1745)*

      *Calculated relationship

      Burial:
      St Martin-in-the-Fields Churchyard
      Westminster
      City of Westminster
      Greater London, England

      Created by: David T Bunton
      Record added: Apr 03, 2014
      Find A Grave Memorial# 127335202

      end of biography [3]
    • David Osheal immigrated from London, England circa 1713-1714 and married Elizabeth Pugh. David O'Sheal, although born in London, England, was of Irish ancestry and is the immigrant ancestor to many descendants. The surname has variants, but O'Sheal and O'Shields are predominate.

      David O'Sheal was an early planter and merchant in Nansemond County, VA (now near Suffolk, VA) and an attorney who practiced in both Virginia and North Carolina.

      David O'Sheal died in 1745, and his widow Elizabeth O'Sheal survived him.

      Although some years ago many stones were broken, vandalized,etc, at Glebe, the graves remain. Fortunately, the graves of David Osheal and his wife Elizabeth Pugh Osheal were noted years before the stones were vandalized. As with many 17th century burials, burial records were often not kept or no longer extant, and stones are often broken and discarded, however the graves have not been removed.

      David Osheal was the son of John Osheal and Alice Apsley.

      The children of John Osheal and Alice Apsley who were baptized in the Church of England (Anglican) at the St. Martin-in-the-Fields Church, Westminster, Middlesex, London, England were:

      1. John Osheal of John and Alice, baptized 7 June 1689.
      2. David Oshell of John and Alice, born 23 Jan 1690
      3. John Oshel of John and Alice born 17 March 1696/97
      4. Barnard Osheal of John and Alice born 16 Jan 1699/1700
      5. Benjamin Osheal of John and Alice born 13 July 1705, baptized on 25 July 1705

      Of the above, David Osheal and his brother Benjamin Osheal came to America.

      The children of David Osheal and Elizabeth Pugh Osheal included the following:

      1. John OSHEAL, b. Abt. 1716, Nansemond Co, Virginia; d. 1749, Norfolk Co, Virginia, m. Ann BOUSCH. Being the oldest son (per my review of early deeds between father and son), John inherited the bulk of estate, plus had an affluent father-in-law named Samuel Boush. Norfolk County, VA Wills and Deeds Book I gives a sizeable inventory showing an affluent household. His widow Ann Boush married second to James Holt. John and Ann Boush Osheal had at least four children, John Jr, David, Samuel, and Elizabeth, according to early guardian bonds of Norfolk County, Va.

      2. David OSHEAL, b. 1723, Nansemond Co, Virginia; d. 1759, Granville, North Carolina. His property was sold in 1759 by his brother Daniel Osheal in Granville Co, NC. He is the Captain David Osheal mentioned as the brother of Teresa Osheal Agnew.

      3. Daniel OSHEAL, b. Abt. 1722, Nansemond Co, Virginia; d. Aft. 1777, (1777 to 1780) Probably in Union District, South Carolina. He married Sarah Walker. He is the Daniel Osheal mentioned by his brother-in-law Rev. John Agnew, stating that he bought a plantation from Daniel Osheal.

      4. William OSHIELDS, b. Abt. 1724, Nansemond Co, Virginia.
      This son included by inference from other original records I have located.

      5. Alice Apsley OSHEAL, b. Abt. 1725, Nansemond Co, Virginia; married William Coupland. Their son David Osheal Coupland had a Bible in which it is recorded that he was born at his grandfather David Osheals seat near Suffolk in Nansemond County, VA. (copy of Bible at Library of Virginia)

      6. Teresa OSHEAL, d. 08 Feb 1795, Monckton House, St. Mary's Parish, York Co, New Brunswick, Canada; m. Rev. John AGNEW. They had a son named Stair Agnew. (see LOYALIST CLAIMS vol. 1 by Coldham). The Agnew family were Tories in the American Revolution, while Daniel's children were staunch patriots.

