William Swindal, The Immigrant

Male 1584 - 1622  (~ 37 years)


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  • Name William Swindal 
    Suffix The Immigrant 
    Born ~1584  (Cheshire, England) Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Gender Male 
    Immigration 1619  Virginia from England Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Religion (Anglican) 
    Died 22 Mar 1622  Berkeley Plantation, Colony of Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    • Berkeley Plantation, one of the first great estates in America, comprises about 1,000 acres (400 ha) on the banks of the James River on State Route 5 in Charles City County, Virginia. Berkeley Plantation was originally called Berkeley Hundred and named after the Berkeley Company of England. Benjamin Harrison IV built on the estate what is believed to be the oldest three-story brick mansion in Virginia and is the ancestral home to two Presidents of the United States: William Henry Harrison, his grandson, and Benjamin Harrison his great-great-grandson.[4][5] It is now a museum property, open to the public.

      Among the many American "firsts" that occurred at Berkeley Plantation are:

      The first official Thanksgiving: 4 December 1619
      First time Army bugle call "Taps" played: July 1862, by bugler Oliver W. Norton; the melody was written at Harrison's Landing, the plantation's old wharf, by Norton and then General Daniel Butterfield.

      On December 4, 1619, a group of 38 English settlers arrived at Berkeley Hundred, about 8,000 acres (32 km2) on the north bank of the James River near Herring Creek in an area then known as Charles Cittie (sic). It was named for one of the original founders, Richard Berkeley,[citation needed] a member of the Berkeley family of Gloucestershire, England. It was about 20 miles upstream from Jamestown, where the first permanent settlement of the Colony of Virginia was established on May 14, 1607.

      View map, images & history ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berkeley_Plantation
    Person ID I25703  The Hennessee Family
    Last Modified 6 Jul 2019 

    Father John Swindal,   b. 1523, (Yorkshire) England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Mother Joan Beete,   b. (West Riding, Yorkshire, England) Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married (~1566)  West Riding, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Family ID F9135  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Isabelle Hiberte,   b. Bef 1580, Cheshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1652, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 72 years) 
    Married 10 Dec 1598  St. Michael's, Macclsesfield, Cheshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [5, 6, 7
    • St Michael and All Angels Church overlooks Market Place in the town of Macclesfield, Cheshire, England. It is an active Anglican parish church in the diocese of Chester, the archdeaconry of Macclesfield and the deanery of Macclesfield.[1] It forms a team parish with three other Macclesfield churches: All Saints, St Peter's and St Barnabas'.[2] The church is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II* listed building.[3]

      A church has been on the site since the 13th century. There have been two major reconstructions, the last being in 18981901. Two ancient chapels remain dating from the 15th and 16th centuries. Inside the church are a number of tombs and memorials, mainly to the memory of the Savage and Legh families.

      The first church on this site was a chapel built around 1220, soon after the borough of Macclesfield was established. Around 1278 it was extended or rebuilt by Queen Eleanor, wife of Edward I and dedicated to All Saints or All Hallows. A chapel, known as the Legh chapel was built around 1442 for Sir Piers Legh who fought and died at the Battle of Agincourt. Between 1505 and 1507 the Savage Chapel, a larger chantry chapel, was built by Thomas Savage, Archbishop of York from 1501 to 1507.[4]

      There have since been a number of reconstructions of the church. In 173940 it was rebuilt in neoclassical style and at this time it is likely that the church was rededicated to Saint Michael. In 1740 the wooden tower was taken down because it was considered dangerous. In 1819 the east end was rebuilt and a new chancel added. The last major rebuilding was in 18981901 by Arthur Blomfield when the whole church, other than part of the chancel and the Legh and Savage chapels, were replaced.
    Children 
     1. Thomas Swindell, An Immigrant,   b. 1604, (Cheshire, England) Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1669, Rappahannock County, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 65 years)
    Photos
    St. Michael's, Macclsesfield, Cheshire, England
    St. Michael's, Macclsesfield, Cheshire, England

