Notes


Matches 39,801 to 39,900 of 42,953

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39801 Surname meaning for "Hansard" ... http://records.ancestry.com/Richard_Hansard_records.ashx?pid=8931047

English: metonymic occupational name for a cutler, from Old French hansard, hansart 'cutlass', 'dagger' (of Germanic origin, composed of elements meaning 'hand' and 'knife' (see Sachs)). 
Hansard, Robert (I37603)
 
39802 Surname mentioned by Wes Dodson in his notebook #3...DAH. Clark, Almira "Myra" (I7162)
 
39803 Surname Welcher was previously spelled Wilsher and Wilcher.

John A. Wilsher was the son of William H. Wilcher and Emiline "Emily" Gilley

John A. Wilsher married Elizabeth Canzada Carter in Cannon County, TN. 
Wilcher, John A. (I40302)
 
39804 Surname: Harmon

This unusual and interesting surname has a very ancient history. It is one of the Norman forms of the Germanic personal name "Hermann", composed of the elements "heri, hari" meaning army, plus "man", man. The first known bearer was "Arminus", the 1st Century leader of a tribe called the "Cherusci", recorded by the Latin historian Tacitus. The popularity of the name is borne out by the large number of surnames it has generated throughout Europe; in England the inherited Norman forms existing in the modern idiom are Hearmon, Harmon, Herman, Harmon, Harmond, Harmant, and Hermon. The name development includes: Robert Hereman (1196, Norfolk), William Heremond (1296, Sussex), and John Harman (1327, Suffolk). London Church Records list the marriage of Constantine Harmon to Margaret Fenton, on October 31st 1570 at St. Mary Abchurch, and John Harmon to Alice Mason, on October 10th 1572 at St. Botolph's, Bishopsgate. A Coat of Arms granted to a Harmon family is silver, in base a red crescent issuant therefrom a green rose branch, blue flowered. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Willelmus Hermannus, which was dated 1141 - 1149, in the "Records of Holme", Norfolk, during the reign of King Stephen, known as "Count of Blois", 1135 - 1154. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

end of note 
Harmon, William (I6705)
 
39805 Surname: Jennings

This interesting surname, is of early medieval English origin, although later strongly associated with both Wales and Ireland. Recorded in the spellings of Jennings, Jennins and Jennens, it is a patronymic. It derives from the given name Janyn or Jenyn, a diminutive of the personal name John, and meaning "Little John". John itself derives from the Hebrew name "Yochanan", meaning "Jehovah has favoured (me with a son)". The patronymic surname which in this case means "the son of Little John", dates back to the late 13th Century (see below), "John" being a 12th century Crusader introduction. Soldiers of the crusades returning from the Holy Land, gave to their children and specifically sons, Hebrew and Greek names as a reminder of the fathers "pilgrimage". These "English" personal names which later became surnames, include such examples as Thomas, Isaac, Abraham, and many others. In this case early recordings include Walter Jannes and Richard Janyns in the Subsidy Rolls of Worcestershire of 1327, and Thomas Jenyn, in the charter rolls of 1428 known as "Inquisitions and Assessments relating to Feudal Aids". Elizabeth, the daughter of Thomas Jennyns, was christened on August 9th 1544, at St. Pancras', Soper Lane, London, and Jeffrey Jennings was christened on August 24th 1561, at St. Dunstans in the East, London. Among the namebearers in the "Dictionary of National Biography" is Sir Patrick Alfred Jennings (1831 - 1896), who was Premier of New South Wales. He was born in Newry, Ireland, and emigrated to the gold fields of Victoria in 1852, before moving to New South Wales in 1863. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Roger Jonyng, which was dated 1296, in the Subsidy Rolls of the county of Sussex, during the reign of King Edward 1, known as "The Hammer of the Scots", 1272 - 1307. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

© Copyright: Name Orgin Research www.surnamedb.com 1980 - 2007 
Jennings), (John (I27764)
 
39806 Surname: Merriman

Recorded in several forms including Merriman, Merryman, Merriment, Maryman, and the usually Irish, Marmon and Marmion, this ancient surname is found in most parts of the British Isles, although is never common. It is a derivative of the Olde English pre 7th century personal name 'Myrige', meaning merry, which in the medival period became a nickname surname given either to a person of 'honest' character, or a professional clown, one who took part in the theatres of the day. The suffix ending "man(n)" was in the context of a surname, a form of endearment meaning "friend of". The overall meaning is probably "Merry's friend". Given the robust humour of the medieval period as shown in the famous works of Geoffrey Chaucer, the alternative possibility exists, that the name could sometimes mean the very reverse of merry! Early examples of the recordings taken from authentic registers and charters of the period include John Meryman in the registers of Gloucester, known as the "Letter books", in the year 1359, whilst Adam Myryman is recorded in the 1379 Poll Tax rolls of the city of York. Later examples include those of Alice Merriman, who married Thomas Chalduke at St James church, Clerkenwell, London, on October 9th 1563, and John Meriment, christened at St Botolphs without Aldgate, also London, on October 17th 1686. The famous Irish poet Brian Merriman, was born in 1757, and died in 1810. The first recorded spelling of the surname is believed to be that of Adam Muryman, which was dated 1332, in the subsidy rolls of the county of Staffordshire, during the reign of King Edward III of England, who reigned from 1327 to 1377.

© Copyright: Name Orgin Research www.surnamedb.com 1980 - 2007 
Merriman, DeMarcus "Mark" (I6812)
 
39807 Survived by daughters Alice Fikes of Seguin and Mrs. Lee Hill of Kermit; sons Larry Bonner of Carrollton, TX, Thomas Bonner of Lorene, TX, Z. D. Ashworth of Abilene, Texas and R. C. Bonner, Jr. of Torrence, CA; brother Homer Grimm of Pecos; sisters Mrs. Bill Alexander of Junesboro, TX and Mrs. Elsie Word of San Antonio, TX. Bonner, Reuel Cadis (I26259)
 
39808 Survivors:
Husband of 57 years: Glemon Kilburn
Daughters: Sheila Hanekow
Denise Miller and husband Jeff
Grandchildren: Mike Hanekow, Jr
Great grasndchild: Michael John Hanekow III
Brother: Robert Cawthon and wife Evelyn
Niece: Geri Marsh and husband Johnny
Several nieces and nephews

Funeral service 11 AM Friday at Mountain View Mausoleum in Atchleys' Seymour Memory Gardens with pastor William Sims officiating. Atchley Funeral Home, Seymour in charge 
Cawthon, Barbara Ruth "Ruth" (I9566)
 
39809 Susan Clontz Ehret, letter written to Thelma Penley, July 25, 1992. Source (S12352)
 
39810 Susan Colon | 3 Nov 2014 | Registrant | Shorties63@yahoo.com Source (S3785)
 
39811 Susan Cora C. Watkins, was the daughter of Thomas S. Watkins of KY and Susan J. ?? of VA, and was born in Warren Co., TN.

Susan married Britton Fletcher Snipes Nov. 15, 1855, in Warren Co., TN.

They had 13 children: Silas, Thomas, Ida, James, Alfred, Connie, John, Josiah, Robert, Lizzie, Absalom, Hattie, and Leon. 
Watkins, Susan Cora "Corry" (I16302)
 
39812 Susan Hennessee Taylor interview | 9 Apr 2011 | sltaylor@blomand.net Source (S44337)
 
39813 Susan J. Neese, Family Tree FTDNA, abstracted October 12, 2015, susan.j.neese@gmail.com Source (S8094)
 
39814 Susan Morris To: TNWARREN-L@rootsweb.com Date: Thursday, August 13, 1998 11:28 PM Subject: Turner/Overturf/Davis Source (S4925)
 
39815 Susan Morris | Pedigree | Information received August 14, 1998 | smorris2@flash.net Source (S4926)
 
39816 Susan moved to Dallas, Texas in 1941 and married in 1944. Susan is a artist also. Susan has a son and worked at Dallas Museum of Art until she retired. Hughes, Anna Susan "Sue" (I42569)
 
39817 Susan's ancestry:


Posted By: CJBryant-Miller
Email: cjm59@bwsys.nt
Subject: William Morrison Bryan,White Co.TN
Post Date: April 01, 2001 at 14:40:58
Message URL: http://genforum.genealogy.com/bryant/messages/5246.html
Forum: Bryant Family Genealogy Forum
Forum URL: http://genforum.genealogy.com/bryant/


I am looking for any of the following decendants of the following.

note::::: William Morrison Bryan's only son was Elijah London Bryan whose named cahnged to BRYANT in abt 1830's

I am looking for the decendants of the following:

William Morrison Bryan b. 23 Apr 1784 White Co.TN d. 1855 White Co Tn. Will book D pg 273 married c. 1810 Jane Wallace , dau of Elias Wallace ( wife Mary)

Children:
Mary Polly b 1810 m/ Charles Denny

Elijah London Bryan b 25 Apr 1811 Overton TN d. Dec 1864 (Civil War, in Warren Co Ky?) m/ 28 Dec 1831 White Co..Mary Adaline McConnell b.14 June 1813 White co TN d. Oct 1883
Smithville Dekalb Co TN., name changed to BRYANT with this son in ??1830's

Isabelle b 1817 Overton Co TN m/ in White Co TN WW Moore

Martha Jane b 1824 White Co TN m/ 1847 Nathaniel G. Austin

Minerva b 1829 m/2 4 Feb 1859 John White

Susan b. unknown m/ 1852 William Monroe Russell





 
Bryan, Susan (I24270)
 
39818 Susannah Hannah Mullican Allen was the daughter of James Mullican and Mary Polly Womack Mullican. She married Andrew Jackson Allen on May 31, 1874, in Warren County, Tennessee. Children: Hannah, Staley T, Mary, John, Ambrose, Martha and Lonnie Allen. Mullican, Susannah Hannah "Susan" (I10612)
 
39819 Susie Simmons Hennessee, telephone interview, September 24, 1994... Source (S2967)
 
39820 Suspect death location... Hogg, Elizabeth Ann (I21351)
 
39821 Suspect her middle-name may be, "Calender", as her grand-daughter, Sarah Hennessee, may have been named after her...DAH Lamb, Sarah C. (I26229)
 
39822 Suspect his roots go the Charles MADEWELL family Van Buren County;

... http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=29237352
... http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=30947416 
Madewell, Sidney Clairborne "Buck" (I32120)
 
39823 Sutton-at-Hone Map & History... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sutton-at-Hone Smythe, Sir Thomas Knight (I33259)
 
39824 Sviatoslav I Igorevich (Old East Slavic: ?~??????? / ??????????[1] ?????????, Sventoslavu / Svantoslavu Igorevici; Old Norse: Sveinald Ingvarsson) (c. 942 – 26 March 972), also spelled Svyatoslav was a Grand prince of Kiev[2][3] famous for his persistent campaigns in the east and south, which precipitated the collapse of two great powers of Eastern Europe, Khazaria and the First Bulgarian Empire. He also conquered numerous East Slavic tribes, defeated the Alans and attacked the Volga Bulgars,[4][5] and at times was allied with the Pechenegs and Magyars.

