Elizabeth Bolling

Female 1595 - 1678  (83 years)


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Generation: 1

  1. 1.  Elizabeth Bolling was born 1595, Kent, England (daughter of Edward Bolling and Jane Greene); died 3 Jun 1678, Charles City County, Colony of Virginia.

    Elizabeth married John Bannister 1612. John was born 1592, Fletcher, Sussex, England; died 3 Jun 1678, Charles City County, Colony of Virginia. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. Mary Bannister was born 1622, Charles City County, Colony of Virginia; died 1661, Charles City County, Colony of Virginia.

Generation: 2

  1. 2.  Edward Bolling was born 0___ 1560, Bradford, Yorkshire, England (son of Tristram Bolling and Anne Rookes); died 0___ 1592, Chellow, Yorkshire, England.

    Edward married Jane Greene Yorkshire, England. Jane (daughter of Gabriel Greene and Margaret Lister) was born 0___ 1564, Bradford,Yorkshire,England; died 13 Oct 1610, Chellow, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 3.  Jane Greene was born 0___ 1564, Bradford,Yorkshire,England (daughter of Gabriel Greene and Margaret Lister); died 13 Oct 1610, Chellow, Yorkshire, England.

    Notes:

    Dates are askew... Would like to contact the submitter, but cannot...DAH

    Children:
    1. Robert Bolling was born 0___ 1590, Bradford, Yorkshire, England; died 13 Nov 1639, London, Middlesex, England.
    2. 1. Elizabeth Bolling was born 1595, Kent, England; died 3 Jun 1678, Charles City County, Colony of Virginia.


Generation: 3

  1. 4.  Tristram Bolling was born 0___ 1530, Chellow, Yorkshire, England (son of Edward Bolling and Magdaline Greene); died 0___ 1561, Chellow, Yorkshire, England.

    Tristram married Anne Rookes 0___ 1555, Chellow, Yorkshire, England. Anne (daughter of Richard Rookes and Elizabeth Waterhouse) was born 0___ 1524, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1563, (Yorkshire) England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 5.  Anne Rookes was born 0___ 1524, Yorkshire, England (daughter of Richard Rookes and Elizabeth Waterhouse); died 0___ 1563, (Yorkshire) England.

    Other Events:

    • Birth: 0___ 1534, Yorkshire, England

    Children:
    1. 2. Edward Bolling was born 0___ 1560, Bradford, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1592, Chellow, Yorkshire, England.

  3. 6.  Gabriel Greene was born 1530-1536, Horsforth, Yorkshire, England; was buried 9 Apr 1598, Yorkshire, England.

    Gabriel married Margaret Lister 12 Jul 1559. Margaret (daughter of Thomas Lyster and Anne King) was born Abt 1540, Gesburn Westly,Yorkshire,England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 7.  Margaret Lister was born Abt 1540, Gesburn Westly,Yorkshire,England (daughter of Thomas Lyster and Anne King).
    Children:
    1. 3. Jane Greene was born 0___ 1564, Bradford,Yorkshire,England; died 13 Oct 1610, Chellow, Yorkshire, England.


Generation: 4

  1. 8.  Edward Bolling was born ~ 1505, Chellow, Yorkshire, England (son of Tristram Bolling and Beatrice Calverley); died 0___ 1592, Chellow, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Death: 0___ 1543, Chellow, Yorkshire, England

    Edward married Magdaline Greene ~ 1536, Chellow, Yorkshire, England. Magdaline was born 0___ 1520, Chellow, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1561, Chellow, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 9.  Magdaline Greene was born 0___ 1520, Chellow, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1561, Chellow, Yorkshire, England.
    Children:
    1. 4. Tristram Bolling was born 0___ 1530, Chellow, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1561, Chellow, Yorkshire, England.

  3. 10.  Richard Rookes was born Abt 1498, Wirley, Halifax, Yorkshire, England; died , (North Yorkshire) England.

    Richard married Elizabeth Waterhouse 0___ 1520, (North Yorkshire) England. Elizabeth was born 0___ 1495, Wirley, Halifax, Yorkshire, England; died Abt 1593, (North Yorkshire) England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 11.  Elizabeth Waterhouse was born 0___ 1495, Wirley, Halifax, Yorkshire, England; died Abt 1593, (North Yorkshire) England.
    Children:
    1. 5. Anne Rookes was born 0___ 1524, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1563, (Yorkshire) England.

  5. 14.  Thomas Lyster was born Abt 1516, Gisburn, Yorkshire, England (son of Thomas Lyster and Effamia "Lucy" de Westbye); died 0___ 1573, (Yorkshire, England).

    Thomas married Anne King (Yorkshire, England). Anne (daughter of Richard King and unnamed spouse) was born Abt 1515, Gisburn, Yorkshire, England; died , (Yorkshire, England). [Group Sheet]


  6. 15.  Anne King was born Abt 1515, Gisburn, Yorkshire, England (daughter of Richard King and unnamed spouse); died , (Yorkshire, England).
    Children:
    1. 7. Margaret Lister was born Abt 1540, Gesburn Westly,Yorkshire,England.


Generation: 5

  1. 16.  Tristram Bolling was born ~ 1427, Bolling Hall, Bradford, Yorkshire, England (son of Robert Bolling and Isabel Thornton); died 30 May 1502, Chellow, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Tristram Bollynge
    • Will: 7 Apr 1502, Chellow, Yorkshire, England
    • Probate: 7 Aug 1502, Chellow, Yorkshire, England

    Notes:

    Tristram Bolling, the eldest son of Robert Bolling, the attainted possessor of Bolling Hall, married Beatrix, daughter of Sir Walter Calverley, of Calverley. He was a man of great courage, and was most loyal to the Lancastrina party, so much so that he appears to have idolized Henry VI.

    In his behalf he fought alongside his father at Towton, but, being young, escaped further consequences than the disastrous defeat of his party. He died at Chellow, near Manningham, leaving an heiress, Rosamund, who had become the wife of Sir Richard Tempest, of Bracewell.

    We give a copy of his will on account of its quaintness of spelling and the information it contains:--

    Will of Tristram Bolling, of Chellow

    April 7, 1502. Proved August 2.

    'I, Tristram Bolling, of Chellow, to be buryd in the high quere of my parish church of Bradforth, and I bequeath in honour of my mortuary my best horse wt. sadyll & brydll, jake, salet, bowe and harnes, sword and bockler, as I went to the warr. I bequeath unto the aulter of Synt Kateryn afore the image of King Henry the vj. one vestment with albe preist iijs. iiijd. To one priest for saying for my saule xxs. and li. wax to be brend upon my sepulture, and iiijd. for the wast of every torch brynnyng about my body the day of my buryall. To every man beyryng me to the church iiijd. I will yet all my manners, lands &c., being my inheritance after the decease of Robert Bolling my fader or any other tytll of right here-after remayne after my decease unto Richard Tempest and Rosamunde my doghter and wyff unto the said Richard and to ther heyrs forever mor. I will that my wyff Elyne during her lyve have a yearly rent for her thirds out of my said manners, &c. To my son Edward Bolling all my lands purchased in the toun of Bradford except a messe, and one tenement lying beside the parich chirch, which I will remayn unto Thos. Tempest, son of Richard Tempest aforesaid. to the said Thos. Tempest one messe soom tyme in the holdynge of Allison Dyn-Gurd. To John Tempest, son unto ye said Richard Tempest, one tenement called Rowley and one tenement in Thornton beside Bradford newly bylded. I wyll that Edwd. Robertshaw take half a coile pytt at Clayton dewring one yere, and my wyff the other half, and then the said coile pytt to remayne to the foresaid Rich. Tempest and hys wyff. I order as executors Nicholas Tempest, Edward Bollynge, and Cudberd Lenthrope, my son Richard Tempest being superviseare.
    Giffen at Chellow. Pro. 3 June, 1502'

    The estates of Tristram Bolling comprised the manors of Bolling and Thornton, and lands in Little Bolling, Bradford, Clayton, Allerton, Wilsden, Hainworth, Horton, and Denholme. He thus left the bulk of is property to his daughter Rosemund, wife of Sir Richard Tempest, although he had a son, Edward, by his second wife, who suceeded him in the Chellow estates, which comprised the manor of Chellow, and a substantial residence.

    end of biography

    Birth:
    Images of Bolling Hall: https://www.google.com/search?q=Bolling+Hall+bradford+pictures&rlz=1C1KMZB_enUS591US591&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjM2IWp06XZAhWCtVMKHUhJBQ4Q7AkIQA&biw=1440&bih=809

    Tristram married Beatrice Calverley ~ 1446, (Yorkshire) England. Beatrice (daughter of Walter Calverley, III and Elizabeth Markenfield) was born ~ 1427, Calverley, Yorkshire, England; died , Bolling Hall, Bradford, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 17.  Beatrice Calverley was born ~ 1427, Calverley, Yorkshire, England (daughter of Walter Calverley, III and Elizabeth Markenfield); died , Bolling Hall, Bradford, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Beatrix Bolling Calverley

    Notes:

    Click here to view her homeplace...http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calverley_Old_Hall

    Children:
    1. 8. Edward Bolling was born ~ 1505, Chellow, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1592, Chellow, Yorkshire, England.

  3. 28.  Thomas Lyster was born ~ 1487, Gisburn, Yorkshire, England (son of Thomas Lyster and Isabel de Clitheroe); died 0___ 1519, (Yorkshire) England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Thomas Lister

    Notes:

    Lister or Lyster is an English occupational surname, and may refer to a textile dyer, from the Middle English word "litster", meaning to dye.[2] It dates back to the 13th century in Scotland with the recording of Aleyn le Littester of Edinburghshire who rendered homage to the Republican Government in 1296, and to the 14th century in England (Richard le Lyster appears in the Subsidy Tax Rolls of Derbyshire in 1327.)

    The name probably comes from the Old Norse verb 'lita', meaning 'to dye' and rendered as 'lystare' in English. The noun for 'dyer' was 'litster' (Scottish), 'lit(t)e' (middle English), or 'lister' (English). The word was also associated with a 'salmon spear', rendered 'lyster' (Danish) or 'lister' (English). A 1533 Act of Parliament stated, "No person shall take in any crele, raw web, lister.... the young fry of salmon."

    The name took hold in areas of England in the 16th Century known for the woollen industry, mainly Yorkshire, but also Lancashire, Lincolnshire and Norfolk.

    The name came to Ireland following the Cromwellian campaign of 1649, and took root in County Laois, rendered by the English as Queen's County.

    Thomas married Effamia "Lucy" de Westbye (Yorkshire) England. Effamia was born Abt 1489, Gisburn, Yorkshire, England; died UNKNOWN, (Yorkshire, England). [Group Sheet]


  4. 29.  Effamia "Lucy" de Westbye was born Abt 1489, Gisburn, Yorkshire, England; died UNKNOWN, (Yorkshire, England).
    Children:
    1. 14. Thomas Lyster was born Abt 1516, Gisburn, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1573, (Yorkshire, England).

  5. 30.  Richard King was born Abt 1489, (of Gisburn,Yorkshire,England); died , (Gisburn,Yorkshire,England).

    Richard married unnamed spouse (Gisburn,Yorkshire,England). [Group Sheet]


  6. 31.  unnamed spouse
    Children:
    1. 15. Anne King was born Abt 1515, Gisburn, Yorkshire, England; died , (Yorkshire, England).


Generation: 6

  1. 32.  Robert Bolling was born ~ 1396, Bradford, England (son of Robert de Bolling and Margaret Thornoe); died 23 Oct 1457, Bolling Hall, Bradford, Yorkshire, England.

    Notes:

    See images & history of Bolling Hall, Bradford, Yorkshire, England... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bolling_Hall,_Bradford

    end of message

    More photos and information on Bolling Hall ... http://www.bradfordmuseums.org/venues/bollinghall/index.php

    Birth:
    Bolling Hall is one of the oldest buildings in Bradford, West Yorkshire, England. It is currently used as a museum and education centre. The building is about a mile from the centre of Bradford. Its surroundings are suburban in character.

    Before the Industrial Revolution, Bradford was a small town and difficult to defend as it lay in a basin. However, Bolling Hall occupies a commanding position on a hillside. The earliest part of this building, dating from the 14th century, has been interpreted as a pele tower, although Bradford is somewhat outside the typical geographical area for these defensive structures.

    The Manor of Bolling (Bollinc) is first mentioned in Domesday Book and was at that time in the possession of a man named Sindi. The manor then came under the control of Ilbert de Lacy. By 1316 the manor was owned by William Bolling, and Bollings owned the estate until the late 15th century when control went to the Tempests who held the estate until 1649. The estate changed hands several times thereafter until eventually it was let to several tenants until being presented to Bradford Corporation in 1912. It was opened as a museum three years later.

    During the second siege of Bradford in 1643, during the English Civil War, the house was a Royalist base. On this occasion the Royalists took the town, which had strong Parliamentarian sympathies, and it was thought that the victors would put the inhabitants to the sword. There is a legend that a ghost appeared in the bedroom where the Royalist commander Earl of Newcastle was staying to tell him to "Pity poor Bradford". There is usually material on display relating to the English Civil War including a death mask of Oliver Cromwell. In the 18th century parts of the house were modernised by the architect John Carr, following a fire.

    http://bit.ly/YaH18A

    Died:
    Bolling Hall is one of the oldest buildings in Bradford, West Yorkshire, England. It is currently used as a museum and education centre. The building is about a mile from the centre of Bradford. Its surroundings are suburban in character.

    Before the Industrial Revolution, Bradford was a small town and difficult to defend as it lay in a basin. However, Bolling Hall occupies a commanding position on a hillside. The earliest part of this building, dating from the 14th century, has been interpreted as a pele tower, although Bradford is somewhat outside the typical geographical area for these defensive structures.

    The Manor of Bolling (Bollinc) is first mentioned in Domesday Book and was at that time in the possession of a man named Sindi. The manor then came under the control of Ilbert de Lacy. By 1316 the manor was owned by William Bolling, and Bollings owned the estate until the late 15th century when control went to the Tempests who held the estate until 1649. The estate changed hands several times thereafter until eventually it was let to several tenants until being presented to Bradford Corporation in 1912. It was opened as a museum three years later.

    During the second siege of Bradford in 1643, during the English Civil War, the house was a Royalist base. On this occasion the Royalists took the town, which had strong Parliamentarian sympathies, and it was thought that the victors would put the inhabitants to the sword. There is a legend that a ghost appeared in the bedroom where the Royalist commander Earl of Newcastle was staying to tell him to "Pity poor Bradford". There is usually material on display relating to the English Civil War including a death mask of Oliver Cromwell. In the 18th century parts of the house were modernised by the architect John Carr, following a fire.

    http://bit.ly/YaH18A

    Images ... https://www.google.com/search?q=Bolling+Hall,+Bradford,+England&rlz=1C1KMZB_enUS591US591&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiUwfTy4f3aAhVwxFkKHbWHAVwQsAQIUw&biw=1440&bih=809

    Robert married Isabel Thornton Bradford, England. Isabel was born 0___ 1468, (Bradford) England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 33.  Isabel Thornton was born 0___ 1468, (Bradford) England.

    Notes:

    FamilySearch.com | Ancestral File reports her birthyear as <1468>. Does'nt seem likely that this date or marriage is correct as her son, Tristram, is born <1427>. This is the problem with the LDS website - they report any information without submitter's name or any other source information...DAH

    Children:
    1. 16. Tristram Bolling was born ~ 1427, Bolling Hall, Bradford, Yorkshire, England; died 30 May 1502, Chellow, Yorkshire, England.

  3. 34.  Walter Calverley, III was born 0___ 1402, Calverley, Yorkshire, England (son of Walter Scott de Calverley, Jr., Knight and Joanna Bigod); died Before 5 Mar 1467, (Calverley, Yorkshire, England).

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Walter Scot

    Notes:

    History and photos of the Ancient Parish of CALVERLEY... http://www.genuki.org.uk/big/eng/YKS/WRY/Calverley/index.html

    Photo & history of "Calverley Hall" from Wikipedia... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calverley_Old_Hall


    The children of John Rupert & Eula James Hansard are his 12th great-grandchildren.

    Walter is the the 12th great-grandson of William the Conqueror (1024-1087) and his lineage includes many kings & queens of England, France, Austria, Spain, Portugal and Italy. Ergo, they are the 24th great-grandchildren of William I, King of England

    View Sir Walter's pedigree...

    http://www.ourfamilyhistories.org/ahnentafel.php?personID=I145233&tree=00&parentset=0&generations=12

    Note: Even though AR and MCS state, in a correction to their prior lines, that Walter Calverley was a son by a previous wife, Paul Reed, researching with original sources, charters, etc., has proven that Walter's mother was Joan Bigod, as AR & MCS originally had it, except she was a daughter of the prior generation.

    ---------------------------

    Walter Calverley, or Scot, fl. 1429, d. 1466; m. Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Thomas Markenfield. [Magna Charta Sureties]
    A Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Commoners of Great Britain and Ireland Vol I Page 673
    http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=jweber&id=I10273

    CALVERLEY, OF THE BROAD AND OF EWELL CASTLE.

    Lineage.

    This ancient family, originally bearing the name of Scott, was founded by

    JOHN SCOTT, who came to England in the suite of the Lady Maud, on that princess's marriage with HENRY I. He espoused Larderina, daughter of Alphonsus Gospatrick, a person of great note in those days, and thereby acquired the lordship of Calverly in Yorkshire, with several other manors. His son and heir,

    JOHN SCOTT, Lord of Calverley in right of his mother, was steward of the household to empress MAUD. He m. the daughter of Sir John Lutterell, knt. of Hooton Pannal, and was s. by his eldest son,

    WALTER SCOTT, or CALVERLEY, of Calverley, who gave to the chapel of the blessed Virgin Mary, at York, the vicarage of Calverley, temp. HENRY II. He wedded Joan, daughter of Sir John Swillington, knt. and had issue,

    1. WILLIAM, his heir.
    2. Robert (Sir), knt.
    3. Henry.
    4. Thomas, who acquired the lands of Newton, and was ancestor of the SCOTTS of that place.
    5. Barnard, who d. unmarried.
    6. Mary, m. to Jeffrey, son of Peter de Arthington.

    The eldest son,
    WILLIAM SCOTT, or CALVERLEY, of Calverley, living in the first year of the reign of HENRY III. married Mabel, daughter of Sir Nicholas Stapleton, knt. and was s. by his son,

    WALTER SCOT, or CALVERLEY, of Calverley, living in 1273, who wedded the dau. of Sir John Normanville, and had several sons from one of whom descended the Calverleys of Hayton, Clareborough, Lound, &c. in Nottinghamshire. The eldest,

    WILLIAM SCOT, or CALVERLEY, of Calverley, the last who retained the name of Scot m. temp. EDWARD III. a daughter of Sir John Goldsbrough, of Goldsbrough, knt. and was s. by his eldest son,

    SIR JOHN DE CALVERLEY, of Calverley, living in the reign of EDWARD III. whom. Johanna, daughter or niece of Sir Simon Ward, and had a son and heir,

    JOHN DE CALVERLEY, of Calverley, high-sheriff of the county of Rutland, and one of the esquires to the queen, temp. RICHARD II. This gentleman engaging in the wars, on the king's part, was taken prisoner and beheaded. Leaving no issue, he was s. by his brother,

    WALTER CALVERLEY, of Calverley, who m. twice, but had issue only by his second wife, Margery, dau. of John de Dineley, namely,

    WALTER, his heir. John (Sir), who was slain in battle, fighting for King HENRY IV.
    The elder son and successor,

    WALTER CALVERLEY, of Calverley, espoused Joanna, daughter of Sir John Bygod,of Sterrington, knt. and had issue. In this Walter's time, Calverley church being rebuilt,his arms were cut or plated in the woodwork there. He was s. by his son,

    WALTER CALVERLEY, of Calverley, living in 1429, who wedded Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Thomas Mackingfield, knt. and had several children, viz.


    Arms--Sa. an inescutcheon arg. with a?? orle of eight horned owls of the second.

    Crest--A horned owl arg.

    Motto--En Caligine veritas.

    Estates--EWELL ESTATE, with the manors of Fitznells or Fennells, Shawford or Roxley and Buttailes or Buttolphs, purchased in 1784. The castle was bought and the mansion erected by the present proprietor in 1812. THE BROAD acquired in 1658; the estate has since been enlarged by purchase of the manor of Warlington and thegreat tithes of Hellingley, with several farms; also several farms at Brinchley andLamberhurst, in Kent; and in Sussex, inherited from the Forbes.

    Town Residence--Berkeley Square
    Seats--The Broad; Hellingley, Sussex; Ewell Castle, Surrey.

    Father: Walter de CALVERLEY , Sir b: ABT 1365 in Calverley, West Riding Yorkshire, England
    Mother: Joan (Joanna) BIGOD b: ABT 1380 in Settrington, East Riding Yorkshire, England

    Marriage 1 Elizabeth MARKENFIELD b: ABT 1410 in Markenfield Hall, Ripon, Yorkshire, England
    Married: 1 MAR 1415/16 in Yorkshire, England 6
    Children
    Miss de CALVERLEY b: ABT 1442 in Calverley, West Riding Yorkshire, England

    Sources:

    Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
    Page: 156-35
    Title: Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999
    Page: 87-12
    Title: Newsgroup: soc.genealogy.medieval, at groups - google.com
    Page: Paul C. Reed (reedpcgen), 2 Aug 2000
    Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
    Page: 156-35
    Text: 1466
    Title: Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999
    Page: 87-12
    Text: 1466
    Title: Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999
    Page: 95-12
    Text: marriage covenant

    Walter Calverley [32865]

    14th great grandfather of Sheila Ann Mynatt:

    http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=&secondpersonID=I27517&maxrels=1&disallowspouses=0&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I32865

    and

    19th great grandfather of David Alden Hennessee:

    http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=I27517&secondpersonID=I3&maxrels=1&disallowspouses=0&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I32865


    Some Descendants of
    John SCOT Of CALVERLEY
    (1120 - 1136)

    (None of the persons on this page are Direct Ancestors of George Washington 1st US President)

    Copyright 2007 by Terry J. Booth. All reproduction or reuse is prohibited, in whole or in part, without written permission of the author.
    The author has relied much on those herein cited. Please contact the author about an important source not cited or improperly cited.

    hr
    First Generation


    1. John SCOT Of CALVERLEY,211 212 son of John SCOTICUS and Larderina GOSPATRICII, was born circa 1120 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 211 212 and died after 1136 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211 212 Another name for John was John SCOT. John married Daughter of John LUTTREL,211 212 daughter of (Sir) John LUTTREL Knight and Wife of John (LUTTREL) UNKNOWN, circa 1148 in Prob Yorkshire, England.211 212 Daughter was born circa 1125 in Hooton Pannel, Yorkshire, England 211 212 and died of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211 212

    Children from this marriage were:
    2. i. Walter SCOT Of CALVERLEY 26 211 was born circa 1150 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 26 211 and died after 1208 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.26 211
    3. ii. John SCOT Of CALVERLEY 211 was born circa 1153 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211
    4. iii. William SCOT Of CALVERLEY 211 was born circa 1156 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211
    5. iv. Jordan DE CALVERLEY 211 was born circa 1159 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211
    6. v. Christopher SCOT Of CALVERLEY 211 was born circa 1162 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211

    hr

    Second Generation

    2. Walter SCOT Of CALVERLEY 26 211 (John SCOT Of 1) was born circa 1150 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 26 211 and died after 1208 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.26 211 Another name for Walter was William SCOT Of CALVERLEY. Walter married Joan DE SWILLINGTON,211 213 daughter of John DE SWILLINGTON and Wife of John DE (SWILLINGTON) UNKNOWN, in 1175 in Prob Yorkshire, England.211 213 Joan was born circa 1155 in Prob Swillington, Yorkshire, England 211 213 and died of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211 213

    Children from this marriage were:
    7. i. (Sir) Roger SCOT Of CALVERLEY 26 211 was born circa 1180 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 26 211 and died before 1226 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.26
    8. ii. Bernard DE CALVERLEY 211 was born circa 1183 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 211 and died of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.
    9. iii. Mary SCOT Of CALVERLEY 211 was born circa 1186 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 211 and died of Arthington, Yorkshire, England.211 Mary married Geoffrey de ARTHINGTON 211 circa 1200 in Prob Yorkshire, England.211 Geoffrey was born circa 1176 in Arthington, Yorkshire, England 211 and died of Arthington, Yorkshire, England.211
    10. iv. Henry CALVERLEY was born circa 1189 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.
    11. v. Thomas SCOT Of CALVERLEY was born circa 1192 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England and died of Newton, Yorkshire, England.

    hr

    Third Generation

    7. (Sir) Roger SCOT Of CALVERLEY 26 211 (Walter SCOT Of 2, John SCOT Of 1) was born circa 1180 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 26 211 and died before 1226 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.26 Roger married Jursella (CALVERLEY) UNKNOWN circa 1210. Jursella was born circa 1190 and died of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.

    Children from this marriage were:
    12. i. (Sir) William SCOT Of CALVERLEY 26 was born circa 1210 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 26 and died before 27 May 1261 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.26
    13. ii. Geoffrey DE CALVERLEY was born circa 1213 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.
    14. iii. Peter DE CALVERLEY was born circa 1216 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.

    hr

    Fourth Generation

    12. (Sir) William SCOT Of CALVERLEY 26 (Roger SCOT Of ((Sir)) 3, Walter SCOT Of 2, John SCOT Of 1) was born circa 1210 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 26 and died before 27 May 1261 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.26 William married Mabel STAPLETON (See Link for Ancestry),211 214 daughter of Nicholas II DE STAPLETON and Wife of Nicholas DE (STAPLETON) UNKNOWN, circa 1240 in Prob Yorkshire, England.211 214 Mabel was born circa 1221 in Stapleton, Yorkshire, England 211 214 and died of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211 214

    Children from this marriage were:
    15. i. Joane SCOT Of CALVERLEY was born circa 1240 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England and died of Nottinghamshire, England. Joane married Richard HYNGERAM circa 1260. Richard was born circa 1240 in Nottinghamshire, England and died of Nottinghamshire, England.
    16. ii. John DE CALVERLEY 211 was born about 1238 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 211 and died after 1273 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211
    17. iii. William SCOT Of CALVERLEY was born circa 1246 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.
    18. iv. Alice SCOT Of CALVERLEY was born circa 1249 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.
    19. v. Margery SCOT Of CALVERLEY was born circa 1252 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.
    20. vi. Walter SCOT DE PONTEFRACT was born circa 1255 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England and died after 1308 of Haydon, Yorkshire, England.

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    16. John DE CALVERLEY 211 (William SCOT Of ((Sir)) 4, Roger SCOT Of ((Sir)) 3, Walter SCOT Of 2, John SCOT Of 1) was born about 1238 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 211 and died after 1273 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211 John married Margaret (CALVERLEY) UNKNOWN 211 circa 1270 in Prob Yorkshire, England.211 Margaret was born circa 1250 211 and died of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211

    Children from this marriage were:
    21. i. (Sir) John DE CALVERLEY 26 211 was born circa 1270 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 26 211 and died after 1349 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.26 211
    22. ii. Simon DE CALVERLEY was born circa 1273 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.
    23. iii. Elizabeth DE CALVERLEY 26 was born circa 1276 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England,26 died 23 Aug 1341 of Heddingley, Yorkshire, England 26 at age 65, and was buried in Priory of Esholt, Yorkshire, England. Elizabeth married Thomas PALTFYN circa 1300. Thomas was born circa 1270 in Heddingley, Yorkshire, England and died before 1341 of Heddingley, Yorkshire, England.
    24. iv. Walter SCOT of CALVERLEY 211 was born circa 1279 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 211 and died after 1325 in Prob Of Goldsborough, Yorkshire, England.211

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    21. (Sir) John DE CALVERLEY 26 211 (John DE 5, William SCOT Of ((Sir)) 4, Roger SCOT Of ((Sir)) 3, Walter SCOT Of 2, John SCOT Of 1) was born circa 1270 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 26 211 and died after 1349 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.26 211 John married Daughter of an Unknown NEVILLE circa 1290. Daughter was born circa 1270 and died circa 1295 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England at age 25.

    John next married Joanna WARDE (See Link for Ancestry),211 215 daughter of (Sir) Simon WARDE Knight and Clarice (WARDE) UNKNOWN, circa 1300 in Prob Yorkshire, England.211 215 Joanna was born circa 1280 in Guiseley, West Riding, Yorkshire, England 211 215 and died after 1377 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211 215

    Children from this marriage were:
    25. i. John DE CALVERLEY 211 was born circa 1305 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 211 and died in Beheaded on Tower Hill, Tower of London, London, Middlesex, England.211
    26. ii. Mary DE CALVERLEY was born circa 1308 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England and died of Birkin, Yorkshire, England. Mary married Adam EVERINGHAM circa 1320. Adam was born circa 1305 in Birkin, Yorkshire, England and died of Birkin, Yorkshire, England.
    27. iii. Walter DE CALVERLEY 211 was born circa 1311 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 211 and died after 1376 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211
    28. iv. Anne DE CALVERLEY 211 was born circa 1314 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 211 and died of Hawksworth, Yorkshire, England. Anne married Richard HAWKSWORTH circa 1320. Richard was born circa 1310 in Hawksworth, Yorkshire, England and died of Hawksworth, Yorkshire, England.
    29. v. Richard DE CALVERLEY was born circa 1317 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.
    30. vi. (Prioress) Isabel DE CALVERLEY of Esholt 211 was born circa 1320 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 211 and died of Eshott, Morpeth, Northumberland, England.211

    24. Walter SCOT of CALVERLEY 211 (John DE 5, William SCOT Of ((Sir)) 4, Roger SCOT Of ((Sir)) 3, Walter SCOT Of 2, John SCOT Of 1) was born circa 1279 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 211 and died after 1325 in Prob Of Goldsborough, Yorkshire, England.211 Walter married Daughter of John DE GOLDSBOROUGH,211 daughter of John DE GOLDSBOROUGH and Wife of John DE (GOLDSBOROUGH) UNKNOWN, in 1325 in Prob Yorkshire, England.211 Daughter was born circa 1300 in Goldsborough, Yorkshire, England 211 and died in Prob Of Goldsborough, Yorkshire, England.211

    Children from this marriage were:

    31. i. Daughter of Walter SCOT of CALVERLEY 211 was born circa 1325 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211 Daughter married Gilbert DE SLINGSBY 211 circa 1320. Gilbert was born circa 1325.
    32. ii. Eleanor CALVERLEY 211 was born circa 1328 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211 Eleanor married John de LEVENTHORP 211 circa 1320.211 John was born circa 1325.

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    27. Walter DE CALVERLEY 211 (John DE ((Sir)) 6, John DE 5, William SCOT Of ((Sir)) 4, Roger SCOT Of ((Sir)) 3, Walter SCOT Of 2, John SCOT Of 1) was born circa 1311 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 211 and died after 1376 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211 Walter married Margery DE DINELEY,211 daughter of John DE DINELEY Esq and Wife of John DE (DINELEY) UNKNOWN, circa 1328 in Prob Yorkshire, England.211 Margery was born circa 1310 in Downham, Yorkshire, England 211 and died of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211

    Children from this marriage were:
    33. i. John 'Le Fitz_Walter Scot' DE CALVERLEY 211 was born circa 1328 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 211 and died before 1346.211 John married Agnes (CALVERLEY) UNKNOWN circa 1350. Agnes was born circa 1330.
    34. ii. (Sir) William CALVERLEY 211 was born circa 1335 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 211 and died after 1376 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211 William married Eleanor THORNHILL,211 daughter of (Sir) John DE THORNHILL and Wife of John DE (THORNHILL) UNKNOWN, circa 1360 in Prob Yorkshire, England.211 Eleanor was born circa 1335 in Thornhill, West Riding, Yorkshire, England 211 and died of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211
    35. iii. Walter CALVERLEY 26 211 216 was born circa 1341 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 26 211 216 and died 10 Oct 1404 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 26 211 216 at age 63.

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    35. Walter CALVERLEY 26 211 216 (Walter DE 7, John DE ((Sir)) 6, John DE 5, William SCOT Of ((Sir)) 4, Roger SCOT Of ((Sir)) 3, Walter SCOT Of 2, John SCOT Of 1) was born circa 1341 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 26 211 216 and died 10 Oct 1404 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 26 211 216 at age 63. Walter married First Wife (CALVERLEY) UNKNOWN circa 1370 in Prob Yorkshire, England. First was born circa 1350 and died circa 1395 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England at age 45.

    The Child from this marriage was:
    36. i. (Sir) John DE CALVERLEY Knight was born circa 1382 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England and died 21 Jul 1403 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England at age 21.

    Walter next married Joane NORMANVILLE,217 daughter of (Sir) John NORMANVILLE and MRIN 762 Constance DE MAULEY, circa 1395 in Prob Yorkshire, England.217 Joane was born circa 1375 217 and died circa 1395 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 217 at age 20.

    Walter next married Joan BIGOD (See Link for Ancestry),211 216 217 daughter of John BIGOD Sheriff of Yorkshire and Amy (BIGOD) UNKNOWN, about 1401 in Prob Yorkshire, England.211 216 217 Joan was born circa 1375 in Settrington, Yorkshire, England 211 216 217 and died before Jun 1423 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211 216 217

    Children from this marriage were:

    37. i. Walter CALVERLEY 148 211 218 was born about 1402 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 148 211 and died before 5 Mar 1467 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.148 211 218
    38. ii. Joan CALVERLEY 211 was born circa 1404 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211 Joan married John PASLEW circa 1420. John was born circa 1400.

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    37. Walter CALVERLEY 148 211 218 (Walter 8, Walter DE 7, John DE ((Sir)) 6, John DE 5, William SCOT Of ((Sir)) 4, Roger SCOT Of ((Sir)) 3, Walter SCOT Of 2, John SCOT Of 1) was born about 1402 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 148 211 and died before 5 Mar 1467 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.148 211 218 Walter married Elizabeth MARKENFIELD (See Link for Ancestry),148 153 211 218 daughter of (Sir) Thomas MARKENFIELD Knight and Beatrice SOTHILL, 1 Mar 1415 in Prob married by contract w children later.148 153 218 Elizabeth was born circa 1403 in Markenfield Hall, Ripon, Yorkshire, England 211 and died after 1472 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.148 211

    Children from this marriage were:
    39. i. William CALVERLEY 148 211 was born circa 1422 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 211 and died after 1488 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211
    40. ii. Margaret CALVERLEY 148 was born circa 1424 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England and died of Beamsley, Yorkshire, England. Margaret married Thomas CLAPHAM Esq 148 211 21 Sep 1442 in Prob Calverley, Yorkshire, England.148 211 Thomas was born circa 1420 in Beamsley, Yorkshire, England 211 and died of Beamsley, Yorkshire, England.
    41. iii. Joan CALVERLEY 148 was born circa 1425 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England and died after 1471 of North Elmsall, Yorkshire, England.
    42. iv. Anne CALVERLEY 148 211 was born circa 1426 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211
    43. v. Beatrice CALVERLEY was born about 1428 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England and died of Bolling Hall, Bradford, West Riding, Yorkshire, England.
    44. vi. Amice CALVERLEY 148 was born about 1429 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England. Amice married Richard BAILDON 148 211 in 1446 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.148 Richard was born circa 1425 of Yorkshire, England.211
    45. vii. Unnamed Daughter #1 of Walter CALVERLEY 211 was born in 1431 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211 Unnamed married Richard KIGHLEY 211 circa 1455 in Prob Calverley, Yorkshire, England.211 Richard was born circa 1430 in Newhall (near Eland), Yorkshire, England.211
    46. viii. Thomas CALVERLEY 148 211 was born before 1433 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 211 and died in 1500 of Park House, Byril, Yorkshire, England.211 Thomas married Agnes SKARGILL circa 1450. Agnes was born circa 1430 and died of Park House, Byril, Yorkshire, England.
    47. ix. Unnamed Daughter #2 of Walter CALVERLEY 211 was born in 1435 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211 Unnamed married William SCOT 211 circa 1455 in Prob Calverley, Yorkshire, England.211 William was born circa 1430 in Scot-hall, Leeds, Yorkshire, England.211
    48. x. Alice CALVERLEY 148 211 was born circa 1437 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 211 and died of Middleton, Leeds, Yorkshire, England. Alice married Gilbert LEGH 148 211 circa 1457 in Prob Calverley, Yorkshire, England.148 211 Gilbert was born circa 1435 in Middleton, Leeds, Yorkshire, England 211 and died of Middleton, Leeds, Yorkshire, England.
    49. xi. Robert CALVERLEY 148 211 was born before 1439 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 211 and died after 1458 of Baseford, Nottinghamshire, England.
    50. xii. Elizabeth CALVERLEY Nun 148 211 was born circa 1441 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 211 and died after 1488 of Eshott, Morpeth, Northumberland, England.211
    51. xiii. Isabel CALVERLEY 148 was born in 1443 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England and died of Scriven, Yorkshire, England. Isabel married John SLENGSBY 148 211 circa 1465 in Prob Calverley, Yorkshire, England.148 211 John was born circa 1440 in Scriven, Yorkshire, England 211 and died of Scriven, Yorkshire, England.

    Walter next married Katherine (DRAX)(BURTON)(MARKENFIELD) UNKNOWN 148 after 1442 in Prob Yorkshire, England. Katherine was born circa 1410 and died after 1472 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.148

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    39. William CALVERLEY 148 211 (Walter 9, Walter 8, Walter DE 7, John DE ((Sir)) 6, John DE 5, William SCOT Of ((Sir)) 4, Roger SCOT Of ((Sir)) 3, Walter SCOT Of 2, John SCOT Of 1) was born circa 1422 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 211 and died after 1488 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211 William married Agnes TEMPEST (See Link for Ancestry),211 daughter of (Sir) John TEMPEST High Sheriff of Yorkshire, Knight and Alice SHERBURNE, 7 Jan 1441 in Prob Yorkshire, England.211 Agnes was born circa 1425 in Bracewell, West Riding, Yorkshire, England 211 and died after 1489 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211

    Children from this marriage were:
    52. i. (Sir) William CALVERLEY 147 was born circa 1443 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 147 and died circa 2 Aug 1506 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 147 at age 63.
    53. ii. Margaret CALVERLEY 211 was born circa 1445 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211 Margaret married Mr POPELY.211 Mr was born circa 1445.
    54. iii. John CALVERLEY 211 was born circa 1447 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211
    55. iv. Joan CALVERLEY 211 was born circa 1449 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211 Joan married Christopher LISTER 211 in 1468.211 Christopher was born circa 1448 of Middop, Yorkshire, England.211

    Joan next married John SLINGSBY circa 1465. John was born circa 1445 in Scriven, Yorkshire, England and died about 1460 of Scriven, Yorkshire, England about age 15.
    56. v. Nicholas CALVERLEY Vicar of Brayton 211 was born circa 1450 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 211 and died after 1490 of Brayton, Yorkshire, England.211
    57. vi. Richard CALVERLEY 211 was born circa 1451 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211
    58. vii. Elizabeth CALVERLEY 147 153 211 was born circa 1453 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 147 211 and died of North Elmsall, Yorkshire, England.147 211
    59. viii. Anne CALVERLEY 211 was born circa 1455 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211 Anne married Thomas ELLIS Esq 211 circa 1475 in Prob Calverley, Yorkshire, England.211 Thomas was born circa 1450 of Kiddal, Yorkshire, England.211
    60. ix. Robert CALVERLEY 211 was born circa 1457 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211
    61. x. Isabel CALVERLEY 211 was born circa 1459 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211 Isabel married Mr MEARING 211 circa 1480 in Prob Yorkshire, England.211 Mr was born circa 1455 of Wheldale, Yorkshire, England.211
    62. xi. Thomas CALVERLEY 211 was born circa 1461 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211
    63. xii. Alice CALVERLEY Nun 211 was born circa 1463 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 211 and died after 1488 of Eshott, Morpeth, Northumberland, England.211
    64. xiii. Eleanor CALVERLEY 211 was born circa 1465 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211 Eleanor married Mr LEVENTHORPE.211 Mr was born circa 1460 of Leventhorpe, Yorkshire, England.211

    41. Joan CALVERLEY 148 (Walter 9, Walter 8, Walter DE 7, John DE ((Sir)) 6, John DE 5, William SCOT Of ((Sir)) 4, Roger SCOT Of ((Sir)) 3, Walter SCOT Of 2, John SCOT Of 1) was born circa 1425 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England and died after 1471 of North Elmsall, Yorkshire, England. Joan married John WENTWORTH Esq (See Link for Ancestry),147 148 153 son of John 'Of North Elmsall' WENTWORTH Esq and Joan BEAUMONT, after 1 Apr 1431 in Prob married by contract w children later.148 150 153 John was born circa 1428 in North Elmsall, Yorkshire, England 147 and died after 1459 of North Elmsall, Yorkshire, England.147 148


    See the John WENTWORTH Esq Entry for this Couple's Children and Descendants.


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    52. (Sir) William CALVERLEY 147 (William 10, Walter 9, Walter 8, Walter DE 7, John DE ((Sir)) 6, John DE 5, William SCOT Of ((Sir)) 4, Roger SCOT Of ((Sir)) 3, Walter SCOT Of 2, John SCOT Of 1) was born circa 1443 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 147 and died circa 2 Aug 1506 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 147 at age 63. William married Alice SAVILE (See Link for Ancestry), daughter of (Sir) John SAVILE Knight and Jane HARRINGTON, circa 1470 in Prob Yorkshire, England.147 153 Alice was born circa 1452 in Thornhill Hall, West Riding, Yorkshire, England and died about 1529 about age 77.

    Children from this marriage were:
    65. i. (Sir) Walter CALVERLEY Knight was born circa 1472 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England and died of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.
    66. ii. (Sir) William CALVERLEY Knight was born circa 1475 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England and died of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.

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    Twelfth Generation

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    65. (Sir) Walter CALVERLEY Knight (William ((Sir)) 11, William 10, Walter 9, Walter 8, Walter DE 7, John DE ((Sir)) 6, John DE 5, William SCOT Of ((Sir)) 4, Roger SCOT Of ((Sir)) 3, Walter SCOT Of 2, John SCOT Of 1) was born circa 1472 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England and died of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England. Walter married Isabel DRAX circa 1500. Isabel was born circa 1480 and died of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.

    The Child from this marriage was:
    67. i. (Sir) William CALVERLEY was born circa 1510 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England and died of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.

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    Thirteenth Generation


    67. (Sir) William CALVERLEY (Walter Knight ((Sir)) 12, William ((Sir)) 11, William 10, Walter 9, Walter 8, Walter DE 7, John DE ((Sir)) 6, John DE 5, William SCOT Of ((Sir)) 4, Roger SCOT Of ((Sir)) 3, Walter SCOT Of 2, John SCOT Of 1) was born circa 1510 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England and died of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England. William married Elizabeth MIDDLETON circa 1530. Elizabeth was born circa 1510 in Stockeld, Yorkshire, England and died of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.

    The Child from this marriage was:
    68. i. Anne CALVERLEY was born circa 1540 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England and died of North Elmsall, Yorkshire, England. Anne married Thomas WENTWORTH Esq, son of John WENTWORTH Esq and Ann HASTINGS, circa 1564. Thomas was born circa 1538 in North Elmsall, Yorkshire, England and died of North Elmsall, Yorkshire, England.


    Website design, architecture and content copyright 2007 by ancestryregister.com
    This page created on Sat Oct 27 16:17:47 2007

    Walter married Elizabeth Markenfield 1 Mar 1415, Calverley, Yorkshire, England. Elizabeth (daughter of Thomas Markenfield, Knight and Beatrice Sothill) was born ~ 1403, Markenfield Hall, Ripon, Yorkshire, England; died Aft 1472, Calverley, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 35.  Elizabeth Markenfield was born ~ 1403, Markenfield Hall, Ripon, Yorkshire, England (daughter of Thomas Markenfield, Knight and Beatrice Sothill); died Aft 1472, Calverley, Yorkshire, England.

    Notes:

    Elizabeth Markenfield is the 19th great grandmother of the grandchildren of Perry Green Byars (1896-1968) ...

    Click this link to view their lineage ... http://bit.ly/1FeHk2L

    Elizabeth Markenfield is the 15th great grandmother of the grandchildren of John Grover Mynatt (1884-1918)

    Click this link to view their lineage ... http://bit.ly/16CWxif

    Pictures & History of Elizabeth's heritage at her ancestral home, Markenfield Hall ... http://www.markenfield.com/

    Some Descendants of (Sir) Thomas DE MARKENFIELD Knight (1335 - 1398)... http://washington.ancestryregister.com/MARKENFIELD00006.htm

    More on Elizabeth... http://washington.ancestryregister.com/MARKENFIELD00006.htm#i6551

    Birth:
    More images of Markenfield Hall ... http://bit.ly/1KyaYkQ

    Children:
    1. Joan Calverley was born ~ 1425, Calverley, Yorkshire, England.
    2. 17. Beatrice Calverley was born ~ 1427, Calverley, Yorkshire, England; died , Bolling Hall, Bradford, England.
    3. William Calverley was born ~ 1428, Calverley, Yorkshire, England; died 12 Apr 1488.

  5. 56.  Thomas Lyster was born 0___ 1464, Gisburn, Yorkshire, England (son of Christopher Lister and Joan Calverley); died 0___ 1491, (Gisburn) Yorkshire, England.

    Thomas married Isabel de Clitheroe (Gisburn, Yorkshire, England). Isabel was born 0___ 1465, Clitheroe, Lancashire, England; died ~ 1491. [Group Sheet]


  6. 57.  Isabel de Clitheroe was born 0___ 1465, Clitheroe, Lancashire, England; died ~ 1491.
    Children:
    1. 28. Thomas Lyster was born ~ 1487, Gisburn, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1519, (Yorkshire) England.


Generation: 7

  1. 64.  Robert de Bolling was born 0___ 1370, Bolling Hall, Bradford, England (son of John de Bolling and Grace Papeley); died 1422-1431, (Bradford) England.

    Notes:

    Generation No. 147

    Robert De Bolling (III) [147] John De Bolling (IV) (=Grace Papeley) [146] Robert De Bolling (II (=Elizabeth De Thornton) [145] John De Bolling (III) (=Alice) [144] William De Bolling (IV) [143] John De Bolling (II) [142] Robert D. Bolling [141] William De Bolling (III) [140] William De Bolling (II) [139] William De Bolling [138] John De Bolling [137] Tristam De Bolling [136] William De Boulogne [135] Eustace II De Boulogne (=Mary of Scotland) [134] Mathilda Van Leuven (=Eustache I, Count of Boulogne)[133] Gerberga of Lower Lorraine [132] Charles, Duke of Lower Lorraine [131] King Louis IV of France (=Gerberga of Saxony) [130] Charles III, the Simple (=Eadgifu of England) [129] Louis II, the Stammerer (=Adelaide of Paris) [128] Charles II, the Bald (=Ermentrude) [127] Louis I, the Pious (=Judith of Bavaria) [126] Charlemagne the Great (=Hildegard) [1-125]

    Robert De Bolling (III) was born 1370 in Bolling Hall, Bradford, Yorkshire, England, and died 1423 in Bolling Hall, Bradford, Yorkshire, England.

    Married Margaret Thornoe. She was born 1374 in Bolling Hall, Bradford, Yorkshire, England, and died 1396 in Bolling Hall, Bradford, Yorkshire, England.

    Children: Robert Bolling (IV)... albeit without the "De"

    Birth:
    Bolling Hall is one of the oldest buildings in Bradford, West Yorkshire, England. It is currently used as a museum and education centre. The building is about a mile from the centre of Bradford. Its surroundings are suburban in character.

    Before the Industrial Revolution, Bradford was a small town and difficult to defend as it lay in a basin. However, Bolling Hall occupies a commanding position on a hillside. The earliest part of this building, dating from the 14th century, has been interpreted as a pele tower, although Bradford is somewhat outside the typical geographical area for these defensive structures.

    The Manor of Bolling (Bollinc) is first mentioned in Domesday Book and was at that time in the possession of a man named Sindi. The manor then came under the control of Ilbert de Lacy. By 1316 the manor was owned by William Bolling, and Bollings owned the estate until the late 15th century when control went to the Tempests who held the estate until 1649. The estate changed hands several times thereafter until eventually it was let to several tenants until being presented to Bradford Corporation in 1912. It was opened as a museum three years later.

    During the second siege of Bradford in 1643, during the English Civil War, the house was a Royalist base. On this occasion the Royalists took the town, which had strong Parliamentarian sympathies, and it was thought that the victors would put the inhabitants to the sword. There is a legend that a ghost appeared in the bedroom where the Royalist commander Earl of Newcastle was staying to tell him to "Pity poor Bradford". There is usually material on display relating to the English Civil War including a death mask of Oliver Cromwell. In the 18th century parts of the house were modernised by the architect John Carr, following a fire.

    http://bit.ly/YaH18A

    Robert married Margaret Thornoe (Bradford) England. Margaret (daughter of Thomas Thornoe and unnamed spouse) was born 1374, (Bradford) England; died 1423, Bolling Hall, Bradford, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 65.  Margaret Thornoe was born 1374, (Bradford) England (daughter of Thomas Thornoe and unnamed spouse); died 1423, Bolling Hall, Bradford, Yorkshire, England.
    Children:
    1. 32. Robert Bolling was born ~ 1396, Bradford, England; died 23 Oct 1457, Bolling Hall, Bradford, Yorkshire, England.

  3. 68.  Walter Scott de Calverley, Jr., Knight was born ~ 1341, Calverley, Yorkshire, England (son of Walter de Calverley, Sr., Knight and Margery de Dineley); died 10 Oct 1404, Calverley, Yorkshire, England.

    Notes:

    Eighth Generation

    35. Walter CALVERLEY 26 211 216 (Walter DE 7, John DE ((Sir)) 6, John DE 5, William SCOT Of ((Sir)) 4, Roger SCOT Of ((Sir)) 3, Walter SCOT Of 2, John SCOT Of 1) was born circa 1341 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 26 211 216 and died 10 Oct 1404 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 26 211 216 at age 63. Walter married First Wife (CALVERLEY) UNKNOWN circa 1370 in Prob Yorkshire, England. First was born circa 1350 and died circa 1395 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England at age 45.

    The Child from this marriage was:

    36. i. (Sir) John DE CALVERLEY Knight was born circa 1382 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England and died 21 Jul 1403 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England at age 21.

    Walter next married Joane NORMANVILLE,217 daughter of (Sir) John NORMANVILLE and MRIN 762 Constance DE MAULEY, circa 1395 in Prob Yorkshire, England.217 Joane was born circa 1375 217 and died circa 1395 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 217 at age 20.

    Walter next married Joan BIGOD (See Link for Ancestry),211 216 217 daughter of John BIGOD Sheriff of Yorkshire and Amy (BIGOD) UNKNOWN, about 1401 in Prob Yorkshire, England.211 216 217 Joan was born circa 1375 in Settrington, Yorkshire, England 211 216 217 and died before Jun 1423 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211 216 217

    Children from this marriage were:

    37. i. Walter CALVERLEY 148 211 218 was born about 1402 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 148 211 and died before 5 Mar 1467 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.148 211 218
    38. ii. Joan CALVERLEY 211 was born circa 1404 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211 Joan married John PASLEW circa 1420. John was born circa 1400.

    Walter married Joanna Bigod ~ 1401, Calverley, Yorkshire, England. Joanna (daughter of John Bigod, Knight and Amy Settrington) was born 1370-1375, Settrington, Yorkshire, England; died Bef 1423, Calverley, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 69.  Joanna Bigod was born 1370-1375, Settrington, Yorkshire, England (daughter of John Bigod, Knight and Amy Settrington); died Bef 1423, Calverley, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Joan Bigod
    • Also Known As: Joan Calverly

    Notes:

    WALTER CALVERLEY, of Calverley, espoused Joanna, daughter of Sir John Bygod, of Sterrington, knt. and had issue. In this Walter's time, Calverley church being rebuilt, his arms were cut or plated in the woodwork there. He was s. by his son,

    Birth:
    Settrington is a village and civil parish in the Ryedale district of North Yorkshire, England, about 3 miles (5 km) east of Malton.

    Map & history ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Settrington

    Children:
    1. 34. Walter Calverley, III was born 0___ 1402, Calverley, Yorkshire, England; died Before 5 Mar 1467, (Calverley, Yorkshire, England).
    2. Joan Calverley was born ~ 1404, Calverley, Yorkshire, England.

  5. 70.  Thomas Markenfield, Knight was born ~ 1365, Markenfield Hall, Ripon, Yorkshire, England (son of John Markenfield, Knight and Joan Minot); died ~ 1415, (North Yorkshire) England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Thomas Markingfield

    Notes:

    He married his stepsister.

    Showing 13 people
    Son of Sir Thomas Markenfield and NN Miniott
    Husband of Beatrice Markinfield
    Father of Elizabeth Calverley; John Markenfield; Joan or Jane Warde; Isabel Mauleverer; Peter Markenfield and 2 others

    *

    Birth:
    View images of Markenfield Hall ... http://bit.ly/1lepHLr

    Markenfield Hall is an early 14th-century moated country house three miles (5 km) south of Ripon, North Yorkshire, England in the civil parish of Markingfield Hall. It is one of the finest surviving English country houses from that time.

    The house is an L-shaped castellated block, with a great hall that stands upon an undercroft and was originally reached by an exterior stone staircase. It is lit by two double-light windows with quatrefoil transom under their arched heads.

    The house is open for public tours during specific periods, for groups by appointment, and is also available for weddings.

    History

    Markenfield was mentioned in the Domesday Book in 1086, when there were two households.[1]

    In 1150 the estate belonged to the Le Bret family who adopted the name de Markenfield. A house existed on the site at that time.

    The present house was built by John de Markenfield, an associate of Piers Gaveston and a servant of Edward II. A licence to crenellate was issued for Markenfield in 1310, the same year that John was appointed Chancellor of the Exchequer. Sir Thomas Markefield was appointed High Sheriff of Yorkshire for 1484 and fought with Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth. In 1569 Thomas de Markenfield was involved in the pro-Catholic Rising of the North and was forced to flee to the Continent. Markenfield was confiscated and granted to Thomas Egerton, Master of the Rolls.

    Egerton never made Markenfield his principal residence, and it devolved to a rented farmhouse, whilst preserving its features. In 1761 the house was bought by Fletcher Norton, 1st Baron Grantley, who replaced the roof of the Great Hall and ensured that the house was structurally sound once more. It descended to the 7th Lord Grantley who began a restoration project in 1980 to convert the hall from a farmhouse into a family home. [2]

    The estate was historically an extra parochial area, which became a civil parish (with the alternative spelling Markingfield Hall) in the West Riding of Yorkshire in 1858.[3] The estate has remained a separate civil parish, since 1974 in the Harrogate district of the new county of North Yorkshire. The population of the civil parish is estimated at 10.[4]

    References

    Jump up ^ Open Domesday website
    Jump up ^ "Markenfield Hall". Welcome to Yorkshire. Retrieved 2013-02-13.
    Jump up ^ Vision of Britain website

    Thomas married Beatrice Sothill ~ 1405, (North Yorkshire) England. Beatrice (daughter of Henry Sothill and Jane Fitzwilliam) was born 1375-1385, Batley, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1430, Givendale, Ripon, Harrogate, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  6. 71.  Beatrice Sothill was born 1375-1385, Batley, Yorkshire, England (daughter of Henry Sothill and Jane Fitzwilliam); died 0___ 1430, Givendale, Ripon, Harrogate, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Beatrice Markinfield
    • Alt Birth: ~ 1390, Ripon, Harrogate, Yorkshire, England

    Children:
    1. 35. Elizabeth Markenfield was born ~ 1403, Markenfield Hall, Ripon, Yorkshire, England; died Aft 1472, Calverley, Yorkshire, England.

  7. 112.  Christopher Lister was born 0___ 1434, Gisburn, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1467, Gisburn, Yorkshire, England.

    Notes:

    Christopher Lister1
    M, #660155, b. 1434, d. 1467
    Last Edited=23 Apr 2015

    Christopher Lister was born in 1434 at Gisburne, Yorkshire, England.1 He was the son of Laurence Lister and Ellen Banester.1 He married Joan Calverley, daughter of Sir William Calverley and Agnes Tempest, on 20 September 1453 at Calverley, Bracewell, Yorkshire, England.1 He died in 1467 at Gisburne, Yorkshire, England.1

    Child of Christopher Lister and Joan Calverley
    Thomas Lyster+1 b. 1464, d. 1491

    Citations
    [S7529] WikiTree, online http://www.wikitree.com/. Hereinafter cited as WikiTree.

    Christopher married Joan Calverley 20 Sep 1453, Calverley, Yorkshire, England. Joan (daughter of William Calverley and Agnes Tempest) was born 0___ 1438, Calverley, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1467, Upper Midhope, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  8. 113.  Joan Calverley was born 0___ 1438, Calverley, Yorkshire, England (daughter of William Calverley and Agnes Tempest); died 0___ 1467, Upper Midhope, Yorkshire, England.
    Children:
    1. 56. Thomas Lyster was born 0___ 1464, Gisburn, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1491, (Gisburn) Yorkshire, England.


Generation: 8

  1. 128.  John de Bolling was born 0___ 1340, Bradford, England (son of Robert de Bolling and Elizabeth de Thornton); died 0___ 1408, (Bradford) England.

    Notes:

    Generation No. 146

    John De Bolling (IV) [146] Robert De Bolling (II (=Elizabeth De Thornton) [145] John De Bolling (III) (=Alice) [144] William De Bolling (IV) [143] John De Bolling (II) [142] Robert D. Bolling [141] William De Bolling (III) [140] William De Bolling (II) [139] William De Bolling [138] John De Bolling [137] Tristam De Bolling [136] William De Boulogne [135] Eustace II De Boulogne (=Mary of Scotland) [134] Mathilda Van Leuven (=Eustache I, Count of Boulogne)[133] Gerberga of Lower Lorraine [132] Charles, Duke of Lower Lorraine [131] King Louis IV of France (=Gerberga of Saxony) [130] Charles III, the Simple (=Eadgifu of England) [129] Louis II, the Stammerer (=Adelaide of Paris) [128] Charles II, the Bald (=Ermentrude) [127] Louis I, the Pious (=Judith of Bavaria) [126] Charlemagne the Great (=Hildegard) [1-125]

    John De Bolling (IV) was born 1340 in Bolling Hall, Bradford, Yorkshire, England, and died 1408 in Bolling Hall, Bradford, Yorkshire, England.

    Married Grace Papeley about 1357 in England. She was born 1344 in Bolling Hall, Bradford, Yorkshire, England, and died 1370 in Bolling Hall, Bradford, Yorkshire, England.

    Children: Robert De Bolling (III)

    Birth:
    Bolling Hall is one of the oldest buildings in Bradford, West Yorkshire, England. It is currently used as a museum and education centre. The building is about a mile from the centre of Bradford. Its surroundings are suburban in character.

    Before the Industrial Revolution, Bradford was a small town and difficult to defend as it lay in a basin. However, Bolling Hall occupies a commanding position on a hillside. The earliest part of this building, dating from the 14th century, has been interpreted as a pele tower, although Bradford is somewhat outside the typical geographical area for these defensive structures.

    The Manor of Bolling (Bollinc) is first mentioned in Domesday Book and was at that time in the possession of a man named Sindi. The manor then came under the control of Ilbert de Lacy. By 1316 the manor was owned by William Bolling, and Bollings owned the estate until the late 15th century when control went to the Tempests who held the estate until 1649. The estate changed hands several times thereafter until eventually it was let to several tenants until being presented to Bradford Corporation in 1912. It was opened as a museum three years later.

    During the second siege of Bradford in 1643, during the English Civil War, the house was a Royalist base. On this occasion the Royalists took the town, which had strong Parliamentarian sympathies, and it was thought that the victors would put the inhabitants to the sword. There is a legend that a ghost appeared in the bedroom where the Royalist commander Earl of Newcastle was staying to tell him to "Pity poor Bradford". There is usually material on display relating to the English Civil War including a death mask of Oliver Cromwell. In the 18th century parts of the house were modernised by the architect John Carr, following a fire.

    http://bit.ly/YaH18A

    Images of Bolling Hall: https://www.google.com/search?q=Bolling+Hall+bradford+pictures&rlz=1C1KMZB_enUS591US591&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjM2IWp06XZAhWCtVMKHUhJBQ4Q7AkIQA&biw=1440&bih=809

    John married Grace Papeley ~1357, (Bradford) England. Grace (daughter of William Popeley and unnamed spouse) was born 0___ 1344, Bradford, England; died 1370, Bolling Hall, Bradford, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 129.  Grace Papeley was born 0___ 1344, Bradford, England (daughter of William Popeley and unnamed spouse); died 1370, Bolling Hall, Bradford, Yorkshire, England.
    Children:
    1. 64. Robert de Bolling was born 0___ 1370, Bolling Hall, Bradford, England; died 1422-1431, (Bradford) England.

  3. 130.  Thomas Thornoe was born 0___ 1344, (Bradford) England; died , (Bradford) England.

    Thomas married unnamed spouse (Bradford) England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 131.  unnamed spouse
    Children:
    1. 65. Margaret Thornoe was born 1374, (Bradford) England; died 1423, Bolling Hall, Bradford, Yorkshire, England.

  5. 136.  Walter de Calverley, Sr., Knight was born ~ 1311, Calverley, Yorkshire, England (son of John de Calverley and Joanna Warde); died Bef 18 Dec 1404, (Calverley, Yorkshire, England).

    Notes:

    Seventh Generation


    27. Walter DE CALVERLEY 211 (John DE ((Sir)) 6, John DE 5, William SCOT Of ((Sir)) 4, Roger SCOT Of ((Sir)) 3, Walter SCOT Of 2, John SCOT Of 1) was born circa 1311 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 211 and died after 1376 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211 Walter married Margery DE DINELEY,211 daughter of John DE DINELEY Esq and Wife of John DE (DINELEY) UNKNOWN, circa 1328 in Prob Yorkshire, England.211 Margery was born circa 1310 in Downham, Yorkshire, England 211 and died of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211

    Children from this marriage were:


    33. i. John 'Le Fitz_Walter Scot' DE CALVERLEY 211 was born circa 1328 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 211 and died before 1346.211 John married Agnes (CALVERLEY) UNKNOWN circa 1350. Agnes was born circa 1330.

    34. ii. (Sir) William CALVERLEY 211 was born circa 1335 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 211 and died after 1376 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211 William married Eleanor THORNHILL,211 daughter of (Sir) John DE THORNHILL and Wife of John DE (THORNHILL) UNKNOWN, circa 1360 in Prob Yorkshire, England.211 Eleanor was born circa 1335 in Thornhill, West Riding, Yorkshire, England 211 and died of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211

    35. iii. Walter CALVERLEY 26 211 216 was born circa 1341 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 26 211 216 and died 10 Oct 1404 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 26 211 216 at age 63.

    Walter married Margery de Dineley ~ 1328, (Calverley, Yorkshire, England). Margery (daughter of John de Dineley and unnamed spouse) was born ~ 1310, Downham, Yorkshire, England; died , Calverley, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  6. 137.  Margery de Dineley was born ~ 1310, Downham, Yorkshire, England (daughter of John de Dineley and unnamed spouse); died , Calverley, Yorkshire, England.
    Children:
    1. 68. Walter Scott de Calverley, Jr., Knight was born ~ 1341, Calverley, Yorkshire, England; died 10 Oct 1404, Calverley, Yorkshire, England.

  7. 138.  John Bigod, Knight was born ~ 1334, Settrington, Yorkshire, England (son of Roger Bigod, Knight and Joan LNU); died 13 Nov 1388, Settrington, Yorkshire, England; was buried , All Saints Church, Settrington, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Sheriff of Yorkshire
    • Also Known As: John Bigod of Settrington

    Notes:

    Birth:
    Settrington is a village and civil parish in the Ryedale district of North Yorkshire, England, about 3 miles (5 km) east of Malton.

    Map & history ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Settrington

    Buried:
    Photos of All Saints Church ... https://www.google.com/search?q=All+Saints+church,+Settrington,+Yorkshire,+England&rlz=1C1KMZB_enUS591US591&espv=2&biw=1440&bih=815&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwju5_D3sYvKAhXHSyYKHevIDtoQsAQIKA&dpr=1

    John married Amy Settrington ~ 1369, (Settrington, Yorkshire, England). Amy was born 0___ 1339, Settrington, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1420, Settrington, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  8. 139.  Amy Settrington was born 0___ 1339, Settrington, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1420, Settrington, Yorkshire, England.
    Children:
    1. 69. Joanna Bigod was born 1370-1375, Settrington, Yorkshire, England; died Bef 1423, Calverley, Yorkshire, England.

  9. 140.  John Markenfield, Knight was born 1340-1343, Markenfield Hall, Ripon, Yorkshire, England (son of Andrew Markenfield and Margery de Middleton); died Bef 1398, (Markenfield Hall) Ripon, Yorkshire, England; was buried , Ripon Cathedral, Ripon, Yorkshire, England.

    Notes:

    History:

    The much-discussed badge on his collar probably indicates loyalty to Richard II (whose royal badge was a white hart couchant lodged (i.e. fenced in), crowned and chained). The Markenfields were quite good at picking the losing side.

    The story of Markenfield Hall is one of the saddest and most romantic in English history. Deeply intertwined with the fortunes of nearby Fountains Abbey, this great house was one of the most important centres of the Rising of the North in 1569, which was the cause of its tragic downfall. A recent archaeological survey has established that the Great Hall is older than the other buildings around the Courtyard. It was probably built about 1280 and was free standing. Thirty years later Canon John de Markenfield completed the building, when a licence to crenellate (fortify) it was granted to him by King Edward II in 1310. John de Markenfield held high office under the King, and his family inter-married with the greatest ruling houses of the North.

    They fought for the King at Agincourt, Bosworth and Flodden while increasing their wealth and national standing, but this powerful family was brought to its tragic end by their leadership of the Rising in 1569. This was the rebellion which, following the Dissolution of the Monasteries 30 years before in the reign of King Henry VIII, was launched by many nobles and ordinary working people of Yorkshire, Durham, Northumberland and Westmoreland. Its object was the replacement of Queen Elizabeth I by Catholic Mary Queen of Scots and thus, in the north at least, to maintain freedom to practice their Catholic faith and defy the attempt of the state to suppress it in favour of Protestantism.

    The Rising was put down with great savagery. Over 200 who took part were hanged, drawn and quartered. The Markenfield family was forced to flee abroad and the house was confiscated for high treason. The Hall became a tenanted farmhouse; its 250 years as the home of a great Yorkshire family were over. For two centuries Markenfield was largely neglected and forgotten by its absentee landlords. Then in 1761 it was bought by Sir Fletcher Norton, the First Lord Grantley, a direct descendent of the Sir Thomas Markenfield who had led the 1569 Rising. The Hall's fortunes started to improve. The Grantley family still owns it and in the 1980s embarked on a programme of restoration, which is almost complete. The house built by John de Markenfield seven centuries ago is now a much loved family home once again, and still remains one of the only completely moated manor houses left in England

    Showing 7 people
    Son of Sir Andro/Andrew Markenfield and NN Markenfield
    Husband of NN Miniott and Dionysia nn
    Father of Sir Thomas Markenfeld

    end of biography

    Some Fabulous Pedigrees

    John Markenfield, Sir
    Male 1343 - 1409 (66 years)

    Name John Markenfield
    Suffix Sir
    Born 1343 Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location
    Gender Male
    Died 1409 Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location
    Buried Rypon Find all individuals with events at this location
    Notes
    M L Call: The Royal Ancestry Bible Vol 3: 3309 shows Thomas
    The Visitation of Yorkshire p.196 shows John
    Person ID I15370 penrose
    Last Modified 27 Jun 2016

    Father Sir. Andrew de Markenfield, b. 1310, Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location, d. 1357, York, , North Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location (Age 47 years)
    Mother Margery de Middleton, b. 1325, Ripon, , North Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location, d. 1409, Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location (Age 84 years)
    Married 1340 Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location
    Family ID F11347 Group Sheet | Family Chart

    Family 1 Dionisia Mynyot, b. 1340, d. 1409 (Age 69 years)
    Children
    + 1. Sir Thomas Markenfield, b. Abt 1372, Markenfeld Hall, Ripon, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location, d. 1415, Ripon, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location (Age ~ 43 years)
    Last Modified 8 Nov 2017
    Family ID F11356 Group Sheet | Family Chart

    Family 2 Joan Mynyot Carlton de Moels, b. 1343, Carlton, Selby, North Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location, d. 1410, Givendale in Allerston, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location (Age 67 years)
    Married Abt 1366 Markingfield, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location
    Notes
    ~SEALING_SPOUSE: Also shown as SealSp 2 Feb 1993, BOISE.
    Children
    + 1. Sir Thomas Markenfield, b. Abt 1372, Markenfeld Hall, Ripon, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location, d. 1415, Ripon, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location (Age ~ 43 years)
    2. John Markinfield, b. 1382, Markenfield, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location, d. 1409, Ripon, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location (Age 27 years)
    Last Modified 8 Nov 2017
    Family ID F11357 Group Sheet | Family Chart


    This site powered by The Next Generation of Genealogy Sitebuilding ©, v. 11.0.1, written by Darrin Lythgoe 2001-2017.

    Buried:
    The effigy to Sir Thomas Markenfield is very beautiful, well-preserved and highly detailed.

    Some strange features set this effigy apart from other contemporary effigies: e.g. his collar, which shows a couchant stag within an elaborate fence round a little field. Numerous learned papers have been written to prove this was a badge marking his adherence to the House of Lancaster, but others think it is simply a play on his name: Mark-in-Field (a ‘mark’ being your quarry in a hunt).

    Another strange feature is what seems to be a sash or bend showing the Markenfield arms, worn over his 'alwhite' armour (complete plate-armour). Usually heraldic arms were depicted on the jupon (a very tight surcoat). But since the Markenfield arms are "argent, on a bend sable three besants", the field of "argent" would be represented by his shining plate-armour, very much resembling silver/argent.

    His armour is beautifully decorated: tiny borders of hearts can be seen around the edges of his breastplate, bascinet and spaulders (the lames protecting his shoulders).
    Note the finial decorating the front edge of the bascinet.

    I like this effigy very much. Pity that Sir Thomas lost his arms though ;)

    A big thank you to John Arblaster for taking the pictures.

    View photostream ... https://www.flickr.com/photos/roelipilami/4920735881/in/photostream/

    John married Joan Minot. Joan was born ~1366, Carlton, Selby, North Yorkshire, England; died 1410, Givendale, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  10. 141.  Joan Minot was born ~1366, Carlton, Selby, North Yorkshire, England; died 1410, Givendale, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Joan Mynyot Carlton de Moels
    • Also Known As: Minott
    • Also Known As: NN Miniott
    • Alt Birth: ~ 1345, Carlton Miniott, North Yorkshire, England

    Notes:

    Her father may be John Miniott ... In the early 14th century the lands were purchased by a John Miniott from whom the village now gets its suffix.

    Alt Birth:
    Carlton Miniott, formerly Carlton Islebeck is a village and civil parish in the Hambleton district of North Yorkshire, England, on the A61 road to the immediate west of Thirsk, 25 miles (40 km) north of York. According to the 2001 census it had a population of 926, increasing to 990 at the 2011 census.

    The village is mentioned in the Domesday Book as Carlton, as is the place-name Islebeck that has been associated with the village.[2] The land was in the possession of Orm, son of Gamal at that time and passed on to Hugh, son of Baldric. It eventually became the property of the Barons de Mowbray. In the early 14th century the lands were purchased by a John Miniott from whom the village now gets its suffix.[3] By the early 15th century the manor had passed out of the Miniott family to the Markenfield and Pigot families. Thereafter, the manor was further divided and passed through other families such as Metcalfe, Folkingham, Hussey, Lamplugh, Clough and Bell.

    Children:
    1. 70. Thomas Markenfield, Knight was born ~ 1365, Markenfield Hall, Ripon, Yorkshire, England; died ~ 1415, (North Yorkshire) England.

  11. 142.  Henry Sothill was born 0___ 1360, Soothill, West Riding, Yorkshire, England; died 5 May 1404, (Yorkshire, England).

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Henry de Southill
    • Alt Birth: ~ 1428

    Henry married Jane Fitzwilliam. Jane (daughter of William Fitzwilliam, Knight and Maude de Cromwell) was born ~ 1376, Tattershall, Lincolnshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  12. 143.  Jane Fitzwilliam was born ~ 1376, Tattershall, Lincolnshire, England (daughter of William Fitzwilliam, Knight and Maude de Cromwell).
    Children:
    1. 71. Beatrice Sothill was born 1375-1385, Batley, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1430, Givendale, Ripon, Harrogate, Yorkshire, England.
    2. Henry Sothill was born 0___ 1392, Stokerstone, Suffolk, England; died 4 May 1404.

  13. 226.  William Calverley was born ~ 1428, Calverley, Yorkshire, England (son of Walter Calverley, III and Elizabeth Markenfield); died 12 Apr 1488.

    William married Agnes Tempest 7 Jan 1442, Bracewell, Yorkshire, England. Agnes (daughter of John Tempest and Alice Sherburne) was born 1 Nov 1421, Bracewell, Yorkshire, England; died 12 Sep 1467, Calverley, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  14. 227.  Agnes Tempest was born 1 Nov 1421, Bracewell, Yorkshire, England (daughter of John Tempest and Alice Sherburne); died 12 Sep 1467, Calverley, Yorkshire, England.
    Children:
    1. 113. Joan Calverley was born 0___ 1438, Calverley, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1467, Upper Midhope, Yorkshire, England.
    2. William Calverley died 0___ 1506.


Generation: 9

  1. 256.  Robert de Bolling was born 0___ 1310, Bolling Hall, Bradford, Yorkshire, England (son of John de Bolling and Alice LNU); died 0___ 1370, Bolling Hall, Bradford, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Robert Bolling

    Notes:

    Generation No. 145

    Robert De Bolling (II) [145] John De Bolling (III) (=Alice) [140] William De Bolling (II) [139] William De Bolling [138] John De Bolling [137] Tristam De Bolling [136] William De Boulogne [135] Eustace II De Boulogne (=Mary of Scotland) [134] Mathilda Van Leuven (=Eustache I, Count of Boulogne)[133] Gerberga of Lower Lorraine [132] Charles, Duke of Lower Lorraine [131] King Louis IV of France (=Gerberga of Saxony) [130] Charles III, the Simple (=Eadgifu of England) [129] Louis II, the Stammerer (=Adelaide of Paris) [128] Charles II, the Bald (=Ermentrude) [127] Louis I, the Pious (=Judith of Bavaria) [126] Charlemagne the Great (=Hildegard) [1-125]

    Robert De Bolling (II) was born 1310 in Bolling Hall, Bradford, Yorkshire, England, and died 1370 in Bolling Hall, Bradford, Yorkshire, England.

    Married Elizabeth De Thornton 1337 in Bolling Hall, Bradford, Yorkshire, England. She was born 1314 in Bolling Hall, Bradford, Yorkshire, England, and died Abt. 1360 in Bolling Hall, Bradford, Yorkshire, England.

    Children: John De Bolling (IV)

    Birth:
    Bolling Hall is one of the oldest buildings in Bradford, West Yorkshire, England. It is currently used as a museum and education centre. The building is about a mile from the centre of Bradford. Its surroundings are suburban in character.

    Before the Industrial Revolution, Bradford was a small town and difficult to defend as it lay in a basin. However, Bolling Hall occupies a commanding position on a hillside. The earliest part of this building, dating from the 14th century, has been interpreted as a pele tower, although Bradford is somewhat outside the typical geographical area for these defensive structures.