      7. Ann OSHEAL, m. Edmund GODWIN. Their son Edmund Godwin left a will in New York dated July 20, 1778 where he appointed his cousin Stair Agnew executor, and he mentioned his aunt Teresa Osheal Agnew. This will is online can also be found by searching for Edmund Goodwin.

      An interesting account of David O'Sheal and Daniel Pugh:

      The research of David Travillion Bunton indicates that the Mr. Pugh and Mr Oshield mentioned by Governor William Byrd in his "Secret History of the Dividing Line" was in fact, David Osheal (ie David O'Shields) and Daniel Pugh.

      The boundry line between Virginia and North Carolina had been in dispute because of a flawed survey conducted in 1710-11 and the dispute had been severe enough that an area was prohibited from settlement by both jurisdictions. In 1728 an actual survey was begun and William Byrd was appointed one of the commissioners for the Virginia party. Byrd kept a diary and two works emerged: "The History of the Dividing Line Betwixt Virginia and North Carolina" and "The Secret History of the Line Betwixt Virginia and North Carolina" which was targeted for the entertainment of his friends in London society. Information and notes by William K. Boyd, PhD, are quite helpful in the combined works by Byrd entitled "William Byrd's Histories of the Dividing Line Betwixt Virginia and North Carolina" (published by the North Carolina Historical Commission in 1929…the "Secret History" appears in this work on the odd numbered pages, while the other appears on the even numbered pages). The 1967 edition includes a new introduction by Percy G. Adams. For his "Secret History" Byrd utilized pseudonyms for his fellow commissioners and surveyors. Some of those of interest are as follows:

      North Carolina

      Christopher Gale (commissioner) Judge Jumble
      Edward Mosely (commissioner and surveyor) Plausible
      William Byrd (commissioner) Steady
      William Little (commissioner) Puzzlecause
      John Lovick (commissioner) Shoebrush
      Samuel Swann (surveyor) Bootes

      Virginia

      William Byrd (commissioner) Steady
      William Dandridge (commissioner) Meanwell
      Richard Fitz-william (commissioner) Firebrand
      Alexander Orion (surveyor) Orion
      William Mayo (surveyor) Astrolabe

      William Byrd included various descriptions of the country, produce, and inhabitants which provide an interesting account of the time and area. He also wrote derisively of some of his companions. From the beginning there were tensions between the Virginia group and the North Carolina group, and further difficulties were encountered in the terrain which included the Dismal Swamp, filled with reeds, briars, fallen cypress trees, and with ground so spongy that Byrd remarked "that the Prints of our Feet were instantly fill'd with Water."

      Byrd stated on March 15, 1728 The Surveyors pursued their work with all Diligence, but Still found the Soil of the Dismal so Spongy that the Water ouzed up into every foot-step they took. To their Sorrow, too, they found the Reeds and Bryars more firmly interwoven than they did the day before. But the greatest Grievance was from large Cypresses, which the Wind had blown down and heap'd upon one another. On the Limbs of most of them grew Sharp Snags, Pointing every way like so many Pikes, that requir'd much Pains and Caution to avoid. These Trees being Evergreens, and Shooting their Large Tops Very high, are easily overset by every Gust of Wind, because there is no firm Earth to Steddy their Roots. Thus many of them were laid prostrate to the great Emcumbrance of the way. Such Variety of Difficulties maed the Business go on heavily, insomuch that, from Morning till Night, the Line could advance no further than 1 Mile and 31 Poles. Never was Rum, that cordial of Life, found more necessary than it was in this Dirty Place. It did not only recruit the People's Spirits, now almost Jaded with Fatigue, but serv'd to correct the Badness of the Water, and at the same time to resist the Malignity of the Air.