His decade-long reign over the Kievan Rus' was marked by rapid expansion into the Volga River valley, the Pontic steppe, and the Balkans. By the end of his short life, Sviatoslav carved out for himself the largest state in Europe, eventually moving his capital in 969 from Kiev (modern-day Ukraine) to Pereyaslavets (identified as the modern village of Nufaru, Romania)[6] on the Danube.

In contrast with his mother's conversion to Christianity, Sviatoslav remained a staunch pagan all of his life.

Due to his abrupt death in ambush, his conquests, for the most part, were not consolidated into a functioning empire, while his failure to establish a stable succession led to a fratricidal feud among his three sons, resulting in two of them being killed.

Reign 945–972
Coronation 964
Predecessor Igor
Successor Yaropolk I
Born 942? AD
Kiev
Died 26 March 972 AD [aged ~30]
The island of Khortytsa Dnieper
Wives
Predslava
Malusha
Issue With unknown woman:
Yaropolk I
Oleg

With Malusha:
Vladimir the Great
Full name
Sviatoslav Igorevich
Dynasty Rurik Dynasty
Father Igor
Mother Saint Olga (regent 945-964)

Name

The Primary Chronicle records Sviatoslav as the first ruler of the Kievan Rus' with a name of Slavic origin (as opposed to his predecessors, whose names had Old Norse forms). The name Sviatoslav, however, is not recorded in other medieval Slavic countries. Nevertheless, Sveinald is the Old East Norse cognate with the Slavic form as attested in the Old East Norse patronymic of Sviatoslav's son Vladimir: Valdamarr Sveinaldsson. This patronymic naming convention continues in Icelandic and in East Slavic languages. Even in Rus', it was attested only among the members of the house of Rurik, as were the names of Sviatoslav's immediate successors: Vladimir, Yaroslav, and Mstislav.[7][need quotation to verify] Some scholars see the name of Sviatoslav, composed of the Slavic roots for "holy" and "glory", as an artificial derivation combining the names of his predecessors Oleg and Rurik (whose names mean "holy" and "glorious" in Old Norse, respectively).[8]

Early life and personality

Virtually nothing is known about Sviatoslav's childhood and youth, which he spent reigning in Novgorod. Sviatoslav's father, Igor, was killed by the Drevlians around 945, and his mother, Olga, ruled as regent in Kiev until Sviatoslav reached maturity (ca. 963).[9] Sviatoslav was tutored by a Varangian named Asmud.[10] The tradition of employing Varangian tutors for the sons of ruling princes survived well into the 11th century. Sviatoslav appears to have had little patience for administration. His life was spent with his druzhina (roughly, "company") in permanent warfare against neighboring states. According to the Primary Chronicle, he carried on his expeditions neither wagons nor kettles, and he boiled no meat, rather cutting off small strips of horseflesh, game, or beef to eat after roasting it on the coals. Nor did he have a tent, rather spreading out a horse-blanket under him and setting his saddle under his head, and all his retinue did likewise.[11]


Illustration of Sviatoslav wearing a vyshyvanka, by Fedor Solntsev

Sviatoslav's appearance has been described very clearly by Leo the Deacon, who himself attended the meeting of Sviatoslav with John I Tzimiskes. Following Deacon's memories, Sviatoslav was a blue-eyed man of average height but of stalwart build, much more sturdy than Tzimiskes. He shaved his blond head and his beard but wore a bushy mustache and a sidelock as a sign of his nobility.[12] He preferred to dress in white, and it was noted that his garments were much cleaner than those of his men, although he had a lot in common with his warriors. He wore a single large gold earring bearing a carbuncle and two pearls.[13]

Religious beliefs

Sviatoslav's mother, Olga, converted to Eastern Orthodox Christianity at the court of Byzantine Emperor Constantine Porphyrogenitus in 957,[14] at the approximate age of 67. However, Sviatoslav remained a pagan all of his life. In the treaty of 971 between Sviatoslav and the Byzantine emperor John I Tzimiskes, the Rus' are swearing by Perun and Veles.[15] According to the Primary Chronicle, he believed that his warriors (druzhina) would lose respect for him and mock him if he became a Christian.[16] The allegiance of his warriors was of paramount importance in his conquest of an empire that stretched from the Volga to the Danube.

Family

Svjatoslav's mother, Olga, with her escort in Constantinople, a miniature from the late 11th century chronicle of John Skylitzes.
Very little is known of Sviatoslav's family life. It is possible that he was not the only (or the eldest) son of his parents. The Russo-Byzantine treaty of 945 mentions a certain Predslava, Volodislav's wife, as the noblest of the Rus' women after Olga. The fact that Predslava was Oleg's mother is presented by Vasily Tatishchev. He also speculated that Predslava was of a Hungarian nobility. George Vernadsky was among many historians to speculate that Volodislav was Igor's eldest son and heir who died at some point during Olga's regency. Another chronicle told that Oleg (? - 944?) was the eldest son of Igor. At the time of Igor's death, Sviatoslav was still a child, and he was raised by his mother or under her instructions. Her influence, however, did not extend to his religious observance.


Sviatoslav I in the Tsarsky Titulyarnik, 1672

Sviatoslav had several children, but the origin of his wives is not specified in the chronicle. By his wives, he had Yaropolk and Oleg.[17] By Malusha, a woman of indeterminate origins,[18] Sviatoslav had Vladimir, who would ultimately break with his father's paganism and convert Rus' to Christianity. John Skylitzes reported that Vladimir had a brother named Sfengus; whether this Sfengus was a son of Sviatoslav, a son of Malusha by a prior or subsequent husband, or an unrelated Rus' nobleman is unclear.[19]

Eastern campaigns

The Kievan Rus' at the beginning of Sviatoslav's reign (in red), showing his sphere of influence to 972 (in orange)
Shortly after his accession to the throne, Sviatoslav began campaigning to expand Rus' control over the Volga valley and the Pontic steppe region. His greatest success was the conquest of Khazaria, which for centuries had been one of the strongest states of Eastern Europe. The sources are not clear about the roots of the conflict between Khazaria and Rus', so several possibilities have been suggested. The Rus' had an interest in removing the Khazar hold on the Volga trade route because the Khazars collected duties from the goods transported by the Volga. Historians have suggested that the Byzantine Empire may have incited the Rus' against the Khazars, who fell out with the Byzantines after the persecutions of the Jews in the reign of Romanus I Lecapenus.[20]

Sviatoslav began by rallying the East Slavic vassal tribes of the Khazars to his cause. Those who would not join him, such as the Vyatichs, were attacked and forced to pay tribute to the Kievan Rus' rather than to the Khazars.[21] According to a legend recorded in the Primary Chronicle, Sviatoslav sent a message to the Vyatich rulers, consisting of a single phrase: "I want to come at you!" (Old East Slavic: "???? ?? ?? ???")[22] This phrase is used in modern Russian (usually misquoted as "??? ?? ??") and in modern Ukrainian ("??? ?? ??") to denote an unequivocal declaration of one's intentions. Proceeding by the Oka and Volga rivers, he attacked Volga Bulgaria. He employed Oghuz and Pecheneg mercenaries in this campaign, perhaps to counter the superior cavalry of the Khazars and Bulgars.[23]


Sviatoslav's Council of War by Boris Chorikov

Sviatoslav destroyed the Khazar city of Sarkel around 965, possibly sacking (but not occupying) the Khazar city of Kerch on the Crimea as well.[24] At Sarkel he established a Rus' settlement called Belaya Vyezha ("the white tower" or "the white fortress", the East Slavic translation for "Sarkel").[25] He subsequently destroyed the Khazar capital of Atil.[26] A visitor to Atil wrote soon after Sviatoslav's campaign: "The Rus' attacked, and no grape or raisin remained, not a leaf on a branch."[27] The exact chronology of his Khazar campaign is uncertain and disputed; for example, Mikhail Artamonov and David Christian proposed that the sack of Sarkel came after the destruction of Atil.[28]

Although Ibn Haukal reports the sack of Samandar by Sviatoslav, the Rus' leader did not bother to occupy the Khazar heartlands north of the Caucasus Mountains permanently. On his way back to Kiev, Sviatoslav chose to strike against the Ossetians and force them into subservience.[29] Therefore, Khazar successor statelets continued their precarious existence in the region.[30] The destruction of Khazar imperial power paved the way for Kievan Rus' to dominate north-south trade routes through the steppe and across the Black Sea, routes that formerly had been a major source of revenue for the Khazars. Moreover, Sviatoslav's campaigns led to increased Slavic settlement in the region of the Saltovo-Mayaki culture, greatly changing the demographics and culture of the transitional area between the forest and the steppe.[31]

Campaigns in the Balkans

Main article: Sviatoslav's invasion of Bulgaria

Sviatoslav invading Bulgaria, Manasses Chronicle
The annihilation of Khazaria was undertaken against the background of the Rus'-Byzantine alliance, concluded in the wake of Igor's Byzantine campaign in 944.[32] Close military ties between the Rus' and Byzantium are illustrated by the fact, reported by John Skylitzes, that a Rus' detachment accompanied Byzantine Emperor Nikephoros Phokas in his victorious naval expedition to Crete.