    The Manor of Bolling (Bollinc) is first mentioned in Domesday Book and was at that time in the possession of a man named Sindi. The manor then came under the control of Ilbert de Lacy. By 1316 the manor was owned by William Bolling, and Bollings owned the estate until the late 15th century when control went to the Tempests who held the estate until 1649. The estate changed hands several times thereafter until eventually it was let to several tenants until being presented to Bradford Corporation in 1912. It was opened as a museum three years later.

    During the second siege of Bradford in 1643, during the English Civil War, the house was a Royalist base. On this occasion the Royalists took the town, which had strong Parliamentarian sympathies, and it was thought that the victors would put the inhabitants to the sword. There is a legend that a ghost appeared in the bedroom where the Royalist commander Earl of Newcastle was staying to tell him to "Pity poor Bradford". There is usually material on display relating to the English Civil War including a death mask of Oliver Cromwell. In the 18th century parts of the house were modernised by the architect John Carr, following a fire.

    http://bit.ly/YaH18A

    Images ... https://www.google.com/search?q=Bolling+Hall,+Bradford,+England&rlz=1C1KMZB_enUS591US591&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiUwfTy4f3aAhVwxFkKHbWHAVwQsAQIUw&biw=1440&bih=809

    Robert married Elizabeth de Thornton 0___ 1337, (Bradford) England. Elizabeth (daughter of Roger de Thornton and unnamed spouse) was born 1314, Bradford, England; died ~1360, Bolling Hall, Bradford, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 257.  Elizabeth de Thornton was born 1314, Bradford, England (daughter of Roger de Thornton and unnamed spouse); died ~1360, Bolling Hall, Bradford, Yorkshire, England.
    Children:
    1. 128. John de Bolling was born 0___ 1340, Bradford, England; died 0___ 1408, (Bradford) England.

  3. 258.  William Popeley was born 0___ 1314, (Bradford) England; died UNKNOWN, (Bradford) England.

    William married unnamed spouse (Bradford) England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 259.  unnamed spouse
    Children:
    1. 129. Grace Papeley was born 0___ 1344, Bradford, England; died 1370, Bolling Hall, Bradford, Yorkshire, England.

  5. 272.  John de Calverley was born ~ 1270, Calverley, Yorkshire, England; died , (Calverley, Yorkshire, England).

    John married Joanna Warde ~ 1300, (Calverley, Yorkshire, England). Joanna (daughter of Simon Warde and Clarice LNU) was born 0___ 1304, Yorkshire, England; died 7 Sep 1362, Hertfordshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  6. 273.  Joanna Warde was born 0___ 1304, Yorkshire, England (daughter of Simon Warde and Clarice LNU); died 7 Sep 1362, Hertfordshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Joan de Rawdon de Berewick
    • Also Known As: Joanna Warder

    Children:
    1. 136. Walter de Calverley, Sr., Knight was born ~ 1311, Calverley, Yorkshire, England; died Bef 18 Dec 1404, (Calverley, Yorkshire, England).

  7. 274.  John de Dineley

    John married unnamed spouse. [Group Sheet]


  8. 275.  unnamed spouse
    Children:
    1. 137. Margery de Dineley was born ~ 1310, Downham, Yorkshire, England; died , Calverley, Yorkshire, England.

  9. 276.  Roger Bigod, Knight was born ~ 1300, Stockton, Norfolk, England (son of John Bigod and Isabel LNU); died 17 Apr 1362, Settrington, Yorkshire, England.

    Roger married Joan LNU ~ 1329, (Stockton, Norfolk, England). Joan was born ~ 1304, (Stockton, Norfolkshire, England); died , (Stockton, Norfolkshire, England). [Group Sheet]


  10. 277.  Joan LNU was born ~ 1304, (Stockton, Norfolkshire, England); died , (Stockton, Norfolkshire, England).
    Children:
    1. 138. John Bigod, Knight was born ~ 1334, Settrington, Yorkshire, England; died 13 Nov 1388, Settrington, Yorkshire, England; was buried , All Saints Church, Settrington, Yorkshire, England.

  11. 280.  Andrew Markenfield was born ~ 1310, Markenfield Hall, Ripon, Yorkshire, England (son of John Markenfield and Eleanor LNU); died 0___ 1357, (Markenfield Hall, Ripon, Yorkshire, England).

    Notes:

    Sir Andrew Markenfield

    Marriage: Unknown
    bullet Information about this person:

    • Family Background. 1060
    The first person of the name Markenfield found in records was Simâon de Markenfield, whose son Roger held one carucate of land in Monketon, of Henry de Hamerton, 29 Edward I. Edward I, in the thirty-third year of his reign, granted to Roger and his brother John free warren in all their demesne lands in Markenfield, Yorkshire. Roger was married to Maud, who gave the monks of Fountains one acre of land, after the death of Roger.

    Roger's heir was William, whose heir was Sir John de Markenfield, who was returned as lord of the manors of Markington and Erryholme in Richmondshire, and a moiety of the manor of Brotherton. On 3 Edward II, Sir John received the fourth part of one mill, which Isabel de Studley held in Grantley. William de Clotherham and others witnessed this deed. The son of Sir John de Markenfield was Sir Andrew, who, in his father's lifetime, possessed the manor of Scruton in Richmondshire, 9 Edward II.

    Sir Andrew's heir was Sir Thomas Markenfield, knight, who by the daughter and heir of Minott, had issue Sir Thomas. This Sir Thomas de Markenfield, knight, lord of Markenfield, Eryholme, Scruton, etc., was living during the 43rd year of the reign of Edward III. He married Dionisia, the widow of Sir Henry Soothill of Soothill, near Wakefield. The children of Sir Thomas Markenfield and Dionisia were Sir John, who succeeded brothers Thomas, Robert and Peter, all who died without issue. Their daughters, Joan, married Sir Roger Ward, and Elizabeth married William Calverley of Calverley, Esquire. (1429)
    ~"Markenfield Family", from the Journal of the British Archeaeological Association, 1864, pp. 285-288


    Comments
    My New Mexico Roots & Native Roots - My New Mexico Roots - My link to the New England Pilgrim settlers & their link to a Web of English Ancestors
    © Nancy Lâopez

    Andrew married Margery de Middleton 1340, Markenfield Hall, Ripon, Yorkshire, England. Margery (daughter of Peter de Middleton and Eustacia Plumpton) was born 1325, Ripon, Yorkshire, England; died 1409, Markenfield Hall, Ripon HG4 3AD, UK. [Group Sheet]


  12. 281.  Margery de Middleton was born 1325, Ripon, Yorkshire, England (daughter of Peter de Middleton and Eustacia Plumpton); died 1409, Markenfield Hall, Ripon HG4 3AD, UK.
    Children:
    1. 140. John Markenfield, Knight was born 1340-1343, Markenfield Hall, Ripon, Yorkshire, England; died Bef 1398, (Markenfield Hall) Ripon, Yorkshire, England; was buried , Ripon Cathedral, Ripon, Yorkshire, England.

  13. 286.  William Fitzwilliam, Knight was born ~ 1354, Sprotboro, West Riding, Yorkshire, England (son of John Fitzwilliam, Knight and Elizabeth Clinton); died 8 Apr 1398.

    William married Maude de Cromwell ~ 1376. Maude (daughter of Ralph de Cromwell, Knight, 1st Baron Cromwell and Maud Bernack, Baroness Cromwell) was born ~ 1362, Tattershall, Lincolnshire, England; died Aft 1418. [Group Sheet]


  14. 287.  Maude de Cromwell was born ~ 1362, Tattershall, Lincolnshire, England (daughter of Ralph de Cromwell, Knight, 1st Baron Cromwell and Maud Bernack, Baroness Cromwell); died Aft 1418.

    Other Events:

    • Alt Birth: 0___ 1355

    Notes:

    Birth:
    Area Map & History ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tattershall

    Children:
    1. 143. Jane Fitzwilliam was born ~ 1376, Tattershall, Lincolnshire, England.

  15. 34.  Walter Calverley, III was born 0___ 1402, Calverley, Yorkshire, England (son of Walter Scott de Calverley, Jr., Knight and Joanna Bigod); died Before 5 Mar 1467, (Calverley, Yorkshire, England).

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Walter Scot

    Notes:

    History and photos of the Ancient Parish of CALVERLEY... http://www.genuki.org.uk/big/eng/YKS/WRY/Calverley/index.html

    Photo & history of "Calverley Hall" from Wikipedia... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calverley_Old_Hall


    The children of John Rupert & Eula James Hansard are his 12th great-grandchildren.

    Walter is the the 12th great-grandson of William the Conqueror (1024-1087) and his lineage includes many kings & queens of England, France, Austria, Spain, Portugal and Italy. Ergo, they are the 24th great-grandchildren of William I, King of England

    View Sir Walter's pedigree...

    http://www.ourfamilyhistories.org/ahnentafel.php?personID=I145233&tree=00&parentset=0&generations=12

    Note: Even though AR and MCS state, in a correction to their prior lines, that Walter Calverley was a son by a previous wife, Paul Reed, researching with original sources, charters, etc., has proven that Walter's mother was Joan Bigod, as AR & MCS originally had it, except she was a daughter of the prior generation.

    ---------------------------

    Walter Calverley, or Scot, fl. 1429, d. 1466; m. Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Thomas Markenfield. [Magna Charta Sureties]
    A Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Commoners of Great Britain and Ireland Vol I Page 673
    http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=jweber&id=I10273

    CALVERLEY, OF THE BROAD AND OF EWELL CASTLE.

    Lineage.

    This ancient family, originally bearing the name of Scott, was founded by

    JOHN SCOTT, who came to England in the suite of the Lady Maud, on that princess's marriage with HENRY I. He espoused Larderina, daughter of Alphonsus Gospatrick, a person of great note in those days, and thereby acquired the lordship of Calverly in Yorkshire, with several other manors. His son and heir,

    JOHN SCOTT, Lord of Calverley in right of his mother, was steward of the household to empress MAUD. He m. the daughter of Sir John Lutterell, knt. of Hooton Pannal, and was s. by his eldest son,

    WALTER SCOTT, or CALVERLEY, of Calverley, who gave to the chapel of the blessed Virgin Mary, at York, the vicarage of Calverley, temp. HENRY II. He wedded Joan, daughter of Sir John Swillington, knt. and had issue,

    1. WILLIAM, his heir.
    2. Robert (Sir), knt.
    3. Henry.
    4. Thomas, who acquired the lands of Newton, and was ancestor of the SCOTTS of that place.
    5. Barnard, who d. unmarried.
    6. Mary, m. to Jeffrey, son of Peter de Arthington.

    The eldest son,
    WILLIAM SCOTT, or CALVERLEY, of Calverley, living in the first year of the reign of HENRY III. married Mabel, daughter of Sir Nicholas Stapleton, knt. and was s. by his son,

    WALTER SCOT, or CALVERLEY, of Calverley, living in 1273, who wedded the dau. of Sir John Normanville, and had several sons from one of whom descended the Calverleys of Hayton, Clareborough, Lound, &c. in Nottinghamshire. The eldest,

    WILLIAM SCOT, or CALVERLEY, of Calverley, the last who retained the name of Scot m. temp. EDWARD III. a daughter of Sir John Goldsbrough, of Goldsbrough, knt. and was s. by his eldest son,

    SIR JOHN DE CALVERLEY, of Calverley, living in the reign of EDWARD III. whom. Johanna, daughter or niece of Sir Simon Ward, and had a son and heir,

    JOHN DE CALVERLEY, of Calverley, high-sheriff of the county of Rutland, and one of the esquires to the queen, temp. RICHARD II. This gentleman engaging in the wars, on the king's part, was taken prisoner and beheaded. Leaving no issue, he was s. by his brother,

    WALTER CALVERLEY, of Calverley, who m. twice, but had issue only by his second wife, Margery, dau. of John de Dineley, namely,

    WALTER, his heir. John (Sir), who was slain in battle, fighting for King HENRY IV.
    The elder son and successor,

    WALTER CALVERLEY, of Calverley, espoused Joanna, daughter of Sir John Bygod,of Sterrington, knt. and had issue. In this Walter's time, Calverley church being rebuilt,his arms were cut or plated in the woodwork there. He was s. by his son,

    WALTER CALVERLEY, of Calverley, living in 1429, who wedded Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Thomas Mackingfield, knt. and had several children, viz.


    Arms--Sa. an inescutcheon arg. with a?? orle of eight horned owls of the second.

    Crest--A horned owl arg.

    Motto--En Caligine veritas.

    Estates--EWELL ESTATE, with the manors of Fitznells or Fennells, Shawford or Roxley and Buttailes or Buttolphs, purchased in 1784. The castle was bought and the mansion erected by the present proprietor in 1812. THE BROAD acquired in 1658; the estate has since been enlarged by purchase of the manor of Warlington and thegreat tithes of Hellingley, with several farms; also several farms at Brinchley andLamberhurst, in Kent; and in Sussex, inherited from the Forbes.

    Town Residence--Berkeley Square
    Seats--The Broad; Hellingley, Sussex; Ewell Castle, Surrey.

    Father: Walter de CALVERLEY , Sir b: ABT 1365 in Calverley, West Riding Yorkshire, England
    Mother: Joan (Joanna) BIGOD b: ABT 1380 in Settrington, East Riding Yorkshire, England

    Marriage 1 Elizabeth MARKENFIELD b: ABT 1410 in Markenfield Hall, Ripon, Yorkshire, England
    Married: 1 MAR 1415/16 in Yorkshire, England 6
    Children
    Miss de CALVERLEY b: ABT 1442 in Calverley, West Riding Yorkshire, England

    Sources:

    Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
    Page: 156-35
    Title: Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999
    Page: 87-12
    Title: Newsgroup: soc.genealogy.medieval, at groups - google.com
    Page: Paul C. Reed (reedpcgen), 2 Aug 2000
    Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
    Page: 156-35
    Text: 1466
    Title: Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999
    Page: 87-12
    Text: 1466
    Title: Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999
    Page: 95-12
    Text: marriage covenant

    Walter Calverley [32865]

    14th great grandfather of Sheila Ann Mynatt:

    http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=&secondpersonID=I27517&maxrels=1&disallowspouses=0&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I32865

    and

    19th great grandfather of David Alden Hennessee:

    http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=I27517&secondpersonID=I3&maxrels=1&disallowspouses=0&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I32865


    Some Descendants of
    John SCOT Of CALVERLEY
    (1120 - 1136)

    (None of the persons on this page are Direct Ancestors of George Washington 1st US President)

    Copyright 2007 by Terry J. Booth. All reproduction or reuse is prohibited, in whole or in part, without written permission of the author.
    The author has relied much on those herein cited. Please contact the author about an important source not cited or improperly cited.

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    First Generation


    1. John SCOT Of CALVERLEY,211 212 son of John SCOTICUS and Larderina GOSPATRICII, was born circa 1120 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 211 212 and died after 1136 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211 212 Another name for John was John SCOT. John married Daughter of John LUTTREL,211 212 daughter of (Sir) John LUTTREL Knight and Wife of John (LUTTREL) UNKNOWN, circa 1148 in Prob Yorkshire, England.211 212 Daughter was born circa 1125 in Hooton Pannel, Yorkshire, England 211 212 and died of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211 212

    Children from this marriage were:
    2. i. Walter SCOT Of CALVERLEY 26 211 was born circa 1150 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 26 211 and died after 1208 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.26 211
    3. ii. John SCOT Of CALVERLEY 211 was born circa 1153 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211
    4. iii. William SCOT Of CALVERLEY 211 was born circa 1156 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211
    5. iv. Jordan DE CALVERLEY 211 was born circa 1159 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211
    6. v. Christopher SCOT Of CALVERLEY 211 was born circa 1162 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211

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    Second Generation

    2. Walter SCOT Of CALVERLEY 26 211 (John SCOT Of 1) was born circa 1150 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 26 211 and died after 1208 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.26 211 Another name for Walter was William SCOT Of CALVERLEY. Walter married Joan DE SWILLINGTON,211 213 daughter of John DE SWILLINGTON and Wife of John DE (SWILLINGTON) UNKNOWN, in 1175 in Prob Yorkshire, England.211 213 Joan was born circa 1155 in Prob Swillington, Yorkshire, England 211 213 and died of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211 213

    Children from this marriage were:
    7. i. (Sir) Roger SCOT Of CALVERLEY 26 211 was born circa 1180 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 26 211 and died before 1226 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.26
    8. ii. Bernard DE CALVERLEY 211 was born circa 1183 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 211 and died of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.
    9. iii. Mary SCOT Of CALVERLEY 211 was born circa 1186 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 211 and died of Arthington, Yorkshire, England.211 Mary married Geoffrey de ARTHINGTON 211 circa 1200 in Prob Yorkshire, England.211 Geoffrey was born circa 1176 in Arthington, Yorkshire, England 211 and died of Arthington, Yorkshire, England.211
    10. iv. Henry CALVERLEY was born circa 1189 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.
    11. v. Thomas SCOT Of CALVERLEY was born circa 1192 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England and died of Newton, Yorkshire, England.

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    Third Generation

    7. (Sir) Roger SCOT Of CALVERLEY 26 211 (Walter SCOT Of 2, John SCOT Of 1) was born circa 1180 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 26 211 and died before 1226 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.26 Roger married Jursella (CALVERLEY) UNKNOWN circa 1210. Jursella was born circa 1190 and died of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.

    Children from this marriage were:
    12. i. (Sir) William SCOT Of CALVERLEY 26 was born circa 1210 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 26 and died before 27 May 1261 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.26
    13. ii. Geoffrey DE CALVERLEY was born circa 1213 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.
    14. iii. Peter DE CALVERLEY was born circa 1216 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.

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    Fourth Generation

    12. (Sir) William SCOT Of CALVERLEY 26 (Roger SCOT Of ((Sir)) 3, Walter SCOT Of 2, John SCOT Of 1) was born circa 1210 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 26 and died before 27 May 1261 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.26 William married Mabel STAPLETON (See Link for Ancestry),211 214 daughter of Nicholas II DE STAPLETON and Wife of Nicholas DE (STAPLETON) UNKNOWN, circa 1240 in Prob Yorkshire, England.211 214 Mabel was born circa 1221 in Stapleton, Yorkshire, England 211 214 and died of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211 214

    Children from this marriage were:
    15. i. Joane SCOT Of CALVERLEY was born circa 1240 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England and died of Nottinghamshire, England. Joane married Richard HYNGERAM circa 1260. Richard was born circa 1240 in Nottinghamshire, England and died of Nottinghamshire, England.
    16. ii. John DE CALVERLEY 211 was born about 1238 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 211 and died after 1273 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211
    17. iii. William SCOT Of CALVERLEY was born circa 1246 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.
    18. iv. Alice SCOT Of CALVERLEY was born circa 1249 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.
    19. v. Margery SCOT Of CALVERLEY was born circa 1252 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.
    20. vi. Walter SCOT DE PONTEFRACT was born circa 1255 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England and died after 1308 of Haydon, Yorkshire, England.

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    Fifth Generation

    picture

    16. John DE CALVERLEY 211 (William SCOT Of ((Sir)) 4, Roger SCOT Of ((Sir)) 3, Walter SCOT Of 2, John SCOT Of 1) was born about 1238 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 211 and died after 1273 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211 John married Margaret (CALVERLEY) UNKNOWN 211 circa 1270 in Prob Yorkshire, England.211 Margaret was born circa 1250 211 and died of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211

    Children from this marriage were:
    21. i. (Sir) John DE CALVERLEY 26 211 was born circa 1270 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 26 211 and died after 1349 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.26 211
    22. ii. Simon DE CALVERLEY was born circa 1273 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.
    23. iii. Elizabeth DE CALVERLEY 26 was born circa 1276 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England,26 died 23 Aug 1341 of Heddingley, Yorkshire, England 26 at age 65, and was buried in Priory of Esholt, Yorkshire, England. Elizabeth married Thomas PALTFYN circa 1300. Thomas was born circa 1270 in Heddingley, Yorkshire, England and died before 1341 of Heddingley, Yorkshire, England.
    24. iv. Walter SCOT of CALVERLEY 211 was born circa 1279 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 211 and died after 1325 in Prob Of Goldsborough, Yorkshire, England.211

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    Sixth Generation

    picture

    21. (Sir) John DE CALVERLEY 26 211 (John DE 5, William SCOT Of ((Sir)) 4, Roger SCOT Of ((Sir)) 3, Walter SCOT Of 2, John SCOT Of 1) was born circa 1270 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 26 211 and died after 1349 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.26 211 John married Daughter of an Unknown NEVILLE circa 1290. Daughter was born circa 1270 and died circa 1295 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England at age 25.

    John next married Joanna WARDE (See Link for Ancestry),211 215 daughter of (Sir) Simon WARDE Knight and Clarice (WARDE) UNKNOWN, circa 1300 in Prob Yorkshire, England.211 215 Joanna was born circa 1280 in Guiseley, West Riding, Yorkshire, England 211 215 and died after 1377 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211 215

    Children from this marriage were:
    25. i. John DE CALVERLEY 211 was born circa 1305 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 211 and died in Beheaded on Tower Hill, Tower of London, London, Middlesex, England.211
    26. ii. Mary DE CALVERLEY was born circa 1308 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England and died of Birkin, Yorkshire, England. Mary married Adam EVERINGHAM circa 1320. Adam was born circa 1305 in Birkin, Yorkshire, England and died of Birkin, Yorkshire, England.
    27. iii. Walter DE CALVERLEY 211 was born circa 1311 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 211 and died after 1376 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211
    28. iv. Anne DE CALVERLEY 211 was born circa 1314 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 211 and died of Hawksworth, Yorkshire, England. Anne married Richard HAWKSWORTH circa 1320. Richard was born circa 1310 in Hawksworth, Yorkshire, England and died of Hawksworth, Yorkshire, England.
    29. v. Richard DE CALVERLEY was born circa 1317 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.
    30. vi. (Prioress) Isabel DE CALVERLEY of Esholt 211 was born circa 1320 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 211 and died of Eshott, Morpeth, Northumberland, England.211

    24. Walter SCOT of CALVERLEY 211 (John DE 5, William SCOT Of ((Sir)) 4, Roger SCOT Of ((Sir)) 3, Walter SCOT Of 2, John SCOT Of 1) was born circa 1279 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 211 and died after 1325 in Prob Of Goldsborough, Yorkshire, England.211 Walter married Daughter of John DE GOLDSBOROUGH,211 daughter of John DE GOLDSBOROUGH and Wife of John DE (GOLDSBOROUGH) UNKNOWN, in 1325 in Prob Yorkshire, England.211 Daughter was born circa 1300 in Goldsborough, Yorkshire, England 211 and died in Prob Of Goldsborough, Yorkshire, England.211

    Children from this marriage were:

    31. i. Daughter of Walter SCOT of CALVERLEY 211 was born circa 1325 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211 Daughter married Gilbert DE SLINGSBY 211 circa 1320. Gilbert was born circa 1325.
    32. ii. Eleanor CALVERLEY 211 was born circa 1328 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211 Eleanor married John de LEVENTHORP 211 circa 1320.211 John was born circa 1325.

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    Seventh Generation

    picture

    27. Walter DE CALVERLEY 211 (John DE ((Sir)) 6, John DE 5, William SCOT Of ((Sir)) 4, Roger SCOT Of ((Sir)) 3, Walter SCOT Of 2, John SCOT Of 1) was born circa 1311 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 211 and died after 1376 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211 Walter married Margery DE DINELEY,211 daughter of John DE DINELEY Esq and Wife of John DE (DINELEY) UNKNOWN, circa 1328 in Prob Yorkshire, England.211 Margery was born circa 1310 in Downham, Yorkshire, England 211 and died of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211

    Children from this marriage were:
    33. i. John 'Le Fitz_Walter Scot' DE CALVERLEY 211 was born circa 1328 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 211 and died before 1346.211 John married Agnes (CALVERLEY) UNKNOWN circa 1350. Agnes was born circa 1330.
    34. ii. (Sir) William CALVERLEY 211 was born circa 1335 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 211 and died after 1376 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211 William married Eleanor THORNHILL,211 daughter of (Sir) John DE THORNHILL and Wife of John DE (THORNHILL) UNKNOWN, circa 1360 in Prob Yorkshire, England.211 Eleanor was born circa 1335 in Thornhill, West Riding, Yorkshire, England 211 and died of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211
    35. iii. Walter CALVERLEY 26 211 216 was born circa 1341 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 26 211 216 and died 10 Oct 1404 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 26 211 216 at age 63.

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    Eighth Generation

    picture

    35. Walter CALVERLEY 26 211 216 (Walter DE 7, John DE ((Sir)) 6, John DE 5, William SCOT Of ((Sir)) 4, Roger SCOT Of ((Sir)) 3, Walter SCOT Of 2, John SCOT Of 1) was born circa 1341 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 26 211 216 and died 10 Oct 1404 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 26 211 216 at age 63. Walter married First Wife (CALVERLEY) UNKNOWN circa 1370 in Prob Yorkshire, England. First was born circa 1350 and died circa 1395 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England at age 45.

    The Child from this marriage was:
    36. i. (Sir) John DE CALVERLEY Knight was born circa 1382 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England and died 21 Jul 1403 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England at age 21.

    Walter next married Joane NORMANVILLE,217 daughter of (Sir) John NORMANVILLE and MRIN 762 Constance DE MAULEY, circa 1395 in Prob Yorkshire, England.217 Joane was born circa 1375 217 and died circa 1395 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 217 at age 20.

    Walter next married Joan BIGOD (See Link for Ancestry),211 216 217 daughter of John BIGOD Sheriff of Yorkshire and Amy (BIGOD) UNKNOWN, about 1401 in Prob Yorkshire, England.211 216 217 Joan was born circa 1375 in Settrington, Yorkshire, England 211 216 217 and died before Jun 1423 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211 216 217

    Children from this marriage were:

    37. i. Walter CALVERLEY 148 211 218 was born about 1402 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 148 211 and died before 5 Mar 1467 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.148 211 218
    38. ii. Joan CALVERLEY 211 was born circa 1404 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211 Joan married John PASLEW circa 1420. John was born circa 1400.

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    Ninth Generation

    picture

    37. Walter CALVERLEY 148 211 218 (Walter 8, Walter DE 7, John DE ((Sir)) 6, John DE 5, William SCOT Of ((Sir)) 4, Roger SCOT Of ((Sir)) 3, Walter SCOT Of 2, John SCOT Of 1) was born about 1402 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 148 211 and died before 5 Mar 1467 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.148 211 218 Walter married Elizabeth MARKENFIELD (See Link for Ancestry),148 153 211 218 daughter of (Sir) Thomas MARKENFIELD Knight and Beatrice SOTHILL, 1 Mar 1415 in Prob married by contract w children later.148 153 218 Elizabeth was born circa 1403 in Markenfield Hall, Ripon, Yorkshire, England 211 and died after 1472 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.148 211

    Children from this marriage were:
    39. i. William CALVERLEY 148 211 was born circa 1422 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 211 and died after 1488 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211
    40. ii. Margaret CALVERLEY 148 was born circa 1424 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England and died of Beamsley, Yorkshire, England. Margaret married Thomas CLAPHAM Esq 148 211 21 Sep 1442 in Prob Calverley, Yorkshire, England.148 211 Thomas was born circa 1420 in Beamsley, Yorkshire, England 211 and died of Beamsley, Yorkshire, England.
    41. iii. Joan CALVERLEY 148 was born circa 1425 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England and died after 1471 of North Elmsall, Yorkshire, England.
    42. iv. Anne CALVERLEY 148 211 was born circa 1426 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211
    43. v. Beatrice CALVERLEY was born about 1428 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England and died of Bolling Hall, Bradford, West Riding, Yorkshire, England.
    44. vi. Amice CALVERLEY 148 was born about 1429 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England. Amice married Richard BAILDON 148 211 in 1446 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.148 Richard was born circa 1425 of Yorkshire, England.211
    45. vii. Unnamed Daughter #1 of Walter CALVERLEY 211 was born in 1431 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211 Unnamed married Richard KIGHLEY 211 circa 1455 in Prob Calverley, Yorkshire, England.211 Richard was born circa 1430 in Newhall (near Eland), Yorkshire, England.211
    46. viii. Thomas CALVERLEY 148 211 was born before 1433 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 211 and died in 1500 of Park House, Byril, Yorkshire, England.211 Thomas married Agnes SKARGILL circa 1450. Agnes was born circa 1430 and died of Park House, Byril, Yorkshire, England.
    47. ix. Unnamed Daughter #2 of Walter CALVERLEY 211 was born in 1435 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211 Unnamed married William SCOT 211 circa 1455 in Prob Calverley, Yorkshire, England.211 William was born circa 1430 in Scot-hall, Leeds, Yorkshire, England.211
    48. x. Alice CALVERLEY 148 211 was born circa 1437 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 211 and died of Middleton, Leeds, Yorkshire, England. Alice married Gilbert LEGH 148 211 circa 1457 in Prob Calverley, Yorkshire, England.148 211 Gilbert was born circa 1435 in Middleton, Leeds, Yorkshire, England 211 and died of Middleton, Leeds, Yorkshire, England.
    49. xi. Robert CALVERLEY 148 211 was born before 1439 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 211 and died after 1458 of Baseford, Nottinghamshire, England.
    50. xii. Elizabeth CALVERLEY Nun 148 211 was born circa 1441 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 211 and died after 1488 of Eshott, Morpeth, Northumberland, England.211
    51. xiii. Isabel CALVERLEY 148 was born in 1443 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England and died of Scriven, Yorkshire, England. Isabel married John SLENGSBY 148 211 circa 1465 in Prob Calverley, Yorkshire, England.148 211 John was born circa 1440 in Scriven, Yorkshire, England 211 and died of Scriven, Yorkshire, England.

    Walter next married Katherine (DRAX)(BURTON)(MARKENFIELD) UNKNOWN 148 after 1442 in Prob Yorkshire, England. Katherine was born circa 1410 and died after 1472 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.148

    hr

    Tenth Generation

    picture

    39. William CALVERLEY 148 211 (Walter 9, Walter 8, Walter DE 7, John DE ((Sir)) 6, John DE 5, William SCOT Of ((Sir)) 4, Roger SCOT Of ((Sir)) 3, Walter SCOT Of 2, John SCOT Of 1) was born circa 1422 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 211 and died after 1488 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211 William married Agnes TEMPEST (See Link for Ancestry),211 daughter of (Sir) John TEMPEST High Sheriff of Yorkshire, Knight and Alice SHERBURNE, 7 Jan 1441 in Prob Yorkshire, England.211 Agnes was born circa 1425 in Bracewell, West Riding, Yorkshire, England 211 and died after 1489 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211

    Children from this marriage were:
    52. i. (Sir) William CALVERLEY 147 was born circa 1443 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 147 and died circa 2 Aug 1506 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 147 at age 63.
    53. ii. Margaret CALVERLEY 211 was born circa 1445 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211 Margaret married Mr POPELY.211 Mr was born circa 1445.
    54. iii. John CALVERLEY 211 was born circa 1447 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211
    55. iv. Joan CALVERLEY 211 was born circa 1449 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211 Joan married Christopher LISTER 211 in 1468.211 Christopher was born circa 1448 of Middop, Yorkshire, England.211

    Joan next married John SLINGSBY circa 1465. John was born circa 1445 in Scriven, Yorkshire, England and died about 1460 of Scriven, Yorkshire, England about age 15.
    56. v. Nicholas CALVERLEY Vicar of Brayton 211 was born circa 1450 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 211 and died after 1490 of Brayton, Yorkshire, England.211
    57. vi. Richard CALVERLEY 211 was born circa 1451 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211
    58. vii. Elizabeth CALVERLEY 147 153 211 was born circa 1453 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 147 211 and died of North Elmsall, Yorkshire, England.147 211
    59. viii. Anne CALVERLEY 211 was born circa 1455 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211 Anne married Thomas ELLIS Esq 211 circa 1475 in Prob Calverley, Yorkshire, England.211 Thomas was born circa 1450 of Kiddal, Yorkshire, England.211
    60. ix. Robert CALVERLEY 211 was born circa 1457 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211
    61. x. Isabel CALVERLEY 211 was born circa 1459 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211 Isabel married Mr MEARING 211 circa 1480 in Prob Yorkshire, England.211 Mr was born circa 1455 of Wheldale, Yorkshire, England.211
    62. xi. Thomas CALVERLEY 211 was born circa 1461 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211
    63. xii. Alice CALVERLEY Nun 211 was born circa 1463 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 211 and died after 1488 of Eshott, Morpeth, Northumberland, England.211
    64. xiii. Eleanor CALVERLEY 211 was born circa 1465 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211 Eleanor married Mr LEVENTHORPE.211 Mr was born circa 1460 of Leventhorpe, Yorkshire, England.211

    41. Joan CALVERLEY 148 (Walter 9, Walter 8, Walter DE 7, John DE ((Sir)) 6, John DE 5, William SCOT Of ((Sir)) 4, Roger SCOT Of ((Sir)) 3, Walter SCOT Of 2, John SCOT Of 1) was born circa 1425 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England and died after 1471 of North Elmsall, Yorkshire, England. Joan married John WENTWORTH Esq (See Link for Ancestry),147 148 153 son of John 'Of North Elmsall' WENTWORTH Esq and Joan BEAUMONT, after 1 Apr 1431 in Prob married by contract w children later.148 150 153 John was born circa 1428 in North Elmsall, Yorkshire, England 147 and died after 1459 of North Elmsall, Yorkshire, England.147 148


    See the John WENTWORTH Esq Entry for this Couple's Children and Descendants.


    hr
    Eleventh Generation

    picture

    52. (Sir) William CALVERLEY 147 (William 10, Walter 9, Walter 8, Walter DE 7, John DE ((Sir)) 6, John DE 5, William SCOT Of ((Sir)) 4, Roger SCOT Of ((Sir)) 3, Walter SCOT Of 2, John SCOT Of 1) was born circa 1443 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 147 and died circa 2 Aug 1506 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 147 at age 63. William married Alice SAVILE (See Link for Ancestry), daughter of (Sir) John SAVILE Knight and Jane HARRINGTON, circa 1470 in Prob Yorkshire, England.147 153 Alice was born circa 1452 in Thornhill Hall, West Riding, Yorkshire, England and died about 1529 about age 77.

    Children from this marriage were:
    65. i. (Sir) Walter CALVERLEY Knight was born circa 1472 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England and died of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.
    66. ii. (Sir) William CALVERLEY Knight was born circa 1475 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England and died of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.

    hr

    Twelfth Generation

    picture

    65. (Sir) Walter CALVERLEY Knight (William ((Sir)) 11, William 10, Walter 9, Walter 8, Walter DE 7, John DE ((Sir)) 6, John DE 5, William SCOT Of ((Sir)) 4, Roger SCOT Of ((Sir)) 3, Walter SCOT Of 2, John SCOT Of 1) was born circa 1472 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England and died of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England. Walter married Isabel DRAX circa 1500. Isabel was born circa 1480 and died of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.

    The Child from this marriage was:
    67. i. (Sir) William CALVERLEY was born circa 1510 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England and died of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.

    hr

    Thirteenth Generation


    67. (Sir) William CALVERLEY (Walter Knight ((Sir)) 12, William ((Sir)) 11, William 10, Walter 9, Walter 8, Walter DE 7, John DE ((Sir)) 6, John DE 5, William SCOT Of ((Sir)) 4, Roger SCOT Of ((Sir)) 3, Walter SCOT Of 2, John SCOT Of 1) was born circa 1510 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England and died of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England. William married Elizabeth MIDDLETON circa 1530. Elizabeth was born circa 1510 in Stockeld, Yorkshire, England and died of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.

    The Child from this marriage was:
    68. i. Anne CALVERLEY was born circa 1540 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England and died of North Elmsall, Yorkshire, England. Anne married Thomas WENTWORTH Esq, son of John WENTWORTH Esq and Ann HASTINGS, circa 1564. Thomas was born circa 1538 in North Elmsall, Yorkshire, England and died of North Elmsall, Yorkshire, England.


    Website design, architecture and content copyright 2007 by ancestryregister.com
    This page created on Sat Oct 27 16:17:47 2007

    Walter married Elizabeth Markenfield 1 Mar 1415, Calverley, Yorkshire, England. Elizabeth (daughter of Thomas Markenfield, Knight and Beatrice Sothill) was born ~ 1403, Markenfield Hall, Ripon, Yorkshire, England; died Aft 1472, Calverley, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  16. 35.  Elizabeth Markenfield was born ~ 1403, Markenfield Hall, Ripon, Yorkshire, England (daughter of Thomas Markenfield, Knight and Beatrice Sothill); died Aft 1472, Calverley, Yorkshire, England.

    Notes:

    Elizabeth Markenfield is the 19th great grandmother of the grandchildren of Perry Green Byars (1896-1968) ...

    Click this link to view their lineage ... http://bit.ly/1FeHk2L

    Elizabeth Markenfield is the 15th great grandmother of the grandchildren of John Grover Mynatt (1884-1918)

    Click this link to view their lineage ... http://bit.ly/16CWxif

    Pictures & History of Elizabeth's heritage at her ancestral home, Markenfield Hall ... http://www.markenfield.com/

    Some Descendants of (Sir) Thomas DE MARKENFIELD Knight (1335 - 1398)... http://washington.ancestryregister.com/MARKENFIELD00006.htm

    More on Elizabeth... http://washington.ancestryregister.com/MARKENFIELD00006.htm#i6551

    Birth:
    More images of Markenfield Hall ... http://bit.ly/1KyaYkQ

    Children:
    1. Joan Calverley was born ~ 1425, Calverley, Yorkshire, England.
    2. Beatrice Calverley was born ~ 1427, Calverley, Yorkshire, England; died , Bolling Hall, Bradford, England.
    3. 226. William Calverley was born ~ 1428, Calverley, Yorkshire, England; died 12 Apr 1488.

  17. 454.  John Tempest was born ~ 1401, Bracewell, Yorkshire, England (son of Piers Tempest and Grace Hebden); died Aft 1462, Bracewell, Yorkshire, England.

    John married Alice Sherburne (West Riding, Yorkshire, England). Alice (daughter of Richard Sherburne and Agnes Harrington) was born 0___ 1383, Stonyhurst, Lancashire, England; died 0___ 1462, Burley Parish, Haigh, Lancashire, England. [Group Sheet]


  18. 455.  Alice Sherburne was born 0___ 1383, Stonyhurst, Lancashire, England (daughter of Richard Sherburne and Agnes Harrington); died 0___ 1462, Burley Parish, Haigh, Lancashire, England.
    Children:
    1. 227. Agnes Tempest was born 1 Nov 1421, Bracewell, Yorkshire, England; died 12 Sep 1467, Calverley, Yorkshire, England.


Generation: 10

  1. 512.  John de Bolling was born ~1284, Bolling Hall, Bradford, Yorkshire, England (son of William de Bolling and unnamed spouse); died 1330, Bolling Hall, Bradford, Yorkshire, England.

    Notes:

    Generation No. 144

    John De Bolling (III) [144] William De Bolling (IV) [143] John De Bolling (II) [142] Robert D. Bolling [141] William De Bolling (III) [140] William De Bolling (II) [139] William De Bolling [138] John De Bolling [137] Tristam De Bolling [136] William De Boulogne [135] Eustace II De Boulogne (=Mary of Scotland) [134] Mathilda Van Leuven (=Eustache I, Count of Boulogne)[133] Gerberga of Lower Lorraine [132] Charles, Duke of Lower Lorraine [131] King Louis IV of France (=Gerberga of Saxony) [130] Charles III, the Simple (=Eadgifu of England) [129] Louis II, the Stammerer (=Adelaide of Paris) [128] Charles II, the Bald (=Ermentrude) [127] Louis I, the Pious (=Judith of Bavaria) [126] Charlemagne the Great (=Hildegard) [1-125]

    John De Bolling (III) was born 1284 in Bolling Hall, Bradford, Yorkshire, England, and died 1330 in Bolling Hall, Bradford, Yorkshire, England.

    Married Alice

    Children Robert De Bolling (II)

    Birth:
    Bolling Hall is one of the oldest buildings in Bradford, West Yorkshire, England. It is currently used as a museum and education centre. The building is about a mile from the centre of Bradford. Its surroundings are suburban in character.

    Before the Industrial Revolution, Bradford was a small town and difficult to defend as it lay in a basin. However, Bolling Hall occupies a commanding position on a hillside. The earliest part of this building, dating from the 14th century, has been interpreted as a pele tower, although Bradford is somewhat outside the typical geographical area for these defensive structures.

    The Manor of Bolling (Bollinc) is first mentioned in Domesday Book and was at that time in the possession of a man named Sindi. The manor then came under the control of Ilbert de Lacy. By 1316 the manor was owned by William Bolling, and Bollings owned the estate until the late 15th century when control went to the Tempests who held the estate until 1649. The estate changed hands several times thereafter until eventually it was let to several tenants until being presented to Bradford Corporation in 1912. It was opened as a museum three years later.

    During the second siege of Bradford in 1643, during the English Civil War, the house was a Royalist base. On this occasion the Royalists took the town, which had strong Parliamentarian sympathies, and it was thought that the victors would put the inhabitants to the sword. There is a legend that a ghost appeared in the bedroom where the Royalist commander Earl of Newcastle was staying to tell him to "Pity poor Bradford". There is usually material on display relating to the English Civil War including a death mask of Oliver Cromwell. In the 18th century parts of the house were modernised by the architect John Carr, following a fire.

    http://bit.ly/YaH18A

    Images of Bolling Hall: https://www.google.com/search?q=Bolling+Hall+bradford+pictures&rlz=1C1KMZB_enUS591US591&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjM2IWp06XZAhWCtVMKHUhJBQ4Q7AkIQA&biw=1440&bih=809

    John married Alice LNU (Bradford) England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 513.  Alice LNU
    Children:
    1. 256. Robert de Bolling was born 0___ 1310, Bolling Hall, Bradford, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1370, Bolling Hall, Bradford, Yorkshire, England.

  3. 514.  Roger de Thornton was born 0___ 1284, Bradford, England; died UNKNOWN, (Bradford) England.

    Roger married unnamed spouse (Bradford) England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 515.  unnamed spouse
    Children:
    1. 257. Elizabeth de Thornton was born 1314, Bradford, England; died ~1360, Bolling Hall, Bradford, Yorkshire, England.

  5. 546.  Simon WardeSimon Warde was born ~1267, Yorkshire, England (son of William Warde and Margaret de Neville); died ~1306, Yorkshire, England.

    Simon married Clarice LNU. [Group Sheet]


  6. 547.  Clarice LNU
    Children:
    1. 273. Joanna Warde was born 0___ 1304, Yorkshire, England; died 7 Sep 1362, Hertfordshire, England.

  7. 552.  John Bigod was born 1245-1250, Stockton, Norfolk, England (son of Hugh Bigod, Knight and Joan de Stuteville); died Bef 18 Mar 1305, (Settrington, Yorkshire, England).

    John married Isabel LNU (Stockton, Norfolk, England). Isabel was born ~ 1265, (Stockton, Norfolk, England); died Bef 12 Sep 1311, Stockton, Norfolk, England. [Group Sheet]


  8. 553.  Isabel LNU was born ~ 1265, (Stockton, Norfolk, England); died Bef 12 Sep 1311, Stockton, Norfolk, England.
    Children:
    1. 276. Roger Bigod, Knight was born ~ 1300, Stockton, Norfolk, England; died 17 Apr 1362, Settrington, Yorkshire, England.

  9. 560.  John Markenfield was born ~ 1280, Markenfield Hall, Ripon HG4 3AD, UK (son of William Markenfield and Alianore LNU); died 1348, York, Yorkshire, England; was buried , Copmanthorpe, York, United Kingdom.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: John de Markingfield

    Notes:

    About Sir John de Markenfield

    An adherent of Piers Gaveston; rose to prominence with him, and fell just as rapidly with him. Built the present Markenfield Hall during his short period of favor (1309-1312) - license to crenelate building, 1310.

    end of comment

    Markenfield Hall

    Built by John de Markenfield

    "The House That Time Forgot"


    AT the end of a winding, bumpy cart-track just a mile-and-a-half south of Ripon, time stands still.

    Once you’ve left the traffic of the busy A61 and your ears have adjusted to the hush, there is a stillness redolent of an earlier age, broken only by the wind and the skylarks. You take a right turn through a farmyard, and there it is, staring you in the face: a small corner of mediaeval England preserved in almost pristine condition. Markenfield Hall is the most unspoiled early 14th-century fortified house in the country. A solid, protective place, built around a large central courtyard, it has a great hall and a chapel with a turret. Two black swans glide around the spring-fed moat. It is incredibly romantic – a place so stunning that it should be wildly famous.

    And yet it isn’t. For most of the year it is simply a family home. It belongs to the Nortons, who are the barons Grantley, and is currently lived in by the widow of the 7th Lord Grantley, Lady Deirdre, and her second husband, television dramatist Ian Curteis. Like his wife before him, Mr Curteis has clearly fallen for Markenfield’s charms.

    I love just about everything about the place,” he says. “The quiet, the isolation, the history, being married to my wife, the birds on the moat – everything. It really can be hauntingly beautiful. When I come down in the morning and switch the light on, the swans hoot at me – it’s magical.” The house was built on the site of an older one in 1310, by Canon John de Markenfield, a ‘thoroughly unscrupulous local bully’, who at various times was accused of rape, kidnap, intimidation and theft. He went on to become Chancellor of the Exchequer to Edward II.

    From then on, it was the Markenfields’ family seat right up until 1570, when dramatic and tragic events brought their tenure to an abrupt end. But more of that later. For the next 400 years, it was occupied by tenant farmers who had neither the means nor the authority to make any great changes. So, while other mediaeval houses were demolished and rebuilt by their status-conscious owners, Markenfield Hall sat out every passing architectural trend.

    But time and neglect effected their own transformations, and by the late 20th century, parts of it were in a sorry state. It was only in 1980 that the 7th Lord Grantley started in earnest to restore the Hall to its former glory. Sadly, he died in 1995, but his work is continued today by Lady Deirdre and Mr Curteis.

    There is a tremendous amount of restoration work yet to be done,” says Mr Curteis. “I don’t resent the time it takes up, but it does take me away from my other work.” That’s hardly surprising, given the huge challenges the restoration project has thrown up over the years. In the Great Hall, for example, the huge fireplace had been dismantled in around 1570 and moved down a floor, to the ‘new’ farm kitchen in the undercroft below. The resulting space had simply been filled in. So, seven years ago, following protracted negotiations with English Heritage, the fireplace was unblocked, revealing the soot from the last fires to burn there four centuries earlier, and a replica fireplace, made from stone from the same quarry as the 14th-century original, was installed.

    It was a complex and time-consuming project, but the effort paid off: the results are impressive (“It comes into its own at Christmas,” says Mr Curteis). Having a private chapel adjoining the main body of the Hall is, says Lady Deirdre, “a great privilege”, and one project close to her heart has been its restoration.

    One of the long walls was sagging dangerously and so had to be rebuilt entirely. The supporting archways of the new niched wall are the only place in the house where bricks are used – a conscious acknowledgement by the architect that it is not original work.

    The chapel has also been the site of one of the most stunning pieces of restoration anywhere in the Hall. The original piscina, from 1310 – with separate bowls for the priest to wash his hands and the communion vessels – had been rendered almost unrecognisable by countless layers of limewash, but was painstakingly uncovered using a second-hand set of surgical tools. The stone was carved in the early 1300s, but what has been revealed looks breath-takingly crisp and unworn.

    Unusually for a place so old, the Hall is not said to be haunted. “I sometimes get requests from people wanting to camp out here, looking for ghosts”, says Mr Curteis, “but there’s nothing to see. It’s a house with a most extraordinarily benign feel to it.”

    Lady Deirdre agrees: “I think it welcomes people after so many years of neglect.”

    As if to thank its owners for all the attention, the house has revealed some pleasant surprises, including a beautiful carved stone hand, which was found when the water-level dropped in the moat. Where it comes from, nobody knows, but it has been speculated that it was salvaged centuries ago from neighbouring Fountains Abbey when it was closed by Henry VIII. Gems like these make it seem all the more surprising that more people don’t know about the place. “The most common comment I hear from visitors is ‘I’ve lived in Ripon all my life and I never knew Markenfield was here’,” says Mr Curteis.

    It is beautifully tucked away – thanks to the Turnpike Act.” He’s referring to the fact that the main road used to pass within yards of the house, but was re-directed in 1771, leaving it stranded a mile away from the main thoroughfare. It’s one of the reasons why the place appears so untouched by the ebb and flow of history. The other reason is that its owners were absent for 400 years. Which brings us to what must be the house’s defining moment in history.

    The year was 1569, and England was riven by sectarian strife. Under Elizabeth I, the country had been restored to Protestantism, yet, like many northern landowners, Sir Thomas Markenfield was a staunch Catholic.

    On November 20 that year, he and his uncle, Sir Richard Norton (a direct ancestor of the Hall’s present owners), gathered a large contingent to take part in a Catholic rebellion against the queen in an attempt to restore freedom of worship. When they had taken their final Mass in the chapel, Sir Thomas carried the banner of the Five Wounds of Christ around the courtyard at Markenfield, before riding out for what he deemed a holy and sacred cause.

    It became known as the Rising of the North – and it was crushed. More than 200 rebels were executed in Ripon on what is still called Gallows Hill, just two miles from Markenfield.

    Sir Thomas and his uncle fled to the Low Countries, where their fortunes sank further still. Sir Richard died in 1585 of wounds sustained while being arrested in Flanders, and Sir Thomas died some years later, alone and destitute. The Hall was confiscated by the Crown and only returned to the family’s hands when it was bought a couple of centuries later by a member of the Norton family which still owns it.

    But that’s not quite where the story ends. A decade ago, the chapel saw a coming together of the two faiths that Sir Thomas and his uncle could never have envisaged.

    When Lady Deirdre married Ian Curteis, in 2001, it was the first marriage in the Chapel of St Michael Archangel for more than 400 years; poignantly, Lady Deirdre is a Catholic, and Mr Curteis is a Protestant. It was described as “this smallest of healings between us”, and Anglican services and Catholic masses are now held alternately at the chapel, every two weeks.

    It seems some things do change – even in places where time stands still. So, if time has healed and the house is reconciled to its past, what of the future? “It must stay a private house to which people are welcome,” says Mr Curteis. “With the chapel in use,” adds Lady Deirdre firmly.

    Markenfield Hall will be open to the public from June 19 to July 2, from 2pm to 5pm each day. Admission is ą4, concs ą3.

    Read more at: http://www.yorkshirepost.co.uk/lifestyle/homes/the-house-that-time-forgot-1-3460832

    Buried:
    Copmanthorpe is a village and civil parish in the City of York in the English county of North Yorkshire, 4 miles (6.4 km) south-west of York, west of Bishopthorpe and close to Acaster Malbis, Askham Bryan and Askham Richard. According to the 2001 census the parish had a population of 4,262, reducing to 4,173 at the 2011 Census.[1] Until 1996 it had been part of the Selby district. Historically part of the West Riding of Yorkshire, the village is part of the York Outer constituency.

    The village is mentioned in the Domesday Book as Copemantorp, from Old Norse Kaupmanna ¤orp,[3] meaning Traders' Village or Craftsmen's Village.[4] The area of Copmanthorpe covering Main Street, Church Street and Low Green became a Conservation Area in 1978.

    Copmanthorpe is bounded to the north by the A64, while the East Coast Main Line runs through its south-east periphery, to the west lies open countryside.

    ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copmanthorpe

    John married Eleanor LNU 1320, Markenfield Hall, Ripon HG4 3AD, UK. Eleanor was born 1254, York, Yorkshire, England; died 1308, York, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  10. 561.  Eleanor LNU was born 1254, York, Yorkshire, England; died 1308, York, Yorkshire, England.
    Children:
    1. 280. Andrew Markenfield was born ~ 1310, Markenfield Hall, Ripon, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1357, (Markenfield Hall, Ripon, Yorkshire, England).

  11. 562.  Peter de Middleton was born 1300, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England (son of William Scot de Middleton and Agnes Boteler); died 1336, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Sheriff of Yorkshire

    Peter married Eustacia Plumpton. Eustacia (daughter of Robert Plumpton, II and Lucia Ros) was born 1299, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England; died 1354, Somme, Picardie, France. [Group Sheet]


  12. 563.  Eustacia Plumpton was born 1299, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England (daughter of Robert Plumpton, II and Lucia Ros); died 1354, Somme, Picardie, France.
    Children:
    1. Thomas de Middleton was born 1321, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England; died 1393, (Yorkshire) England.
    2. 281. Margery de Middleton was born 1325, Ripon, Yorkshire, England; died 1409, Markenfield Hall, Ripon HG4 3AD, UK.

  13. 572.  John Fitzwilliam, Knight was born 0___ 1327, Sprotboro, West Riding, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1385, Howden Parish, East Riding of Yorkshire, England.

    John married Elizabeth Clinton ~ 1352. Elizabeth (daughter of John Clinton, II, 2nd Lord Clinton and Margery Corbet) was born 1330, Maxstoke, Warwick, England. [Group Sheet]


  14. 573.  Elizabeth Clinton was born 1330, Maxstoke, Warwick, England (daughter of John Clinton, II, 2nd Lord Clinton and Margery Corbet).
    Children:
    1. 286. William Fitzwilliam, Knight was born ~ 1354, Sprotboro, West Riding, Yorkshire, England; died 8 Apr 1398.

  15. 574.  Ralph de Cromwell, Knight, 1st Baron Cromwell was born 0___ 1335, (Tattershall, Lincolnshire, England); died 27 Aug 1398.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Member of Parliament - House of Lords
    • Also Known As: Sir Ralph Cromwell

    Notes:

    Ralph de Cromwell, 1st Baron Cromwell (died 27 August 1398), Tattershall in Lincolnshire, was an English peer. He was summoned to the House of Lords as Lord Cromwell in 1375. [1]

    Cromwell died in August, 1398, and was succeeded in the barony by his son, Ralph.

    Family

    Ralph married Maud (b.1337), daughter of John Bernack and Joan (d.1361),[2][3] daughter of John Marmion, 4th Baron Marmion of Winteringham and had the following issue:-

    Ralph Cromwell. Son and heir.
    Amice de Cromwell
    Maud de Cromwell
    Elizabeth de Cromwell

    Rerences

    Jump up ^ Plea Rolls of the Court of Common Pleas; National Archives; CP40/541; year 1396; http://aalt.law.uh.edu/AALT6/R2/CP40no541a/aCP40no541afronts/IMG_0312.htm; third entry, as plaintiff; presumably referring to the first Baron Cromwell 'Radus de Cromwell de Tateshale, chevalier '
    Jump up ^ Cal Inq PMs XI.
    Jump up ^ Farnham 1919–20, p. 466
    Bibliography[edit]
    Farnham, George F. (1919–20). Leicestershire Manors: The Manors of Allexton, Appleby and Ashby Folville (PDF). Leicester: Leicestershire Archaelogical and Historical Society.
    Kidd, Charles, Williamson, David (editors). Debrett's Peerage and Baronetage (1990 edition). New York: St Martin's Press, 1990.
    Calendar of Inquisitions Post Mortem XI. London: HMSO. 1935.
    Leigh Rayment's Peerage Pages [self-published source][better source needed]

    Ralph married Maud Bernack, Baroness Cromwell Bef 20 Jan 1352. Maud was born 7 Mar 1337, Tattershall, Lincolnshire, England; died 10 Apr 1419, Hornby Castle, Hornby, Bedale, DL8 1NQ. [Group Sheet]


  16. 575.  Maud Bernack, Baroness Cromwell was born 7 Mar 1337, Tattershall, Lincolnshire, England; died 10 Apr 1419, Hornby Castle, Hornby, Bedale, DL8 1NQ.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Lady of Tatishale
    • Also Known As: Maud Bernacke
    • Also Known As: Maud Bernake

    Notes:

    Biography

    Maud Bernake was born circa 1337 at/of Tattershall, Lincolnshire, England. [1] She married Sir Ralph before 20 January 1352. [2] They had five sons, Ralph, Knight, 2nd Lord Cromwell, Robert, William, Knight, Thomas and John, and three daughters, Elizabeth, Amice (or Avice) and Maud.[3]

    Maud left a will on 14 September 1416, and wrote a codicil on 1 January 1417.[4] She died on 10 April 1419. [5] [6]

    At Easter in 2 Henry IV (3 April 1401), at Ebor, Matilda de Cromwell, the lady of Tatishale, sued Henry fitz Hugh and Elizabeth, his wife, for a moiety of the manors of Tanfeld and Carthorp and other lands.[7] The pedigree provided for the plea says:

    John Marmyon, living 1 Edward III [which began on 25 January 1327], married Matilda, and had:
    Robert Marmyon, living in 1338;
    John who had:
    Matilda de Cromwell, the plaintiff in 1401;
    Avice who had:
    Robert who had:
    Elizabeh who married Henry fitz Hugh, the defendants in 1401.
    Matilda Cromwell was back in De Banco at Norfolk, at Michaelmas in 7 Henry IV (3 April 1406), suing Margaret, formerly wife of Gilbert Talbot, Kt, for the next presentation to the church of Attilburgh, appurtenant to the manor of Plessinghalle, and she said Hugh Daubeney, Earl of Arundell, presented Peter Giffard in the time of Henry III and his four sisters were his heirs, and gave the descents below:[8]

    Margaret stated the Earl presented Godfrey Giffard in the reign of Richard I. The jury found in Margaret's favour as the church was not appurtenant to the manor of Plessinghalle. Margaret's claim was from Constantine Clifton. The descent she provided is added below in blue:[8]

    Hugh Daubeney, Earl of Arundell, his four sisters were his heirs;
    Mabel, Plessinghalle was part of eldest sister Mabel's purparty and descended through her to:
    Robert de Tateshale, heir, granted the manor of Plessinghalle to William Bernak, Kt, who presented in the reign of Edward III;
    Robert de Tateshale who was dead and had no surviving children;
    Emma de Tateshale who married Osbert Cayley and had:
    Thomas who had:
    Margery who married Roger de Clifton and had:
    Adam who had:
    Constantine de Clifton who had:
    John de Clifton who had:
    Constantine Clifton;
    Joan de Tateshale who married Robert Dryby and had:
    Alice Dryby who married William Bernak and had:
    John who had:
    Matilda Cromwell, the plaintiff in 1406
    Isabella, who married John de Orby and died without having children;
    Isabella married John fitz Alan and had:
    John fitz Alan;
    Nicholaa married Roger Somery;
    Cecilia married Roger de Mohaut;
    Matilda said William Bernak, Kt. had:

    John who had:
    John, who was dead and had no surviving children;
    William, who was dead and had no surviving children; and
    Matilda Cromwell, the plaintiff.
    No more info is currently available for Maud Bernacke. Can you add to her biography?

    Sources

    ? Our Royal, Titled, Noble and Commoner Ancestors and Cousins
    ? Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families
    ? Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families
    ? Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families
    ? Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families
    ? Maud Bernake, database, Our Royal, Titled, Noble and Commoner Ancestors and Cousins, extracted from Mr. Marlyn Lewis, Portland, Oregon.
    ? Wrottesley 1905, p. 221 Is her parent John a misprint for Joan?
    ? 8.0 8.1 Wrottesley 1905, p. 244-5

    See also:

    Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, (2011), Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, Royal Ancestry series, 2nd edition, 4 vols., ed. Kimball G. Everingham, (Salt Lake City, Utah: the author, 2011), volume I, page 569-570 #8.
    Maud Bernake, database, Our Royal, Titled, Noble and Commoner Ancestors and Cousins, extracted from Mr. Marlyn Lewis, Portland, Oregon.[9]
    Major-General The Hon G Wrottesley, comp., Pedigrees from the Plea Rolls collected from the Pleadings in the Various Courts of Law AD 1200 to 1500 from the Original Rolls, ( 1905), accessed 29 August 2014, https://archive.org/stream/pedigreesfromple00wrotrich#page/n5/mode/2up .

    Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Volume II
    Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants
    Caerphilly Castle

    Children:
    1. 287. Maude de Cromwell was born ~ 1362, Tattershall, Lincolnshire, England; died Aft 1418.
    2. William de Cromwell was born ~ 1395, (Tattershall, Lincolnshire, England).

  17. 68.  Walter Scott de Calverley, Jr., Knight was born ~ 1341, Calverley, Yorkshire, England (son of Walter de Calverley, Sr., Knight and Margery de Dineley); died 10 Oct 1404, Calverley, Yorkshire, England.

    Notes:

    Eighth Generation

    35. Walter CALVERLEY 26 211 216 (Walter DE 7, John DE ((Sir)) 6, John DE 5, William SCOT Of ((Sir)) 4, Roger SCOT Of ((Sir)) 3, Walter SCOT Of 2, John SCOT Of 1) was born circa 1341 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 26 211 216 and died 10 Oct 1404 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 26 211 216 at age 63. Walter married First Wife (CALVERLEY) UNKNOWN circa 1370 in Prob Yorkshire, England. First was born circa 1350 and died circa 1395 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England at age 45.

    The Child from this marriage was:

    36. i. (Sir) John DE CALVERLEY Knight was born circa 1382 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England and died 21 Jul 1403 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England at age 21.

    Walter next married Joane NORMANVILLE,217 daughter of (Sir) John NORMANVILLE and MRIN 762 Constance DE MAULEY, circa 1395 in Prob Yorkshire, England.217 Joane was born circa 1375 217 and died circa 1395 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 217 at age 20.

    Walter next married Joan BIGOD (See Link for Ancestry),211 216 217 daughter of John BIGOD Sheriff of Yorkshire and Amy (BIGOD) UNKNOWN, about 1401 in Prob Yorkshire, England.211 216 217 Joan was born circa 1375 in Settrington, Yorkshire, England 211 216 217 and died before Jun 1423 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211 216 217

    Children from this marriage were:

    37. i. Walter CALVERLEY 148 211 218 was born about 1402 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 148 211 and died before 5 Mar 1467 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.148 211 218
    38. ii. Joan CALVERLEY 211 was born circa 1404 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211 Joan married John PASLEW circa 1420. John was born circa 1400.

    Walter married Joanna Bigod ~ 1401, Calverley, Yorkshire, England. Joanna (daughter of John Bigod, Knight and Amy Settrington) was born 1370-1375, Settrington, Yorkshire, England; died Bef 1423, Calverley, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  18. 69.  Joanna Bigod was born 1370-1375, Settrington, Yorkshire, England (daughter of John Bigod, Knight and Amy Settrington); died Bef 1423, Calverley, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Joan Bigod
    • Also Known As: Joan Calverly

    Notes:

    WALTER CALVERLEY, of Calverley, espoused Joanna, daughter of Sir John Bygod, of Sterrington, knt. and had issue. In this Walter's time, Calverley church being rebuilt, his arms were cut or plated in the woodwork there. He was s. by his son,

    Birth:
    Settrington is a village and civil parish in the Ryedale district of North Yorkshire, England, about 3 miles (5 km) east of Malton.

    Map & history ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Settrington

    Children:
    1. 34. Walter Calverley, III was born 0___ 1402, Calverley, Yorkshire, England; died Before 5 Mar 1467, (Calverley, Yorkshire, England).
    2. Joan Calverley was born ~ 1404, Calverley, Yorkshire, England.

  19. 70.  Thomas Markenfield, Knight was born ~ 1365, Markenfield Hall, Ripon, Yorkshire, England (son of John Markenfield, Knight and Joan Minot); died ~ 1415, (North Yorkshire) England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Thomas Markingfield

    Notes:

    He married his stepsister.

    Showing 13 people
    Son of Sir Thomas Markenfield and NN Miniott
    Husband of Beatrice Markinfield
    Father of Elizabeth Calverley; John Markenfield; Joan or Jane Warde; Isabel Mauleverer; Peter Markenfield and 2 others

    *

    Birth:
    View images of Markenfield Hall ... http://bit.ly/1lepHLr

    Markenfield Hall is an early 14th-century moated country house three miles (5 km) south of Ripon, North Yorkshire, England in the civil parish of Markingfield Hall. It is one of the finest surviving English country houses from that time.

    The house is an L-shaped castellated block, with a great hall that stands upon an undercroft and was originally reached by an exterior stone staircase. It is lit by two double-light windows with quatrefoil transom under their arched heads.

    The house is open for public tours during specific periods, for groups by appointment, and is also available for weddings.

    History

    Markenfield was mentioned in the Domesday Book in 1086, when there were two households.[1]

    In 1150 the estate belonged to the Le Bret family who adopted the name de Markenfield. A house existed on the site at that time.

    The present house was built by John de Markenfield, an associate of Piers Gaveston and a servant of Edward II. A licence to crenellate was issued for Markenfield in 1310, the same year that John was appointed Chancellor of the Exchequer. Sir Thomas Markefield was appointed High Sheriff of Yorkshire for 1484 and fought with Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth. In 1569 Thomas de Markenfield was involved in the pro-Catholic Rising of the North and was forced to flee to the Continent. Markenfield was confiscated and granted to Thomas Egerton, Master of the Rolls.

    Egerton never made Markenfield his principal residence, and it devolved to a rented farmhouse, whilst preserving its features. In 1761 the house was bought by Fletcher Norton, 1st Baron Grantley, who replaced the roof of the Great Hall and ensured that the house was structurally sound once more. It descended to the 7th Lord Grantley who began a restoration project in 1980 to convert the hall from a farmhouse into a family home. [2]

    The estate was historically an extra parochial area, which became a civil parish (with the alternative spelling Markingfield Hall) in the West Riding of Yorkshire in 1858.[3] The estate has remained a separate civil parish, since 1974 in the Harrogate district of the new county of North Yorkshire. The population of the civil parish is estimated at 10.[4]

    References

    Jump up ^ Open Domesday website
    Jump up ^ "Markenfield Hall". Welcome to Yorkshire. Retrieved 2013-02-13.
    Jump up ^ Vision of Britain website

    Thomas married Beatrice Sothill ~ 1405, (North Yorkshire) England. Beatrice (daughter of Henry Sothill and Jane Fitzwilliam) was born 1375-1385, Batley, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1430, Givendale, Ripon, Harrogate, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  20. 71.  Beatrice Sothill was born 1375-1385, Batley, Yorkshire, England (daughter of Henry Sothill and Jane Fitzwilliam); died 0___ 1430, Givendale, Ripon, Harrogate, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Beatrice Markinfield
    • Alt Birth: ~ 1390, Ripon, Harrogate, Yorkshire, England

    Children:
    1. 35. Elizabeth Markenfield was born ~ 1403, Markenfield Hall, Ripon, Yorkshire, England; died Aft 1472, Calverley, Yorkshire, England.

  21. 908.  Piers Tempest was born 0___ 1378, Bracewell, Yorkshire, England (son of Richard Tempest, MP, Knight and Margaret Stainforth); died 0___ 1417, Wakefield, St. John, West Riding, Yorkshire, England.

    Piers married Grace Hebden. Grace was born ~ 1377, Gosberton, Lincolnshire, England; died 0___ 1434, Craven, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  22. 909.  Grace Hebden was born ~ 1377, Gosberton, Lincolnshire, England; died 0___ 1434, Craven, Yorkshire, England.
    Children:
    1. 454. John Tempest was born ~ 1401, Bracewell, Yorkshire, England; died Aft 1462, Bracewell, Yorkshire, England.

  23. 910.  Richard Sherburne was born 12 Oct 1381, Stonyhurst, Lancashire, England; died 29 Apr 1441, Stonyhurst, Lancashire, England; was buried , Great Mitton, Lancashire. England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Richard Bayley Sherburne
    • Also Known As: Sir Richard Shireburn

    Notes:

    Richard Sherburne
    Also Known As: "Richard Bayley Sherburne", "Sir Richard Shireburn"
    Birthdate: October 12, 1381
    Birthplace: Stonyhurst, Clitheroe, Lancashire, England, (Present UK)
    Death: Died May 29, 1441 in Mitton Parish, Craven, Lancashire, England, (Present UK)
    Place of Burial: Great Mitton, Lancashire, England, United Kingdom
    Immediate Family:
    Son of Richard Sherburne and Margaret Sherburne
    Husband of Agnes Sherburne
    Father of Richard Sherburne, of Stoneyhurst; Alice Tempest (Sherburne); Jenetta Sherborne; Nicholas Sherborne; Elizabeth Sherburne and 3 others
    Managed by: Private User
    Last Updated: June 5, 2016

    About Richard Sherburne

    Married Agnes Harrington 1391 when he was 9 years old. He was a Knight of the Shire of Lancaster and is entombed in the Shireburne Chapel at All Hallows Church, Mitton commonly known as Mytton Church. He was given his mothers surname Shireburn rather than his fathers Bailey. Being of the Bailey line he was the 4th. great grandson of Otto de Mitton whos own family then began to use the surname Bailey after their manor granted to Otto de Mitton by his older brother Hugh de Mitton circa 1200. His son is the next Richard Shireburne and lived until 1494. He was married at 12 years old and lived at Stonyhurst. He is also entombed in this chapel. https://thefamilydemitton.wordpress.com/shireburne-shireburne-and-more-shireburnes/

    Margaret Sherburne conveyed all her Shireburne estates and assets to her husband Richard Bayley (descendant of Ralph the Red) to be left to their only son and heir Richard. He was however given the more predominate surname Shireburne to perpetuate the mothers family name and secure the Shireburne inheritance. Margaret’s father in law John de Bailey (descendant Mitton) was the possessor of Stonyhurst at the time. He was the grandfather of Richard Shirburne. Richard Bailey, father of Richard Shireburne never had possession of Stoneyhurst. Richard Bailey died 3 years before his father and eventually his son Richard Shireburne inherited Stonyhurst directly from his grandfather John Bailey in 1391.

    He built the aisle to Mitton Church and was the first of the Shireburns of Stonyhurst Hall. His effigy is at Mitton Church with his Shireburne family successors. https://thefamilydemitton.wordpress.com/the-baileys-and-the-shireburnes-are-all-de-mittons/

    Richard Sherburne

    Birth: Oct 12 1381 - Stonyhurst, Lancashire, England
    Death: May 29 1441 - Stonyhurst, Lancashire, England
    Wife: Agnes Harrington
    Child: Alice Sherburne
    =========================
    Family Sheet

    HUSBAND

    Name: Richard SherburneMale Born: Married: Died:

    Other Spouses: Alice Plumpton

    Father: Richard Bayley
    Mother: Agnes Stanley
    WIFE

    Name: Matilda Hamerton

    Born:
    Died:
    CHILDREN

    Name: Isabel Sherburne

    Born:
    Died:
    Husband: John Towneley
    Source Information:

    Film Number: 170606
    Page Number:
    Reference number: 18760
    Family Sheet

    HUSBAND

    Name: Richard SherburneMale Born: Married: Died:

    Other Spouses: Alice Plumpton

    Father: Richard Bayley
    Mother: Agnes Stanley
    WIFE

    Name: Matilda Hamerton

    Born:
    Died:
    CHILDREN

    Name: Isabel Sherburne

    Born:
    Died:
    Husband: John Towneley
    ___________________ http://washington.ancestryregister.com/SHERBURNE00006.htm 6. Richard 'De Bayley' SHERBURNE Esq 5 68 211 488 498 (Margaret SHERBURNE Heiress of Stonyhurst 3, Richard DE Knight ((Sir)) 2, John DE M.P., Knight ((Sir)) 1) was born 12 Oct 1381 in Stonyhurst, Clitheroe, Lancaster, England,68 498 died 25 May 1441 of Stonyhurst, Clitheroe, Lancaster, England 68 498 at age 59, and was buried in Church at Mitton, Lancaster, England. Richard married Agnes HARRINGTON (See Link for Ancestry),5 26 68 488 498 daughter of Nicholas HARINGTON and Isabel ENGLISH, circa 1390.5 68 488 499 Agnes was born circa 1370 in Farleton, Melling, Lancastershire, England,26 68 498 died before 3 Nov 1444 of Stonyhurst, Clitheroe, Lancaster, England,26 68 498 and was buried 3 Nov 1444 in Church at Mitton, Lancaster, England.

    Children from this marriage were:

    7. i. Alice SHERBURNE 68 211 490 was born circa 1400 in Stonyhurst, Clitheroe, Lancaster, England 68 490 and died of Bracewell, West Riding, Yorkshire, England.68 211 490 8. ii. Richard SHERBURNE Jr. 5 68 488 490 498 was born circa 1403 in Stonyhurst, Clitheroe, Lancaster, England 68 490 498 and died before 1440 of Stonyhurst, Clitheroe, Lancaster, England.490 498 9. iii. Robert SHERBURNE was born circa 1406 in Stonyhurst, Clitheroe, Lancaster, England. 10. iv. Isabel SHERBURNE was born circa 1409 in Stonyhurst, Clitheroe, Lancaster, England. 11. v. Elizabeth SHERBURNE was born circa 1412 in Stonyhurst, Clitheroe, Lancaster, England. 12. vi. John SHERBURNE was born circa 1415 in Stonyhurst, Clitheroe, Lancaster, England. 13. vii. Nicholas SHERBURNE was born circa 1418 in Stonyhurst, Clitheroe, Lancaster, England. 14. viii. James SHERBURNE was born circa 1421 in Stonyhurst, Clitheroe, Lancaster, England. 15. ix. Mabel SHERBURNE was born circa 1424 in Stonyhurst, Clitheroe,

    Richard married Agnes Harrington 0___ 1391. Agnes (daughter of Nicholas Harington, Knight, Baron and Isabella English, Baroness of Harington) was born ~ 1375, England; died 3 Nov 1444, Lancashire, England. [Group Sheet]


  24. 911.  Agnes Harrington was born ~ 1375, England (daughter of Nicholas Harington, Knight, Baron and Isabella English, Baroness of Harington); died 3 Nov 1444, Lancashire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alt Birth: 0___ 1391, Hooton, Cheshire, England

    Notes:

    Agnes Sherburne (Harrington)
    Also Known As: "Stanley"
    Birthdate: circa 1391
    Birthplace: Hooton, Cheshire West and Chester, England, United Kingdom
    Death: Died November 3, 1444 in Lancashire, England
    Place of Burial: Hooten, Cheshire, England, UK
    Immediate Family:
    Daughter of Sir Nicholas Harrington, Lord of Farleton and Isabella Harrington
    Wife of Richard Sherburne
    Mother of Richard Sherburne, of Stoneyhurst; Alice Tempest (Sherburne); Jenetta Sherborne; Nicholas Sherborne; Elizabeth Sherburne and 3 others
    Sister of Isabella Tunstall; Nicholas Harrington; Sir William Harrington, of Hornby; Sir James Harrington "Esquire of Westby Lane"; Mary Harrington and 4 others
    Managed by: Bernard Raimond Assaf
    Last Updated: June 15, 2016

    About Agnes Sherburne
    Many sources show Agnes as a Stanley, but Hickling has shown that she was the daughter of Sir Nicholas Harrington.

    TEMPEST WIVES AND DAUGHTERS IN THE LATE MEDIEVAL PERIOD.

    PART 4.

    BY JOHN R. SCHUERMAN AND DOUGLAS HICKLING

    http://www.medievalgenealogy.org.uk/families/tempest/tempest4.shtml

    This Richard Sherburne's parents were Richard Sherburne (d. 1441, will in Test. Ebor. II, Surtees Society Publications v. 30, p. 75-76, dated 3 January 1436 and probated 7 June 1441, Test. Ebor. shows the date of probate as 1440, but Wills in the York Registry, YASRS v. 6 shows it as 1441; IPM in Report of the Deputy Keeper of the Public Records, appendix to v. 39, p. 541 says died on Monday before Pentecost 19 Henry 6 [29 May 1441]) and Agnes Harrington (d. 1444, her will is also in Test. Ebor. II, p. 105-06, dated 3 November 1444, IPM in Towneley's Abstracts of IPMs, Chetham Society Remains, v. 99, pp. 52-53, where it says she died in 1445 or 1446; Wills in York Registry gives the date of the will as above, date of probate 30 November 1444). Richard Sherburne the son evidently predeceased his father by a few days. The will of Richard senior identifies his wife as Agnes and makes his son James and Robert and Thomas Harrington (brothers) his executors "at the sight of John Tempest." No other children are mentioned. Agnes's will identifies, among other children, “my daughter, Alice Tempest.” Later in the will she leaves a gold broach “to my son Sir John Tempest” and appoints “John Tempest, knight” as one of her executors. This John Tempest was the son of Piers Tempest who was the son of Richard above and perhaps Margaret Stainforth. Agnes's IPM references her deceased son Richard and his son Robert.