      Byrd continued his entry of March 15, 1728:

      We sent away the Baggage about 8 a Clock under the Guard of 4 Men. We paid off a long reckoning to Capt Wilson, for our Men & Horses, but Firebrand [ie Richard Fitz-william] forgot to pay for the washing of his Linen, which saved him 2 Shillings at least. He & his Flatterer Shoebrush [ie John Lovick] left us to ourselves, intending to reach Capt. Meads [ie Andrew Meade], but losing their way, they took up at Mr. Peugh's [sic, Pugh's], after riding above 50 miles, & part of the way in the dark. How many Curses this Misadventure cost them I cant say, tho' at least as many as they rode Miles…


      Byrd wrote the next day March 16, 1728 [page 69]:

      We march't from hence about 9 always giving our Baggage the Start of Us [aside from commissioners and surveyors, the party consisted of chain-carriers, markers, horse and baggage handlers, and woodsmen for clearing trees]. We call'd at John Ive's for a Tast of good Water, which is as rare in these parts as good Doctrine. We saw several pretty Girls here as wild as Colts, tho' not so ragged, but drest all in their own Industry. Even those cou'd not tempt us to aligt, but we pursued our Journey with Diligence. We past by Mr. Osheild's & Mr. Pugh's, the last of which has a very good Brick House, & arriv'd about 4 at Capt Meads. [this was Andrew Meade, member of the House of Burgesses 1727-1734 and of the county court, Senior Captain of Militia. Colonel Andrew Meade as well as Daniel Pugh were listed at the first vestry-meeting for the Glebe Church in Nansemond County, VA].

      The Mr Osheild and Mr Pugh aforementioned are undoubtedly David O'Shields (aka David O'Sheal or David O'Sheals) and Daniel Pugh.

      Byrd and his group continued on to the household of Mr. Thomas Speight who "appear'd to be a Grandee of North Carolina" [Footnote: Thomas Speight of Perquimans County, member of the North Carolina Assembly in 1725, and Associate Justice of the General Court, 1726-1728] …"our Landlord [Thomas Speight] gave us much Concern, by affirming with some Assurance, that the Dismal cou'd not be less than 30 Miles in Breadth. All our Comfort was, that his Computation depended wholly on his own wild Conjecture. We ordered Guns to be fired & a Drum to be beaten to try if we cou'd be answer'd out of the Desert, but we had no answer…the servants ty'd the Horses so carelessly that some of them did our Landlord much Damage in his Fodder. I was the more concern'd at this, because the poor Man did all he cou'd to supply our Wants. Firebrand [Richard Fitzwilliam] & the Parson lay single while some were oblig'd to stow 3 in a Bed. Nor cou'd lying soft & alone cure the first of these of swearing outrageously in his Sleep.

      March 19, 1728 We dispatch't Men to the North & South to fire Guns on the Edge of the Dismal by way of Signal, but cou'd gain no Intelligence of our People. Men, Women, and Children flockt from the Neighborhood, to state at us with as much Curiosity as if he had been Morrocco Embassadors. Many Children were brought to our Chaplain to be christen'd, but no Capons, so that all the good he did that way was gratis. Major Alston & Capt. Baker made us a visit & din'd with us. [Footnote: The Alstons and Bakers were families of Chowan County, NC]. My Landlord's Daughter Rachel [Rachel Speight] offer'd her Service to wash my Linnen, & regal'd me with a Mess of Hominy toss't up with Rank Butter & Glyster Sugar. This I was forc't to eat, to shew that nothing from so fair a hand cou'd be disagreeable. She was a smart Lass, & when I desired th Parson to make a Memorandum of his Christenings, that we might keep an Account of the good we did, she ask't me very pertly, who was to keep an Account of the Evil? I told her she shou'd be my Secretary for that, if she wou'd go along with me. Mr. Pugh [Daniel Pugh] & Mr. Oshield [David O'Shields] help't to fill up our House, to that my Landlady told us in her cups, that now we must lie 3 in a Bed.