In 967 or 968,[33] Nikephoros sent to Sviatoslav his agent, Kalokyros, with the task of talking Sviatoslav into assisting him in a war against Bulgaria.[34] Sviatoslav was paid 15,000 pounds of gold and set sail with an army of 60,000 men, including thousands of Pecheneg mercenaries.[35][36]

Sviatoslav defeated the Bulgarian ruler Boris II[37] and proceeded to occupy the whole of northern Bulgaria. Meanwhile, the Byzantines bribed the Pechenegs to attack and besiege Kiev, where Olga stayed with Sviatoslav's son Vladimir. The siege was relieved by the druzhina of Pretich, and immediately following the Pecheneg retreat, Olga sent a reproachful letter to Sviatoslav. He promptly returned and defeated the Pechenegs, who continued to threaten Kiev.

[show] v t e
Rus'–Byzantine Wars
Sviatoslav refused to turn his Balkan conquests over to the Byzantines, and the parties fell out as a result. To the chagrin of his boyars and his mother (who died within three days after learning about his decision), Sviatoslav decided to move his capital to Pereyaslavets in the mouth of the Danube due to the great potential of that location as a commercial hub. In the Primary Chronicle record for 969, Sviatoslav explains that it is to Pereyaslavets, the centre of his lands, "all the riches flow: gold, silks, wine, and various fruits from Greece, silver and horses from Hungary and Bohemia, and from Rus' furs, wax, honey, and slaves".


Pursuit of Sviatoslav's warriors by the Byzantine army, a miniature from 11th century chronicles of John Skylitzes.

In summer 969, Sviatoslav left Rus' again, dividing his dominion into three parts, each under a nominal rule of one of his sons. At the head of an army that included Pecheneg and Magyar auxiliary troops, he invaded Bulgaria again, devastating Thrace, capturing the city of Philippopolis, and massacring its inhabitants. Nikephoros responded by repairing the defenses of Constantinople and raising new squadrons of armored cavalry. In the midst of his preparations, Nikephoros was overthrown and killed by John Tzimiskes, who thus became the new Byzantine emperor.[38]


Madrid Skylitzes, meeting between John Tzimiskes and Sviatoslav.

John Tzimiskes first attempted to persuade Sviatoslav into leaving Bulgaria, but he was unsuccessful. Challenging the Byzantine authority, Sviatoslav crossed the Danube and laid siege to Adrianople, causing panic on the streets of Constantinople in summer 970.[39] Later that year, the Byzantines launched a counteroffensive. Being occupied with suppressing a revolt of Bardas Phokas in Asia Minor, John Tzimiskes sent his commander-in-chief, Bardas Skleros, who defeated the coalition of Rus', Pechenegs, Magyars, and Bulgarians in the Battle of Arcadiopolis.[40] Meanwhile, John, having quelled the revolt of Bardas Phokas, came to the Balkans with a large army and promoting himself as the liberator of Bulgaria from Sviatoslav, penetrated the impracticable mountain passes and shortly thereafter captured Marcianopolis, where the Rus' were holding a number of Bulgar princes hostage.


Siege of Durostorum in Manasses Chronicle

Sviatoslav retreated to Dorostolon, which the Byzantine armies besieged for sixty-five days. Cut off and surrounded, Sviatoslav came to terms with John and agreed to abandon the Balkans, renounce his claims to the southern Crimea, and return west of the Dnieper River. In return, the Byzantine emperor supplied the Rus' with food and safe passage home. Sviatoslav and his men set sail and landed on Berezan Island at the mouth of the Dnieper, where they made camp for the winter. Several months later, their camp was devastated by famine, so that even a horse's head could not be bought for less than a half-grivna, reports the Kievan chronicler of the Primary Chronicle.[41] While Sviatoslav's campaign brought no tangible results for the Rus', it weakened the Bulgarian statehood and left it vulnerable to the attacks of Basil the Bulgar-Slayer four decades later.

Death and aftermath

The Death of Sviatoslav by Boris Chorikov
Fearing that the peace with Sviatoslav would not endure, the Byzantine emperor induced the Pecheneg khan Kurya to kill Sviatoslav before he reached Kiev. This was in line with the policy outlined by Constantine VII Porphyrogenitus in De Administrando Imperio of fomenting strife between the Rus' and the Pechenegs.[42] According to the Slavic chronicle, Sveneld attempted to warn Sviatoslav to avoid the Dnieper rapids, but the prince slighted his wise advice and was ambushed and slain by the Pechenegs when he tried to cross the cataracts near Khortitsa early in 972. The Primary Chronicle reports that his skull was made into a chalice by the Pecheneg khan.[43]

Following Sviatoslav's death, tensions between his sons grew. A war broke out between his legitimate sons, Oleg and Yaropolk, in 976, at the conclusion of which Oleg was killed. In 977 Vladimir fled Novgorod to escape Oleg's fate and went to Scandinavia, where he raised an army of Varangians and returned in 980. Yaropolk was killed, and Vladimir became the sole ruler of Kievan Rus'.

Art and literature

Ivan Akimov. Sviatoslav's Return from the Danube to His Family in Kiev (1773)
Sviatoslav has long been a hero of Belarusian, Russian, and Ukrainian patriots due to his great military successes. His figure first attracted attention of Russian artists and poets during the Russo-Turkish War (1768–1774), which provided obvious parallels with Sviatoslav's push towards Constantinople. Russia's southward expansion and the imperialistic ventures of Catherine II in the Balkans seemed to have been legitimized by Sviatoslav's campaigns eight centuries earlier.

Among the works created during the war was Yakov Knyazhnin's tragedy Olga (1772). The Russian playwright chose to introduce Sviatoslav as his protagonist, although his active participation in the events following Igor's death is out of sync with the traditional chronology. Knyazhnin's rival Nikolai Nikolev (1758–1815) also wrote a play on the subject of Sviatoslav's life. Ivan Akimov's painting Sviatoslav's Return from the Danube to Kiev (1773) explores the conflict between military honour and family attachment. It is a vivid example of Poussinesque rendering of early medieval subject matter.

Interest in Sviatoslav's career increased in the 19th century. Klavdiy Lebedev depicted an episode of Sviatoslav's meeting with Emperor John in his well-known painting, while Eugene Lanceray sculpted an equestrian statue of Sviatoslav in the early 20th century.[44] Sviatoslav appears in the 1913 poem of Velimir Khlebnikov Written before the war (#70. ?????????? ?? ?????)[45] as an epitome of militant Slavdom:

?????????? ??? ?????, Pouring the famed juice of the Danube
??????? ? ????? ?????, Into the depth of my head,
????? ???? ?, ????????? I shall drink and remember
??????? ????: "??? ?? ??!". The cry of the bright ones: "I come at you!"[46]
Sviatoslav is the villain of the novel The Lost Kingdom, or the Passing of the Khazars, by Samuel Gordon,[47] a fictionalised account of the destruction of Khazaria by the Rus'. The Slavic warrior figures in a more positive context in the story "Chernye Strely Vyaticha" by Vadim Viktorovich Kargalov; the story is included in his book Istoricheskie povesti.[48]

In 2005, reports circulated that a village in the Belgorod region had erected a monument to Sviatoslav's victory over the Khazars by the Russian sculptor Vyacheslav Klykov. The reports described the 13-meter tall statue as depicting a Rus' cavalryman trampling a supine Khazar bearing a Star of David and Kolovrat. This created an outcry within the Jewish community of Russia. The controversy was further exacerbated by Klykov's connections with Pamyat and other anti-Semitic organizations, as well as by his involvement in the "letter of 500", a controversial appeal to the Prosecutor General to review all Jewish organizations in Russia for extremism.[49] The Press Centre of the Belgorod Regional Administration responded by stating that a planned monument to Sviatoslav had not yet been constructed but would show "respect towards representatives of all nationalities and religions."[50] When the statue was unveiled, the shield bore a twelve-pointed star.

Sviatoslav is the main character of the books "Knyaz" ("?????") and "The Hero" ("?????"), written by Russian writer Alexander Mazin.

On 7 November 2011, a Ukrainian fisherman found a one metre long sword in the waters of the Dnieper on Khortytsia near where Sviatoslav is believed to have been killed in 972. The handle is made out of four different metals including gold and silver, and could possibly have belonged to Sviatoslav himself.[51]

end of biography 
Sviatoslav I, Grand Prince of Kiev (I51056)
 
39825 Swaffords of Sequatchie Valley,TN,by Ray C.Swofford,2nd Edition,1978:
U.S. Social Security Death Index 
Source (S5403)
 
39826 Swaffords of Sequatchie Valley,TN,by Ray C.Swofford,2nd Edition,1978: Source (S2521)
 
39827 Sweet Aunt Bessie passed into paradise July 12, 2013. Gone to be with all those whom she loved; Uncle Murlis, Ma, Pop, sisters Lucile, Margie, brothers, Pete and Fred. What a happy reunion for her.

I'll never forget her loving nature, her wonderful fudge pies and cakes and how she loved:

Sweets,
Garage sales,
Shoes,
Prune juice and
Dinners out...

She will be sorely missed by all who knew her...DAH

Byars, Bessie Lee (I751)
 
39828 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Harrison, Sandra Lynn (I27745)
 
39829 Swindell,James Earl:SWINDELL Registry;swindell1936@clds.net;2 Feb 2001 Source (S16732)
 
39830 Swindle Family

compiled by Bill Brackett

The Swindle name is believed to be English. It is said to mean "one who came from Swindale" a chapelry in the parish of Shap in northern England’s county of Westmoreland. The original meaning of the name is thought to be derived from a dale or dell where swine were raised or perhaps a haunt of wild boars.

The family claims a coat of arms, which has a boar’s head and two crossed blue swords with gold hilts on a silver shield.

In records I have seen that there was a William Swindell who was born before 1584 in England and was killed in an Indian massacre in Virginia. He died on Captain Berkley's plantation about 60 miles from Jamestown, Virginia in 1624. His last named is spelled Swandal in these records.

In Cheshire, England on 08 Oct 1578 a William Swyndles married Margery Barber. On 10 Dec 1598 in Cheshire, England a William Swindles married Izabell Hiberte. On 29 May 1610 in Cheshire England a William Swindles married Elizabeth Mallbone. There are several others by this name in Cheshire. William Swindles and Isabell Hiberte had sons, Thomas Swindle and Daniel Swindle.