    The identity of Agnes (Harrington) Sherburne was the topic of an article on the Soc. Gen. Med. newsgroup (http://groups.google.com/group/soc.genealogy.medieval) on 24 May 2004 by Douglas Hickling, building on work reported by Douglas Richardson in the recent Plantagenet Ancestry (2004, p. 678). Many sources show Agnes as a Stanley, but Hickling has shown that she was the daughter of Sir Nicholas Harrington.

    -------------------------------

    Ancestral roots of certain American colonists who came to America before ... By Frederick Lewis Weis, Walter Lee Sheppard, Kaleen E. Pg.163

    http://books.google.com/books?id=3F9nG8aFJ7MC&pg=PA163&lpg=PA163&dq=Richard+Bayley+1381&source=bl&ots=9jCenIGrzq&sig=BMzkbrS5J3vGBHKB0iNzmc5gHuw&hl=en&ei=Bd2rTK29MZD0tgOW_-HzAw&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=7&ved=0CCoQ6AEwBg#v=onepage&q=Richard%20Bayley%201381&f=false

    32. Sir Richard Sherburne (formerly de Bayley), b. 12 Oct. 1381, d. 1441; m. Agnes Stanley, bur. Mitton, 3 nov. 1444, dau. of William Stanley, of Hooton, co. Chester.

    ------------------------------------------------------

    A History of the Family of Sherborn By Charles Davies Sherborn Pg.12

    http://books.google.com/books?id=kivhPAHpMjIC&pg=PA12&lpg=PA12&dq=Richard+Bayley+1381&source=bl&ots=R-AtZkSNoV&sig=Uq_rfYcnn_XW-2jI5Uu-OHoYdZU&hl=en&ei=ot6rTKyVNYzksQOEhYDpAw&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=10&ved=0CDoQ6AEwCQ#v=onepage&q=Richard%20Bayley%201381&f=false

    -----------------------------

    http://thepeerage.com/p17621.htm#i176208

    Agnes Stanley married Richard Sherburne, son of Richard Bayley and Margaret Sherburne.1

    Her married name became Sherburne.1
    Citations

    1.[S1545] Mitchell Adams, "re: West Ancestors," e-mail message to Darryl Roger Lundy, 6 December 2005 - 19 June 2009. Hereinafter cited as "re: West Ancestors."

    [PDF] SHERBURN of Stonyhurst

    File Format: PDF/Adobe Acrobat - Quick View

    Richard de Bayley = Agnes Stanley. Vix 45HenIII. Vix 40 HenIII. Seneschal of Clitheroe ... Stanley of Hooton,. Co. Chester; Will dated 3 Nov 1444

    http://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&q=cache:XWUpJ0pfU_oJ:ingilbyhistory.ripleycastle.co.uk/ingilby_3/SHERBURN%2520of%2520Stonyhurst.pdf+Agnes+Stanley+1444&hl=en&gl=us&pid=bl&srcid=ADGEESjO9ITke_P8Jjkg1__i1IbzNBD1kTfN-ruzuLxmIPOgmdOFydbtqG6Wmwrye091-OhA8COkgkpMl-9XQyWSUy0DSTZ30ZHSG6r6q189B0vVn39PcKBn0b6azLzAPT7dJ8i0UvDb&sig=AHIEtbSYqoLPWy24c17m2gafOwgC5oMWQQ

    Compact Disc #15 Pin #32492 (AFN: 17NN-F5L)

    Children:
    1. 455. Alice Sherburne was born 0___ 1383, Stonyhurst, Lancashire, England; died 0___ 1462, Burley Parish, Haigh, Lancashire, England.


Generation: 11

  1. 1024.  William de Bolling was born 1258, (Bradford) England (son of John de Bolling and unnamed spouse); died 1316, (Bradford) England.

    Notes:

    Generation No. 143

    William De Bolling (IV) [143] John De Bolling (II) [142] Robert D. Bolling [141] William De Bolling (III) [140] William De Bolling (II) [139] William De Bolling [138] John De Bolling [137] Tristam De Bolling [136] William De Boulogne [135] Eustace II De Boulogne (=Mary of Scotland) [134] Mathilda Van Leuven (=Eustache I, Count of Boulogne)[133] Gerberga of Lower Lorraine [132] Charles, Duke of Lower Lorraine [131] King Louis IV of France (=Gerberga of Saxony) [130] Charles III, the Simple (=Eadgifu of England) [129] Louis II, the Stammerer (=Adelaide of Paris) [128] Charles II, the Bald (=Ermentrude) [127] Louis I, the Pious (=Judith of Bavaria) [126] Charlemagne the Great (=Hildegard) [1-125]

    William De Bolling (IV) was born 1258 in Bolling Hall, Bradford, Yorkshire, England, and died 1316 in Bolling Hall, Bradford, Yorkshire, England.

    Children: John De Bolling (III)

    Birth:
    Bolling Hall is one of the oldest buildings in Bradford, West Yorkshire, England. It is currently used as a museum and education centre. The building is about a mile from the centre of Bradford. Its surroundings are suburban in character.

    Before the Industrial Revolution, Bradford was a small town and difficult to defend as it lay in a basin. However, Bolling Hall occupies a commanding position on a hillside. The earliest part of this building, dating from the 14th century, has been interpreted as a pele tower, although Bradford is somewhat outside the typical geographical area for these defensive structures.

    The Manor of Bolling (Bollinc) is first mentioned in Domesday Book and was at that time in the possession of a man named Sindi. The manor then came under the control of Ilbert de Lacy. By 1316 the manor was owned by William Bolling, and Bollings owned the estate until the late 15th century when control went to the Tempests who held the estate until 1649. The estate changed hands several times thereafter until eventually it was let to several tenants until being presented to Bradford Corporation in 1912. It was opened as a museum three years later.

    During the second siege of Bradford in 1643, during the English Civil War, the house was a Royalist base. On this occasion the Royalists took the town, which had strong Parliamentarian sympathies, and it was thought that the victors would put the inhabitants to the sword. There is a legend that a ghost appeared in the bedroom where the Royalist commander Earl of Newcastle was staying to tell him to "Pity poor Bradford". There is usually material on display relating to the English Civil War including a death mask of Oliver Cromwell. In the 18th century parts of the house were modernised by the architect John Carr, following a fire.

    http://bit.ly/YaH18A

    William married unnamed spouse (Bradford) England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 1025.  unnamed spouse
    Children:
    1. 512. John de Bolling was born ~1284, Bolling Hall, Bradford, Yorkshire, England; died 1330, Bolling Hall, Bradford, Yorkshire, England.

  3. 1092.  William Warde was born ~1230; died ~ July 1266.

    William married Margaret de Neville (Yorkshire, England). Margaret was born ~1235, Yorkshire, England; died ~1300, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 1093.  Margaret de Neville was born ~1235, Yorkshire, England; died ~1300, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Margaret Neville

    Notes:

    Margaret Warde formerly Neville aka de Neville
    Born about 1235 in Yorkshire, England
    ANCESTORS ancestors
    Daughter of Jollan (Neville) de Neville and Maud (Beauchamp) Neville
    Sister of Andrew (Neville) de Neville
    Wife of William Warde — married [date unknown] [location unknown]
    DESCENDANTS descendants
    Mother of Simon Warde
    Died about 1300 in Yorkshire, England
    Profile manager: Charles Walter private message [send private message]
    Neville-2189 created 4 Jun 2016
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    Children:
    1. 546. Simon Warde was born ~1267, Yorkshire, England; died ~1306, Yorkshire, England.

  5. 1104.  Hugh Bigod, Knight was born ~ 1215, Thetford, Norfolk, England (son of Hugh Bigod, Knight, 3rd Earl of Norfolk and Maud Marshal, Countess of Norfolk); died Bef 7 May 1266.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Chief Justice of England

    Notes:

    Hugh BIGOD (Chief Justice of England)

    Born: ABT 1215, Thetford, Norfolk, England

    Died: BEF 7 May 1266

    Notes: There is some uncertainty as to which wife was mother of which of Hugh's children.

    Father: Hugh BIGOD (3ş E. Norfolk and Suffolk)

    Mother: Maud MARSHALL (C. Norfolk)

    Married 1: Joan BURNETT (Wife) (dau of Robert Burnet)

    Married 2: Helen HARCOURT Bosworth, Leicestershire, England

    Married 3: Joan De STUTEVILLE (b. ABT 1220) BEF 5 Feb 1243/44 (dau. of Nicholas De Stuteville and Joan Peche) (m.2 Hugh Wake of Lidell)

    Children:

    1. Joan BIGOD

    2. Roger BIGOD (5° E. Norfolk and Suffolk)

    3. John BIGOD of Settrington

    Hugh married Joan de Stuteville. Joan (daughter of Nicholas de Stuteville, Lord of Liddell and Joan Peche) was born ~ 1220; died Bef 1244. [Group Sheet]


  6. 1105.  Joan de Stuteville was born ~ 1220 (daughter of Nicholas de Stuteville, Lord of Liddell and Joan Peche); died Bef 1244.
    Children:
    1. 552. John Bigod was born 1245-1250, Stockton, Norfolk, England; died Bef 18 Mar 1305, (Settrington, Yorkshire, England).

  7. 1120.  William Markenfield was born ~ 1250, Markenfield Hall, Ripon HG4 3AD, UK (son of William Markenfield and unnamed spouse); died 0___ 1308.

    Notes:

    Generation: 1

    1. Sir. William Markenfield was born 1275, Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England (son of Sir. Lawrence Markenfield and Mrs. Lady Mary Markenfield); died 1308, Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England.
    William married Lady Constance 1298, Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England. Constance was born 1278, Ripon, , North Yorkshire, England; died , Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    Sir. John Markenfield, Chancellor of the Exchequer was born 1280, Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England; died 1348, York, , North Yorkshire, England.

    Generation: 2

    2. Sir. Lawrence Markenfield was born 1245, Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England (son of Sir. Roger Markenfield and Mrs. Lady Maud Markenfield); died Aft 1276, Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England.
    Lawrence married Mrs. Lady Mary Markenfield 1267, Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England. Mary was born 1247, Ripon, , North Yorkshire, England; died , Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


    3. Mrs. Lady Mary Markenfield was born 1247, Ripon, , North Yorkshire, England; died , Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England.
    Children:
    1. Sir. William Markenfield was born 1275, Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England; died 1308, Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England.


    Generation: 3

    4. Sir. Roger Markenfield was born 1215, Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England (son of Roger Markenfeld and Mrs. Roger Markingfield); died , Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England.
    Roger married Mrs. Lady Maud Markenfield 1238, Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England. Maud was born 1218, Ripon, , North Yorkshire, England; died , Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


    5. Mrs. Lady Maud Markenfield was born 1218, Ripon, , North Yorkshire, England; died , Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England.
    Children:
    2. Sir. Lawrence Markenfield was born 1245, Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England; died Aft 1276, Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England.


    Generation: 4

    8. Roger Markenfeld was born Abt 1180, England (son of Mr Markenfeld); died DECEASED.
    Roger — Mrs. Roger Markingfield. Roger was born Abt 1180, of Markingfield, Yorkshire, England; died DECEASED. [Group Sheet]


    9. Mrs. Roger Markingfield was born Abt 1180, of Markingfield, Yorkshire, England; died DECEASED.
    Children:
    Sir. Simon de Markenfield was born 1195, Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England; died , Ripon, , North Yorkshire, England.
    Lawrence Markingfield was born Abt 1208, of Markingfield, Yorkshire, England; died DECEASED.
    4. Sir. Roger Markenfield was born 1215, Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England; died , Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England.

    William married Alianore LNU 1298, Markenfield Hall, Ripon HG4 3AD, UK. Alianore was born 1278, Ripon, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  8. 1121.  Alianore LNU was born 1278, Ripon, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Lady Constance

    Children:
    1. 560. John Markenfield was born ~ 1280, Markenfield Hall, Ripon HG4 3AD, UK; died 1348, York, Yorkshire, England; was buried , Copmanthorpe, York, United Kingdom.

  9. 1124.  William Scot de Middleton was born 1254, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England; died 1318, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England.

    William married Agnes Boteler. Agnes (daughter of Noel le Boteler and Agnes LNU) was born 1285, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England; died 1311, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  10. 1125.  Agnes Boteler was born 1285, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England (daughter of Noel le Boteler and Agnes LNU); died 1311, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England.
    Children:
    1. 562. Peter de Middleton was born 1300, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England; died 1336, Yorkshire, England.

  11. 1126.  Robert Plumpton, II was born 1262-1268, Yorkshire, England; died 1325-1326, Yorkshire, England.

    Notes:

    Generation: 1

    1. Sir Robert de Plumpton, Ii was born Abt 1268, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England; died 1325, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England.
    Robert married Lucy de Ros Abt 1295, Plumpton by Ecclesall, Yorkshire, England. Lucy (daughter of Sir William, knight de Ros and Eustace Fitzhugh) was born Abt 1269, Of Plumpton, Yorkshire, England; died Aft 1332, Plumpton in Spofforth, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    2. Sir William de Plumpton Descendancy chart to this point was born Abt 1295, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England; died 1362, Berwick upon Tweed, Northumberland, England.
    3. Robert de Plumpton, Iii Descendancy chart to this point was born 1296, PLUMPTON, Yorkshire, England; died 1301.
    4. Marmaduke de Plumpton Descendancy chart to this point was born Abt 1296, Plumpton in Spofforth, Yorkshire, England; died 1322.
    5. Isabella de Plumpton Descendancy chart to this point was born Abt 1298, Plumpton in Spofforth, Yorkshire, England; died 1354, Y, Somme, Picardie, France.
    6. Eustacia de Plumpton Descendancy chart to this point was born 1299, Plumpton in Spofforth, Yorkshire, Angleterre; died 1354, Somme, Picardie, France.


    Generation: 2

    2. Sir William de Plumpton Descendancy chart to this point (1.Robert1) was born Abt 1295, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England; died 1362, Berwick upon Tweed, Northumberland, England.

    3. Robert de Plumpton, Iii Descendancy chart to this point (1.Robert1) was born 1296, PLUMPTON, Yorkshire, England; died 1301.

    4. Marmaduke de Plumpton Descendancy chart to this point (1.Robert1) was born Abt 1296, Plumpton in Spofforth, Yorkshire, England; died 1322.

    5. Isabella de Plumpton Descendancy chart to this point (1.Robert1) was born Abt 1298, Plumpton in Spofforth, Yorkshire, England; died 1354, Y, Somme, Picardie, France.

    6. Eustacia de Plumpton Descendancy chart to this point (1.Robert1) was born 1299, Plumpton in Spofforth, Yorkshire, Angleterre; died 1354, Somme, Picardie, France.
    Eustacia — Sheriff of Yorkshire Peter de Middelton. Peter (son of Sir Lord William Scot De Middleton and Agnes Boteler) was born 1300, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England; died 1336, Yorkshire, England; was buried , Ilkley, West Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    7. Thomas Middelton Descendancy chart to this point was born 1321, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England; died 1393, England.
    8. Nicholas De Middleton Descendancy chart to this point was born Abt 1323, Middleton Hall, Kendal, Westmorland, Eng; died 1414, Middleton Hall, Kendal, Westmorland, Eng.
    9. Margery de Middleton Descendancy chart to this point was born 1325, Ripon, , North Yorkshire, England; died 1409, Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England.
    10. Margaret De Middleton Descendancy chart to this point was born 1328, Stockeld, Yorks, Eng.; died DECEASED.


    Generation: 3

    7. Thomas Middelton Descendancy chart to this point (6.Eustacia2, 1.Robert1) was born 1321, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England; died 1393, England.
    Thomas — Elizabeth Gramary. Elizabeth (daughter of Robert Gramary) was born 1325, Yorkshire, England; died DECEASED. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    11. Sir John Middleton Descendancy chart to this point was born 1347, Kendal, Westmorland, England; died 9 Aug 1396, Belsay, Northumberland, England.
    12. Joane de Middleton Descendancy chart to this point was born Abt 1357; died 1429.

    8. Nicholas De Middleton Descendancy chart to this point (6.Eustacia2, 1.Robert1) was born Abt 1323, Middleton Hall, Kendal, Westmorland, Eng; died 1414, Middleton Hall, Kendal, Westmorland, Eng.

    9. Margery de Middleton Descendancy chart to this point (6.Eustacia2, 1.Robert1) was born 1325, Ripon, , North Yorkshire, England; died 1409, Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England.
    Margery married Sir. Andrew de Markenfield 1340, Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England. Andrew (son of Sir. John Markenfield, Chancellor of the Exchequer and Lady Eleanor) was born 1310, Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England; died 1357, York, , North Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    13. John Markenfield, Sir Descendancy chart to this point was born 1343, Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England; died 1409, Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England; was buried , Rypon.

    10. Margaret De Middleton Descendancy chart to this point (6.Eustacia2, 1.Robert1) was born 1328, Stockeld, Yorks, Eng.; died DECEASED.


    Generation: 4

    11. Sir John Middleton Descendancy chart to this point (7.Thomas3, 6.Eustacia2, 1.Robert1) was born 1347, Kendal, Westmorland, England; died 9 Aug 1396, Belsay, Northumberland, England.
    John married Christian de Stryvelin Abt 1370. Christian (daughter of Sir John de Stryvelin, Baron and Barnaba de Swinburne) was born 1374, Belsay Castle, , Northumberland, England; died 19 Mar 1421, Middleton Hall, Kendal, Westmorland, England. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    14. Sir John Middleton Descendancy chart to this point was born Abt 1372, of Belsay.
    15. Thomas Middleton Descendancy chart to this point was born Abt 1374.
    16. Annie Middleton Manners Descendancy chart to this point was born 1382, Belsay, Northumberland, England.

    12. Joane de Middleton Descendancy chart to this point (7.Thomas3, 6.Eustacia2, 1.Robert1) was born Abt 1357; died 1429.
    Joane — Sir Bernard Brocas. Bernard (son of Sir Bernard Brocas and Agnes Le Vavasour) was born 1354, (42:1396) of Beaurepaire, Hampshire, England; died 1400, Beheaded. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    17. William Brocas Descendancy chart to this point was born 1388, of Denton, Hamptonshire, England; died 1456.

    13. John Markenfield, Sir Descendancy chart to this point (9.Margery3, 6.Eustacia2, 1.Robert1) was born 1343, Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England; died 1409, Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England; was buried , Rypon.
    John — Dionisia Mynyot. Dionisia was born 1340; died 1409. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    18. Sir Thomas Markenfield Descendancy chart to this point was born Abt 1372, Markenfeld Hall, Ripon, Yorkshire, England; died 1415, Ripon, Yorkshire, England.
    John married Joan Mynyot Carlton de Moels Abt 1366, Markingfield, Yorkshire, England. Joan (daughter of Carlton de Moels) was born 1343, Carlton, Selby, North Yorkshire, England; died 1410, Givendale in Allerston, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    18. Sir Thomas Markenfield Descendancy chart to this point was born Abt 1372, Markenfeld Hall, Ripon, Yorkshire, England; died 1415, Ripon, Yorkshire, England.
    19. John Markinfield Descendancy chart to this point was born 1382, Markenfield, Yorkshire, England; died 1409, Ripon, Yorkshire, England.

    Robert married Lucia Ros ~1295, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England. Lucia (daughter of William de Ros, Knight and Eustache FitzRalph) was born ~ 1272; died ~ 1362. [Group Sheet]


  12. 1127.  Lucia Ros was born ~ 1272 (daughter of William de Ros, Knight and Eustache FitzRalph); died ~ 1362.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Lucy de Ros

    Children:
    1. William Plumpton was born ~ 1295, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1362, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England.
    2. 563. Eustacia Plumpton was born 1299, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England; died 1354, Somme, Picardie, France.

  13. 1146.  John Clinton, II, 2nd Lord Clinton was born Abt 1299, Maxstoke, Warwick, England (son of John de Clinton, I, Knight and Ida Odingsells, Baroness of Clinton); died 1 Apr 1335, Maxstoke, Warwick, England.

    Other Events:

    • Military: Scottish & French Wars

    John married Margery Corbet Bef 24 Feb 1328, Chaddesley Corbett, Worcester, England. Margery was born Abt 1304, Chaddesley Corbett, Worcester, England; died Aft 1343. [Group Sheet]


  14. 1147.  Margery Corbet was born Abt 1304, Chaddesley Corbett, Worcester, England; died Aft 1343.
    Children:
    1. 573. Elizabeth Clinton was born 1330, Maxstoke, Warwick, England.
    2. Margaret Clinton was born Abt 1331, Maxstoke, Warwick, England.
    3. Ida Clinton was born 1320, Warwickshire, England; died ~1360, England.

  15. 136.  Walter de Calverley, Sr., Knight was born ~ 1311, Calverley, Yorkshire, England (son of John de Calverley and Joanna Warde); died Bef 18 Dec 1404, (Calverley, Yorkshire, England).

    Notes:

    Seventh Generation


    27. Walter DE CALVERLEY 211 (John DE ((Sir)) 6, John DE 5, William SCOT Of ((Sir)) 4, Roger SCOT Of ((Sir)) 3, Walter SCOT Of 2, John SCOT Of 1) was born circa 1311 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 211 and died after 1376 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211 Walter married Margery DE DINELEY,211 daughter of John DE DINELEY Esq and Wife of John DE (DINELEY) UNKNOWN, circa 1328 in Prob Yorkshire, England.211 Margery was born circa 1310 in Downham, Yorkshire, England 211 and died of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211

    Children from this marriage were:


    33. i. John 'Le Fitz_Walter Scot' DE CALVERLEY 211 was born circa 1328 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 211 and died before 1346.211 John married Agnes (CALVERLEY) UNKNOWN circa 1350. Agnes was born circa 1330.

    34. ii. (Sir) William CALVERLEY 211 was born circa 1335 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 211 and died after 1376 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211 William married Eleanor THORNHILL,211 daughter of (Sir) John DE THORNHILL and Wife of John DE (THORNHILL) UNKNOWN, circa 1360 in Prob Yorkshire, England.211 Eleanor was born circa 1335 in Thornhill, West Riding, Yorkshire, England 211 and died of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England.211

    35. iii. Walter CALVERLEY 26 211 216 was born circa 1341 in Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 26 211 216 and died 10 Oct 1404 of Calverley, North Riding, Yorkshire, England 26 211 216 at age 63.

    Walter married Margery de Dineley ~ 1328, (Calverley, Yorkshire, England). Margery (daughter of John de Dineley and unnamed spouse) was born ~ 1310, Downham, Yorkshire, England; died , Calverley, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  16. 137.  Margery de Dineley was born ~ 1310, Downham, Yorkshire, England (daughter of John de Dineley and unnamed spouse); died , Calverley, Yorkshire, England.
    Children:
    1. 68. Walter Scott de Calverley, Jr., Knight was born ~ 1341, Calverley, Yorkshire, England; died 10 Oct 1404, Calverley, Yorkshire, England.

  17. 138.  John Bigod, Knight was born ~ 1334, Settrington, Yorkshire, England (son of Roger Bigod, Knight and Joan LNU); died 13 Nov 1388, Settrington, Yorkshire, England; was buried , All Saints Church, Settrington, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Sheriff of Yorkshire
    • Also Known As: John Bigod of Settrington

    Notes:

    Birth:
    Settrington is a village and civil parish in the Ryedale district of North Yorkshire, England, about 3 miles (5 km) east of Malton.

    Map & history ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Settrington

    Buried:
    Photos of All Saints Church ... https://www.google.com/search?q=All+Saints+church,+Settrington,+Yorkshire,+England&rlz=1C1KMZB_enUS591US591&espv=2&biw=1440&bih=815&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwju5_D3sYvKAhXHSyYKHevIDtoQsAQIKA&dpr=1

    John married Amy Settrington ~ 1369, (Settrington, Yorkshire, England). Amy was born 0___ 1339, Settrington, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1420, Settrington, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  18. 139.  Amy Settrington was born 0___ 1339, Settrington, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1420, Settrington, Yorkshire, England.
    Children:
    1. 69. Joanna Bigod was born 1370-1375, Settrington, Yorkshire, England; died Bef 1423, Calverley, Yorkshire, England.

  19. 140.  John Markenfield, Knight was born 1340-1343, Markenfield Hall, Ripon, Yorkshire, England (son of Andrew Markenfield and Margery de Middleton); died Bef 1398, (Markenfield Hall) Ripon, Yorkshire, England; was buried , Ripon Cathedral, Ripon, Yorkshire, England.

    Notes:

    History:

    The much-discussed badge on his collar probably indicates loyalty to Richard II (whose royal badge was a white hart couchant lodged (i.e. fenced in), crowned and chained). The Markenfields were quite good at picking the losing side.

    The story of Markenfield Hall is one of the saddest and most romantic in English history. Deeply intertwined with the fortunes of nearby Fountains Abbey, this great house was one of the most important centres of the Rising of the North in 1569, which was the cause of its tragic downfall. A recent archaeological survey has established that the Great Hall is older than the other buildings around the Courtyard. It was probably built about 1280 and was free standing. Thirty years later Canon John de Markenfield completed the building, when a licence to crenellate (fortify) it was granted to him by King Edward II in 1310. John de Markenfield held high office under the King, and his family inter-married with the greatest ruling houses of the North.

    They fought for the King at Agincourt, Bosworth and Flodden while increasing their wealth and national standing, but this powerful family was brought to its tragic end by their leadership of the Rising in 1569. This was the rebellion which, following the Dissolution of the Monasteries 30 years before in the reign of King Henry VIII, was launched by many nobles and ordinary working people of Yorkshire, Durham, Northumberland and Westmoreland. Its object was the replacement of Queen Elizabeth I by Catholic Mary Queen of Scots and thus, in the north at least, to maintain freedom to practice their Catholic faith and defy the attempt of the state to suppress it in favour of Protestantism.

    The Rising was put down with great savagery. Over 200 who took part were hanged, drawn and quartered. The Markenfield family was forced to flee abroad and the house was confiscated for high treason. The Hall became a tenanted farmhouse; its 250 years as the home of a great Yorkshire family were over. For two centuries Markenfield was largely neglected and forgotten by its absentee landlords. Then in 1761 it was bought by Sir Fletcher Norton, the First Lord Grantley, a direct descendent of the Sir Thomas Markenfield who had led the 1569 Rising. The Hall's fortunes started to improve. The Grantley family still owns it and in the 1980s embarked on a programme of restoration, which is almost complete. The house built by John de Markenfield seven centuries ago is now a much loved family home once again, and still remains one of the only completely moated manor houses left in England

    Showing 7 people
    Son of Sir Andro/Andrew Markenfield and NN Markenfield
    Husband of NN Miniott and Dionysia nn
    Father of Sir Thomas Markenfeld

    end of biography

    Some Fabulous Pedigrees

    John Markenfield, Sir
    Male 1343 - 1409 (66 years)

    Name John Markenfield
    Suffix Sir
    Born 1343 Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location
    Gender Male
    Died 1409 Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location
    Buried Rypon Find all individuals with events at this location
    Notes
    M L Call: The Royal Ancestry Bible Vol 3: 3309 shows Thomas
    The Visitation of Yorkshire p.196 shows John
    Person ID I15370 penrose
    Last Modified 27 Jun 2016

    Father Sir. Andrew de Markenfield, b. 1310, Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location, d. 1357, York, , North Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location (Age 47 years)
    Mother Margery de Middleton, b. 1325, Ripon, , North Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location, d. 1409, Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location (Age 84 years)
    Married 1340 Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location
    Family ID F11347 Group Sheet | Family Chart

    Family 1 Dionisia Mynyot, b. 1340, d. 1409 (Age 69 years)
    Children
    + 1. Sir Thomas Markenfield, b. Abt 1372, Markenfeld Hall, Ripon, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location, d. 1415, Ripon, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location (Age ~ 43 years)
    Last Modified 8 Nov 2017
    Family ID F11356 Group Sheet | Family Chart

    Family 2 Joan Mynyot Carlton de Moels, b. 1343, Carlton, Selby, North Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location, d. 1410, Givendale in Allerston, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location (Age 67 years)
    Married Abt 1366 Markingfield, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location
    Notes
    ~SEALING_SPOUSE: Also shown as SealSp 2 Feb 1993, BOISE.
    Children
    + 1. Sir Thomas Markenfield, b. Abt 1372, Markenfeld Hall, Ripon, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location, d. 1415, Ripon, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location (Age ~ 43 years)
    2. John Markinfield, b. 1382, Markenfield, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location, d. 1409, Ripon, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location (Age 27 years)
    Last Modified 8 Nov 2017
    Family ID F11357 Group Sheet | Family Chart


    This site powered by The Next Generation of Genealogy Sitebuilding ©, v. 11.0.1, written by Darrin Lythgoe 2001-2017.

    Buried:
    The effigy to Sir Thomas Markenfield is very beautiful, well-preserved and highly detailed.

    Some strange features set this effigy apart from other contemporary effigies: e.g. his collar, which shows a couchant stag within an elaborate fence round a little field. Numerous learned papers have been written to prove this was a badge marking his adherence to the House of Lancaster, but others think it is simply a play on his name: Mark-in-Field (a ‘mark’ being your quarry in a hunt).

    Another strange feature is what seems to be a sash or bend showing the Markenfield arms, worn over his 'alwhite' armour (complete plate-armour). Usually heraldic arms were depicted on the jupon (a very tight surcoat). But since the Markenfield arms are "argent, on a bend sable three besants", the field of "argent" would be represented by his shining plate-armour, very much resembling silver/argent.

    His armour is beautifully decorated: tiny borders of hearts can be seen around the edges of his breastplate, bascinet and spaulders (the lames protecting his shoulders).
    Note the finial decorating the front edge of the bascinet.

    I like this effigy very much. Pity that Sir Thomas lost his arms though ;)

    A big thank you to John Arblaster for taking the pictures.

    View photostream ... https://www.flickr.com/photos/roelipilami/4920735881/in/photostream/

    John married Joan Minot. Joan was born ~1366, Carlton, Selby, North Yorkshire, England; died 1410, Givendale, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  20. 141.  Joan Minot was born ~1366, Carlton, Selby, North Yorkshire, England; died 1410, Givendale, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Joan Mynyot Carlton de Moels
    • Also Known As: Minott
    • Also Known As: NN Miniott
    • Alt Birth: ~ 1345, Carlton Miniott, North Yorkshire, England

    Notes:

    Her father may be John Miniott ... In the early 14th century the lands were purchased by a John Miniott from whom the village now gets its suffix.

    Alt Birth:
    Carlton Miniott, formerly Carlton Islebeck is a village and civil parish in the Hambleton district of North Yorkshire, England, on the A61 road to the immediate west of Thirsk, 25 miles (40 km) north of York. According to the 2001 census it had a population of 926, increasing to 990 at the 2011 census.

    The village is mentioned in the Domesday Book as Carlton, as is the place-name Islebeck that has been associated with the village.[2] The land was in the possession of Orm, son of Gamal at that time and passed on to Hugh, son of Baldric. It eventually became the property of the Barons de Mowbray. In the early 14th century the lands were purchased by a John Miniott from whom the village now gets its suffix.[3] By the early 15th century the manor had passed out of the Miniott family to the Markenfield and Pigot families. Thereafter, the manor was further divided and passed through other families such as Metcalfe, Folkingham, Hussey, Lamplugh, Clough and Bell.

    Children:
    1. 70. Thomas Markenfield, Knight was born ~ 1365, Markenfield Hall, Ripon, Yorkshire, England; died ~ 1415, (North Yorkshire) England.

  21. 142.  Henry Sothill was born 0___ 1360, Soothill, West Riding, Yorkshire, England; died 5 May 1404, (Yorkshire, England).

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Henry de Southill
    • Alt Birth: ~ 1428

    Henry married Jane Fitzwilliam. Jane (daughter of William Fitzwilliam, Knight and Maude de Cromwell) was born ~ 1376, Tattershall, Lincolnshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  22. 143.  Jane Fitzwilliam was born ~ 1376, Tattershall, Lincolnshire, England (daughter of William Fitzwilliam, Knight and Maude de Cromwell).
    Children:
    1. 71. Beatrice Sothill was born 1375-1385, Batley, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1430, Givendale, Ripon, Harrogate, Yorkshire, England.
    2. Henry Sothill was born 0___ 1392, Stokerstone, Suffolk, England; died 4 May 1404.

  23. 1816.  Richard Tempest, MP, Knight was born 0___ 1356, Bracewell, Yorkshire, England; died Bef 30 Sep 1428, Wakefield, West Riding, Yorkshire, England.

    Notes:

    Sir Richard Tempest had an illustrious career involving battles with the Scots and French and extensive administrative responsibilities in the north of England under five kings of England, from Edward III to Henry VI. As noted above, he was co-warden of Berwick Castle with Sir Thomas Talbot, presumably his mother's brother, in 1385-86. (This could not have been her father, since he was dead by 1366, History of Whalley, v. 1, p. 500.)

    Richard's birth year is well established through his testimony in the Scrope and Grosvenor trial, when he said in October 1386 that he was 30 years old (N. Harris Nicholas, Scrope and Grosvenor Controversy, 1832, v. 1, pp. 198-99, v. 2, pp. 473-74; Nicholas suggests two possibilities for Richard's father, both of which are clearly wrong). He made his will 26 August 1427 and it was proved by his son Roger 30 September 1430 (Testamenta Eboracensia I, hereafter Test. Ebor., Surtees Society Publications v. 4, p. 412-13). As evidence for his death in 1428, EBT cites non-payment of an annuity due to him "because he is dead" (quoting Duchy of Lancaster Minister's Accounts No. 8352, Bdle. 524) and accounts of the Priory of Finchale for May 1429 to May 1430 (Surtees Society Publications vol. 6, p. cciii). (J. S. Roskell, The House of Commons 1386-1421, 1992, pp. 573-575, has a biography which incorrectly identifies Richard's father as his grandfather, John, and does not identify his wife.)

    As to who Richard's wife was, there is great confusion in the literature. She is identified as Margaret in his will and in an inscription in a window in Bracewell church viewed by Dodsworth in 1645 (Dodsw. 88, f. 31, printed in the appendix to Dodsworth's Yorkshire Church Notes, Yorkshire Archaeological Society Record Series, v. 34, p. 242: "Orate pro Domino Ricardo Tempest et Domina Margareta consorte sua"). Several Burke's publications have almost identical formulations: "said to have married Isabel, widow of John Grassus, of Gemelyn, and also Margaret, daughter and co-heiress of Robert de Stainforth" (Landed Gentry, 1925, p. 1724, 1937, p. 2214, 1972, p. 886; Family Records, 1897, p. 584; Peerage & Baronetage, 107th ed., 2003, v. 2, p. 2384, sub Londonderry). Joseph Foster's 1875 edition of Glover's Yorkshire visitation of 1584-85 and St. George's visitation of 1612 shows Richard's wife as Isabella, sister and heir of John Gras of Studley, while Dugdale's Visitation of Yorkshire 1665-66 (1899, J. W. Clay, ed., pp. 120-21) says "believed to have married Margaret, dau. and ch. of Robt. de Staynford, of Gyggleswick (some say Isabel, wid. of John le Gras)." R. Surtees, History and Antiquities of Durham (1820, p. 327) says she was "Isabel, daughter and heir of John le Gras, of Studley, co. York, (otherwise stated to be Isabel, daughter and heir of Sir Hugh Clitherow, Knt. by Elizabeth, daughter and heir of John le Gras)." Whitaker's History and Antiquities of the Deanery of Craven (3rd ed. 1878, opposite p. 96) confuses things further, showing Richard's wife as Isabel de Clitheroe, daughter of his step-mother Isabel de Gras by her second husband Sir Hugh de Clitheroe. Similar confusions exist in the Tempest chart in Foster's Pedigrees of the County Families of Yorkshire. In a note to Richard's will in Test. Ebor. I, the editor says his wife was Isabel, widow of John le Gras, without documentation (p. 413).

    An Appendix to the Memorials of Fountains Abbey (Surtees Society, v. 67, 1876, p. 312), "A Genealogical and Biographical Memoir of the Lords of Studley, in Yorkshire," by John Richard Walbran, discussing Sir John le Gras says "his only daughter and heiress, Isabel le Gras, married, according to the usually received account, Sir Richard Tempest . . . who thus became lord of Studley and other possessions, jure uxoris; but there appears to be some confusion, or perhaps deficiency in this statement. It has been said, though we have seen no proofs of the assertion, that this Isabel was the daughter and heiress of Sir Hugh Clitheroe, by Elizabeth his wife, daughter and heiress of Sir John le Gras." Apparently, Walbran has confused Sir Richard Tempest with his uncle Richard (see below). In recent postings on the Internet, Richard's wife is often identified as Isabel Leygard, perhaps a corruption of le Gras.

    EBT notes that Richard's wife has been identified as Isabel, widow of John Grassus, citing a pedigree by G. C. Brooke, Somerset Herald at the College of Arms 1 C.R. 92, also taking note of the footnote in Test. Ebor., and citing British Library Add. MS. 18011, f. 188 (also see Harleian 4630, f. 388). She goes on to say, "No evidence has yet been found to prove this marriage & no John Grassus or Graas appears forthcoming to suit the dates." We agree, we have not found substantial evidence for this marriage either, other than the many secondary sources cited above, all of which may have been copying from each other (they may have gotten this idea from EBT, who cited the College of Arms pedigree in an earlier work, Pedigree of Tempest, of Bracewell, Broughton-in-Craven, Bowling, Tong, etc., 1890, Family History Library film 702215).

    In Tempest Pedigrees EBT prefers Margaret Stainforth (or Staynforth), sister or daughter of Robert de Stainforth, as the likely wife. As principal evidence for this relationship, she cites Robert Stainforth's will. This will is in the York Registry of Wills at the Borthwick Institute of the University of York (volume 1, ff. 56 and 25, the sheets of this volume were disarranged prior to binding, so that the will begins on f. 56 and is completed on f. 25). Reference to it may be found in the Index of Wills in the York Registry, YASRS v. 6, p. 158 (it is not in Testamenta Eboracensia). We have obtained a copy of the will from the Borthwick Institute and are grateful to the staff there for providing us a translation. The will was made 16 March 1390-91 and was apparently probated on the last day of that month. Robert bequeaths animals and household utensils to his daughters Margaret and Agnes, but as EBT observes, fails to indicate whether they were married. He goes on: "Also I bequeath to the daughter of Richard Tempest 100 marks at her marriage if she should be married, or to the daughters of the said Richard Tempest or to the sons of the same." Then: "Also I bequeath the residue of all my goods not bequeathed to Richard Tempest knight and to the abbot of Sallay so that they shall ordain and dispose for my soul as is best." He names Richard Tempest, knight, and John de Standon executors. While not absolutely dispositive, we agree with EBT that this is substantial evidence for the marriage of Richard Tempest and Margaret Stainforth.

    EBT goes on to present other evidence for this marriage. Richard's son Roger named a daughter Margaret. More importantly, property at Staynforth and Gigglesworth, formerly in the possession of the Stainforths, was owned by Richard's son Robert (EBT cites Yorkshire Archaeological Journal, v. 12, p. 114, which is a demise 12 September 1419 by Robert Tempest of Stayneforth to William Finch and others of various manors and lands, "late held by Thos. de Scheffeld of Braythwell," there is no mention of these properties having been owned by the Stainforths, although EBT shows this from other sources). Furthermore, Robert's son Richard was "of Staynforth" in September 1437 (EBT cites Lanc. Plea Roll 33 Lent 3 Ed 4, m. 33, which we have not found but note that 3 Edward IV was 1463-4, so if this reference is correct, it must be retrospective). There are also other documented associations of Richard Tempest with Robert de Stainforth, as noted by EBT: "In Aug 1382, Robt de Staynforth was witness to a grant from John son of Sir Richard Tempest of Studley to Sir Ric. Tempest of Bracewell, of land in Pathorne (Ric: Gascoignes MSS) & was associated with Sir Ric. Tempest in a suit over land there & in Settle (Assize Ro. 1500. m. 10). In 1389, Robt Staynforth was to have gone with Sir Richard to Berwick, but was too infirm & aged to go (Pat Ro Cal 1385-89, p. 267)." We have verified only the last of these references.
    A recent book on the Stainforths by Peter Stainforth, Not Found Wanting (Knebworth, Hertfordshire, Able Publishing, 2003) references this will (p. 21, online at http://www.stainforth-history.co.uk/excerpts/yorksavon.html). The book definitively identifies Robert Stainforth's daughter as the wife of Richard Tempest, and says Margaret's daughter, Margaret, was the daughter of Richard Tempest who was to have received 100 marks as a marriage portion. We do not know the source of this identification and believe that the author may have inferred too much.

    EBT notes that a source for the belief that Richard's wife was somehow related to the le Gras family may be the fact that Richard's great uncle, Sir Richard Tempest was married to Isabel, daughter of Sir John le Gras of Studley.
    One of the most fascinating tidbits about Richard's wife is the following notation by EBT: "During the time Sir Ric. Tempest was the warden of Roxburgh Castle, between April 1385 & April 1386, the Scots carried off his papers & his wife." EBT's citation for this is "Exch: Q.R. Memorand: Mich: 1 Hen 4 Writs to Barons m. 9." We are grateful to Chris Phillips who has found this document for us in the National Archives at Kew. The reference is E 159/176, King's Remembrancer: Memoranda Rolls and Enrolment Books. Phillips's summary translation is as follows:
    Henry [IV] to the Treasurer and barons of the Exchequer. Recites that on 28 February 8 Richard II [1384/5] Thomas Swynburn and Richard Tempest knights bound themselves by indenture made between the king of the one part and them of the other to guard at their peril the Castle of Roxburgh for a whole year starting on the day of the feast of Easter in the said year [2 April 1385] and taking from him for the said guard 4300 marks to be paid at terms limited in the said indenture. The part of [the indenture] which remained with the said Richard at the time that his wife was taken by our Scots enemies was accidentally lost as he says, so that it cannot be received to his account at our said Exchequeur unless he is helped by us.
    Unfortunately, we have not located additional sources that would throw light on this alleged abduction or its outcome.

    EBT shows five sons for Richard and Margaret: Sir Piers, Sir Robert, John, Richard, and Roger. She gives varying dates for their births at different places in the manuscript, Piers: "circa 1378" and "born say 1382"; Robert: "born say 1385"; Roger: "circa 1390," "born say 1390," and "c. 1398"; she does not suggest birthdates for John and Richard. She also shows a single daughter, Isabel, also without birthdate. (Roger married Catherine Gilliot, founded the Tempests of Broughton, and is the ancestor of EBT's husband, Arthur Cecil Tempest.)
    Since Robert de Stainforth's will was dated April 1390, if Margaret was in fact Richard Tempest's wife, either she had returned from her ordeal as a captive of the Scots in 1385 or 1386 or she was a successor wife to the one who was abducted. So, while we believe that Margaret Stainforth was Richard's wife, we cannot be sure that he did not have a first wife.

    Sources

    Dugdale's Visitation of Yorkshire, J. W. Clay, ed. (Exeter: William Pollard & Co., The Printing Works., 1894)
    Page 120-1: "SIR RICHARD TEMPEST, of Bracewell, Waddington, and Broughton, M.P. Lancashire 1401, examined in the Scrope and Grosvenor dispute. Will 26 Aug. 1437, pr. 30 Sept. 1438 (Test. Eb., i, 412); believed to have married Margaret, dau. and ch. of Robt. de Staynford of Gyggleswick (some say Isabel, wid. of John le Gras). They had issue--"
    http://www.historyofparliamentonline.org/volume/1386-1421/member/tempest-sir-richard-1356-14278
    TEMPEST WIVES AND DAUGHTERS IN THE LATE MEDIEVAL PERIOD. PART 3, BY JOHN R. SCHUERMAN AND DOUGLAS HICKLING - http://www.medievalgenealogy.org.uk/families/tempest/tempest3.shtml
    http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=23114633&pid=1405021801
    http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=7179083&pid=-564352885

    Birth:
    The Ancient Parish of BRACEWELL

    [Transcribed information mainly from the early 1820s]

    "BRACEWELL, a parish-town, in the east-division of Staincliffe, liberty of Clifford's-Fee; 2 miles E. of Gisburn, 5 miles from Colne, (Lanc.) 9 from Skipton, 11 from Burnley, (Lanc.) 50 from York. Pop. 176. The Church is a vicarage, dedicated to St. Michael, in the deanry of Craven, value, ~ą2. 9s. 9˝d. p.r. ą60. Patron, Lord Grantham.
    "The Vicarage House," Dr. Whitaker observes, and very justly, "is a disgrace to the parish and Church of England, a miserable thatched cottage of two rooms only, floored with clay, and open to the roof. --History of Craven.

    Here is the ruin of an old Hall, built of brick, probably about the time of Henry VII. or VIII. and was formerly the residence of the ancient family of the Tempests. North of this are the remains of a still older house of stone, in which is an apartment called "King Henry's Parlour"; undoubtedly one of the retreats of Henry VI. --Whitaker's Craven."

    "CROOKS HOUSE, a farm-house in the township of Stock, and parish of Bracewell; 10 miles from Skipton."
    "STOCK, in the township and parish of Bracewell, east-division of Staincliffe, liberty of Clifford's-Fee; 2˝ miles E. of Gisburn, 5˝ miles from Colne, (Lanc.) 9˝ from Skipton."

    Source: http://www.genuki.org.uk/big/eng/YKS/WRY/Bracewell/

    Richard married Margaret Stainforth ~ 1377. [Group Sheet]


  24. 1817.  Margaret Stainforth
    Children:
    1. 908. Piers Tempest was born 0___ 1378, Bracewell, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1417, Wakefield, St. John, West Riding, Yorkshire, England.
    2. Robert Tempest was born 0___ 1382, Bracewell, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1428, West Riding, Yorkshire, England.

  25. 1822.  Nicholas Harington, Knight, Baron was born ~ 1343, Farleton, Melling, Lancashire, England (son of John Harington, Knight, 2nd Baron Harington and (Joan de Birmingham), Baroness of Harington); died 8 Feb 1404, Farleton, Melling, Lancashire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Member of Parliament
    • Occupation: Sheriff of Lancaster

    Notes:

    Biography

    "Nicholas Harington (or Haverington), Knt., Knight of the Shire for Lancashire, Sheriff of Lancashire, master forester of Quernmore, co. Lancaster, third son, born about 1344 (proved his age in 1365). He was heir in 1361 to his older brother, Thomas Haverington, by which he inherited the manors of Farleton (in Melling), Bolton-le-Moors, Heath Charnock, Aighton, etc., co. Lancaster and Farleton in Kendale, co. Westmorland.

    He married (lst) before September 1369, Isabel English, daughter and heiress of William English, Knt., of Appleby, Little Strickland, and Hasket, Westmorland, Knight of the Shire for Westmoreland, by Margaret, daughter of Richard le Brun. She was born about 1345.

    They had three sons, William, Knt., James, Knt., and Nicholas, and five daughters,

    Isabel (first), Margaret (wife of Richard Huddleston, Knt.),
    Agnes (wife of Richard Sherburne),
    Mary (wife of John Redman), and Isabel (second). Isabel was co-heiress c. 1369 to her uncle, Robert le Brun, by which she inherited the manor of Drumburgh (in Bowness), Bowness, Cardurnock, etc., and a one-third share in the manors of Bothel (in Torpenhow), Beaumont, and Brunskaith, co. Cumberland.

    In 1369 he went to Ireland in the retinue of William de Windsor, Knt., where he fought for the next two years. In 1373 he and William Curwen, knt. (husband of his wife's aunt, Ellen le Brun) caused major devastation on the estates at Beaumont, co. Cumberland of Ralph de Dacre, Lord Dacre.

    In 1375 he was implicated in the murder of Lord Dacre, for which action he was excommunicated by the Archbishop of York.

    He married (2nd) before August 1397 (date of fine) Joan (or Jennet) Venables, widow successively of Thomas de Lathom, Knt. (died 1382), of Lathom, Knowsley, and Huyton, co. Lancaster, and Roger Fazakerley, and daughter of Hugh Venables, of Kinderton, Cheshire. They had no issue.

    Sir Nicholas Harington died shortly before 8 February 1404." (Ref: 21 July 2010 posting of Douglas Richardson on soc.genealogy.medieval)

    More information about Sir Nicholas can be found at the History of Parliament online site here http://www.historyofparliamentonline.org/volume/1386-1421/member/haryngton-sir-nicholas-1344-1404

    Sources

    Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study In Colonial And Medieval Families, 2nd Edition pg 265. http://books.google.com/books?id=kjme027UeagC&pg=RA1-PA10&lpg=RA1-PA10&dq=%22Plantagenet+ancestry%22+Isabel|Elizabeth+Harrington+Stanley&source=bl&ots=quJpHA1imi&sig=MN-L2bh0ZrxX3gah_XQhqRpkRrc&hl=en&sa=X&ei=k0saUuzdCcin2AXxtIDYBg&ved=0CEQQ6AEwAg#v=onepage&q=%22John%20Stanley%22%20Isabel|Elizabeth%20Harrington&f=false
    Acknowledgements

    *

    more ...

    Constituency Dates

    LANCASHIRE 1372
    LANCASHIRE Oct. 1377
    LANCASHIRE 1379
    LANCASHIRE 1386
    LANCASHIRE 1402

    Family and Education

    b.c.1344, 3rd s. of Sir John Haryngton† (d. 1 Aug. 1359) of Farleton in Lonsdale by his w. Katherine (d. 7 Aug. 1359), da. and coh. of Sir Adam Banaster (d.c.1329) of Farleton in Kendal and Margaret Holland of Chorley, Bolton-le-Sands and Aighton, Lancs.; bro. and h. of Robert (d. Feb. 1361) and Thomas (d. Aug. 1361). m. (1) by Sept. 1369, Isabel (b.1344/5), da. and coh. of Sir William English (d. 3 Aug. 1369) of Oakington, Cambs. and Little Strickland, Westmld., 3s. inc. Sir James*; (2) by Aug. 1397, Joan, da. of Hugh Venables of Kinderton, Cheshire, wid. of Sir Thomas Lathom (d.c.1382) of Huyton and Lathom, Lancs. and Roger Fazakerley. Kntd. by Apr. 1369.1

    Offices Held

    Commr. of array, Lancs. Dec. 1368, Aug. 1402 (bis);2 to make arrests, Yorks. Feb. 1375, Nov. 1377, Lancs. Dec. 1397; of oyer and terminer, Yorks. May 1375 (murder at Sedbergh); inquiry, Westmld. Apr. 1378 (unlawful assemblies), Lancs. Feb. 1383 (shipwreck),3 July 1391; to levy troops and lead them against the Scots Mar. 1380;4 hold a special assize July 1398.5

    Sheriff, Lancs. 6 Mar. 1379-14 Mar. 1384.6

    Master forester of Quernmore, Lancs. for John of Gaunt, duke of Lancaster, 21 Feb. 1380.7

    J.p. Lancs. July 1394, Mar. 1400, Feb. 1402.8

    Biography

    By marrying the heiress to property in Chorley, Bolton-le-Sands, Broughton, Whalley and Aighton, Sir John Haryngton was able greatly to extend his own holdings in Lancashire, which comprised the manor of Farleton in Lonsdale and land in Aldingham. His wife also brought him a sizeable estate in Westmorland, centred upon the manor of Farleton in Kendal, so he came to enjoy considerable influence as a rentier. Not surprisingly, Sir John served on a variety of royal commissions, as well as occupying a seat on the Lancashire bench and representing the county three times in Parliament. He and his wife died within a week of each other in August 1359, being succeeded by their eldest son, Robert. Neither he nor his next brother, Thomas, survived for very long, and since both were childless the Haryngton estates passed, in August 1361, to Nicholas, the third of Sir John’s four sons. Then aged about 17, Nicholas became a ward of John of Gaunt, who granted all his rights of custody and marriage to Sir James Pickering*. The boy had need of a powerful guardian to resist attempts by Sir William Ferrers to gain control of his inheritance in Bolton-le-Sands, where his aunt, a co-parcener of the manor, had already been coerced into relinquishing her title. Despite his persistence, however, Ferrers proved unsuccessful, and in October 1365 Nicholas obtained seisin of all the property left by his parents. He did not choose to remain at home for very long, and in October 1367 he obtained permission from the King to leave England from the port of Dover with a servant and cash to the value of ten marks. His choice of attorneys was approved by the Crown three months later, although he must have been back in England by the following December, when he served on his first royal commission. In April 1369, as a newly made knight, Sir Nicholas prepared to set out for Ireland in the retinue of Sir William Windsor, under whose banner he fought for the next two years at least. Another member of the expedition was his former guardian, Sir James Pickering, who, as chief justice of Ireland, was responsible for the implementation of some highly dubious financial practices.9

    We do not know the precise date of Sir Nicholas’s marriage to Isabel, the younger daughter of Sir William English, a wealthy landowner with estates in Cumberland, Westmorland, Cambridgeshire and Huntingdonshire, but it evidently took place during the latter’s lifetime. Sir William died in August 1369, having settled most of his property upon William Restwold, the son and heir of his elder daughter, Julia. Even so, farmland in the Cambridgeshire village of Oakington and houses in Carlisle did revert to Isabel; and it may well be that the holdings in Torpenhow and Bothel, Cumberland, which Sir Nicholas later occupied, were also part of her inheritance. By now a figure of some consequence in the north-west, Sir Nicholas first entered Parliament in 1372, being returned by the electors of Lancashire on five occasions altogether. Yet his increasing involvement in local administration did not prevent him from disregarding the law if it suited his purposes to do so. In 1373, for example, he and (Sir) William Curwen*, at the head of a large force of armed men, caused major devastation on Ralph, Lord Dacre’s estates at Beaumont near Carlisle by ransacking buildings, stealing cattle and carrying off quantities of valuable goods. A royal commission of oyer and terminer was, indeed, set up to investigate the affair (which can now be seen as just one event in a rapidly escalating vendetta), but nothing was done to discipline the offenders. Having so far escaped scot-free, Sir Nicholas pursued his grudge to its logical conclusion, and was personally implicated in the murder of Lord Dacre, who died childless and intestate, in August 1375, almost certainly at the hands of his own brother, Sir Hugh, and our Member, his accomplice. Although both men were presented for the murder at Preston in the following year, having already been excommunicated by the archbishop of York, neither suffered much in the way of long-term retribution. Indeed, not long afterwards Sir Nicholas was accepted by the Crown as a suitable mainpernor for Sir Walter Urswyk† on his assumption of the lease of certain confiscated estates. His appearance, in April 1378, on a commission of oyer and terminer set up to investigate attacks on Sir James Pickering is of particular interest, especially as the latter had agreed to stand bail for Sir Hugh Dacre at the time of his temporary imprisonment in the Tower. Haryngton’s former misdemeanours were apparently forgotten altogether by the spring of 1379, when he became sheriff of Lancashire, a post then in the gift of John of Gaunt, who awarded him letters of pardon soon afterwards. The following year saw his appointment as master forester of Quernmore, again as a result of Gaunt’s patronage; and there is every reason to believe that the duke had intervened personally to protect him during this difficult period. His circle of friends included such other notable adherents of the house of Lancaster as Sir Adam Hoghton† and his son, Sir Richard*, for whom he went surety in August 1384 during the course of litigation over revenues from the manor of Wheelton. He also acted as a feoffee at this time for his former commander, Sir William Windsor, who settled property in Dorset upon him in trust. Together with Sir Richard Hoghton (his future colleague in the Parliament of 1402), Sir Nicholas was commissioned to take depositions from gentry in the north-west concerning the respective claims of Sir Robert Grosvenor and Lord Scrope to bear the same coat of arms, although he was apparently not himself called upon to give evidence. He and Hoghton were by now members of an informal advisory council responsible for the smooth running of Gaunt’s properties in the north. Their colleagues included Sir James Pickering and Sir Robert Urswyk* (whose daughter, Ellen, married Haryngton’s second son); and although they were technically subordinate to the duchy council in London, this small group of knights enjoyed considerable power in Lancashire, where they were the leaders of the ducal affinity.10

    The death, in May 1391, of John Bailey, a feudal tenant of the Haryngtons, enabled Sir Nicholas to assert his rights of wardship, and although Bailey’s grandson, Richard Shirburne*, was only ten years old, he promptly married the boy to another of his charges, the young Agnes Stanley, securing a settlement upon them of the Shirburne estates. Not long afterwards Sir Nicholas took a seat on the Lancashire bench. Once again, however, he manifestly considered himself to be above the law; and, unconstrained by either the demands of his new position or his obligations to Gaunt, he repeatedly poached game and held illicit hunting parties in the parks of the duchy. Perhaps he already knew that the duke would turn a blind eye to such comparatively minor offences on the part of an otherwise loyal retainer; at all events, in 1393, he secured a full pardon from his patron and continued to hunt just as before. A second pardon, this time for both the unrepentant Sir Nicholas and his younger son, James, appears to have been issued in 1397, so Gaunt must have viewed his activities with tolerance. By this date, Sir Nicholas had decided to remarry, taking as his second wife the twice-widowed Joan Venables. A somewhat notorious character, Joan was said to have neglected and abused her first husband, Sir Thomas Lathom, while he lay dying, and to have lived openly in the same house with her lover, Roger Fazakerley. Having consigned Sir Thomas to a speedy burial without ceremony or mourners, she married Fazakerley, retaining a substantial share of the Lathom estates in Huyton and Knowsley. She and Sir Thomas had produced four daughters, one of whom was betrothed, in, or before, 1397, to Sir Nicholas’s third son and namesake, bringing as her marriage portion part of the manor of Huyton which she continued to hold during her mother’s lifetime. Having thus made sure that his wife’s property would remain securely in the hands of his own descendants, Sir Nicholas set out, in 1400, to find a bride for his young grandson, John, selecting Thomas Hornby’s daughter, Margaret, as the most suitable candidate. Sir Nicholas evidently took up residence at Knowsley, for in May 1401 he became involved in a lawsuit over the abduction of one of his household servants there. He and his wife were also at this time trying to recover possession of land in Roby, which was, indeed, awarded to them at the Lancaster assizes. A few months later, in the following November, Nicholas Haryngton the younger and his brother, James, were both retained as esquires by Henry IV at fees of ą10 p.a. and ą20 p.a. respectively. Sir Nicholas performed his own final service to the house of Lancaster in the autumn of 1402, when he entered the House of Commons for the fifth time. He died before 8 Feb. 1404, leaving estates in Westmorland, Lancashire and an unspecified part of Yorkshire, all of which passed to his eldest son, Sir William.11

    Nicholas' 6-generation pedigree... http://histfam.familysearch.org/ahnentafel.php?personID=I55137&tree=EuropeRoyalNobleHous&parentset=0&generations=6

    Note: Wikipedia does not cite his kinship to Sir John...DAH

    *

    Nicholas married Isabella English, Baroness of Harington ~ 1363, Hornby Castle, Hornby, Lancaster LA2 8LA, UK. Isabella (daughter of William English, Knight and Margaret le Brun) was born 1348-1351, Cumbria, England; died 0___ 1397. [Group Sheet]


  26. 1823.  Isabella English, Baroness of Harington was born 1348-1351, Cumbria, England (daughter of William English, Knight and Margaret le Brun); died 0___ 1397.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Isabella L'Engles
    • Alt Death: 21 Aug 1400, Lancashire, England

    Notes:

    Isabella Harrington (l'Engleys)
    Also Known As: "English"
    Birthdate: circa 1351
    Birthplace: Little Strickland, Cumbria, England
    Death: Died August 21, 1400 in Lancashire, England
    Immediate Family:
    Daughter of Sir William l'Engleys and Lady Margaret Le Brun
    Wife of Sir Nicholas Harrington, Lord of Farleton
    Mother of Isabella Tunstall; Nicholas Harrington; Sir William Harrington, of Hornby; Sir James Harrington "Esquire of Westby Lane"; Mary Harrington and 5 others
    Sister of Juliana l'Engleys
    Half sister of Isabella English, Lady
    Managed by: Private User
    Last Updated: August 23, 2016

    About Isabella Harrington
    ID: I15250

    Name: Isabel ENGLISH

    Given Name: Isabel

    Surname: ENGLISH

    Sex: F

    Birth: 1344-1345

    Death: Bef 1397

    _UID: CE8AD904413545F88CC289E6826A64675C9C

    Change Date: 27 Jan 2000 at 20:37

    Father: William ENGLISH b: Abt 1326 in Lancashire, England

    Mother: Margaret LE BRUN b: <1318> in Bownwys, Cumberland, England

    Marriage 1 Nicholas DE HARINGTON b: 1345 in Farleton, Lancashire, England

    Married:

    Change Date: 2 Mar 1999

    Children

    William HARINGTON b: 1373 in Hornby, Lancashire, England
    James HARRINGTON b: Abt 1375 in Blackrod, Lancashire, England
    Isabel \ Margaret HARINGTON b: Abt 1364 in Hornby, Lancaster, Eng
    Eleanor HARINGTON b: 1370 in Brearley, Yorkshire, England
    ***
    Reportedly an ancestress of George Washington,1st US President: http://washington.ancestryregister.com/HAVERINGTONLineage00006.htm

    JUST A NOTE : all the accending Tree information was gathered from the Smith-Goodale-Caldwell family tree on Ancestry.com I have attempted to copy accurately, however I may have made mistakes in transfering, so I would suggest going th that site and checking for yourself. I am only copyint the info here, and have done none of the research. Any errors in research belong to the owners of the S-G-C tree.

    Children:
    1. Isabel Harington was born 0___ 1364, Brearley, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1402, Tunstall, Lancashire, England.
    2. William Harington, Knight was born ~ 1365, Hornby Castle, Hornby, Lancaster LA2 8LA, UK; died 22 May 1441.
    3. 911. Agnes Harrington was born ~ 1375, England; died 3 Nov 1444, Lancashire, England.
    4. Elizabeth Harington was born Abt 1379, Aldingham, Cumbria, England; died , Anglesey, Wales.


Generation: 12

  1. 2048.  John de Bolling was born ~1232, (Bradford) England (son of Robert de Bolling and unnamed spouse); died 1323, (Bradford) England.

    Notes:

    Generation No. 142

    John De Bolling (II) [142] Robert D. Bolling [141] William De Bolling (III) [140] William De Bolling (II) [139] William De Bolling [138] John De Bolling [137] Tristam De Bolling [136] William De Boulogne [135] Eustace II De Boulogne (=Mary of Scotland) [134] Mathilda Van Leuven (=Eustache I, Count of Boulogne)[133] Gerberga of Lower Lorraine [132] Charles, Duke of Lower Lorraine [131] King Louis IV of France (=Gerberga of Saxony) [130] Charles III, the Simple (=Eadgifu of England) [129] Louis II, the Stammerer (=Adelaide of Paris) [128] Charles II, the Bald (=Ermentrude) [127] Louis I, the Pious (=Judith of Bavaria) [126] Charlemagne the Great (=Hildegard) [1-125]

    John De Bolling (II) was born 1232 in Bolling Hall, Bradford, Yorkshire, England, and died 1323 in Yorkshire, England.

    Children: William De Bolling (IV)

    John married unnamed spouse (Bradford) England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 2049.  unnamed spouse
    Children:
    1. 1024. William de Bolling was born 1258, (Bradford) England; died 1316, (Bradford) England.

  3. 2208.  Hugh Bigod, Knight, 3rd Earl of NorfolkHugh Bigod, Knight, 3rd Earl of Norfolk was born ~ 1182, Thetford, Norfolk, England (son of Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk and Ida de Tosny, Countess of Norfolk); died 18 Feb 1225, (Norfolk, England); was buried , Thetford Priory, Thetford, Norfolk, England.

    Notes:

    Hugh Bigod (c.?1182 - 1225) was a member of the powerful early Norman Bigod family and was for a short time the 3rd Earl of Norfolk.

    He was born c. 1182, the eldest son of Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk by his wife Ida de Tosny.

    Born c.?1182
    Died 18 February 1225
    Title 3rd Earl of Norfolk
    Tenure 1221-1225
    Nationality English
    Predecessor Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk
    Successor Roger Bigod, 4th Earl of Norfolk
    Spouse(s) Maud Marshal
    Parents Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk
    Ida de Tosny

    Career

    In 1215 he was one of the twenty-five sureties of Magna Carta of King John. He succeeded to his father’s estates (including Framlingham Castle) in 1221.

    Marriage & progeny

    In late 1206 or early 1207, Hugh married Maud Marshal (1192 - 27 March 1248), daughter of William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke (1147–1219), Marshal of England, by his wife Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke. They had four, or possibly five, children:

    Roger Bigod, 4th Earl of Norfolk (c.?1209-1270), died without progeny.
    Hugh Bigod (1211–1266), Justiciar of England. Married Joan de Stuteville, by whom he had issue.
    Isabel Bigod (c. 1212- 1250), married twice: Firstly to Gilbert de Lacy, by whom she had issue; Secondly to John FitzGeoffrey, Lord of Shere, by whom she had issue, including Maud FitzJohn, and Joan FitzJohn who married Theobald le Botiller, and from whom descended the Irish Earls of Ormond.
    Ralph Bigod (born c. 1215)
    Contrary to the assertion of Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots, there is no evidence for a fourth son called Simon Bigod. A man of that name appears as a witness to one of Earl Hugh's charters (Morris, HBII 2), but as the eighteenth name in a list of twenty, suggesting no close connection to the main branch of the family. He is also named among the knights who surrendered to King John at Framlingham Castle in 1216. He was a probably a descendant of Hugh or William Bigod, half-brothers to Earl Roger II Bigod.

    Death

    Hugh died on 18 Feb 1225. Very soon after Hugh's death, his widow Maud remarried William de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey.

    Hugh Bigod in fiction[edit]
    Hugh Bigod and his wife [Mahelt] are the main characters in Elizabeth Chadwick's To Defy a King. They also appear as secondary characters in novels chronicling their parents such as The Time of Singing (UK: Sphere, 2008) published in the USA as For the King's Favor; The Greatest Knight; and The Scarlet Lion.

    Ancestry

    [show]Ancestors of Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk

    References

    M. Morris, The Bigod Earls of Norfolk in the Thirteenth Century (Woodbridge, 2005)

    External links

    Cawley, Charles, Medieval Lands on Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk, Medieval Lands database, Foundation for Medieval Genealogy
    Cawley, Charles, Medieval Lands on Isabel Bigod, Medieval Lands database, Foundation for Medieval Genealogy

    Hugh married Maud Marshal, Countess of Norfolk 1206-1207, (Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales). Maud (daughter of William Marshal, Templar Knight, 1st Earl Pembroke and Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke) was born ~ 1193, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales; died 27 Mar 1248, Tintern Abbey, Chapel Hill, Monmouthshire, Wales. [Group Sheet]


  4. 2209.  Maud Marshal, Countess of Norfolk was born ~ 1193, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales (daughter of William Marshal, Templar Knight, 1st Earl Pembroke and Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke); died 27 Mar 1248, Tintern Abbey, Chapel Hill, Monmouthshire, Wales.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Countess of Surrey

    Notes:

    Maud Marshal, Countess of Norfolk, Countess of Surrey (1192 – 27 March 1248) was an Anglo-Norman noblewoman and a wealthy co-heiress of her father William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke, and her mother Isabel de Clare suo jure 4th Countess of Pembroke. Maud was their eldest daughter.[1] She had two husbands: Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk, and William de Warenne, 5th Earl of Surrey.

    Maud was also known as Matilda Marshal.

    Family

    Maud's birthdate is unknown other than being post 1191. She was the eldest daughter of William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke and Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke, herself one of the greatest heiresses in Wales and Ireland. Maud had five brothers and four younger sisters. She was a co-heiress to her parents' extensive rich estates.

    Her paternal grandparents were John FitzGilbert Marshal and Sybilla of Salisbury, and her maternal grandparents were Richard de Clare, 2nd Earl of Pembroke, known as "Strongbow", and Aoife of Leinster.

    Marriages and issue

    Sometime before Lent in 1207, Maud married her first husband, Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk. It was through this marriage between Maud and Hugh that the post of Earl Marshal of England came finally to the Howard (Dukes of Norfolk).[2] In 1215, Hugh was one of the twenty-five sureties of the Magna Carta. He came into his inheritance in 1221, thus Maud became the Countess of Norfolk at that time. Together they had five children:[3]

    Roger Bigod, 4th Earl of Norfolk (1209–1270) He died childless.
    Hugh Bigod (1212–1266), Justiciar of England. Married Joan de Stuteville, by whom he had issue.
    Isabel Bigod (c. 1215–1250), married firstly Gilbert de Lacy of Ewyas Lacy, by whom she had issue; she married secondly John Fitzgeoffrey, Lord of Shere, by whom she had issue.
    Ralph Bigod (born c. 1218, date of death unknown), married Bertha de Furnival, by whom he had one child.
    William Bigod
    Hugh Bigod died in 1225. Maud married her second husband, William de Warenne, 5th Earl of Surrey before 13 October that same year. Together they had two children:

    Isabella de Warenne (c. 1228 – before 20 September 1282), married Hugh d'Aubigny, 5th Earl of Arundel. She died childless.
    John de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey (August 1231 – c. 29 September 1304), in 1247 married Alice de Lusignan, a half-sister of King Henry III of England, by whom he had three children.
    Maud's second husband died in 1240. Her youngest son John succeeded his father as the 6th Earl of Surrey, but as he was a minor, Peter of Savoy, uncle of Queen consort Eleanor of Provence, was guardian of his estates.

    Death

    Maud died on 27 March 1248 at the age of about fifty-six years and was buried at Tintern Abbey with her mother, possibly her maternal grandmother, and two of her brothers.

    Maud Marshal in literature

    Maud Marshal is the subject of a novel by Elizabeth Chadwick, titled To Defy a King. In the book she is called Mahelt rather than Maud. She and her first husband Hugh Bigod appear as secondary characters in books chronicling their parents's lives: The Time of Singing (UK: Sphere, 2008) published in the USA as For the King's Favor; The Greatest Knight; and The Scarlet Lion.

    Ancestors[edit]
    [show]Ancestors of Maud Marshal

    References

    Jump up ^ Thomas B. Costain, The Magnificent Century, pp. 103-104
    Jump up ^ Costain, The Magnificent Century, pp. 103-104
    Jump up ^ Charles Cawley, Medieval Lands, Earls of Norfolk, Bigod
    Thomas B. Costain, The Magnificent Century, published by Doubleday and Company, Garden City, New York, 1959
    Charles Cawley, Medieval Lands, Earls of Pembroke
    thePeerage.com/p 10677.htm#106761

    Children:
    1. Ralph Bigod, Knight was born 1208, Thetford, Norfolk, England; died Bef 28 Jul 1260, Thetford, Norfolk, England.
    2. Isabelle Bigod, Countess of Essex was born ~ 1211, Thetford, Norfolk, England; died 0___ 1239.
    3. 1104. Hugh Bigod, Knight was born ~ 1215, Thetford, Norfolk, England; died Bef 7 May 1266.

  5. 2210.  Nicholas de Stuteville, Lord of Liddell was born <1191, Liddell, Cumbria, England; died 1233, Liddell, Cumbria, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Nicholas de Stuteville, Lord of Stuteville

    Notes:

    Nicholas de Stuteville, Lord Of Stuteville
    Also Known As: "Lord of Liddell", "Stoteville", "Estuteville"
    Birthdate: after 1191
    Birthplace: Liddell, Cumberland, , England
    Death: 1233
    Liddell, Cumberland, , England
    Immediate Family:
    Son of Nicholas de Stuteville, III and Gunnora d'Aubigny
    Husband of Joan de Stuteville (Peche) and Devorguilla of Galloway, I
    Father of Joan de Stuteville
    Occupation: Lord of baronies of Cottingham, Yorkshire and Liddel Strength, Cumberland
    Managed by: Private User
    Last Updated: November 15, 2017

    Immediate Family

    Joan de Stuteville (Peche)
    wife

    Devorguilla of Galloway, I
    wife

    Joan de Stuteville
    daughter

    Gunnora d'Aubigny
    mother

    Nicholas de Stuteville, III
    father

    William Abernethy, 1st of Saltoun
    stepson

    Hugh de Abernathy
    stepson

    Patrick de Abernethy
    stepson

    Robert de Gant, Lord of Folkingham
    stepfather

    Avice Gant
    stepsister

    Gilbert de Gaunt, Earl of Lincoln
    stepbrother
    About Nicholas de Stuteville, Lord Of Stuteville
    http://www.geneajourney.com/stutvll.html

    Sir Nicholas de Stuteville b abt 1182, of Liddel, Cumberland, England. He md Devorguilla of Galloway abt 1205, daughter of Roland of Galloway and Elena de Morville.

    Child of Nicholas de Stuteville and Devorguilla of Galloway was:

    Joan de Stuteville b abt 1215, of Liddel, Cumberland, England, d sh bef 6 Apr 1276. She md:

    [1] Sir Hugh Wake bef 29 May 1229, son of Baldwin Wake and Isabel de Briwere; and

    [2] Sir Hugh Bigod, Chief Justice of England, bef 5 Feb 1243/44, son of Sir Hugh Bigod, Earl of Norfolk, Magna Carta Surety, and Maud Marshal.

    https://fabpedigree.com/s010/f011477.htm
    http://washington.ancestryregister.com/STUTEVILLE00006.htm

    end of profile

    Nicholas married Joan Peche. [Group Sheet]


  6. 2211.  Joan Peche
    Children:
    1. 1105. Joan de Stuteville was born ~ 1220; died Bef 1244.

  7. 2240.  William Markenfield was born ~ 1222, Markenfield Hall, Ripon HG4 3AD, UK (son of Roger Markenfield and FNU Le Breton).

    Notes:

    About William de Markenfield

    William, as s/o Roger le Breton confirmed to Fountains all in his fee 1271 (CF 520), by 1275 he had been succeeded by his son Roger (CF 67) who presumably dsp. [J.C.B. Sharp, SGM, 5 May 2000]

    William married unnamed spouse. [Group Sheet]


  8. 2241.  unnamed spouse
    Children:
    1. 1120. William Markenfield was born ~ 1250, Markenfield Hall, Ripon HG4 3AD, UK; died 0___ 1308.

  9. 2250.  Noel le Boteler was born 1258, Wem, Shropshire, England (son of William le Boteler and Ankaret verch Griffith); died 14 Sep 1334, St. Mary, Devonshire, England.

    Noel married Agnes LNU 1284, St. Mary, Devonshire, England. Agnes was born 1269, St. Mary, Devonshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  10. 2251.  Agnes LNU was born 1269, St. Mary, Devonshire, England.
    Children:
    1. 1125. Agnes Boteler was born 1285, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England; died 1311, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England.

  11. 2254.  William de Ros, Knight was born ~ 1244, (Yorkshire) England (son of William de Ros, Knight and Lucy FitzPeter, Baroness de Ros); died 0May 1310, (Yorkshire) England; was buried , Greyfriars Abbey Church, King's Straith, York, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Residence: Ingmanthorpe, Yorkshire, England
    • Residence: Scotland
    • Residence: Gascony, France
    • Also Known As: Baron Ingmanthorpe
    • Also Known As: William de Roos

    Notes:

    Birth: unknown, England
    Death: May, 1310, England

    Knight of Ingmanthorpe in Kirk Deighton, Yorkshire, in right of his wife, of Greasley, Nottinghamshire, Ilkeston, Derbyshire.