      March 20, 1728 No News yet of our Dismalities tho' we dispatch't Men to every point of the Compass to enquire after them. Our Visitors took their Leave, but others came in the Evening to supply their Places. Judge Jumble [Christopher Gale] who left us at Coratuck, return'd now from Edenton, and brought 3 Cormorants along with him. One was his own Brother [Edmund Gale], the 2d was Brother to Shoebrush [ie Shoebrush was John Lovick and his brother was Thomas Lovick of Chowan County, NC Collector of Customs] & the 3d Capt Genneau, who had sold his Commission & spent the money. These honest Gentlemen had no business, but to help drink out our Liquor, having very little at Home. Shoebrush's Brother [Thomas Lovick] is a Collector, & owes his Place to a Bargain he made with Firebrand [Richard Fitzwilliam]. Never were understrappers so humble, as the N. Carolina Collectors are to this huge Man. They pay him the same Colirt they wou'd do, if they held their Commisions immediately from his Will & Pleasure. Tho' the Case is much otherwise, because their Commissions are a good as his, being granted by the same Commissioners of his Majesty's Customers. However he expects a World of Homage from them, calling them his Officers. Nor is he content with homage only, but he taxes them as indeed he does all the other Collectors of his Province with a hundred little Services.

      At Night the Noble Captain [Genneau] retir'd before the rest of the company, & was stepping without Ceremony into our Bed, but I arriv'd just time enough to prevent it. We cou'd not possibly be so civil to this free Gentleman, as to make him so great a Compliment: Much less let him take possession according to the Carolina Breeding without Invitation. Had Ruth or Rachel [Speight] my Landlord's Daughters taken this Liberty; We shou'd perhaps have made no Words: but in truth the Captain had no Charms that merited so particular in Indulgence.

      March 21, 1728 Several Persons from several parts came to see Us amongst which was Mr Baker & his Brother the Surveyor of Nansimond, but cou'd tell us no Tydings from the Dismal. We began to be in pain for the Men who had been trotting in that Bogg so long, & the more because we apprehended a Famine amongst them. I had indeed given a Warrant to kill any thing that came in their way in case of Necessity, not knowing that no living Creature cou'd inhabit that in hospitable Place. My Landlord [Thomas Speight] thought our Stay here as tedious as we did, because we eat up his corn and Summer Provisions. However, the Hopes of being well paid render'd that Evil more Supportable. But Complaint being made that the Corn grew low, We retrench't the poor Man's Horses to one Meal a day. In the evening Plausible [Edward Mosely] & Puzzlecause [William Little] return'd to Us from Edenton, where they had been to recover the great Fatique of doing nothing, & to pick up new Scandel against their Governour.

      March 22, 1728 Our disagreeable Carolina Vistors were so kind as to take their Leave, so did Mr. Osheilds [David O'Sheal] & Capt Toot [apparently Captain Genneau], by which our Company & my Landlord's Trouble were considerably lessen'd. We went out several Ways in the Morning, & cou'd get no intelligence. But in the Afternoon Bootes [the NC surveyor Samuel Swann] brought us the welcome News that the Surveyors & all the People were come safe out of the Dismal.

      The survey group came out of the Dismal Swamp about 6 miles from Byrd, not far from the home of Peter Brinkley where they were fed. They continued on for some miles and Byrd remarked that the survey company were "reduced to such Straights that they began to look upon John Ellis's Dog with a longing appetite, and John Evans who was fat & well liking, had reasons to fear that he wou'd be the next Morsel…" Byrd continued "We also sent Horses for the Men, that they might come to us & refresh themselves after so dreadfull a Fatigue…it will be just to remember Captain Meads [Andrew Meade] Generosity to Us. His Cart arriv'd here Yesterday with a very handsome present to the Commissioners of Virginia. It brought them 2 Doz. Quart Bottles of Excellent Madera Wine, 1 Doz. Pottle Bottles of Strong Beer, & half a Dozen Quarts of Jamaica Rum. To this general Present was added a particular One to Meanwell [William Dandridge] of Naples-Biscuit from Mrs. Mead. At the same time we receiv'd a very Polite Letter, which gave a good Grace to his Generosity, & double our Obligation. And surely never was Bounty better timed, when it enabled us to regale the poor Dismalites whose Spirits needed some Recruit.

      On April 1, 1728 Byrd reported that they reached Richard Parkers and then proceeded past Somerton Chappel (which was left 2 miles in Virginia) to the plantation of William Speight, his plantation being cut in two by the line with his Tobacco House in Carolina.