In a muster taken 30 Jan 1624 there is a Thomas Swinhow (Swindell) who was reported as having arrived on the "Diana" and living in the main of the Corporation of James City, Virginia. There was a Thomas Swindell who arrived in Westmoreland County, Virginia in 1654. It has been indicated that Thomas Swindell moved to the eastern shore of Virginia. There was also a Daniel Swindell in this same area as mentioned as tithables in that county in 1666. Thomas Swindell had a son named John Swindell who married the daughter of George Willis. George Willis gave the couple a cow in 1668. John and ... (Willis) Swindell lived in North Hampton, Virginia and he died in North Carolina 1750. Thomas Swindell, who arrived in Westmoreland County, Virginia in 1654, was an indentured servant and John Walton and John Baynol who were Virginian “Planters” paid his transport. John Swindell was still on the eastern shore of Virginia as late as 1700 when he witnessed the will of John Tilney of Nassawaddox.

In 1702 John Swindell moved into Bath County, North Carolina and in that same year proved headrights to 240 acres. This John Swindell may have been the father to Thomas Swindell. In 1729 there was a Thomas Swindell who was a cooper from Beauford Precinct of Bath County North Carolina. Thomas Swindell purchased 100 acres on the north side of the Pamlico River from James Singleton.

There was a Timothy Swindle in Culpeper County, Virginia in the 1770's. This area of Virginia was settled by Germans, but it is believed that this Timothy Swindle was not of German ancestry. Timothy Swindle married Rebecca Crease (Crees, Crest, Criece, Greys) who was clearly German. Rebecca Crease's family was from Wurttemberg in what was to become Germany. Timothy and Rebecca Swindle had children:

Sarah Swindle m. Frederick Baumgardner
Michael Swindle m. Elizabeth Utz
John Swindle m. Hannah Weaver
George Swindle m. Hannah Cornelius
Rebecca Swindle m. John Fray

It is obvious that the Swindle family came from England possibly as early as 1619. They settled in Virginia, moved into North Carolina by 1702, into Tennessee by 1815 and later into Arkansas by 1860.
According to research done by Charles H. Swindle and James E. Swindell The Swindle line is as follows:

John Swindle was born about 1523 in England. John’s wife’s name is unknown. Their son was William Swindle (Swandal) who was born before 1584 in England.
William Swindle (Swandal) married Isabell Hiberte on 10 Dec 1598 in Macclesfield, St. Michael, Cheshire, England. Isabell was born before 1580 in Cheshire.
William Swindle (Swandal) was killed in the Indian massacre on Good Friday, 22 Mar 1622 at Berkley’s Plantation 66 miles from James City, Virginia. James City is known today as Jamestown. Isabell died in 1652 in Virginia. William came to the New World about 1619/20. William and Isabell Swindle had at least two sons:

Thomas Swindle
Daniel Swindle

Thomas Swindle was born about 1604, lived in North Hampton, Virginia and died about 1669 in Rappanock, Richmond County, Virginia. Thomas’s wife’s name is unknown but she was born about 1610 in Rappanock and died about 1670 in Virginia. Thomas Swindle’s known children were:
Timothy Swindle born between 1646-51 and died in 1683 in Virginia

John Swindle b, 1648 in North Hampton, Virginia.

Daniel Swindle born about 1648. Timothy Swindle married a lady named Sarah who was born in England. Sarah’s last name is not known. Timothy and Sarah’s son was John Swindle who was born 20 Mar 1675/76 in Rappanock, Farnham Parish, Richmond County, Virginia.
John Swindle married Mary McPherson, the daughter of William McPherson, about 1696 in Lower Norfolk, Currtuck County, Virginia. John died before 1772 in Hyde County, North Carolina. Mary Swindle died between 1746 and 1751. Some of their sons were:

Timothy Swindle married Rebecca Crees
John Swindle b. 1723 in Hyde County, N. C.
Caleb Swindle
Parker Swindle b. abt 1730 in Hyde County
Josiah Swindle b. 1732 in Hyde County
William Swindle b. 1735 in Hyde County
Zedekiah Swindle b. 04 Apr 1737

Josiah Swindle was born about 1732 in Albermarie, Hyde County, North Carolina. Josiah was a carpenter by trade. He signed his will on 07May 1804. His estate was probated in 1806. He left mechanic tools equally divided among sons, furniture to daughters and most of his estate to his wife, Ester. Josiah Swindle was married at least three times. The name of his first wife is not known but they had a son:

Caleb Swindle

Josiah Swindle married 2nd Sarah ... . They had sons:

Samuel Swindle
Abraham Swindle

Josiah Swindle married 3rd Ester Balance. They had children:

Robert Swindle
Ananias Swindle b. 1758 in Hyde County, North Carolina
Willis Swindle
Marget Swindle b. 1764 in Hyde County
Pricilla Swindle
Delilah Swindle
Ann Swindle
Elizabeth Swindle

Samuel Swindle was born about 1754 in Hyde County, North Carolina. He died about 1807 in the same county. Samuel is believed to have moved to Bladen County, North Carolina from Hyde County in the late 1700's. Samuel Swindle married a lady named Mary. Mary’s last name is not known. Samuel and Mary Swindle had children:

Willis Swindle
Samuel Swindle
Henry Swindle b. abt. 1776
James Swindle
James Swindle was born about 1777 in North Carolina. He died in 1850 in Tennessee. James Swindle married Mary Howe, the daughter of Job Howe Jr.. They were married on 08 Mar 1808 in North Carolina. Mary Swindle died in Tennessee. Mary Swindle died before 25 Jan 1825 as her estate was probated on that date. James and Mary Swindle had children:

Thomas Swindle
Seth Swindle b. abt. 1810
William E. Swindle
Nathan Swindle b. abt 1813

Jena (Faye) Green Hopwood [Editor's Note: February 24, 1925 - January 29, 2006, obituary: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=hopwood&GSfn=jena&GSbyrel=all&GSdyrel=all&GSob=n&GRid=28457875&df=all&] wrote a family history in 1987 called "The Swineherders". It contains photocopies of documents, photos and detailed information about the following:

Thomas Swindle was born 02 Feb 1811 in North Carolina. He died 29 May 1904 in Benton County, Tennessee. Thomas Swindle came to Tennesse with his parents when he was four years of age (1815). Thomas Swindle lived in Gismunda, Tennessee for over sixty years. When Thomas died he was reportedly 93 years, 3 months and 20 days old and was the oldest man in the county. Thomas Swindle was a Methodist and member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South and was licensed to "exhort", which is to preach, about 1850-1860. Thomas Swindle married 1st Miriam Anderson, the daughter of John and Elizabeth Anderson, on 15 Jan 1833. Thomas Swindle was Justice of the Peace in Benton County, Tennesee in 1869. Thomas and Miriam Swindle had children:

William Anderson Swindle
Louisa C. Swindle
Felissa Ann Swindle b. abt. 1836
John S. Swindle
Isaac Harrison Swindle b. abt 1838
James Eli Swindle
Green P. Swindle b. abt. 1840
Asa E. Swindle b. abt. 1843
Thomas Swindle married 2nd Nancy F. Harris on 12 Jul 1873 and they had children:
Mary A. P. Swindle
Isabella Swindle
Doctor Bennet Swindle
Clark M. (Martin) Swindle
Louellen Swindle
Enoch Hawkins Swindle

The Camden Chronicle, one of the early newspapers of Benton County, Tennessee reported Thomas’s death on 10 Jun 1904. “Thomas Swindle, who had been in bad health for some time, died Sunday at the advanced age of 93 years, 3 months and 20 days, and was the oldest man in the county. Mr. Swindle was born February 9, 1811. He professed religion in July or August, 1843, and joined the Methodist Episcopal church in 1844. In the division to which he belonged, the Methodist Episcopal Church South, he was licensed to exhort somewhere in the date between 1850 and 1860, and was faithful to the trust until his death, being a devoted servant of God for more than sixty years. He was first married to Miriam Anderson on January 15, 1833. To that union there was twelve children, eight of whom lived to be grown and four died in infancy. His second marriage was to Mrs. N.F. Harris on December 7, 1873, who survives him. In 1867, he received the degrees of F. & A.M. at Camden Lodge # 179, of which he died a member. The burial took place at Shiloh Cemetery Tuesday with all the honors of masonry and was attended by a large gathering of friends and relatives.”

William Anderson Swindle was born 18 Jan 1834 in Benton County, Tennessee which was Humphreys County at that time. He died 26 Jan 1914 in Randolph County, Arkansas. William A. Swindle was a farmer and trader. William A. Swindle married 1st Angelina Smith on 10 Nov 1850 in Benton County, Tennessee. Angelina was the daughter of William and Elizabeth (Lewis) Smith. William A. and Angelina Swindle were living in Arkansas in 1860. Angelina Swindle died in Randolph County, Arkansas in 1860. William A. Swindle volunteered in the Civil War from Arkansas in 1863 under Captain William Black and Colonel Shaver. William A. Swindle was in battles in Missouri and Siloam, Arkansas. In 1864 William A. Swindle returned to Tennessee and lived there until 1911 when he returned to Arkansas to live with his son, Dr. William T. Swindle. He was known as “Uncle Billie” Swindle. William Anderson Swindle is buried in the Siloam Cemetery near Middlebrook, Arkansas. William A. and Angelina Swindle had children:

Dr. William T. Swindle
Anna A. Swindle
Paralee Swindle
Green P. Swindle
William A. Swindle married 2nd Mary Lewis on 20 Jul 1864. Mary was married 1st to John Lewis on 30 Sep 1855. Mary and John Lewis had two children, Martha and William. Mary Smith was the sister of William A. Swindle’s first wife. Mary Smith was born in Benton County, Tennessee 06 Oct 1840 and died in Randolph County, Arkansas on 23 Aug 1905. William A. and Mary Swindle had children:

Arty Swindle b. 18 Jul 1865
Ada E. Swindle b. 10 Jul 1871
Isabelle B. Swindle
Ida Swindle

The 1870 census of Benton County, Tennessee shows:

William A. Swindle
Mary Swindle
Thomas Swindle
Martha Lewis
William Lewis
Artie Swindle
Elizabeth Smith (mother-in-law)
William A. Swindle’s military records indicate he was wounded at the battle of Siloam, Arkansas and that he was shot with a “Minnie ball” through the right “rist” joint, breaking these bones and “then into my body on the right side and lodged at skin in back”. William died in Randolph County, Arkansas on 26 Jan 1914 and is buried in the churchyard at Siloam near Middlebrook, Arkansas.

