Brian Palmes, Esquire

Brian Palmes, Esquire

Male 1467 - 1519  (52 years)

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  • Name Brian Palmes 
    Suffix Esquire 
    Born 1467  Naburn, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 2, 3
    • Naburn is a small village and civil parish in the unitary authority of the City of York in North Yorkshire, England. It lies on the eastern side of the River Ouse about 4 miles (6.4 km) south of York. According to the 2001 census the parish had a population of 470. Before 1996 it had been part of the Selby district.

      History & Photos ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naburn
    Gender Male 
    Occupation Member of Parliamentm, House of Commons, for York, Yorkshire, England  [3, 4
    Will 31 Oct 1519  (York, Yorkshire, England) Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Died 1 Dec 1519  Naburn, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [2, 3
    • Naburn is a small village and civil parish in the unitary authority of the City of York in North Yorkshire, England. It lies on the eastern side of the River Ouse about 4 miles south of York.
    Probate 11 Jan 1520  (York, Yorkshire, England) Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Religion Roman Catholic  [4
    Also Known As Bryan Palmes  [4
    Person ID I35894  The Hennessee Family
    Last Modified 6 Sep 2019 

    Father William Palmes, Esquire,   b. ~ 1435, Naburn, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 14 Dec 1492, (Naburn, Yorkshire, England) Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 57 years) 
    Mother Eleanor Heslerton,   b. ~1438, (West Heslerton) Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married (Naburn, Yorkshire, England) Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Family ID F16415  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Ellen Acclome,   b. Abt 1475, Moreby, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married 15 Nov 1493  (Yorkshire, England) Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 2, 3, 5, 6
    Residence (Family) Naburn Hall, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Children 
     1. Agnes Palmes,   b. Abt 1507, Naburn, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. (Yorkshire) England Find all individuals with events at this location
    Last Modified 19 Sep 2019 
    Family ID F13228  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 1467 - Naburn, Yorkshire, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 15 Nov 1493 - (Yorkshire, England) Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsWill - 31 Oct 1519 - (York, Yorkshire, England) Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 1 Dec 1519 - Naburn, Yorkshire, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsProbate - 11 Jan 1520 - (York, Yorkshire, England) Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence (Family) - - Naburn Hall, Yorkshire, England Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Photos
    Brian Palmes (1467-1519)
    Brian Palmes (1467-1519)
    Bryan Palmes M.P., of Naburn Hall in 1511; Member of Parliament for York

    Palmes' portrait depicts him wearing a signet ring on his index finger; this ring was lost by his descendant in the Battle of Marston Moor and it was found during the 1860s when a farmer was ploughing the battle site.

  • Notes 
    • Brian Palmes (before 1467-1519) was an English landowner, justice of the assize and politician who sat in the House of Commons.

      Early life

      Palmes was the son eldest son and heir of William Palmes of Naburn and Eleanor, daughter of William Heslerton of Heslerton. He was a member of the Palmes family, an ancient upper-gentry family that had been seated at Naburn Hall since the 13th century.

      In about 1480 the and his younger brother Guy entered the Middle Temple, where both were to do well. In 1496 he became recorder of York in succession to Sir William Fairfax, and in the following year was made a Freeman; he proved more diligent in attending the York council than some recorders, twice supervising elections when a mayor died in office. It was a measure of the city’s satisfaction that in 1504 it appointed his brother, who was already a serjeant, to be "of counsel" at 20s. a year. His and his first wife’s membership of the city’s Corpus Christi guild, and his own of the merchants’ guild, suggest that he engaged in trade. When in December 1509 Palmes was elected to Parliament he at once resigned the recordership. The city rarely elected its recorder and the choice of Palmes may have been influenced by his recent despatch to London with two aldermen, one of them his fellow-Member William Nelson, on unspecified business. Unlike Nelson, he was not to be re-elected, perhaps because he was made a serjeant in 1510, but his continued standing in the city and shire is reflected in his appointment to nine subsidy commissions between 1512 and 1515. Little of a personal nature has come to light about his later years. In 1515 he presented his son George (later Wolsey’s confessor and a canon of York) to the living of Sutton-upon-Derwent, Yorkshire, and in the following year he was named executor by his brother.

      Family[edit]
      Palmes married first Ellen Acclome, the daughter of John Acclome of Moreby Hall, Yorkshire. His second wife was Anne Markenfield, daughter of Sir Thomas Markenfield of Markenfield Hall. Palmes was the father of five children from his first marriage:

      Nicholas Palmes (d. 1551), succeeded his father to Naburn Hall. He married his cousin Johana, daughter of William Conyers of Sockburn Hall, who was the mother of his eldest son and heir, Brian. He married secondly Susan, daughter of Sir Robert Waterton of Walton Hall, West Yorkshire.
      George Palmes, died unmarried
      William Palmes, died unmarried
      Richard Palmes, died unmarried
      Agnes Palmes, married in 1559 Sir William Babthorpe of Babthorpe and Osgodby. They were the parents of two children.
      Marston Moor signet ring[edit]
      Palmes' portrait depicts him wearing a signet ring on his index finger; this ring was lost by his descendant in the Battle of Marston Moor and it was found during the 1860s when a farmer was ploughing the battle site.[1]