      April 2, 1728 This Morning early Capt Baker came to make us a Visit, & explain'd to us the Reason of the present of Mutton which he sent us Yesterday. It seems the Plantation where he lives is taken into Virginia which without good Friends might prejudice him in his Surveyor's Place of Nansimond County. But we promised to employ our Interest in his Favour. We made the best of our way to Chowan River, crossing the Line several times. About a mile before we came to that River, we crost Somerton Creek. We found our Surveyors at a little Cottage on the Banks of Chowan over against the Mouth of the Nottoway River. They told us that our Line cut Black-Water River, about half a Mile to the Northward of that Place but in Obedience to his Majesty's Order in that Case, we directed them to continue the Line from the Middle of the Mouth of the Nottoway River. According the Surveyors post Cowan there, & carry'd the Line over a miry Swamp more than half a mile thro', as far as an Indian Old-Field.

      In the meantime our Horses & Baggage were ferry'd over the River, a little lower, to the same Field, where we pitch't our Tent, promising ourselves a comfortable Repose: but our Evil Genius came at Night & interrupted all our Joys. Firebrand [Richard Fitzwilliam] arriv'd with his most humble Servant Shoebrush [John Lovick], tho' to make them less unwelcome, they brought a present from Mr Oshields [David O'Sheal] of 12 Bottles of Wine, & as many of Strong Beer. But to say the Truth we had rather have drunk Water the whole Journey to have been fairly quit of such disagreeable Company.

      Of further interest is an account of David O'Sheal and his brother Benjamin O'Sheal:

      The colonial records of NC reveal that there was a tug of war in power between Governor George Burrington and Richard Everard who replaced him in 1725. In November of 1728 David Osheal, an attorney and merchant, got Everard to appoint his brother Benjamin Osheal (formerly court clerk in Pasquotank Precinct Court and Carteret Precinct, NC in 1726) as the naval officer in charge of collected ten percent of the whale oil and whalebone on the coast off of Port Beaufort. Supposedly Ben Osheal collected some 80 barrels of oil and half ton of bone (about 500 pounds worth), and then after converting the duty to his own use, Ben Osheal fled to Gambia (Africa). Because David Osheal had signed as security for the bond for his brothers position, David Osheal was arrested and ordered to pay what his brother owed.

      The colonial records of NC which I researched in 2001 (included at that time in THE OSHEAL RECORD, THE COLONIAL HISTORY OF THE OSHEAL FAMILY by David Travillion Bunton) mentioned David Osheal being fined and hauled off to jail for "a bond entered into at Edenton [NC] as security for the faithful discharge of a naval office..."

      The naval office was that of his brother Benjamin Osheal who was christened at St Martin in the Fields, Middlesex, London on 25 July 1705 (parents John Osheal and Alice Apsley).
      David was fined 50 pounds and "dragged away to the common Gaol in a very rough manner which was broke open on the occasion and with the judges assistance the said David was thrust into it and another Lock put on, and he locked up and kept till weary of so noisome a place the Gentleman [Osheal] was compelled to pay the money to be discharged, which the judge also recieved himself." The Judge Edward Porter had a lot of complaints against him, including this one by Osheal, and it was felt that the judge abused his power.
      Source records on Benjamin Osheal and David Osheal are included in North Carolina's Vice Admiralty Papers.

      There is an excellent article on whaling of this period, which mentions my Osheal forbears. It was originally published in The North Carolina Historical Review in January 1988 (Volume 65, pages 1 to 51) under title "The Pursuit of Leviathan: A History of Whaling on the North Carolina Coast" by Marcus B. Simpson Jr and Sallie W. Simpson. Local libraries often have this journal or can obtain it through inter library loan. It provides an excellent account of shore-based whaling on the coast which was conducted by local fishing communities along the Atlantic coast during the colonial period, from Maine to South Carolina, according to Simpson.