Dr. William Thomas Swindle was born in Benton County, Tennessee on 13 Mar 1854. He died 04 Aug 1924 in Middlebrook, Randolph County, Arkansas. In Benton County, Tennessee he married Vandora Hatley on 11 Dec 1873. Vandora was Victoria Vandora Hatley, the only child of Wyley and Leah (Nowell) Hatley. Vandora Hatley was born 11 Dec 1858 and died in Maynard, Randolph County, Arkansas on 12 Feb 1924. Dr. William T. and Vandora Swindle had ten children:

Nancy Elizabeth Swindle m. Daniel Odom
Larkin Leonard Swindle m. Annie Green
Uler or Ula Balkus Swindle m. John Francis Rapert
Arcus Eli Swindle m. Effie Jones
Anderson Horace Swindle m. Bell Curtis
Pizoler Belle Swindle m. Felix Johnson
Dovie Dee Swindle m. Frank Luter
Warner Thurman Swindle m. Ethel Lindsey
Izra Swindle died young
Tula Swindle m. Patrick Parker

Dr. William and Vandora (Hatley) Swindle are buried in the Siloam Cemetery near Middlebrook, Arkansas. Dr. William T. Swindle traveled back and forth between Benton County, Tennessee and Randolph County, Arkansas where he practiced medicine.
There is an interesting story passed down by Arvena Hambrick Brackett concerning her grandmother Ula Balkus Swindle. Arvena says her grandmother "chewed tobacco and that she would sit on the porch and spit it out into the street". It should be understood that this was a rural area and the street was a dirt path.

*According to another family historian a family Bible records Ula Balkus Swindle as Uler Balkus Swindle. My mother, her grandaughter, says her name was Ula?
Ula (Uler) Blakus Swindle married John Francis Rapert in Randolph County, Arkansas. John and Ula (Swindle) Rapert are buried in the Antioch Cemetery near Doniphan, Missouri.
Their daughter Gussie I. Rapert married Thad Hambrick in Randolph County, Arkansas.
Their daughter Ula Arvena Hambrick married 2nd Harold Earl Brackett in 1947 in Berrien County, Michigan.
Their son William Brackett married Jane Hauch in Lakeside, Berrien County, Michigan in 1970. 
Swindell, Thomas An Immigrant (I25705)
 
39831 Swindle Family compiled by Bill Brackett

The Swindle name is believed to be English. It is said to mean "one who came from Swindale" a chapelry in the parish of Shap in northern England’s county of Westmoreland. The original meaning of the name is thought to be derived from a dale or dell where swine were raised or perhaps a haunt of wild boars.

The family claims a coat of arms, which has a boar’s head and two crossed blue swords with gold hilts on a silver shield.

In records I have seen that there was a William Swindell who was born before 1584 in England and was killed in an Indian massacre in Virginia. He died on Captain Berkley's plantation about 60 miles from Jamestown, Virginia in 1624. His last named is spelled Swandal in these records.

In Cheshire, England on 08 Oct 1578 a William Swyndles married Margery Barber. On 10 Dec 1598 in Cheshire, England a William Swindles married Izabell Hiberte. On 29 May 1610 in Cheshire England a William Swindles married Elizabeth Mallbone.

There are several others by this name in Cheshire. William Swindles and Isabell Hiberte had sons, Thomas Swindle and Daniel Swindle.

In a muster taken 30 Jan 1624 there is a Thomas Swinhow (Swindell) who was reported as having arrived on the "Diana" and living in the main of the Corporation of James City, Virginia.

There was a Thomas Swindell who arrived in Westmoreland County, Virginia in 1654. It has been indicated that Thomas Swindell moved to the eastern shore of Virginia.

There was also a Daniel Swindell in this same area as mentioned as tithables in that county in 1666.

Thomas Swindell had a son named John Swindell who married the daughter of George Willis. George Willis gave the couple a cow in 1668. John and ... (Willis) Swindell lived in North Hampton, Virginia and he died in North Carolina 1750.

Thomas Swindell, who arrived in Westmoreland County, Virginia in 1654, was an indentured servant and John Walton and John Baynol who were Virginian “Planters” paid his transport. John Swindell was still on the eastern shore of Virginia as late as 1700 when he witnessed the will of John Tilney of Nassawaddox.

In 1702 John Swindell moved into Bath County, North Carolina and in that same year proved headrights to 240 acres. This John Swindell may have been the father to Thomas Swindell.

In 1729 there was a Thomas Swindell who was a cooper from Beauford Precinct of Bath County North Carolina. Thomas Swindell purchased 100 acres on the north side of the Pamlico River from James Singleton.

There was a Timothy Swindle in Culpeper County, Virginia in the 1770's. This area of Virginia was settled by Germans, but it is believed that this Timothy Swindle was not of German ancestry. Timothy Swindle married Rebecca Crease (Crees, Crest, Criece, Greys) who was clearly German. Rebecca Crease's family was from Wurttemberg in what was to become Germany. Timothy and Rebecca Swindle had children:

Sarah Swindle m. Frederick Baumgardner
Michael Swindle m. Elizabeth Utz
John Swindle m. Hannah Weaver
George Swindle m. Hannah Cornelius
Rebecca Swindle m. John Fray

It is obvious that the Swindle family came from England possibly as early as 1619. They settled in Virginia, moved into North Carolina by 1702, into Tennessee by 1815 and later into Arkansas by 1860.
According to research done by Charles H. Swindle and James E. Swindell The Swindle line is as follows:

John Swindle was born about 1523 in England. John’s wife’s name is unknown. Their son was William Swindle (Swandal) who was born before 1584 in England.

William Swindle (Swandal) married Isabell Hiberte on 10 Dec 1598 in Macclesfield, St. Michael, Cheshire, England. Isabell was born before 1580 in Cheshire.

William Swindle (Swandal) was killed in the Indian massacre on Good Friday, 22 Mar 1622 at Berkley’s Plantation 66 miles from James City, Virginia. James City is known today as Jamestown. Isabell died in 1652 in Virginia. William came to the New World about 1619/20. William and Isabell Swindle had at least two sons:

Thomas Swindle
Daniel Swindle

Thomas Swindle was born about 1604, lived in North Hampton, Virginia and died about 1669 in Rappanock, Richmond County, Virginia. Thomas’s wife’s name is unknown but she was born about 1610 in Rappanock and died about 1670 in Virginia. Thomas Swindle’s known children were:

Timothy Swindle born between 1646-51 and died in 1683 in Virginia
John Swindle b, 1648 in North Hampton, Virginia.
Daniel Swindle born about 1648. Timothy Swindle married a lady named Sarah who was born in England. Sarah’s last name is not known. Timothy and Sarah’s son was John Swindle who was born 20 Mar 1675/76 in Rappanock, Farnham Parish, Richmond County, Virginia.
John Swindle married Mary McPherson, the daughter of William McPherson, about 1696 in Lower Norfolk, Currtuck County, Virginia. John died before 1772 in Hyde County, North Carolina. Mary Swindle died between 1746 and 1751. Some of their sons were:
Timothy Swindle married Rebecca Crees
John Swindle b. 1723 in Hyde County, N. C.
Caleb Swindle
Parker Swindle b. abt 1730 in Hyde County
Josiah Swindle b. 1732 in Hyde County
William Swindle b. 1735 in Hyde County
Zedekiah Swindle b. 04 Apr 1737

Josiah Swindle was born about 1732 in Albermarie, Hyde County, North Carolina. Josiah was a carpenter by trade. He signed his will on 07May 1804. His estate was probated in 1806. He left mechanic tools equally divided among sons, furniture to daughters and most of his estate to his wife, Ester. Josiah Swindle was married at least three times. The name of his first wife is not known but they had a son:

Caleb Swindle

Josiah Swindle married 2nd Sarah ... . They had sons:

Samuel Swindle
Abraham Swindle
Josiah Swindle married 3rd Ester Balance. They had children:

Robert Swindle
Ananias Swindle b. 1758 in Hyde County, North Carolina
Willis Swindle
Marget Swindle b. 1764 in Hyde County
Pricilla Swindle
Delilah Swindle
Ann Swindle
Elizabeth Swindle

Samuel Swindle was born about 1754 in Hyde County, North Carolina. He died about 1807 in the same county. Samuel is believed to have moved to Bladean County, North Carolina from Hyde County in the late 1700's. Samuel Swindle married a lady named Mary. Mary’s last name is not known. Samuel and Mary Swindle had children:

Willis Swindle
Samuel Swindle
Henry Swindle b. abt. 1776
James Swindle

James Swindle was born about 1777 in North Carolina. He died in 1850 in Tennessee. James Swindle married Mary Howe, the daughter of Job Howe Jr.. They were married on 08 Mar 1808 in North Carolina. Mary Swindle died in Tennessee. Mary Swindle died before 25 Jan 1825 as her estate was probated on that date. James and Mary Swindle had children:

Thomas Swindle
Seth Swindle b. abt. 1810
William E. Swindle
Nathan Swindle b. abt 1813

Jena Green Hopwood wrote a family history in 1987 called "The Swineherders". It contains photocopies of documents, photos and detailed information about the following:

Thomas Swindle was born 02 Feb 1811 in North Carolina. He died 29 May 1904 in Benton County, Tennessee. Thomas Swindle came to Tennesse with his parents when he was four years of age (1815). Thomas Swindle lived in Gismunda, Tennessee for over sixty years. When Thomas died he was reportedly 93 years, 3 months and 20 days old and was the oldest man in the county. Thomas Swindle was a Methodist and member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South and was licensed to "exhort", which is to preach, about 1850-1860. Thomas Swindle married 1st Miriam Anderson, the daughter of John and Elizabeth Anderson, on 15 Jan 1833. Thomas Swindle was Justice of the Peace in Benton County, Tennesee in 1869. Thomas and Miriam Swindle had children:

William Anderson Swindle
Louisa C. Swindle
Felissa Ann Swindle b. abt. 1836
John S. Swindle
Isaac Harrison Swindle b. abt 1838
James Eli Swindle
Green P. Swindle b. abt. 1840
Asa E. Swindle b. abt. 1843

Thomas Swindle married 2nd Nancy F. Harris on 12 Jul 1873 and they had children:

Mary A. P. Swindle
Isabella Swindle
Doctor Bennet Swindle
Clark M. (Martin) Swindle
Louellen Swindle
Enoch Hawkins Swindle

The Camden Chronicle, one of the early newspapers of Benton County, Tennessee reported Thomas’s death on 10 Jun 1904.