      Death

      In his own will of 31 October 1519 Palmes asked to be buried in his parish church of St. George, York, whither his body was to be escorted by friars from the four York houses and by members of the Corpus Christi guild, and to have prayers said for him and his family locally for seven years and at Roecliffe for ever. He made numerous bequests of lands and goods to his family, and named as executors and residuary legatees his wife, Sir William Bulmer and Sir Guy Dawny, Thomas Langton and James Duffelde, gentlemen, Richard Ellis, clerk, and William Marshall. The will was proved on 11 January 1520 and an inquisition post mortem held at York castle on 27 (?)April 1520 found that Palmes had died on 1 Oct. (sic) 1519 leaving as his heir a 20-year-old son Nicholas. At his death Palmes held the manors of Naburn and Gate Fulford, and lands, some of them acquired recently, scattered over a wide area of Yorkshire.[2]

      References

      Jump up ^ W. M. Baines, Old Naburn, p. 47.
      Jump up ^ History of Parliament Online
      D. M. Palliser, Tudor York, p. 74

      * [3]
    • more...

      The Palmes family of Naburn Hall, and the cadet branches of Lindley Hall, North Yorkshire; Ashwell, Rutland; and Carcraig in Ireland, are an ancient English aristocratic family, noted for their adherence to Catholicism.


      Origins and estates

      The family were originally seated at Taunton Deane, Somerset, where Manfred de Palma/Palmes had by the "Gift of Milo Earl of Hereford & Constable of England, 53 Oxgangs of Land and 25 Messages in the Lordship of Taunton Dean".[1] Manfred was "known to be living in the sixth year of the reign of King Stephen, 1140 AD".[2]

      The Palmes family of Naburn can trace its ancestry through a maternal line to Robert de Todeni (died 1088), a powerful Norman baron. Todeni's importance is reflected by the 80 estates in 11 counties that he was granted by William across England. His principal Lordship was at Belvoir where he built his home, Belvoir Castle, before establishing Belvoir Priory in 1076.[3] Among Todeni's many estates was Naburn. In 1226, William Palmes of Taunton acquired the Lordship of Naburn through his marriage to Matilda, daughter or sister of Richard de Watterville; a direct descendant of Robert de Todeni from whom the land had passed to the Wattervilles. From then on, the estate continued to descend uninterrupted from father to son within the Palmes family until 1974, on the death of Commander George Bryan Palmes.[4] The Palmes family were said to have been "unique in being able to boast an unbroken heritage".[4] Edmund Burke described the family as "one of serious antiquity".[5]

      The will of Brian Palmes, Sergeant-at-Law, of Naburn Hall, was dated 31 October 1519. It shows that in addition to Naburn the family held estates in: Riccall, Escrick, South Duffield, Elvington, Barthorpe, Sutton, Holtby, Berrythorpe and Gate Fulford.[6] A cadet branch of the family was seated at Lindley Hall, North Yorkshire, and an Irish line of the family settled at Carcraig.[7]

      Naburn Hall

      The manor house of the Palmes family – Naburn Hall – is first recorded in 1345. It had eight hearths in 1672. A drawing of circa 1720 shows it as a two-storey house, three bays long, with attic windows in tall pointed gables. The house was remodelled in 1735 by Brian Palmes (1696–1737), who was married to Anne, daughter of Robert Scarisbrick of Scarisbrick Hall. The hall was again altered in 1818 by George Palmes (1776–1851). In 1870, it was restored and enlarged to the designs of William Atkinson, though the 18th century interior and central block remained unchanged. The main three-storey square block of rendered brick and stone dressings has a concealed slate roof. In the 19th century, a two-storey wing was attached. Attached to the rear of the hall is the derelict yellow brick and tile Chapel of St. Nicholas, originally built in the 16th century by Nicholas Palmes (died 1551) of Naburn, so his family could continue to practice Catholicism. The chapel was rebuilt in 1870. The Coach house and Stables were built in the late 18th century with a Pedimented Clock tower and domed bell-turret. A one and a half-storey Gate Lodge was built on the main road in the early 19th century, with a central stack, slated roof and veranda.[8] [4]

  • Sources 
    1. [S49366] http://ingilbyhistory.ripleycastle.co.uk/ingilby_4/Babthorpe%20Family%20(1501-1635).pdf.

    2. [S49775] http://histfam.familysearch.org/getperson.php?personID=I30651&tree=EuropeRoyalNobleHous.

    3. [S8814] "Brian Palmes" biography, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brian_Palmes_(died_1519), abstracted January 1, 2016 by David A.

    4. [S8813] "Palmes Family" its profile & history, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Palmes_family, abstracted January 1, 2016 by David.

    5. [S7170] "The History of Parliament", http://www.historyofparliamentonline.org/volume/1509-1558/member/babthorpe-sir-william-1489.

    6. [S8817] "Ellen Acclame" biography, http://our-royal-titled-noble-and-commoner-ancestors.com/p2052.htm#i61653, abstracted January.