Jane Seymour, Queen of England

Jane Seymour, Queen of England

Female 1509 - 1537  (28 years)

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  • Name Jane Seymour 
    Suffix Queen of England 
    Born 1508-1509  Wolf Hall, Burbage, Wiltshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 2
    Gender Female 
    Alt Birth 1517-1518  Wolf Hall, Burbage, Wiltshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    • Wulfhall or Wolfhall is an early 17th-century manor house in Burbage, Wiltshire, England. A previous manor house on the same site was the seat of the Seymour family, a member of which, Jane Seymour, was Queen to King Henry VIII.
    Died 24 Oct 1537  Hampton Court, Middlesex, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [2, 3
    Buried 12 Nov 1537  Saint Georges Church, Windsor, Berkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 3
    Person ID I26607  The Hennessee Family
    Last Modified 3 Oct 2018 

    Father John Seymour, IV, Knight,   b. Abt 1476, Wolf Hall, Burbage, Wiltshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 21 Dec 1536  (Age ~ 60 years) 
    Mother Margery Wentworth,   b. ~ 1478, Nettlestead, Suffolk, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 0Oct 1550  (Age ~ 72 years) 
    Married 22 Oct 1494  Wolf Hall, Burbage, Wiltshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Family ID F9596  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Henry VIII, King of England,   b. 28 Jun 1491, Greenwich Palace, Greenwich, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 28 Jan 1547, Palace of Whitehall, Wesminster, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 55 years) 
    Married 30 May 1536  Whitehall, Westminster, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 3
    Children 
     1. Edward VI, King of England,   b. 12 Oct 1537, Hampton Court, Middlesex, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 6 Jul 1553, Greenwich Palace, Greenwich, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 15 years)
    Last Modified 14 Dec 2018 
    Family ID F11326  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 1508-1509 - Wolf Hall, Burbage, Wiltshire, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsAlt Birth - 1517-1518 - Wolf Hall, Burbage, Wiltshire, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 30 May 1536 - Whitehall, Westminster, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 24 Oct 1537 - Hampton Court, Middlesex, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - 12 Nov 1537 - Saint Georges Church, Windsor, Berkshire, England Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Photos
    Jane Seymour (1515-1536) Queen of England
    Jane Seymour (1515-1536) Queen of England
    She succeeded Anne Boleyn as queen consort following the latter's execution for high treason, incest and adultery in May 1536.

    She died of postnatal complications less than two weeks after the birth of her only child, a son who reigned as Edward VI. She was the only one of Henry's wives to receive a queen's funeral, and his only consort to be buried beside him in St. George's Chapel, Windsor Castle.

    She was the only wife of Henry VIII whose son survived infancy.

  • Notes 
    • Jane Seymour (c. 1508 - 24 October 1537) was Queen of England from 1536 to 1537 as the third wife of King Henry VIII.

      She succeeded Anne Boleyn as queen consort following the latter's execution for high treason, incest and adultery in May 1536.

      She died of postnatal complications less than two weeks after the birth of her only child, a son who reigned as Edward VI. She was the only one of Henry's wives to receive a queen's funeral, and his only consort to be buried beside him in St. George's Chapel, Windsor Castle.

      She was the only wife of Henry VIII whose son survived infancy.

      Jane is the cousin several times over to the grandchildren of Vernia Elvira Swindell Byars:

      http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=I824&secondpersonID=&maxrels=6&disallowspouses=0&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I26607

      end of biography [1]
    • In profile: Jane Seymour

      Historian Elizabeth Norton tells you everything you need to know about Jane Seymour, queen of England from 1536 to 1537 as the third wife of Henry VIII

      A portrait of Jane Seymour, queen of England from 1536 to 1537 as the third wife of Henry VIII. Jane is remembered for being the only wife to provide Henry with a son and male heir (the future Edward VI). Jane died on 24 October 1537, most likely from puerperal, or childbed, fever. (Photo by Popperfoto/Getty Images)
      October 3, 2018 at 8:00 am
      Born: In around 1508

      Died: 24 October 1537

      Ruled: from 1536 to 1537

      Family: the daughter of Sir John Seymour of Wolfhall (‘the real Wolf Hall’) in Wiltshire and his wife, Margery Wentworth

      Successor: Anne of Cleves, Henry’s fourth wife

      Remembered for: being the only wife to provide Henry with a son and male heir

      Life: Jane Seymour, Henry VIII’s third wife, was born in around 1508. Her kinsman, the courtier Sir Francis Bryan, secured a place for her in the service of Queen Catherine of Aragon. Jane later transferred into the household of Catherine’s successor, Anne Boleyn.