    Third son of Sir William de Ros and Lucy FitzPeter, grandson of Sir Robert de Ros and Isabel of Scotland, Peter FitzHubert and Alice FitzRoger.

    Husband of Eustache FitzEalph, daughter and heiress of Sir Ralph FitzHugh of Greasley and the daughter of Sir John de la Haye, widow of Sir Nicholas de Cantelowe of Buckinghamshire. They married in 1268 and had one son and five daughters:
    * Sir William
    * Lucy
    * Isabel
    * Margaret
    * Ivette
    * Mary, the Prioress of Rosedale Priory

    Sir William served in Scotland 1257 and 1258, Gascony in 1294 and then Scotland in 1296. Sir William died shortly before May 28 1310, the date of his burial, and was buried beside his wife who died previously.

    The family surname is found both Ros and Roos.

    Family links:
    Parents:
    William de Ros (1192 - 1264)
    Lucy FitzPiers de Ros (1207 - 1267)

    Spouse:
    Eustache FitzRalph Ros

    Children:
    Ivetta De Ros Scrope (1285 - 1331)*

    Siblings:
    William de Ros (____ - 1310)
    Alice de Ros (____ - 1286)*
    Robert de Ros (1223 - 1285)*
    Lucy de Ros de Kyme (1230 - ____)*

    *Calculated relationship

    Burial:
    Greyfriars Abbey Church (Defunct)
    York
    York Unitary Authority
    North Yorkshire, England

    Created by: Anne Shurtleff Stevens
    Record added: Apr 02, 2013
    Find A Grave Memorial# 107743856

    Buried:
    Greyfriars Abbey Church (Defunct)

    William married Eustache FitzRalph 0___ 1268. Eustache was born , England; died Bef 1310, England; was buried , Greyfriars Abbey Church, King's Straith, York, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  12. 2255.  Eustache FitzRalph was born , England; died Bef 1310, England; was buried , Greyfriars Abbey Church, King's Straith, York, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Eustace FitzHugh

    Notes:

    Birth: unknown, England
    Death: unknown, England

    Eustache FitzHugh de Cantelowe de Ros

    Daughter and heiress of Sir Ralph FitzHugh of Greasley and the daughter of Sir John de la Haye. Of her own right of Greasley, Nottinghamshire, and of Ilkeston, Derbyshire.

    She was the wife of Sir Nicholas de Cantelowe of Buckinghamshire, who died after May 1262.

    Secondly wife of Sir William de Ros, third son of Sir William de Ros and Lucy FitzPeter. They married in 1268 and had one son and five daughters;
    * Sir William
    * Lucy
    * Isabel
    * Margaret
    * Ivette
    * Mary, the Prioress of Rosedale Priory

    Eustace was also the heir to her kinsman, Peter de la Haye of Arlington, Sussex. She died before her husband who died in May of 1310. They were buried together at GreyFriars, York.

    The family surname is found both Ros and Roos.

    Family links:
    Spouse:
    William de Ros (____ - 1310)*

    Children:
    Ivetta De Ros Scrope (1285 - 1331)*

    *Calculated relationship

    Burial:
    Greyfriars Abbey Church (Defunct)
    York
    York Unitary Authority
    North Yorkshire, England

    Created by: Anne Shurtleff Stevens
    Record added: Apr 03, 2013
    Find A Grave Memorial# 107756207

    Buried:
    Greyfriars Abbey Church (Defunct)

    Children:
    1. 1127. Lucia Ros was born ~ 1272; died ~ 1362.
    2. Isabel de Ros was born ~ 1276, Helmsley Castle, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1318, Cleveland, Yorkshire, England.
    3. Ivette de Ros was born 0___ 1285, Ingmanthorpe, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1331; was buried , Coverham Abbey, Coverham, Richmondshire, Yorkshire, England.

  13. 2292.  John de Clinton, I, KnightJohn de Clinton, I, Knight was born 0___ 1258, Amington, Staffordshire, England; died 0___ 1315.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Constable of Wallingford Castle
    • Also Known As: 1st Baron Clinton
    • Also Known As: John Clinton
    • Also Known As: Lord Clinton

    Notes:

    John de Clinton, 1st Baron Clinton (died 1315) was an English peer.

    Clinton was a knight who had served in the Scottish and French wars. He was summoned to Parliament as Lord Clinton in February 1299. Clinton was Knight of the Shire for Warwickshire between 1300 and 1301 and Constable of Wallingford Castle in 1308. He died in 1315 and was succeeded by his grandson John.

    His descendants include the Earls of Lincoln and Dukes of Newcastle, including the first Duke, who served as Prime Minister of Great Britain.

    References

    Kidd, Charles, Williamson, David (editors). Debrett's Peerage and Baronetage (1990 edition). New York: St Martin's Press, 1990.
    Leigh Rayment's Peerage Pages [self-published source][better source needed]

    Barons Clinton (1298) source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baron_Clinton

    John de Clinton, 1st Baron Clinton (d. 1315)
    John de Clinton, 2nd Baron Clinton (d. c. 1335)
    John de Clinton, 3rd Baron Clinton (d. 1398)
    William de Clinton, 4th Baron Clinton (1378–1431)
    John de Clinton, 5th Baron Clinton (1410–1464)
    John Clinton, 6th Baron Clinton (1431–1488)
    John Clinton, 7th Baron Clinton (1471–1514)
    Thomas Clinton, 8th Baron Clinton (1490–1517)
    Edward Clinton, 9th Baron Clinton (1512–1585) (created Earl of Lincoln in 1572)

    Birth:
    Amington and Stonydelph formerly formed one "township" and were part of the ancient parish of Tamworth.[2] Amington, now in Staffordshire, was previously part of the county of Warwickshire; the county boundary between Staffordshire and Warwickshire formerly running along Tamworth high street.

    source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amington

    John married Ida Odingsells, Baroness of Clinton ~1290. Ida (daughter of William de Odingsells and Ela Fitzwalter, Countess of Warwick) was born ~1275, Maxstoke, Warwick, England; was christened , Amington, Warwick, England; died Aft 1 Mar 1321. [Group Sheet]


  14. 2293.  Ida Odingsells, Baroness of Clinton was born ~1275, Maxstoke, Warwick, England; was christened , Amington, Warwick, England (daughter of William de Odingsells and Ela Fitzwalter, Countess of Warwick); died Aft 1 Mar 1321.
    Children:
    1. 1146. John Clinton, II, 2nd Lord Clinton was born Abt 1299, Maxstoke, Warwick, England; died 1 Apr 1335, Maxstoke, Warwick, England.
    2. Joan Clinton was born 1300, Coleshill, Warwickshire, England; died Aft 1371, (Warwickshire) England.

  15. 272.  John de Calverley was born ~ 1270, Calverley, Yorkshire, England; died , (Calverley, Yorkshire, England).

    John married Joanna Warde ~ 1300, (Calverley, Yorkshire, England). Joanna (daughter of Simon Warde and Clarice LNU) was born 0___ 1304, Yorkshire, England; died 7 Sep 1362, Hertfordshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  16. 273.  Joanna Warde was born 0___ 1304, Yorkshire, England (daughter of Simon Warde and Clarice LNU); died 7 Sep 1362, Hertfordshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Joan de Rawdon de Berewick
    • Also Known As: Joanna Warder

    Children:
    1. 136. Walter de Calverley, Sr., Knight was born ~ 1311, Calverley, Yorkshire, England; died Bef 18 Dec 1404, (Calverley, Yorkshire, England).

  17. 274.  John de Dineley

    John married unnamed spouse. [Group Sheet]


  18. 275.  unnamed spouse
    Children:
    1. 137. Margery de Dineley was born ~ 1310, Downham, Yorkshire, England; died , Calverley, Yorkshire, England.

  19. 276.  Roger Bigod, Knight was born ~ 1300, Stockton, Norfolk, England (son of John Bigod and Isabel LNU); died 17 Apr 1362, Settrington, Yorkshire, England.

    Roger married Joan LNU ~ 1329, (Stockton, Norfolk, England). Joan was born ~ 1304, (Stockton, Norfolkshire, England); died , (Stockton, Norfolkshire, England). [Group Sheet]


  20. 277.  Joan LNU was born ~ 1304, (Stockton, Norfolkshire, England); died , (Stockton, Norfolkshire, England).
    Children:
    1. 138. John Bigod, Knight was born ~ 1334, Settrington, Yorkshire, England; died 13 Nov 1388, Settrington, Yorkshire, England; was buried , All Saints Church, Settrington, Yorkshire, England.

  21. 280.  Andrew Markenfield was born ~ 1310, Markenfield Hall, Ripon, Yorkshire, England (son of John Markenfield and Eleanor LNU); died 0___ 1357, (Markenfield Hall, Ripon, Yorkshire, England).

    Notes:

    Sir Andrew Markenfield

    Marriage: Unknown
    bullet Information about this person:

    • Family Background. 1060
    The first person of the name Markenfield found in records was Simâon de Markenfield, whose son Roger held one carucate of land in Monketon, of Henry de Hamerton, 29 Edward I. Edward I, in the thirty-third year of his reign, granted to Roger and his brother John free warren in all their demesne lands in Markenfield, Yorkshire. Roger was married to Maud, who gave the monks of Fountains one acre of land, after the death of Roger.

    Roger's heir was William, whose heir was Sir John de Markenfield, who was returned as lord of the manors of Markington and Erryholme in Richmondshire, and a moiety of the manor of Brotherton. On 3 Edward II, Sir John received the fourth part of one mill, which Isabel de Studley held in Grantley. William de Clotherham and others witnessed this deed. The son of Sir John de Markenfield was Sir Andrew, who, in his father's lifetime, possessed the manor of Scruton in Richmondshire, 9 Edward II.

    Sir Andrew's heir was Sir Thomas Markenfield, knight, who by the daughter and heir of Minott, had issue Sir Thomas. This Sir Thomas de Markenfield, knight, lord of Markenfield, Eryholme, Scruton, etc., was living during the 43rd year of the reign of Edward III. He married Dionisia, the widow of Sir Henry Soothill of Soothill, near Wakefield. The children of Sir Thomas Markenfield and Dionisia were Sir John, who succeeded brothers Thomas, Robert and Peter, all who died without issue. Their daughters, Joan, married Sir Roger Ward, and Elizabeth married William Calverley of Calverley, Esquire. (1429)
    ~"Markenfield Family", from the Journal of the British Archeaeological Association, 1864, pp. 285-288


    Comments
    My New Mexico Roots & Native Roots - My New Mexico Roots - My link to the New England Pilgrim settlers & their link to a Web of English Ancestors
    © Nancy Lâopez

    Andrew married Margery de Middleton 1340, Markenfield Hall, Ripon, Yorkshire, England. Margery (daughter of Peter de Middleton and Eustacia Plumpton) was born 1325, Ripon, Yorkshire, England; died 1409, Markenfield Hall, Ripon HG4 3AD, UK. [Group Sheet]


  22. 281.  Margery de Middleton was born 1325, Ripon, Yorkshire, England (daughter of Peter de Middleton and Eustacia Plumpton); died 1409, Markenfield Hall, Ripon HG4 3AD, UK.
    Children:
    1. 140. John Markenfield, Knight was born 1340-1343, Markenfield Hall, Ripon, Yorkshire, England; died Bef 1398, (Markenfield Hall) Ripon, Yorkshire, England; was buried , Ripon Cathedral, Ripon, Yorkshire, England.

  23. 286.  William Fitzwilliam, Knight was born ~ 1354, Sprotboro, West Riding, Yorkshire, England (son of John Fitzwilliam, Knight and Elizabeth Clinton); died 8 Apr 1398.

    William married Maude de Cromwell ~ 1376. Maude (daughter of Ralph de Cromwell, Knight, 1st Baron Cromwell and Maud Bernack, Baroness Cromwell) was born ~ 1362, Tattershall, Lincolnshire, England; died Aft 1418. [Group Sheet]


  24. 287.  Maude de Cromwell was born ~ 1362, Tattershall, Lincolnshire, England (daughter of Ralph de Cromwell, Knight, 1st Baron Cromwell and Maud Bernack, Baroness Cromwell); died Aft 1418.

    Other Events:

    • Alt Birth: 0___ 1355

    Notes:

    Birth:
    Area Map & History ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tattershall

    Children:
    1. 143. Jane Fitzwilliam was born ~ 1376, Tattershall, Lincolnshire, England.

  25. 3644.  John Harington, Knight, 2nd Baron Harington was born 0___ 1328, Aldingham, Cumbria, England (son of Robert Harington, Knight and Elizabeth de Multon); died 28 May 1363, Gleaston Hall, Aldingham, Lancashire, England; was buried 7 Jun 1363, Cartmel Priory, Cartmel, Cumbria, England.

    Notes:

    John Harington, 2nd Baron Harington (1328-1363)[2] of Aldingham in Furness, Lancashire, was an English peer, who inherited the title Baron Harington in 1347 on the death of his grandfather John Harington, 1st Baron Harington (1281-1347).

    Origins

    He was the son of Sir Robert Harington (d.1334), who predeceased his own father the 1st Baron.[4] His mother was Elizabeth de Multon (born 1306), daughter of Thomas de Multon and one of the three sisters and co-heiresses of John de Multon.[5] She was the heiress of several estates including: Thurston in Suffolk; Moulton, Skirbeck and Fleet in Lincolnshire , of Egremont in Cumbria and of manors in County Limerick, Ireland.[6] Elizabeth outlived her husband and in about 1334 remarried to Walter de Birmingham.[7]

    Career

    In 1353 he confirmed the agreement made by his grandfather with the Abbot of Furness Abbey,[8] his feudal overlord at Aldingham.[9] In 1355 he nominated an attorney to act for him in Ireland, where he had inherited lands in County Limerick from his mother.[10] John Harington was granted a lease of the manor of Hornby by Henry of Grosmont, 1st Duke of Lancaster and also held the manors of Bolton-le-Moors, Chorley and Aighton. In 1358 he moved to London to take part in services for king Edward III.

    Marriage & progeny

    The name of his wife is not known, possibly she was Joan de Birmingham, daughter of his step-father Walter de Birmingham.[11] By his wife he had progeny including:

    Robert Harington, 3rd Baron Harington (1356–1406)

    Death & burial

    He died on 28 May 1363 at his seat Gleaston Hall[12] in the manor of Aldingham,[13] and was buried in Cartmel Priory in Lancashire.[14]

    Sources

    GEC Complete Peerage, Vol.6, pp. 314–321, Baron Harington, pp. 314–16, biography of John Harington, 1st Baron Harington

    Buried:
    Cartmel Priory church serves as the parish church of Cartmel, Cumbria (formerly in Lancashire). The priory was founded in 1190 by William Marshal, created 1st Earl of Pembroke, intended for the Augustinian Canons and dedicated to Saint Mary the Virgin and Saint Michael. To support the new house William granted it the whole fief of the district of Cartmel.[1] It was first colonised by a prior and twelve monks from Bradenstoke Priory in Wiltshire.[2] The only other surviving monastic building is the gatehouse which faces the village square. The church is an active Anglican parish church in the deanery of Windermere, the archdeaconry of Westmorland and Furness, and the diocese of Carlisle. Its benefice is united with those of St Mary, Allithwiate, St Peter, Field Broughton, St John the Baptist, Flookburgh, St Paul, Grange-over-Sands, Grange Fell Church, Grange-Over-Sands, and St Paul, Lindale, to form the benefice of Cartmel Peninsula.[3] The church is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade I listed building.

    Between 1327 and 1347 a chapel with four traceried windows was provided by Lord Harrington in the south choir aisle, and in fact his tomb is still in the building. The gatehouse, which apart from the church itself is the only surviving structure of the priory, was built between 1330 and 1340.

    Map, image & source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cartmel_Priory

    Died:
    Gleaston Castle is situated in a valley about 0.5 km north-east of the village of Gleaston, which lies between the towns of Ulverston and Barrow-in-Furness in the Furness peninsula, Cumbria, England.

    The castle is first mentioned specifically in 1389, although Sir John de Harrington, 2nd Baron Harington of Aldingham is said to have died at Gleaston in 1369. It is generally assumed that the castle was begun by his grandfather Sir John, 1st Baron Harington at around the time he was summoned to Parliament in 1326. It has been suggested that the Harington family may have found it necessary to move from Aldingham as the sea was eating away at the cliff on which their tower was built. Another alternative explanation is that they needed more room for a greater number of servants.

    Map, image & source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gleaston_Castle

    John married (Joan de Birmingham), Baroness of Harington. (Joan was born ~ 1335. [Group Sheet]


  26. 3645.  (Joan de Birmingham), Baroness of Harington was born ~ 1335.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Katherine Banastre

    Children:
    1. 1822. Nicholas Harington, Knight, Baron was born ~ 1343, Farleton, Melling, Lancashire, England; died 8 Feb 1404, Farleton, Melling, Lancashire, England.
    2. Robert Harington, Knight, 3rd Baron Harington was born ~ 28 Mar 1356, Gleaston Castle, Lancashire, England; died 21 May 1406, Aldingham, Cumbria, England.

  27. 3646.  William English, Knight was born 0___ 1322, Appleby, Westmorland, England (son of William L'Engleys and Isabel de Warcop); died 3 Aug 1369, Wembley, Cambridgeshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: William L'Engleys
    • Alt Birth: ~ 1320, Highhead Castle, Cumbria, England

    Notes:

    Sir William's 5-generation pedigree... http://www.ourfamilyhistories.org/ahnentafel.php?personID=I58809&tree=00&parentset=0&generations=5

    William married Margaret le Brun Abt 1348, Talton, Lancashire, England. Margaret was born 0___ 1328, Bowness, Cumbria, England; died 0___ 1362, England. [Group Sheet]


  28. 3647.  Margaret le Brun was born 0___ 1328, Bowness, Cumbria, England; died 0___ 1362, England.

    Notes:

    About Lady Margaret Le Brun
    ID: I33824

    Name: Margaret LE BRUN

    Given Name: Margaret

    Surname: LE BRUN

    Sex: F

    Birth: <1318> in Bownwys, Cumberland, England

    Death: Y

    _UID: 6DDEDD87A8F24A4FB0D5162AE6CC62EEA90B

    Change Date: 6 Aug 2001 at 17:51

    Father: Richard LE BRUN b: <1312> in Bownwys, Cumberland, England

    Marriage 1 William ENGLISH b: Abt 1326 in Lancashire, England

    Married: Abt 1342 in Talton, Lancashire, England

    Change Date: 6 Aug 2001

    Children

    Isabel ENGLISH b: 1344-1345

    JUST A NOTE : all the accending Tree information was gathered from the Smith-Goodale-Caldwell family tree on Ancestry.com I have attempted to copy accurately, however I may have made mistakes in transfering, so I would suggest going th that site and checking for yourself. I am only copyint the info here, and have done none of the research. Any errors in research belong to the owners of the S-G-C tree.

    Children:
    1. 1823. Isabella English, Baroness of Harington was born 1348-1351, Cumbria, England; died 0___ 1397.


Generation: 13

  1. 4096.  Robert de Bolling was born 1220, Bradford, Yorkshire, England (son of William de Bolling and unnamed spouse); died 1258-1259, (Bradford) England.

    Notes:

    Generation No. 141

    Robert D. Bolling [141] William De Bolling (III) [140] William De Bolling (II) [139] William De Bolling [138] John De Bolling [137] Tristam De Bolling [136] William De Boulogne [135] Eustace II De Boulogne (=Mary of Scotland) [134] Mathilda Van Leuven (=Eustache I, Count of Boulogne)[133] Gerberga of Lower Lorraine [132] Charles, Duke of Lower Lorraine [131] King Louis IV of France (=Gerberga of Saxony) [130] Charles III, the Simple (=Eadgifu of England) [129] Louis II, the Stammerer (=Adelaide of Paris) [128] Charles II, the Bald (=Ermentrude) [127] Louis I, the Pious (=Judith of Bavaria) [126] Charlemagne the Great (=Hildegard) [1-125]

    Robert De Bolling was born 1220 in Bolling Hall, Bradford, Yorkshire, England, and died 1258 in Bolling Hall, Bradford, Yorkshire, England.

    Children: John De Bolling (II)

    Robert married unnamed spouse. [Group Sheet]


  2. 4097.  unnamed spouse
    Children:
    1. 2048. John de Bolling was born ~1232, (Bradford) England; died 1323, (Bradford) England.

  3. 4416.  Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of NorfolkRoger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk was born 1144-1150, Norfolk, England (son of Hugh Bigod, Knight, 1st Earl of Norfolk and Juliane de Vere, Countess of Norfolk); died 0___ 1221, (Norfolk, England); was buried , Thetford, Norfolk, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Ambassador to France
    • Military: 17 Oct 1173; Battle of Fornham

    Notes:

    Roger Bigod (c.?1144/1150 - 1221) was the son of Hugh Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk and his first wife, Juliana de Vere. Although his father died 1176 or 1177, Roger did not succeed to the earldom of Norfolk until 1189 for his claim had been disputed by his stepmother for her sons by Earl Hugh in the reign of Henry II. Richard I confirmed him in his earldom and other honours, and also sent him as an ambassador to France in the same year. Roger inherited his father's office as royal steward. He took part in the negotiations for the release of Richard from prison, and after the king's return to England became a justiciar.

    During the Revolt of 1173-74, Roger remained loyal to the king while his father sided with the king's rebellious sons. Roger fought at the Battle of Fornham on 17 October 1173, where the royalist force defeated a rebel force led by Robert de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester.[1]

    In most of the years of the reign of King John, the earl was frequently with the king or on royal business. Yet Roger was to be one of the leaders of the baronial party which obtained John's assent to Magna Carta, and his name and that of his son and heir Hugh II appear among the twenty-five barons who were to ensure the king's adherence to the terms of that document. The pair were excommunicated by the pope in December 1215, and did not make peace with the regents of John's son Henry III until 1217.

    Around Christmas 1181, Roger married Ida, apparently Ida de Tosny (or Ida de Toesny),[2] and by her had a number of children including:

    Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk who married in 1206/ 1207, Maud, a daughter of William Marshal
    William Bigod
    Ralph Bigod
    Roger Bigod
    Margery, married William de Hastings
    Mary Bigod, married Ralph fitz Robert[3]

    Many historians, including Marc Morris have speculated that the couple had a third daughter, Alice, who married Aubrey de Vere IV, Earl of Oxford as his second wife. If so, the marriage would have been well within the bounds of consanguinity, for the couple would have been quite closely related, a daughter of the second earl of Norfolk being first cousin once removed to the second earl of Oxford.

    Roger Bigod in fiction

    Roger Bigod and his wife Ida de Tosny are the main characters in Elizabeth Chadwick's The Time of Singing (Sphere, 2008), published in the USA as For the King's Favor. They appear as minor characters in other of her books set at the same time, notably To Defy a King, which concerns the marriage of their son Hugh to Maud, a daughter of William Marshal

    References

    Jump up ^ Bartlett, Robert C. (2000). England Under the Norman and Angevin Kings: 1075–1225. Oxford: Clarendon Press. pp. 257–258. ISBN 0-19-822741-8.
    Jump up ^ For Ida's ancestry, see "Some corrections and additions to the Complete Peerage: Volume 9: Summary" and Marc Morris's The Bigod Earls of Norfolk in the Thirteenth Century
    Jump up ^ S. D. Church, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography
    Liber Vitae Ecclesiae Dunelmensis, Vol. 13
    Morris, Marc. The Bigod Earls of Norfolk in the Thirteenth Century (2005)
    Cawley, Charles, Medieval Lands Project on Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk, Foundation for Medieval Genealogy, retrieved August 2012,[better source needed]

    *

    more ...

    Four years after William's birth, in 1181, Ida de Tosny was married to Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk, by whom she had a number of children.

    Roger married Ida de Tosny, Countess of Norfolk 0___ 1181, (Norfolk, England). Ida (daughter of Ralph de Tosny, V, Knight, Earl and Margaret de Beaumont) was born <1160, Flamstead, Hertfordshire, England; died Aft 1185. [Group Sheet]


  4. 4417.  Ida de Tosny, Countess of Norfolk was born <1160, Flamstead, Hertfordshire, England (daughter of Ralph de Tosny, V, Knight, Earl and Margaret de Beaumont); died Aft 1185.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Ida de Toesny

    Notes:

    Ida de Tosny, Countess of Norfolk was very likely a daughter of Ralph V de Tosny (died 1162) and his wife Margaret (born circa 1125 and living in 1185), a daughter of Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester.[1]

    Relationship to Henry II

    Ida de Tosny was a royal ward and mistress of King Henry II, by whom she was mother of one of his illegitimate sons, William Longespâee, 3rd Earl of Salisbury, (b c. 1176-March 7, 1226). For many years, until the discovery of a charter of William mentioning "Comitissa Ida, mater mea" (Countess Ida, my mother),[2] it was assumed that Rosamund Clifford, a previous mistress of Henry's, was the mother, but painstaking genealogical detective work [3] has since shown otherwise. Ida was not the first English royal ward to be taken as a royal mistress. Isabel de Beaumont (Elizabeth de Beaumont), daughter of Robert de Beaumont, who fought at the Battle of Hastings with the Conqueror, was the ward of King Henry I and the mistress of one of his sons.[4]

    Marriage

    Around Christmas 1181, Ida de Tosny was given in marriage to Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk by Henry II, together with the manors of Acle, Halvergate and South Walsham, which had been confiscated from his inheritance after his father's death (Hugh Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk).[5] Ida and Roger had a number of children including:

    Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk who married in 1206 or 1207, Maud Marshal, a daughter of William Marshal
    William Bigod
    Ralph Bigod
    Roger Bigod
    Margery Bigod, married William de Hastings
    Mary Bigod, married Ralph fitz Robert

    Many historians, including Marc Morris have speculated that the couple had a third daughter, Alice, who married Aubrey de Vere IV, 2nd Earl of Oxford as his second wife. If so, the marriage would have been well within the bounds of consanguinity, for the couple would have been quite closely related, a daughter of the second earl of Norfolk being first cousin once removed to the second earl of Oxford.

    Ida de Tosney in fiction

    Ida de Tosny and her husband Roger are the main characters in Elizabeth Chadwick's The Time of Singing (Sphere, 2008), published in the USA as For the King's Favor. They appear as minor characters in other of her books set at the same time, notably To Defy a King, which concerns the marriage of their son Hugh to Maud, a daughter of William Marshal

    *

    more ...

    Ida de Tosny was a royal ward who became the mistress of King Henry II. The first evidence of contemporary information about Ida came to light in 1979 with the publication in the of two charters found in the Bradenstoke Priory Cartulary where he mentions "Comitissa Ida, mater mea" (Countess Ida, my mother), until then, it was assumed that Rosamund Clifford, a previous and more famous mistress of King Henry II's, was William's mother.

    Notes:

    Married:
    around Christmas...

    Children:
    1. 2208. Hugh Bigod, Knight, 3rd Earl of Norfolk was born ~ 1182, Thetford, Norfolk, England; died 18 Feb 1225, (Norfolk, England); was buried , Thetford Priory, Thetford, Norfolk, England.
    2. Margaret Bigod was born 1182, Thetford, Norfolk, England; died 31 Mar 1237, Ashill, Swaffham, Norfolk, England.

  5. 4418.  William Marshal, Templar Knight, 1st Earl PembrokeWilliam Marshal, Templar Knight, 1st Earl Pembroke was born 1146-1147, (Berkshire, England) (son of John FitzGilbert and Sibyl of Salisbury); died 14 Apr 1219, Caversham, Berkshire, England; was buried , Temple Church, London, Middlesex, England.

    Notes:

    William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke (1146 or 1147 - 14 May 1219), also called William the Marshal (Norman French: Williame le Mareschal), was an Anglo-Norman soldier and statesman.[1] He served five English kings – The "Young King" Henry, Henry II, Richard I, John, and Henry III.

    Knighted in 1166, he spent his younger years as a knight errant and a successful tournament fighter; Stephen Langton eulogized him as the "best knight that ever lived."[2] In 1189, he received the title of Earl of Pembroke through marriage during the second creation of the Pembroke Earldom. In 1216, he was appointed protector for the nine-year-old Henry III, and regent of the kingdom.

    Before him, his father's family held an hereditary title of Marshal to the king, which by his father's time had become recognized as a chief or master Marshalcy, involving management over other Marshals and functionaries. William became known as 'the Marshal', although by his time much of the function was actually delegated to more specialized representatives (as happened with other functions in the King's household). Because he was an Earl, and also known as the Marshal, the term "Earl Marshal" was commonly used and this later became an established hereditary title in the English Peerage.


    Early life

    Tomb effigy of William Marshal in Temple Church, London
    William's father, John Marshal, supported King Stephen when he took the throne in 1135, but in about 1139 he changed sides to back the Empress Matilda in the civil war of succession between her and Stephen which led to the collapse of England into "the Anarchy".[4]

    When King Stephen besieged Newbury Castle in 1152, according to William's biographer, he used the young William as a hostage to ensure that John kept his promise to surrender the castle. John, however, used the time allotted to reinforce the castle and alert Matilda's forces. When Stephen ordered John to surrender immediately or William would be hanged, John replied that he should go ahead saying, "I still have the hammer and the anvil with which to forge still more and better sons!" Subsequently there was a bluff made to launch William from a pierriáere, a type of trebuchet towards the castle. Fortunately for the child, Stephen could not bring himself to harm young William.[5] William remained a crown hostage for many months, only being released following the peace that resulted from the terms agreed at Winchester on 6 November 1153 that ended the civil war.

    Knight-Errant

    As a younger son of a minor nobleman, William had no lands or fortune to inherit, and had to make his own way in life. Around the age of twelve, when his father's career was faltering, he was sent to Normandy to be brought up in the household of William de Tancarville, a great magnate and cousin of young William's mother. Here he began his training as a knight. This would have included basic biblical stories and prayers written in Latin, as well as exposure to French romances, which conferred the basic precepts of chivalry to the budding knight.[6] In addition, while in Tancarville’s household, it is likely that Marshal also learned important and lasting practical lessons concerning the politics of courtly life. According to his thirteenth-century biography, L'Histoire de Guillaume le Marechal, Marshal had a number of adversaries in court who machinated to his disadvantage—these individuals likely would have been threatened by the boy’s close relationship with the magnate.[7] He was knighted in 1166 on campaign in Upper Normandy, then being invaded from Flanders. His first experience in battle came with mixed reviews. According to L'Histoire, everyone who witnessed the young knight in action agreed that he had acquitted himself well in combat. However, as medieval historian David Crouch explains, “War in the twelfth century was not fought wholly for honour. Profit was there to be made…”[8] On this front, Marshal was not so successful, as he was unable to parlay his combat victories into profit from either ransom or seized booty. As described in L'Histoire, the Earl of Essex, who was expecting the customary tribute from his valorous knight following battle, jokingly remarked: “Oh? But Marshal, what are you saying? You had forty or sixty of them — yet you refuse me so small a thing!”[9] In 1167 he was taken by William de Tancarville to his first tournament where he found his true mâetier. Quitting the Tancarville household he then served in the household of his mother's brother, Patrick, Earl of Salisbury. In 1168 his uncle was killed in an ambush by Guy de Lusignan. William was injured and captured in the same skirmish. It is known that William received a wound to his thigh and that someone in his captor's household took pity on the young knight. He received a loaf of bread in which were concealed several lengths of clean linen bandages with which he could dress his wounds. This act of kindness by an unknown person perhaps saved Marshal's life as infection setting into the wound could have killed him. After a period of time, he was ransomed by Eleanor of Aquitaine, who was apparently impressed by tales of his bravery.

    Thereafter he found he could make a good living out of winning tournaments, dangerous, often deadly, staged battles in which money and valuable prizes could be won by capturing and ransoming opponents, their horses and armour. His record is legendary: on his deathbed he recalled besting 500 knights during his tourneying career.[10]

    Royal favour

    13th-century depiction by Matthew Paris of the Earl of Pembroke's coat of arms[11]
    Upon his return during the course of 1185 William rejoined the court of King Henry II, and now served the father as a loyal captain through the many difficulties of his final years. The returns of royal favour were almost immediate. The king gave William the large royal estate of Cartmel in Cumbria, and the keeping of Heloise, the heiress of the northern barony of Lancaster. It may be that the king expected him to take the opportunity to marry her and become a northern baron, but William seems to have had grander ambitions for his marriage. In 1188 faced with an attempt by Philip II to seize the disputed region of Berry, Henry II summoned the Marshal to his side. The letter by which he did this survives, and makes some sarcastic comments about William's complaints that he had not been properly rewarded to date for his service to the king. Henry therefore promised him the marriage and lands of Dionisia, lady of Chăateauroux in Berry. In the resulting campaign, the king fell out with his heir Richard, count of Poitou, who consequently allied with Philip II against his father. In 1189, while covering the flight of Henry II from Le Mans to Chinon, William unhorsed the undutiful Richard in a skirmish. William could have killed the prince but killed his horse instead, to make that point clear. He is said to have been the only man ever to unhorse Richard. Nonetheless after Henry's death, Marshal was welcomed at court by his former adversary, now King Richard I, who was wise to include a man whose legendary loyalty and military accomplishments were too useful to ignore, especially in a king who was intending to go on Crusade.[1]

    During the old king's last days he had promised the Marshal the hand and estates of Isabel de Clare (c.1172–1220), but had not completed the arrangements. King Richard however, confirmed the offer and so in August 1189, at the age of 43, the Marshal married the 17-year-old daughter of Richard de Clare (Strongbow). Her father had been Earl of Pembroke, and Marshal acquired large estates and claims in England, Wales, Normandy and Ireland. Some estates however were excluded from the deal. Marshal did not obtain Pembroke and the title of earl, which his father-in-law had enjoyed, until 1199, as it had been taken into the king's hand in 1154. However, the marriage transformed the landless knight from a minor family into one of the richest men in the kingdom, a sign of his power and prestige at court. They had five sons and five daughters, and have numerous descendants.[1] William made numerous improvements to his wife's lands, including extensive additions to Pembroke Castle and Chepstow Castle.[citation needed]

    William was included in the council of regency which the King appointed on his departure for the Third Crusade in 1190. He took the side of John, the king's brother, when the latter expelled the justiciar, William Longchamp, from the kingdom, but he soon discovered that the interests of John were different from those of Richard. Hence in 1193 he joined with the loyalists in making war upon him. In spring 1194, during the course of the hostilities in England and before King Richard's return, William Marshal's elder brother John Marshal (who was serving as seneschal) was killed while defending Marlborough for the king's brother John. Richard allowed Marshal to succeed his brother in the hereditary marshalship, and his paternal honour of Hamstead Marshall. The Marshal served the king in his wars in Normandy against Philip II. On Richard's death-bed the king designated Marshal as custodian of Rouen and of the royal treasure during the interregnum.[1]

    King John and Magna Carta

    A 13th-century depiction of the Second Battle of Lincoln, which occurred at Lincoln Castle on 20 May 1217; the illustration shows the death of Thomas du Perche, the Comte de la Perche

    William supported King John when he became king in 1199, arguing against those who maintained the claims of Arthur of Brittany, the teenage son of John's elder brother Geoffrey Plantagenet. William was heavily engaged with the defence of Normandy against the growing pressure of the Capetian armies between 1200 and 1203. He sailed with King John when he abandoned the duchy in December 1203. He and the king had a falling out in the aftermath of the loss of the duchy, when he was sent with the earl of Leicester as ambassadors to negotiate a truce with King Philip II of France in 1204. The Marshal took the opportunity to negotiate the continued possession of his Norman lands.

    Before commencing negotiations with King Philip, William had been generously permitted to do homage to the King of France by King John so he might keep his possessions in Normandy; land which must have been of sentimental value due to the time spent there in his youth and adolescence. However, once official negotiations began, Philip demanded that such homage be paid exclusively to him, which King John had not consented to.[12] When William paid homage to King Philip, John took offence and there was a major row at court which led to cool relations between the two men. This became outright hostility in 1207 when John began to move against several major Irish magnates, including William. Though he left for Leinster in 1207 William was recalled and humiliated at court in the autumn of 1208, while John's justiciar in Ireland Meilyr fitz Henry invaded his lands, burning the town of New Ross.

    Meilyr's defeat by Countess Isabel led to her husband's return to Leinster. He was once again in conflict with King John in his war with the Braose and Lacy families in 1210, but managed to survive. He stayed in Ireland until 1213, during which time he had Carlow Castle erected[13] and restructured his honour of Leinster. Taken back into favour in 1212, he was summoned in 1213 to return to the English court. Despite their differences, William remained loyal throughout the hostilities between John and his barons which culminated on 15 June 1215 at Runnymede with the sealing of Magna Carta. William was one of the few English earls to remain loyal to the king through the First Barons' War. It was William whom King John trusted on his deathbed to make sure John's nine-year-old son Henry would get the throne. It was William who took responsibility for the king's funeral and burial at Worcester Cathedral.[1]

    On 11 November 1216 at Gloucester, upon the death of King John, William Marshal was named by the king's council (the chief barons who had remained loyal to King John in the First Barons' War) to serve as protector of the nine-year-old King Henry III, and regent of the kingdom. In spite of his advanced age (around 70) he prosecuted the war against Prince Louis and the rebel barons with remarkable energy. In the battle of Lincoln he charged and fought at the head of the young King's army, leading them to victory. He was preparing to besiege Louis in London when the war was terminated by the naval victory of Hubert de Burgh in the straits of Dover. [1]

    William was criticised for the generosity of the terms he accorded to Louis and the rebels in September 1217; but his desire for an expeditious settlement was dictated by sound statesmanship. Self-restraint and compromise were the keynote of Marshal's policy, hoping to secure peace and stability for his young liege. Both before and after the peace of 1217 he reissued Magna Carta, in which he is a signatory as one of the witnessing barons.

    Death and legacy

    William Marshal was interred in Temple Church, London
    Marshal's health finally failed him early in 1219. In March 1219 he realised that he was dying, so he summoned his eldest son, also William, and his household knights, and left the Tower of London for his estate at Caversham in Berkshire, near Reading, where he called a meeting of the barons, Henry III, the Papal legate Pandulf Verraccio, the royal justiciar (Hubert de Burgh), and Peter des Roches (Bishop of Winchester and the young King's guardian). William rejected the Bishop's claim to the regency and entrusted the regency to the care of the papal legate; he apparently did not trust the Bishop or any of the other magnates that he had gathered to this meeting. Fulfilling the vow he had made while on crusade, he was invested into the order of the Knights Templar on his deathbed. He died on 14 May 1219 at Caversham, and was buried in the Temple Church in London, where his tomb can still be seen.[1]

    Descendants of William Marshal and Isabel de Clare

    William Marshal, 2nd Earl of Pembroke (1190–6 April 1231), married (1) Alice de Bâethune, daughter of Earl of Albemarle; (2) 23 April 1224 Eleanor Plantagenet, daughter of King John of England. They had no children.
    Richard Marshal, 3rd Earl of Pembroke (1191–16 April 1234), married Gervase le Dinant. He died in captivity. They had no children.
    Maud Marshal (1194–27 March 1248), married (1) Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk, they had four children; (2) William de Warenne, 5th Earl of Surrey, they had two children; (3) Walter de Dunstanville.
    Gilbert Marshal, 4th Earl of Pembroke (1197–27 June 1241), married (1) Marjorie of Scotland, youngest daughter of King William I of Scotland; by an unknown mistress he had one illegitimate daughter:
    Isabel Marshal, married to Rhys ap Maeldon Fychan.
    Walter Marshal, 5th Earl of Pembroke (c. 1199 – November 1245), married Margaret de Quincy, Countess of Lincoln, granddaughter of Hugh de Kevelioc, 3rd Earl of Chester. No children.
    Isabel Marshal (9 October 1200 – 17 January 1240), married (1) Gilbert de Clare, 5th Earl of Hertford, whose daughter Isabel de Clare married Robert Bruce, 5th Lord of Annandale, the grandfather of Robert the Bruce; (2) Richard Plantagenet, Earl of Cornwall
    Sibyl Marshal (c. 1201–27 April 1245), married William de Ferrers, 5th Earl of Derby–they had seven daughters.
    Agnes Ferrers (died 11 May 1290), married William de Vesci.

    Isabel Ferrers (died before 26 November 1260)
    Maud Ferrers (died 12 March 1298), married (1) Simon de Kyme, and (2) William de Vivonia (de Forz), and (3) Amaury IX of Rochechouart.
    Sibyl Ferrers, married Sir Francis or Franco de Bohun.
    Joan Ferrers (died 1267)
    Agatha Ferrers (died May 1306), married Hugh Mortimer, of Chelmarsh.
    Eleanor Ferrers (died 16 October 1274), married to:

    Eva Marshal (1203–1246), married William de Braose, Lord of Abergavenny

    Isabella de Braose (b.1222), married Prince Dafydd ap Llywelyn. She died childless.
    Maud de Braose (1224–1301), in 1247, she married Roger Mortimer, 1st Baron Mortimer and they had descendants.
    Eva de Braose (1227 – 28 July 1255), married Sir William de Cantelou and had descendants.
    Eleanor de Braose (c.1228–1251). On an unknown date after August 1241, she married Sir Humphrey de Bohun and had descendants.

    Anselm Marshal, 6th Earl of Pembroke (c. 1208–22 December 1245), married Maud de Bohun, daughter of Humphrey de Bohun, 2nd Earl of Hereford. They had no children.
    Joan Marshal (1210–1234), married Warin de Munchensi (d. 1255), Lord of Swanscombe
    Joan de Munchensi (1230–20 September 1307) married William of Valence, the fourth son of King John's widow, Isabella of Angoulăeme, and her second husband, Hugh X of Lusignan, Count of La Marche. Valence was half-brother to Henry III and Edward I's uncle.

    The fate of the Marshal family

    During the civil wars in Ireland, William had taken two manors that the Bishop of Ferns claimed but could not get back. Some years after William's death, that bishop is said[14] to have laid a curse on the family that William's sons would have no children, and the great Marshal estates would be scattered. Each of William's sons did become earl of Pembroke and marshal of England, and each died without legitimate issue. William's vast holdings were then divided among the husbands of his five daughters. The title of "Marshal" went to the husband of the oldest daughter, Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk, and later passed to the Mowbray dukes of Norfolk and then to the Howard dukes of Norfolk, becoming "Earl Marshal" along the way. The title of "Earl of Pembroke" passed to William of Valence, the husband of Joan Marshal's daughter, Joan de Munchensi; he became the first of the de Valence line of earls of Pembroke.

    Through his daughter Isabel, William is ancestor to the both the Bruce and Stewart kings of Scots. Through his granddaughter Maud de Braose, William is ancestor to the last Plantagenet kings, Edward IV through Richard III, and all English monarchs from Henry VIII and afterward.

    Buried:
    at Temple Church...

    The Temple Church is a late 12th-century church in the City of London located between Fleet Street and the River Thames, built by the Knights Templar as their English headquarters. During the reign of King John (1199-1216) it served as the royal treasury, supported by the role of the Knights Templars as proto-international bankers. It is jointly owned by the Inner Temple and Middle Temple[1] Inns of Court, bases of the English legal profession. It is famous for being a round church, a common design feature for Knights Templar churches, and for its 13th and 14th century stone effigies. It was heavily damaged by German bombing during World War II and has since been greatly restored and rebuilt. The area around the Temple Church is known as the Temple and nearby formerly in the middle of Fleet Street stood the Temple Bar, an ornamental processional gateway. Nearby is the Temple Underground station.

    Photo, history & source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Temple_Church

    Died:
    Caversham is a suburb in the Borough of Reading...

    Map, history & source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caversham,_Berkshire

    William married Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke 0Aug 1189, London, England. Isabel (daughter of Richard de Clare, Knight, 2nd Earl Pembroke and Eva Aoife Mac Murchada, Countess Pembroke) was born 0___ 1172, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales; died 14 Oct 1217, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales; was buried , Tintern Abbey, Tintern, Monmouthshire, Wales. [Group Sheet]


  6. 4419.  Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke was born 0___ 1172, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales (daughter of Richard de Clare, Knight, 2nd Earl Pembroke and Eva Aoife Mac Murchada, Countess Pembroke); died 14 Oct 1217, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales; was buried , Tintern Abbey, Tintern, Monmouthshire, Wales.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Isabel Clare
    • Alt Death: 0___ 1220, Pembrokeshire, Wales

    Notes:

    F Isabel De CLAREPrint Family Tree
    Born in 1172 - Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales
    Deceased 14 October 1217 - Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales , age at death: 45 years old
    Buried in 1217 - Monmouth, Monmouthshire, Wales

    Parents
    Richard (Strongbow) De ( 2nd Earl Pembroke, Lord Marshall) CLARE, born in 1125 - Tonbridge, Kent, England, Deceased 20 April 1176 - Dublin, Ireland age at death: 51 years old , buried in 1176 - Dublin, Ireland
    Married 26 August 1171, Waterford, Waterford, Ireland, to
    Eva Aoife Mac (Countess Pembroke) MURCHADA, born 26 April 1141 - Dublin, Ireland, Deceased in 1188 - Waterford, Ireland age at death: 47 years old , buried - Tintern, Monmouthshire, Wales

    Spouses, children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren
    Married in August 1189, London, England, to William (SIR - Knight Templar)(Earl Pembroke) MARSHALL, born 12 May 1146 - Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales, Deceased 14 May 1219 - Reading, Berkshire, England age at death: 73 years old , buried in 1219 - London, England (Parents : M John (Fitzgilbert) (Earl of Pembroke, Marshall of England) MARSHALL 1105-1165 & F Sibilla De SALISBURY 1109-1155) with
    F Maud (Countess of Norfolk Countess of Surrey) MARSHALL 1192-1248 married to William (de Warenne) WARREN 1166-1240 with
    M John De (SIR - Earl of Surrey) WARREN 1231-1304 married before 1244, England, to Alice (Le Brun) De (Countess of Surrey) LUSIGNAN 1224-1291 with :
    F Eleanor (Plantagenet) De WARREN 1244-1282
    M William De (SIR) WARREN 1256-1286

    John De (SIR - Earl of Surrey) WARREN 1231-1304 married in 1247, Surrey, England, to Isabel De Surrey 1234-
    Maud (Countess of Norfolk Countess of Surrey) MARSHALL 1192-1248 married to Hugh (Magna Charta Baron - EARL of NORFOLK) BIGOD 1175-1225 with
    F Isabel BIGOD ca 1215-1239 married before 1235, Shere, Surrey, England, to John (Fitzgeoffrey) (SIR - Lord of Shere) (Justiciar of England) FITZPIERS 1215-1258 with :
    F Aveline (Fitzjohn) FITZPIERS ca 1235-1274
    F Maud (Fitzjohn) (Countess of WARWICK) FITZPIERS 1237-1301
    F Eve (Baroness of Abergavenny) MARSHALL 1194-1246 married 2 May 1230, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales, to William "Black William" (de Braose) BRUCE 1204-1230 with
    M William (de Braose) BRUCE 1210-1292 married to Maud De Fay 1180-1249 with :
    F Eleanor (de Braose) BRUCE 1230-
    F Isabella (de Braose) BRUCE 1220/- married to Dafydd (Ap Llywelyn) (Prince of WALES) TUDOR 1208-1246
    F Eva (de Braose) BRUCE 1220-1255 married 25 July 1238, Calne, Wiltshire, England, to William De CANTILUPE 1216-1254 with :
    F Joane CANTILUPE 1240-1271
    F Sybilla De Cantilupe ca 1240-
    F Millicent (Cauntelo) De CANTILUPE ca 1250-/1299
    F Maud (de Braose) (BARONESS WIGMORE) BRUCE 1226-1300 married in 1247, King's Stanley, Gloucestershire, England, to Roger De (SIR) MORTIMER 1231-1282 with :
    F Isabella De MORTIMER 1248-1274
    M Edmund De (Sir - 7th Lord) MORTIMER 1252-1303
    F Isolde De MORTIMER 1267-1338
    Eve (Baroness of Abergavenny) MARSHALL 1194-1246 married in 1230, England, to Milo (de Saint Maur) (SIR) SEYMOUR ca 1200-1245 with
    M Richard SEYMOUR 1230-1271 married in 1250 to Isabel (Lady) MARSHALL 1238-1268 with :
    M Roger (de Saint Maur) SEYMOUR 1258-1300
    F Katherine SEYMOUR ca 1265-ca 1335
    M Gilbert MARSHALL 1196-1241 married to Marjorie Of SCOTLAND 1204-1244 with
    F Isabel (Lady) MARSHALL 1238-1268 married in 1250 to Richard SEYMOUR 1230-1271 with :
    M Roger (de Saint Maur) SEYMOUR 1258-1300
    F Katherine SEYMOUR ca 1265-ca 1335
    M William (4th Earl of Pembroke/ChiefJusticar of Ireland) MARSHALL 1198-1231 married 23 April 1224, Hampshire, England, to Eleanor (Princess of England) PLANTAGENET ca 1205-1275 with
    F Isabel Marshall 1225/-1239
    M X MARSHALL ca 1230- married to ? ? with :
    M X MARSHALL ca 1260-
    F Isabel (Fitzgilbert) (Countess MARSHALL) MARSHALL 1200-1239 married 9 October 1217, Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England, to Gilbert III De (Earl of Gloucester - Hertford) CLARE, MAGNA CARTA BARON ca 1180-1230 with
    M Richard De (Earl of Herts - Gloucs) CLARE 1222-1262 married 25 January 1238, Lincolnshire, England, to Maud De (Countess of Gloucester) LACY 1223-1289 with :
    M Gilbert IV De (Earl of Herts - Gloucs) CLARE 1243-1295
    M Thomas De (Lord of Thomand, Connaught, Chancellor of Ireland) CLARE 1245-1287
    F Rohesia De CLARE 1252-1316
    F Isabel De (Lady Annabelle - 3rd Countess of Pembroke) CLARE 1226-1264 married in May 1240, Scotland, to Robert "the Competitor" De (SIR - 5th Lord of Annandale) BRUCE 1210-1295 with :
    M Robert De (Lord Annadale) BRUCE 1243-1304
    F Mary Clarissa De BRUCE 1255-1283
    Isabel (Fitzgilbert) (Countess MARSHALL) MARSHALL 1200-1239 married 30 March 1231, Bucks, Pennsylvania, USA, to Richard (Earl of CORNWALL) CORNWALL 1209-1272 with
    M Richard (SIR) (PLANTAGENET) CORNWALL 1234-1272 married before 1280, Cornwall, England, to Joan SAINT OWEN 1234-1308 with :
    M Edmund De (PLANTAGENET) CORNWALL 1280-1354
    F Sibyl MARSHALL ca 1201-1245 married 14 May 1219, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales, to William De (SIR - 5th Earl of Derby,) (Sheriff of Leicester) FERRERS 1190-1254 with
    F Maud De FERRERS ca 1215-1298 married in 1248 to William (Fortibus) De (SIR) VIVONNE 1215-1259 with :
    F Joan de ** (Countess of Chewton) VIVONNE 1235-1314
    F Margaret (Joan) De (to Wynter) FERRERS ca 1220-1267 married 5 December 1242, England, to Roger De Quincy ca 1215-1242/
    Margaret (Joan) De (to Wynter) FERRERS ca 1220-1267 married before 1245, England, to John De MOHUN ca 1220-1255 with :
    M John De MOHUN ca 1243-1279

    Margaret (Joan) De (to Wynter) FERRERS ca 1220-1267 married about 1256, Derbyshire, England, to Roger (SIR ) (MIDLANDS) WYNTER ca 1220- with :
    M Robert ** (Bedfordshire) WYNTER /1260-
    M Roger de ** (Suffolk - ??) WYNTER /1267-ca 1327
    M ** (Connection speculative) WYNTER /1268-
    F Isabel De FERRERS 1223-1252 married after 1247, England, to Reginald De MOHUN 1202-1256 with :
    F Isabel De MOHUN 1248-1280
    F Agatha De FERRERS ca 1225- married to Hugh De MORTIMER 1219-1274 with :
    M Robert De MORTIMER 1251-1287
    F Mary De MORTIMER 1260-1290
    M William De (SIR) FERRERS 1235-1287 married in 1262, Wootton Bassett, Wiltshire, England, to Anne le De SPENCER 1240/-1280 with :
    M ? ?
    F Anne De (to GREY) FERRERS 1268-1324
    M William De (SIR - to Wynter via VERDON) FERRERS 1272-1325
    M Robert De (6th Earl of Derby) (to NEVILLE) FERRERS ca 1239-1279 married 26 June 1269, Staffordshire, England, to Alianore De BOHUN 1240-1314 with :
    M John De (SIR - Baron of Chartley) FERRERS 1271-1312
    F Joane MARSHALL 1202-1234 married to Warin Munchensy 1192-1255 with
    F Joan MUNCHENSY 1222-1307 married to William (de Lusignan) (Earl of Pembroke) VALENCE 1225-1296 with :
    F Margaret De (Baroness de la ROCHE) VALENCE 1254-1315
    F Isabel De VALENCE ca 1262-1305

    Siblings
    M Richard III De (SIR) CLARE, MAGNA CARTA BARON ca 1153-1217 Married in 1180, England, to Amicie De CAEN 1160-1225
    F Joan De ( Baroness of Gamage) CLARE 1175-1222/ Married in 1196, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales, to Godfrey De (Sir) ( Lord of Gamage) GAMAGE 1176-1253

    Paternal grand-parents, uncles and aunts
    M Gilbert De (1st Earl Pembroke) CLARE 1100-1148 married (1130)
    F Isabel De (Countess Pembroke and Buckingham) BEAUMONT 1086-1147
    M Richard (Strongbow) De ( 2nd Earl Pembroke, Lord Marshall) CLARE 1125-1176
    married (1171)
    3 children

    F Isabel De (Countess Pembroke and Buckingham) BEAUMONT 1086-1147
    married (1098)M Henry I (Beauclerc) (KING OF ENGLAND) NORMANDY 1068-1135
    F Constance Maude FITZROY 1098-
    married (1120)
    1 child



    Maternal grand-parents, uncles and aunts
    M Dermot Dairmait Mac (King of Leinster) MURCHADA 1110-1171 married (1140)
    F Mor Tauthail Moringen Murchertaig (Queen of Ireland) O'TOOLE 1114-1191
    F Eva Aoife Mac (Countess Pembroke) MURCHADA 1141-1188
    married (1171)
    3 children
    F Urlachen Mac MURCHADA 1154-1200
    married (1171)
    2 children



    Notes
    Individual Note
    Source: Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Millennium File - Heritage Consulting - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2003.Original data - Heritage Consulting. The Millennium File. Salt Lake City, UT, USA: Heritage Consulting.Original data: Heritage Consulting. The Millennium File. Salt Lake City, UT, USA: - 1,7249::0
    http://search.Ancestry.com.au/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=millind&h=10154284&ti=5544&indiv=try&gss=pt Birth date: 1172 Birth place: Pembroke, Wales Death date: 1220 Death place: Pembroke, Wales 1,7249::10154284
    Source: Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - Web: International, Find A Grave Index - Ancestry.com - Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. - 1,70699::0 1,70699::438790
    Source: Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - UK and Ireland, Find A Grave Index, 1300s-Current - Ancestry.com - Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. - 1,60526::0 1,60526::219175

    Death
    Age: 48


    Sources
    Individual:
    - Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Ancestry Family Trees - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members. - This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created. - Ancestry Family Trees - http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=18829447&pid=8010
    - Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Ancestry Family Trees - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members. - This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created. - Ancestry Family Trees - http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=18829447&pid=8010
    - Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Ancestry Family Trees - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members. - This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created. - Ancestry Family Trees - http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=18829447&pid=8010
    - Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Ancestry Family Trees - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members. - This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created. - Ancestry Family Trees - http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=18829447&pid=8010
    Birth, death:
    - Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Millennium File - Heritage Consulting - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2003.Original data - Heritage Consulting. The Millennium File. Salt Lake City, UT, USA: Heritage Consulting.Original data: Heritage Consulting. The Millennium File. Salt Lake City, UT, USA: - 1,7249::0
    Note http://search.Ancestry.com.au/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=millind&h=10154284&ti=5544&indiv=try&gss=pt - Birth date: 1172 Birth place: Pembroke, Wales Death date: 1220 Death place: Pembroke, Wales - 1,7249::10154284
    - Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - Web: International, Find A Grave Index - Ancestry.com - Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. - 1,70699::0 - 1,70699::438790
    - Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - UK and Ireland, Find A Grave Index, 1300s-Current - Ancestry.com - Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. - 1,60526::0 - 1,60526::219175
    Burial:
    - Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - Web: International, Find A Grave Index - Ancestry.com - Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. - 1,70699::0 - 1,70699::438790
    - Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - UK and Ireland, Find A Grave Index, 1300s-Current - Ancestry.com - Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. - 1,60526::0 - 1,60526::219175

    Family Tree Preview
    Ancestry Chart Descendancy Chart
    _____| 16_ Richard (Fitzgilbert) De CLARE 1030-1089
    _____| 8_ Gilbert (Fitzrichard) De (Some say - Lord of Chepstow) CLARE 1065-1114
    _____| 4_ Gilbert De (1st Earl Pembroke) CLARE 1100-1148
    / \ _____| 18_ Hugh De CLERMONT 1030-1101
    |2_ Richard (Strongbow) De ( 2nd Earl Pembroke, Lord Marshall) CLARE 1125-1176
    | \ _____| 20_ Roger De (SIR - Barbatus le Barber) BEAUMONT 1022-1094
    | \ _____| 10_ Robert De (SIR - 1st Earl Leics - Count Melun) BEAUMONT 1046-1118
    | \ _____| 22_ Hugh (The Great) (Count of Vermandois) CAPET 1053-1102
    |--1_ Isabel De CLARE 1172-1217
    | _____| 24_ Murchad Macdairmata MURCHADA 1032-1070
    | _____| 12_ Donnchad Enna Mac MURCHADA 1085-1115
    | _____| 6_ Dermot Dairmait Mac (King of Leinster) MURCHADA 1110-1171
    | / \ _____| 26_ Gilla Michil O'BRIEN 1055-1068
    |3_ Eva Aoife Mac (Countess Pembroke) MURCHADA 1141-1188
    \ _____| 28_ Gilla-Comgaill II (King of Ui Muriedaig) O'TOOLE 1055-1127
    \ _____| 14_ Mouirchertach (King of Ui Muiredaig) O'TOOLE 1089-1164
    \ _____| 30_ Loigsech (King of Loigsi) O'MORDA

    end of biography

    Isabel de Clare, suo jure Countess of Pembroke and Striguil (1172-1220) was a Cambro-Norman-Irish noblewoman, go to this link for further clarification ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cambro-Norman, and one of the wealthiest heiresses in Wales and Ireland. She was the wife of William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke, who served four successive kings as Lord Marshal of England. Her marriage had been arranged by King Richard I.

    Daniel Maclise's painting of the marriage of Isabel's parents, Strongbow and Aoife of Leinster in August 1170, the day after the capture of Waterford.
    Isabel was born in 1172 in Pembrokeshire, Wales, the eldest child of Richard de Clare, 2nd Earl of Pembroke (1130 – 20 April 1176), known to history as "Strongbow", and Aoife of Leinster, who was the daughter of Dermot MacMurrough, the deposed King of Leinster and Mor Ui Thuathail. The latter was a daughter of Muirchertach Ua Tuathail and Cacht Nâi Morda. The marriage of Strongbow and Aoife took place in August 1170, the day after the capture of Waterford by the Cambro-Norman forces led by Strongbow.

    Isabel's paternal grandparents were Gilbert de Clare, 1st Earl of Pembroke and Isabel de Beaumont. She had a younger brother Gilbert de Striguil who, being a minor, was not formally invested with either the earldom of Pembroke or of Striguil. It is unlikely that his father could have passed on the title to Pembroke as he himself did not possess it. When Gilbert died in 1185, Isabel became Countess of Pembroke in her own right (suo jure) until her death in 1220. In this way, she could be said to be the first successor to the earldom of Pembroke since her grandfather Gilbert, the first earl. By this reckoning, Isabel ought to be called the second countess, not the fourth countess of Pembroke. In any event, the title Earl was re-created for her husband. She also had an illegitimate half-sister Basile de Clare, who married three times. Basile's husbands were: Robert de Quincy; Raymond Fitzgerald, Constable of Leinster: Geoffrey FitzRobert, Baron of Kells.

    Isabel was described as having been "the good, the fair, the wise, the courteous lady of high degree".[2] She allegedly spoke French, Irish and Latin.[3] After her brother Gilbert's death, Isabel became one of the wealthiest heiresses in the kingdom, owning besides the titles of Pembroke and Striguil, much land in Wales and Ireland.[4] She inherited the numerous castles on the inlet of Milford Haven, guarding the South Channel, including Pembroke Castle.[5] She was a legal ward of King Henry II, who carefully watched over her inheritance.[6]

    Marriage

    The new King Richard I arranged her marriage in August 1189 to William Marshal, regarded by many as the greatest knight and soldier in the realm. Henry II had promised Marshal he would be given Isabel as his bride, and his son and successor Richard upheld the promise one month after his accession to the throne. At the time of her marriage, Isabel was residing in the Tower of London in the protective custody of the Justiciar of England, Ranulf de Glanville.[7] Following the wedding, which was celebrated in London "with due pomp and ceremony",[8] they spent their honeymoon at Stoke d'Abernon in Surrey which belonged to Enguerrand d'Abernon.[9]

    Marriage to Isabel elevated William Marshal from the status as a landless knight into one of the richest men in the kingdom. He would serve as Lord Marshal of England, four kings in all: Henry II, Richard I, John, and Henry III. Although Marshal did not become the jure uxoris 1st Earl of Pembroke, Earl of Striguil until 1199, he nevertheless assumed overlordship of Leinster in Ireland, Pembroke Castle, Chepstow Castle, as well as Isabel's other castles in Wales such as the keep of Haverford, Tenby, Lewhaden, Narberth, Stackpole.[10]

    Shortly after their marriage, Marshal and Isabel arrived in Ireland, at Old Ros, a settlement located in the territory which belonged to her grandfather, Dermot MacMurrough. A motte was hastily constructed, a medieval borough quickly grew around it, and afterwards the Marshals founded the port town by the river which subsequently became known as New Ross. The Chronicles of Ros, which are housed in the British Museum, described Isabel and Marshal's arrival in Ireland and records that Isabella set about building a lovely city on the banks of the Barrow.

    In 1192, Isabel and her husband assumed the task of managing their vast lands; starting with the rebuilding of Kilkenny Castle and the town, both of which had been damaged by the O'Brien clan in 1173. Later they commissioned the construction of several abbeys in the vicinity.[11]

    The marriage was happy, despite the vast difference in age between them. William Marshal and Isabel produced a total of five sons and five daughters.[12]

    end of biography

    Buried:
    Tintern Abbey (Welsh: Abaty Tyndyrn, About this sound pronunciation in Welsh (help·info)) was founded by Walter de Clare, Lord of Chepstow, on 9 May 1131. It is situated adjacent to the village of Tintern in Monmouthshire, on the Welsh bank of the River Wye, which forms the border between Monmouthshire in Wales and Gloucestershire in England. It was only the second Cistercian foundation in Britain, and the first in Wales. Falling into ruin after the Dissolution of the Monasteries in the 16th century, the remains were celebrated in poetry and often painted by visitors from the 18th century onwards. In 1984 Cadw took over responsibility for the site.

    Photos, history & source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tintern_Abbey

    Children:
    1. William Marshal, Knight, 2nd Earl of Pembroke was born 1190-1198, (Berkshire, England); died 6 Apr 1231, London, Middlesex, England.
    2. 2209. Maud Marshal, Countess of Norfolk was born ~ 1193, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales; died 27 Mar 1248, Tintern Abbey, Chapel Hill, Monmouthshire, Wales.
    3. Isabel Marshal, Countess Marshall was born 9 Oct 1200, Pembroke Castle, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales; died 17 Jan 1240, Berkhamsted Castle, Berkhamsted, Hertforshire, England.
    4. Sybil Marshal was born ~ 1201, (Pembroke Castle, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales); died 0Apr 1245.
    5. Eva Marshal, Countess of Abergavenny was born 0___ 1203, Pembroke Castle, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales; died 0___ 1246.
    6. Joan Marshal was born 1210, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales; died 1234, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales.

  7. 4480.  Roger Markenfield was born Bef 1150, (Yorkshire, England).

    Roger married FNU Le Breton. [Group Sheet]


  8. 4481.  FNU Le Breton
    Children:
    1. 2240. William Markenfield was born ~ 1222, Markenfield Hall, Ripon HG4 3AD, UK.

  9. 4500.  William le Boteler was born ~ 1245, Wem, Shropshire, England (son of Ralph Boteler and Matilda Pantulf); died 11 Dec 1283, Wem, Shropshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: William Butler
    • Also Known As: William le Botiller

    Notes:

    William le BOTILLER and Ankaret verch GRUFFYDD

    HUSBAND:
    William le BOTILLER. (Boteler).
    Born (in 1230)(about 1245) in Wemme, Shropshire, England; son of Ralph le BOTELER and Maud PANTULF.

    He married Ankaret verch Gruffydd after 1261.

    He died on 11 December 1283.

    WIFE:
    Ankaret verch GRUFFYDD Maelor.
    Born (in 1236)(about 1248) (in Powys)(at Bromfield; Lower Powys), Montgomeryshire, Wales; daughter of Gruffydd ap Madog and Emma de Aldithley. (Audley). She died on 22 June 1308.

    Genealogy of Ankaret:
    Ankaret verch Gruffydd (Gruffydd "Griffith" ap Madoc79, Madoc ap Gruffydd Maelor78, Angharad77, Cristin verch Gronwy76, Gronwy75, Owain74, Eadwine "Edwin" ap Gronwy73, Gronwy ap Einion72, Einion ap Owain71, Owain ap Hywel "Dda"70, Hywel "Dda" ap Cadell69, Cadell ap Rhodri Mawr68, Rhodri Mawr ap Merfyn67, Merfyn "the Freckled" ap Gwriad66, Gwriad ap Elidir of Man65, Elidir ap Sandde64, Sandde ap Alewn63, Alewn ap Tegid62, Tegid ap Gwair61, Gwair ap Dwywg60, Dwywg ap Llywarch59, Llywarch Hen ap Elidir58, Elidir ap Meirchion57, Meirchion Gul ap Gwrst56, Gwrst Lledlwin ap Ceneu55, Ceneu54, Coel *53, Tegfan Gloff52, Deheuwaint51, Telpwyll50, Urban49, Gradd "Grat"48, Remetel "Jumetel" Rhyfedel47, Rhydeyrn Rhyfedel46, Euddigan45, Eudeyrn44, Eifudd43, Eudos42, Euddolen41, Eugein40, Afallach39, Beli "Mawr" * the Great38, Manogan * ap Eneid37, Eneid *36, Cerwyd *35, Crydon *34, Dyfnarth Cynfarch *33, Prydain *32, Aedd * Mawr31, Antonius *30, Sisillius *29, Gwrst ? *28, Rhiwallon *27, Cunedda *26, Henwyn * ap Bleiddud25, Bleiddud Cyngen ap Asser24, Asser ap Cyngen23, Cyngen Bleiddud22, Dyfnwal ap Gorbonian21, Gorbonian20, Cymryw Camber19, Brutus *18, Silivius *17, Iulus * Ascanius16, Aeneas *15, Anchisa Anchises14, Capps13, Assaracus12, Tros11, Erichthonius10, Dardanus9, Zerah8, Judah *7, Jacob *6, Isaac *5, Abraham *4, Terah *3, Nahor.

    CHILDREN of William le BOTILLER and Ankaret verch GRUFFYDD.
    (Sir) William le BOTILER. First Baron Boteler. Born on 11 January 1274, (of Wemme, Shropshire)(in Oversley, Warwickshire), England. He married (1) Beatrice about 1295. He married (2) Ela de HERDEBURGH before February 1316. He died before 14 September 1334, when an inquest post mortem was held for him.
    Anne le BOTELER. Born (in 1272)(in 1280) in Wemme, Shropshire, England. She married Gilbert TALBOT.
    John Le Boteler was born on 17 Jul 1266.
    Gawaine Le Boteler was born on 2 Feb 1269/1270.
    Ralph le BOTELER. Born about 1244. Died before 5 June 1307.


    SOURCES:
    [S1]. McMahan/Kilsdonk Ancestors. RootsWeb. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=REG&db=kmcmahan&id=I12491.
    [S2]. Wikipedia, the Free Ecyclopedia.

    end

    William married Ankaret verch Griffith Aft 1261. Ankaret (daughter of Gruffydd ap Madog and Emma de Aldithley) was born 1236-1248, Powys, Wales; died 22 Jun 1308, (Ludlow, Shropshire, England). [Group Sheet]


  10. 4501.  Ankaret verch Griffith was born 1236-1248, Powys, Wales (daughter of Gruffydd ap Madog and Emma de Aldithley); died 22 Jun 1308, (Ludlow, Shropshire, England).

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Ankaret verch Gruffydd
    • Also Known As: Lady Angharad ferch Gruffydd

    Notes:

    Genealogy of Ankaret:

    Ankaret verch Gruffydd (Gruffydd "Griffith" ap Madoc79, Madoc ap Gruffydd Maelor78, Angharad77, Cristin verch Gronwy76, Gronwy75, Owain74, Eadwine "Edwin" ap Gronwy73, Gronwy ap Einion72, Einion ap Owain71, Owain ap Hywel "Dda"70, Hywel "Dda" ap Cadell69, Cadell ap Rhodri Mawr68, Rhodri Mawr ap Merfyn67, Merfyn "the Freckled" ap Gwriad66, Gwriad ap Elidir of Man65, Elidir ap Sandde64, Sandde ap Alewn63, Alewn ap Tegid62, Tegid ap Gwair61, Gwair ap Dwywg60, Dwywg ap Llywarch59, Llywarch Hen ap Elidir58, Elidir ap Meirchion57, Meirchion Gul ap Gwrst56, Gwrst Lledlwin ap Ceneu55, Ceneu54, Coel *53, Tegfan Gloff52, Deheuwaint51, Telpwyll50, Urban49, Gradd "Grat"48, Remetel "Jumetel" Rhyfedel47, Rhydeyrn Rhyfedel46, Euddigan45, Eudeyrn44, Eifudd43, Eudos42, Euddolen41, Eugein40, Afallach39, Beli "Mawr" * the Great38, Manogan * ap Eneid37, Eneid *36, Cerwyd *35, Crydon *34, Dyfnarth Cynfarch *33, Prydain *32, Aedd * Mawr31, Antonius *30, Sisillius *29, Gwrst ? *28, Rhiwallon *27, Cunedda *26, Henwyn * ap Bleiddud25, Bleiddud Cyngen ap Asser24, Asser ap Cyngen23, Cyngen Bleiddud22, Dyfnwal ap Gorbonian21, Gorbonian20, Cymryw Camber19, Brutus *18, Silivius *17, Iulus * Ascanius16, Aeneas *15, Anchisa Anchises14, Capps13, Assaracus12, Tros11, Erichthonius10, Dardanus9, Zerah8, Judah *7, Jacob *6, Isaac *5, Abraham *4, Terah *3, Nahor.

    CHILDREN of William le BOTILLER and Ankaret verch GRUFFYDD.
    (Sir) William le BOTILER. First Baron Boteler. Born on 11 January 1274, (of Wemme, Shropshire)(in Oversley, Warwickshire), England. He married (1) Beatrice about 1295. He married (2) Ela de HERDEBURGH before February 1316. He died before 14 September 1334, when an inquest post mortem was held for him.
    Anne le BOTELER. Born (in 1272)(in 1280) in Wemme, Shropshire, England. She married Gilbert TALBOT.
    John Le Boteler was born on 17 Jul 1266.
    Gawaine Le Boteler was born on 2 Feb 1269/1270.
    Ralph le BOTELER. Born about 1244. Died before 5 June 1307.


    SOURCES:
    [S1]. McMahan/Kilsdonk Ancestors. RootsWeb. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=REG&db=kmcmahan&id=I12491.
    [S2]. Wikipedia, the Free Ecyclopedia.

    Children:
    1. 2250. Noel le Boteler was born 1258, Wem, Shropshire, England; died 14 Sep 1334, St. Mary, Devonshire, England.
    2. William le Boteler, 1st Baron Boteler was born 11 Jun 1274, Oversley, Warwickshire, England; died 14 Sep 1334, Wem, Shropshire, England.
    3. Anne le Boteler was born ~ 1278, (Wemme) Shropshire, England; died 0___ 1340, Linton, Herefordshire, England.

  11. 4508.  William de Ros, Knight was born 0___ 1192, Helmsley, Yorkshire, England (son of Robert de Ros, Knight and Isabella Mac William); died 1264-1265, England; was buried , Kirkham Priory, Kirkham, North Yorkshire, England.

    Notes:

    Birth: 1192
    Helmsley
    North Yorkshire, England
    Death: 1264, England

    Knight of Helmsley and Hunsingore, Yorkshire

    Son and heir to Robert de Ros and Isabel of Scotland, grandson of Everard de Ros and Roese Trussebut, William the Lion, King of Scotland and a mistress Avenel. Sir Robert was born before 1200.

    Husband of Lucy FitzPeter, daughter of Peter FitzHerbert of Blaen Llyfni, Breconshire, Wales and Alice FitzRobert, daughter of Robert FitzRoger of Warkworth, Northumbria. They were married before 24 Jan 1234 and had six sons and two daughters;

    * Sir Robert
    * Sir Peter
    * Sir William
    * Sir Alexander
    * Herbert
    * John
    * Lucy
    * Alice

    William was excommunicated with his father by Pope Innocent III on 16th of December 1215. He was taken as prisoner at the Battle of Lincoln on 20 May 1217, released on sureties 26 Oct 1217. He took no part in the Baron's war and was apparently faithful to the king. Sir William was the benefactor of the monasteries of Kirkham, Rievaulx, Meaux and of the Templars.

    Sir William died 1258 or 1264, buried at Kirkham. His widow, Lucy, was alive Michaelmas 1266.

    Sir William's name is spelled both Ros and Roos.