"Thomas Swindle, who had been in bad health for some time, died Sunday at the advanced age of 93 years, 3 months and 20 days, and was the oldest man in the county. Mr. Swindle was born February 9, 1811. He professed religion in July or August, 1843, and joined the Methodist Episcopal church in 1844. In the division to which he belonged, the Methodist Episcopal Church South, he was licensed to exhort somewhere in the date between 1850 and 1860, and was faithful to the trust until his death, being a devoted servant of God for more than sixty years. He was first married to Miriam Anderson on January 15, 1833. To that union there was twelve children, eight of whom lived to be grown and four died in infancy. His second marriage was to Mrs. N.F. Harris on December 7, 1873, who survives him. In 1867, he received the degrees of F. & A.M. at Camden Lodge # 179, of which he died a member. The burial took place at Shiloh Cemetery Tuesday with all the honors of masonry and was attended by a large gathering of friends and relatives."

William Anderson Swindle was born 18 Jan 1834 in Benton County, Tennessee which was Humphreys County at that time. He died 26 Jan 1914 in Randolph County, Arkansas. William A. Swindle was a farmer and trader. William A. Swindle married 1st Angelina Smith on 10 Nov 1850 in Benton County, Tennessee. Angelina was the daughter of William and Elizabeth (Lewis) Smith. William A. and Angelina Swindle were living in Arkansas in 1860. Angelina Swindle died in Randolph County, Arkansas in 1860. William A. Swindle volunteered in the Civil War from Arkansas in 1863 under Captain William Black and Colonel Shaver. William A. Swindle was in battles in Missouri and Siloam, Arkansas. In 1864 William A. Swindle returned to Tennessee and lived there until 1911 when he returned to Arkansas to live with his son, Dr. William T. Swindle. He was known as “Uncle Billie” Swindle. William Anderson Swindle is buried in the Siloam Cemetery near Middlebrook, Arkansas. William A. and Angelina Swindle had children:

Dr. William T. Swindle
Anna A. Swindle
Paralee Swindle
Green P. Swindle

William A. Swindle married 2nd Mary Lewis on 20 Jul 1864. Mary was married 1st to John Lewis on 30 Sep 1855. Mary and John Lewis had two children, Martha and William. Mary Smith was the sister of William A. Swindle’s first wife. Mary Smith was born in Benton County, Tennessee 06 Oct 1840 and died in Randolph County, Arkansas on 23 Aug 1905. William A. and Mary Swindle had children:

Arty Swindle b. 18 Jul 1865
Ada E. Swindle b. 10 Jul 1871
Isabelle B. Swindle
Ida Swindle

The 1870 census of Benton County, Tennessee shows:

William A. Swindle
Mary Swindle
Thomas Swindle
Martha Lewis
William Lewis
Artie Swindle
Elizabeth Smith (mother-in-law)

William A. Swindle’s military records indicate he was wounded at the battle of Siloam, Arkansas and that he was shot with a "Minnie ball" through the right "rist" joint, breaking these bones and "then into my body on the right side and lodged at skin in back". William died in Randolph County, Arkansas on 26 Jan 1914 and is buried in the churchyard at Siloam near Middlebrook, Arkansas.

Dr. William Thomas Swindle was born in Benton County, Tennessee on 13 Mar 1854. He died 04 Aug 1924 in Middlebrook, Randolph County, Arkansas. In Benton County, Tennessee he married Vandora Hatley on 11 Dec 1873. Vandora was Victoria Vandora Hatley, the only child of Wyley and Leah (Nowell) Hatley. Vandora Hatley was born 11 Dec 1858 and died in Maynard, Randolph County, Arkansas on 12 Feb 1924. Dr. William T. and Vandora Swindle had ten children:

Nancy Elizabeth Swindle m. Daniel Odom
Larkin Leonard Swindle m. Annie Green
Uler or Ula Balkus Swindle m. John Francis Rapert
Arcus Eli Swindle m. Effie Jones
Anderson Horace Swindle m. Bell Curtis
Pizoler Belle Swindle m. Felix Johnson
Dovie Dee Swindle m. Frank Luter
Warner Thurman Swindle m. Ethel Lindsey
Izra Swindle died young
Tula Swindle m. Patrick Parker

Dr. William and Vandora (Hatley) Swindle are buried in the Siloam Cemetery near Middlebrook, Arkansas. Dr. William T. Swindle traveled back and forth between Benton County, Tennessee and Randolph County, Arkansas where he practiced medicine.

There is an interesting story passed down by Arvena Hambrick Brackett concerning her grandmother Ula Balkus Swindle. Arvena says her grandmother "chewed tobacco and that she would sit on the porch and spit it out into the street". It should be understood that this was a rural area and the street was a dirt path.

*According to another family historian a family Bible records Ula Balkus Swindle as Uler Balkus Swindle. My mother, her grandaughter, says her name was Ula?
Ula (Uler) Blakus Swindle married John Francis Rapert in Randolph County, Arkansas. John and Ula (Swindle) Rapert are buried in the Antioch Cemetery near Doniphan, Missouri.

Their daughter Gussie I. Rapert married Thad Hambrick in Randolph County, Arkansas.
Their daughter Ula Arvena Hambrick married 2nd Harold Earl Brackett in 1947 in Berrien County, Michigan.
Their son William Brackett married Jane Hauch in Lakeside, Berrien County, Michigan in 1970.
 
Swindell, John (I28540)
 
39832 Sybil "Sibel, Sebilla" de Booth formerly Brereton aka de Brereton
Born about 1255 in Barton, Lancashire, , England
ANCESTORS ancestors
Daughter of Gilbert (Brereton) of Brereton and [mother unknown]
Sister of Henry Brereton
Wife of William Booth — married [date unknown] [location unknown]
DESCENDANTS descendants
Mother of Thomas Booth
Died 1279 in , , England
Profile managers: Katherine Patterson Find Relationship private message [send private message], Ray Nichols Find Relationship private message [send private message], Ted Williams Find Relationship private message [send private message], and Bill Domineau private message [send private message]
Brereton-34 created 21 Feb 2011 | Last modified 18 Apr 2017
This page has been accessed 1,444 times.

Biography
Name
Name: Sybil /de Brereton/[1]
Name: Sebilla /Brereton/[2]
Name: Sebilla /Brereton/[3]
Birth
Birth:
Date: ABT 1255
Place: Barton, Lancashire
Note
Various gedcoms at Ancestry.com call her daughter of Gilbert, Ralph or Richard Brereton.

Sources

http://our-royal-titled-noble-and-commoner-ancestors.com/p374.htm#i11218
http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=13248593&pid=1468349839
http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=13248593&pid=1468359134
http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=13248593&pid=1468349838
http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=178602&pid=942
? http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=6436419&pid=-984745961
? http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=6436419&pid=-984745956
? http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=17838154&pid=650765107

Acknowledgments

Thanks to Raymond Nichols for starting this profile.
WikiTree profile Brereton-166 created through the import of Lent_Vise_2011-05-11aa.ged on May 26, 2011 by Bryan Sypniewski.
WikiTree profile Brereton-178 created through the import of WILLIAMS 2011.GED on Jun 22, 2011 by Ted Williams.
WikiTree profile Brereton-257 created through the import of Domineau_Mathews_Breen_Doty Fa (3).ged on Aug 21, 2011 by Bill Domineau.
This person was created through the import of paul clare family tree (1).ged on 10 May 2011.
This person was created through the import of Acrossthepond.ged on 21 February 2011.

end of this profile 
de Brereton, Sibel (I44792)
 
39833 Sybil Hennessee Elam (1923-2005), 580.353.7549, Telephone Interview, August 28th, 2000, 1812 NW 19th Street, Lawton, OK 73507 Source (S1270)
 
39834 Sybil Pauline Riner Hennessee Stevenson

Sybil P. Hennessee Stevenson, passed away after an extended illness Tuesday, june 30, 2015, she was 100 years old. She was born in Lawrence County and lived most of her life in Lauderdale County as a homemaker, loving mother and grandmother. She was a charter member of Woodlawn Church of Christ. Sybil worked as a floral designer for Folden’s Florist and Bills Florist for 17 years.

Visitation will be Friday, July 3, 2015 at Elkins Funeral Home from 11 AM to 1 PM. Funeral services will follow at 1PM in the Chapel, with Bro. Don McGee officiating. Burial will be at Tri-Cities Memorial Gardens

Sybil was preceded in death by parents, Thomas Peay (T.P.) and Era Belle Riner; husbands, William Walter (Buddy) Hennessee and Ivan C. Stevenson; grandson, William Russell Hennessee; brothers, Charley, Ernest, and Gilbert Riner; sisters, Leona King and Arlene McCollister; step-daughters, Wanda Smith, Billie Jean Stevenson, and Regina Brooks.

She is survived by her sons, William (Bill) Hennessee and wife Pam and Horace Hennessee and wife Ruby all of Florence; step-daughters, Geraldine Ashley and Debby Blalock all of Florence; ten grandchildren, numerous great-grandchildren, and great-great grandchildren; a number of nieces and nephews.

The family would like to thank the staff at “A” station Glenwood Center for the love and care shown to our mother and Hospice of North Alabama, she will be missed greatly by family and friends.

Pallbearers will be David Hennessee, Joe Hennessee, Chad Hennessee, Bob Hennessee, Steve Hennessee, Brent Goins, and Hagen Hennessee. Alternate pallbearers will be Vick Hodges and Max Schell. 
Riner, Sybil Pauline (I534)
 
39835 Sylvester saw a lot of changes in his lifetime. His father died when he was 11 or 12, leaving his mother a widow. Sylvester may well have been apprenticed to the mariners to learn a trade in order to be able to support himself, and possibly his widowed mother and younger siblings as well.