      By 1535, Jane was in her late twenties, with few marriage prospects. One contemporary considered her to be “no great beauty, so fair that one would call her rather pale than otherwise”.

      Read more:

      Podcast: Jane Seymour – Henry VIII’s favourite queen
      Alison Weir: “Jane Seymour had the courage to stand up for what she cared about” (exclusive to The Library)
      A c1536 portrait of Jane Seymour by Hans Holbein the Younger. "Jane's marriage to Henry VIII lasted less than 18 months, and yet she was witness to some of the most turbulent events of his reign," says Alison Weir. (Photo by PAINTING / Alamy Stock Photo)
      She nonetheless attracted the king’s attention – perhaps when he visited Wolfhall in September 1535. Anne Boleyn blamed her miscarriage, in late January 1536, on the developing relationship, complaining to Henry that she had “caught that abandoned woman Jane sitting on your knees”. The queen and her maid had already come to blows.

      Jane’s rise: Anne’s failure to bear a son was an opportunity for Jane. When Henry sent her a letter and a purse of gold, she refused them, declaring that “she had no greater riches in the world than her honour, which she would not injure for a thousand deaths”.

      Henry was smitten with this show of virtue, henceforth insisting on meeting her only with a chaperone. During April they discussed marriage and, on 20 May 1536 – the day after Anne Boleyn’s execution – the couple were betrothed. They married shortly afterwards.

      Read more:

      11 facts about Anne Boleyn https://www.historyextra.com/period/tudor/10-things-you-probably-didnt-know-about-anne-boleyn/
      Guilty or not guilty: why did Anne Boleyn have to die? (exclusive to The Library)
      Anne Boleyn: a 16th-century feminist? https://www.historyextra.com/period/tudor/anne-boleyn-a-16th-century-feminist/
      A portrait of Anne Boleyn. (Photo by DeAgostini/Getty Images) https://images.immediate.co.uk/volatile/sites/7/2015/02/AB-6c81f48.jpg?quality=90&resize=250,250
      Jane, who took as her motto “bound to obey and serve”, presented herself as meek and obedient. She was, however, instrumental in bringing Henry’s estranged daughter, princess Mary, back to court.

      The new queen held conservative religious beliefs. This became apparent in October 1536 when she threw herself on her knees before the king at Windsor, begging him to restore the abbeys for fear that the rebellion, known as the Pilgrimage of Grace, was God’s judgment against him. In response, Henry publicly reminded her of the fate of Anne Boleyn, “enough to frighten a woman who is not very secure”.

      Jane’s fall: Without a son, Jane was vulnerable, and the postponement of her coronation was ominous. Finally, in March 1537, her pregnancy was announced. Henry was solicitous to his wife, resolving to stay close to her and ordering fat quails from Calais when she desired to eat them.

      Jane endured a labour of two days and three nights before bearing a son, Edward, at Hampton Court on 12 October, to great rejoicing. She was well enough to appear at the christening on 15 October, lying in an antechamber, wrapped in furs.

      Read more:

      To kidnap a king: the foiled plot to abduct Edward VI
      Edward VI: boy king and religious zealot (exclusive to The Library)
      How could the son of Henry VIII become Edward VI?
      A portrait of Edward VI. The young monarch’s support for a trade venture through the North-East Passage laid the foundations for the Elizabethan age of exploration. (Photo by GeorgiosArt/Getty Images)
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      However, she soon sickened, with her attendants blamed for suffering “her to take great cold and to eat things that her fantasy in sickness called for”. In reality, she was probably suffering from puerperal, or childbed, fever. She died on 24 October.

      Jane Seymour, as the only one of Henry VIII’s wives to die as queen, received a royal funeral at Windsor. She was later joined there by the king, who requested burial beside the mother of his only surviving son. Her child succeeded as Edward VI, but died at the age of 15.

      This article was first published by History Extra in April 2014

      Tags Henry VIII's wives Tudor kings and queens Henry VIII Jane Seymour Kings and queens Women's history

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      A portrait of Jane Seymour, queen of England from 1536 to 1537 as the third wife of Henry VIII. Jane is remembered for being the only wife to provide Henry with a son and male heir (the future Edward VI). Jane died on 24 October 1537, most likely from puerperal, or childbed, fever. (Photo by Popperfoto/Getty Images) Learn more about this subject

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  • Sources 
    1. [S6342] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jane_Seymour.

    2. [S13224] "In profile: Jane Seymour", https://www.historyextra.com/period/tudor/kings-and-queens-in-profile-jane-seymour/?utm_sour.

    3. [S6341] "Jane Seymour, Queen of England Pedigree", http://www.ourfamilyhistories.org/ahnentafel.php?personID=I23584&tree=00&pare.