    Family links:
    Parents:
    Robert De Ros (1170 - 1226)
    Isabella nic William de Ros (1175 - 1240)

    Spouse:
    Lucy FitzPiers de Ros (1207 - 1267)*

    Children:
    Alice de Ros (____ - 1286)*
    William de Ros (____ - 1310)*
    Robert de Ros (1223 - 1285)*
    Lucy de Ros de Kyme (1230 - ____)*

    Sibling:
    William de Ros (1192 - 1264)
    Robert de Ros (1195 - 1269)*

    *Calculated relationship

    Burial:
    Kirkham Priory
    Kirkham
    Ryedale District
    North Yorkshire, England

    Maintained by: Anne Shurtleff Stevens
    Originally Created by: Jerry Ferren
    Record added: May 25, 2011
    Find A Grave Memorial# 70352904

    William married Lucy FitzPeter, Baroness de Ros Bef 24 Jan 1234, Helmsley, Yorkshire, England. Lucy (daughter of Peter FitzHerbert, Lord of Brecknock and Alice FitzRoger) was born 1207-1210, Forest Dean, Gloucestershire, England; died 1267, North Yorkshire, England; was buried , Kirkham Priory, Kirkham, North Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  12. 4509.  Lucy FitzPeter, Baroness de Ros was born 1207-1210, Forest Dean, Gloucestershire, England (daughter of Peter FitzHerbert, Lord of Brecknock and Alice FitzRoger); died 1267, North Yorkshire, England; was buried , Kirkham Priory, Kirkham, North Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Lucia of Brecknock FitzPiers
    • Also Known As: Lucy FitzPiers
    • Alt Birth: 1204, Helmsley, Yorkshire, England

    Notes:

    Lucy FitzPiers
    Also Known As: "Lucia", "Lucy;de;ros; Lucy", "FITZ", "PETER", "ros"
    Birthdate: circa 1210
    Birthplace: Forest Dean, Gloucestershire, England, (Present UK)
    Death: Died 1247 in Yorkshire, England, (Present UK)
    Immediate Family:
    Daughter of Piers FitzHerbert, Lord of Brecknock and Alice Fitzpiers
    Wife of Thomas de Newsom and Sir William de Ros
    Mother of Constance Scrope (de Newsom); Sir Alexander de Braose; Sir Herbert de Braose; Alicia de Ros, of Helmsley; Robert de Ros and 10 others
    Sister of Beatrix Fitzpiers; Reginald FitzPiers, Lord of Blaen Llyfni and Herbert Fitzpiers, Sheriff Hampshire
    Half sister of Joan de Verdun

    The de Ros family, from Scottish Kings to English Gentry

    Lucy FitzPiers
    Also Known As: "Lucia", "Lucy;de;ros; Lucy", "FITZ", "PETER", "ros"
    Birthdate: circa 1210
    Birthplace: Forest Dean, Gloucestershire, England, (Present UK)
    Death: Died 1247 in Yorkshire, England, (Present UK)
    Immediate Family:
    Daughter of Piers FitzHerbert, Lord of Brecknock and Alice Fitzpiers
    Wife of Thomas de Newsom and Sir William de Ros
    Mother of Constance Scrope (de Newsom); Sir Alexander de Braose; Sir Herbert de Braose; Alicia de Ros, of Helmsley; Robert de Ros and 10 others
    Sister of Beatrix Fitzpiers; Reginald FitzPiers, Lord of Blaen Llyfni and Herbert Fitzpiers, Sheriff Hampshire
    Half sister of Joan de Verdun
    Managed by: James Fred Patin, Jr.
    Last Updated: April 1, 2016
    View Complete Profile
    Matching family tree profiles for Lucy FitzPiers, Baroness de Ros view all matches ›

    Lucy De Ros (born Fitzpiers) in MyHeritage family trees (Maynard, Jr. Web Site)

    Lucy (Lucia) De Ross (born Fitzpiers) in MyHeritage family trees (Keefe Web Site)

    Lucy De Ros (born Fitzpiers) in MyHeritage family trees (Carter Family Website)

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    view all 31
    Immediate Family

    Thomas de Newsom
    husband

    Constance Scrope (de Newsom)
    daughter

    Sir Alexander de Braose
    son

    Sir Herbert de Braose
    son

    Sir William de Ros
    husband

    Alicia de Ros, of Helmsley
    daughter

    Robert de Ros
    son

    Lucy de Ros
    daughter

    Robert de Ros, Lord of Belvoir
    son

    Alexander de Ros
    son

    Peter de Ros
    son

    Mary de Ros
    daughter
    About Lucy FitzPiers, Baroness de Ros
    Individual Record FamilySearch™ Pedigree Resource File

    Search Results | Print

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Lucia of Brecknock FitzPiers Compact Disc #41 Pin #277411 Pedigree

    Sex: F
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Event(s)

    Birth: abt 1196
    Helmsley,Yorkshire,England
    Death: aft 1266
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Parents

    Father: Piers FitzHerbert Disc #41 Pin #283090
    Mother: Alice de Warkworth FitzRobert Disc #41 Pin #283089
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Marriage(s)

    Spouse: Sir William I of Hamlake de Ros Disc #41 Pin #277410
    Marriage:
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Notes and Sources

    Notes: None
    Sources: Available on CD-ROM Disc# 41
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Submitter

    Kathy LONGHURST
    1175 S. 180 W. Hurricane Utah

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Submission Search: 1606834-0220102210938

    URL:
    CD-ROM: Pedigree Resource File - Compact Disc #41
    CD-ROM Features: Pedigree View, Family View, Individual View, Reports, Downloadable GEDCOM files, Notes and Sources.
    Order Pedigree Resource File CD-ROMS
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    About FamilySearch Pedigree Resource File

    The Pedigree Resource File is a new lineage linked database of records available on compact disc containing family history records submitted by individuals through FamilySearch Internet Genealogy Service. Family information is organized in family groups and pedigrees and includes submitted notes and sources. Many charts and reports can be printed from this data. Each disc contains about 1.1 million names. With the publication of every five discs, a master index for those discs will be published and packaged with that set of discs. With the publication of every 25 discs, a master index for those discs will also be published and packaged with that volume of discs. Discs may be purchased as sets or volumes.
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    Lucia FITZPIERS Pedigree

    Female Family
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Event(s):

    Birth: 1195
    Christening:
    Death:
    Burial:
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Parents:

    Father: Herbert FITZHERBERT Family
    Mother: Alice FITZ ROGER
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Marriages:

    Spouse: William De ROSS Family
    Marriage: About 1259 Of Igmanthorpe, , Yorkshire, England
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Messages:

    Record submitted after 1991 by a member of the LDS Church. No additional information is available. Ancestral File may list the same family and the submitter.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Source Information:

    No source information is available.
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    Lucy FITZPIERS (-1266) [Pedigree]

    Daughter of Piers FITZHERBERT (-1235) and Alice de WARKWORTH (-1225)

    b. of Brecknock, Wales
    d. AFT 1266
    Married Sir William de ROS (1193-1264)

    Children: [listed under entry for William de ROS]

    References:

    1. "Magna Charta Sureties, 1215",

    F. L. Weis,
    4th Ed..
    2. "Burke's Peerage, 1938".

    3. "Presidents GEDCOM File",

    Otto-G. Richter, Brian Tompsett.
    4. "Ancestral roots of certain American colonists who came

    to America before 1700",
    Frederick Lewis Weis, 1992, seventh edition.
    The earlier editions were called: "Ancestral roots of
    sixty colonists who came to New England 1623-1650"
    Lucy FitzPiers

    (say 1195 - )

    Lucy FitzPiers|b. s 1195|p317.htm#i18533|Reginald or Piers FitzPeirs or FitzHerbert||p317.htm#i14306||||||||||||||||

    Lucy FitzPiers married Sir William de Ros, son of Sir Robert de Ros Fursan and Isabel Avenal of Scotland. Rosie Bevan wrote: That William de Ros of Helmsley was married to Lucy fitz Piers identified, ( CP (XI : 94) as you say, citing Dugdale), as daughter of Piers fitz Herbert, lord of Brecknock, would appeare to be borne out by the names of their children - Robert, William, Alexander, Herbert, John, Piers, Lucy and Alice, as listed in CP XI p. 94 note (l) and supported by about ten references. Lucy FitzPiers was born say 1195 at Wales. Dugdale citing Glover, Somerset Herald, stated that she was the daughter of Reginald FitzPiers of Blewlebeny in Wales. If she belonged to this family, she was presumably sister of Herbert Fitzpiers and of his brother and heir Reynold FitzPiers, and daughter of Piers FitzHerbert, lords of the Honour of Brecknock, whose castle was built at Blaenllyfni. She was the daughter of Reginald or Piers FitzPeirs or FitzHerbert.
    She was living at Michaelmas 1266, when there is a record of her claim for dower in Ulceby, Lincs, against Alice de Ros, and in a manor in Yorks against Piers de Ros.
    Children of Lucy FitzPiers and Sir William de Ros

    * Sir William de Ros (of Ingmanthorpe)+ d. b 28 May 1310
    * Sir Alexander de Ros
    * Sir Herbert de Ros
    * Sir John de Ros
    * Piers de Ros
    * Sir Robert de Ros 1st Baron+ b. bt 1220 - 1223, d. 17 May 1285
    * Lucy de Ros+ b. s 1230, d. a 1279
    * Alice de Ros d. 29 Apr 1286
    Lucy FitzPiers1

    F, #176196

    Lucy FitzPiers||p17620.htm#i176196|Piers FitzHerbert||p36888.htm#i368871||||||||||||||||

    Last Edited=13 Jun 2009

    Lucy FitzPiers is the daughter of Piers FitzHerbert.2 She married Sir William de Ros, son of Robert de Ros, 1st Lord Ros of Helmsley and Isabella (?).1
    Children of Lucy FitzPiers and Sir William de Ros

    * Sir Robert de Ros+ d. 17 Mar 12852
    * Sir William de Ros+ d. 28 May 13101
    * Piers Ros 2
    Citations

    1. [S1545] Mitchell Adams, "re: West Ancestors," e-mail message from (Australia) to Darryl Roger Lundy, 6 December 2005 - 19 June 2009. Hereinafter cited as "re: West Ancestors".
    2. [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke's Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke's Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 1, page 1107. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
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    William De ROSS Pedigree

    Male Family
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Event(s):

    Birth:
    Christening:
    Death:
    Burial:
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Marriages:

    Spouse: Lucia FITZPIERS Family
    Marriage: About 1259 Of Igmanthorpe, , Yorkshire, England
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Messages:

    Record submitted after 1991 by a member of the LDS Church. No additional information is available. Ancestral File may list the same family and the submitter.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Source Information:

    No source information is available.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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    Lucy[1,2,3]

    - 1266
    Sex Female

    Lived In Scotland

    Complete *

    Died Aft 1265

    Person ID I00113893 Leo

    Last Modified 22 Aug 1997

    Father Piers FitzHerbert

    Mother Alice

    Family ID F00119593 Group Sheet

    Family Sir William de Ros, of Helmsley

    Children

    1. Sir Robert de Ros, of Helmsley, b. est 1235

    2. Sir William de Ros, of Ingmanthorpe, b. est 1240

    3. Alexander de Ros
    4. Herbert de Ros
    5. John de Ros
    6. Piers de Ros
    7. Lucy de Ros
    8. Alice de Ros
    Last Modified 22 Aug 1997

    Family ID F00049669 Group Sheet

    Sources 1. [S00058] The Complete Peerage, 1936 , Doubleday, H.A. & Lord Howard de Walden, Reference: XI Ros 94n

    2. [S01336] Descendants of Leofric of Mercia 2002 , Ravilious, John & Rosie Bevan

    3. [S00123] ~Living descendants of Blood Royal in America , Angerville, Count d', Reference: 54

    "Of Brecknock, Wales"

    Children:
    1. Robert de Ros, Knight was born ~ 1223, Helmsley Castle, Yorkshire, England; died 17 May 1285; was buried , Kirkham Priory, Kirkham, North Yorkshire, England.
    2. Peter de Ros was born , (Yorkshire, England).
    3. Alexander de Ros was born , (Yorkshire, England).
    4. Herbert de Ros was born , (Yorkshire, England).
    5. 2254. William de Ros, Knight was born ~ 1244, (Yorkshire) England; died 0May 1310, (Yorkshire) England; was buried , Greyfriars Abbey Church, King's Straith, York, Yorkshire, England.
    6. Anne de Ros was born ~ 1246, Helmsley, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1290.

  13. 4586.  William de Odingsells was born Abt 1211, Maxstoke, Warwick, England; died 19 Apr 1295, (Warwickshire) England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Justiciar of Ireland
    • Also Known As: William de Odyngsells

    William married Ela Fitzwalter, Countess of Warwick Abt 1257, Maxstoke, Warwick, England. Ela (daughter of Walter FitzRobert, Knight and Ida Longespee, II) was born ~ 1245, of Maxstoke and Solihull, Warwickshire, England; died 8 Feb 1297, Oseney Abbey, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England; was buried , Oseney Abbey, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  14. 4587.  Ela Fitzwalter, Countess of Warwick was born ~ 1245, of Maxstoke and Solihull, Warwickshire, England (daughter of Walter FitzRobert, Knight and Ida Longespee, II); died 8 Feb 1297, Oseney Abbey, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England; was buried , Oseney Abbey, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alt Birth: Salisbury, Wiltshire, England

    Children:
    1. 2293. Ida Odingsells, Baroness of Clinton was born ~1275, Maxstoke, Warwick, England; was christened , Amington, Warwick, England; died Aft 1 Mar 1321.
    2. Margaret de Odingsells was born ~ 1276, Solihull, Warwickshire, England; died 17 Oct 1311, Rotherfield Greys, Oxfordshire, England.

  15. 546.  Simon WardeSimon Warde was born ~1267, Yorkshire, England (son of William Warde and Margaret de Neville); died ~1306, Yorkshire, England.

    Simon married Clarice LNU. [Group Sheet]


  16. 547.  Clarice LNU
    Children:
    1. 273. Joanna Warde was born 0___ 1304, Yorkshire, England; died 7 Sep 1362, Hertfordshire, England.

  17. 552.  John Bigod was born 1245-1250, Stockton, Norfolk, England (son of Hugh Bigod, Knight and Joan de Stuteville); died Bef 18 Mar 1305, (Settrington, Yorkshire, England).

    John married Isabel LNU (Stockton, Norfolk, England). Isabel was born ~ 1265, (Stockton, Norfolk, England); died Bef 12 Sep 1311, Stockton, Norfolk, England. [Group Sheet]


  18. 553.  Isabel LNU was born ~ 1265, (Stockton, Norfolk, England); died Bef 12 Sep 1311, Stockton, Norfolk, England.
    Children:
    1. 276. Roger Bigod, Knight was born ~ 1300, Stockton, Norfolk, England; died 17 Apr 1362, Settrington, Yorkshire, England.

  19. 560.  John Markenfield was born ~ 1280, Markenfield Hall, Ripon HG4 3AD, UK (son of William Markenfield and Alianore LNU); died 1348, York, Yorkshire, England; was buried , Copmanthorpe, York, United Kingdom.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: John de Markingfield

    Notes:

    About Sir John de Markenfield

    An adherent of Piers Gaveston; rose to prominence with him, and fell just as rapidly with him. Built the present Markenfield Hall during his short period of favor (1309-1312) - license to crenelate building, 1310.

    end of comment

    Markenfield Hall

    Built by John de Markenfield

    "The House That Time Forgot"


    AT the end of a winding, bumpy cart-track just a mile-and-a-half south of Ripon, time stands still.

    Once you’ve left the traffic of the busy A61 and your ears have adjusted to the hush, there is a stillness redolent of an earlier age, broken only by the wind and the skylarks. You take a right turn through a farmyard, and there it is, staring you in the face: a small corner of mediaeval England preserved in almost pristine condition. Markenfield Hall is the most unspoiled early 14th-century fortified house in the country. A solid, protective place, built around a large central courtyard, it has a great hall and a chapel with a turret. Two black swans glide around the spring-fed moat. It is incredibly romantic – a place so stunning that it should be wildly famous.

    And yet it isn’t. For most of the year it is simply a family home. It belongs to the Nortons, who are the barons Grantley, and is currently lived in by the widow of the 7th Lord Grantley, Lady Deirdre, and her second husband, television dramatist Ian Curteis. Like his wife before him, Mr Curteis has clearly fallen for Markenfield’s charms.

    I love just about everything about the place,” he says. “The quiet, the isolation, the history, being married to my wife, the birds on the moat – everything. It really can be hauntingly beautiful. When I come down in the morning and switch the light on, the swans hoot at me – it’s magical.” The house was built on the site of an older one in 1310, by Canon John de Markenfield, a ‘thoroughly unscrupulous local bully’, who at various times was accused of rape, kidnap, intimidation and theft. He went on to become Chancellor of the Exchequer to Edward II.

    From then on, it was the Markenfields’ family seat right up until 1570, when dramatic and tragic events brought their tenure to an abrupt end. But more of that later. For the next 400 years, it was occupied by tenant farmers who had neither the means nor the authority to make any great changes. So, while other mediaeval houses were demolished and rebuilt by their status-conscious owners, Markenfield Hall sat out every passing architectural trend.

    But time and neglect effected their own transformations, and by the late 20th century, parts of it were in a sorry state. It was only in 1980 that the 7th Lord Grantley started in earnest to restore the Hall to its former glory. Sadly, he died in 1995, but his work is continued today by Lady Deirdre and Mr Curteis.

    There is a tremendous amount of restoration work yet to be done,” says Mr Curteis. “I don’t resent the time it takes up, but it does take me away from my other work.” That’s hardly surprising, given the huge challenges the restoration project has thrown up over the years. In the Great Hall, for example, the huge fireplace had been dismantled in around 1570 and moved down a floor, to the ‘new’ farm kitchen in the undercroft below. The resulting space had simply been filled in. So, seven years ago, following protracted negotiations with English Heritage, the fireplace was unblocked, revealing the soot from the last fires to burn there four centuries earlier, and a replica fireplace, made from stone from the same quarry as the 14th-century original, was installed.

    It was a complex and time-consuming project, but the effort paid off: the results are impressive (“It comes into its own at Christmas,” says Mr Curteis). Having a private chapel adjoining the main body of the Hall is, says Lady Deirdre, “a great privilege”, and one project close to her heart has been its restoration.

    One of the long walls was sagging dangerously and so had to be rebuilt entirely. The supporting archways of the new niched wall are the only place in the house where bricks are used – a conscious acknowledgement by the architect that it is not original work.

    The chapel has also been the site of one of the most stunning pieces of restoration anywhere in the Hall. The original piscina, from 1310 – with separate bowls for the priest to wash his hands and the communion vessels – had been rendered almost unrecognisable by countless layers of limewash, but was painstakingly uncovered using a second-hand set of surgical tools. The stone was carved in the early 1300s, but what has been revealed looks breath-takingly crisp and unworn.

    Unusually for a place so old, the Hall is not said to be haunted. “I sometimes get requests from people wanting to camp out here, looking for ghosts”, says Mr Curteis, “but there’s nothing to see. It’s a house with a most extraordinarily benign feel to it.”

    Lady Deirdre agrees: “I think it welcomes people after so many years of neglect.”

    As if to thank its owners for all the attention, the house has revealed some pleasant surprises, including a beautiful carved stone hand, which was found when the water-level dropped in the moat. Where it comes from, nobody knows, but it has been speculated that it was salvaged centuries ago from neighbouring Fountains Abbey when it was closed by Henry VIII. Gems like these make it seem all the more surprising that more people don’t know about the place. “The most common comment I hear from visitors is ‘I’ve lived in Ripon all my life and I never knew Markenfield was here’,” says Mr Curteis.

    It is beautifully tucked away – thanks to the Turnpike Act.” He’s referring to the fact that the main road used to pass within yards of the house, but was re-directed in 1771, leaving it stranded a mile away from the main thoroughfare. It’s one of the reasons why the place appears so untouched by the ebb and flow of history. The other reason is that its owners were absent for 400 years. Which brings us to what must be the house’s defining moment in history.

    The year was 1569, and England was riven by sectarian strife. Under Elizabeth I, the country had been restored to Protestantism, yet, like many northern landowners, Sir Thomas Markenfield was a staunch Catholic.

    On November 20 that year, he and his uncle, Sir Richard Norton (a direct ancestor of the Hall’s present owners), gathered a large contingent to take part in a Catholic rebellion against the queen in an attempt to restore freedom of worship. When they had taken their final Mass in the chapel, Sir Thomas carried the banner of the Five Wounds of Christ around the courtyard at Markenfield, before riding out for what he deemed a holy and sacred cause.

    It became known as the Rising of the North – and it was crushed. More than 200 rebels were executed in Ripon on what is still called Gallows Hill, just two miles from Markenfield.

    Sir Thomas and his uncle fled to the Low Countries, where their fortunes sank further still. Sir Richard died in 1585 of wounds sustained while being arrested in Flanders, and Sir Thomas died some years later, alone and destitute. The Hall was confiscated by the Crown and only returned to the family’s hands when it was bought a couple of centuries later by a member of the Norton family which still owns it.

    But that’s not quite where the story ends. A decade ago, the chapel saw a coming together of the two faiths that Sir Thomas and his uncle could never have envisaged.

    When Lady Deirdre married Ian Curteis, in 2001, it was the first marriage in the Chapel of St Michael Archangel for more than 400 years; poignantly, Lady Deirdre is a Catholic, and Mr Curteis is a Protestant. It was described as “this smallest of healings between us”, and Anglican services and Catholic masses are now held alternately at the chapel, every two weeks.

    It seems some things do change – even in places where time stands still. So, if time has healed and the house is reconciled to its past, what of the future? “It must stay a private house to which people are welcome,” says Mr Curteis. “With the chapel in use,” adds Lady Deirdre firmly.

    Markenfield Hall will be open to the public from June 19 to July 2, from 2pm to 5pm each day. Admission is ą4, concs ą3.

    Read more at: http://www.yorkshirepost.co.uk/lifestyle/homes/the-house-that-time-forgot-1-3460832

    Buried:
    Copmanthorpe is a village and civil parish in the City of York in the English county of North Yorkshire, 4 miles (6.4 km) south-west of York, west of Bishopthorpe and close to Acaster Malbis, Askham Bryan and Askham Richard. According to the 2001 census the parish had a population of 4,262, reducing to 4,173 at the 2011 Census.[1] Until 1996 it had been part of the Selby district. Historically part of the West Riding of Yorkshire, the village is part of the York Outer constituency.

    The village is mentioned in the Domesday Book as Copemantorp, from Old Norse Kaupmanna ¤orp,[3] meaning Traders' Village or Craftsmen's Village.[4] The area of Copmanthorpe covering Main Street, Church Street and Low Green became a Conservation Area in 1978.

    Copmanthorpe is bounded to the north by the A64, while the East Coast Main Line runs through its south-east periphery, to the west lies open countryside.

    ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copmanthorpe

    John married Eleanor LNU 1320, Markenfield Hall, Ripon HG4 3AD, UK. Eleanor was born 1254, York, Yorkshire, England; died 1308, York, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  20. 561.  Eleanor LNU was born 1254, York, Yorkshire, England; died 1308, York, Yorkshire, England.
    Children:
    1. 280. Andrew Markenfield was born ~ 1310, Markenfield Hall, Ripon, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1357, (Markenfield Hall, Ripon, Yorkshire, England).

  21. 562.  Peter de Middleton was born 1300, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England (son of William Scot de Middleton and Agnes Boteler); died 1336, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Sheriff of Yorkshire

    Peter married Eustacia Plumpton. Eustacia (daughter of Robert Plumpton, II and Lucia Ros) was born 1299, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England; died 1354, Somme, Picardie, France. [Group Sheet]


  22. 563.  Eustacia Plumpton was born 1299, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England (daughter of Robert Plumpton, II and Lucia Ros); died 1354, Somme, Picardie, France.
    Children:
    1. Thomas de Middleton was born 1321, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England; died 1393, (Yorkshire) England.
    2. 281. Margery de Middleton was born 1325, Ripon, Yorkshire, England; died 1409, Markenfield Hall, Ripon HG4 3AD, UK.

  23. 572.  John Fitzwilliam, Knight was born 0___ 1327, Sprotboro, West Riding, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1385, Howden Parish, East Riding of Yorkshire, England.

    John married Elizabeth Clinton ~ 1352. Elizabeth (daughter of John Clinton, II, 2nd Lord Clinton and Margery Corbet) was born 1330, Maxstoke, Warwick, England. [Group Sheet]


  24. 573.  Elizabeth Clinton was born 1330, Maxstoke, Warwick, England (daughter of John Clinton, II, 2nd Lord Clinton and Margery Corbet).
    Children:
    1. 286. William Fitzwilliam, Knight was born ~ 1354, Sprotboro, West Riding, Yorkshire, England; died 8 Apr 1398.

  25. 574.  Ralph de Cromwell, Knight, 1st Baron Cromwell was born 0___ 1335, (Tattershall, Lincolnshire, England); died 27 Aug 1398.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Member of Parliament - House of Lords
    • Also Known As: Sir Ralph Cromwell

    Notes:

    Ralph de Cromwell, 1st Baron Cromwell (died 27 August 1398), Tattershall in Lincolnshire, was an English peer. He was summoned to the House of Lords as Lord Cromwell in 1375. [1]

    Cromwell died in August, 1398, and was succeeded in the barony by his son, Ralph.

    Family

    Ralph married Maud (b.1337), daughter of John Bernack and Joan (d.1361),[2][3] daughter of John Marmion, 4th Baron Marmion of Winteringham and had the following issue:-

    Ralph Cromwell. Son and heir.
    Amice de Cromwell
    Maud de Cromwell
    Elizabeth de Cromwell

    Rerences

    Jump up ^ Plea Rolls of the Court of Common Pleas; National Archives; CP40/541; year 1396; http://aalt.law.uh.edu/AALT6/R2/CP40no541a/aCP40no541afronts/IMG_0312.htm; third entry, as plaintiff; presumably referring to the first Baron Cromwell 'Radus de Cromwell de Tateshale, chevalier '
    Jump up ^ Cal Inq PMs XI.
    Jump up ^ Farnham 1919–20, p. 466
    Bibliography[edit]
    Farnham, George F. (1919–20). Leicestershire Manors: The Manors of Allexton, Appleby and Ashby Folville (PDF). Leicester: Leicestershire Archaelogical and Historical Society.
    Kidd, Charles, Williamson, David (editors). Debrett's Peerage and Baronetage (1990 edition). New York: St Martin's Press, 1990.
    Calendar of Inquisitions Post Mortem XI. London: HMSO. 1935.
    Leigh Rayment's Peerage Pages [self-published source][better source needed]

    Ralph married Maud Bernack, Baroness Cromwell Bef 20 Jan 1352. Maud was born 7 Mar 1337, Tattershall, Lincolnshire, England; died 10 Apr 1419, Hornby Castle, Hornby, Bedale, DL8 1NQ. [Group Sheet]


  26. 575.  Maud Bernack, Baroness Cromwell was born 7 Mar 1337, Tattershall, Lincolnshire, England; died 10 Apr 1419, Hornby Castle, Hornby, Bedale, DL8 1NQ.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Lady of Tatishale
    • Also Known As: Maud Bernacke
    • Also Known As: Maud Bernake

    Notes:

    Biography

    Maud Bernake was born circa 1337 at/of Tattershall, Lincolnshire, England. [1] She married Sir Ralph before 20 January 1352. [2] They had five sons, Ralph, Knight, 2nd Lord Cromwell, Robert, William, Knight, Thomas and John, and three daughters, Elizabeth, Amice (or Avice) and Maud.[3]

    Maud left a will on 14 September 1416, and wrote a codicil on 1 January 1417.[4] She died on 10 April 1419. [5] [6]

    At Easter in 2 Henry IV (3 April 1401), at Ebor, Matilda de Cromwell, the lady of Tatishale, sued Henry fitz Hugh and Elizabeth, his wife, for a moiety of the manors of Tanfeld and Carthorp and other lands.[7] The pedigree provided for the plea says:

    John Marmyon, living 1 Edward III [which began on 25 January 1327], married Matilda, and had:
    Robert Marmyon, living in 1338;
    John who had:
    Matilda de Cromwell, the plaintiff in 1401;
    Avice who had:
    Robert who had:
    Elizabeh who married Henry fitz Hugh, the defendants in 1401.
    Matilda Cromwell was back in De Banco at Norfolk, at Michaelmas in 7 Henry IV (3 April 1406), suing Margaret, formerly wife of Gilbert Talbot, Kt, for the next presentation to the church of Attilburgh, appurtenant to the manor of Plessinghalle, and she said Hugh Daubeney, Earl of Arundell, presented Peter Giffard in the time of Henry III and his four sisters were his heirs, and gave the descents below:[8]

    Margaret stated the Earl presented Godfrey Giffard in the reign of Richard I. The jury found in Margaret's favour as the church was not appurtenant to the manor of Plessinghalle. Margaret's claim was from Constantine Clifton. The descent she provided is added below in blue:[8]

    Hugh Daubeney, Earl of Arundell, his four sisters were his heirs;
    Mabel, Plessinghalle was part of eldest sister Mabel's purparty and descended through her to:
    Robert de Tateshale, heir, granted the manor of Plessinghalle to William Bernak, Kt, who presented in the reign of Edward III;
    Robert de Tateshale who was dead and had no surviving children;
    Emma de Tateshale who married Osbert Cayley and had:
    Thomas who had:
    Margery who married Roger de Clifton and had:
    Adam who had:
    Constantine de Clifton who had:
    John de Clifton who had:
    Constantine Clifton;
    Joan de Tateshale who married Robert Dryby and had:
    Alice Dryby who married William Bernak and had:
    John who had:
    Matilda Cromwell, the plaintiff in 1406
    Isabella, who married John de Orby and died without having children;
    Isabella married John fitz Alan and had:
    John fitz Alan;
    Nicholaa married Roger Somery;
    Cecilia married Roger de Mohaut;
    Matilda said William Bernak, Kt. had:

    John who had:
    John, who was dead and had no surviving children;
    William, who was dead and had no surviving children; and
    Matilda Cromwell, the plaintiff.
    No more info is currently available for Maud Bernacke. Can you add to her biography?

    Sources

    ? Our Royal, Titled, Noble and Commoner Ancestors and Cousins
    ? Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families
    ? Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families
    ? Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families
    ? Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families
    ? Maud Bernake, database, Our Royal, Titled, Noble and Commoner Ancestors and Cousins, extracted from Mr. Marlyn Lewis, Portland, Oregon.
    ? Wrottesley 1905, p. 221 Is her parent John a misprint for Joan?
    ? 8.0 8.1 Wrottesley 1905, p. 244-5

    See also:

    Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, (2011), Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, Royal Ancestry series, 2nd edition, 4 vols., ed. Kimball G. Everingham, (Salt Lake City, Utah: the author, 2011), volume I, page 569-570 #8.
    Maud Bernake, database, Our Royal, Titled, Noble and Commoner Ancestors and Cousins, extracted from Mr. Marlyn Lewis, Portland, Oregon.[9]
    Major-General The Hon G Wrottesley, comp., Pedigrees from the Plea Rolls collected from the Pleadings in the Various Courts of Law AD 1200 to 1500 from the Original Rolls, ( 1905), accessed 29 August 2014, https://archive.org/stream/pedigreesfromple00wrotrich#page/n5/mode/2up .

    Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants, Volume II
    Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants
    Caerphilly Castle

    Children:
    1. 287. Maude de Cromwell was born ~ 1362, Tattershall, Lincolnshire, England; died Aft 1418.
    2. William de Cromwell was born ~ 1395, (Tattershall, Lincolnshire, England).

  27. 7288.  Robert Harington, Knight was born 0___ 1305, Melling, Lancashire, England (son of John de Harington, Knight, 1st Baron Harington and Margaret Burlingham); died 0___ 1334, Aldingham, Cumbria, England.

    Notes:

    Sir Robert Harington (1305[citation needed]-1334), eldest son and heir apparent, knighted before 1331, who predeceased his father, having in about 1327 married Elizabeth de Multon (born 1306), daughter of Thomas de Multon and one of the three sisters and co-heiresses of John de Multon.

    She was the heiress of several estates including: Thurston in Suffolk; Moulton, Skirbeck and Fleet in Lincolnshire, of Egremont in Cumbria and of manors in County Limerick, Ireland.

    He left a son, heir to his grandfather:

    John Harington, 2nd Baron Harington (1328-1363).

    Robert married Elizabeth de Multon ~ 1327. Elizabeth (daughter of Thomas de Multon, V, Knight, 1st Baron Multon and Eleanor Burgh) was born 23 Nov 1306, Mulgrave Castle, Whitby, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1344, Aldingham, Cumbria, England. [Group Sheet]


  28. 7289.  Elizabeth de Multon was born 23 Nov 1306, Mulgrave Castle, Whitby, Yorkshire, England (daughter of Thomas de Multon, V, Knight, 1st Baron Multon and Eleanor Burgh); died 0___ 1344, Aldingham, Cumbria, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Elizabeth de Haverington

    Notes:

    About

    history:

    http://www.thepeerage.com/p43184.htm#i431837

    Elizabeth de Multon is the daughter of Thomas de Multon.2 She married Sir Robert Haverington, son of Sir John de Haverington, 1st Lord Harington and Joan Dacre, before 1327.1 From before 1327, her married name became Haverington.1

    Children of Elizabeth de Multon and Sir Robert Haverington

    Robert Harington+2
    Simon Harington2
    John de Harington, 2nd Lord Harington+2 b. b 1315, d. 28 May 1363

    Citations

    [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke's Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke's Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 2, page 1789. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    [S37] Charles Mosley, Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.

    Birth:
    Mulgrave Castle refers to one of three structures on the same property in Lythe, near Whitby, Yorkshire, England. One of these, known as the "old" or "ancient" castle, was by legend founded by Wada, a 6th-century ruler of Hčalsingland. The second castle, (54.4935°N 0.7055°W) caput of the feudal barony of Mulgrave, was of Norman construction and remained active until destroyed by order of Parliament in 1647. The third is a country house (54.5012°N 0.6922°W) which was constructed by Lady Catherine Darnley and passed in 1718 by marriage into the Phipps family, when her daughter Lady Catherine Annesley married William Phipps. The Phipps family later held the titles of Baron Mulgrave, Earl of Mulgrave and Marquess of Normanby. ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mulgrave_Castle

    More images of Mulgrave Castle ... https://www.google.com/search?q=mulgrave+castle&rlz=1C1KMZB_enUS591US591&espv=2&biw=1440&bih=815&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjfiKz6hKPLAhVFqB4KHY94A7AQ7AkIMg&dpr=1

    Children:
    1. Elizabeth de Harington was born Abt 1322, Aldingham, Cumbria, England.
    2. 3644. John Harington, Knight, 2nd Baron Harington was born 0___ 1328, Aldingham, Cumbria, England; died 28 May 1363, Gleaston Hall, Aldingham, Lancashire, England; was buried 7 Jun 1363, Cartmel Priory, Cartmel, Cumbria, England.

  29. 7292.  William L'Engleys was born ~ 1296, Inglewood (Forest), Cumbria, England.

    William married Isabel de Warcop. Isabel was born ~ 1300, Warcop, Cumbria, England. [Group Sheet]


  30. 7293.  Isabel de Warcop was born ~ 1300, Warcop, Cumbria, England.

    Notes:

    Birth:
    Map & History ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Warcop

    Children:
    1. 3646. William English, Knight was born 0___ 1322, Appleby, Westmorland, England; died 3 Aug 1369, Wembley, Cambridgeshire, England.


Generation: 14

  1. 8192.  William de Bolling was born 1190, New Hall (Derbyshire) England (son of William de Bolling and unnamed spouse); died ~1258, Kirkstall Abbey, Yorkshire, England.

    William married unnamed spouse. [Group Sheet]


  2. 8193.  unnamed spouse
    Children:
    1. 4096. Robert de Bolling was born 1220, Bradford, Yorkshire, England; died 1258-1259, (Bradford) England.

  3. 8832.  Hugh Bigod, Knight, 1st Earl of Norfolk was born 0___ 1095, Belvoir Castle, Belvoir, Leicestershire, England (son of Roger Bigod, Knight and Adeliza de Tosny); died 0___ 1177, Israel.

    Notes:

    Hugh Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk (109-1177) was the second son of Roger Bigod (also known as Roger Bigot) (d. 1107), sheriff of Norfolk and royal advisor, and Adeliza, daughter of Robert de Tosny.

    Early Years

    After the death of his elder brother William, who perished without issue in the sinking of the White Ship on 26 November 1120, Hugh was allowed to inherit his brother's office of royal steward and many estates in East Anglia. He also succeeded his aunt Albreda, heiress of her brother Berengar de Tosny, with lands in Yorkshire and in Normandy.[1] Hugh became Constable of Norwich Castle in 1122.

    During King Stephen's reign

    Hugh initially supported Stephen of Blois as king of England. On the death of Henry I in 1135, his nephew Stephen usurped the throne, despite the oath Stephen and the barons had sworn to accept Henry's daughter Empress Matilda as his successor. It was Bigod who asserted that, in his last days, Henry I had named Stephen to become king at the expense of his daughter Matilda.[2] Civil war resulted when, in 1139 Matilda, commanded the military strength necessary to challenge Stephen within his own realm.

    King Stephen had the initial support of the English barons, but in 1136 he was stricken with sickness and the report of his death was quickly spread abroad. Hugh Bigod seized and held Norwich castle. Stephen, quickly recovering, laid siege to the city and Hugh was compelled to surrender.[3] In February 1141 Bigod fought on Stephen's side in the First Battle of Lincoln, after which the Earl deserted the captured king. In July of that year he was granted the earldom of Norfolk by the Empress Matilda but he appears to have assumed a position of armed neutrality during the civil war, rather than actively siding with the supporters of the empress.[4]

    He supported his first wife's brother-in-law, Geoffrey de Mandeville, 1st Earl of Essex, during his rebellion against King Stephen in 1143-44.[5] During the disagreement between King Stephen and Archbishop Theobald in 1148, Hugh Bigod sided with the archbishop and received him in his stronghold, Castle of Framlingham, but joined with others in negotiating a reconciliation between the king and archbishop.

    Rise of King Henry II

    Five years later, in 1153, when Henry, Duke of Normandy, soon to be King Henry II (r. 1154–89), landed in England to assert his claim to the throne, Bigod held out in Ipswich against Stephen's forces, while Henry II, on the other side, laid siege to Stamford. Both places fell to Stephen. In the critical state of his fortunes, however, Stephen was in no position to punish the rebel earl. Negotiations between the two parties resulted in Henry's recognition as Stephen's heir and Hugh eluded retaliation.

    On Henry II's accession in December 1154, Bigod received confirmation of the possession of his earldom and office of royal steward by a charter issued apparently in January of the next year. The first years of the new reign were spent in restoring order to the shattered kingdom, and in breaking the power of the independent barons, which had grown out of control during King Stephen's reign.

    It was not before long that Bigod became agitated under the rule of law initiated by Henry. He grew restless with measures such as the scutage, a fee paid by vassals in lieu of military service, which became the central feature of Henry II's military system of operation by 1159. The Earl showed signs of resistance, but was at once put down. In 1157 Henry II marched into the eastern counties and received the earl's submission.

    After this incident Hugh Bigod makes no significant appearances in the chronicles for some time; he is named among those who had been excommunicated by Becket, in consequence of his retention of lands belonging to the monastery of Pentney in Norfolk.

    The revolt of 1173
    Main article: Revolt of 1173–1174

    In 1173 the young Crown Prince Henry (also known as Henry the Young King), raised a revolt against his father, Henry II. This gave Hugh Bigod yet another chance for rebellion, along with the league of the English barons and the kings of France and Scotland in his favour. He at once became a leader in the cause, perhaps eager to revive the feudal power, which Henry II had curtailed. In addition to the fact that the inevitable conflict, as far as England was concerned, centred round his possessions. The custody of Norwich Castle was promised by the young prince as his reward.

    The king's energy and good fortune were equal to the occasion. While he held in check his rebel vassals in France, the loyal barons in England defeated his enemies there. Robert de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester (d.1190) landed at Walton, in Suffolk, on 29 September 1173 and marched to Framlingham, joining forces with Hugh. Together they besieged and took the castle of Hagenet in Suffolk on 13 October, held by Randal de Broc for the crown. But the Earl of Leicester was defeated and taken prisoner setting out from Framlingham at the Battle of Fornham, near Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, by the justiciar, Richard de Luci and other barons. These then turned their arms against Earl Hugh, who, not being strong enough to fight, opened negotiations with his assailants. It is said he bought them off, and at the same time secured a safe passage home for the Flemings in his service.

    Final days

    Though defeated and compelled to surrender his castles, Bigod kept his lands and his earldom, and lived at peace with Henry II until his death reportedly in 1177 in Palestine.[6]

    It should be noted, however, that on 1 March 1177, his son Roger Bigod appealed to the king on a dispute with his stepmother. Hugh being dead at the time of Roger's appeal, the date of his father's death is fixed 'ante caput jejunii', (i.e. before 9 March). If, then, he died in Palestine, his death must have taken place in the preceding year, 1176, to allow time for the arrival of the news in England. Henry II took advantage of Roger's appeal to seize upon the late Earl's treasure. Earl Hugh had possessed vast estates, which he inherited, and was also the recipient of the third penny of judicial fines levied in the county of Norfolk by right of his earldom.

    Marriage and family

    Bigod married firstly to Juliane de Vere (died c. 1199). She was the daughter of Aubrey de Vere II and Adeliza de Clare, the daughter of Gilbert Fitz Richard de Clare, 2nd Earl of Clare. The marriage was dissolved before 1156. They had one son:

    Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk (born c. 1144-5). He married Ida de Tosny, had issue.
    Bigod married secondly Gundreda (c.1135-1200), daughter of Roger de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Warwick. They had two children:

    Hugh Bigod (b. c. 1156)
    William Hugh Bigod (b. 1168)

    end

    Died:
    State of Palestine

    Hugh married Juliane de Vere, Countess of Norfolk. Juliane (daughter of Aubrey de Vere, II and Adeliza de Clare) was born ~ 1116, Castle Hedingham, Essex, England; died ~ 1199. [Group Sheet]


  4. 8833.  Juliane de Vere, Countess of Norfolk was born ~ 1116, Castle Hedingham, Essex, England (daughter of Aubrey de Vere, II and Adeliza de Clare); died ~ 1199.
    Children:
    1. 4416. Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk was born 1144-1150, Norfolk, England; died 0___ 1221, (Norfolk, England); was buried , Thetford, Norfolk, England.

  5. 8834.  Ralph de Tosny, V, Knight, Earl was born ~1140, Flamstead, Hertfordshire, England (son of Roger Toeni, Lord of Flamstead and Ida Hainault); died 0___ 1162, Flamstead, Hertfordshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Ralph V de Toeni
    • Also Known As: Raoul IV

    Notes:

    Sir Ralph de Tony formerly Toeni aka de Conches, de Tosny
    Born about 1140 in Flamstead, Hertfordshire

    ANCESTORS ancestors

    Son of Roger (Toeni) de Toeni and Ida (Hainault) de Toeni
    Brother of Godehaut (Toeni) de Mohun, Roger (Toeni) de Toeni IV, Baldwin (Toeni) de Toeni, Geoffrey (Toeni) de Toeni and Goda (Toeni) de Ferrers

    Husband of Marguerite (Beaumont) de Tosny — married after 1155 in Leicester, England

    DESCENDANTS descendants

    Father of Roger (Toeni) de Tony and Ida (Toeni) le Bigod
    Died 1162 in Flamstead, Hertfordshire, Englandmap
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    Categories: House of Tosny.

    European Aristocracy
    Ralph (Toeni) de Tony is a member of royalty, nobility or aristocracy in the British Isles.
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    Contents
    [hide]
    1 Biography
    2 Ralph V of Tosny
    2.1 Marriage
    3 Sources
    4 Acknowledgements
    Biography
    Title of Ralph de Tony (Royal Ancestry):

    Seigneur of Toeni (now Tosny) in Normandy
    Ralph V of Tosny
    RAOUL [V] de Tosny (-1162). The Chronicon Hanoniense names (in order) "Radulphum primum [filium Rogerum], Rogerum secundum et Balduinum tercium et Gaufridum quartum clericum" as the children of "[Rogerum] domino de Thoenio" & his wife[99]. Robert of Torigny records the death in 1162 of "Radulfus de Toene"[100].
    m (after 1155) MARGUERITE de Beaumont, daughter of ROBERT [II] Earl of Leicester & his wife Amice de Gačel ([1125]-after 1185). Robert of Torigny refers to the wife of "Radulfus de Toene" as "filia Roberti comitis Leccestriµ" but does not name her[101]. The 1163/64 Pipe Roll records "Margareta uxor Rad de Toeni" making payment "de Suppl de Welcumesto" in Essex/Hertfordshire[102]. The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Margareta de Tony…lx annorum” and her land “in Welcumestowe". Raoul [V] & wife had [two] children:
    ROGER [IV] de Tosny (-after 29 Dec 1208). Robert of Torigny records that "parvulo filio" succeeded in 1162 on the death of his father "Radulfus de Toene" but does not name him[104]. Seigneur de Tosny. The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], names "Rogerus de Tony" paying "xl s" in Sussex[105].
    [RALPH de Tosny of Holkham, co Norfolk (-before 1184). The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Radulfus de Tonay ii m" in Sussex in [1167/68][106].] m ADA de Chaumont, daughter of ROBERT de Chaumont & his wife -- (-aft 1184). Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “in Holkham…de feodo Rogeri de Tony” held by “Ade de Tony…fuit Roberti de Chaumunt”, adding that she has “i filium Baldewinum…xv annorum et…v filias”. A charter dated 25 Sep 1188 confirms the foundation of Dodnash Priory, Suffolk by "Baldewin de Toeni et dna Alda mr sua".
    Marriage
    Husband: Ralph de TOENI
    Wife: Margaret de BEAUMONT
    Child: Roger de TOENI
    Marriage: AFT 1155[1]
    Sources
    "Royal Ancestry" 2013 by Douglas Richardson Vol. I page 40
    Illegitimate child of Henry II, by a mistress, Ida de Tony, daughter of Ralph de Tony (died 1162), by Margaret, daughter of Robert, 2nd Earl of Leicester. Ida later became the wife of Roger le Bigod, Earl of Norfolk (died 1221).

    "Royal Ancestry" 2013 D. Richardson Vol. V p. 171-172
    Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XI, p. 55.
    Gallia Christiana, XI, Instrumenta, V, col. 128.
    Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Christ Church, Aldgate, London, VI, p. 152. Actes Henri II, Tome I, CCCCXXIII, p. 550.
    Hunter, J. (ed.) (1844) The Great Rolls of the Pipe for the second, third and fourth years of the reign of King Henry II 1155-1158 (London) ("Pipe Roll") 4 Hen II (1157), Norfolk and Suffolk, p. 125.
    Gisleberti Chronicon Hanoniense, MGH SS XXI, pp. 505 and 506.
    Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 134.
    Gisleberti Chronicon Hanoniense, MGH SS XXI, pp. 505 and 506.
    Chronique de Robert de Torigny I, 1162, p. 339.
    Chronique de Robert de Torigny I, 1162, p. 339.
    Pipe Roll Society, Vol. VII (1886) The Great Roll of the Pipe for the 10th year of King * Henry II (London) ("Pipe Roll 10 Hen II (1163/64)"), p. 38.
    Rotuli Dominabus, Rotuli VIII, Essex, p. 41.
    Chronique de Robert de Torigny I, 1162, p. 339.
    Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno VI regis Ricardi, ad redemptionem eius, scutagium ad XXs, p. 92.
    Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Knights fees, p. 47.
    Rotuli Dominabus, Rotuli V, Norffolk, p. 27.
    Ancient Charters (Round), Part I, 53, p. 87.
    Rotuli Dominabus, Rotuli V, Norffolk, p. 27.
    Ancient Charters (Round), Part I, 53, p. 87.
    Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, p. 499.
    Rotuli Dominabus, Rotuli V, Norffolk, p. 27.
    Gisleberti Chronicon Hanoniense, MGH SS XXI, pp. 505 and 506.
    Magna Carta Ancestry, Fenwick Allied Ancestry, Sellers. Teacher Genealogist Bond 007. http://fmg.ac/
    Jean Maunder Long Bio/Time, etc...
    Geni. Sources and discussion.

    end of biography

    History of the House of Tosny: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_of_Tosny

    Ralph married Margaret de Beaumont <1155, Leicester, Leicestershire, England. Margaret (daughter of Robert de Beaumont, Knight, 2nd Earl of Leicester and Amice de Montfort, Countess of Leicester) was born 0___ 1125, (Leicestershire, England); died Aft 1185. [Group Sheet]


  6. 8835.  Margaret de Beaumont was born 0___ 1125, (Leicestershire, England) (daughter of Robert de Beaumont, Knight, 2nd Earl of Leicester and Amice de Montfort, Countess of Leicester); died Aft 1185.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Marguerite of Leicester

    Children:
    1. 4417. Ida de Tosny, Countess of Norfolk was born <1160, Flamstead, Hertfordshire, England; died Aft 1185.
    2. Roger Toeni, IV, Lord of Flamstead was born 1156, Flamstead, Hertfordshire, England; died Bef 1209.

  7. 8836.  John FitzGilbert was born 26 Nov 1105, (Wiltshire) England (son of Gilbert Giffard, Royal Serjeant and Mary Margarite De Venuz); died 29 Sep 1165, Rockley, Marlborough, Wiltshire, England; was buried , Bradenstoke, Wiltshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: John Marshal
    • Also Known As: The Marshal of the Horses
    • Alt Birth: ~ 1105
    • Alt Death: 0___ 1165

    Notes:

    John FitzGilbert the Marshal of the Horses (c. 1105 – 1165) was a minor Anglo-Norman nobleman during the reign of King Stephen, and fought in the 12th century civil war on the side of Empress Matilda. Since at least 1130 and probably earlier, he had been the royal marshal to King Henry I. When Henry died, John FitzGilbert swore for Stephen and was granted the castles of Marlborough and Ludgershall, Wiltshire during this time. Along with Hamstead Marshal, this gave him control of the valley of the River Kennet in Wiltshire. Around 1139, John changed sides and swore for the Empress Matilda. In September 1141, Matilda fled the siege of Winchester and took refuge in the Marshal's castle at Ludgershall. While covering her retreat from Winchester, John Marshal was forced to take refuge at Wherwell Abbey. The attackers set fire to the building, and John lost an eye to dripping lead from the melting roof.

    In 1152, John had a celebrated confrontation with King Stephen, who had besieged him at Newbury Castle. After John had broken an agreement to surrender, Stephen threatened to kill his son, whom John had given as a hostage. John refused, saying he could make more sons, but Stephen apparently took pity on the young boy and did not kill him. The boy grew up to be William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke, a legendary figure in medieval lore, and one of the most powerful men in England.

    The office of Lord Marshal, which originally related to the keeping of the King's horses, and later, the head of his household troops, was won as a hereditary title by John, and was passed to his eldest son, and later claimed by William. John also had a daughter, Margaret Marshal, who married Ralph de Somery, son of John de Somery and Hawise de Paynell.

    Family

    John was the son of Gilbert, Royal Serjeant and Marshal to Henry I, and his wife Margaret. After his father died in 1129 John inherited the title of the king's marshal. John married Aline Pipard whose father Walter Pipard had been a friend of John's father. John arranged an annulment of his marriage to Aline Pipard in order to marry Sibyl of Salisbury, the sister of Patrick of Salisbury, who had been a local rival of his, and a supporter of King Stephen, up to that point. John had two sons by Aline - Gilbert (d. 1166) and Walter (d. bef.1165). Walter predeceased his father and Gilbert died shortly after inheriting his father's lands.

    John's eldest son by Sibyl of Salisbury, also called John Marshal (1145-1194), inherited the title of Marshal, which he held until his death. The title was then granted by King Richard the Lionheart to his second son by Sybilla, William (1147-1219), who made the name and title famous. Though he had started out as a younger son without inheritance, by the time he actually inherited the title his reputation as a soldier and statesman was unmatched across Western Europe. John Marshal had four sons in total by his second wife. As well as John and William, there was Henry (1150-1206), who went on to become Bishop of Exeter, and Ancel, who served as a knight in the household of his kinsman, Rotrou, Count of Perche. There were also two daughters Sybilla and Margaret.

    References

    Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis, Lines 55-28, 66-27, 81-28, 122A-29
    Barlow, Frank. The Feudal Kingdom of England 1042-1216 London: Longman Group Limited, 1961. ISBN 0-582-48237-2
    William Marshal, Knighthood, War and Chivalry 1147-1219 Longman 2002 ISBN 0-582-77222-2

    end of biography

    Biography

    John Fitz-Gilbert, also called John Marshal, was the son of Gilbert Giffard, who was like John an hereditary marshal of the household of King Henry I. John and his father Gilbert, it was noted several generations later by King John, had successfully claimed the right to being "chief" marshall against competing claims from Robert de Venoix and William de Hasings.[1] By the time of John's children, the surname was being used as an early example of a surname, not only by his son and heir, but also by his younger sons.

    John's career coincided with a dark 19-year period in Anglo-Norman history, called "The Anarchy" (1135-1164). It was an interregnum following King Henry I's death with no clear male heir (his legitimate son had been lost at sea in 1620). Henry I's illegitimate son, Stephen, seized the throne, opposed by Henry's daughter-in-law, Empress Matilda, fighting for her (legitimate) son's rights (he became King Henry II in 1164). The Anglo-Norman nobility nearly wrecked the country in a lengthy civil war.[2]

    John's marriage to Aline Pipard was a casualty of this conflict. From 1135 to 1140 John loyally served King Stephen as Marshal of England, managing the Army's supplies and accompanying the King when he secured Normandy to his cause. John received three important castles in Wiltshire as his reward. With Hamstead Marshal, this gave him control of Wiltshire's strategic Kennet River valley. He was bitterly opposed by Patrick de Salisbury (also in Wiltshire), who supported Empress Matilda.[3].

    In February 1141, Stephen's army was defeated at Lincoln and the King taken prisoner, temporarily. John, who may have opposed Stephen's questionable military strategy, decided to change sides. Later that year, with great bravery, he helped Empress Matilda escape an ambush in Wiltshire, loosing an eye and being left for dead in the process. At the same time he came to a political/family agreement with his local enemy, the Patrick of Salisbury, by arranging to annul his first marriage to his distant cousin Aline Pipard (for "consanguinity" an often-used excuse by Medieval nobles at a time when divorce was impossible) and marry Patrick's spinster sister, Sybil.[4]

    Aline's sons' rights were maintained but they both died within a year of their father, leaving John's lands, and the "Marshal of England" office, to John's third son (first son by Sibyl), John Marshal, who exercised it under King Henry II until his death in 1192. King Richard (Lionheart) then passed the office to his younger brother, William, who had gone to Normandy as squire to his cousin William de Tancarville, High Chamberlain of Normandy. Though William had started out as a fourth son without any inheritance, by the time he became the Marshal of England, his reputation as a soldier and statesman was unmatched. He expanded the powers of the Marshal's office and was later Regent for Henry III when he inherited the throne as a boy[5].

    John Fitz-Gilbert Marshal was a ruthless Anglo-Norman baron with considerable daring, energy, and ambition. His abilities as a soldier and his love of military stratagy were well recorded as was his political savvy. Despite what some detractors wrote, he was also quite loyal by contemporary standards. During the Anarchy he only changed sides once, remaining faithful to Matilda and her son after 1141 and defending them skillfully and at his own peril. His son William inherited his father's skills, reportedly rescuing Queen Eleanor (of Aquitaine), Henry II's wife, after an ambush near Lusignan Castle in France in 1167. After his brother's death without issue opened the way for him to become Marshal of England, he also showed great political skills, including helping implement the Magna Carta of 1215 between King John and the Barons. Between them, this father and son, from a relatively-minor Norman house, marked their century and influenced the course of English history.[6]

    Burial: Bradenstoke Priory, Wiltshire

    John FitzGilbert the Marshal (Marechal) (c. 1105 - 1165) was a minor Anglo-Norman nobleman during the reign of King Stephen, and fought in the 12th century civil war on the side of the Empress Matilda. Since at least 1130 and probably earlier, he had been the royal marshal to King Henry I. When Henry died, John FitzGilbert swore for Stephen and was granted the castles of Marlborough and Ludgershall, in Wiltshire. Along with Hamstead Marshal, this gave him control of the valley of the River Kennet in Wiltshire.

    Around 1139, John changed sides and swore for the Empress Matilda. In September 1141, Matilda fled the siege of Winchester and took refuge in the Marshal's castle at Ludgershall. While covering her retreat from Winchester, John Marshal was forced to take refuge at Wherwell Abbey. The attackers set fire to the building, and John lost an eye to dripping lead from the melting roof.

    In 1152, John had a legendary confrontation with King Stephen, who had besieged him at Newbury Castle. After John had broken an agreement to surrender, Stephen threatened to kill his son, whom John had given as a hostage. John refused, saying he could make more sons, but Stephen apparently took pity on the young boy and did not kill him. The boy grew up to be William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke, a legendary figure in medieval lore, and one of the most powerful men in England.

    The office of Lord Marshal, was an a hereditary title held by John's father, Gilbert Giffard, King's Marshal [7] and was passed to John, his eldest son, and then to John's eldest son also named John, who died in 1192. John's younger brother William (later Regent of England) then inherited the title.

    John the son of Gilbert, also had a daughter, Margaret Marshal, who married Ralph de Somery, son of John de Somery and Hawise de Paynell.

    John was the son of Gilbert Giffard (Royal Serjeant and Marshal to Henry I). In 1141, John arranged an annulment of his marriage to Aline Pipard in order to marry Sibyl of Salisbury, the sister of Patrick of Salisbury, [8] who had been a local rival of his, and a supporter of King Stephen, up to that point. John had two sons by Aline - Gilbert and Walter. Walter predeceased his father and Gilbert died shortly after inheriting his father's lands.

    John's eldest son by Sybilla of Salisbury, also called John Marshal (died 1194), inherited the title of Marshal, which he held until his death. The title was then granted by King Richard the Lionheart to John's second son by Sybilla, William, who made the name and title famous. Though William had started out as a younger son without inheritance, by the time he actually inherited the title of Marshal his reputation as a soldier and statesman was unmatched across Western Europe. John Marshal had four sons in total by his second wife. As well as John and William, there was Henry, who went on to become Bishop of Exeter, and Ancel, who served as a knight in the household of his kinsman, Rotrou, Count of Perche.
    Title of "Marshal"

    "Mareschal" is "Marshal" in from old French, the common language of the Anglo-Norman nobility of Medieval England. The title, which in Carolingian times had meant "horse servant". The position evolved into an official position and was imported from Normandy to England. John's father, Gilbert Fitz-Robert, was a marshal of King Henry I.

    Marshal was the title of the person in the king's household who maintained discipline at court; supplied receipts for payments, gifts and liveries from the king. He was over all servants of the court connected with the royal sports; over the king's bodyguard, and in charge of the horses. He was required to witness writs. It was an hereditary office. The Marshal took part in the ceremony of coronation. His sign of office was a baton bestowed by the king. [9]
    The Marshal, under the Royal Constable, was responsible for keeping order at the royal court, making billeting arrangements, tallying the household's expenditures, monitoring knights performing military service for the King, and insuring the imprisonment of debtors. Under John's son William, who was often simply called "The Marshal" the office became "Earl Marshal" and is still the seventh of the eight "great Officers of State" of the British monarchy, just below the Lord High Constable and above the Lord High Admiral.[10]


    Sources

    ? Round, J. H. (1911), The King's Serjeants & Officers of State with their Coronation Services. https://archive.org/stream/kingsserjeantsof00rounuoft#page/88/mode/2up
    ? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Anarchy
    ? http://www.geni.com/people/Aline-de-Pipard/6000000004382755262?through=6000000001353952871 and "John Fitz-Gilbert, the Marshal," © 1999 by Catherine Armstrong, at: http://www.castlewales.com/jf_gilbt.html
    ? See preceding note.
    ? "John Fitz-Gilbert, the Marshal," © 1999 by Catherine Armstrong, at: http://www.castlewales.com/jf_gilbt.html
    ? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Marshal,_1st_Earl_of_Pembroke and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Marshal_(Marshal_of_England)
    ? Medieval Lands
    ? Medieval Lands
    ? Dictionary of Medieval Knighthood and Chivalry page 326
    ? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earl_Marshal#Lords_Marshal_of_England.2C_1135.E2.80.931397
    http://www.castlewales.com/jf_gilbt.html - excellent narrative; well researched short biography, (c) 1999 by Catherine Armstrong.
    http://www.geni.com/people/John-FitzGilbert-The-Marshal-of-England/6000000006265484751?through=6000000002459854209
    Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis, Lines 55-28, 66-27, 81-28, 122A-29
    Barlow, Frank, The Feudal Kingdom of England 1042-1216 (London: Longman Group Limited, 1961). ISBN 0-582-48237-2
    William Marshal, Knighthood, War and Chivalry 1147-1219, Longman, 2002, ISBN 0 582 77222 2
    Richardson, Douglas, and Kimball G. Everingham. 2013. Royal ancestry: a study in colonial and medieval families. Salt Lake City, UT.: Douglas Richardson. Vol IV, page 34-35, cited by Mr. Marlyn Lewis, Our Royal, Titled, Noble, and Commoner Ancestors & Cousins, database online, Portland, Oregon.
    Medieval Lands, database online, author Charles Cawley, (Foundation for Medieval Genealogy, 2006-2013), England, earls created 1138-1143, Chapter 10, Pembroke: B. Earls of Pembroke 1189-1245 (MARSHAL), 1. John FitzGilbert "the Marshal"

    See also:

    Dictionary of Medieval Knighthood and Chivalry, Bradford B. Broughton, (Westport, Connecticut, Greenwood Press, Inc., 1986).

    end of biography

    Buried:
    Bradenstoke Priory is a medieval priory in the village of Bradenstoke, Wiltshire, England. It is noted today for some of its structures having been used by William Randolph Hearst for the renovation of St Donat's Castle, near Llantwit Major, Wales, in the 1930s. ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bradenstoke_Priory

    John married Sibyl of Salisbury 0___ 1142, Wooten Basset, Wiltshire, England. Sibyl (daughter of Walter of Salisbury and Sibilla de Chaworth) was born 27 Nov 1126; died 0___ 1176, Old Sarum (Salisbury), Wiltshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  8. 8837.  Sibyl of Salisbury was born 27 Nov 1126 (daughter of Walter of Salisbury and Sibilla de Chaworth); died 0___ 1176, Old Sarum (Salisbury), Wiltshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Sybilla Evreux

    Children:
    1. 4418. William Marshal, Templar Knight, 1st Earl Pembroke was born 1146-1147, (Berkshire, England); died 14 Apr 1219, Caversham, Berkshire, England; was buried , Temple Church, London, Middlesex, England.
    2. FNU Marshal was born ~ 1150.
    3. Anselm Marshal, 6th Earl of Pembroke was born ~1150, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales; died 22 Dec 1245.

  9. 8838.  Richard de Clare, Knight, 2nd Earl Pembroke was born 0___ 1125, Tonbridge, Kent, England (son of Gilbert de Clare, Knight, 1st Earl of Pembroke and Isabel de Beaumont); died 20 Apr 1176, Dublin, Leinster, Ireland.

    Richard married Eva Aoife Mac Murchada, Countess Pembroke 26 Aug 1171, Waterford, Ireland. Eva (daughter of Dermot Dairmait Mac Murchada, King of Leinster and Mor Tauthail Moringen Murchertaig O'Toole, Queen of Ireland) was born 26 Apr 1141, Dublin, Leinster, Ireland; died 0___ 1188, Waterford, Ireland; was buried , Tintern, Monmouthshire, Wales. [Group Sheet]


  10. 8839.  Eva Aoife Mac Murchada, Countess Pembroke was born 26 Apr 1141, Dublin, Leinster, Ireland (daughter of Dermot Dairmait Mac Murchada, King of Leinster and Mor Tauthail Moringen Murchertaig O'Toole, Queen of Ireland); died 0___ 1188, Waterford, Ireland; was buried , Tintern, Monmouthshire, Wales.
    Children:
    1. Richard de Clare, Knight, 3rd Earl of Hertford was born ~ 1153, Tonbridge Castle, Kent, England; died 28 Nov 1217.
    2. 4419. Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke was born 0___ 1172, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales; died 14 Oct 1217, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales; was buried , Tintern Abbey, Tintern, Monmouthshire, Wales.

  11. 9000.  Ralph Boteler was born Abt 1215, Alcester, Warwickshire, England; died 3 Jul 1281.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: (Ralph Butler)

    Ralph married Matilda Pantulf. Matilda (daughter of William Pantulf and Hawise FitzWarin) was born Abt 1227, Wem, Shropshire, England; died Bef 6 May 1289. [Group Sheet]


  12. 9001.  Matilda Pantulf was born Abt 1227, Wem, Shropshire, England (daughter of William Pantulf and Hawise FitzWarin); died Bef 6 May 1289.
    Children:
    1. 4500. William le Boteler was born ~ 1245, Wem, Shropshire, England; died 11 Dec 1283, Wem, Shropshire, England.

  13. 9002.  Gruffydd ap Madog was born Abt 1195, Montgomeryshire, Wales; died 7 Dec 1269.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Gruffydd Madog Maelor II

    Gruffydd married Emma de Aldithley. Emma was born Abt 1220, Staffordshire, England; died Aft 10 Nov 1278. [Group Sheet]


  14. 9003.  Emma de Aldithley was born Abt 1220, Staffordshire, England; died Aft 10 Nov 1278.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Emma Audley

    Children:
    1. 4501. Ankaret verch Griffith was born 1236-1248, Powys, Wales; died 22 Jun 1308, (Ludlow, Shropshire, England).

  15. 9016.  Robert de Ros, KnightRobert de Ros, Knight was born 1170-1172, (Yorkshire) England; died 0___ 1227; was buried , Temple Church, London, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Sheriff of Cumbria
    • Also Known As: Baron of Helmsley
    • Also Known As: Lord of Hamlake

    Notes:

    Sir Robert de Ros, or de Roos of Helmsley, (ca. 1170/1172 – 1227[1]), was the grandfather and ancestor of the Barons Ros of Helmsley that was created by writ in 1264. In 1215, Ros joined the confederation of the barons at Stamford. He was one of the twenty-five barons to guarantee the observance of Magna Carta, sealed by King John on 15 Jun 1215.[1]

    Life

    He was the son of Everard de Ros, Baron of Helmsley and Rohese Trusbut, daughter of William Trusbut of Wartre. In 1191, aged fourteen, he paid a thousand marks fine for livery of his lands to King Richard I of England. In 1197, while serving King Richard in Normandy, he was arrested for an unspecified offence, and was committed to the custody of Hugh de Chaumont, but Chaumont entrusted his prisoner to William de Spiney, who allowed him to escape from the castle of Bonville, England. King Richard thereupon hanged Spiney and collected a fine of twelve hundred marks from Ros' guardian as the price of his continued freedom.[2]

    When King John came to the throne, he gave Ros the barony of his great-grandmother's father, Walter d'Espec. Soon afterwards he was deputed one of those to escort William the Lion, his father-in-law, into England, to swear fealty to King John. Some years later, Robert de Ros assumed the habit of a monk, whereupon the custody of all his lands and Castle Werke (Wark), in Northumberland, were committed to Philip d'Ulcote, but he soon returned and about a year later he was High Sheriff of Cumberland.[2]

    When the struggle of the barons for a constitutional government began, de Ros at first sided with King John, and thus obtained some valuable grants from the crown, and was made governor of Carlisle; but he subsequently went over to the barons and became one of the celebrated twenty-five "Sureties" appointed to enforce the observance of Magna Carta, the county of Northumberland being placed under his supervision. He gave his allegiance to King Henry III and, in 1217–18, his manors were restored to him. Although he was witness to the second Great Charter and the Forest Charter, of 1224, he seems to have remained in royal favour.[2]

    Marriage and issue

    In early 1191, in Haddington, East Lothian, Scotland, Ros married Isabella Mac William (Isibâeal nic Uilliam), widow of Robert III de Brus. Isabella was the illegitimate daughter of William the Lion, King of Scots by the daughter of Richard Avenel.[1][3]

    Issue with Isabella:

    Sir William de Ros (b. before 1200 – d. ca. 1264/1265), father of Robert de Ros, 1st Baron de Ros.[1] and Sir William de Roos of Helmsley, Yorkshire (whose daughter, Ivette de Roos, married Sir Geoffrey le Scrope, K.B. of Masham, Yorkshire.[4]
    Sir Robert de Ros[1] (ca. 1223 – 13 May 1285), was Chief Justice of the Kings Bench. He married Christian Bertram; from which Elizabeth Ros (d.1395), wife of Sir William Parr of Kendal (1350 – c.1404) descended. The two were ancestors of Queen consort Catherine Parr.
    Sir Alexander de Ros (d. ca. 1306), he fathered one child with an unknown wife, William.[1]
    Peter de Ros[1]
    He erected Helmsley or Hamlake Castle in Yorkshire, and of Wark Castle in Northumberland. Sir Robert is buried at the Temple Church under a magnificent tomb.[1]

    Controversy

    While "Fursan" is given as a location for Robert de Ros (sometimes also Roos) most use the term "furfan" to designate a title within the Templars essentially equivalent to grandmaster or head priest. This title also further refers to the resulting aura resembling a "fan" / "Furry fan". Some would also use the term "Kingmaker".[citation needed]

    References

    ^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h Douglas Richardson, Kimball G. Everingham. Magna Carta ancestry: a study in colonial and medieval families, Genealogical Publishing Company, 2005. pg 699. Google eBook
    ^ Jump up to: a b c "Ros, Robert de (d.1227)". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900.
    Jump up ^ Chronicle of Melrose
    Jump up ^ Douglas Richardson, , Kimball G. Everingham, (2011). Magna Carta ancestry : a study in colonial and medieval families, Volume II (2nd ed.). Salt Lake City, UT.: Douglas Richardson. p. 198. ISBN 9781449966386.

    Buried:
    View a gallery of pictures, history & source for Temple Church ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Temple_Church

    Robert married Isabella Mac William 0___ 1191, Haddington, East Lothian, Scotland. Isabella (daughter of William, I, King of the Scots and Isabel d'Avenel) was born ~ 1165, (Scotland). [Group Sheet]


  16. 9017.  Isabella Mac William was born ~ 1165, (Scotland) (daughter of William, I, King of the Scots and Isabel d'Avenel).

    Notes:

    Isabella mac William (ca. 1165 - ) (Gaelic:Isibâeal nic Uilliam) was the illegitimate daughter of William the Lion King of Scots by a daughter of Robert Avenel. She married Robert III de Brus in 1183. They had no children. After his death in 1191, Isabella was married to Robert de Ros, Baron Ros of Wark, (died 1227). They had the following children:

    Sir William de Ros (b. before 1200 – d. ca. 1264/1265), father of Robert de Ros, 1st Baron de Ros.[1] and Sir William de Roos of Helmsley, Yorkshire (whose daughter, Ivette de Roos, married Sir Geoffrey le Scrope, K.B. of Masham, Yorkshire.[2]
    Sir Robert de Ros[2] (ca. 1223 – 13 May 1285), was Chief Justice of the Kings Bench. He married Christian Bertram; from which Elizabeth Ros (d.1395), wife of Sir William Parr of Kendal (1350 – ca. 1404) descended. The two were ancestors of Queen consort Catherine Parr.
    Sir Alexander de Ros (d. ca. 1306), who fathered one child, William, with an unknown wife.[2]
    Peter de Ros.[2]

    References

    Jump up ^ Douglas Richardson, Kimball G. Everingham. Magna Carta ancestry: a study in colonial and medieval families, Genealogical Publishing Company, 2005. pg 699. Google eBook
    ^ Jump up to: a b c d Douglas Richardson, , Kimball G. Everingham, (2011). Magna Carta ancestry : a study in colonial and medieval families, Volume II (2nd ed.). Salt Lake City, UT.: Douglas Richardson. p. 198. ISBN 9781449966386.

    Birth:
    Isabella was the illegitimate daughter of William the Lion, King of Scots by the daughter of Richard Avenel...

    Notes:

    Residence (Family):
    View image, ready history & source for Helmsley Castle ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helmsley_Castle

    Children:
    1. 4508. William de Ros, Knight was born 0___ 1192, Helmsley, Yorkshire, England; died 1264-1265, England; was buried , Kirkham Priory, Kirkham, North Yorkshire, England.

  17. 9018.  Peter FitzHerbert, Lord of Brecknock was born 1163, Blewleveny Castle, Blaen Llyfni, Wales (son of Herbert FitzHerbert and Lucy FitzMiles); died 1 Jun 1235, Reading, Berkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Baron of Barnstable in Devonshire
    • Also Known As: Piers FitzHerbert
    • Also Known As: Piers FitzHerbert, Lord of Brecknock

    Notes:

    About Piers FitzHerbert, Lord of Brecknock


    Peter Fitz-Herbert, Baron of Barnstable in Devonshire, the honor of which he obtained from King John with fifteen knight's fees, part of the lands of William de Braose, and he was made Governor of Pickering Castle in Yorkshire, and Sheriff of that county by the same monarch.


    This Peter was one of the barons named in Magna Carta and, by his signature, fourth in rank amongst the barons. He m. first, Alice, dau. of Robert Fitz Roger, a great baron in Northumberland, Lord of Warkworth and Clavering, and sister of John, to whom Edward I gave the surname of Clavering, Lord of Callaly in Northumberland. By this lady he had a son and heir, Reginald Fitz Peter.


    He m. secondly, Isabel, dau. and coheir of William de Braose, and widow of David Llewellin, Prince of Wales, and by the alliance acquired the lordships and castle of Blenlevenny and Talgarth in the county of Brecknock, with other possessions in Wales. He fortified his castle of Blenlevenny, and, dying in 1235, was s. by his son, ReginaldFitzPeter, Lord of Blenlevenny, [John Burke, History of the Commoners of Great Britain and Ireland, Vol. IV, R. Bentley,London, 1834, p. 728, Jones, of Llanarth]

    Piers FITZHERBERT (-1235) [Pedigree]

    Son of Herbert FITZHERBERT (-1204) and Lucy of Hereford (-1220)

    r. Blaen Llyfni, Wales
    d. 1 Jun 1235
    d. BEF 6 Jun 1235
    bur. Reading, Eng.
    Married first Alice de WARKWORTH (-1225)

    Children:

    1. Lucy FITZPIERS (-1266) m. Sir William de ROS (1193-1264)
    2. Herbert FITZPETER Sheriff of Hampshire (-1248)
    3. Sir Reginald (Rynold) FitzPiers (-1286) m(1) Alice (-1264)

    Married second Isabel de FERRERS (1166-1252)

    Married third Sibyl de DINHAM

    References:

    1. "Ancestral roots of certain American colonists who came to America before 1700",
    Frederick Lewis Weis, 1992, seventh edition. The earlier editions were called: "Ancestral roots of sixty colonists who came to New England 1623-1650"

    2. "The Complete Peerage", Cokayne.

    3. "Ancestors of Deacon Edward Converse".

    4. "Plantagenet Ancestry", Turton.

    5. "Burke's Peerage, 1938".

    6. "Presidents GEDCOM File", Otto-G. Richter, Brian Tompsett.

    7. "Ancestral Roots of Sixty Colonists Who Came to New England 1623-1650", Weis, Editions 1-6. The latest edition (7) of this book is titled: "Ancestral roots of certain American colonists who came to America before 1700" by Weis, 1992, 7th edition. Information which has been checked in the latest edition usually has the reference key "AR7", while information from earlier editions (1-6) will have the reference key "Weis1".

    8. "Some Early English Pedigrees", Vernon M. Norr. Piers FitzHerbert1 M, #368871

    Last Edited=13 Jun 2009

    Piers FitzHerbert gained the title of Lord of the Honour of Brecknock [England by writ].1

    Child of Piers FitzHerbert

    * Lucy FitzPiers+ 1

    Citations

    1. [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke's Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke's Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 1, page 1107. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    Piers was also called Lord of Blaen Llynfi county Brecknock; and also called Peter.

    A settlement for the marriage Piers FitzHerbert, Lord Blaen Llynfi, and Alice de Warkworth was made on 28 November 1203.

    Piers was "seen" in 1204.

    He was was present in support of King John at the signing of the Magna Carta on 15 June 1215 at Runnymede, between Windsor and Staines, in Surrey.

    Piers inherited, through his mother, a 1/3 interest in the barony of Miles Fitz Walter of Gloucester in 1219.

    He married Isabel de Ferrers, daughter of William I, 3rd Earl of Derby, and Goda de Tosny, before 1225.

    Piers died before 6 June 1235.

    See "My Lines"

    ( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/p391.htm#i7189 )

    from Compiler: R. B. Stewart, Evans, GA

    ( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/index.htm )

    view all 18

    Piers FitzHerbert, Lord of Brecknock's Timeline
    1163
    1163
    Birth of Piers
    Blewleveny Castle, Blaen Llyfni, Brecknockshire, Wales
    1183
    1183
    Age 20
    Birth of Joan de Verdun
    Blaen Llyfni, , Brecknockshire, Wales
    1206
    1206
    Age 43
    Birth of Reginald FitzPiers, Lord of Blaen Llyfni
    Blaen, Llyfni, Brecknock, Wales
    1206
    Age 43
    Birth of Beatrix Fitzpiers
    1207
    1207
    Age 44
    Birth of Herbert Fitzpiers, Sheriff Hampshire
    1210
    1210
    Age 47
    Birth of Lucy FitzPiers, Baroness de Ros
    Forest Dean, Gloucestershire, England, (Present UK)
    1235
    June 1, 1235
    Age 72
    Death of Piers at Reading, Berkshire, England
    Reading, Berkshire, England

    Birth:
    Blaenllyfni Castle (Welsh: Castell Blaenllynfi) is a privately-owned ruinous stone castle near the village of Bwlch in southern Powys, Wales. It was probably built in the early thirteenth century. It was captured several times during the rest of the century and apparently was never fully repaired afterwards and fell into ruins. It is a Scheduled Ancient Monument.

    Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blaenllynfi_Castle

    Peter married Alice FitzRoger 28 Nov 1203, (Warkworth, Northumberland, England). Alice (daughter of Robert FitzRoger, Knight, 2nd Baron of Warkworth and Margaret de Cheney) was born 1184-1185, (Warkworth, Northumberland, England); died 1225, (Reading, Berkshire, England). [Group Sheet]


  18. 9019.  Alice FitzRoger was born 1184-1185, (Warkworth, Northumberland, England) (daughter of Robert FitzRoger, Knight, 2nd Baron of Warkworth and Margaret de Cheney); died 1225, (Reading, Berkshire, England).

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Alice De Warkworth FitzRoger
    • Also Known As: Alice Warkworth

    Notes:

    My Lines
    Person Page - 397

    Alice de Warkworth1
    b. circa 1184, d. before 1255

    Father Robert fitz Roger, 2nd Baron of Warkworth1,2 b. circa 1161, d. 1214
    Mother Margaret de Cheney1 b. circa 1162, d. after 1214
    Also called Alice FitzRoger.3 Alice de Warkworth was born circa 1184.1 She was the daughter of Robert fitz Roger, 2nd Baron of Warkworth and Margaret de Cheney.1,2 A settlement for the marriage Alice de Warkworth and Piers FitzHerbert, Lord Blaen Llynfi was made on 28 November 1203; His 1st.4,5 Alice de Warkworth died before 1255.

    Family

    Piers FitzHerbert, Lord Blaen Llynfi b. circa 1172, d. before 6 June 1235

    Children

    Lucy fitz Piers+ b. c 1207, d. a 1266
    Reynold fitz Piers, Lord of Blaen Llynfi+ b. c 1210?, d. c 5 May 12863

    Citations

    [S206] With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr. and assisted by David Faris Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis: AR 7th ed., 246D-28.
    [S206] With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr. and assisted by David Faris Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis: AR 7th ed., Line 262.29.
    [S206] With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr. and assisted by David Faris Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis: AR 7th ed., Line 261.32.
    [S206] With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr. and assisted by David Faris Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis: AR 7th ed., Line 261.32, 262.29.
    [S1191] Esq. John Burke B:C of GB&I, IV:728.

    Children:
    1. Joan FitzPiers was born 1183, Baen Llyfni, Brecknockshire, Wales; died 1205, Alton Castle, Cheadle, Staffordshire, England.
    2. 4509. Lucy FitzPeter, Baroness de Ros was born 1207-1210, Forest Dean, Gloucestershire, England; died 1267, North Yorkshire, England; was buried , Kirkham Priory, Kirkham, North Yorkshire, England.

  19. 9174.  Walter FitzRobert, Knight was born ~ 1204, Woodham Walter, Essex, England (son of Robert FitzWalter, Knight, Baron FitzWalter and Rohese LNU); died 10 Apr 1258.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Lord of LIttle Dunmow
    • Also Known As: Sir Walter Fitzwalter

    Notes:

    Walter FitzRobert de Clare, Lord of Little Dunmow

    son of Robert FitzWalter (Magna Carta Surety) and Rohese

    married Ida (Idonea) de Longespee de Salisbury (daughter of Ela de Salisbury and William Longespee son of Henry II - they apparently had *two* daughters named Ida. [He married the younger one.]

    Daughter:

    Ela Fitz Walter b abt 1245, of Maxstoke and Solihull, Warwickshire, England. She md Sir William de Odingsells, Justiciar of Ireland, abt 1258, son of William de Odingsells and Joan.

    The instability of surnames at this early period is shown by his being known as both "FitzWalter" (a genuine surname) and "FitzRobert" (a Norman patronymic).

    Walter married Ida Longespee, II. Ida (daughter of William (Plantagenet) Longespee, 3rd Earl of Salisbury and Ela FitzPatrick, 3rd Countess of Salisbury) was born , (Salisbury, Wiltshire) England. [Group Sheet]


  20. 9175.  Ida Longespee, II was born , (Salisbury, Wiltshire) England (daughter of William (Plantagenet) Longespee, 3rd Earl of Salisbury and Ela FitzPatrick, 3rd Countess of Salisbury).
    Children:
    1. 4587. Ela Fitzwalter, Countess of Warwick was born ~ 1245, of Maxstoke and Solihull, Warwickshire, England; died 8 Feb 1297, Oseney Abbey, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England; was buried , Oseney Abbey, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England.
    2. Robert FitzWalter, 1st Baron FitzWalter was born 0___ 1247, Henham, Essex, England; died 18 Jan 1326.

  21. 1092.  William Warde was born ~1230; died ~ July 1266.

    William married Margaret de Neville (Yorkshire, England). Margaret was born ~1235, Yorkshire, England; died ~1300, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  22. 1093.  Margaret de Neville was born ~1235, Yorkshire, England; died ~1300, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Margaret Neville

    Notes:

    Margaret Warde formerly Neville aka de Neville
    Born about 1235 in Yorkshire, England
    ANCESTORS ancestors
    Daughter of Jollan (Neville) de Neville and Maud (Beauchamp) Neville
    Sister of Andrew (Neville) de Neville
    Wife of William Warde — married [date unknown] [location unknown]
    DESCENDANTS descendants
    Mother of Simon Warde
    Died about 1300 in Yorkshire, England
    Profile manager: Charles Walter private message [send private message]
    Neville-2189 created 4 Jun 2016
    This page has been accessed 335 times.

    Children:
    1. 546. Simon Warde was born ~1267, Yorkshire, England; died ~1306, Yorkshire, England.

  23. 1104.  Hugh Bigod, Knight was born ~ 1215, Thetford, Norfolk, England (son of Hugh Bigod, Knight, 3rd Earl of Norfolk and Maud Marshal, Countess of Norfolk); died Bef 7 May 1266.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Chief Justice of England

    Notes:

    Hugh BIGOD (Chief Justice of England)

    Born: ABT 1215, Thetford, Norfolk, England

    Died: BEF 7 May 1266

    Notes: There is some uncertainty as to which wife was mother of which of Hugh's children.

    Father: Hugh BIGOD (3ş E. Norfolk and Suffolk)

    Mother: Maud MARSHALL (C. Norfolk)

    Married 1: Joan BURNETT (Wife) (dau of Robert Burnet)

    Married 2: Helen HARCOURT Bosworth, Leicestershire, England

    Married 3: Joan De STUTEVILLE (b. ABT 1220) BEF 5 Feb 1243/44 (dau. of Nicholas De Stuteville and Joan Peche) (m.2 Hugh Wake of Lidell)

    Children:

    1. Joan BIGOD

    2. Roger BIGOD (5° E. Norfolk and Suffolk)

    3. John BIGOD of Settrington

    Hugh married Joan de Stuteville. Joan (daughter of Nicholas de Stuteville, Lord of Liddell and Joan Peche) was born ~ 1220; died Bef 1244. [Group Sheet]


  24. 1105.  Joan de Stuteville was born ~ 1220 (daughter of Nicholas de Stuteville, Lord of Liddell and Joan Peche); died Bef 1244.
    Children:
    1. 552. John Bigod was born 1245-1250, Stockton, Norfolk, England; died Bef 18 Mar 1305, (Settrington, Yorkshire, England).

  25. 1120.  William Markenfield was born ~ 1250, Markenfield Hall, Ripon HG4 3AD, UK (son of William Markenfield and unnamed spouse); died 0___ 1308.

    Notes:

    Generation: 1

    1. Sir. William Markenfield was born 1275, Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England (son of Sir. Lawrence Markenfield and Mrs. Lady Mary Markenfield); died 1308, Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England.
    William married Lady Constance 1298, Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England. Constance was born 1278, Ripon, , North Yorkshire, England; died , Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    Sir. John Markenfield, Chancellor of the Exchequer was born 1280, Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England; died 1348, York, , North Yorkshire, England.

    Generation: 2

    2. Sir. Lawrence Markenfield was born 1245, Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England (son of Sir. Roger Markenfield and Mrs. Lady Maud Markenfield); died Aft 1276, Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England.
    Lawrence married Mrs. Lady Mary Markenfield 1267, Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England. Mary was born 1247, Ripon, , North Yorkshire, England; died , Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


    3. Mrs. Lady Mary Markenfield was born 1247, Ripon, , North Yorkshire, England; died , Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England.
    Children:
    1. Sir. William Markenfield was born 1275, Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England; died 1308, Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England.


    Generation: 3

    4. Sir. Roger Markenfield was born 1215, Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England (son of Roger Markenfeld and Mrs. Roger Markingfield); died , Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England.
    Roger married Mrs. Lady Maud Markenfield 1238, Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England. Maud was born 1218, Ripon, , North Yorkshire, England; died , Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


    5. Mrs. Lady Maud Markenfield was born 1218, Ripon, , North Yorkshire, England; died , Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England.
    Children:
    2. Sir. Lawrence Markenfield was born 1245, Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England; died Aft 1276, Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England.


    Generation: 4

    8. Roger Markenfeld was born Abt 1180, England (son of Mr Markenfeld); died DECEASED.
    Roger — Mrs. Roger Markingfield. Roger was born Abt 1180, of Markingfield, Yorkshire, England; died DECEASED. [Group Sheet]


    9. Mrs. Roger Markingfield was born Abt 1180, of Markingfield, Yorkshire, England; died DECEASED.
    Children:
    Sir. Simon de Markenfield was born 1195, Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England; died , Ripon, , North Yorkshire, England.
    Lawrence Markingfield was born Abt 1208, of Markingfield, Yorkshire, England; died DECEASED.
    4. Sir. Roger Markenfield was born 1215, Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England; died , Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England.

    William married Alianore LNU 1298, Markenfield Hall, Ripon HG4 3AD, UK. Alianore was born 1278, Ripon, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  26. 1121.  Alianore LNU was born 1278, Ripon, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Lady Constance

    Children:
    1. 560. John Markenfield was born ~ 1280, Markenfield Hall, Ripon HG4 3AD, UK; died 1348, York, Yorkshire, England; was buried , Copmanthorpe, York, United Kingdom.

  27. 1124.  William Scot de Middleton was born 1254, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England; died 1318, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England.

    William married Agnes Boteler. Agnes (daughter of Noel le Boteler and Agnes LNU) was born 1285, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England; died 1311, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  28. 1125.  Agnes Boteler was born 1285, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England (daughter of Noel le Boteler and Agnes LNU); died 1311, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England.
    Children:
    1. 562. Peter de Middleton was born 1300, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England; died 1336, Yorkshire, England.

  29. 1126.  Robert Plumpton, II was born 1262-1268, Yorkshire, England; died 1325-1326, Yorkshire, England.

    Notes:

    Generation: 1

    1. Sir Robert de Plumpton, Ii was born Abt 1268, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England; died 1325, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England.
    Robert married Lucy de Ros Abt 1295, Plumpton by Ecclesall, Yorkshire, England. Lucy (daughter of Sir William, knight de Ros and Eustace Fitzhugh) was born Abt 1269, Of Plumpton, Yorkshire, England; died Aft 1332, Plumpton in Spofforth, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    2. Sir William de Plumpton Descendancy chart to this point was born Abt 1295, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England; died 1362, Berwick upon Tweed, Northumberland, England.
    3. Robert de Plumpton, Iii Descendancy chart to this point was born 1296, PLUMPTON, Yorkshire, England; died 1301.
    4. Marmaduke de Plumpton Descendancy chart to this point was born Abt 1296, Plumpton in Spofforth, Yorkshire, England; died 1322.
    5. Isabella de Plumpton Descendancy chart to this point was born Abt 1298, Plumpton in Spofforth, Yorkshire, England; died 1354, Y, Somme, Picardie, France.
    6. Eustacia de Plumpton Descendancy chart to this point was born 1299, Plumpton in Spofforth, Yorkshire, Angleterre; died 1354, Somme, Picardie, France.


    Generation: 2

    2. Sir William de Plumpton Descendancy chart to this point (1.Robert1) was born Abt 1295, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England; died 1362, Berwick upon Tweed, Northumberland, England.

    3. Robert de Plumpton, Iii Descendancy chart to this point (1.Robert1) was born 1296, PLUMPTON, Yorkshire, England; died 1301.

    4. Marmaduke de Plumpton Descendancy chart to this point (1.Robert1) was born Abt 1296, Plumpton in Spofforth, Yorkshire, England; died 1322.

    5. Isabella de Plumpton Descendancy chart to this point (1.Robert1) was born Abt 1298, Plumpton in Spofforth, Yorkshire, England; died 1354, Y, Somme, Picardie, France.

    6. Eustacia de Plumpton Descendancy chart to this point (1.Robert1) was born 1299, Plumpton in Spofforth, Yorkshire, Angleterre; died 1354, Somme, Picardie, France.
    Eustacia — Sheriff of Yorkshire Peter de Middelton. Peter (son of Sir Lord William Scot De Middleton and Agnes Boteler) was born 1300, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England; died 1336, Yorkshire, England; was buried , Ilkley, West Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    7. Thomas Middelton Descendancy chart to this point was born 1321, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England; died 1393, England.
    8. Nicholas De Middleton Descendancy chart to this point was born Abt 1323, Middleton Hall, Kendal, Westmorland, Eng; died 1414, Middleton Hall, Kendal, Westmorland, Eng.
    9. Margery de Middleton Descendancy chart to this point was born 1325, Ripon, , North Yorkshire, England; died 1409, Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England.
    10. Margaret De Middleton Descendancy chart to this point was born 1328, Stockeld, Yorks, Eng.; died DECEASED.


    Generation: 3

    7. Thomas Middelton Descendancy chart to this point (6.Eustacia2, 1.Robert1) was born 1321, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England; died 1393, England.
    Thomas — Elizabeth Gramary. Elizabeth (daughter of Robert Gramary) was born 1325, Yorkshire, England; died DECEASED. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    11. Sir John Middleton Descendancy chart to this point was born 1347, Kendal, Westmorland, England; died 9 Aug 1396, Belsay, Northumberland, England.
    12. Joane de Middleton Descendancy chart to this point was born Abt 1357; died 1429.

    8. Nicholas De Middleton Descendancy chart to this point (6.Eustacia2, 1.Robert1) was born Abt 1323, Middleton Hall, Kendal, Westmorland, Eng; died 1414, Middleton Hall, Kendal, Westmorland, Eng.

    9. Margery de Middleton Descendancy chart to this point (6.Eustacia2, 1.Robert1) was born 1325, Ripon, , North Yorkshire, England; died 1409, Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England.
    Margery married Sir. Andrew de Markenfield 1340, Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England. Andrew (son of Sir. John Markenfield, Chancellor of the Exchequer and Lady Eleanor) was born 1310, Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England; died 1357, York, , North Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    13. John Markenfield, Sir Descendancy chart to this point was born 1343, Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England; died 1409, Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England; was buried , Rypon.

    10. Margaret De Middleton Descendancy chart to this point (6.Eustacia2, 1.Robert1) was born 1328, Stockeld, Yorks, Eng.; died DECEASED.


    Generation: 4

    11. Sir John Middleton Descendancy chart to this point (7.Thomas3, 6.Eustacia2, 1.Robert1) was born 1347, Kendal, Westmorland, England; died 9 Aug 1396, Belsay, Northumberland, England.
    John married Christian de Stryvelin Abt 1370. Christian (daughter of Sir John de Stryvelin, Baron and Barnaba de Swinburne) was born 1374, Belsay Castle, , Northumberland, England; died 19 Mar 1421, Middleton Hall, Kendal, Westmorland, England. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    14. Sir John Middleton Descendancy chart to this point was born Abt 1372, of Belsay.
    15. Thomas Middleton Descendancy chart to this point was born Abt 1374.
    16. Annie Middleton Manners Descendancy chart to this point was born 1382, Belsay, Northumberland, England.

    12. Joane de Middleton Descendancy chart to this point (7.Thomas3, 6.Eustacia2, 1.Robert1) was born Abt 1357; died 1429.
    Joane — Sir Bernard Brocas. Bernard (son of Sir Bernard Brocas and Agnes Le Vavasour) was born 1354, (42:1396) of Beaurepaire, Hampshire, England; died 1400, Beheaded. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    17. William Brocas Descendancy chart to this point was born 1388, of Denton, Hamptonshire, England; died 1456.

    13. John Markenfield, Sir Descendancy chart to this point (9.Margery3, 6.Eustacia2, 1.Robert1) was born 1343, Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England; died 1409, Markingfield Hall, Ripon, North Yorkshire, England; was buried , Rypon.
    John — Dionisia Mynyot. Dionisia was born 1340; died 1409. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    18. Sir Thomas Markenfield Descendancy chart to this point was born Abt 1372, Markenfeld Hall, Ripon, Yorkshire, England; died 1415, Ripon, Yorkshire, England.
    John married Joan Mynyot Carlton de Moels Abt 1366, Markingfield, Yorkshire, England. Joan (daughter of Carlton de Moels) was born 1343, Carlton, Selby, North Yorkshire, England; died 1410, Givendale in Allerston, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    18. Sir Thomas Markenfield Descendancy chart to this point was born Abt 1372, Markenfeld Hall, Ripon, Yorkshire, England; died 1415, Ripon, Yorkshire, England.
    19. John Markinfield Descendancy chart to this point was born 1382, Markenfield, Yorkshire, England; died 1409, Ripon, Yorkshire, England.

    Robert married Lucia Ros ~1295, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England. Lucia (daughter of William de Ros, Knight and Eustache FitzRalph) was born ~ 1272; died ~ 1362. [Group Sheet]


  30. 1127.  Lucia Ros was born ~ 1272 (daughter of William de Ros, Knight and Eustache FitzRalph); died ~ 1362.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Lucy de Ros

    Children:
    1. William Plumpton was born ~ 1295, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1362, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England.
    2. 563. Eustacia Plumpton was born 1299, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England; died 1354, Somme, Picardie, France.

  31. 1146.  John Clinton, II, 2nd Lord Clinton was born Abt 1299, Maxstoke, Warwick, England (son of John de Clinton, I, Knight and Ida Odingsells, Baroness of Clinton); died 1 Apr 1335, Maxstoke, Warwick, England.

    Other Events:

    • Military: Scottish & French Wars

    John married Margery Corbet Bef 24 Feb 1328, Chaddesley Corbett, Worcester, England. Margery was born Abt 1304, Chaddesley Corbett, Worcester, England; died Aft 1343. [Group Sheet]


  32. 1147.  Margery Corbet was born Abt 1304, Chaddesley Corbett, Worcester, England; died Aft 1343.
    Children:
    1. 573. Elizabeth Clinton was born 1330, Maxstoke, Warwick, England.
    2. Margaret Clinton was born Abt 1331, Maxstoke, Warwick, England.
    3. Ida Clinton was born 1320, Warwickshire, England; died ~1360, England.

  33. 14576.  John de Harington, Knight, 1st Baron HaringtonJohn de Harington, Knight, 1st Baron Harington was born 0___ 1281, Melling, Lancashire, England (son of Robert de Haverington and Agnes de Cansfield); died 2 Jul 1347, Aldingham, Cumbria, England; was buried , Cartmel Priory, Cartmel, Cumbria, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Member of Parliament
    • Also Known As: John de Harrington
    • Also Known As: John de Haverington
    • Alt Birth: Abt 1281, Aldingham, Cumbria, England

    Notes:

    John Harington, 1st Baron Harington (1281-1347) of Aldingham in Furness, Lancashire, was an English peer, created Baron Harington by writ of summons to Parliament dated 1326.

    Origins

    John Harington (alias de Haverington) was born in 1281 in Farleton,[citation needed] Melling, the son of Sir Robert de Haverington (d.1297),[5] of Harrington in Cumbria, by his wife Agnes de Cansfield (d.1297), heiress of Aldingham[6] in Furness, Lancashire. Agnes was the daughter and heiress of Richard de Cansfield by his wife Aline de Furness (alias de Fleming), heiress of Muchland (alias Michelland) in Furness, that is to say a moiety of the manor of Furness which had its caput at Aldingham.[7] Muchland was held from the Abbot of Furness Abbey, who held the other moiety of Furness from the Earl of Lancaster.[8]

    Career

    He was a minor at his father's death in 1297 and between 1297 and 1302 he was in wardship to Sir William de Dacre.[9] He was knighted on 22 May 1306 and was summond to military service in October 1309 when he accompanied Edward, Prince of Wales on a trip to Scotland. Upon leaving the military in March 1335, he became involved with his local council and later became a member of English Parliament in 1326 until his death in 1347. He held the manors of Aldingham, Thurnham, and Ulverston in Lancashire and Witherslack and Hutton Roof in Westmorland, with further estates in Austwick and Harrington in Cumberland.

    Marriages and progeny

    (According to Findagrave # 71719420) John married twice:

    First to Margaret de Barlingham (d. 1307) having issue:
    1.Robert Harington (1305-1334) who predeceased his father.
    2.John Harington (b.1307). Margaret died during his birth.

    Secondly to Joan de Dacre by whom he had one child:
    1.Joan Harington (b. 1330)

    He married a certain "Joan", probably a member of the Dacre family,[10] by whom he had progeny including:

    Sir Robert Harington (1305[citation needed]-1334), eldest son and heir apparent, knighted before 1331,[11] who predeceased his father, having in about 1327 married Elizabeth de Multon (born 1306), daughter of Thomas de Multon and one of the three sisters and co-heiresses of John de Multon. She was the heiress of several estates including: Thurston in Suffolk; Moulton, Skirbeck and Fleet in Lincolnshire, of Egremont in Cumbria and of manors in County Limerick, Ireland.[12] He left a son, heir to his grandfather:
    John Harington, 2nd Baron Harington (1328-1363)[13]

    Death and burial

    He died on 2 June 1347 at Aldingham[14] and was buried in Cartmel Priory, formerly in Lancashire, now in Cumbria,[15] where survives his monument with effigies of himself and his wife.

    Further reading

    Atkinson, Rev. J.C., The Coucher Book of Furness Abbey, Printed from the Original Preserved in the Record Office, London, Part 1, London, 1886 [1]

    Sources

    GEC Complete Peerage, Vol.6, pp. 314–321, Baron Harington, pp. 314–16, biography of John Harington, 1st Baron Harington

    References

    Jump up ^ Source: Burke's General armory 1884, p.459
    Jump up ^ Further reading re monument: Transactions of the Cumberland and Westmorland Archaeological Society, Vol.5, p.109
    Jump up ^ 1646 drawing by Daniel King, in Dodsworth Manuscripts, Vol.88, folio 20, quoted in GEC Complete Peerage, Vol.6, p.315, note (n)
    Jump up ^ GEC Complete Peerage, Vol.6, p.314
    Jump up ^ GEC Complete Peerage, Vol.6, p.314
    Jump up ^ C.Mosley, (1999) "Burke's Peerage & Baronetage", 106th Edition
    Jump up ^ GEC Complete Peerage, Vol.6, p.314 & note (e)
    Jump up ^ GEC Complete Peerage, Vol.6, p.314 & note (e)
    Jump up ^ GEC, p.314, note f
    Jump up ^ GEC Complete Peerage, Vol.6, p.314, gives his only wife as "Joan", "probably a Dacre", deduced from the Dacre arms once visible on the couple's monument in Cartmel Priory and from the fact that the 1st Baron as a child had been in the wardship of a member of the Dacre family, which might suggest his first wife was a Dacre
    Jump up ^ GEC Complete Peerage, Vol.6, p.316
    Jump up ^ GEC Complete Peerage, Vol.6, p.316
    Jump up ^ GEC Complete Peerage, Vol.6, p.316
    Jump up ^ F. L. Weis, (1999) "Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists", 7th Edition, Pages 34-31.
    Jump up ^ GEC Complete Peerage, Vol.6, pp.314-321, Baron Harington, p.315

    end of biography

    John was a British nobleman and member of English Parliament and gained the title of 1st Baron Harington of Aldingham. John was the son of Lord Robert de Haverington, of Harington and his wife Agnes de Cansfield of Aldingham.

    He was knighted in 22 May 1306 and was summond to military service in Oct. 1309 when he accompanied Edward, Prince of Wales on a trip to Scotland. Upon leavng the military in March 1335, he became involved with his local council and later became a member of English Parliament in 1326 until his death in 1347.

    He held the manors of Aldingham, Thurnham, and Ulverston in Lancashire and Witherslack and Hutton Roof in Westmorland, with further estates in Austwick and Harington in Cumberland.

    John married twice:

    Firstly to Margaret de Barlingham (d. 1307) by whom he had the following children:

    Robert Harington (1305-1334), predeceased father.
    John Harington (b.1307), in giving birth to whom Margaret died.

    Secondly to Joan de Dacre by whom he had one child:

    Joan Harington (b. 1330)

    John married Margaret Burlingham Abt 1303, Aldingham, Cumbria, England. Margaret was born Abt 1283, Aldingham, Cumbria, England; died 0___ 1307, (Aldingham, Cumbria, England). [Group Sheet]


  34. 14577.  Margaret Burlingham was born Abt 1283, Aldingham, Cumbria, England; died 0___ 1307, (Aldingham, Cumbria, England).

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Margaret de Barlingham

    Children:
    1. 7288. Robert Harington, Knight was born 0___ 1305, Melling, Lancashire, England; died 0___ 1334, Aldingham, Cumbria, England.

  35. 14578.  Thomas de Multon, V, Knight, 1st Baron Multon was born 21 Feb 1276, Edgemont, Cumbria, England; died 8 Feb 1321, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: 1st Baron of Multon of Gilsland
    • Also Known As: Lord Thomas de Multon of Burghs-on-Sands

    Notes:

    'Lord Thomas de Multon (b.1276 d.1322) was the first Baron Multon of Gilsland.[1] He married Eleanor de Burgh daughter of Richard de Burgh 2nd Earl of Ulster, Richard's other daughter Elizabeth de Burgh married King Robert the Bruce of Scotland. The title Baron Multon of Gilsland was created once in the Peerage of England.

    On 26 August 1307 Thomas de Multon was summoned to parliament as Baron Multon, of Gilsland, from 26th August 1307, to 26th November 1313. He was engaged in many of the Scottish wars and subsequently obtained many immunities from the crown in the shape of grants for fairs and markets upon his many manors. He died in 1313 leaving an only daughter and heiress, Margaret who inherited the title and estates.

    She married Ranulph (Ralph) de Dacre, who was summoned to parliament as Lord Dacre in 1321. The title and estates after Margaret inherited them was conveyed to the Dacre family.

    Margaret de Multon, 2nd Baroness Multon of Gilsland (d.1361)

    Thomas is the Great, Great Grandson of Thomas de Multon(d.1240).

    Citations

    1.^ http://www.thepeerage.com/p918.htm#i9174

    References

    A General and Heraldic Dictionary of the Peerages of England, Ireland, and Scotland, Extinct, Dormant and in Abeyance, (1831). John Burke, Esq. page 379
    From: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_de_Multon,_1st_Baron_Multon_of_Gilsland

    ___________________________
    'Sir Thomas de Multon, 1st Lord Multon of Egremont1,2,3,4,5,6
    'M, #10945, b. 21 February 1276, d. circa 8 February 1322
    Father Sir Thomas de Multon3 d. b 24 Jul 1287
    Mother Emoine le Boteler3

    ' Sir Thomas de Multon, 1st Lord Multon of Egremont was born on 21 February 1276 at Lincolnshire, Egremont, Cumberland, Cockermouth, England. He married Eleanor de Burgh, daughter of Sir Richard de Burgh, 2nd Earl Ulster, 4th Lord Connaught and Margaret de Guines, on 3 January 1297 at St. Peter's Priory, Ipswich, Suffolk, England; They had 1 son (Sir John, 2nd Lord Multon) and 3 daughters (Joan, wife of Sir Robert FitzWalter; Elizabeth, wife of Sir Robert de Harington, & of Sir Walter de Bermingham; & Margaret, wife of Thomas, 2nd Lord Lucy). Married in the King's presence.2,3,6 Sir Thomas de Multon, 1st Lord Multon of Egremont died circa 8 February 1322.3

    'Family Eleanor de Burgh b. c 1283, d. a 1327

    Children

    Joan de Multon+7,2,3 b. c 1304, d. 16 Jun 1363
    Elizabeth de Multon+3 b. 1306, d. b 30 Oct 1350
    Sir John de Multon, 2nd Lord Multon8,3,6 b. Oct 1308, d. c 23 Nov 1334
    Margaret de Multon+9,3,4,5 b. c 1310, d. bt Sep 1341 - 28 Jul 1343

    Citations

    1.[S2781] Unknown author, The Complete Peerage, by Cokayne, Vol. V, p. 474, Vol. VI, p. 316; Magna Charta Sureties, 1215, by F. L. Weis, 4th Ed., p. 15.
    2.[S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. II, p. 209-210.
    3.[S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. II, p. 349.
    4.[S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. III, p. 116-117.
    5.[S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. III, p. 339.
    6.[S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. IV, p. 69-71.
    7.[S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 328.
    8.[S11568] The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain, and the United Kingdom, by George Edward Cokayne, Vol. IX, p. 404-405.
    9.[S11568] The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain, and the United Kingdom, by George Edward Cokayne, Vol. VIII, p. 253.
    From: http://our-royal-titled-noble-and-commoner-ancestors.com/p365.htm#i10945
    _______________
    'Sir Thomas de Multon, 1st Lord Multon1
    'M, #9174, b. 21 February 1276, d. before 8 February 1321/22
    Last Edited=6 Sep 2010
    ' Sir Thomas de Multon, 1st Lord Multon was born on 21 February 1276.2 He was the son of Thomas de Multon.2 He married Eleanor de Burgh, daughter of Richard de Burgh, 2nd Earl of Ulster, on 3 January 1297 at St. Peter's Priory, Ipswich, Suffolk, England.3 He died before 8 February 1321/22.2
    ' He was created 1st Lord Multon [England by writ] on 6 February 1298/99.1
    'Children of Sir Thomas de Multon, 1st Lord Multon and Eleanor de Burgh
    1.Margaret de Multon+4 d. 10 Dec 1361
    2.Joan de Multon+5 d. 16 Jun 1363
    Citations
    1.[S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume I, page 150. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
    2.[S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume IX, page 403.
    3.[S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume IX, page 404.
    4.[S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke's Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke's Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 1, page 1013. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    5.[S37] Charles Mosley, Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    From: http://www.thepeerage.com/p918.htm#i9174
    _______________________________

    Thomas married Eleanor Burgh 3 Jan 1297, St. Peter's Priory, Ipswich, Suffolk, England. Eleanor (daughter of Richard de Burgh, 2nd Earl of Ulster and Margaret de Burgh, Countess of Ulster) was born 0___ 1282, Belfast, County Antrim, Ireland; died 0Aug 1324, Spalding, Lincolnshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  36. 14579.  Eleanor Burgh was born 0___ 1282, Belfast, County Antrim, Ireland (daughter of Richard de Burgh, 2nd Earl of Ulster and Margaret de Burgh, Countess of Ulster); died 0Aug 1324, Spalding, Lincolnshire, England.
    Children:
    1. Joan de Multon was born 0___ 1304, Cumbria, England; died 16 Jun 1363; was buried , Dunmow Priory, Dunmow, Essex, England.
    2. 7289. Elizabeth de Multon was born 23 Nov 1306, Mulgrave Castle, Whitby, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1344, Aldingham, Cumbria, England.
    3. Thomas de Multon was born ~ 1307, Cumbria, England.


Generation: 15

  1. 16384.  William de Bolling was born 1165, Yorkshire, England (son of William de Bolling and unnamed spouse).

    Notes:

    Generation No. 139

    William De Bolling (II) [139] William De Bolling [138] John De Bolling [137] Tristam De Bolling [136] William De Boulogne [135] Eustace II De Boulogne (=Mary of Scotland) [134] Mathilda Van Leuven (=Eustache I, Count of Boulogne)[133] Gerberga of Lower Lorraine [132] Charles, Duke of Lower Lorraine [131] King Louis IV of France (=Gerberga of Saxony) [130] Charles III, the Simple (=Eadgifu of England) [129] Louis II, the Stammerer (=Adelaide of Paris) [128] Charles II, the Bald (=Ermentrude) [127] Louis I, the Pious (=Judith of Bavaria) [126] Charlemagne the Great (=Hildegard) [1-125]

    William De Bolling (II) was born 1165 in Yorkshire, England, and died Unknown in England.

    Children: William De Bolling (III)

    William married unnamed spouse. [Group Sheet]


  2. 16385.  unnamed spouse
    Children:
    1. 8192. William de Bolling was born 1190, New Hall (Derbyshire) England; died ~1258, Kirkstall Abbey, Yorkshire, England.

  3. 17664.  Roger Bigod, Knight was born , Normandy, France; died 9 Sep 1107, (Norfolkshire, England); was buried , Norwich, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Roger Bigod of Norfolk

    Notes:

    Roger Bigod (died 1107) was a Norman knight who travelled to England in the Norman Conquest. He held great power in East Anglia, and five of his descendants were earls of Norfolk. He was also known as Roger Bigot, appearing as such as a witness to the Charter of Liberties of Henry I of England.

    Biography

    Roger came from a fairly obscure family of poor knights in Normandy. Robert le Bigot, certainly a relation of Roger's, possibly his father, acquired an important position in the household of William, Duke of Normandy (later William I of England), due, the story goes, to his disclosure to the duke of a plot by the duke's cousin William Werlenc.[1]

    Both Roger and Robert may have fought at the Battle of Hastings, and afterwards they were rewarded with a substantial estate in East Anglia. The Domesday Book lists Roger as holding six lordships in Essex, 117 in Suffolk and 187 in Norfolk.

    Bigod's (Bigot) base was in Thetford, Norfolk, then the see of the bishop, where he founded a priory later donated to the abbey at Cluny. In 1101 he further consolidated his power when Henry I granted him licence to build a castle at Framlingham, which became the family seat of power until their downfall in 1307. Another of his castles was Bungay Castle, also in Suffolk.

    In 1069 he, Robert Malet and Ralph de Gael (then Earl of Norfolk), defeated Sweyn Estrithson (Sweyn II) of Denmark near Ipswich. After Ralph de Gael's fall in 1074, Roger was appointed sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk, and acquired many of the dispossessed earl's estates. For this reason he is sometimes counted as Earl of Norfolk, but he probably was never actually created earl. (His son Hugh acquired the title earl of Norfolk in 1141.) He acquired further estates through his influence in local law courts as sheriff and great lord of the region.

    In the Rebellion of 1088 he joined other barons in England against William II, whom they hoped to depose in favour of Robert Curthose, Duke of Normandy. He seems to have lost his lands after the rebellion had failed, but regained them after reconciling with the king.

    In 1100, Robert Bigod (Bigot) was one of the witnesses recorded on the Charter of Liberties, King Henry I's coronation promises later to influence the Magna Carta of 1215.

    In 1101 there was another attempt to bring in Robert of Normandy by removing King Henry, but this time Roger Bigod stayed loyal to the king.

    He died on 9 September 1107 and is buried in Norwich. Upon his death there was a dispute over his burial place between the Bishop of Norwich, Herbert Losinga, and the monks at Thetford Priory, founded by Bigod. The monks claimed Roger's body, along with those of his family and successors, had been left to them by Roger for burial in the priory in Roger's foundation charter (as was common practice at the time). The bishop of Norwich stole the body in the middle of the night and had him buried in the new cathedral he had built in Norwich.

    For some time he was thought to have two wives, Adelaide/Adeliza and Alice/Adeliza de Tosny. It is now believed these were the same woman, Adeliza (Alice) de Tosny (Toeni, Toeny). She was the sister and coheiress of William de Tosny, Lord of Belvoir.

    He was succeeded by his eldest son, William Bigod, and, after William drowned in the sinking of the White Ship, by his second son, Hugh Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk. He also had three daughters: Gunnor, who married Robert fitz Swein of Essex, Lord of Rayleigh; Cecily, who married William d'Aubigny "Brito"; and Maud, who married William d'Aubigny "Pincerna", and was mother to William d'Aubigny, 1st Earl of Arundel.[2]

    end

    Roger married Adeliza de Tosny. [Group Sheet]


  4. 17665.  Adeliza de Tosny
    Children:
    1. 8832. Hugh Bigod, Knight, 1st Earl of Norfolk was born 0___ 1095, Belvoir Castle, Belvoir, Leicestershire, England; died 0___ 1177, Israel.
    2. Maud Bigod was born , (Belvoir Castle, Belvoir, Leicestershire, England).

  5. 17666.  Aubrey de Vere, II was born ~ 1085, (Normandy, France) (son of Aubrey de Vere, I and Beatrice Ghent); died 0May 1141, (Thrapston, Northamptonshire, England).

    Notes:

    Aubrey de Vere (c. 1085 – May 1141) — also known as "Alberic[us] de Ver" and "Albericus regis camerarius" (the king's chamberlain)— was the second of that name in England after the Norman Conquest, being the eldest surviving son of Aubrey de Vere and his wife Beatrice.

    Aubrey II served as one of the king's chamberlains and as a justiciar under kings Henry I and Stephen.[1] Henry I also appointed him as sheriff of London and Essex and co-sheriff with Richard Basset of eleven counties. In June 1133, that king awarded the office of master chamberlain to Aubrey and his heirs. A frequent witness of royal charters for Henry I and Stephen, he appears to have accompanied Henry to Normandy only once. The chronicler William of Malmesbury reports that in 1139, Aubrey was King Stephen's spokesman to the church council at Winchester, when the king had been summoned to answer for the seizure of castles held by Roger, Bishop of Salisbury and his nephews, the bishops of Ely and Lincoln.[2] In May 1141, during the English civil war, Aubrey was killed by a London mob and was buried in the family mausoleum at Colne Priory, Essex.

    The stone tower at Hedingham, in Essex, was most likely begun by Aubrey and completed by his son and heir, Aubrey de Vere, 1st Earl of Oxford. In addition to his patronage of Colne Priory, the new master chamberlain either founded a cell of the Benedictine abbey St. Melanie in Rennes, Brittany, at Hatfield Broadoak or Hatfield Regis, Essex, or took on the primary patronage of that community soon after it was founded.

    His eldest son, another Aubrey de Vere, was later created Earl of Oxford, and his descendants held that title and the office that in later centuries was known as Lord Great Chamberlain until the extinction of the Vere male line in 1703.[3]

    His wife Adeliza, daughter of Gilbert fitz Richard of Clare, survived her husband for twenty-two years. For most of that time she was a corrodian at St. Osyth's Priory, Chich, Essex.[4]

    Their known children are:

    Aubrey de Vere, 1st Earl of Oxford (married 1. Beatrice, countess of Guisnes, 2. Eufemia, 3. Agnes of Essex)
    Rohese de Vere, Countess of Essex (married 1. Geoffrey de Mandeville, 1st Earl of Essex, 2. Payn de Beauchamp)
    Robert (married 1. Matilda de Furnell, 2. Margaret daughter of Baldwin Wake)
    Alice "of Essex" (married 1. Robert of Essex, 2. Roger fitz Richard)
    Geoffrey (married 1. widow of Warin fitz Gerold, 2. Isabel de Say)
    Juliana Countess of Norfolk (married 1. Hugh Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk, 2. Walkelin Maminot)
    William de Vere, Bishop of Hereford (1186-1198)
    Gilbert, prior of the Knights Hospitaller in England (1195-1197)
    a daughter (name unknown) who married Roger de Ramis.

    end of biography

    Aubrey married Adeliza de Clare ~ 1105, Suffolk, England. Adeliza (daughter of Gilbert Fitz Richard, Knight, 2nd Lord of Clare and Adeliza de Claremont) was born ~1093, Risbridge, Suffolk, England; died 1 Nov 1163, St Osyth Priory, Essex, England. [Group Sheet]


  6. 17667.  Adeliza de Clare was born ~1093, Risbridge, Suffolk, England (daughter of Gilbert Fitz Richard, Knight, 2nd Lord of Clare and Adeliza de Claremont); died 1 Nov 1163, St Osyth Priory, Essex, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Alice Clare
    • Also Known As: Alice de Clare

    Children:
    1. Rohese de Vere was born ~1110; died Aft 1166.
    2. Aubrey de Vere, III, Knight, 1st Earl of Oxford was born ~ 1115; died 26 Dec 1194.
    3. 8833. Juliane de Vere, Countess of Norfolk was born ~ 1116, Castle Hedingham, Essex, England; died ~ 1199.
    4. Robert de Vere, Lord of Twywell was born 1124, Thrapston, Northamptonshire, England; died 26 Dec 1194, Thrapston, Northamptonshire, England.
    5. Adeliza de Vere was born ~1125, Essex, England; died 1185, Saffron Walden, Essex, England.

  7. 17668.  Roger Toeni, Lord of Flamstead was born ~1104, Hertfordshire, England; died >1162, Flamstead, Hertfordshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: de Conches, de Tosny

    Notes:

    Roger "Lord of Flamstead" de Toeni formerly Toeni aka de Conches, de Tosny
    Born about 1104 in Hertfordshire, England

    ANCESTORS ancestors

    Son of Radulph (Toeni) de Tony and Adelise (Huntingdon) de Tony
    Brother of Godechilde (Toeni) de Neufbourg, Simon Toeni, Robert Toeni, Isabel Toeni, Hugh Toeni and Margaret (Toeni) de Clifford
    Husband of Ida (Hainault) de Toeni — married before 1135 [location unknown]

    DESCENDANTS descendants

    Father of Godehaut (Toeni) de Mohun, Roger (Toeni) de Toeni IV, Baldwin (Toeni) de Toeni, Geoffrey (Toeni) de Toeni, Goda (Toeni) de Ferrers and Ralph (Toeni) de Tony
    Died before 1162 in Flamstead, Hertford, Englandmap
    Profile managers: Katherine Patterson private message [send private message], David Robinson private message [send private message], and Wendy Hampton private message [send private message]
    Toeni-2 created 14 Sep 2010 | Last modified 2 Mar 2017
    This page has been accessed 5,374 times.

    Categories: House of Tosny.

    European Aristocracy

    Roger (Toeni) de Toeni is a member of royalty, nobility or aristocracy in the British Isles.
    Join: British Isles Royals and Aristocrats 742-1499 Project
    Discuss: EUROARISTO

    Contents

    1 Biography
    1.1 Chronology for Roger de Toeni and Ida of Hainault
    1.2 Early Life
    1.3 Family
    1.4 Roger III & wife had four children
    1.4.1 Raoul [V] & his wife had [two] children
    1.5 Ralph & his wife had one child
    2 Roger de Tosney 1104-1158
    3 Sources
    Biography
    Title of Roger de Tony (Royal Ancestry):

    Seigneur of Conches and Nogent-le-Roi (in France)

    Chronology for Roger de Toeni and Ida of Hainault
    ... [1]


    8/2/1100: Henry I crowned.
    ~1104 Roger born in England, s/o Sir Ralph IV de Tony and Alice of Northumberland.[2][3]
    8/3/1108 Louis VI crowned King of France.
    ~1110: Ida born in Hainaut, d/o Baldwin III Count of Hainaut and Yolende of Gueldre.
    1126: Roger’s father died; mother remarried.
    1129-35: Confirmation of gifts made by Robert de Brus to canons of Guisborough, co. York … signatories .. king, … Roger de Toeni, … (S) English Historical Review, V34, 1919, P561.
    1130 Roger founds Conches abbey, “Rogerus de Totteneio filius Radulphi junioris” made donation. (S) FMG.[4]
    1130s Roger de Tosny wages war against neighbor Hugh de Chateauneuf who attacked Nogent.
    1131-33 Henry I forces occupy Conches when Roger de Toeny, with William Talvas, don't show up court.[5]
    1132: Hughes II[6] fights Roger Tosny against William Monvoisin, seigneur de Rosny.
    By 1135: Confirmation of various grant of alms made to monaster of St. Ouen, Conches, by Roger de Toesni the elder and others.[7]
    1135: Roger de Tosny supports Geoffrey of Anjou in conflict w/ king of France.[8]
    22 Dec 1135: Stephen crowned.
    1135-54: Roger de Tany tenant of honour of Boulogne.[9]
    May 1136: Roger de Tosny sized ducal castle of Vaudreuil, widening local conflict. Roger driven out by earl of Mellent.[10]
    5/12/1136: Roger excutes reprisals agains Count of Mellant for buring of Acuigni the previous day.
    Jun 1136: Theobald, count of Blois, began to prosecute war against Roger de Tosny ; while Earls of Mellent and Leicester [Beaumont brothers] pillaged his lands. [11]
    Oct 1136: Roger de Conches ravages diocese of Lisieux, pillaging abbey of Croix-Saint-Leufroi, and burning church of St. Stephen at Vauvai. Robert of Gloucester captured Roger de Tosny.
    Imprisoned.[12]
    May 1137 Stephen of England liberats Roger de Conches.
    8/1/1137 Louis VII succeeds as king of France.
    1138: Baldwin, count of Hainault, rides 150 miles across northern France to support Roger and Ida in war with Earl of Leicester.
    9/7/1138 Roger de Toeni burns down Bretueil.
    1138 Roger reconciles with the earls of Leicester and Mellent, and King Stephen. Settlement: Margaret, dau of Earl Robert Beaument, m. Roger’s son [Ralph].
    1140 Vincent abbey gives a palfrey to Roger Tossny and two ounces of gold to Ida, wife of latter, in exchange for donations in England.[13]
    1140: Raoul du Fresne and bros. Girelme, witness charter of Roger de Tosny.
    By 1142: Pont St-Pierre given back to Roger de Tosny [previously held by Robert of Leicester].
    1142: Roger's confirmation to Lyre abbey at Pont St-Pierre. (S) Beaumont Twins, Crouch, 2008, P55.
    1144: Roger de Conches named as a lord in Normandy of Count of Anjou's army
    1145: Robert de Mesnil witness charter of Roger de Tosny associated with Mesnil-Vicomte.
    1147: Roger de Tosny, fils de Raoul le Jeune, decharge l’abbe Vincent de l’obligation de reparer ou de refaire la chaussee de l’etang de Fontaine.[14]
    19 Dec 1154: Henry II crowned.
    1155: Roger de Conches granted charter in case of forteiture of citizens of Plessis-Mahiel; witnessed by Robert de Mesnil.
    1156: Roger gave abbey of Bernay 5 acres of land and vine at Tosny.
    1157: Rogo de Toeni in Norfolk and Suffolk, ‘in Holcha’. (S) FMG.[15]
    1157-62: Roger granted charter to Bec concerning Norfolk manor of East Wretham “to all his men either French or Normans and English.”
    9/29/1158: Roger living.
    1160: Louis VII takes possession of Nogent from Roger [returns it later that year.]
    1162: Roger de Tony, lord of Flamsted, Herts, dies.[3]
    1165: Henry II King of England confirms property of Conches abbey.[16]
    Family notes: Conches about 4 leagues southwest of Everux.
    Early Life
    Roger /de TOENI (DE CONCHES)/ [17][18][3]
    Taking de TOENI as the last name from de TOENI (DE CONCHES).

    Roger 'The Spaniard' de Toeni[19]

    p. Ralph de TOENI m. Alice (Adeliza) Huntingdon 1104-aft 29 Sep 1158[20][21]
    Roger de TOENI
    Simon de TOENI
    Isabel de TOENI
    Hugh de TOENI
    Family
    m (before 9 Aug 1138) GERTRUDE [Ida] de Hainaut dau of BAUDOUIN III count of Hainaut & Yolande van Geldern.[22][23]
    The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that Henry I King of England had granted "xx libratas terre in Bercolt" in Norfolk to "Rogero de Tooni…in maritagio cum filia comitis de Henou"[98].

    Roger III & wife had four children
    RAOUL [V] de Tosny (-1162). Chronicon Hanoniense names (in order) "Radulphum primum [filium Rogerum], Rogerum secundum et Balduinum tercium et Gaufridum quartum clericum" as the children of "[Rogerum] domino de Thoenio" & his wife[99]. Robert of Torigny records the death in 1162 of "Radulfus de Toene"[100]. m (after 1155) MARGUERITE de Beaumont, daughter of ROBERT [II] Earl of Leicester & his wife Amice de Gačel ([1125]-after 1185). Robert of Torigny refers to the wife of "Radulfus de Toene" as "filia Roberti comitis Leccestriµ" but does not name her[101]. The 1163/64 Pipe Roll records "Margareta uxor Rad de Toeni" making payment "de Suppl de Welcumesto" in Essex/Hertfordshire[102]. The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Margareta de Tony…lx annorum” and her land “in Welcumestowe"[103].
    Raoul [V] & his wife had [two] children
    ROGER [IV] de Tosny (-after 29 Dec 1208). Robert of Torigny records that "parvulo filio" succeeded in 1162 on the death of his father "Radulfus de Toene" but does not name him[104]. Seigneur de Tosny. The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], names "Rogerus de Tony" paying "xl s" in Sussex[105].
    [RALPH de Tosny of Holkham, co Norfolk (-before 1184). The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Radulfus de Tonay ii m" in Sussex in [1167/68][106].] m ADA de Chaumont, daughter of ROBERT de Chaumont & his wife --- (-after 1184). The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “in Holkham…de feodo Rogeri de Tony” held by “Ade de Tony…fuit Roberti de Chaumunt”, adding that she has “i filium Baldewinum…xv annorum et…v filias”[107]. A charter dated 25 Sep 1188 confirms the foundation of Dodnash Priory, Suffolk by "Baldewin de Toeni et dna Alda mr sua"[108].

    Ralph & his wife had one child
    BALDWIN de Tosny ([1169]-after 1210). The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “in Holkham…de feodo Rogeri de Tony” held by “Ade de Tony…fuit Roberti de Chaumunt”, adding that she has “i filium Baldewinum…xv annorum et…v filias”[109]. A charter dated 25 Sep 1188 confirms the foundation of Dodnash Priory, Suffolk by "Baldewin de Toeni et dna Alda mr sua"[110]. m --- Bardolf, daughter of THOMAS BARDOLF of Bradwell, Essex & his wife ---. The Red Book of the Exchequer records that "Willelmus frater regis H[enrici]" gave land at "Bradewelle" in Essex to "Thomas Bardulf" who gave three parts thereof with "tres filiabus suis in maritagio…Roberto de Sancto Remigio et Willelmo Bacun et Baldewino de Tony", which "Baldewinus de Thony" still held in [1210/12][111]. Baldwin & his wife had one child:
    ROGER
    5 dau. Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “in Holkham…de feodo Rogeri de Tony” held by “Ade de Tony…fuit Roberti de Chaumunt”, adding that she has “i filium Baldewinum…xv annorum et…v filias”[112].
    ROGER de Tosny . Chronicon Hanoniense names (in order) "Radulphum primum [filium Rogerum], Rogerum secundum et Balduinum tercium et Gaufridum quartum clericum" as the children of "[Rogerum] domino de Thoenio" & his wife[113].
    BAUDOUIN de Tosny (-1170). Chronicon Hanoniense names (in order) "Radulphum primum [filium Rogerum], Rogerum secundum et Balduinum tercium et Gaufridum quartum clericum" as the children of "[Rogerum] domino de Thoenio" & his wife[114]. He had descendants in Hainaut[115].
    GEOFFROY de Tosny . Chronicon Hanoniense names (in order) "Radulphum primum [filium Rogerum], Rogerum secundum et Balduinum tercium et Gaufridum quartum clericum" as the children of "[Rogerum] domino de Thoenio" & his wife[116]. Monk.
    Roger de Tosney 1104-1158
    ROGER [III] de Tosny, son of RAOUL [IV] Seigneur de Tosny & his wife Adelisa of Huntingdon ([1104]-after 29 Sep 1158). His parentage is recorded by Orderic Vitalis[91]. Henry I King of England confirmed the foundation of Conches by "Rogerius senior de Toenio et filius eius Radulphus senex et Radulphus juvenis filius prµdicti Radulphi senis et Rogerius filius Radulphi juvenis", quoting the donation by "Rogerus de Totteneio filius Radulphi junioris", dated to [1130][92]. In prison 1136/37. “Aliz de Toeni” donated "ecclesiam de Welcomstowe" to “ecclesiµ S. Trinitatis Lond.”, for the soul of “…et pro incolumitate filiorum meorum Rogeri de Toeni et Simonis et filiµ meµ Isabellµ", by undated charter[93]. Henry II King of England confirmed the property of Conches abbey, including donations by "Rogeris senior de Toenio et filius eius Radulfus senex et Radulphus juvenis filius predicti Radulphi senex et Roger filius Radulphi juvenis", by charter dated 1165 or [1167/73][94].

    Henry II King of England confirmed the property of Conches abbey, including donations by "Rogeris senior de Toenio et filius eius Radulfus senex et Radulphus juvenis filius predicti Radulphi senex et Roger filius Radulphi juvenis", by charter dated 1165 or [1167/73][95]. The 1157 Pipe Roll records "Rogo de Toeni" in Norfolk and Suffolk, "in Holcha"[96]. m (before 9 Aug 1138) GERTRUDE [Ida] de Hainaut, daughter of BAUDOUIN III Comte de Hainaut & his wife Yolande van Geldern. The Chronicon Hanoniense refers to one of the daughters of "Balduinus comes Hanoniensis" & his wife as wife of "domino de Thoenio", in a later passage naming their children "Radulphum primum [filium Rogerum], Rogerum secundum et Balduinum tercium et Gaufridum quartum clericum"[97]. The Testa de Nevill includes a writ of King John dated 1212 which records that Henry I King of England had granted "xx libratas terre in Bercolt" in Norfolk to "Rogero de Tooni…in maritagio cum filia comitis de Henou"[98]. The primary source which confirms her name has not yet been identified.

    Roger [III] & his wife had four children: 1. RAOUL [V] de Tosny (-1162). The Chronicon Hanoniense names (in order) "Radulphum primum [filium Rogerum], Rogerum secundum et Balduinum tercium et Gaufridum quartum clericum" as the children of "[Rogerum] domino de Thoenio" & his wife[99]. Robert of Torigny records the death in 1162 of "Radulfus de Toene"[100].

    m (after 1155) MARGUERITE de Beaumont, daughter of ROBERT [II] Earl of Leicester & his wife Amice de Gačel ([1125]-after 1185). Robert of Torigny refers to the wife of "Radulfus de Toene" as "filia Roberti comitis Leccestriµ" but does not name her[101]. The 1163/64 Pipe Roll records "Margareta uxor Rad de Toeni" making payment "de Suppl de Welcumesto" in Essex/Hertfordshire[102]. The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Margareta de Tony…lx annorum” and her land “in Welcumestowe"[103]. Raoul [V] & his wife had [two] children:

    a) ROGER [IV] de Tosny (-after 29 Dec 1208). Robert of Torigny records that "parvulo filio" succeeded in 1162 on the death of his father "Radulfus de Toene" but does not name him[104]. Seigneur de Tosny. The Red Book of the Exchequer, listing scutage payments in [1194/95], names "Rogerus de Tony" paying "xl s" in Sussex[105]. - see below. b) [RALPH de Tosny of Holkham, co Norfolk (-before 1184). The Red Book of the Exchequer refers to "Radulfus de Tonay ii m" in Sussex in [1167/68][106].] m ADA de Chaumont, daughter of ROBERT de Chaumont & his wife --- (-after 1184). The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “in Holkham…de feodo Rogeri de Tony” held by “Ade de Tony…fuit Roberti de Chaumunt”, adding that she has “i filium Baldewinum…xv annorum et…v filias”[107]. A charter dated 25 Sep 1188 confirms the foundation of Dodnash Priory, Suffolk by "Baldewin de Toeni et dna Alda mr sua"[108]. Ralph & his wife had one child: i) BALDWIN de Tosny ([1169]-after 1210). The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “in Holkham…de feodo Rogeri de Tony” held by “Ade de Tony…fuit Roberti de Chaumunt”, adding that she has “i filium Baldewinum…xv annorum et…v filias”[109]. A charter dated 25 Sep 1188 confirms the foundation of Dodnash Priory, Suffolk by "Baldewin de Toeni et dna Alda mr sua"[110]. m --- Bardolf, daughter of THOMAS BARDOLF of Bradwell, Essex & his wife ---. The Red Book of the Exchequer records that "Willelmus frater regis H[enrici]" gave land at "Bradewelle" in Essex to "Thomas Bardulf" who gave three parts thereof with "tres filiabus suis in maritagio…Roberto de Sancto Remigio et Willelmo Bacun et Baldewino de Tony", which "Baldewinus de Thony" still held in [1210/12][111]. Baldwin & his wife had one child: (a) ROGER . ii) five daughters . The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records property “in Holkham…de feodo Rogeri de Tony” held by “Ade de Tony…fuit Roberti de Chaumunt”, adding that she has “i filium Baldewinum…xv annorum et…v filias”[112]. 2. ROGER de Tosny . The Chronicon Hanoniense names (in order) "Radulphum primum [filium Rogerum], Rogerum secundum et Balduinum tercium et Gaufridum quartum clericum" as the children of "[Rogerum] domino de Thoenio" & his wife[113]. 3. BAUDOUIN de Tosny (-1170). The Chronicon Hanoniense names (in order) "Radulphum primum [filium Rogerum], Rogerum secundum et Balduinum tercium et Gaufridum quartum clericum" as the children of "[Rogerum] domino de Thoenio" & his wife[114]. He had descendants in Hainaut[115]. 4. GEOFFROY de Tosny . The Chronicon Hanoniense names (in order) "Radulphum primum [filium Rogerum], Rogerum secundum et Balduinum tercium et Gaufridum quartum clericum" as the children of "[Rogerum] domino de Thoenio" & his wife[116]. Monk.

    Sources
    Royal Ancestry 2013 D. Richardson Vol. V p. 170-171
    ?
    Parochial and Family History of the Parish of Blisland, Maclean, 1868, P65. Norman Frontier, Power, 2004, P295.
    Dictionnaire Historique de Toutes Les Communes, Charpillon, 1868 & 1879. Ecclesiastical History of England, Vitalis, 1856.
    [91] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XI, p. 55.
    [92] Gallia Christiana, XI, Instrumenta, V, col. 128.
    [93] Dugdale Monasticon VI.1, Christ Church, Aldgate, London, VI, p. 152.
    [94] Actes Henri II, Tome I, CCCCXXIII, p. 550.
    [95] Actes Henri II, Tome I, CCCCXXIII, p. 550.
    [96] Hunter, J. (ed.) (1844) The Great Rolls of the Pipe for the second, third and fourth years of the reign of King Henry II 1155-1158 (London) ("Pipe Roll") 4 Hen II (1157), Norfolk and Suffolk, p. 125.
    [97] Gisleberti Chronicon Hanoniense, MGH SS XXI, pp. 505 and 506.
    [98] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 134.
    [99] Gisleberti Chronicon Hanoniense, MGH SS XXI, pp. 505 and 506.
    [100] Chronique de Robert de Torigny I, 1162, p. 339.
    [101] Chronique de Robert de Torigny I, 1162, p. 339.
    [102] Pipe Roll Society, Vol. VII (1886) The Great Roll of the Pipe for the 10th year of King Henry II (London) ("Pipe Roll 10 Hen II (1163/64)"), p. 38.
    [103] Rotuli Dominabus, Rotuli VIII, Essex, p. 41.
    [104] Chronique de Robert de Torigny I, 1162, p. 339.
    [105] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Anno VI regis Ricardi, ad redemptionem eius, scutagium ad XXs, p. 92.
    [106] Red Book Exchequer, Part I, Knights fees, p. 47.
    [107] Rotuli Dominabus, Rotuli V, Norffolk, p. 27.
    [108] Ancient Charters (Round), Part I, 53, p. 87.
    [109] Rotuli Dominabus, Rotuli V, Norffolk, p. 27.
    [110] Ancient Charters (Round), Part I, 53, p. 87.
    [111] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, p. 499.
    [112] Rotuli Dominabus, Rotuli V, Norffolk, p. 27.
    [113] Gisleberti Chronicon Hanoniense, MGH SS XXI, pp. 505 and 506.
    ? Acrossthepond.ged on 21 Feb 2011. User: AA428DBB1CB84E3B845C44BBBBCF47ABEC7F. Note: Birth: ABT 1104 Flamsted, Hertfordshire
    ? 3.0 3.1 3.2 De TOENI-68 on Jun 20, 2011 by Michael Stephenson. hofundssonAnces.ged
    ? Henry I confirmed foundation of Conches by "Rogerius senior de Toenio et filius eius Radulphus senex et Radulphus juvenis filius prµdicti Radulphi senis et Rogerius filius Radulphi juvenis", quoting the donation by "Rogerus de Totteneio filius Radulphi junioris", dated to 1130.
    ? (S) History of Normandy, V4, P562.
    ? son of Gervais
    ? signatories : king and Queen Adelaide, Hugh archbishop of rouen, Auding bishop of Evreux, William earl of Warenne, Amaury count of Everux, Hugh [king’s sewer], … (S) English Historical Review, V34, 1919, P561.
    ? (S) Norman Frontier, Power, 2004, P382.
    ? (S) Families, Friends, Allies : Boulogne, Tanner, 2004, P340.
    ? (S) Reign of King Stephen, Longman, 2000, P60.
    ? (S) Reign of King Stephen, Longman, 2000, P61.
    ? “Aliz de Toeni” donated "ecclesiam de Welcomstowe" to “ecclesiµ S. Trinitatis Lond.”, for the soul of “…et pro incolumitate filiorum meorum Rogeri de Toeni et Simonis et filiµ meµ Isabellµ", by undated charter[93].
    ? (S) Prosopographie des Abbes Benedictins, Gazeau, 2007, P71.
    ? (S) Prosopographie des Abbes Benedictins, Gazeau, 2007, P71.
    ? 1157 Pipe Roll records "Rogo de Toeni" in Norfolk and Suffolk, "in Holcha"[96].
    ? including donations by "Rogeris senior de Toenio et filius eius Radulfus senex et Radulphus juvenis filius predicti Radulphi senex et Roger filius Radulphi juvenis", by charter dated 1165 or [1167/73][94]. Henry II King of England confirmed the property of Conches abbey, including donations by "Rogeris senior de Toenio et filius eius Radulfus senex et Radulphus juvenis filius predicti Radulphi senex et Roger filius Radulphi juvenis", by charter dated 1165 or [1167/73][95].
    ? De TOENI-68 on Jun 20, 2011 by Michael Stephenson. Pedigree Resource File CD 49: (Salt Lake City, UT: Intellectual Reserve, Inc., 2002)
    ? De TOENI-68 on Jun 20, 2011 by Michael Stephenson. Ancestral File. Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day SAINTS Publication: June 1998
    ? #S96
    ? Orderic Vitalis.
    ? Alias: RAOUL [IV] Seigneur de Tosny & Adelisa of Huntingdon
    ? Issue: Chronicon Hanoniense refers to one of the daughters of "Balduinus comes Hanoniensis" & his wife as wife of "domino de Thoenio", in a later passage naming their children "Radulphum primum [filium Rogerum], Rogerum secundum et Balduinum tercium et Gaufridum quartum clericum"[97].
    ? ~1130: Child of Roger and Ida: Ralph de Tony born in England.

    end of biography

    Roger married Ida Hainault >1135. Ida was born ~1109; died 9 Aug 1138. [Group Sheet]


  8. 17669.  Ida Hainault was born ~1109; died 9 Aug 1138.
    Children:
    1. 8834. Ralph de Tosny, V, Knight, Earl was born ~1140, Flamstead, Hertfordshire, England; died 0___ 1162, Flamstead, Hertfordshire, England.
    2. Godehaut Toeni was born ~1130, Derbyshire, England; died Bef 1186.

  9. 17670.  Robert de Beaumont, Knight, 2nd Earl of Leicester was born 0___ 1104, (Meulan, France) (son of Robert de Beaumont, Knight, 1st Earl of Leicester and Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester); died 5 Apr 1168, Brackley, Northamptonshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Justiciar of England, 1155-1168
    • Also Known As: Earl of Hereford
    • Also Known As: Robert Beaumont
    • Military: The Anarchy

    Notes:

    Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester (1104 - 5 April 1168) was Justiciar of England 1155-1168.

    The surname "de Beaumont" is given him by genealogists. The only known contemporary surname applied to him is "Robert son of Count Robert". Henry Knighton, the fourteenth-century chronicler notes him as Robert "Le Bossu" (meaning "Robert the Hunchback" in French).

    Early life and education

    Robert was an English nobleman of Norman-French ancestry. He was the son of Robert de Beaumont, Count of Meulan and 1st Earl of Leicester, and Elizabeth de Vermandois, and the twin brother of Waleran de Beaumont. It is not known whether they were identical or fraternal twins, but the fact that they are remarked on by contemporaries as twins indicates that they were probably identical.

    The two brothers, Robert and Waleran, were adopted into the royal household shortly after their father's death in June 1118 (upon which Robert inherited his father's second titles of Earl of Leicester). Their lands on either side of the Channel were committed to a group of guardians, led by their stepfather, William, Earl of Warenne or Surrey. They accompanied King Henry I to Normandy, to meet with Pope Callixtus II in 1119, when the king incited them to debate philosophy with the cardinals. Both twins were literate, and Abingdon Abbey later claimed to have been Robert's school, but though this is possible, its account is not entirely trustworthy. A surviving treatise on astronomy (British Library ms Royal E xxv) carries a dedication "to Earl Robert of Leicester, that man of affairs and profound learning, most accomplished in matters of law" who can only be this Robert. On his death he left his own psalter to the abbey he founded at Leicester, which was still in its library in the late fifteenth century. The existence of this indicates that like many noblemen of his day, Robert followed the canonical hours in his chapel.

    Career at the Norman court

    In 1120 Robert was declared of age and inherited most of his father's lands in England, while his twin brother took the French lands. However in 1121, royal favour brought Robert the great Norman honors of Breteuil and Pacy-sur-Eure, with his marriage to Amice de Gael, daughter of a Breton intruder the king had forced on the honor after the forfeiture of the Breteuil family in 1119. Robert spent a good deal of his time and resources over the next decade integrating the troublesome and independent barons of Breteuil into the greater complex of his estates. He did not join in his brother's great Norman rebellion against King Henry I in 1123–24. He appears fitfully at the royal court despite his brother's imprisonment until 1129. Thereafter the twins were frequently to be found together at Henry I's court.

    Robert held lands throughout the country. In the 1120s and 1130s he tried to rationalise his estates in Leicestershire. Leicestershire estates of the See of Lincoln and the Earl of Chester were seized by force. This enhanced the integrity of Robert's block of estates in the central midlands, bounded by Nuneaton, Loughborough, Melton Mowbray and Market Harborough.

    In 1135, the twins were present at King Henry's deathbed. Robert's actions in the succession period are unknown, but he clearly supported his brother's decision to join the court of the new king Stephen before Easter 1136. During the first two years of the reign Robert is found in Normandy fighting rival claimants for his honor of Breteuil. Military action allowed him to add the castle of Pont St-Pierre to his Norman estates in June 1136 at the expense of one of his rivals. From the end of 1137 Robert and his brother were increasingly caught up in the politics of the court of King Stephen in England, where Waleran secured an ascendancy which lasted till the beginning of 1141. Robert participated in his brother's political coup against the king's justiciar, Roger of Salisbury (the Bishop of Salisbury).

    Civil war in England

    The outbreak of civil war in England in September 1139 brought Robert into conflict with Earl Robert of Gloucester, the bastard son of Henry I and principal sponsor of the Empress Matilda. His port of Wareham and estates in Dorset were seized by Gloucester in the first campaign of the war. In that campaign the king awarded Robert the city and castle of Hereford as a bid to establish the earl as his lieutenant in Herefordshire, which was in revolt. It is disputed by scholars whether this was an award of a second county to Earl Robert. Probably in late 1139, Earl Robert refounded his father's collegiate church of St Mary de Castro in Leicester as a major Augustinian abbey on the meadows outside the town's north gate, annexing the college's considerable endowment to the abbey.

    The battle of Lincoln on 2 February 1141 saw the capture and imprisonment of King Stephen. Although Count Waleran valiantly continued the royalist fight in England into the summer, he eventually capitulated to the Empress and crossed back to Normandy to make his peace with the Empress's husband, Geoffrey of Anjou. Earl Robert had been in Normandy since 1140 attempting to stem the Angevin invasion, and negotiated the terms of his brother's surrender. He quit Normandy soon after and his Norman estates were confiscated and used to reward Norman followers of the Empress. Earl Robert remained on his estates in England for the remainder of King Stephen's reign. Although he was a nominal supporter of the king, there seems to have been little contact between him and Stephen, who did not confirm the foundation of Leicester Abbey till 1153. Earl Robert's principal activity between 1141 and 1149 was his private war with Ranulf II, Earl of Chester. Though details are obscure it seems clear enough that he waged a dogged war with his rival that in the end secured him control of northern Leicestershire and the strategic Chester castle of Mountsorrel. When Earl Robert of Gloucester died in 1147, Robert of Leicester led the movement among the greater earls of England to negotiate private treaties to establish peace in their areas, a process hastened by the Empress's departure to Normandy, and complete by 1149. During this time the earl also exercised supervision over his twin brother's earldom of Worcester, and in 1151 he intervened to frustrate the king's attempts to seize the city.

    Earl Robert and Henry Plantagenet

    The arrival in England of Duke Henry, son of the Empress Mathilda, in January 1153 was a great opportunity for Earl Robert. He was probably in negotiation with Henry in that spring and reached an agreement by which he would defect to him by May 1153, when the duke restored his Norman estates to the earl. The duke celebrated his Pentecost court at Leicester in June 1153, and he and the earl were constantly in company till the peace settlement between the duke and the king at Winchester in November 1153. Earl Robert crossed with the duke to Normandy in January 1154 and resumed his Norman castles and honors. As part of the settlement his claim to be chief steward of England and Normandy was recognised by Henry.

    Earl Robert began his career as chief justiciar of England probably as soon as Duke Henry succeeded as King Henry II in October 1154.[1] The office gave the earl supervision of the administration and legal process in England whether the king was present or absent in the realm. He appears in that capacity in numerous administrative acts, and had a junior colleague in the post in Richard de Luci, another former servant of King Stephen. The earl filled the office for nearly fourteen years until his death,[1] and earned the respect of the emerging Angevin bureaucracy in England. His opinion was quoted by learned clerics, and his own learning was highly commended.

    He died on 5 April 1168,[1] probably at his Northamptonshire castle of Brackley, for his entrails were buried at the hospital in the town. He was received as a canon of Leicester on his deathbed, and buried to the north of the high altar of the great abbey he had founded and built. He left a written testament of which his son the third earl was an executor, as we learn in a reference dating to 1174.

    Church patronage

    Robert founded and patronised many religious establishments. He founded Leicester Abbey and Garendon Abbeyin Leicestershire, the Fontevraldine Nuneaton Priory in Warwickshire, Luffield Abbey in Buckinghamshire, and the hospital of Brackley, Northamptonshire. He refounded the collegiate church of St Mary de Castro, Leicester, as a dependency of Leicester abbey around 1164, after suppressing it in 1139. Around 1139 he refounded the collegiate church of Wareham as a priory of his abbey of Lyre, in Normandy. His principal Norman foundations were the priory of Le Dâesert in the forest of Breteuil and a major hospital in Breteuil itself. He was a generous benefactor of the Benedictine abbey of Lyre, the oldest monastic house in the honor of Breteuil. He also donated land in Old Dalby, Leicestershire to the Knights Hospitallers who used it to found Dalby Preceptory.

    Family and children

    He married after 1120 Amice de Montfort, daughter of Raoul II de Montfort, himself a son of Ralph de Gael, Earl of East Anglia. Both families had lost their English inheritances through rebellion in 1075. They had four children:

    Hawise de Beaumont, who married William Fitz Robert, 2nd Earl of Gloucester and had descendants.
    Robert de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester who married Petronilla de Grandmesnil and had descendants.
    Isabel, who married: Simon de St. Liz, Earl of Huntingdon and had descendants.
    Margaret, who married Ralph V de Toeni and had descendants through their daughter, Ida de Tosny.

    Occupation:
    In medieval England and Scotland the Chief Justiciar (later known simply as the Justiciar) was roughly equivalent to a modern Prime Minister[citation needed] as the monarch's chief minister. Similar positions existed on the European Continent, particularly in Norman Italy. The term is the English form of the medieval Latin justiciarius or justitiarius ("man of justice", i.e. judge).

    source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Justiciar

    Military:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Anarchy

    Robert married Amice de Montfort, Countess of Leicester Aft 1120, Brittany, France. Amice was born 0___ 1108, Norfolk, England; died 31 Aug 1168, Nuneaton, Warwickshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  10. 17671.  Amice de Montfort, Countess of Leicester was born 0___ 1108, Norfolk, England; died 31 Aug 1168, Nuneaton, Warwickshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Amicia de Gael

    Notes:

    Click this link to view 5 generations of her issue ... http://www.wikitree.com/genealogy/Gael-Descendants-3

    Children:
    1. 8835. Margaret de Beaumont was born 0___ 1125, (Leicestershire, England); died Aft 1185.
    2. Hawise de Beaumont was born , Leicestershire, England.
    3. Robert de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester was born ~ 1120, Leicestershire, England; died 31 Aug 1190, Albania.

  11. 17672.  Gilbert Giffard, Royal Serjeant was born ~ 1065, (France); died 0___ 1129, Winterbourne Monkton, Marlborough, Wiltshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: the King's Marshal
    • Alt Birth: 0___ 1075, Axbridge, Somerset, England

    Notes:

    Gilbert Giffard
    Born about 1065 in England or France
    Son of [father unknown] and [mother unknown]
    [sibling(s) unknown]
    [spouse(s) unknown]
    DESCENDANTS descendants
    Father of John (Marshal) FitzGilbert and William (Giffard) Fitz Gilbert
    Died before 1129 in Winterbourne Monkton, Marlborough, Wiltshire, England

    DISPUTED PARENTAGE

    Since his various parentages are all disputed, they have been removed. See the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy's Medieval Lands Index for more information. Also see discussion below.

    Removed these profiles as parents: Rollo Cheddar, Geoffrey Le Mareschal, and Sibyl di Conversano . Please don't attach any parents without first discussing via post on G2G. (Darlene Athey Hill - 26 Sep 2015)

    Biography

    Gilbert Giffard was a tenant of Glastonbury manor in Winterbourne Monkton in Wiltshire, and held a position as a marshal to the King. That Gilbert was the name of the grandfather of William the Marshall was known because William's father was often referred to as John fitz (son of) Gilbert. That Gilbert, John's father, was already involved in the family's tradition of claiming a royal marshalcy was also indicated from a record in the time of King John, although the nature of that marshalcy in his generation is not well understood.[1] However the identification of Gilbert with records for a man normally called Gilbert Giffard (or Gibard) has become widespread since a publication of N. E. Stacy in 1999 concerning Gilbert's landlord.[2] He not only showed that Giffard had a tax exemption, such as his descendants did for their marshalcy, and that his lands were inherited by the Marshals, but also that Gilbert Giffard's son William Giffard or William fitz Gilbert, was presented to the church of Cheddar as "William Giffard, son of Gilbert the king's marshal".