Changes were afoot in England itself as well. England was in the process of politically becoming a Protestant nation with the King at the head of the church, instead of a Catholic nation with the Pope at the head of the church. In the 1530s, Henry VIII wanted to remarry because his wife did not produce a male heir, and his Catholicism prevented that, especially when the Pope refused to annul his marriage. As a result Henry renounced Catholicism and became Protestant, ordered the destruction of all things Catholic, such as monasteries and abbeys. The churches “became” Protestant overnight, along with their parishioners. In some places, of course, there was strong resistance and the resisters were called ‘recussants.’ That did not seem to be a problem in Kent.

In addition to the national issues, there were local and regional problems to contend with as well.

In October 1536, when Sylvester would have been about 14, four Flemish ships entered the Downs, landed and plundered the local boats of their “herrings, hogbushes, arrows and beer.” A few days later, those same ships robbed a Deal fishing boat of its entire catch and then sent a pinnace ashore on St. Leonard’s Day (November 6 and feast day at Deal’s St. Leonard’s church) to cut the cable of Captain Rychardson’s boat and tow it away. Rychardson’s inventory of his losses reflects a typical fishing boat of the time – two long bows, sheaves of arrows, barrels of beer, bread, candles, boots and bonnets. Sylvester’s ship probably was provisioned with the same things.

end 
Estes, Sylvester (I37307)
 
39836 Sylvia Janet Smith Smartt | Telecon - 4 Jan 2012 | ssmart443@yahoo.com Source (S44668)
 
39837 Sympathy E. Oakes Hennessee
BIRTH 1 FEB 1861 in White Co., Tennessee
DEATH 2 DEC 1944 in Cumberland Co., Tennessee
burial Crossville City Cemetery , Crossville,Cumberland County, Tennessee Findagrave Memorial # 175172121

end of profile 
Oakes, Samantha Elizabeth (I3245)
 
39838 T SGT Co G 382 Infantry Hogan, Fitzhugh Hubern (I17974)
 
39839 T Sgt US Army Air Corps WWII Underwood, Thomas Clayton "TC" Jr. (I1130)
 
39840 T. A. Gordon, tagordon@hotmail.com, Tue Feb 1 22:59:59 MST 2000 Source (S7694)
 
39841 T. C. McGee, obituary, "Southern Standard", abstracted by Margie Tucker. Source (S2866)
 
39842 T.B. Hospital... Jones, Leola (I10992)
 
39843 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Hennessee, Odus Miller (I1831)
 
39844 Tahlequah Township 17 N. Range 2 E., Cherokee Nation, Indian Territory Helton, Edward Clay "Ned" (I3729)
 
39845 Take a look at the castle; http://www.thirlestanecastle.co.uk/

Set in the Scottish Borders at Lauder, Thirlestane Castle has its origins in the 13th century. It was rebuilt as the Maitland family home in 1590 and greatly enhanced by the Duke of Lauderdale in the 1670s. In 1840, it was extended and refurbished with the addition of two new wings

For more information on the families, go to: http://www.thirlestanecastle.co.uk/thirlestanecastle.cfm

Sir Charles' biography ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Maitland,_3rd_Earl_of_Lauderdale 
Maitland, Sir Charles 3rd Earl of Lauderdale (I31825)
 
39846 Talitha & her family are enumerated as floows:

Name: John A Taylor
Event Type: Census
Event Year: 1860
Event Place: The 6 District, DeKalb, Tennessee, United States
Gender: Male
Age: 6
Race: White
Race (Original): [Blank]
Birth Year (Estimated): 1854
Birthplace: Tennessee
Page: 84
Household ID: 593
Affiliate Name: The U.S. National Archives and Records Administration (NARA)
Affiliate Publication Number: M653
GS Film Number: 805247
Digital Folder Number: 004296187
Image Number: 00250


Household Role Gender Age Birthplace
Levi Webb undefined M 49 Tennessee
Mary Webb undefined F 45 Tennessee
Samuel Webb undefined M 11 Tennessee
Levi W Webb undefined M 9 Tennessee
Tibitha Taylor undefined F 34 Tennessee
Elias L Taylor undefined M 16 Tennessee
Hannah Taylor undefined F 14 Tennessee
Mary F Taylor undefined F 8 Missouri
John A Taylor undefined M 6 Tennessee
Charles A Taylor undefined M 2 Tennessee
Benjamin F Taylor undefined M 0 Tennessee
Levisa C Malone undefined F 21 Tennessee



Citing this Record:
"United States Census, 1860," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/M8TH-CLL : accessed 08 May 2014), John A Taylor in household of Levi Webb, The 6 District, DeKalb, Tennessee, United States; citing "1860 U.S. Federal Census - Population," Fold3.com; p. 84, household ID 593, NARA microfilm publication M653; FHL microfilm 805247. 
Cantrell, Matilda Talitha "Talitha" (I9093)
 
39847 Talitha was the first wife of Isaac Cantrell (1733-1805) who formed the Wolf Island Primitive Baptist Church in 1777 and was its pastor for over 20 years. The church was first known as "Cantrell's Meeting House". Cloud, Talitha (I4817)
 
39848 Tall & Lanky fellow. Was once mayor of Morrison. Ref Cannon Census 1870 & 80. Hennessee, John Dillard "Dee" (I2684)
 
39849 Tamara West Stevens, Pedigree & Family Group Records, prntimge@lcc.net, 16 Oct 1998 Source (S35300)
 
39850 tamaraadams73@yahoo.com Source (S36519)
 
39851 Tamie;hardings@mstar2.net;18 Feb 2002;White County,Tennessee Queries Source (S36129)
 
39852 Tammie Chada identifies her as "Minerva Rachel RHEA"...DAH
Texas Deaths, 1890-1976 for Gertrude Hybarger Taylor ids her as "Rachel"

The following census record appears to match her parents, however, she is not enumerated which is curious...DAH

https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/M67C-22T
ame: Moses B Ray
esidence: Powell, Greene, Arkansas
ge: 28 years
alculated Birth Year: 1822
irthplace: Tennessee
ender: Male
ace (original):
ace (expanded):
eath Month:
eath Year:
ilm Number: 2480
igital GS Number: 4193066
mage Number: 00393
ine Number: 5
welling House Number: 316
amily Number: 345
arital Status:
ree or Slave:
ollection: United States Census, 1850 
Rhea, Minerva Rachel "Rachel" (I3109)
 
39853 Tammy Gillentine Hall confirmed this event January 12, 2016, mstammy@blomand.net Source (S8875)
 
39854 Tammy Hensel, 14 Jul 2014, tammylou.hensel@gmail.com Source (S1558)
 
39855 Tanarra Grissom | Registrant | 12 Jun 2014 | tagrissom@gmail.com Source (S1195)
 
39856 Tanner,Martha;FGR;Address:113235 Glen Brae Drive,Saratoga,CA 95070-4429,
E-Mail:NarthaT466@aol.com 
Source (S17134)
 
39857 Tar's younger sister and mean as sin...She and her husband with "Tar" ran an illegal "Speak-Easy". Tar and Phine got into a dispute with Benton and hired a negro,"Patch-Eye",to kill Benton.The negro was convicted and sent to prison. Hennessee, Ella Josephine "Phine" (I1383)
 
39858 Tarasovich,Margie S.;Obituary,"Southern Standard", 8 Jan 1997. Source (S883)
 
39859 Taught Lucile Byars Hennessee to walk...Iola Howard. Davis, Myrtle (I19985)
 
39860 Taught school in Hiram,GA. in the early 1930's. Was a lawyer in Washington,
D.C. before moving to Knoxville,TN. Is reported that he has two children,
names unknown. 
Clonts, Stephen (I10792)
 
39861 Taylor Womack, taylor.womack@gmailcom, submitted this person, event or place, Friday, July 28th, 2017, retrieved, recorded & uploaded to this website, Friday, July 28th, 2017, by David A. Hennessee, info@classroomfurniture.com Source (S11354)
 
39862 Taylor,David L.;Family Group Records & Pedigree,1301 NW 7th Street,
Lindsay,OK 73052,Tel:406/756-3664 E-Mail:on4wheels@aol.com 
Source (S34315)
 
39863 Taylor,Deen;Family Group Records,558 Marigold Drive,Fairfield,CA 94533,
Tel:707/421-2302 
Source (S4747)
 
39864 Taylor,Edith Hennessee personal knowledge, McMinnville Arms, Apt. M-4,
McMinnville,TN 37110, Tel:931/473-3810;1880 Warren Co.,TN census,p.139 
Source (S16966)
 
39865 Taylor,Mary Hennessee:Personal Knowledge;Telecon Interview 8 Sep 2002,
940/552-6859,2730 Oaklawn Drive,Vernon,TX 76384
FamilySearch.org 
Source (S1907)
 
39866 Taylor,Mary Hennessee:Personal Knowledge;Telecon Interview 8 Sep 2002,
940/552-6859,2730 Oaklawn Drive,Vernon,TX 76384;Jean Huddleston Interview 
Source (S44083)
 
39867 Teal,Sara Clonts:Pedigree;5070 Tewkesbury Drive,Huber Hights,OH 45424;
Tel:937/236-2247;grenslev@aol.com 
Source (S13592)
 
39868 TEC 5 US Army Moore, Ellis Loyd (I39768)
 
39869 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Gordon, Tei Allen (I43676)
 
39870 Tei A. GORDON | tagordon@hotmail.com |
1360 NW Forest Dr. Corvallis, OR 97330 
Source (S36902)
 
39871 Telecon interview with Lewis Garrou & personal knowledge, November 11, 1992 Source (S13018)
 
39872 Telecon with Debra Byars George | 24 Oct.2013 Source (S51778)
 
39873 Telecon with Edora Freeman, July 8, 1993, personal knowledge & records. Source (S16928)
 
39874 Telecon with Franklin Clonts, 9/15/1992 Source (S9390)
 
39875 Telecon with Gary Webb, September 14, 1992.
Based on will-adminstration dates. 
Source (S181)
 
39876 Telecon with Jr, 7 Jan 2007 Source (S36549)
 
39877 Telephone interview & personal knowledge of Naomi Jones,
November 13, 1992 
Source (S12553)
 
39878 Telephone interview 14 Apr 1991...DAH Source (S3099)
 
39879 Telephone interview 5/5/1991. Lives in Arab,AL. Whisenant, Mary Leo (I2758)
 
39880 Telephone interview with Annah, 5/9/1991. Lived in Owensboro,KY.

She was born to the late Dr. I.J. and Nannabelle Harrison Hoover in Daviess County. She had taught at Owensboro High School, was a member of St. Stephens Cathedral and a member of Mayflower Society. She enjoyed cooking, gardening, reading and volunteering with the American Heart Association and helping at the Carmel Home

She was preceded in death by her husband, Francis W. Hennessee on May 8, 1975 and her sister, Marian Hoover Garth on September 30, 1977.