    Marriage site of William & Isabelle Hiberte Swindal, December 10th, 1598

    8th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Vernia Swindell Byars (1894-1985)
    Last Modified 24 Sep 2021 
    Family ID F9136  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - ~1584 - (Cheshire, England) Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 10 Dec 1598 - St. Michael's, Macclsesfield, Cheshire, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsImmigration - 1619 - Virginia from England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 22 Mar 1622 - Berkeley Plantation, Colony of Virginia Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Notes 
    • ...http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/c/o/r/John-C-Cornelson/WEBSITE-0001/UHP-0666.html (Now extinct as of July 6th, 2019)

      William Swindle (b. Abt. 1584, d. 22 Mar 1620/21)

      William Swindle (son of John Swindell.) was born Abt. 1584, and died 22 Mar 1620/21 in Captain Berkeley's Plantation, 66 mi from Jamestown. He married Isabell Hiberte on 10 Dec 1598 in Macclesfield, St. Michael, Cheshire, England.

      More on Berkeley Plantation... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berkeley_Plantation

      On December 4, 1619, a group of 38 English settlers arrived at Berkeley Hundred , about 8,000 acres (32 km2) on the north bank of the James River near Herring Creek in an area then known as Charles Cittie (sic). It was about 20 miles upstream from Jamestown , where the first permanent settlement of the Colony of Virginia was established on May 14, 1607.

      The group's charter required that the day of arrival be observed yearly as a "day of thanksgiving" to God. On that first day, Captain John Woodleaf held the service of thanksgiving. The Charter of Berkeley Plantation specified the thanksgiving service: "Wee ordaine that the day of our ships arrival at the place assigned for plantacon in the land of Virginia shall be yearly and perpetually keept holy as a day of thanksgiving to Almighty God."[8]

      During the Indian Massacre of 1622 , nine of the settlers at Berkeley Hundred were killed, as well as about a third of the entire population of the Virginia Colony. The Berkeley Hundred site and other outlying locations were abandoned as the colonists withdrew to Jamestown and other more secure points.


      Notes for William Swindle:
      [2793807.ged]

      ALMANACK; PLACES; HISTORIC BUILDINGS In the 17th century, the sprawling farm was named Martin's Hundred, and it was among the subsidiary "particular plantations" of the joint-stock Virginia Company of London. The Society of Martin's Hundred, named for Richard Martin, recorder of the City of London, was its owner. Sir John Wolstenholme was among its investors. William Harwood was the farm's commander. Martin's Hundred (hundred defined a subdivision of an English county) fronted on 10 miles of the north shore of a bend in the James River, about 9 miles below Jamestown. The administrative center was Wolstenholme Towne, a fortified settlement of about 40 souls sheltering in rough cabins of wattle and daub woven on wooden posts thrust into the clay subsoil. Still, fresh settlers came, and on March 22, 1622, the Powhatans rose to kill as many English as they could surprise in their homes and fields. From near modern Richmond to Newport News, the Powhatans burned and looted dwellings and desecrated corpses. Death counts vary, but about 400 English died. Martin's Hundred, the plantation hardest hit, lost more than 50, perhaps as many as 70. Wolstenholme Towne's death toll was not separated in the death rolls. Wolstenholme Towne was resettled a year or more later but abandoned sometime after 1645. It may be that no trace of the town was apparent by the time planter Robert "King" Carter bought the land about 1709. What remained of Wolstenholme Towne and its dead lay forgotten beneath the plantation's fields and woodlands until 1976. Colonial Williamsburg Foundation 2002.

      posted by: Jay Glaze Heflin Date: October 30, 1998 at 14:46:00
      In Reply to: WILLIAM SWINDLE (1584-1624) by Charles Swindle of 890

      Charles, we have very similar ancestry up thru Tenn., then my folks went to Texas in 1880's.I have recently returned from England, and visited the church where William and Izabel were married, and got copies of the marriage records. I did not have time to do more, but plan to return at the first opportunity. This is definitely the seat of the Swindles. By the way, most of the Swindles in Cheshire, England have an s on the end of their name. There are still Hibertes also. They pronounce it Hibbert.