    Concerning his parentage, various theories exist but none are proven. Each tends to start with one known thing, and build from there:

    Starting from the newest known information, the surname Giffard, Crouch for example notes that it was a common descriptive second name meaning "chubby cheeks" and says "It is highly unlikely that Gilbert Giffard was related to the Conqueror's leading follower, Walter Giffard, Earl of Buckingham; it is conceivable on the grounds of proximity, however, that he might have had a connection with the unrelated West Country barons, the Giffards of Brimpsfield." (Traditionally the Giffards of Brimpsfield and Bucks are often linked.[3] Some still suspect there is a link.[4]
    Keats-Rohan has an entry for him in "Domesday People" (p.214) under "Gislebert Gibart", apparently an entry written without reference to Stacey. She adds that "The fee of Robert Gibart is mentioned in Hist. S. Petri Glocs. ii, 230."[5] In her later "Domesday Descendants" she cites Stacey and has him under "Marescal, Gilbert" (p.1029). She suggests he might be the son of "Robert marshal, who occurs in Domesday Wiltshire" (Domesday People p.391). However In footnote g, Appendix G, Complete Peerage says "Gilbert may have been son or grandson of an otherwise unknown Robert, who in 1086 held Cheddar, Somerset, under Roger de Courseulles (Domesday Book, vol i, fol 94; cf note 'h' infra). Robert the Marshal, who in 1086 held Lavington, Wilts, in chief (Idem, vol i, f. 73) has been suggested as the possible progenitor of the family (Davis, op. cit., pp xxvi - xxvii); but this is unlikely as in 1166 Lavington was held by Piers de la Mare (Red Book, p 248)." It therefore appears that Keats-Rohan was following up the lead of CP, seeking for evidence that Robert in Lavington having other land holdings that might correspond to those known for the later Marshall family, specifically in Cheddar. The Robert in Cheddar has an entry in Domesday People called "Robert Herecom" (p.389[6]). According to a summary of this line of thought by Chris Phillips, Keats-Rohan's various entries give "a slightly complicated picture, but maybe worth investigating further".[7]
    Older works speculated based on the longer-known above-mentioned claim to a "chief marshalship" which King John said happened during the time of King Henry I. Gilbert and his son John faced counter claims from two other men, Robert de Venoiz, and William Hastings. And on this basis many authors have speculated that the three families shared a common ancestry. Robert de Venoiz in particular was apparently son and heir to a Norman named Geoffrey who was sometimes referred to as "Marshall" (although in his time this would not normally have been considered a name, just a description). This family's particular tradition of Marshalcy apparently went back to a marshalcy in Venoix in Normandy.[8] Various scenarios have been presented as fact, such as Gilbert being a son of Robert, or of Geoffrey, or that Gilbert married a lady of their family. (And similarly, the Hastings family have sometimes been linked in speculative pedigrees.) But in fact the record of King John does not strongly imply that before the time of Henry I there was one single "chief" marshal. It could well have been a decision made at that time. There were many hereditary "marshalls" in England and Normandy, as discussed by Round in his book on the subject. (The use of a the job as a surname also probably did not start until King Stephen's time.[9])
    A very simple proposal found in the Complete Peerage is that Gilbert's father was also possibly named Gilbert. The reasoning being that the Gilbert of the Domesday book made around 1086 was many decades before the reign of Henry I, when Gilbert the father of John was still alive.[7] Other authorities seem to accept it is the same person though the generations are long.[10]
    Gilbert had two sons:

    John Fitz-Gilbert, who was accepted as being "chief" Marshal of England while his father still lived, in the time of King Henry I. Probably the first of his family to use the job title as a surname. Born about 1105.
    William Giffard or Fitz-Gilbert, born about 1107. He became chancellor to Queen Mathilda.[11]
    As an hereditary marshal of the King, Gilbert was a French speaking Norman (although some Normans married locally and could speak some English) and the old French title Le Mareschal (Latin Marescallus or Marescalcus) which has evolved into modern English "Marshal" was a term going back to Frankish times, originally referring to a function of "horse servant", which is what the word meant in the old language of the Franks. But by his lifetime, this job, like many other household positions, had evolved. According to a treatise of 1136 made for King Stephen, the Master Marshall ("John", Gilbert's son) had duties which "involved the keeping of certain royal records" and the management of "four other lesser marshals, both clerks and knights, assistants called sergeants, the knight ushers and common ushers of the royal hall, the usher of the king's chamber, the watchmen of court, the tent-keeper and the keeper of the king's hearth".[12]

    In Gilbert's family, the evidence is relatively clear that the function became a surname, not in Gilbert's lifetime probably, but during the lifetime of his son John. Crouch (p.226) mentions that while surnames from hereditary offices were not an uncommon innovation in the 12th century, this family is a "rather early" example of a case where not only the heir of the Marshall, but several of John's sons, all used the office as a second name. Richard Brooks suggests that John was the first to use the word as a name, because he is specifically referred to as someone "named" the Marshall, and this was during a period when he had split with King Stephen and could not have been functioning as the King's Marshall.[9]

    Gilbert's grandson, Sir William Marshal, knighted and named 1st Earl of Pembroke, made the office very important during the last decades of the 12th Century and first decades of the 13th. He served under four kings: Henry II, Richard "Lionheart," John "Lackland" and Henry III. As the regent for Henry III, Sir William Marshal became a powerful European statesman, raising his office still further beyond its humble origins. In William's time the Chief Marshal became "Earl Marshal". It is still the seventh of the eight "great officers of state" of the British monarchy, just below the Lord High Constable and above the Lord High Admiral. Since the 13th Century the office has been a hereditary position of the Earls (now Dukes) of Norfolk.[13]


    Sources

    Source S-2024265482 Royal and Noble Genealogical Data, database online, Brian Tompsett, Copyright 1994-2001, Version March 25, 2001, Royal and Noble Genealogical Data, Department of Computer Science, University of Hull, (Hull, United Kingdom, HU6 7RX, B.C.Tompsett@dcs.hull.ac.uk), NS073013
    Richardson, Douglas, and Kimball G. Everingham. 2013. Royal ancestry: a study in colonial and medieval families. Salt Lake City, UT.: Douglas Richardson. Vol IV, page 33, cited by Mr. Marlyn Lewis, Our Royal, Titled, Noble, and Commoner Ancestors & Cousins, database online, Portland, Oregon.
    Medieval Lands, database online, author Charles Cawley, (Foundation for Medieval Genealogy, 2006-2013), England, earls created 1138-1143, Chapter 10, Pembroke: B. Earls of Pembroke 1189-1245 (MARSHAL), Gilbert "the Marshal"
    Dictionary of Medieval Knighthood and Chivalry, Bradford B. Broughton, (Westport, Connecticut, Greenwood Press, Inc., 1986).
    ? Round, J. H. (1911), The King's Serjeants & Officers of State with their Coronation Services. p.88
    ? English Historical Review, Feb. 1999: Henry of Blois and the Lordship of Glastonbury (N. E. Stacy). This article is now cited by newer editions of David Crouch's "William Marshall" and has been discussed online by medieval genealogists such as John Ravilious, Chris Phillips and Douglas Richardson. For example: http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/gen-medieval/2003-01/1042089376.
    ? For example in old editions of Burkes. https://books.google.be/books?id=uo9AAAAAcAAJ&pg=PA207
    ? http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/gen-medieval/2003-01/1042326346
    ? See online here. But the editors believe this is a 12th century document.
    ? So Keats-Rohan equated this Robert with the one in Shearston, with the same overlord as the Robert in Cheddar.
    ? 7.0 7.1 See the post of Chris Phillips: http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/GEN-MEDIEVAL/2003-01/1042105703
    ? Round, J. H. (1911), The King's Serjeants & Officers of State with their Coronation Services. p.90
    ? 9.0 9.1 Richard Brooks, The Knight who saved England.
    ? Ravilious on the generation length: http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/gen-medieval/2003-01/1042297945
    ? See the post of John Ravilious: http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/GEN-MEDIEVAL/2003-01/1042089376
    ? David Crouch, "William Marshall" 2nd ed. 2002, Appendix 2.
    ? Earl_Marshal on Wikipedia

    Gilbert married Mary Margarite De Venuz 0___ 1104, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales. Mary was born 10 Mar 1085, Calvados, Basse-Normandie, France; died 0___ 1119, Pembrokeshire, Wales. [Group Sheet]


  12. 17673.  Mary Margarite De Venuz was born 10 Mar 1085, Calvados, Basse-Normandie, France; died 0___ 1119, Pembrokeshire, Wales.

    Notes:

    Mary Margarite De VenuzPrint Family Tree Mary /De Venuz/

    Born 10 March 1085 - Calvados, Basse-Normandie, France
    Deceased in 1119 - Pembrokeshire, Wales , age at death: 34 years old

    Parents
    Geoffrey De Venuz, born in 1066 - France, Deceased in 1157 - East Worldham, Hampshire, England age at death: 91 years old
    Married to
    ? ?

    Spouses, children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren
    Married in 1104, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales, to Gilbert Giffard (Fitzgilbert) (Royal Serjeant and Marshall to Henry I) MARSHALL, born in 1075 - Axbridge, Somerset, England, Deceased in 1130 - Marlborough, Wiltshire, England age at death: 55 years old (Parents : M Robert (Curthose) De (Duke of NORMANDY) NORMANDY 1054-1134 & F Sybilla (Brindisi Of) CONVERSANO 1079-1103) with
    M John (Fitzgilbert) (Earl of Pembroke, Marshall of England) MARSHALL 1105-1165 married, Wiltshire, England, to Aline Pipard
    John (Fitzgilbert) (Earl of Pembroke, Marshall of England) MARSHALL 1105-1165 married in 1143, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales, to Sibilla De SALISBURY 1109-1155 with
    M John MARSHALL 1144-1194 married in 1165, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales, to Alice De Port 1144-1180 with :
    M John Marshall 1185-1235
    M William (SIR - Knight Templar)(Earl Pembroke) MARSHALL 1146-1219 married in August 1189, London, England, to Isabel De CLARE 1172-1217 with :
    F Maud (Countess of Norfolk Countess of Surrey) MARSHALL 1192-1248
    F Eve (Baroness of Abergavenny) MARSHALL 1194-1246
    M Gilbert MARSHALL 1196-1241
    M William (4th Earl of Pembroke/ChiefJusticar of Ireland) MARSHALL 1198-1231
    F Isabel (Fitzgilbert) (Countess MARSHALL) MARSHALL 1200-1239
    F Sibyl MARSHALL ca 1201-1245
    F Joane MARSHALL 1202-1234
    F Margaret (Fitzgilbert) MARSHALL /1155-1242 married in 1181, Wiltshire, England, to Ralph De (Lord Dudley) SOMERY 1151-1210 with :
    F Joan De SOMERY ca 1191-1276
    M Roger De (SIR - Lord Dudley) SOMERY 1208-1273

    Paternal grand-parents, uncles and aunts
    M Ralf De Venuz 1040- married
    F ? ?
    M Geoffrey De Venuz 1066-1157
    married
    1 child


    (hide)

    Timeline
    10 March 1085 : Birth - Calvados, Basse-Normandie, France
    1104 : Marriage (with Gilbert Giffard (Fitzgilbert) (Royal Serjeant and Marshall to Henry I) MARSHALL) - Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales
    1105 : Birth - Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales
    1119 : Death - Pembrokeshire, Wales
    19 July 1119 : Death - Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales


    Sources
    Individual:
    - Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Ancestry Family Trees - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members. - This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created. - Ancestry Family Trees - http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=18829447&pid=9978
    - Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Ancestry Family Trees - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members. - This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created. - Ancestry Family Trees - http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=18829447&pid=9978
    - Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Ancestry Family Trees - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members. - This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created. - Ancestry Family Trees - http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=18829447&pid=9978
    - Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Ancestry Family Trees - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members. - This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created. - Ancestry Family Trees - http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=18829447&pid=9978
    - Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Ancestry Family Trees - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members. - This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created. - Ancestry Family Trees - http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=18829447&pid=9978
    Search the matching civil records

    Family Tree Preview
    Ancestry Chart Descendancy Chart
    _____| 4_ Ralf De Venuz 1040-
    /
    |2_ Geoffrey De Venuz 1066-1157
    | \
    |--1_ Mary Margarite De Venuz 1085-1119
    |3_ ? ?



    Family Tree owner : Dave BRADLEY (belfast8)

    end of profile

    Children:
    1. 8836. John FitzGilbert was born 26 Nov 1105, (Wiltshire) England; died 29 Sep 1165, Rockley, Marlborough, Wiltshire, England; was buried , Bradenstoke, Wiltshire, England.

  13. 17674.  Walter of Salisbury was born 0___ 1087, Salisbury, Wiltshire, England (son of Edward of Salisbury and Maud Fitz Hurbert); died 0___ 1147, Bradenstoke, Wiltshire, England; was buried , Bradenstoke, Wiltshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Lord Salisbury
    • Also Known As: Walter Evreux
    • Also Known As: Walter Fitz Edward
    • Also Known As: Walter the Sheriff

    Notes:

    Birth: 1091
    Salisbury
    Wiltshire Unitary Authority
    Wiltshire, England
    Death: 1147
    Bradenstoke
    Wiltshire Unitary Authority
    Wiltshire, England

    Walter of Salisbury was born to Edward of Salisbury, Earl of Salisbury, Sheriff of Wiltshire and Maud Fitz Hurbert. He was also styled also Walter FitzEdward and Walter the Sheriff. He married Sybil de Chaworth daughter of Patrick De Chaworth and, Matilda de Hesdin. He founded the Priory of Bradenstoke, and was a benefactor to Salisbury Cathedral. His wife, Sybil, preceeded in death, and was buried near the chior in Bradenstoke Priory. Walter took the habit of a canon there, died in 1147, he is buried in the same grave as his wife.


    Family links:
    Parents:
    Edward Of Salisbury

    Spouse:
    Sibilla de Chaworth (1100 - 1140)*

    Children:
    Hawise de Salisbury de Dreux (1118 - 1151)*
    Patrick d' Evereux (1122 - 1168)*
    Sybilla de Salisbury (1126 - 1176)*

    *Calculated relationship

    Burial:
    Bradenstoke Priory
    Bradenstoke
    Wiltshire Unitary Authority
    Wiltshire, England

    Created by: Audrey DeCamp Hoffman
    Record added: Apr 21, 2012
    Find A Grave Memorial# 88928387

    end

    Buried:
    at Bradenstoke Priory...

    The priory was founded in 1142 as the Augustinian priory of Clack, and dedicated to Saint Mary.[1] It was well-sited on a high ridge near a holy well, with further springs nearby; there is some evidence that a chapel of the era of Henry I already existed at the holy well.[1]

    The founder,[2] Walter FitzEdward de Salisbury, was the son of Edward de Salisbury,[3] a High Sheriff of Wiltshire; he gave lands for a priory as a daughter house of St. Mary's Abbey, Cirencester, according to its charter, "to serve God forever!".[4] After the death of his wife, he "took the tonsure and habit of the canons" and on his death in 1147, was buried in the Priory, near the choir.[4] His descendants, the Earls of Salisbury remained closely connected with the priory for many years.[1] In 1190 thirteen of the monks migrated to Cartmel Priory, Cumbria, which had been recently established by William Marshal.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bradenstoke_Priory

    Walter married Sibilla de Chaworth. Sibilla was born 0___ 1100, Kempsford, Gloucestershire, England; died 0___ 1140, Bradenstoke, Wiltshire, England; was buried , Bradenstoke, Wiltshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  14. 17675.  Sibilla de Chaworth was born 0___ 1100, Kempsford, Gloucestershire, England; died 0___ 1140, Bradenstoke, Wiltshire, England; was buried , Bradenstoke, Wiltshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Sybil Chaworth

    Notes:

    Birth: 1100
    Kempsford
    Cotswold District
    Gloucestershire, England
    Death: 1140
    Bradenstoke
    Wiltshire Unitary Authority
    Wiltshire, England

    Sibilla was the daughter of Patrick de Chaources and Matilda Hesdin.
    She married Walter de Salisbury, son of Edward de Salisbury and Matilda Fitz Herbert. (Walter de Salisbury was born about 1087 in Salisbury, Wiltshire, England, died in 1147 in Bradenstoke, Wiltshire, England.
    Both Sibilla and Walter were buried together in the choir in Bradenstoke Priory, Bradenstoke, Wiltshire County, England.
    They had at least three children: Patrick, Sibyl and Harvise (Hedwige)


    Family links:
    Spouse:
    Walter Fitz Edward (1091 - 1147)

    Children:
    Hawise de Salisbury de Dreux (1118 - 1151)*
    Patrick d' Evereux (1122 - 1168)*
    Sybilla de Salisbury (1126 - 1176)*

    *Calculated relationship

    Burial:
    Bradenstoke Priory
    Bradenstoke
    Wiltshire Unitary Authority
    Wiltshire, England
    Plot: Choir with her husband

    Created by: Kat
    Record added: May 15, 2012
    Find A Grave Memorial# 90151726

    end

    Buried:
    at Bradenstoke Priory...

    The priory was founded in 1142 as the Augustinian priory of Clack, and dedicated to Saint Mary.[1] It was well-sited on a high ridge near a holy well, with further springs nearby; there is some evidence that a chapel of the era of Henry I already existed at the holy well.[1]

    The founder,[2] Walter FitzEdward de Salisbury, was the son of Edward de Salisbury,[3] a High Sheriff of Wiltshire; he gave lands for a priory as a daughter house of St. Mary's Abbey, Cirencester, according to its charter, "to serve God forever!".[4] After the death of his wife, he "took the tonsure and habit of the canons" and on his death in 1147, was buried in the Priory, near the choir.[4] His descendants, the Earls of Salisbury remained closely connected with the priory for many years.[1] In 1190 thirteen of the monks migrated to Cartmel Priory, Cumbria, which had been recently established by William Marshal.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bradenstoke_Priory

    Children:
    1. Patrick of Salisbury, Knight, 1st Earl of Salisbury was born 1117-1122, Salisbury, Wiltshire, England; died 27 Mar 1168, Poitiers, France; was buried , St. Hilaire Abbey, Poitiers, Vienne, France.
    2. 8837. Sibyl of Salisbury was born 27 Nov 1126; died 0___ 1176, Old Sarum (Salisbury), Wiltshire, England.

  15. 17676.  Gilbert de Clare, Knight, 1st Earl of Pembroke was born ~ 1100, Tonbridge, Kent, England (son of Gilbert Fitz Richard, Knight, 2nd Lord of Clare and Adeliza de Claremont); died 6 Jan 1148.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Gilbert Fitz Gilbert de Clare

    Notes:

    Gilbert fitz Gilbert de Clare (c.?1100 – 6 January 1148), was created Earl of Pembroke in 1138. He was commonly known as Strongbow.[a]

    Life

    Born at Tonbridge, Gilbert de Clare was a son of Gilbert Fitz Richard de Clare and Alice de Claremont.[1] He started out without land and wealth of his own but was closely related to very powerful men, specifically his uncles Walter de Clare and Roger de Clare.[2]

    In 1136 Gilbert fitz Gilbert led an expedition against Exmes and burned parts of the town, including the church of Notre Dame, but was interrupted by the forces of William III, Count of Ponthieu and escaped the resulting melee only after suffering heavy losses.[3] Gilbert was a Baron, that is, a tenant-in-chief in England, and inherited the estates of his paternal uncles, Roger and Walter, which included the baronies and castles of Bienfaite and Orbec in Normandy. He held the lordship of Nether Gwent and the castle of Striguil (later Chepstow). King Stephen created him Earl of Pembroke, and gave him the rape and castle of Pevensey.

    After Stephen's defeat at Lincoln on 2 February 1141, Gilbert was among those who rallied to Empress Matilda when she recovered London in June, but he was at Canterbury when Stephen was recrowned late in 1141.[4] He then joined Geoffrey's plot against Stephen, but when that conspiracy collapsed, he again adhered to Stephen, being with him at the siege of Oxford late in 1142. In 1147 he rebelled when Stephen refused to give him the castles surrendered by his nephew Gilbert, 2nd Earl of Hertford, whereupon the King marched to his nearest castle and nearly captured him. However, the Earl appears to have made his peace with Stephen before his death the following year.[5]

    Family

    He married Isabel de Beaumont, before 1130, daughter of Sir Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Leicester, Count of Meulan, and Elizabeth de Vermandois.[6] Isabel had previously been the mistress of King Henry I of England.[7]

    By her Gilbert had:

    Richard de Clare, 2nd Earl of Pembroke[b][8]
    Basilia, who married (1) Raymond FitzGerald (Raymond le Gros) and (2) Geoffrey FitzRobert.[9]
    a daughter who married William Bloet.[10]

    end of biography

    Gilbert married Isabel de Beaumont. [Group Sheet]


  16. 17677.  Isabel de Beaumont (daughter of Robert de Beaumont, Knight, 1st Earl of Leicester and Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester).

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Isabel Beaumont

    Children:
    1. 8838. Richard de Clare, Knight, 2nd Earl Pembroke was born 0___ 1125, Tonbridge, Kent, England; died 20 Apr 1176, Dublin, Leinster, Ireland.

  17. 17678.  Dermot Dairmait Mac Murchada, King of Leinster was born 0___ 1110, Dublin, Ireland (son of Donnchad Enna Mac Murchada and Orlaith Ingen O'Brien, Queen of Leinster); died 1 May 1171, Ireland.

    Notes:

    Dermot Dairmait Mac MURCHADA (King of Leinster)Print Family Tree(Dermot Dairmait Mac MURCHADA)


    Born in 1110 - Dublin, Ireland
    Deceased 1 May 1171 - Ireland , age at death: 61 years old

    Parents
    Donnchad Enna Mac MURCHADA, born in 1085 - Dublin, Dublin, Ireland, Deceased 8 December 1115 - Wexford, Ireland age at death: 30 years old
    Married to
    Orlaith Ingen (Queen of Leinster) O'BRIEN, born in 1080 - Dublin, Ireland, Deceased in 1113 - Dublin, Ireland age at death: 33 years old

    Spouses, children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren
    Married in 1140, Wexford, Ireland, to Mor Tauthail Moringen Murchertaig (Queen of Ireland) O'TOOLE, born in 1114 - Wexford, Ireland, Deceased 1 May 1191 - Wexford, Ireland age at death: 77 years old (Parents : M Mouirchertach (King of Ui Muiredaig) O'TOOLE 1089-1164 & F Cacht Ingen (Princess of Loigsig, Queen of Muiredaig O'Toole) O'MORDA 1094-1149) with
    F Eva Aoife Mac (Countess Pembroke) MURCHADA 1141-1188 married 26 August 1171, Waterford, Waterford, Ireland, to Richard (Strongbow) De ( 2nd Earl Pembroke, Lord Marshall) CLARE 1125-1176 with
    M Richard III De (SIR) CLARE, MAGNA CARTA BARON ca 1153-1217 married in 1180, England, to Amicie De CAEN 1160-1225 with :
    F Matilda De CLARE 1175-1213
    M Gilbert III De (Earl of Gloucester - Hertford) CLARE, MAGNA CARTA BARON ca 1180-1230
    F Maud Matilda De CLARE 1184-1213
    F Isabel De CLARE 1172-1217 married in August 1189, London, England, to William (SIR - Knight Templar)(Earl Pembroke) MARSHALL 1146-1219 with :
    F Maud (Countess of Norfolk Countess of Surrey) MARSHALL 1192-1248
    F Eve (Baroness of Abergavenny) MARSHALL 1194-1246
    M Gilbert MARSHALL 1196-1241
    M William (4th Earl of Pembroke/ChiefJusticar of Ireland) MARSHALL 1198-1231
    F Isabel (Fitzgilbert) (Countess MARSHALL) MARSHALL 1200-1239
    F Sibyl MARSHALL ca 1201-1245
    F Joane MARSHALL 1202-1234
    F Joan De ( Baroness of Gamage) CLARE 1175-1222/ married in 1196, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales, to Godfrey De (Sir) ( Lord of Gamage) GAMAGE 1176-1253 with :
    M Payne De GAMAGE 1211-
    F Elizabeth GAMAGE 1222-1272
    F Urlachen Mac MURCHADA 1154-1200 married in 1171 to Domnall Mor (Ua) (King of Leinster) O'BRIEN 1137-1194 with
    F Mor O'BRIEN 1172-1218 married in 1185, Ireland, to William De (Lord of Connaught) BURGH 1158-1204 with :
    M Richard Mor "The Great", De (1st Earl of Ulster) BURGH 1202-1242
    M Domnall Cairbreach (King of Munster) O'BRIEN 1175-1242 married in 1194 to Sabia O'KENNEDY 1177- with :
    M Connor Conchobar Suidaine (King of Thormond) O'BRIEN 1195-1258

    Paternal grand-parents, uncles and aunts
    M Murchad Macdairmata MURCHADA 1032-1070 married
    F Sadb Ingen Mac BRICC 1020-1070
    M Donnchad Enna Mac MURCHADA 1085-1115
    married
    1 child



    Maternal grand-parents, uncles and aunts
    M Gilla Michil O'BRIEN 1055-1068 married
    F Iuchdelb Hui GARBITA 1062-
    F Orlaith Ingen (Queen of Leinster) O'BRIEN 1080-1113
    married
    1 child



    Notes
    Individual Note
    Source: Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Irish Landed Gentry - Ancestry.com - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2002.Original data - O'Hart, John. Irish Landed Gentry When Cromwell Came to Ireland. Dublin, Ireland: James Duffy and Sons, 1887.Original data: O'Hart, John. Irish Landed Gentry When Crom - 1,6308::0
    http://search.Ancestry.com.au/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=uki1-irish-landed_gnty&h=170&ti=5544&indiv=try&gss=pt 1,6308::170
    Source: Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Millennium File - Heritage Consulting - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2003.Original data - Heritage Consulting. The Millennium File. Salt Lake City, UT, USA: Heritage Consulting.Original data: Heritage Consulting. The Millennium File. Salt Lake City, UT, USA: - 1,7249::0
    http://search.Ancestry.com.au/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=millind&h=105913193&ti=5544&indiv=try&gss=pt Birth date: 1100 Birth place: Leinster, Ireland Death date: 1 May 1171 Death place: Ferns, Wexford, Ire, Ireland 1,7249::105913193
    Source: Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Dictionary of National Biography, Volumes 1-20, 22 - Ancestry.com - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. This collection was indexed by Ancestry World Archives Project contributors.Original data - Stephen, Sir Leslie, ed. Dictionary of National Biography, 1921–1922. London, England: Oxf - 1,1981::0
    http://search.Ancestry.com.au/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=dictnatbiogv1&h=34636&ti=5544&indiv=try&gss=pt Birth date: 1110 Birth place: Death date: 1171 Death place: Ferns 1,1981::34636


    Sources
    Individual:
    - Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Ancestry Family Trees - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members. - This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created. - Ancestry Family Trees - http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=18829447&pid=10182
    - Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Ancestry Family Trees - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members. - This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created. - Ancestry Family Trees - http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=18829447&pid=10182
    - Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Ancestry Family Trees - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members. - This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created. - Ancestry Family Trees - http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=18829447&pid=10182
    Birth, death:
    - Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Millennium File - Heritage Consulting - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2003.Original data - Heritage Consulting. The Millennium File. Salt Lake City, UT, USA: Heritage Consulting.Original data: Heritage Consulting. The Millennium File. Salt Lake City, UT, USA: - 1,7249::0
    Note http://search.Ancestry.com.au/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=millind&h=105913193&ti=5544&indiv=try&gss=pt - Birth date: 1100 Birth place: Leinster, Ireland Death date: 1 May 1171 Death place: Ferns, Wexford, Ire, Ireland - 1,7249::105913193
    - Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Dictionary of National Biography, Volumes 1-20, 22 - Ancestry.com - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. This collection was indexed by Ancestry World Archives Project contributors.Original data - Stephen, Sir Leslie, ed. Dictionary of National Biography, 1921–1922. London, England: Oxf - 1,1981::0
    Note http://search.Ancestry.com.au/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=dictnatbiogv1&h=34636&ti=5544&indiv=try&gss=pt - Birth date: 1110 Birth place: Death date: 1171 Death place: Ferns - 1,1981::34636

    Family Tree Preview
    Ancestry Chart Descendancy Chart Printable Family Tree
    _____| 16_ Donnchad Mâael Na Mbâo (O'CHEINNSELAIG) MURCHADA ca 960-1006
    _____| 8_ Diarmait Macmail Na Mbo (177th High King of Ireland) MURCHADA 974-1072
    _____| 4_ Murchad Macdairmata MURCHADA 1032-1070
    / \ _____| 18_ Donnchad (King of MUNSTER) O'BRIEN 982/-1064
    |2_ Donnchad Enna Mac MURCHADA 1085-1115
    | \ _____| 20_ Brecc (Na Dessi) Mac BRICC 950-1051
    | \ _____| 10_ Muirchertach Mac BRICC 1005-1051
    | \
    |--1_ Dermot Dairmait Mac (King of Leinster) MURCHADA 1110-1171
    | _____| 12_ Echmarcach O'BRIEN 1009-
    | /
    | _____| 6_ Gilla Michil O'BRIEN 1055-1068
    | / \
    |3_ Orlaith Ingen (Queen of Leinster) O'BRIEN 1080-1113
    \
    \ _____| 14_ Cearnachan GAIRBITA 1040-
    \ /
    \

    end of report

    Dermot married Mor Tauthail Moringen Murchertaig O'Toole, Queen of Ireland 0___ 1140, Wexford, Ireland. Mor was born 0___ 1114, Wexford, Ireland; died 1 May 1191, Wexford, Ireland. [Group Sheet]


  18. 17679.  Mor Tauthail Moringen Murchertaig O'Toole, Queen of Ireland was born 0___ 1114, Wexford, Ireland; died 1 May 1191, Wexford, Ireland.
    Children:
    1. 8839. Eva Aoife Mac Murchada, Countess Pembroke was born 26 Apr 1141, Dublin, Leinster, Ireland; died 0___ 1188, Waterford, Ireland; was buried , Tintern, Monmouthshire, Wales.
    2. Orlacan Nâi Murchada was born 0___ 1154, Dublin, Leinster, Ireland; died 0___ 1200, Ireland.

  19. 18002.  William Pantulf was born 1171, Shropshire, England; died Bef 4 Feb 1233.

    William married Hawise FitzWarin. Hawise (daughter of Fulk FitzWarin and Maud le Vavasour, Baroness Butler) was born 3 Feb 1210, Shropshire, England; died Abt 1253. [Group Sheet]


  20. 18003.  Hawise FitzWarin was born 3 Feb 1210, Shropshire, England (daughter of Fulk FitzWarin and Maud le Vavasour, Baroness Butler); died Abt 1253.
    Children:
    1. 9001. Matilda Pantulf was born Abt 1227, Wem, Shropshire, England; died Bef 6 May 1289.

  21. 18034.  William, I, King of the Scots was born ~ 1143, (Scotland) (son of Henry of Scotland and Ada de Warenne); died 4 Dec 1214, Stirling, Scotland; was buried , Arbroath Abbey, Scotland.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Uilliam mac Eanric (i.e. William, son of Henry)
    • Also Known As: William the Lion

    Notes:

    William the Lion (Mediaeval Gaelic: Uilliam mac Eanric; Modern Gaelic: Uilleam mac Eanraig), sometimes styled William I, also known by the nickname Garbh, "the Rough",[1] (c. 1143 – 4 December 1214) reigned as King of the Scots from 1165 to 1214. He had the second-longest reign in Scottish history before the Act of Union with England in 1707. James VI (reigned 1567–1625) would have the longest.

    Life

    He became king following his brother Malcolm IV's death on 9 December 1165 and was crowned on 24 December 1165.

    In contrast to his deeply religious, frail brother, William was powerfully built, redheaded, and headstrong. He was an effective monarch whose reign was marred by his ill-fated attempts to regain control of Northumbria from the Normans.

    Traditionally, William is credited with founding Arbroath Abbey, the site of the later Declaration of Arbroath.

    He was not known as "The Lion" during his own lifetime, and the title did not relate to his tenacious character or his military prowess. It was attached to him because of his flag or standard, a red lion rampant with a forked tail (queue fourchâee) on a yellow background. This (with the substitution of a 'double tressure fleury counter-fleury' border instead of an orle) went on to become the Royal standard of Scotland, still used today but quartered with those of England and of Ireland. It became attached to him because the chronicler John of Fordun called him the "Lion of Justice".

    William was grandson of David I of Scotland. He also inherited the title of Earl of Northumbria in 1152 from his father, Henry of Scotland. However he had to give up this title to King Henry II of England in 1157. This caused trouble after William became king, since he spent a lot of effort trying to regain Northumbria.

    William was a key player in the Revolt of 1173–1174 against Henry II. In 1174, at the Battle of Alnwick, during a raid in support of the revolt, William recklessly charged the English troops himself, shouting, "Now we shall see which of us are good knights!" He was unhorsed and captured by Henry's troops led by Ranulf de Glanvill and taken in chains to Newcastle, then Northampton, and then transferred to Falaise in Normandy. Henry then sent an army to Scotland and occupied it. As ransom and to regain his kingdom, William had to acknowledge Henry as his feudal superior and agree to pay for the cost of the English army's occupation of Scotland by taxing the Scots. The church of Scotland was also subjected to that of England. This he did by signing the Treaty of Falaise. He was then allowed to return to Scotland. In 1175 he swore fealty to Henry II at York Castle.

    The humiliation of the Treaty of Falaise triggered a revolt in Galloway which lasted until 1186, and prompted construction of a castle at Dumfries. In 1179, meanwhile, William and his brother David personally led a force northwards into Easter Ross, establishing two further castles, and aiming to discourage the Norse Earls of Orkney from expanding beyond Caithness.

    A further rising in 1181 involved Donald Meic Uilleim, descendant of King Duncan II. Donald briefly took over Ross; not until his death (1187) was William able to reclaim Donald's stronghold of Inverness. Further royal expeditions were required in 1197 and 1202 to fully neutralise the Orcadian threat.

    The Treaty of Falaise remained in force for the next fifteen years. Then the English king Richard the Lionheart, needing money to take part in the Third Crusade, agreed to terminate it in return for 10,000 silver marks, on 5 December 1189.

    William attempted to purchase Northumbria from Richard in 1194, as he had a strong claim over it. However, his offer of 15,000 marks was rejected due to wanting the castles within the lands, which Richard was not willing to give.[2]

    Despite the Scots regaining their independence, Anglo-Scottish relations remained tense during the first decade of the 13th century. In August 1209 King John decided to flex the English muscles by marching a large army to Norham (near Berwick), in order to exploit the flagging leadership of the ageing Scottish monarch. As well as promising a large sum of money, the ailing William agreed to his elder daughters marrying English nobles and, when the treaty was renewed in 1212, John apparently gained the hand of William's only surviving legitimate son, and heir, Alexander, for his eldest daughter, Joan.

    Despite continued dependence on English goodwill, William's reign showed much achievement. He threw himself into government with energy and diligently followed the lines laid down by his grandfather, David I. Anglo-French settlements and feudalization were extended, new burghs founded, criminal law clarified, the responsibilities of justices and sheriffs widened, and trade grew. Arbroath Abbey was founded (1178), and the bishopric of Argyll established (c.1192) in the same year as papal confirmation of the Scottish church by Pope Celestine III.

    According to legend, "William is recorded in 1206 as curing a case of scrofula by his touching and blessing a child with the ailment whilst at York.[3] William died in Stirling in 1214 and lies buried in Arbroath Abbey. His son, Alexander II, succeeded him as king, reigning from 1214 to 1249.

    Marriage and issue

    Due to the terms of the Treaty of Falaise, Henry II had the right to choose William's bride. As a result, William married Ermengarde de Beaumont, a great-granddaughter of King Henry I of England, at Woodstock Palace in 1186. Edinburgh Castle was her dowry. The marriage was not very successful, and it was many years before she bore him an heir. William and Ermengarde's children were:

    Margaret (1193–1259), married Hubert de Burgh, 1st Earl of Kent.
    Isabel (1195–1253), married Roger Bigod, 4th Earl of Norfolk and Robert "of Fur Fan" De Ros, Sir Knight and had issue.
    Alexander II of Scotland (1198–1249).
    Marjorie (1200 – 17 November 1244),[4] married Gilbert Marshal, 4th Earl of Pembroke.
    Out of wedlock, William I had numerous children, their descendants being among those who would lay claim to the Scottish crown.

    By an unnamed daughter of Adam de Hythus:

    Margaret, married Eustace de Vesci, Lord of Alnwick.[5]

    By Isabel d'Avenel:

    Robert de London[6]
    Henry de Galightly, father of Patrick Galightly one of the competitors to the crown in 1291[7]
    Ada Fitzwilliam (c.1146-1200), married Patrick I, Earl of Dunbar (1152–1232)[7]
    Aufrica, married William de Say, and whose grandson Roger de Mandeville was one of the competitors to the crown in 1291[7]
    Isabella Mac William married Robert III de Brus then Robert de Ros (died 1227), Magna Carta Suretor[8]

    Buried:
    Arbroath Abbey, in the Scottish town of Arbroath, was founded in 1178 by King William the Lion for a group of Tironensian Benedictine monks from Kelso Abbey. It was consecrated in 1197 with a dedication to the deceased Saint Thomas Becket, whom the king had met at the English court. It was William's only personal foundation — he was buried before the high altar of the church in 1214.[1]

    The last Abbot was Cardinal David Beaton, who in 1522 succeeded his uncle James to become Archbishop of St Andrews. The Abbey is cared for by Historic Scotland and is open to the public throughout the year (entrance charge). The distinctive red sandstone ruins stand at the top of the High Street in Arbroath.

    Image & History ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arbroath_Abbey

    William married Isabel d'Avenel. Isabel (daughter of Robert Avenel, Lord of Eskdale and Sibyl LNU) was born ~ 1143; died 0___ 1234, Castle Stirling, Stirling, Stirlingshire, Scotland. [Group Sheet]


  22. 18035.  Isabel d'Avenel was born ~ 1143 (daughter of Robert Avenel, Lord of Eskdale and Sibyl LNU); died 0___ 1234, Castle Stirling, Stirling, Stirlingshire, Scotland.

    Notes:

    Isabel d'Avenel (Avenel), Mistress of King William
    Also Known As: "Isobel Avenel", "12237", "Sybil Avenell"
    Birthdate: circa 1143
    Birthplace: Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland
    Death: Died 1234 in Castle Stirling, Stirling, Stirlingshire, Scotland
    Immediate Family:
    Daughter of Robert Avenel and Sybil Avenel
    Partner of William "The Lion", King of Scots
    Mother of ... nic Uilliam; Ada of Scotland; Henry de Galightly; Robert 'de London' de Lundin; Isabel of Scotland and 1 other
    Managed by: Private User
    Last Updated: July 30, 2016

    Died:
    Stirling Castle, located in Stirling, is one of the largest and most important castles, both historically and architecturally, in Scotland. The castle sits atop Castle Hill, an intrusive crag, which forms part of the Stirling Sill geological formation. It is surrounded on three sides by steep cliffs, giving it a strong defensive position.

    Images, map & more history ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stirling_Castle

    Children:
    1. 9017. Isabella Mac William was born ~ 1165, (Scotland).
    2. Aufrica of Scotland was born ~ 1169, Scotland.

  23. 18036.  Herbert FitzHerbert was born ~1135, Brecknockshire, Wales; died Bef June 1204.

    Herbert married Lucy FitzMiles. Lucy (daughter of Miles of Gloucester, Knight, 1st Earl of Hereford and Sibyl de Neufmarche, Countess of Hereford) was born ~1136, Brecknockshire, Wales; died ~1220. [Group Sheet]


  24. 18037.  Lucy FitzMiles was born ~1136, Brecknockshire, Wales (daughter of Miles of Gloucester, Knight, 1st Earl of Hereford and Sibyl de Neufmarche, Countess of Hereford); died ~1220.
    Children:
    1. 9018. Peter FitzHerbert, Lord of Brecknock was born 1163, Blewleveny Castle, Blaen Llyfni, Wales; died 1 Jun 1235, Reading, Berkshire, England.

  25. 18038.  Robert FitzRoger, Knight, 2nd Baron of Warkworth was born ~ 1161, (Warkworth, Northumberland, England) (son of Roger FitzRichard and Adeliza de Vere); died 0___ 1214, (Warkworth, Northumberland, England).

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Robert FitzRoger Warkworth

    Notes:

    Robert fitzRoger was an Anglo-Norman nobleman and Sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk.

    FitzRoger was the son of Roger fitzRichard, who held Warkworth and was lord of Clavering, Essex. FitzRoger was sheriff of Norfolk from Michaelmas in 1190 to Easter 1194 and then again from Michaelmas 1197 to Easter 1200.[1] FitzRoger's first appointment as sheriff was due to the influence of William de Longchamp, who was Lord Chancellor. Longchamp's influence also secured custody of Orford Castle for fitzRoger.[2] Longchamp also arranged for fitzRoger to have custody of Eye Castle in Suffolk.[3] When Longchamp fell from royal favour and was replaced by Walter of Coutances, fitzRoger was one of the few of Longchamp's appointments to retain his office of sheriff.[4]

    FitzRoger had confirmation of his ownership of Warkworth in 1199 and in 1205 was granted Newburn and the barony of Whalton in Northumberland. Warkworth and Newburn occasionally were considered baronies, but not consistently.[5] FitzRoger also held Clavering from Henry of Essex for one knight's fee.[6][a] FitzRoger's holdings were extensive enough that he was considered a baron during the reigns of King Richard I[7] and King John of England.[8]

    FitzRoger married Margaret,[9] one of the daughters and heiresses of William de Chesney, the founder of Sibton Abbey.[10] Margaret was one of three daughters, but she inherited the bulk of her father's estates.[11] Margaret was the widow of Hugh de Cressy.[b] Through Margaret, Roger gained the barony of Blythburgh in Suffolk.[13] He also acquired lands at Rottingdean in Sussex from Margaret.[14]

    FitzRoger died in 1214, and his heir was his son John fitzRobert, by his wife Margaret.[5][13] Margaret survived fitzRoger and paid a fine of a thousand pounds to the king for the right to administer her lands and dower properties herself.[1]

    Notes

    Jump up ^ Robert fitzRoger who held Clavering should not be confused with a separate Robert fitzRoger who held lands around Calthorpe in Norfolk.[6]
    Jump up ^ Although Margaret was the eldest daughter, she received the bulk of her father's estates as a reward for de Cressy from King Henry II of England. The king arranged Margaret's first marriage as well as ensuring that most of her father's lands went to her.[12]

    Citations

    ^ Jump up to: a b Round "Early Sheriffs of Norfolk" English Historical Review pp. 491–494
    Jump up ^ Turner and Heiser Reign of Richard Lionheart p. 116
    Jump up ^ Heiser "Castles, Constables, and Politics" Albion p. 34
    Jump up ^ Turner and Heiser Reign of Richard Lionheart p. 132
    ^ Jump up to: a b Sanders English Baronies p. 150
    ^ Jump up to: a b Keats-Rohan Domesday Descendants p. 953
    Jump up ^ Turner and Heiser Reign of Richard Lionheart p. 103
    Jump up ^ Russell "Social Status" Speculum p. 324
    Jump up ^ Keats-Rohan Domesday Descendants p. 416
    Jump up ^ Keats-Rohan Domesday Descendants p. 370
    Jump up ^ Green Aristocracy of Norman England p. 380
    Jump up ^ Waugh "Women's Inheritance" Nottingham Medieval Studies p. 82
    ^ Jump up to: a b Sanders English Baronies p. 16
    Jump up ^ Loyd Origins of Some Anglo-Norman Families p. 35

    References

    Green, Judith A. (1997). The Aristocracy of Norman England. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-52465-2.
    Heiser, Richard R. (Spring 2000). "Castles, Constables, and Politics in Late Twelfth-Century English Governance". Albion. 32 (1): 19–36. doi:10.2307/4053985. JSTOR 4053985.
    Keats-Rohan, K. S. B. (1999). Domesday Descendants: A Prosopography of Persons Occurring in English Documents, 1066–1166: Pipe Rolls to Cartae Baronum. Ipswich, UK: Boydell Press. ISBN 0-85115-863-3.
    Loyd, Lewis Christopher (1975) [1951]. The Origins of Some Anglo-Norman Families (Reprint ed.). Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Company. ISBN 0-8063-0649-1.
    Round, J. H. (1920). "The Early Sheriffs of Norfolk". The English Historical Review. 35 (140): 481–496. doi:10.1093/ehr/xxxv.cxl.481. JSTOR 552094.
    Russell, Josiah Cox (July 1937). "Social Status at the Court of King John". Speculum. 12 (3): 319–329. doi:10.2307/2848628. JSTOR 2848628.
    Sanders, I. J. (1960). English Baronies: A Study of Their Origin and Descent 1086–1327. Oxford, UK: Clarendon Press. OCLC 931660.
    Turner, Ralph V.; Heiser, Richard R. (2000). The Reign of Richard Lionheart: Ruler of the Angevin Empire 1189–1199. The Medieval World. Harlow, UK: Longman. ISBN 0-582-25660-7.
    Waugh, Scott L. (1990). "Women's Inheritance and the Growth of Bureaucratic Monarchy in Twelfth- and Thirteenth-Century England". Nottingham Medieval Studies. 34: 71–92. doi:10.1484/J.NMS.3.182.

    Robert married Margaret de Cheney. Margaret (daughter of William de Chesney, Knight, Baron of Horsford and Albreda Poynings) was born ~ 1162, (Horsford, Norfolkshire, England); died Aft 1214. [Group Sheet]


  26. 18039.  Margaret de Cheney was born ~ 1162, (Horsford, Norfolkshire, England) (daughter of William de Chesney, Knight, Baron of Horsford and Albreda Poynings); died Aft 1214.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Margaret Chesney
    • Also Known As: Margaret de Chesney
    • Alt Death: 1230

    Children:
    1. 9019. Alice FitzRoger was born 1184-1185, (Warkworth, Northumberland, England); died 1225, (Reading, Berkshire, England).

  27. 18348.  Robert FitzWalter, Knight, Baron FitzWalter was born , Woodham Walter, Essex, England (son of Walter FitzRobert, Knight, 2nd Loard of Little Dunmow and Maude de Lucy); died 9 Dec 1235, Little Dunmow, Essex, England; was buried , Little Dunmow Priory, Essex, England.

    Notes:

    Robert Fitzwalter[c] (died 9 December 1235)[b] was the leader of the baronial opposition against King John, and one of the twenty-five sureties of Magna Carta.[3] He was feudal baron of Little Dunmow, Essex[4] and constable of Baynard's Castle, in London, to which was annexed the hereditary office of castellain and chief banneret of the City of London.[3] Part of the official aristocracy created by Henry I and Henry II, he served John in the wars in Normandy, in which he was taken prisoner by King Philip II of France and forced to pay a heavy ransom.[3]

    Fitzwalter was implicated in the baronial conspiracy of 1212. According to his own statement the king had attempted to seduce his eldest daughter, but Robert's account of his grievances varied from time to time. The truth seems to be that he was irritated by the suspicion with which John regarded the new baronage. Fitzwalter escaped a trial by fleeing to France. He was outlawed, but returned under a special amnesty after John's reconciliation with the pope.[3]

    Fitzwalter continued, however, to take the lead in the baronial agitation against the king, and upon the outbreak of hostilities in 1215 was elected "Marshal of the Army of God and Holy Church". It was due to his influence in London that his party obtained the support of the city and used it as their base of operations. The clause of the Magna Carta prohibiting sentences of exile, except as the result of a lawful trial, refers more particularly to his case. He was one of the twenty-five barons appointed to enforce the promises of Magna Carta, and his aggressive attitude was one of the causes which contributed to the revival of civil war later in 1215.[3]

    Fitzwalter's incompetent leadership made it necessary for the rebels to invoke the help of France. He was one of the envoys who invited Prince Louis to England, and was the first of the barons to do homage when Louis entered London. Slighted by the French as a traitor to his natural lord, he served Louis with fidelity until he was captured at the battle of Lincoln in May 1217. Released on the conclusion of peace, he joined the Fifth Crusade, but returned at an early date to make his peace with the regency. The remainder of his life was uneventful, and he died peacefully in 1235.[b][3] He was the father of three children: Matilda, Robert, and Christina (who married William FitzGeoffrey de Mandeville, 3rd Earl of Essex). He is remembered as a champion of English liberty, and has also become associated with various legends, including that of Robin Hood.

    Family

    Robert FitzWalter's original seal-die, with modern wax impression, in the British Museum.[1]
    Robert Fitzwalter was the son of Walter Fitz Robert of Woodham Walter and his wife Maud (or Mathilde), the daughter of Richard de Lucy of Diss (a member of the de Lucy family).[5] Robert was a feudal baron of the fourth generation after the Norman conquest, great-grandson of Richard fitz Gilbert (d. c. 1090).[6] His paternal grandfather was Richard fitz Gilbert's son Robert Fitz Richard, steward of Henry I, to whom the king had granted the lordship of Dunmow and of the honour or soke of Baynard's Castle in the southwest angle of the City of London, to which the hereditary office of castellain and chief banneret of the City of London was annexed, both of which had become forfeited to the crown by William Baynard.[5] While steward Robert may have been descended from the powerful Norman counts of Brionne, among the higher ranks of the nobility of the Norman Conquest, the house of Fitzwalter belongs properly to the administrative families, who in the latter part of the twelfth century had stepped into the place of the old feudal houses. The house of Fitzwalter's possession of the soke of Baynard's Castle, which grew into an ordinary ward, brought it into intimate relations with the Londoners. Robert Fitzwalter was himself engaged in trade, and owned wine ships which received special privileges from King John.[5]

    Nothing of Fitzwalter's birth and early life is recorded. A possible early record of him is a mention of a knight named "Robert Fitzwalter" at a tournament in Henry the Young King's retinue in 1180 at Lagny-sur-Marne.[6] Fitzwalter was married to Gunnor or Gunnora, daughter and heiress of Robert de Valognes, some time before his father died in 1198. His eldest son, named Robert Fitzwalter, junior, was taken prisoner along with him at Lincoln, but died before him. At his death, his heir, Walter, was under age, so that the son who fought with him at Lincoln must have been dead. This Sir Walter Fitzwalter (also known as Fitz Robert) of Dunmow Castle (c. 1222–1258), married to Ida Longespâee,[d] must have been either a younger son or a grandson.[7][8] After the death of Gunnor (she was alive in 1207) it is said that Fitzwalter married a second wife, Rohese, who survived him. He had also a daughter, Christina, who married William FitzGeoffrey de Mandeville, 3rd Earl of Essex.[9][10]

    Career

    When Baron Walter died in 1198, Fitzwalter succeeded to his estates, being already more than of full age and married to his first wife, Gunnor. His marriage to Gunnor had brought him 30˝ knight's fees, and he inherited more than 66 from his father.[11][6] He also acquired two knight's fees through Gunnor's uncle Geoffry of Valognes, and about 1204 obtained livery of seisin of the lands of his own uncle, Godfrey de Luci, bishop of Winchester.[11][6] Francisque Xavier Michel said that Fitzwalter came to be "one of the greatest men in England, and one of the most powerful".[6] His lands were mainly situated in the north, so that his interests now became close to those of a faction called the "Aquilonares", whom he would later lead in the struggle against King John.[11]

    In the years following 1200, Fitzwalter is recorded as a participant in several lawsuits. In 1200 Fitzwalter was surety for half the fine incurred by his brother, Simon Fitzwalter, for marrying without royal licence. In 1201 he made an agreement in the curia regis with St Albans Abbey with respect to the wood of Northaw. Another suit sprang from his claim to the custody of the Hertford Castle as of ancient right. He withdrew this suit for a time, and in August 1202 King John made Fitzwalter warden of Hertford Castle by royal letters patent, releasing him from his family's debts to Jewish moneylenders as well.[12][6]

    Early in 1203 Fitzwalter was in attendance on the king in Normandy, in February and March at Rouen. Fitzwalter was made joint-governor of the castle of Le Vaudreuil (near the mouth of the Eure) with Saer de Quincy, later Earl of Winchester. After Easter King Philip II Augustus of France took the field, and despite being well fortified and supplied, the governors of Vaudreuil surrendered at the first summons. Philip shut them up in close confinement at Compiáegne, where they remained until redeemed by a heavy ransom of five thousand marks. On 5 July John issued letters patent from Rouen to certify that they had surrendered the castle by his precept, witnessed by William Marshal, but in late November Fitzwalter's cousin William d'Aubigny was still engaged in selling some of Fitzwalter's lands to raise the ransom. The surrender of Vaudreuil has been ascribed to the cowardice of Fitzwalter and de Quincy, which contemporary sources mocked greatly. However, the actual reason for their actions, and those of the two kings, was mysterious at the time, and remains unknown. In October 1206 Fitzwalter witnessed the truce made between John and Philip Augustus at Thouars.[12][6]

    1212 Conspiracy

    The misgovernment of John provoked Fitzwalter's profound resentment, and in 1212 he entered into intrigues with Eustace de Vesci and the Welsh prince Llewelyn ab Iorwerth against the king.[12] According to his own statement the king had attempted to seduce his eldest daughter Matilda, but his account of his grievances varied from time to time.[3] Several other barons later made similar accusations, and these stories were well recorded by monastic chroniclers, so later the story of Matilda developed into a complex legend. Financial factors, "unjust exaction which reduced [the barons of England] to extreme poverty", as the monk Roger of Wendover put it, were more likely the primary reason for the dissatisfaction of barons such as Fitzwalter.[13]

    In 1212, John's quarrel with Pope Innocent III and Philip Augustus reached a breaking point, and Innocent absolved the barons of England from their allegiance to John. John was preparing to march at Nottingham against his rebellious son-in-law Llewelyn ab Iorwerth. His suspicions that his barons were plotting to capture him were aroused by private intelligence, and he turned back to London with his foreign mercenaries, disbanding his regular forces. He demanded that each baron send a relative to him as a hostage. Most of the barons did so, but Fitzwalter and de Vesci decided to flee, to France and Scotland respectively.[13] They were condemned to perpetual exile. But John was so much alarmed that he shut himself up from his subjects, and abandoned his projected Welsh campaign. John now seized upon Fitzwalter's estates, and on 14 January 1213 destroyed Baynard's Castle. He also demolished Robert's castle of Benington and his woods in Essex. Fitzwalter remained in exile until John's submission to the pope.[12] Fitzwalter's sister, Alice Peche, was required to provide hostages to prove her loyalty. One hostage was her and Gilbert Peche's daughter, Alice.[14]

    On 13 May 1213 John promised peace and security to him as part of the conditions of his reconciliation with Rome, and on 27 May issued letters patent informing him that he might safely come to England. On 19 July his estates were restored. John also granted a hundred marks to his steward as compensation, and directed a general inquest into his losses like those made in the case of the clerks who had suffered by the interdict.[12]

    Magna Carta revolt

    Stylised depiction of John signing of the Magna Carta, from Cassell's History of England (1902)

    Fitzwalter, however, remained a vigorous opponent of John's later measures. Matthew Paris said that John specially hated him, Archbishop Stephen Langton, and Saer de Quincy. In August 1213, he was at St Paul's Cathedral in London when Archbishop Langton read a charter signed by Henry I and announced that services could be conducted ahead of the lifting of the interdict on England.[15] On 4 November 1214 Fitzwalter met in secrecy with the Archbishop and the other barons at Bury St Edmunds. The assembled barons resolved to withdraw their fealty from King John and swore at the altar of the abbey church that they would wage war on John if he did not accept their demands of a charter by Christmas. The barons and the King both began to arm themselves, and John secured the support of the Pope and took up the cross as a crusader.[16] By January, John still refused to accede to the barons' demands and when Fitzwalter and several other barons visited him in armour at the headquarters of the Knights Templar in England in London (the modern Inns of Court) he asked for a truce until Easter.[12][16]

    In 1215 Fitzwalter was the first mentioned in the list of barons who assembled on Easter week (April 19–26) at Stamford.[12][16] He accompanied the revolted lords on the march to Brackley in Northamptonshire on 27 April. But John now formally refused to accept the long list of demands which they forwarded to him at Oxford. Thereupon the barons elected Fitzwalter their general, with the title of "Marshal of the Army of God and Holy Church". They solemnly renounced their homage to John and proceeded to besiege Northampton.[12] They failed there and at Bedford, where Fitzwalter's standard-bearer was slain. But the adhesion of London secured their success. It was due to Fitzwalter's influence in London that his party obtained the support of the city and used it as their base of operations. On 17 May Fitzwalter entered the city at the head of the "army of God", though the partisans of John still held out in the Tower. Fitzwalter and the Earl of Essex specially busied themselves with repairing the walls of London, using for the purpose the stones taken from the demolished houses of the Jews.[12]

    In June, John met the barons at Runnymede, where the two sides agreed to the Great Charter, and the barons renewed their vows of fealty.[3][17][18] In its final draft the Magna Carta contained a clause prohibiting sentences of exile, except as the result of a lawful trial, which refers more particularly to Fitzwalter's case.[3] Fitzwalter was one of the twenty-five executors appointed to see that its provisions were really carried out. For a short time nominal peace prevailed, and Fitzwalter now got back the custody of Hertford Castle. But the barons remained under arms, and Fitzwalter was still acting as "Marshal of the Army of God and Holy Church". He now made a convention with John, by which London remained in the barons' hands till 15 August.[17] But Fitzwalter was so fearful of treachery that within a fortnight of the Runnymede meeting he thought it wise to postpone a tournament fixed to be held at Stamford on the Monday after the feast of Saints Peter and Paul (29 June) for another week, and chose as the place of its meeting Hounslow Heath, that the barons might be near enough to protect London.[17]

    First Barons' War

    Rochester Castle, where Fitzwalter was besieged by royalists
    On 26 August, John and the barons tried to arrange at a meeting at Staines. When this failed, the First Barons' War broke out. The twenty-five executors assigned to themselves various counties to secure them for their side. Fitzwalter, who with Eustace de Vesci was still the leading spirit of the movement, became responsible for Northamptonshire. On 17 September John granted Fitzwalter's Cornish estates to his young son Prince Henry. But the pope's annulling the charter had paralysed the clerical supporters of the popular side, and the thoroughgoing policy of the twenty-five under Fitzwalter's guidance had alienated of the more moderate men.[17]

    Fearing Archbhishop Langton might be forced to surrender his castle of Rochester, Fitzwalter, with the assent of the warden of the castle, Reginald de Cornhill, secretly occupied it with a large force. John's troops soon approached, and strove, by burning Rochester bridge and occupying the left bank of the way, to cut off Fitzwalter from his London confederates. But Fitzwalter succeeded keeping his position, though before long he was forced on 11 October to retreat to London, allow the royalists to occupy the town besiege the castle. John now tried to deceive him by forged letters. Fitzwalter, conscious of the weakness of his position, sought to negotiate.[17]

    On 9 November, Fitzwalter received with the Earl of Hertford and the citizens of London safe conduct for a conference, but nothing came of it. In vain the beleaguered garrison of Rochester bitterly reproached him for deserting them. On 10 November they were forced to surrender. On 16 December the barons, including Fitzwalter, were excommunicated by name. French help was now their only refuge.[17]


    An illustration by Matthew Paris of the Second Battle of Lincoln
    Fitzwalter went over to France with the Earl of Winchester and offered the throne to Louis, the son of King Philip, putting into his hands twenty-four hostages and assuring him of the support of their party. Fitzwalter was back in England early in 1216. Louis landed in May, and as John made great progress in the east, Fitzwalter busied himself in compelling Essex and Suffolk, his own counties, to accept the foreign king. The tide of fortune now turned, but after John's death on 19 October Fitzwalter's difficulties increased. Gradually the English went over to the side of the new king Henry III. Those who remained in arms were not respected by the French, because of their betrayal of John.[17]

    On 6 December Louis captured Hertford Castle from the followers of the new king Henry. Fitzwalter naturally asked for the custody of a stronghold that had already been so long under his care. The French urged that a traitor to his own lord was not to be trusted, and Louis told him he must wait until the end of the war. Fitzwalter was too deeply pledged to Louis to join the deserters.[17] He was sent from London on 30 April 1217 at the head of a strong French force to raise the siege of Mountsorrel in Leicestershire, now closely pressed by the Earl of Chester. On his way he rested at St Albans, where his hungry troops ate up all the supplies of the abbey, according to abbey chronicler Matthew Paris. He raised the siege of Mountsorrel and advanced to Lincoln. He was met by the regent, William Marshall, whose forces were now joined by the Earl of Chester with the army that had besieged Mountsorrel. Fitzwalter was anxious for an immediate battle.[17]

    On 20 May Fitzwalter fought in the Second Battle of Lincoln, in which the baronial forces were thoroughly defeated. Fitzwalter himself was taken prisoner along with his son and most of the leaders of his party. The Londoners still held out until Hubert de Burgh's great naval victory on 24 August. On 11 September the Treaty of Lambeth ended the struggle. But the reissue of the charter as the result of the treaty showed that Fitzwalter's cause had triumphed in spite of his personal failure. On 8 October 1217 Fitzwalter's release from prison was ordered, and on 24 January 1218 the king granted him his scutage. In July he received the custody of his nephew, Walter Fitzsimon Fitzwalter, whose father had died.[17]

    Later life

    A 1628 painting by Cornelis Claesz van Wieringen depicting the 1218 siege of Damietta, in which Fitzwalter took part as a crusader
    Later in the year 1218 Fitzwalter witnessed the undertaking that the Great Seal of England was to be affixed to no letters patent or charters until the king came of age. But the Fifth Crusade must have offered a convenient opportunity to him and others. In 1219 he sailed for the Holy Land along with Earl Saer of Winchester and Earl William d'Aubigny of Arundel. He departed from Genoa in August, shortly after the main force of the crusade left Brindisi, and arrived in Acre some time in September.[19] Before he arrived the crusading host had been diverted to the siege of Damietta. There he seems to have arrived along with Saer de Quincy and other English crusaders, at the same time as the cardinal legate Pelagius in the autumn of 1219. Saer de Quincy died on 3 November. This date makes impossible the statement of Walter of Coventry that they only arrived after Damietta had been captured. The town fell into the crusaders' hands on 6 November. Fitzwalter, therefore, though he is not mentioned, must have taken part in the latter part of the siege.[9]

    The crusaders remained in Egypt until August 1221. But Fitzwalter had gone home sick, probably at some earlier period. He spent the rest of his life peaceably in England, thoroughly reconciled to the government of Henry III. He must have by this time become well advanced in years. On 11 February 1225 Fitzwalter was one of the witnesses of Henry III's third confirmation of the great charter. In June 1230 he was one of those assigned to hold the assize of arms in Essex and Hertfordshire.[9] According to Matthew Paris, he died on 9 December 1235,[b] and was buried before the high altar at Priory Church in Little Dunmow. Administration of his goods and chattels was granted to his executors on 16 December 1235. He was described by Paris as a "noble baron, illustrious by his birth, and renowned for his martial deeds".[9]

    Legacy

    Little Dunmow Priory, where Fitzwalter is buried
    A large legendary and romantic history gradually gathered round the memory of Fitzwalter, as the first champion of English liberty. A picturesque tale, first found in the manuscript chronicle of Dunmow, tells how Fitzwalter had a very beautiful daughter named Matilda, who indignantly rejected the immoral advances of King John. At last, as the maiden proved obdurate, John caused her to be poisoned, so that the bitterest sense of personal wrong drove Fitzwalter to take up the part of a constitutional leader. So generally was the story believed that an alabaster figure on a grey altar-tomb in Priory Church, Little Dunmow is still sometimes pointed out as the effigy of the unfortunate Matilda.[9][21]

    Several poems and plays have been based upon this picturesque romance. In them, Matilda is curiously mixed up with Maid Marian, the mistress of Robin Hood. Such are the 1601 plays by Henry Chettle and Anthony Munday called The Downfall of Robert, Earl of Huntingdon, afterwards called Robin Hood, with his Love to Chaste Matilda, the Lord Fitzwater's daughter, afterwards his faire Maid Marian, and The Death of Robin Hood with the lamentable Tragedy of Chaste Matilda, his faire Maid Marian, poisoned at Dunmowe by King John. Michael Drayton also published in 1594 a poetical account, called Matilda, the faire and chaste Daughter of the Lord Robert Fitzwalter, as well as two letters in verse, purporting to be written between her and King John. Before 1639 Robert Davenport wrote another play, The Tragedy of King John and Matilda. It was also believed in the seventeenth century that Robert Fitzwalter, "or one of his successors", was the founder of the flitch of bacon custom in Little and Great Dunmow.[22][9] Fitzwalter and King John are the two central characters in the comic monologue Magna Charter by Marriott Edgar.[23]

    Notes

    Footnotes

    Jump up ^ The title of Baron FitzWalter was created in 1295, for Robert FitzWalter, 1st Baron FitzWalter, the son of Walter fitz Robert (d. before 1258), who was the heir of Robert Fitzwalter (d. 1235).[2]
    ^ Jump up to: a b c d However, Charles Lethbridge Kingsford said in his notes on John Stow's A Survey of London that he died in 1234, not 1235.[20]
    Jump up ^ Also spelled FitzWalter, fitzWalter, etc.
    Jump up ^ There may have been two Ida Longespâees. The one who married Sir Walter FitzRobert of Woodham Walter, Essex, had issue including Ela FitzWalter, wife of William de Odyngsells. These Idas been given different parents by different genealogists: G. Andrews Moriarty suggested the two Idas were sisters; Gerald Paget suggests the Ida who married Walter FitzRobert may have been the daughter of William Longespâee II, Earl of Salisbury, by his wife, Idoine de Camville.

    Citations

    ^ Jump up to: a b "Seal-die of Robert Fitzwalter". British Museum. Retrieved 18 September 2010.
    Jump up ^ Starr 2004.
    ^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h i Chisholm 1911.
    Jump up ^ Sanders 1960, p. 129.
    ^ Jump up to: a b c Tout 1889, p. 225.
    ^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g Strickland 2004.
    Jump up ^ White 1885, p. 478.
    Jump up ^ Richardson 2011.
    ^ Jump up to: a b c d e f Tout 1889, p. 228.
    Jump up ^ Round 1904.
    ^ Jump up to: a b c Tout 1889, pp. 225–226.
    ^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h i Tout 1889, p. 226.
    ^ Jump up to: a b Ronay 1978, pp. 20–23.
    Jump up ^ Powlett 1889, p. 395.
    Jump up ^ Ronay 1978, pp. 35–38.
    ^ Jump up to: a b c Ronay 1978, pp. 38–40.
    ^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h i j Tout 1889, p. 227.
    Jump up ^ Turner 2009, pp. 180, 182.
    Jump up ^ Ronay 1978, pp. 64,67.
    Jump up ^ Kingsford 1908
    Jump up ^ Thomson 1829, pp. 504–508.
    Jump up ^ Ronay 1978, pp. 226–227.
    Jump up ^ Edgar, Marriott. "The Magna Charter". Make Em Laugh.

    References

    Ronay, Gabriel (1978). The Tartar Khan's Englishman. London: Cassel. ISBN 1-84212-210-X.
    Round, J. H. (1904). "King John and Robert Fitzwalter". The English Historical Review. 19 (76): 707–711. doi:10.1093/ehr/xix.lxxvi.707. JSTOR 548615.
    Kingsford, C. L. (1908). "Notes: Volume 1, pp. 1–100". A Survey of London, by John Stow: Reprinted from the text of 1603. pp. 269–283. Retrieved 23 November 2010.
    Powlett, C. L. W. (1889). The Battle Abbey Roll: With Some Account of the Norman Lineages. 2.
    Richardson, D. (2011). Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families (2nd ed.).
    Thomson, Richard (1829). An historical essay on the Magna Charta of King John: to which are added, the Great charter in Latin and English; the charters of liberties and confirmations, granted by Henry III. and Edward I.; the original Charter of the forests; and various authentic instruments connected with them: explanatory notes on their several privileges; a descriptive account of the principal originals and editions extant, both in print and manuscript; and other illustrations, derived from the most interesting and authentic sources. London: J. Major and R. Jennings.
    Sanders, I. J. (1960). English Baronies. Oxford.
    Starr, Christopher (2004). "Fitzwalter family (per. c.1200–c.1500)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/54522. (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
    Strickland, Matthew (September 2004). "Fitzwalter, Robert (d. 1235)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/9648. (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
    Turner, Ralph V. (2009). King John: England's Evil King?. Stroud: History Press. ISBN 978-0-7524-4850-3.
    White, W. (1885). Notes and Queries. Oxford University Press.

    Attribution

    This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Fitzwalter, Robert". Encyclopµdia Britannica. 10 (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press. p. 449.
    This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Tout, T. F. (1889). "Fitzwalter, Robert". In Stephen, Leslie. Dictionary of National Biography. 19. London: Smith, Elder & Co. pp. 225–229.

    Buried:
    View Picture ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Fitzwalter#/media/File:LittleDunmowPriory.JPG

    Robert married Rohese LNU. [Group Sheet]


  28. 18349.  Rohese LNU
    Children:
    1. 9174. Walter FitzRobert, Knight was born ~ 1204, Woodham Walter, Essex, England; died 10 Apr 1258.

  29. 18350.  William (Plantagenet) Longespee, 3rd Earl of SalisburyWilliam (Plantagenet) Longespee, 3rd Earl of Salisbury was born ~ 1176, (Salisbury, Wiltshire) England (son of Henry II, King of England and Ida de Tosny, Countess of Norfolk); died 7 Mar 1226, Salisbury Castle, Salisbury, Wiltshire, England; was buried , Salisbury Cathedral, Salisbury, Wiltshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: William Longsword

    Notes:

    William Longespâee, 3rd Earl of Salisbury (c. 1176 – 7 March 1226) ("Long Sword", Latinised to de Longa Spatha) was an English noble, primarily remembered for his command of the English forces at the Battle of Damme and for remaining loyal to his half-brother, King John. His nickname "Longespâee" is generally taken as a reference to his great size and the outsize weapons he wielded.

    Early life

    He was an illegitimate son of Henry II, King of England. His mother was unknown for many years until the discovery of a charter William made that mentions "Comitissa Ida, mater mea" (Countess Ida, my mother).[1][2] This referred to Ida de Tosny, a member of the prominent Tosny (or Toesny) family, who had married Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk[3] in 1181.

    Prior to the discovery of the charter mentioning Countes Ida, speculation and folklore gave Rosamond Clifford, another misress of Henry II, as William's mother. URL https://www.genealogieonline.nl/en/family-tree-fountaine-fontaine-fountain-lafontaine/P2800.php

    King Henry acknowledged William as his son and gave him the honour of Appleby, Lincolnshire, in 1188. Eight years later, his half brother King Richard I married him to a great heiress, Ela of Salisbury, 3rd Countess of Salisbury.

    During the reign of King John, Salisbury was at court on several important ceremonial occasions and held various offices: sheriff of Wiltshire; lieutenant of Gascony; constable of Dover; and Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports; and later warden of the Welsh Marches. He was appointed sheriff of Cambridgeshire and Huntingdonshire about 1213.

    Military career

    He was a commander in the king's Welsh and Irish expeditions of 1210–1212 and was appointed Viceroy of Ireland, jointly with John de Gray, Bishop of Norwich, when the king left for England in 1210.[4] The king also granted him the honour of Eye in Suffolk.

    In 1213, Salisbury led a large fleet to Flanders, where he seized or destroyed a good part of a French invasion fleet anchored at or near Damme. This ended the invasion threat but not the conflicts between England and France. In 1214, Salisbury was sent to help Otto IV of Germany, an English ally, who was invading France. Salisbury commanded the right wing of the army at their disastrous defeat in that year at the Battle of Bouvines, where he was captured.

    By the time he returned to England, revolt was brewing amongst the barons. Salisbury was one of the few who remained loyal to John. In the civil war that took place the year after the signing of the Magna Carta, Salisbury was one of the leaders of the king's army in the south. He was made High Sheriff of Wiltshire again, this time for life. After raising the siege of Lincoln with William Marshall he was also appointed High Sheriff of Lincolnshire (in addition to his current post as High Sheriff of Somerset) and governor of Lincoln castle. However, after the French prince Louis (later Louis VIII) landed as an ally of the rebels, Salisbury went over to his side. Presumably, he thought John's cause was lost.


    Tomb of William Longespâee in Salisbury Cathedral
    After John's death and the departure of Louis, Salisbury, along with many other barons, joined the cause of John's young son, now Henry III of England. He held an influential place in the government during the king's minority and fought in Gascony to help secure the remaining part of the English continental possessions. He was appointed High Sheriff of Devon in 1217 and High Sheriff of Staffordshire and Shropshire in 1224. Salisbury's ship was nearly lost in a storm while returning to England in 1225, and he spent some months in refuge at a monastery on the French island of Râe.

    Death

    He died not long after his return to England at Salisbury Castle. Roger of Wendover alleged that he was poisoned by Hubert de Burgh. He was buried at Salisbury Cathedral in Salisbury, Wiltshire, England.

    William Longespâee's tomb was opened in 1791. Bizarrely, the well-preserved corpse of a rat which carried traces of arsenic, was found inside his skull.[5] The rat is now on display in a case at the Salisbury and South Wiltshire Museum.[5]

    Likeness

    A terracotta statue of Longespâee, dating from 1756, is located in the Great Hall of Lacock Abbey in Lacock, Wiltshire, England. A likeness of his wife Ela is also on display, while several other statues are believed to show their children.

    Family

    By his wife Ela, Countess of Salisbury, he had four sons and six daughters:[6]

    William II Longespâee (1212?–1250), who was sometimes called Earl of Salisbury but never legally bore the title because he died before his mother, Countess Ela, who held the earldom until her death in 1261.

    Richard, a canon of Salisbury.

    Stephen (d. 1260), who was seneschal of Gascony and married Emeline de Ridelsford, widow of Hugh de Lacy, 1st Earl of Ulster. Their two daughters were Eleanor Longspee, who married Sir Roger La Zouche and Emeline Longspee, who married Sir Maurice FitzMaurice, Justiciar of Ireland.

    Nicholas (d. 1297), bishop of Salisbury.

    Isabella Longespâee, who married Sir William de Vesci.

    Ela Longespâee, who first married Thomas de Beaumont, 6th Earl of Warwick, and then married Philip Basset. No issue.[7]

    Ida Longespâee, married firstly Ralph who was son of Ralph de Somery, Baron of Dudley, and Margaret, daughter of John Marshal;[7] she married secondly William de Beauchamp, Baron of Bedford, by whom she had six children, including Maud de Beauchamp, wife of Roger de Mowbray.[8]

    Ida II de Longespâee (she is alternatively listed as William and Ela's granddaughter: see notes below), married Sir Walter FitzRobert, son of Robert Fitzwalter, by whom she had issue including Ela FitzWalter, wife of William de Odyngsells. Ela's and Williams's grandsons include William de Clinton and John de Grey.[7]

    Mary Longespâee, married. No issue.[7]

    Pernel Longespâee.

    *

    William Longespâee was the illegitimate son of the first Plantagenet king, Henry II and Ida de Tosny, a member of the Tosny (or Toesny) family. The epithet "Longespâee" ,or Longsword is a reference to his great size and the huge weapons he wielded.

    Ida de Tosny was a royal ward who became the mistress of King Henry II. The first evidence of contemporary information about Ida came to light in 1979 with the publication in the of two charters found in the Bradenstoke Priory Cartulary where he mentions "Comitissa Ida, mater mea" (Countess Ida, my mother), until then, it was assumed that Rosamund Clifford, a previous and more famous mistress of King Henry II's, was William's mother. Four years after William's birth, in 1181, Ida de Tosny was married to Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk, by whom she had a number of children.

    King Henry II readily acknowledged William as his son and in 1188 granted him the honour of Appleby in Lincolnshire. Following the death of his father in 1189, his half brother King Richard I 'the Lionheart' succeeded to the throne, William began his successful military career by fighting alongside his half brother in Normandy.

    King Richard arranged for the marriage of his half brother to the young heiress, Ela FitzPatrick, who was Countess of Salisbury in her own right, the daughter of William FitzPatrick, 2nd Earl of Salisbury and Elâeonore de Vitrâe.