Survivors include her daughter, Suz-Annah Nelson and her husband, Edward A. of North Little Rock, AR; a son, Francis M. Hennessee of Denver, CO; a granddaughter, Annamarie Nelson; several nephews and a niece, Nancy Garth Shotts; dear friends, Irene Nealen and Sr. Andrea.

end of comment 
Hoover, Annah Gray (I2787)
 
39881 Telephone interview with Eva Clontz Bouchard, August 27, 1992. Source (S13372)
 
39882 Telephone interview with Eva Clontz Bouchard, September 7, 1992. Source (S13580)
 
39883 Telephone interview with him Oct.31, 1990. He lived in Old Hickory, TN. Hennessee, Lloyd Raymond (I1962)
 
39884 Telephone interview with Luther April 19, 1991. Lived in Richmond Hill,GA.

His father, James, told him that his grandfather, John David, left North Carolina with two half-sisters, names unknown (Dalton? - name now confirmed), but married names were "Beavers" and "Roberts", because his father (unknown - later uncovered as David Hennessa) made brew and John David could not abide that because he was a preacher and tee-totaler...
----------

April 26, 1991; Further interview with Luther: Modifies Mattie Belle's testimony to add that his father, James William, also went west with David and Frank. James & Frank also spent time in Oklahoma cutting timber to be used as railroad ties.

----------
From: "jhenn"
To: "Nick Hennessee"
Subject: Luther F. Hennessee
Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2005 11:19:26 -0400


Nick

I regret to have to tell you that Luther Hennessee (father of James Franklin) died June 25, 2005 at his home in Richmond Hill. Franklin and I had gone to Richmond Hill on Friday afternoon so we were there at the time of his death. His older sister Sallie H. Ellis in Athens, Tenn died July 7, 2005

Sallie's husband Larry Ellis died in July 2001 ( That date is approximate - as I don't remember the exact date - but I thought the information might be useful in updating the family history)

Betty Hennessee 
Hennessee, Luther Franklin (I2111)
 
39885 Telephone interview with Ruth Curtis, October 16, 1992 Source (S14168)
 
39886 Telephone interview with William Evans Byars, October 17, 1992 Source (S14215)
 
39887 Telephone interview with Willie Mae Clontz Hennessee, August 27, 1992 Source (S13322)
 
39888 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Hennessee, Charles Thomas "Tommie" Jr. (I3466)
 
39889 Temple Daily Telegram
Jan 31, 1943

Mrs T.M. Harrison, 58, died in a local hospital Saturday at 7 a.m. after a 10 days' illness. Funeral services will be held at the Hewett funeral home Sunday at 2 p.m., Rev G.W. Forehand conducting. Burial will be in Hillcrest Cemetery.

Mrs Harrison was born at Cedar Creek Dec 2, 1884, and had lived at Cedar Creek and Pendleton for 40 years. She had lived in Temple for the past 15 years. She was a member of the Methodist Church.

Surviving are her husband; seven sons; LB of Beaumont, Joe of Temple, John of Macon, GA, Wilbert Of Camp Wallace, Cullen of the US Army in Hawaii, and Odell and Marchell of Temple; three daughters, Mrs RA Thompson of Temple, Mrs A Beran of Temple and Mrs AB Beddow of Austin; 10 grandchildren; two brothers, Will Gribble of Temple and Landy Gribble of Oenaville; four sisters, Mrs Henry Veazey of Belton, Mrs Charles Rogers and Mrs Raymond Burns of Temple, and Mrs Alice Cline of San Francisco, Cal.

Pallbearers will be Earl Neal, F Crow, French Moss, Lester Gibson, Jack Cox, and Victor Russell. Honorary pallbearers will be Firm Miller, Meade Miller, Ebb White, Mervin Spoonts, Clea Myers, and Dick Nichols.
[Obit courtesy of Karen Morey]

Family links:
Parents:
William Carroll Gribble (1850 - 1898)
Eliza Evelyn Cox Gribble (1852 - 1920) 
Gribble, Bell (I32521)
 
39890 Ten children... Knowles, William B. (I23043)
 
39891 Ten children...Evelyn Boyd Boyd, Major Elliot Hodge (I19108)
 
39892 Tenn. dodson


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Tenn. dodson
Posted by: Steve Dodson (ID *****2133)Date: November 03, 2002 at 20:00:37
of 2706



I'm looking for any family links to the branch of the Dodson family that came
from or lived in or around White county, Tenn. My grandfather is Ezra Franklin
Dodson, dob 1-25-03, died june 28, 1963 in WV (wife, Ethel Lucille Myers). His
brothers and sister are 1) Edward William Dodson born 08-29-1900 died ???? in
Webster County, WV., wife unknown at this time, had two kids, a boy (David) and
a girl unknown. 2) Joe Elmer Dodson, born sept 1 1906, died mar,1974, wife
unknown, two kids(?), Joe Dodson 4-10-1936 died june,1980(?) and johnny dodson
all in WV. 3) Howell Paskel Dodson, born 6-6-1912, died 12-1969 in salem, VA. 1
adopted kid (name unknown) 4) Thelma Grace Dodson Johnson,dob 03 20 09, first
husband, raymond johnson, second husband, brother of raymond johnson.

Ezra's father was a Mumpford ?? Dodson(unsure of correct spelling),known as
Monk, Mumpford could be first or middle name, dob 1871, died 1940 in Tenn. His
wife was a Melissa (?) Frances Moore. (1875-1950?), died in WV. As the story has
been told. Mumpford had to leave Tenn for moonshining. Went to KY, then to WV,
then back to Tenn. I was told that everyone was born in or around White county,
Tenn. Any info would be greatly appreciated.
Steve Dodson
zeusloves@yahoo.com 
Dodson, Mumford "Mump" (I26961)
 
39893 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Harmon, William Bryan "Bryan" (I33624)
 
39894 Tennesseans in the Revolutionay War... http://www.tngenweb.org/revwar/counties/white.htm

Jonathan Harris NC Line, applied 16 Aug 1833 White Co, TN aged 82, he lived in Rowan Co, NC at enl, was born in 1751 in Hopewell Co in East Jersey; his widow applied 4 Apr 1838 White Co TN aged 86, declared they had married in Feb 1772 in Lancaster Co, PA.

He died 28 Jun 1834, and his daughter Mary CHISOM made affidavit on 24 Feb 1852 White Co TN & she stated her mother had died 24 Aug 1849 leaving only 1 child Mary "Polly" CHISOM; a copy of his will is in the file dated 25 Jun 1834 in White Co TN, naming his wife and John CHISOM whom he appointed executor & Polly CHISOM; refers to grandchildren (not named) (RW Pension File W4979) Private, North Carolina Line, $20.00 Annual Allowance $60.00 Amount Received September 30 1833 Pension Started Age 83 (1835 TN Pension Roll) See also RW John CHISUM above. 
Harris, Jonathan (I26295)
 
39895 Tennessee (Tennie) Gertrude Webb was born May 25, 1858 and died October 15, 1920. She married Pope Womack, a carpenter and contractor. They lived in a handsome home just south of Smithville, where she entertained her brothers and sisters regularly. She played the piano and painted, and was noted as a spotless housekeeper and a hostess with a bountiful table. They were members of the Smithville Church of Christ. [NOTE: by Athol K. Foster] Pope and Tennie had three children one girl and two boys. Pearl, Hubern and Lester. Pearl Married George Monroe Foster (My Grandfather). Webb, Tennessee Gertrude "Tennie" (I13603)
 
39896 Tennessee Births and Christenings, 1828-1939 for Brett Asley Taylor Source (S37676)
 
39897 Tennessee Births and Christenings, 1828-1939 for David Charles Hennessee Source (S1830)
 
39898 Tennessee Births and Christenings, 1828-1939 for Mattie Lee Source (S3746)
 
39899 TENNESSEE CONVICTS, Early Records of the State Penitentiary, Volume 1, 1831-1850, Charles A. Sherrill and Tomye M. Sherrill, Mt. Juliet, Tenn.,
1997. [Abstracts from ledgers of the State Pen.] p. 140. Martin Thaxton. From Rutherford County. Crime: horse stealing. Sentence: three years and six months from 16 July 1840.

Received 22 July 1840. He is 22 years old, 5' 9 1/2" high, weighs 128 lbs. Born and brought up in Warren Co., Tenn., eight miles south of McMinnville near the stage road to Huntsville on the waters of Hickory Creek, where his brother John Thaxton now lives. His father is very old and lives on the same piece of land with his brother. He has one brother in Rhea Co., Missouri, by the name of Thos. Thaxton, and follows farming. One sister in Gibson Co., Tenn., married to a man by the name of Robt. Ellison. Two sisters in Warren County, one married to a man by the name of Elisha Runnels, the other to James Ellison. Said Thaxton has uncles in Kentucky by the name of Brooks, but knows not what county. Said Thaxton has dark hair, dark eyes and dark sin. A tailor by trade. Has a small scar on the wrist joint of the left hand, also a small scar on the joint of the thumb where it joins the hand. He served his apprenticeship with Thos. F. Hicks. [Ledger 45, p. 204] p. 222.

Martin Thaxton, age 22, born in Tennessee, occupation: tailor. Convicted of horse stealing by a court in Rutherford County, and sentenced to 3 years and 6 months in the Penitentiary. Received July 22, 1840 and discharged July 22, 1844. Notes: resentenced to 6 months.
Number in ledger 86: 459. p. 252. 
Thaxton, Martin (I28648)
 
39900 Tennessee Deaths and Burials, 1874-1955 Source (S37344)
 

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