      On pages 13-14, Simpson quotes a petition revealing that Ben O'Sheal, was originally empowered to "receive the Tenths of Whale Oyl & Bone Catched on the Sea Coast of the said Port." [footnote 48: Petition of Richard Everard to Edmund Porter, July 23, 1730, Court Order for David Osheal, August 3, 1730, Vice-Admiralty Papers, CCR 191; Order of Edmund Porter to Marshal of Court, August 3, 1730, Vice-Admiralty Papers, CCR 142.]

      The transcription by David Travillion Bunton of an entry concerning his ancestor David Osheal, the great-grandfather of Elizabeth Osheal Hewitt, is as follows:

      Virginia Gazette, page 4 column 2, dated Jan 11, 1740

      Lost on the 1st of December last, riding from Major Oshealls Plantation in Nansemond, through the Swamp to Mr. Turners, Inspector at Sleepy-Hole,thence to Mr. Thomas Brickles at Sleepy Hole, and from thence back to Major
      Osheals, a Silver Tumbler of a Seal, engraved on one Side a Lyon Rampant, Or, in a Field Vert, the Motto, Deus nobis haec otta fecit; on another Side, a Crest, a Hand and Arm armed, holding a Mans Head by the Hair; on the third Side, the Letters I O in a Cypher. Whoever returns it to the
      Subcriber, shall be rewarded to the full Value of it.

      Also Strayd from the same Plantation, on the 26th of the same Month, 8 Sheep, of Several Marks, purchasd a few Days before from an Eastern Shore Man, and remarked with a Hole in one Ear, one had a Bell about its neck. Whoever informs what is become of them, shall be reasonably rewarded, by David Osheal.

      Note by O'Sheal - O'Shields Historian David T.Bunton:

      The letters IO in cipher are Latin for the intials JO, which in all likelihood refer to John Osheal, the father of David Osheal. David O'Sheal apparently inherited this tumbler after his father's death in 1736.

      The family motto appears to have been taken from the writing of the Roman poet Virgil (Eclogue I, written in 37 BC) where it can be translated loosely as God has given us this place of rest, God has provided us this rest,or
      God has provided this leisure for us. Other families which share this motto include the Boleyn and Bolgur, etc families and the translation is given as God has given us this tranquility.

      The motto can also be found on state seals and city coat of arms. It amuses me that the University of Liverpool has the latin motto Haec otia studia fovent translating as This leisure makes our studies flourish or These
      days of peace foster learningthis is in answer to the City of Liverpool motto of Deus nobis haec otia fecit.
      from David Travillion Bunton, author of THE O'SHEAL RECORD, THE COLONIAL HISTORY OF THE O'SHEAL FAMILY


      Family links:
      Parents:
      John O'Sheal (1660 - 1736)
      Alice Apsley O'Sheal (1666 - 1710)

      Spouse:
      Elizabeth Pugh Osheal (1699 - 1760)

      Children:
      John O'Sheal (1715 - 1749)*
      David O'Sheal (1720 - 1755)*
      Daniel O'Sheal (1722 - 1780)*
      Alice Apsley O'Sheal Coupland (1725 - 1768)*
      Teresa O'Sheal Agnew (1730 - 1795)*
      Ann O'Sheal Godwin (1735 - 1760)*

      *Calculated relationship

      Burial:
      Glebe Church Cemetery
      Bennett Creek
      Suffolk City
      Virginia, USA

      Created by: David T Bunton
      Record added: Sep 21, 2010
      Find A Grave Memorial# 59034749

      end of biography [4]

  • Sources 
    1. [S3702] David Bunton | Telephone interview & Pedigree, October 26, 2014 | 479.967.9109 | travillion@hotmail.com.

    2. [S11389] "John O'Sheal", Obituary, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=127335202, retrieved, recorded & uploade.

    3. [S11390] "John O'Sheal", Obituary written by David T. Bunton, travillion@hotmail.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?pa.

    4. [S11394] "David O'Sheal", Obituary written by David T. Bunton, travillion@hotmail.com, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?p.