      More About William Swindle:
      Emigration: 1619, Moved to Virginia from England
      Fact 1 (2): 1624, Killed in an Indian raid on Capt. Berkeley's plantation.

      More About William Swindle and Isabell Hiberte:
      Marriage: 10 Dec 1598, Macclesfield, St. Michael, Cheshire, England.

      Children of William Swindle and Isabell Hiberte are:
      +Thomas Swindle, b. Abt. 1604, d. Abt. 1669, Rappahanock County, VA. [8]
    • Notes for WILLIAM SWINDELL: William Swindle (Swandal) married Isabell Hiberte on 10 Dec 1598 in Macclesfield, St. Michael, Cheshire, England. Isabell was born before 1580 in Cheshire. William Swindle (Swandal) was killed in the Indian massacre on Good Friday, 22 Mar 1622 at Berkley?s Plantation 66 miles from James City, Virginia. James City is known today as Jamestown. Isabell died in 1652 in Virginia. William came to the New World about 1619/20.

      a) Excerpted 12 Feb 2006:

      Home: Surnames: Swindell Family Genealogy Forum

      WILLIAM SWINDLE BEF 1584-1624

      Posted by: Charles Swindle Date: October 30, 1998 at 11:06:29
      of 448

      I am researching my SWINDLE (various spelling) ancestors. I have my line traced back to William Swindle b. before 1584 in England and died 1624 in Virginia. If anyone can tie into this line I will be glad to share any info I have.

      My line comes from England to Virginia then through North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and Tennessee, to Alabama. I am from Walker Co., Alabama.

      William SWINDLE was my GGGGGGGGG Grandfather.

      FIVE GENERATIONS OF SWINDLES

      1-William SWINDLE (bef 1584-1624)
      sp: Isabell HIBERTE (abt 1590-1652)
      2-Thomas SWINDLE (1604-abt 1669)
      sp: (unknown) (abt 1610-abt 1670)
      3-Timothy SWINDLE (1646-1683)
      sp: Sarah (-)
      4-John SWINDLE (Mar 20 1676-1772)
      sp: Mary MCPHERSON (1700-bef 1751)
      5-Timothy SWINDLE (bet 1715 and 1720-abt 1790)
      5-John SWINDLE (1723-1775)
      5-Parker SWINDLE (abt 1730-bef 1800)
      5-Josiah SWINDLE (1732-abt 1806)
      5-William SWINDLE (abt 1735-bef Aug 1785)
      5-Zedeklah SWINDLE (Jun 4 1737-1795)
      5-Caleb SWINDLE (abt 1737-abt 1791)
      3-John SWINDLE (1648-abt 1700)
      sp: WILLIS (1649-abt 1700)
      4-(Son) SWINDLE (1673-1750)
      3-Daniel SWINDLE (1648-)
      2-Daniel SWINDLE (1640-1666)

      Thanks in advance for any help.

      Charles Swindle
      377 Belcher Drive
      Midfield, AL 35228-1701
      205-923-0964
      Tidecrim@aol.com

      http://genforum.genealogy.com/swindell/messages/8.html [9]

  • Sources 
    1. [S35032] Leggett,Margaret;Family Group Records;Internet Address:leggett@magicnet.net.

    2. [S14275] http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/c/o/r/John-C-Cornelson/WEBSITE-0001/UHP-0666.html (July7th, 2019: This link i.

    3. [S44975] http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~randolph/nostalgia_html/swindle/swindle.html.

    4. [S45316] Dalton Smith Pedigree | 3 June 2012 | tennis7074@gmail.com.

    5. [S35034] Leggett,Margaret;Family Group Records;Internet Address:leggett@magicnet.net.

    6. [S44976] http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/c/o/r/John-C-Cornelson/WEBSITE-0001/UHP-0662.html.

    7. [S14272] "Swindle Family", compiled by Bill Brackett, , this person, place, event, location, docum.

    8. [S45682] .http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/c/o/r/John-C-Cornelson/WEBSITE-0001/UHP-0666.html.

    9. [S45683] http://genforum.genealogy.com/swindell/messages/8.html.