    Richard died of a crossbow wound at Chalus, near Limoges in 1199 to be succeeded by his younger brother, King John, William held various offices during John's reign, sheriff of Wiltshire; lieutenant of Gascony; constable of Dover; and Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports; and later warden of the Welsh Marches. He was appointed sheriff of Cambridgeshire and Huntingdonshire about 1213.

    William LongswordWilliam took part in John's Welsh and Irish expeditions of 1210-1212. In 1213, Salisbury led a large fleet to Flanders, where he seized or destroyed a good part of a French invasion fleet anchored at or near Damme, then the port of Bruges, thus temporarily ending the French invasion threat.

    In 1214, Salisbury was dispatched to aid John's nephew and ally, Otto IV of Germany, in his invasion of France. Salisbury commanded the right wing of Otto's army at their disastrous and decisive defeat in that year at the Battle of Bouvines, where he was taken prisoner by the French.

    William returned to England to find the barons in revolt against John, he was one of the few who remained loyal to his unpopular half brother. In the civil war that broke out the year after the signing of the Magna Carta, William served as one of the leaders of the king's army in the south. Along with William Marshall he raised the siege of Lincoln, but after Prince Louis of France, son and heir of the John's arch enemy French King Philip II 'Augustus' landed in England in alliance with the rebels, Salisbury, assuming John's cause now lost, deserted him and went over to the rebels.

    William LongswordWhile retreating before this incursion, King John died of dysentry at Newark on the wild stormy night of 18th October, 1216, leaving England in a state of anarchy and civil war. His nine year old son Henry was crowned King Henry III of England at the Abbey Church of Gloucester with a circlet belonging to his mother Isabella of Angouleme, since his father had previously lost the royal treasure in the Wash.

    After the defeat of Louis, Salisbury joined the cause of John's young son Henry. By 1218, the English and French signed the Treaty of Lambeth, which agreed that the French prince Louis would surrender his claims to the English throne.

    William held an influential place in the government during the young king's minority and fought in Gascony to help secure the remaining remnant of the once great Angevin Empire in France. He fell sick after campaigning in Gascony in 1226. Salisbury's ship was nearly lost in a storm while returning to England, and he spent some months in refuge at a monastery on the French island of Râe.

    William Longespâee died on 7 March 1226 at Salisbury Castle soon after his return to England. Roger of Wendover alleged that he had been poisoned by Hubert de Burgh. He was buried at Salisbury Cathedral of which he had been a benefactor. His eldest son William succeeded to the title Earl of Salisbury, His widow, Ela, Countess of Salisbury lived on until 1261 and was buried in Lacock Abbey.

    The tomb of William Longespâee was opened in 1791, inside his skull was found the remains of a rat which carried traces of arsenic. The rat is now on display at the Salisbury and South Wiltshire Museum.

    *

    More history and images for Sir William ... http://bit.ly/1FlUhIj

    More history and images for Salisbury Cathedral ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salisbury_Cathedral

    *

    Buried:
    The cathedral has the tallest church spire in the United Kingdom (123m/404 ft).

    The tomb of William Longespâee was opened in 1791, inside his skull was found the remains of a rat which carried traces of arsenic. The rat is now on display at the Salisbury and South Wiltshire Museum.

    More history and images for Salisbury Cathedral ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salisbury_Cathedral

    Died:
    Roger of Wendover alleged that he had been poisoned by Hubert de Burgh.

    William married Ela FitzPatrick, 3rd Countess of Salisbury 0___ 1196, Salisbury, Wiltshire, England. Ela (daughter of William of Salisbury, Knight, 2nd Earl of Salisbury and Eleonore de Vitre, Countess of Salisbury) was born 0___ 1187, Amesbury, Wiltshire, England; died 24 Aug 1261, Lacock Abbey, Wiltshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  30. 18351.  Ela FitzPatrick, 3rd Countess of Salisbury was born 0___ 1187, Amesbury, Wiltshire, England (daughter of William of Salisbury, Knight, 2nd Earl of Salisbury and Eleonore de Vitre, Countess of Salisbury); died 24 Aug 1261, Lacock Abbey, Wiltshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Ela d'Evreux
    • Also Known As: Ela of Salisbury

    Notes:

    Ela of Salisbury, 3rd Countess of Salisbury (1187 - 24 August 1261) was a wealthy English heiress and the suo jure Countess of Salisbury, having succeeded to the title in 1196 upon the death of her father, William FitzPatrick, 2nd Earl of Salisbury.[1] Her husband William Longespâee, an illegitimate half-brother of kings Richard I of England and John of England assumed the title of 3rd Earl of Salisbury by right of his marriage to Ela, which took place in 1196 when she was nine years old.

    Ela held the post of High Sheriff of Wiltshire for two years after William's death, then became a nun, and eventually Abbess of Lacock Abbey in Wiltshire, which she had founded in 1229.

    Family

    Ela was born in Amesbury, Wiltshire in 1187, the only child and heiress of William FitzPatrick, 2nd Earl of Salisbury, Sheriff of Wiltshire and Elâeonore de Vitrâe (c.1164- 1232/1233).[2] In 1196, she succeeded her father as suo jure 3rd Countess of Salisbury. There is a story that immediately following her father's death she was imprisoned in a castle in Normandy by one of her paternal uncles who wished to take her title and enormous wealth for himself. According to the legend, Ela was eventually rescued by William Talbot, a knight who had gone to France where he sang ballads under windows in all the castles of Normandy until he received a response from Ela.[3]

    In 1198, Ela's mother married her fourth husband, Gilbert de Malesmains.

    Marriage and issue

    In 1196, the same year she became countess and inherited her father's numerous estates, Ela married William Longespâee, an illegitimate son of King Henry II of England, by his mistress Ida de Tosny, who later married Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk. Longespee became 3rd Earl of Salisbury by right of his wife. The Continuator of Florence recorded that their marriage had been arranged by King Richard I of England, who was William's legitimate half-brother.[1]

    Together William and Ela had at least eight or possibly nine children:

    William II Longespâee, titular Earl of Salisbury (c.1209- 7 February 1250), married in 1216 Idoine de Camville, daughter of Richard de Camville and Eustache Basset, by whom he had four children. William was killed while on crusade at the Battle of Mansurah.

    Richard Longespâee, clerk and canon of Salisbury.

    Stephen Longespâee, Seneschal of Gascony and Justiciar of Ireland (1216–1260), married as her second husband 1243/1244 Emmeline de Ridelsford, daughter of Walter de Ridelsford and Annora Vitrâe, by whom he had two daughters: Ela, wife of Sir Roger La Zouche, and Emmeline (1252–1291), the second wife of Maurice FitzGerald, 3rd Lord of Offaly.

    Nicholas Longespâee, Bishop of Salisbury (died 28 May 1297)

    Isabella Longespâee (died before 1244), married as his first wife shortly after 16 May 1226, William de Vescy, Lord of Alnwick, by whom she had issue.

    Petronilla Longespâee, died unmarried

    Ela Longespâee, who first married Thomas de Beaumont, 6th Earl of Warwick, and then married Philip Basset. No issue.[4]

    Ida Longespâee, married firstly Ralph who was son of Ralph de Somery, Baron of Dudley, and Margaret, daughter of John Marshal;[4] she married secondly William de Beauchamp, Baron of Bedford, by whom she had six children, including Maud de Beauchamp, wife of Roger de Mowbray.[5]

    Ida II de Longespâee (she is alternatively listed as William and Ela's granddaughter: see notes below), married Sir Walter FitzRobert, son of Robert Fitzwalter, by whom she had issue including Ela FitzWalter, wife of William de Odyngsells. Ela's and Williams's grandsons include William de Clinton and John de Grey.[4]

    Mary Longespâee, married. No issue.[4]

    Pernel Longespâee.

    Lacock Abbey, founded in 1229 by Ela, Countess of Salisbury

    Later life

    In 1225, Ela's husband William was shipwrecked off the coast of Brittany, upon returning from Gascony. He spent months recovering at a monastery on the Island of Râe in France. He died at Salisbury Castle on 7 March 1226 just several days after arriving in England. Ela held the post of Sheriff of Wiltshire for two years following her husband's death.

    Three years later in 1229, Ela founded Lacock Abbey in Wiltshire as a nunnery of the Augustinian order. In 1238, she entered the abbey as a nun; she was made Abbess of Lacock in 1240, and held the post until 1257. The Book of Lacock recorded that Ela founded the monasteries at Lacock and Henton.[1] During her tenure as abbess, Ela obtained many rights for the abbey and village of Lacock.

    Ela, Countess of Salisbury died on 24 August 1261 and was buried in Lacock Abbey. The inscription on her tombstone, originally written in Latin, reads:

    Below lie buried the bones of the venerable Ela, who gave this sacred house as a home for the nuns. She also had lived here as holy abbess and Countess of Salisbury, full of good works[6]

    Her numerous descendants included English kings Edward IV and Richard III, Mary, Queen of Scots, Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex, Sir Winston Churchill, Diana, Princess of Wales, the Dukes of Norfolk, and the English queen consorts of King Henry VIII: Anne Boleyn, Jane Seymour, Catherine Howard, and Catherine Parr.

    Ela has been described as having been "one of the two towering female figures of the mid-13th century", the other one being Margaret de Quincy, Countess of Lincoln.[7]

    Died:
    Lacock Abbey in the village of Lacock, Wiltshire, England, was founded in the early 13th century by Ela, Countess of Salisbury, as a nunnery of the Augustinian order. The Abbey remained a nunnery until the suppression of Catholic institutions in England in the 16th century.

    Some interior sequences in Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets were filmed at Lacock, including the cloister walk (illustrated, left) where Harry comes out from Professor Lockhart's room after serving detention and hears the basilisk. During four days in October 2007 Lacock was also used to film some scenes for the sixth Harry Potter film, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince.

    The Abbey was one of two major locations for the 2008 film version of the historical novel The Other Boleyn Girl.

    Lacock appears in the "Robin Hood and the Sorcerer", "Cromm Cruac" and "The Pretender" episodes of Robin of Sherwood. It was also used in the 1995 BBC/A&E production of Pride and Prejudice.

    In the Spring of 2012, it was a filming location of the fantasy adventure movie Mariah Mundi and the Midas Box, which is scheduled for release in 2013.

    Scenes for the BBC's historical TV serial Wolf Hall were filmed there in 2014.

    Photos, history & source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lacock_Abbey

    Notes:

    Married:
    King Richard arranged for the marriage of his half brother to the young heiress, Ela FitzPatrick, who was Countess of Salisbury in her own right, the daughter of William FitzPatrick, 2nd Earl of Salisbury and Elâeonore de Vitrâe.

    Children:
    1. William Longespee, II, Knight, Earl of Salisbury, Crusader was born 0___ 1212, (Salisbury, Wiltshire) England; died 8 Feb 1250, Al-Mansurah, Egypt.
    2. Richard Longespee was born , (Salisbury, Wiltshire) England.
    3. 9175. Ida Longespee, II was born , (Salisbury, Wiltshire) England.
    4. Stephen Longespee was born ~ 1216, (Salisbury, Wiltshire) England; died ~ 1260.
    5. Ida Longespee was born 1205-1210, Salisbury, Wiltshire, England; died 0___ 1269, England.

  31. 2208.  Hugh Bigod, Knight, 3rd Earl of NorfolkHugh Bigod, Knight, 3rd Earl of Norfolk was born ~ 1182, Thetford, Norfolk, England (son of Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk and Ida de Tosny, Countess of Norfolk); died 18 Feb 1225, (Norfolk, England); was buried , Thetford Priory, Thetford, Norfolk, England.

    Notes:

    Hugh Bigod (c.?1182 - 1225) was a member of the powerful early Norman Bigod family and was for a short time the 3rd Earl of Norfolk.

    He was born c. 1182, the eldest son of Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk by his wife Ida de Tosny.

    Born c.?1182
    Died 18 February 1225
    Title 3rd Earl of Norfolk
    Tenure 1221-1225
    Nationality English
    Predecessor Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk
    Successor Roger Bigod, 4th Earl of Norfolk
    Spouse(s) Maud Marshal
    Parents Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk
    Ida de Tosny

    Career

    In 1215 he was one of the twenty-five sureties of Magna Carta of King John. He succeeded to his father’s estates (including Framlingham Castle) in 1221.

    Marriage & progeny

    In late 1206 or early 1207, Hugh married Maud Marshal (1192 - 27 March 1248), daughter of William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke (1147–1219), Marshal of England, by his wife Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke. They had four, or possibly five, children:

    Roger Bigod, 4th Earl of Norfolk (c.?1209-1270), died without progeny.
    Hugh Bigod (1211–1266), Justiciar of England. Married Joan de Stuteville, by whom he had issue.
    Isabel Bigod (c. 1212- 1250), married twice: Firstly to Gilbert de Lacy, by whom she had issue; Secondly to John FitzGeoffrey, Lord of Shere, by whom she had issue, including Maud FitzJohn, and Joan FitzJohn who married Theobald le Botiller, and from whom descended the Irish Earls of Ormond.
    Ralph Bigod (born c. 1215)
    Contrary to the assertion of Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots, there is no evidence for a fourth son called Simon Bigod. A man of that name appears as a witness to one of Earl Hugh's charters (Morris, HBII 2), but as the eighteenth name in a list of twenty, suggesting no close connection to the main branch of the family. He is also named among the knights who surrendered to King John at Framlingham Castle in 1216. He was a probably a descendant of Hugh or William Bigod, half-brothers to Earl Roger II Bigod.

    Death

    Hugh died on 18 Feb 1225. Very soon after Hugh's death, his widow Maud remarried William de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey.

    Hugh Bigod in fiction[edit]
    Hugh Bigod and his wife [Mahelt] are the main characters in Elizabeth Chadwick's To Defy a King. They also appear as secondary characters in novels chronicling their parents such as The Time of Singing (UK: Sphere, 2008) published in the USA as For the King's Favor; The Greatest Knight; and The Scarlet Lion.

    Ancestry

    [show]Ancestors of Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk

    References

    M. Morris, The Bigod Earls of Norfolk in the Thirteenth Century (Woodbridge, 2005)

    External links

    Cawley, Charles, Medieval Lands on Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk, Medieval Lands database, Foundation for Medieval Genealogy
    Cawley, Charles, Medieval Lands on Isabel Bigod, Medieval Lands database, Foundation for Medieval Genealogy

    Hugh married Maud Marshal, Countess of Norfolk 1206-1207, (Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales). Maud (daughter of William Marshal, Templar Knight, 1st Earl Pembroke and Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke) was born ~ 1193, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales; died 27 Mar 1248, Tintern Abbey, Chapel Hill, Monmouthshire, Wales. [Group Sheet]


  32. 2209.  Maud Marshal, Countess of Norfolk was born ~ 1193, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales (daughter of William Marshal, Templar Knight, 1st Earl Pembroke and Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke); died 27 Mar 1248, Tintern Abbey, Chapel Hill, Monmouthshire, Wales.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Countess of Surrey

    Notes:

    Maud Marshal, Countess of Norfolk, Countess of Surrey (1192 – 27 March 1248) was an Anglo-Norman noblewoman and a wealthy co-heiress of her father William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke, and her mother Isabel de Clare suo jure 4th Countess of Pembroke. Maud was their eldest daughter.[1] She had two husbands: Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk, and William de Warenne, 5th Earl of Surrey.

    Maud was also known as Matilda Marshal.

    Family

    Maud's birthdate is unknown other than being post 1191. She was the eldest daughter of William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke and Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke, herself one of the greatest heiresses in Wales and Ireland. Maud had five brothers and four younger sisters. She was a co-heiress to her parents' extensive rich estates.

    Her paternal grandparents were John FitzGilbert Marshal and Sybilla of Salisbury, and her maternal grandparents were Richard de Clare, 2nd Earl of Pembroke, known as "Strongbow", and Aoife of Leinster.

    Marriages and issue

    Sometime before Lent in 1207, Maud married her first husband, Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk. It was through this marriage between Maud and Hugh that the post of Earl Marshal of England came finally to the Howard (Dukes of Norfolk).[2] In 1215, Hugh was one of the twenty-five sureties of the Magna Carta. He came into his inheritance in 1221, thus Maud became the Countess of Norfolk at that time. Together they had five children:[3]

    Roger Bigod, 4th Earl of Norfolk (1209–1270) He died childless.
    Hugh Bigod (1212–1266), Justiciar of England. Married Joan de Stuteville, by whom he had issue.
    Isabel Bigod (c. 1215–1250), married firstly Gilbert de Lacy of Ewyas Lacy, by whom she had issue; she married secondly John Fitzgeoffrey, Lord of Shere, by whom she had issue.
    Ralph Bigod (born c. 1218, date of death unknown), married Bertha de Furnival, by whom he had one child.
    William Bigod
    Hugh Bigod died in 1225. Maud married her second husband, William de Warenne, 5th Earl of Surrey before 13 October that same year. Together they had two children:

    Isabella de Warenne (c. 1228 – before 20 September 1282), married Hugh d'Aubigny, 5th Earl of Arundel. She died childless.
    John de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey (August 1231 – c. 29 September 1304), in 1247 married Alice de Lusignan, a half-sister of King Henry III of England, by whom he had three children.
    Maud's second husband died in 1240. Her youngest son John succeeded his father as the 6th Earl of Surrey, but as he was a minor, Peter of Savoy, uncle of Queen consort Eleanor of Provence, was guardian of his estates.

    Death

    Maud died on 27 March 1248 at the age of about fifty-six years and was buried at Tintern Abbey with her mother, possibly her maternal grandmother, and two of her brothers.

    Maud Marshal in literature

    Maud Marshal is the subject of a novel by Elizabeth Chadwick, titled To Defy a King. In the book she is called Mahelt rather than Maud. She and her first husband Hugh Bigod appear as secondary characters in books chronicling their parents's lives: The Time of Singing (UK: Sphere, 2008) published in the USA as For the King's Favor; The Greatest Knight; and The Scarlet Lion.

    Ancestors[edit]
    [show]Ancestors of Maud Marshal

    References

    Jump up ^ Thomas B. Costain, The Magnificent Century, pp. 103-104
    Jump up ^ Costain, The Magnificent Century, pp. 103-104
    Jump up ^ Charles Cawley, Medieval Lands, Earls of Norfolk, Bigod
    Thomas B. Costain, The Magnificent Century, published by Doubleday and Company, Garden City, New York, 1959
    Charles Cawley, Medieval Lands, Earls of Pembroke
    thePeerage.com/p 10677.htm#106761

    Children:
    1. Ralph Bigod, Knight was born 1208, Thetford, Norfolk, England; died Bef 28 Jul 1260, Thetford, Norfolk, England.
    2. Isabelle Bigod, Countess of Essex was born ~ 1211, Thetford, Norfolk, England; died 0___ 1239.
    3. 1104. Hugh Bigod, Knight was born ~ 1215, Thetford, Norfolk, England; died Bef 7 May 1266.

  33. 2210.  Nicholas de Stuteville, Lord of Liddell was born <1191, Liddell, Cumbria, England; died 1233, Liddell, Cumbria, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Nicholas de Stuteville, Lord of Stuteville

    Notes:

    Nicholas de Stuteville, Lord Of Stuteville
    Also Known As: "Lord of Liddell", "Stoteville", "Estuteville"
    Birthdate: after 1191
    Birthplace: Liddell, Cumberland, , England
    Death: 1233
    Liddell, Cumberland, , England
    Immediate Family:
    Son of Nicholas de Stuteville, III and Gunnora d'Aubigny
    Husband of Joan de Stuteville (Peche) and Devorguilla of Galloway, I
    Father of Joan de Stuteville
    Occupation: Lord of baronies of Cottingham, Yorkshire and Liddel Strength, Cumberland
    Managed by: Private User
    Last Updated: November 15, 2017

    Immediate Family

    Joan de Stuteville (Peche)
    wife

    Devorguilla of Galloway, I
    wife

    Joan de Stuteville
    daughter

    Gunnora d'Aubigny
    mother

    Nicholas de Stuteville, III
    father

    William Abernethy, 1st of Saltoun
    stepson

    Hugh de Abernathy
    stepson

    Patrick de Abernethy
    stepson

    Robert de Gant, Lord of Folkingham
    stepfather

    Avice Gant
    stepsister

    Gilbert de Gaunt, Earl of Lincoln
    stepbrother
    About Nicholas de Stuteville, Lord Of Stuteville
    http://www.geneajourney.com/stutvll.html

    Sir Nicholas de Stuteville b abt 1182, of Liddel, Cumberland, England. He md Devorguilla of Galloway abt 1205, daughter of Roland of Galloway and Elena de Morville.

    Child of Nicholas de Stuteville and Devorguilla of Galloway was:

    Joan de Stuteville b abt 1215, of Liddel, Cumberland, England, d sh bef 6 Apr 1276. She md:

    [1] Sir Hugh Wake bef 29 May 1229, son of Baldwin Wake and Isabel de Briwere; and

    [2] Sir Hugh Bigod, Chief Justice of England, bef 5 Feb 1243/44, son of Sir Hugh Bigod, Earl of Norfolk, Magna Carta Surety, and Maud Marshal.

    https://fabpedigree.com/s010/f011477.htm
    http://washington.ancestryregister.com/STUTEVILLE00006.htm

    end of profile

    Nicholas married Joan Peche. [Group Sheet]


  34. 2211.  Joan Peche
    Children:
    1. 1105. Joan de Stuteville was born ~ 1220; died Bef 1244.

  35. 2240.  William Markenfield was born ~ 1222, Markenfield Hall, Ripon HG4 3AD, UK (son of Roger Markenfield and FNU Le Breton).

    Notes:

    About William de Markenfield

    William, as s/o Roger le Breton confirmed to Fountains all in his fee 1271 (CF 520), by 1275 he had been succeeded by his son Roger (CF 67) who presumably dsp. [J.C.B. Sharp, SGM, 5 May 2000]

    William married unnamed spouse. [Group Sheet]


  36. 2241.  unnamed spouse
    Children:
    1. 1120. William Markenfield was born ~ 1250, Markenfield Hall, Ripon HG4 3AD, UK; died 0___ 1308.

  37. 2250.  Noel le Boteler was born 1258, Wem, Shropshire, England (son of William le Boteler and Ankaret verch Griffith); died 14 Sep 1334, St. Mary, Devonshire, England.

    Noel married Agnes LNU 1284, St. Mary, Devonshire, England. Agnes was born 1269, St. Mary, Devonshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  38. 2251.  Agnes LNU was born 1269, St. Mary, Devonshire, England.
    Children:
    1. 1125. Agnes Boteler was born 1285, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England; died 1311, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England.

  39. 2254.  William de Ros, Knight was born ~ 1244, (Yorkshire) England (son of William de Ros, Knight and Lucy FitzPeter, Baroness de Ros); died 0May 1310, (Yorkshire) England; was buried , Greyfriars Abbey Church, King's Straith, York, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Residence: Ingmanthorpe, Yorkshire, England
    • Residence: Scotland
    • Residence: Gascony, France
    • Also Known As: Baron Ingmanthorpe
    • Also Known As: William de Roos

    Notes:

    Birth: unknown, England
    Death: May, 1310, England

    Knight of Ingmanthorpe in Kirk Deighton, Yorkshire, in right of his wife, of Greasley, Nottinghamshire, Ilkeston, Derbyshire.

    Third son of Sir William de Ros and Lucy FitzPeter, grandson of Sir Robert de Ros and Isabel of Scotland, Peter FitzHubert and Alice FitzRoger.

    Husband of Eustache FitzEalph, daughter and heiress of Sir Ralph FitzHugh of Greasley and the daughter of Sir John de la Haye, widow of Sir Nicholas de Cantelowe of Buckinghamshire. They married in 1268 and had one son and five daughters:
    * Sir William
    * Lucy
    * Isabel
    * Margaret
    * Ivette
    * Mary, the Prioress of Rosedale Priory

    Sir William served in Scotland 1257 and 1258, Gascony in 1294 and then Scotland in 1296. Sir William died shortly before May 28 1310, the date of his burial, and was buried beside his wife who died previously.

    The family surname is found both Ros and Roos.

    Family links:
    Parents:
    William de Ros (1192 - 1264)
    Lucy FitzPiers de Ros (1207 - 1267)

    Spouse:
    Eustache FitzRalph Ros

    Children:
    Ivetta De Ros Scrope (1285 - 1331)*

    Siblings:
    William de Ros (____ - 1310)
    Alice de Ros (____ - 1286)*
    Robert de Ros (1223 - 1285)*
    Lucy de Ros de Kyme (1230 - ____)*

    *Calculated relationship

    Burial:
    Greyfriars Abbey Church (Defunct)
    York
    York Unitary Authority
    North Yorkshire, England

    Created by: Anne Shurtleff Stevens
    Record added: Apr 02, 2013
    Find A Grave Memorial# 107743856

    Buried:
    Greyfriars Abbey Church (Defunct)

    William married Eustache FitzRalph 0___ 1268. Eustache was born , England; died Bef 1310, England; was buried , Greyfriars Abbey Church, King's Straith, York, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  40. 2255.  Eustache FitzRalph was born , England; died Bef 1310, England; was buried , Greyfriars Abbey Church, King's Straith, York, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Eustace FitzHugh

    Notes:

    Birth: unknown, England
    Death: unknown, England

    Eustache FitzHugh de Cantelowe de Ros

    Daughter and heiress of Sir Ralph FitzHugh of Greasley and the daughter of Sir John de la Haye. Of her own right of Greasley, Nottinghamshire, and of Ilkeston, Derbyshire.

    She was the wife of Sir Nicholas de Cantelowe of Buckinghamshire, who died after May 1262.

    Secondly wife of Sir William de Ros, third son of Sir William de Ros and Lucy FitzPeter. They married in 1268 and had one son and five daughters;
    * Sir William
    * Lucy
    * Isabel
    * Margaret
    * Ivette
    * Mary, the Prioress of Rosedale Priory

    Eustace was also the heir to her kinsman, Peter de la Haye of Arlington, Sussex. She died before her husband who died in May of 1310. They were buried together at GreyFriars, York.

    The family surname is found both Ros and Roos.

    Family links:
    Spouse:
    William de Ros (____ - 1310)*

    Children:
    Ivetta De Ros Scrope (1285 - 1331)*

    *Calculated relationship

    Burial:
    Greyfriars Abbey Church (Defunct)
    York
    York Unitary Authority
    North Yorkshire, England

    Created by: Anne Shurtleff Stevens
    Record added: Apr 03, 2013
    Find A Grave Memorial# 107756207

    Buried:
    Greyfriars Abbey Church (Defunct)

    Children:
    1. 1127. Lucia Ros was born ~ 1272; died ~ 1362.
    2. Isabel de Ros was born ~ 1276, Helmsley Castle, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1318, Cleveland, Yorkshire, England.
    3. Ivette de Ros was born 0___ 1285, Ingmanthorpe, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1331; was buried , Coverham Abbey, Coverham, Richmondshire, Yorkshire, England.

  41. 2292.  John de Clinton, I, KnightJohn de Clinton, I, Knight was born 0___ 1258, Amington, Staffordshire, England; died 0___ 1315.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Constable of Wallingford Castle
    • Also Known As: 1st Baron Clinton
    • Also Known As: John Clinton
    • Also Known As: Lord Clinton

    Notes:

    John de Clinton, 1st Baron Clinton (died 1315) was an English peer.

    Clinton was a knight who had served in the Scottish and French wars. He was summoned to Parliament as Lord Clinton in February 1299. Clinton was Knight of the Shire for Warwickshire between 1300 and 1301 and Constable of Wallingford Castle in 1308. He died in 1315 and was succeeded by his grandson John.

    His descendants include the Earls of Lincoln and Dukes of Newcastle, including the first Duke, who served as Prime Minister of Great Britain.

    References

    Kidd, Charles, Williamson, David (editors). Debrett's Peerage and Baronetage (1990 edition). New York: St Martin's Press, 1990.
    Leigh Rayment's Peerage Pages [self-published source][better source needed]

    Barons Clinton (1298) source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baron_Clinton

    John de Clinton, 1st Baron Clinton (d. 1315)
    John de Clinton, 2nd Baron Clinton (d. c. 1335)
    John de Clinton, 3rd Baron Clinton (d. 1398)
    William de Clinton, 4th Baron Clinton (1378–1431)
    John de Clinton, 5th Baron Clinton (1410–1464)
    John Clinton, 6th Baron Clinton (1431–1488)
    John Clinton, 7th Baron Clinton (1471–1514)
    Thomas Clinton, 8th Baron Clinton (1490–1517)
    Edward Clinton, 9th Baron Clinton (1512–1585) (created Earl of Lincoln in 1572)

    Birth:
    Amington and Stonydelph formerly formed one "township" and were part of the ancient parish of Tamworth.[2] Amington, now in Staffordshire, was previously part of the county of Warwickshire; the county boundary between Staffordshire and Warwickshire formerly running along Tamworth high street.

    source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amington

    John married Ida Odingsells, Baroness of Clinton ~1290. Ida (daughter of William de Odingsells and Ela Fitzwalter, Countess of Warwick) was born ~1275, Maxstoke, Warwick, England; was christened , Amington, Warwick, England; died Aft 1 Mar 1321. [Group Sheet]


  42. 2293.  Ida Odingsells, Baroness of Clinton was born ~1275, Maxstoke, Warwick, England; was christened , Amington, Warwick, England (daughter of William de Odingsells and Ela Fitzwalter, Countess of Warwick); died Aft 1 Mar 1321.
    Children:
    1. 1146. John Clinton, II, 2nd Lord Clinton was born Abt 1299, Maxstoke, Warwick, England; died 1 Apr 1335, Maxstoke, Warwick, England.
    2. Joan Clinton was born 1300, Coleshill, Warwickshire, England; died Aft 1371, (Warwickshire) England.

  43. 29152.  Robert de Haverington died 0___ 1297, Harrington, Cumbria, England.

    Robert married Agnes de Cansfield. Agnes was born , Furness, Cumbria, England. [Group Sheet]


  44. 29153.  Agnes de Cansfield was born , Furness, Cumbria, England.
    Children:
    1. 14576. John de Harington, Knight, 1st Baron Harington was born 0___ 1281, Melling, Lancashire, England; died 2 Jul 1347, Aldingham, Cumbria, England; was buried , Cartmel Priory, Cartmel, Cumbria, England.

  45. 29158.  Richard de Burgh, 2nd Earl of Ulster was born 0___ 1259, Ireland (son of Walter de Burgh, 1st Earl of Ulster and Aveline FitzJohn); died Bef 29 Aug 1326, Athassel Monestary, Tipperary, Munster, Ireland; was buried , Athassel Monestary, Tipperary, Munster, Ireland.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: 3rd Baron Connaught
    • Also Known As: Richard Óg de Burgh

    Notes:

    Richard Óg de Burgh, 2nd Earl of Ulster and 3rd Baron of Connaught (1259 – 29 July 1326), called The Red Earl and often named as Richard de Burgo, was one of the most powerful Irish nobles of the late 13th and early 14th centuries.

    Richard Óg de Burgh
    Born 1259
    Ireland
    Died 29 July 1326
    Athassel Priory, near Cashel
    Title 2nd Earl of Ulster
    Tenure 1271-1326
    Other titles 3rd Baron of Connaught
    Nationality Irish
    Predecessor Walter de Burgh, 1st Earl of Ulster
    Successor Elizabeth de Burgh, 4th Countess of Ulster
    Spouse(s) Margaret
    Parents Walter de Burgh
    Aveline FitzJohn

    Early life

    Richard's father was Walter de Burgh, 1st Earl of Ulster (of the second creation) & Lord of Connacht.,[1] who was the second son of Richard Mâor de Burgh, 1st Lord of Connaught and Egidia de Lacy. "Richard Óg", means "Richard the Young", which may be a reference to his youth when he became earl in 1271, or to differentiate him from his grandfather, Richard Mâor.

    Earl of Ulster

    Richard Óg was the most powerful of the de Burgh Earls of Ulster, succeeding his father in Ulster and Connacht upon reaching his majority in 1280.[1] He was a friend of King Edward I of England, and ranked first among the Earls of Ireland. Richard married Margaret, the daughter of his cousin John de Burgh (also spelled de Borough) and Cecily Baillol.[2] He pursued expansionist policies that often left him at odds with fellow Norman lords.

    His daughter Elizabeth was to become the second wife of King Robert the Bruce of Scotland. However, this did not stop him leading his forces from Ireland to support England's King Edward I in his Scottish campaigns and when the forces of Edward Bruce invaded Ulster in 1315, the Earl led a force against him, but was beaten at Connor in Antrim. The invasion of Bruce and the uprising of Felim Ó Conchâuir in Connacht left him virtually without authority in his lands, but Ó Conchâuir was killed in 1316 at the Second Battle of Athenry, and he was able to recover Ulster after the defeat of Bruce at Faughart.[1]

    He died on 29 July 1326 at Athassel Priory, near Cashel, County Tipperary.

    Children and family

    Aveline de Burgh (b. c. 1280), married John de Bermingham, 1st Earl of Louth
    Eleanor de Burgh (1282 – aft. August 1324), married Lord Thomas de Multon of Burghs-on-Sands
    Elizabeth de Burgh (c. 1284 – 26 October 1327), Queen consort of Scotland, married Robert the Bruce as his second wife, and was the mother of David II of Scotland
    Walter de Burgh (c. 1285–1304)
    John de Burgh (c. 1286 – 18 June 1313)
    Matilda de Burgh (c. 1288–1320), married Gilbert de Clare, 7th Earl of Hertford
    Thomas de Burgh (c. 1292–1316)
    Catherine de Burgh (c. 1296 – 1 November 1331), married Maurice Fitzgerald, 1st Earl of Desmond
    Edmond de Burgh (b. c. 1298)
    Joan de Burgh (c. 1300 – 23 April 1359), married firstly, Thomas FitzGerald, 2nd Earl of Kildare, by whom she had issue, and secondly, Sir John Darcy, 1st Baron Darcy de Knayth, by whom she had issue, including Elizabeth Darcy who married James Butler, 2nd Earl of Ormond

    Richard married Margaret de Burgh, Countess of Ulster. Margaret (daughter of John de Burgh and Cecilia de Balliol) was born ~ 1264, Portslade, Sussex, England; died 0___ 1304. [Group Sheet]


  46. 29159.  Margaret de Burgh, Countess of Ulster was born ~ 1264, Portslade, Sussex, England (daughter of John de Burgh and Cecilia de Balliol); died 0___ 1304.
    Children:
    1. 14579. Eleanor Burgh was born 0___ 1282, Belfast, County Antrim, Ireland; died 0Aug 1324, Spalding, Lincolnshire, England.
    2. Elizabeth de Burgh, Queen Consort of Scotland was born ~ 1284, Ireland; died 26 Oct 1327.
    3. Joan de Burgh was born 1300, Ulster, Donegal, Ireland; died 17 May 1359, Kildare, Ireland.
    4. Margaret de Burgh was born , (Ulster, Ireland); died 1331.


Generation: 16

  1. 32768.  William de Bolling was born 1140, New Hall (Yorkshire) England (son of John de Bolling and unnamed spouse); died 1246, Norfolk, England.

    Notes:

    Generation No. 138

    William De Bolling [138] John De Bolling [137] Tristam De Bolling [136] William De Boulogne [135] Eustace II De Boulogne (=Mary of Scotland) [134] Mathilda Van Leuven (=Eustache I, Count of Boulogne)[133] Gerberga of Lower Lorraine [132] Charles, Duke of Lower Lorraine [131] King Louis IV of France (=Gerberga of Saxony) [130] Charles III, the Simple (=Eadgifu of England) [129] Louis II, the Stammerer (=Adelaide of Paris) [128] Charles II, the Bald (=Ermentrude) [127] Louis I, the Pious (=Judith of Bavaria) [126] Charlemagne the Great (=Hildegard) [1-125]

    William De Bolling was born 1140 in Yorkshire, England, and died 1246 in Norfolk, England.

    William married unnamed spouse. [Group Sheet]


  2. 32769.  unnamed spouse
    Children:
    1. 16384. William de Bolling was born 1165, Yorkshire, England.

  3. 35332.  Aubrey de Vere, I was born 16 Dec 1030, Ver, Normandie, France; died 1112-1113, Abingdon Abbey, Berkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alt Birth: (~ 1045), (Normandy, France)

    Notes:

    Aubrey (Albericus) de Vere (died circa 1112-1113) was a tenant-in-chief in England of William the Conqueror in 1086, as well as a tenant of Geoffrey de Montbray, bishop of Coutances and of Count Alan, lord of Richmond. A much later source named his father as Alphonsus.[1]

    Biography

    His origins are obscure and various regions have been proposed for his birthplace, from Zeeland to Brittany. He may have been Norman, possibly from the region of Ver in the Cotentin peninsula of western Normandy, but the evidence is such that no certainty is possible.[2]

    In Domesday Book, he is listed as "Aubrey the chamberlain" and "Aubrey the queen's chamberlain" as well as Aubrey de Vere. He and his wife held land in nine counties in 1086. Both were accused of some unauthorized land seizures.[3] Aubrey's estates were valued at approximately ą300, putting him in roughly the middle ranks of the post-conquest barons of England in terms of landed wealth.[4] He served King Henry I in the first decade of his reign as a chamberlain and local justiciar in the counties of Berkshire and Northamptonshire.[5]

    Sometime in or before 1104, Aubrey's eldest son Geoffrey fell ill and was tended at Abingdon Abbey in Berkshire by the royal physician, Abbot Faritius. The youth appeared to have recovered but suffered a relapse, died, and was buried at the abbey. His parents then founded a cell of Abingdon on land they donated for the purpose: Colne Priory, Essex. Within a year of the formal dedication in March 1111, Aubrey I joined that community and died soon. His youngest son William died not long after his father. Both were buried at the priory, establishing it as the Vere family mausoleum.[6] Aubrey de Vere II then succeeded to his father's estates.

    Aubrey I was married by 1086. As his spouse's name is recorded as Beatrice in 1104 and Beatrice is named as the mother of his eldest son, she was almost certainly his wife in 1086.[7] Beatrice attended the formal ceremony for the founding of Earl's Colne Priory. Besides sons Geoffrey, Aubrey II, and William mentioned above, the couple's children included Roger and Robert.[8]

    Estates

    The principal estates held by Aubrey de Vere in 1086: Castle Hedingham, Beauchamp [Walter], Great Bentley, Great Canfield, Earls Colne, [White] Colne, and Dovercourt, Essex; Aldham, Belstead, Lavenham, and Waldingfield, Suffolk; Castle Camps, Hildersham, Silverley, and Wilbraham, Cambridgeshire. He possessed houses and acreage in Colchester and a house in Winchester. As tenant of Geoffrey bishop of Coutances, he held Kensington, Middlesex; Scaldwell and Wadenhoe, Northamptonshire. Of the barony of Count Alan of Brittany, he held the manors of Beauchamp Roding, Canfield, and West Wickham, Essex. His wife held Aldham, Essex, in her own right of Odo bishop of Bayeux. The couple both were accused by Domesday jurors of expansion into Little Maplestead, Essex. Aubrey's seizures or questionable right of possession to estates included Manuden, Essex; Great Hemingford, Huntingdonshire; and Swaffham, Cambridgeshire. (Counties given are those of Domesday Book.)

    end

    Aubrey married Beatrice Ghent BY 1086. Beatrice was born 1045, France; died 1090. [Group Sheet]


  4. 35333.  Beatrice Ghent was born 1045, France; died 1090.
    Children:
    1. 17666. Aubrey de Vere, II was born ~ 1085, (Normandy, France); died 0May 1141, (Thrapston, Northamptonshire, England).

  5. 35334.  Gilbert Fitz Richard, Knight, 2nd Lord of Clare was born > 1066, Clare, Suffolk, England; died 0___ 1117; was buried , Tonbridge Priory, Kent, England.

    Notes:

    Gilbert Fitz Richard (c.?1066–c.?1117), was styled de Clare, de Tonbridge, and Lord of Clare. He was a powerful Anglo-Norman baron who was granted the Lordship of Cardigan, in Wales c.?1107-1111.

    Life

    Gilbert, born before 1066, was the second son and an heir of Richard Fitz Gilbert of Clare and Rohese Giffard.[1] He succeeded to his father's possessions in England in 1088 when his father retired to a monastery;[2] his brother, Roger Fitz Richard, inherited his father's lands in Normandy.[3] That same year he, along with his brother Roger, fortified his castle at Tonbridge against the forces of William Rufus. But his castle was stormed, Gilbert was wounded and taken prisoner.[4] However he and his brother were in attendance on king William Rufus at his death in August 1100.[4] He was with Henry I at his Christmas court at Westminster in 1101.[4]

    It has been hinted, by modern historians, that Gilbert, as a part of a baronial conspiracy, played some part in the suspicious death of William II.[5] Frank Barlow points out that no proof has been found he had any part in the king's death or that a conspiracy even existed.[5]

    In 1110, King Henry I took Cardigan from Owain ap Cadwgan, son of Cadwgan ap Bleddyn as punishment for a number of crimes including that of the abduction of Nest, wife of Gerald de Windsor.[6] In turn Henry gave the Lordship of Cardigan, including Cardigan Castle to Gilbert Fitz Richard.[7] He founded the Clunic priory at Stoke-by-Clare, Suffolk.[7] Gilbert died in or before 1117.[7][8]

    Family

    About 1088,[9] Gilbert married Adeliza/Alice de Claremont, daughter of Hugh, Count of Clermont, and Margaret de Roucy.[8] Gilbert and Adeliza had at least eight children:

    Richard Fitz Gilbert de Clare, d. 1136.[10]
    Gilbert Fitz Gilbert de Clare, d. 1148, 1st Earl of Pembroke.[10]
    Baldwin Fitz Gilbert de Clare, d. 1154, m. Adeline de Rollos.[11]
    Adelize/Alice de Clare, d. 1163, m. (ca. 1105), Aubrey II de Vere, son of Aubrey I de Vere and Beatrice.[12] She had 9 children and in her widowhood was a corrodian at St. Osyth's, Chich, Essex.
    Hervey de Clare, Lord of Montmorency.[13]
    Walter de Clare, d. 1149.[14]
    Margaret de Clare, d. 1185, m. (ca. 1108), Sir William de Montfitchet, Lord of Stansted Mountfitchet.[15]
    Rohese de Clare, d. 1149, m. (ca. 1130), Baderon of Monmouth[16]

    end

    Gilbert married Adeliza de Claremont. [Group Sheet]


  6. 35335.  Adeliza de Claremont

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Adeliza de Breteuil

    Children:
    1. Richard Fitz Gilbert de Clare was born 1092, Clare, Suffolk, England; died 15 Apr 1136, Abergavenny, Monmouthshire, Wales.
    2. 17667. Adeliza de Clare was born ~1093, Risbridge, Suffolk, England; died 1 Nov 1163, St Osyth Priory, Essex, England.
    3. Agnes Clare was born ~ 1091, Clare, Suffolk, England; died 1115.
    4. 17676. Gilbert de Clare, Knight, 1st Earl of Pembroke was born ~ 1100, Tonbridge, Kent, England; died 6 Jan 1148.

  7. 35340.  Robert de Beaumont, Knight, 1st Earl of Leicester was born ~ 1049, Meulan, Yvelines, Ile-De-France, France (son of Roger de Beaumont and Adeline of Meulan); died 5 Jun 1118.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Count of Meulan
    • Also Known As: Robert Beaumont
    • Also Known As: Robert of Meulan
    • Military: Battle of Hastings, 1066

    Notes:

    Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Leicester (Sometime between 1040 & 1050 – 5 June 1118), also known as Robert of Meulan, count of Meulan, was a powerful Norman nobleman, one of the Companions of William the Conqueror during the Norman Conquest of England, and was revered as one of the wisest men of his age. Chroniclers spoke highly of his eloquence, his learning, and three kings of England valued his counsel.

    Biography

    He was born between 1040-1050, the eldest son of Roger de Beaumont (1015-1094) by his wife Adeline of Meulan (died 1081), a daughter of Waleran III, Count de Meulan, and was an older brother of Henry de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Warwick (c. 1050-1119)

    Robert de Beaumont was one of only about 15 of the Proven Companions of William the Conqueror at the Battle of Hastings in 1066, and was leader of the infantry on the right wing of the Norman army, as evidenced in the following near contemporary account by William of Poitiers:

    "A certain Norman, Robert, son of Roger of Beaumont, being nephew and heir to Henry, Count of Meulan, through Henry's sister Adeline, found himself that day in battle for the first time. He was as yet but a young man and he performed feats of valour worthy of perpetual remembrance. At the head of a troop which he commanded on the right wing he attacked with the utmost bravery and success".[1]

    His service earned him the grant of more than 91 English manors confiscated from the defeated English, as listed in the Domesday Book of 1086.

    When his mother died in 1081, Robert inherited the title of Count of Meulan in Normandy, and the title, Viscount Ivry and Lord of Norton. He paid homage to King Philip I of France for these estates and sat as a French Peer in the Parliament held at Poissy.

    He and his brother Henry were members of the Royal hunting party in the New Forest in Hampshire when King William II Rufus (1087-1100) was shot dead accidentally by an arrow on 2 August 1100. He pledged allegiance to William II's brother, King Henry I (1100-1135), who created him Earl of Leicester in 1107.

    On the death of William Rufus, William, Count of âEvreux and Ralph de Conches made an incursion into Robert's Norman estates, on the pretence they had suffered injury through some advice that Robert had given to the king; their raid was successful and they collected a vast booty.

    During the English phase of the Investiture Controversy, he was excommunicated by Pope Paschal II on 26 March 1105 for advising King Henry to continue selecting the bishops of his realm in opposition to the canons of the church. Sometime in 1106, Henry succeeded in having Anselm, the exiled archbishop of Canterbury, revoke this excommunication. Anselm's (somewhat presumptuous) act was ultimately ratified by Paschal.

    According to Henry of Huntingdon, Robert died of shame after "a certain earl carried off the lady he had espoused, either by some intrigue or by force and stratagem." He was the last surviving Norman nobleman to have fought in the Battle of Hastings.[2]

    Family

    In 1096 he married Elizabeth (or Isabel) de Vermandois, daughter of Hugh Magnus (1053-1101) a younger son of the French king and Adelaide, Countess of Vermandois (1050-1120). After his death Elizabeth remarried in 1118 to William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey. He had the following progeny:

    Waleran IV de Beaumont, Count of Meulan, 1st Earl of Worcester (b. 1104), eldest twin and heir.
    Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester & Earl of Hereford (b. 1104), twin
    Hugh de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Bedford (b. circa 1106)
    Emma de Beaumont (born 1102)
    Adeline de Beaumont, married twice:
    Hugh IV of Montfort-sur-Risle;
    Richard de Granville of Bideford (d. 1147)
    Aubree de Beaumont, married Hugh II of Chăateauneuf-Thimerais.
    Agnes de Beaumont, a nun
    Maud de Beaumont, married William Lovel. (b. c. 1102)
    Isabel de Beaumont, a mistress of King Henry I. Married twice:
    Gilbert de Clare, 1st Earl of Pembroke;
    Hervâe de Montmorency, Constable of Ireland

    Sources

    icon Normandy portal
    Edward T. Beaumont, J.P. The Beaumonts in History. A.D. 850-1850. Oxford.
    References[edit]
    Jump up ^ Wm. of Poitiers, per Douglas (1959), p.227
    Jump up ^ Edward T. Beaumont, J.P. The Beaumonts in History. A.D. 850-1850. Oxford.

    end

    Robert married Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester ~ 1096. Isabel (daughter of Hugues de France, Count of Vermandois and Adelaide of Vermandois) was born 13 Dec 1081, Basse-Normandie, France; died 17 Feb 1131, France; was buried , Lewes Priory, Southover, Sussex, England. [Group Sheet]


  8. 35341.  Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester was born 13 Dec 1081, Basse-Normandie, France (daughter of Hugues de France, Count of Vermandois and Adelaide of Vermandois); died 17 Feb 1131, France; was buried , Lewes Priory, Southover, Sussex, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Elizabeth de Vermandois
    • Also Known As: Isabel Capet

    Notes:

    Birth: 1081
    Basse-Normandie, France
    Death: Feb. 17, 1131, France

    Countess of Leicester, Countess of Surrey

    Third daughter of Hugh Magnus and Adelaide of Vermandois, granddaughter of King Henry I of France and Anne of Kiev, Herbert IV, Count of Vermandois, and Adele of Valois. She was the heiress of the county of Vermandois and descendant of Charlemagne.

    Wife of Sir Robert de Beaumont, Count of Meulan, the son of Roger de Beaumont and Adeline of Meulan; Isabel became the Countess of Leicester. They married about 1096 and had three sons and at least five daughters:
    * Emma b 1101, probably died young
    * Waleran IV de Beaumont, Count of Meulan, twin
    * Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester, twin
    * Hugh de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Bedford
    * Adeline, wife of Hugh Montfort & Richard de Granville
    * Aubree, wife of Hugh II of Chăateauneuf-en-Thimerais
    * Maud, wife of William Lovel
    * Isabel, mistress of King Henry I, wife of Gilbert de Clare and mother of Richard Strongbow & wife of Hervâe de Montmorency

    Secondly, the wife of William de Warenne, son of William de Warenne, 1st Earl of Surrey and his first wife Gundred; Isabel became the Countess of Surrey. They married in 1118 and had three sons and two daughters:
    * William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey
    Ralph de Warenne
    * Reginald de Warenne
    * Gundrada de Warenne, wife of Roger de Beaumont& William de Lancaster
    * Ada de Warenne, wife of Henry of Scotland, 3rd Earl of Huntingdon, mother King Malcolm IV and King William I 'the Lion'

    Sir Robert de Beaumont, described as being "the wisest man in his time between London and Jerusalem", and aged over fifty was determined to marry Isabel, aged about eleven. Bishop Ivo dismissed their request based on their being within a few degrees of kindred. Isabel's father was able to sway Bishop Ivo, and saw his daughter married by April of 1096 when he left on a crusade.

    In 1115, Isabel was either carried away or willingly abducted by William de Warrene, revealing they had been lovers for some time. They were unable to marry until the death of Sir Robert, which occurred in 1118.

    The Beaumont sons were on opposite sides of support for King Stephen and Queen Matilda, but were not enemies.

    Sources vary on her death, reported as 1131 to outliving William who died in 1138.

    Family links:
    Parents:
    Hugues de France (1057 - 1102)

    Spouses:
    Robert de Beaumont (1049 - 1118)
    William II de Warenne (1065 - 1138)

    Children:
    Waleran de Beaumont (1104 - 1166)*
    Robert de Beaumont (1104 - 1168)*
    Reginald de Warenne (1113 - 1179)*
    William de Warenne (1118 - 1148)*
    Ada De Warenne De Huntingdon (1120 - 1178)*

    Sibling:
    Isabel Of Vermandois Beaumont de Warenne (1081 - 1131)
    Raoul I de Vermandois (1094 - 1152)*

    *Calculated relationship

    Burial:
    Lewes Priory
    Lewes
    Lewes District
    East Sussex, England

    end

    Children:
    1. Waleran de Beaumont, IV was born 1104, (Meulan, France); died 9 Apr 1166, Preaux, France.
    2. 17670. Robert de Beaumont, Knight, 2nd Earl of Leicester was born 0___ 1104, (Meulan, France); died 5 Apr 1168, Brackley, Northamptonshire, England.
    3. 17677. Isabel de Beaumont

  9. 35348.  Edward of Salisbury was born BY 1045, Normandy, France; died , Denbighshire, Wales.

    Other Events:

    • Residence: Salisbury, Wiltshire, England
    • Also Known As: Edward Evreux
    • Occupation: 0___ 1081; Vicecomitem (sheriff)

    Notes:

    Birth: unknown
    Haute-Normandie, France
    Death: unknown
    Denbighshire, Wales

    Born by 1045, he seems, by virtue of his wide land holdings, to have been well placed among the followers of William the Conqueror. He was called "vicecomitem" [sheriff] of Wiltshire in a charter dated 1081.

    Family links:
    Children:
    Walter Fitz Edward (1091 - 1147)*

    *Calculated relationship

    Burial:
    Unknown

    Created by: Darrel Salisbury
    Record added: Aug 06, 2014
    Find A Grave Memorial# 133948641

    end

    Edward married Maud Fitz Hurbert. [Group Sheet]


  10. 35349.  Maud Fitz Hurbert

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Matilda FitzHubert

    Children:
    1. 17674. Walter of Salisbury was born 0___ 1087, Salisbury, Wiltshire, England; died 0___ 1147, Bradenstoke, Wiltshire, England; was buried , Bradenstoke, Wiltshire, England.
    2. Maud of Salisbury

  11. 35356.  Donnchad Enna Mac Murchada was born 0___ 1085, Dublin, Leinster, Ireland (son of Murchad Macdairmata Murchada and Sadb Ingen Mac Bricc); died 8 Dec 1115, Wexford, Ireland.

    Donnchad married Orlaith Ingen O'Brien, Queen of Leinster. Orlaith (daughter of Gilla Michil O'Brien and Luchdelb Hui Garbita) was born 0___ 1080, Dublin, Leinster, Ireland; died 0___ 1113, Dublin, Leinster, Ireland. [Group Sheet]


  12. 35357.  Orlaith Ingen O'Brien, Queen of Leinster was born 0___ 1080, Dublin, Leinster, Ireland (daughter of Gilla Michil O'Brien and Luchdelb Hui Garbita); died 0___ 1113, Dublin, Leinster, Ireland.
    Children:
    1. 17678. Dermot Dairmait Mac Murchada, King of Leinster was born 0___ 1110, Dublin, Ireland; died 1 May 1171, Ireland.

  13. 36006.  Fulk FitzWarin was born Bef 1178; died Aft 8 Oct 1250.

    Fulk married Maud le Vavasour, Baroness Butler. Maud was born 24 Jun 1176, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1225. [Group Sheet]


  14. 36007.  Maud le Vavasour, Baroness Butler was born 24 Jun 1176, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1225.

    Notes:

    Maud le Vavasour, Baroness Butler (c. June 24 1176 – 1225) was an Anglo-Norman heiress and the wife of Fulk FitzWarin,[1] a medieval landed gentleman who was forced to become an outlaw in the early 13th century. Part of the legend of Robin Hood might be based on him.

    By her first marriage to Theobald Walter, 1st Baron Butler, Maud was the ancestress of the Butler Earls of Ormond.


    The legend of Robin Hood and Maid Marian is allegedly based on Fulk FitzWarin and Maud le Vavasour

    Family

    Maud le Vavasour was the daughter of Robert le Vavasour, deputy sheriff of Lancashire (1150–1227), and his first wife, an unnamed daughter of Adam de Birkin.[2] She had a half-brother, Sir John le Vavasour who married Alice Cockfield, by whom he had issue. Maud's paternal grandfather was William le Vavasour, Lord of Hazlewood, and Justiciar of England. Her maternal grandfather was Adam fitz Peter of Birkin.

    Maud was heiress to properties in Edlington, Yorkshire and Narborough in Leicestershire.

    She is a matrilineal ancestor of Anne Boleyn, Queen of England and second wife to King Henry VIII of England.

    Marriages and issue

    In or shortly before 1200, Maud married her first husband Theobald Walter, 1st Baron Butler (died February 1206), son of Hervey Walter and Maud de Valoignes, and went to live in Ireland. His brother Hubert Walter was Archbishop of Canterbury. In 1185, Theobald had been granted land by Prince John, who was then Lord of Ireland. He was appointed Butler of Ireland in 1192,[3] and High Sheriff of Lancashire in 1194.

    Theobald and Maud had three children:

    a female (dead by 1240), married as his first wife Sir Gerald de Prendergast by whom she had issue, including Marie de Prendergast, who in her turn married Sir John de Cogan and had issue. We know about her only because a later inquisition claimed that Gerald married a "sister of Theobald pincerna", no name is given to her, and no dates.

    Theobald le Botiller, chief Butler of Ireland (by 1199 - 19 July 1230), who married firstly Joan du Marais, daughter of Geoffrey du Marais and Eva de Bermingham, and had a son Theobald le Botiller (1224–1248), who married Margery de Burgh, daughter of Richard Mor de Burgh, Lord of Connacht, and Egidia de Lacy (daughter of Walter de Lacy and Margaret de Braose), and from whom descended the Earls of Ormond. Theobald le Botiller, chief Butler of Ireland married secondly, after 4 September 1225, Rohese de Verdon (1205- 10 February 1247), daughter of Nicholas de Verdon and Joan de Lacy, by whom he had a son and daughter: John le Botiller de Verdon, Lord of Westmeath (1226–1274), who married Margery de Lacy (1229- after 10 June 1276), by whom he had issue, and Maud le Botiller de Verdon, who upon her marriage to John Fitzalan became the 6th Countess of Arundel, and from whom descended the Fitzalan Earls of Arundel.

    Following the death of Theobald in early February 1206, Maud returned to England into the custody of her father, who, having bought the right of marrying her at the price of 1200 marks and two palfreys, gave her in marriage by October 1207, to Fulk FitzWarin.[4] Fulk was the son of Fulk FitzWarin and Hawise de Dinan, who subsequent to a violent quarrel with King John of England, was deprived of his lands and property by the vengeful king. Fulk then sought refuge in the woods and became an outlaw, with Maud having accompanied him. The legendary figures of Robin Hood and Maid Marian are said to be based on Fulk and Maud.[5] Maud died in 1226 and Fulke III married again to Clarice D'Auberville.

    By FitzWarin, Maud had two sons and three daughters

    Fulk IV

    Fulk Glas

    Hawise, wife of William Pantulf

    Joanna

    Mabel

    *

    Children:
    1. 18003. Hawise FitzWarin was born 3 Feb 1210, Shropshire, England; died Abt 1253.

  15. 36068.  Henry of Scotland was born 0___ 1114, (Scotland) (son of David I of Scotland, King of the Scots and Maud of Huntingdon, Queen Consort of Scotland); died 12 Jun 1152; was buried , Kelso Abbey, Scotland.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: 3rd Earl of Huntingdon
    • Also Known As: Earl of Northumbria

    Notes:

    Henry of Scotland (Eanric mac Dabâid, 1114 – 12 June 1152[1]) was heir apparent to the Kingdom of Alba. He was also the 3rd Earl of Northumberland and the 3rd Earl of Huntingdon. He was the son of King David I of Scotland and Queen Maud, 2nd Countess of Huntingdon.[2] Henry was named after his uncle, King Henry I of England, who had married his paternal aunt Edith.

    Earldom

    David, Henry's father, invaded England in 1136. His army was met by Stephen of Blois at Carlisle. Instead of battle, there was a negotiated settlement that included Henry performing homage to Stephen for Carlisle and the Earldom of Huntingdon.[3] Henry's journey to Stephen's court for Easter (1136) was met with resentment, including an accusation of treason,[4] which brought about his return at his father's insistence.[4]

    After another invasion by his father, Henry was finally invested with the Earldom of Northumberland in 1139.[5] Later in the year, Henry met with Stephen at Nottingham, where he was also reinvested with Carlisle and Cumberland.[5] At which time Henry paid homage to Stephen for his Earldom.[5]

    Henry's inclusion into King Stephen's inner circle was highlighted by his arranged marriage to Ada de Warenne.[6] This marriage secured Henry's place within Stephen's kingdom.[6] Following Stephen's capture by forces of Empress Matilda, Henry held the Earldom of Northumberland as a Scottish fief.[7]

    On Henry's death, the Earldom passed to his half-brother Simon II de Senlis.

    Family

    In 1139, Henry married Ada de Warenne,[1] the daughter of William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey (died 1138), and Elizabeth of Vermandois, daughter of Hugh of Vermandois.

    Ada of Huntingdon (1139–1206), married in 1161, Floris III, Count of Holland.[2]
    Margaret of Huntingdon (1145–1201)
    Married [1] in 1160 Conan IV, Duke of Brittany, (died 1171)[8]
    Married [2] Humphrey III de Bohun, Lord of Trowbridge.
    Married [3] Sir William fitz Patrick de Hertburn
    Malcolm IV of Scotland.[2]
    William I of Scotland.[2]
    David of Scotland, 8th Earl of Huntingdon.[2]
    Matilda of Huntingdon, born and died 1152.
    Marjorie of Huntingdon, married Gille Crâist, Earl of Angus.

    end of biography

    Henry married Ada de Warenne 0___ 1139, England. Ada (daughter of William de Warenne, Knight, 2nd Earl of Surrey and Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester) was born ~ 1120, Surry, England; died 0___ 1178, England. [Group Sheet]


  16. 36069.  Ada de Warenne was born ~ 1120, Surry, England (daughter of William de Warenne, Knight, 2nd Earl of Surrey and Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester); died 0___ 1178, England.

    Notes:

    Ada de Warenne (or Adeline de Varenne) (c. 1120 – 1178) was the Anglo-Norman wife of Henry of Scotland, Earl of Northumbria and Earl of Huntingdon. She was the daughter of William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey by Elizabeth of Vermandois, and a great-granddaughter of Henry I of France. She became mother to two Kings of Scots, Malcolm the Maiden and William the Lion.

    Marriage and motherhood

    Ada and Henry were married in England in 1139.[1] They had seven children:

    Malcolm IV, King of Scots.
    William the Lion, King of Scots
    Margaret of Huntingdon married 1) Conan IV, Duke of Brittany and 2) Humphrey III de Bohun.[2]
    David of Scotland, Earl of Huntingdon married Mathilda (Maud) of Chester. Through their daughter, Isobel, they were the direct ancestors of the renowned Scottish King, Robert the Bruce.
    Matilda of Huntingdon, born and died 1152.
    Marjorie of Huntingdon, married Gille Crâist, Earl of Angus.
    Ada of Huntingdon, married Count Floris III of Holland.
    As part of her marriage settlement, the new Countess Ada was granted the privileges of Haddington, amongst others in East Lothian. Previously the seat of a thanage Haddington is said to be the first Royal burgh in Scotland, created by Countess Ada's father-in-law, David I of Scotland, who held it along with the church and a mill.[3]

    In close succession both her husband and King David died, in 1152 and 1153 respectively. Following the death of Henry, who was buried at Kelso Abbey, King David arranged for his grandson to succeed him, and at Scone on 27 May 1153, the twelve-year-old was declared Malcolm IV, King of Scots. Following his coronation, Malcolm installed his brother William as Earl of Northumbria (although this county was "restored" to King Henry II of England by Malcolm in 1157[4]), and the young dowager-Countess retired to her lands at Haddington.

    On Thursday 9 December 1165[5] King Malcolm died at the age of 25 without issue. His mother had at that time been attempting to arrange a marriage between him and Constance, daughter of Conan III, Duke of Brittany, but Malcolm died before the wedding could be celebrated.[6]

    Following his brother's death Ada's younger son William became King of Scots at the age of twenty two. William the Lion was to become the longest serving King of Scots until the Union of the Crowns in 1603.

    Church patroness

    Religious houses were established in Haddington at an early date. They came to include the Blackfriars (who came into Scotland in 1219) and most notably the Church of the Greyfriars, or Minorites (came into Scotland in the reign of Alexander II), which would become famous as "Lucerna Laudoniae"- The Lamp of Lothian, the toft of land upon which it stands being granted by King David I of Scotland to the Prior of St. Andrews (to whom the patronage of the church of Haddington belonged). David I also granted to the monks of Dunfermline "unam mansuram" in Haddington, as well as to the monks of Haddington a full toft "in burgo meo de Hadintun, free of all custom and service."[7]

    Ada devoted her time to good works, improving the lot of the Church at Haddington, where she resided. Countess Ada gave lands to the south and west of the River Tyne near to the only crossing of the river for miles, to found a Convent of Cistercian Nuns ("white nuns"[8]) dedicated to St. Mary, in what was to become the separate Burgh of Nungate, the extant remains are still to be seen in the ruined parish church of St. Martin. The nunnery she endowed with the lands of Begbie, at Garvald and Keith Marischal amongst other temporal lands. Miller, however, states that she only "founded and richly endowed a nunnery at the Abbey of Haddington" and that "Haddington, as demesne of the Crown, reverted to her son William the Lion upon her death".[3]

    Haddington seat

    According to inscriptions within the town of Haddington, Countess Ada's residence was located near the present day County buildings and Sheriff Court. Countess Ada died in 1178[9] and is thought to be buried locally. Her remaining dower-lands were brought back into the Royal desmesne and William the Lion's wife, Ermengarde de Beaumont, is said to have taken to her bed in Countess Ada's house to bear the future Alexander II. Miller states that when the future King was born in Haddington in 1198 it took place "in the palace of Haddington".[10]

    Ancestry

    [show]Ancestors of Ada de Warenne

    Notes

    Jump up ^ Anderson, Alan O., Scottish Annals from English Chroniclers AD500 – 1286, London, 1908: 215.
    Jump up ^ Richardson, Douglas, Magna Carta Ancestry, Baltimore, Md, 2005: 99. ISBN 0-8063-1759-0
    ^ Jump up to: a b Miller, James, The Lamp of Lothian, Haddington, 1900: 2
    Jump up ^ Anderson, Alan O., Scottish Annals from English Chroniclers AD500 – 1286, London, 1908: 239.
    Jump up ^ Anderson, Alan O., Scottish Annals from English Chroniclers AD500 – 1286, London, 1908: 243.
    Jump up ^ Oram, The Canmores, p. 51.
    Jump up ^ Miller, James, The Lamp of Lothian, Haddington, 1900: 173
    Jump up ^ Anderson, Alan O., Scottish Annals from English Chroniclers AD500 – 1286, London, 1908: 327.
    Jump up ^ Dunbar, Archibald Scottish Kings, 1899: 65.
    Jump up ^ Miller, James, The Lamp of Lothian, Haddington, 1900: 4

    References

    The Royal Families of England, Scotland, and Wales, with their descendants, Sovereigns and Subjects, by Messrs. John and John Bernard Burke, London, 1851, vol.2, page xlvii and pedigree XXIX.
    Miscellanea Genealogica et Heraldica, edited by Joseph Jackson Howard, LL.D.,F.S.A., New Series, volume I, London, 1874, p. 337.
    Scottish Kings – A Revised Chronology of Scottish History 1005–1625 by Sir Archibald H. Dunbar, Bt., Edinburgh, 1899, p. 65.
    Oram, Richard, The Canmores: Kings & Queens of the Scots 1040–1290. Tempus, Stroud, 2002. ISBN 0-7524-2325-8
    The Bretons, by Patrick Galliou and Michael Jones, Oxford, 1991, p. 191. ISBN 0-631-16406-5

    Children:
    1. 18034. William, I, King of the Scots was born ~ 1143, (Scotland); died 4 Dec 1214, Stirling, Scotland; was buried , Arbroath Abbey, Scotland.
    2. David of Scotland, Earl of Huntingdon was born 0___ 1152, (Scotland); died 17 Jun 1219.
    3. Margaret of Huntingdon, Duchess of Brittany was born 0___ 1145; died 0___ 1201.

  17. 36070.  Robert Avenel, Lord of Eskdale was born ~ 1115, Normandy, France; died 8 Mar 1185, Langholm, Dumfries, Scotland.

    Notes:

    Name: Robert AVENEL Lord of Eskdale 1 2
    Sex: M
    Birth: ABT 1115 in Normandy
    ALIA: Richard de AVENAL
    Title: Sir
    Death: 08 MAR 1185 in Langholm, Dumfries-shire, Scotland
    Name: Robert AVENEL 3 4
    Birth: ABT 1110 in of Sandhurst, Gloucestershire, England
    Death: AFT 1180 in of Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland



    Marriage 1 SIBYL b: ABT 1120 in Scotland
    Children
    Has Children Unknownl AVENEL b: ABT 1140 in Langholm, Dumfries-shire, Scotland
    Has No Children Cleric Robert Avenel b: ABT 1152 in Langholm, Dumfries-shire, Scotland
    Has Children Gervase AVENEL Lord of Eskdale b: ABT 1150 in Langholm, Dumfries-shire, Scotland
    Has No Children John Avenel b: ABT 1155 in Langholm, Dumfries-shire, Scotland

    Sources:
    Author: Catherine Lucy Wilhilmina Stanhope Powlett
    Title: The Battle Abbey Roll with Some Account of the Norman Lineages
    Publication: Name: 1889 J. Murray;
    Repository:
    Name: Google Book

    Page: 353-354
    Text: n 1169, Robert Avenel witnessed another donation to this Priory, and the foundation charter of Welbeck Abbey.
    Title: John P. Ravilious -soc.genealogy.medieval, at groups - google.com
    Repository:
    Name: soc.genealogy.medieval, at groups - google.com

    Note:
    Source Medium: Internet
    Page: 6/11/2007
    Text:

    First, the relationship of the Avenels of Eskdale, and their Graham descendants, to the Avenel paramour of William 'the Lion', King of Scots (d. 1214) is reflected in the following chart.

    This does not provide any other relationship to the royal house of Scotland (the Comyn ancestry of the Grahams aside), but it does show a near kinship with the de Ros family, of Helmsley, Wark, &c. Sir William de Ros of Helmsley (d. ca. 1264) and his brother, Sir Robert de Ros of Wark, were in fact 2nd cousins of the Avenel wife of Sir Henry de Graham of Dalkeith.

    Robert Avenel = Sibyl [Sibilla] lord of Eskdale I d. 8 Mar 1184/5

    I ________I___________
    I I William ~ NN Gervase Avenel = Sibyl 'the Lion' I lord of Eskdale I K of I d. 1219 I Scots
    I I _____I _________________________I_________
    I I I I I Isabel Gervase Roger Robert William = 1) Sir Robert (dvp) lord of clerk de Brus (dsp) Eskdale = 2) Sir Robert d. 1243 I de Ros I __I______________ I I I I Sir William Sir Robert NN = Sir Henry de Graham de Ros of de Ros I of Dalkeith Helmsley of Wark I d. aft 5 Feb 1283/4 d. ca. 1264 d. 1269 I I I I V V V The other item alluded to above involves the Avenel family and their otherwise unidentified relations.

    On 13 June 1213, King John of England ordered a number of hostages of the King of Scotland be released by their hosts, to be delivered to the King (of England) at Portsmouth.

    One such letter is detailed in Bain's Calendar of Documents Pertaining to Scotland, addressed to Saier de Quincy, Earl of Winchester

    [1]. As Bain wrote, there were " Similar letters written to Robert de Vaux concerning the son of William de Vaux; to William de Mobray concerning Nigel son of Philip de Mobray; to William son of Walkelin concerning the son of Gervase Avenel;.."
    [2] There has been much ink spilt in the past concerning such transactions, and the relationships between the hostages and their appointed hosts. In the case of the 1213 transactions, I have seen no hostage-host relationship that did not also involve a known or discernable kinship, save one: that of the son of Gervase Avenel (likely his eldest son Gervase, who ob.v.p. before 1219) and William fitz Walkelin. William fitz Walkelin was most likely a near kinsman of the family of de Ferrers, earls of Derby. He held lands in Stainsby, Derbyshire, which he had obtained from Henry II in 1170, and is recorded as continuing in his tenure there in 1212
    [3]. He died sometime before 4 April 1218, when Robert (le) Savage, husband of his deceased daughter Hawise, fined to have seisin of her lands in Lincolnshire [4]. One interesting possibility would place Sibyl, the mother of Gervase Avenel 'the elder', as a daughter of William de Ferrers, earl of Derby and his wife Sibyl de Braose. This may be something of a stretch, but the chronology would work. We know that this particular William de Ferrers (d. at Acre before 21 Oct 1190) had a kinsman, Henry son of Robert son of Wakelin, to whom he granted lands of his aunt Letitia de Ferrers in Passenham. Further, Earl William allegedly had a brother Walkelin, the father of Robert fitz Walkelin, ancestor of the Chaundos family (see SGM archives on this).

    The possiblity that William fitz Walkelin was a brother of this Robert would make it chronologically feasible (although not nearly proven) that Gervase Avenel's son - possibly a great-nephew of Earl William (d. 1190) and his brother Walkelin - was being hosted by Earl William's nephew William fitz Walkelin, a first cousin to Gervase Avenel in June 1213. The identifiation of the parentage of William fitz Wakelin, and of his potential kinswoman (presumably Sibyl, mother or wife of Gervase Avenel) would be of great interest to the Graham and Douglas descendants of the Avenels, and also to the Savage descendants of William fitz Wakelin. Should anyone have additional thoughts or documentation that either support or refute the above conjecture, that would be of great interest.

    Cheers, John *

    NOTES [1] Bain, Calendar of Documents Pertaining to Scotland I:100-101, cites Foedera I:113; and Close Roll 15 John, p. 1, m. 4. : ' 574. Concerning the K. of Scotland's hostages. The K. to S[aher] earl of Winchester.
    Title: Society of Genealogists, London-Woodward MSS
    Title: Ancestral Roots by Weis-7th edition-GPC
    Note:
    Source Medium: Book

    Robert married Sibyl LNU. Sibyl was born ~ 1120, Scotland. [Group Sheet]


  18. 36071.  Sibyl LNU was born ~ 1120, Scotland.
    Children:
    1. 18035. Isabel d'Avenel was born ~ 1143; died 0___ 1234, Castle Stirling, Stirling, Stirlingshire, Scotland.

  19. 36074.  Miles of Gloucester, Knight, 1st Earl of Hereford was born 1092-1100, Gloucestershire, England; died 24 Dec 1143.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Constable of England
    • Occupation: High Sheriff of Gloucester
    • Also Known As: Lord Brecknock
    • Also Known As: Miles FitzWalter de Pitres
    • Also Known As: Milese Gloucester

    Notes:

    Miles FitzWalter of Gloucester, 1st Earl of Hereford, Lord of Brecknock (died 24 December 1143) was High Sheriff of Gloucester and Constable of England.[a]

    Biography

    Miles was the son and heir of Walter of Gloucester, hereditary castellan of Gloucester and sheriff of Gloucester, by Berta, his wife.[1] Miles' grandfather, Roger de Pitres, had been sheriff from about 1071, then was succeeded by his brother Durand, the Domesday sheriff, before 1083.[2] Durand was succeeded by his nephew Walter of Gloucester, c.?1096, who was sheriff in 1097 and in 1105–1106.[2] Walter was in favour with Henry I, three of whose charters to him are extant.[3] Walter held the post of a Constable of England. Early in 1121 his son Miles was given the hand of Sibyl, daughter of Bernard de Neufmarchâe, the conqueror of Brecknock, with the reversion of her father's possessions.[3] In the Pipe Roll of 1130 Walter is found to have been succeeded by his son,[4] having died in or around 1126.[5]

    Miles was (from 1128 at least) sheriff of Gloucestershire, a justice itinerant, and a justice of the forest,[6] and by 1130 was sheriff of Staffordshire.[5] He had also (though the fact has been doubted) been granted his father's office of constable by a special charter.[7] In conjunction with Pain Fitzjohn, sheriff of Herefordshire and Shropshire, he ruled the whole Welsh border "from the Severn to the sea".[8]

    On his accession, King Stephen set himself to secure the allegiance of these two lords-marchers, who at length, on receiving a safe-conduct and obtaining all they asked for, did him homage.[8] It was at Reading that they met the king early in 1136.[b] Miles is next found attending the Easter court at Westminster as one of the royal constables,[9] and, shortly after, the Oxford council in the same capacity.[10] He was then despatched to the aid of the widow of Richard fitz Gilbert de Clare, who was beleaguered in her castle by the Welsh and whom he gallantly rescued.[11]

    Meanwhile, Miles had married his son and heir, Roger, to Cecily, daughter of Pain Fitzjohn, who inherited the bulk of her father's possessions.[12] In the same year 1136 Miles transferred the original house of Augustinian canons at Llanthony Priory, Monmouthshire to a site on the south side of Gloucester, which they named Llanthony Secunda.[13][14]

    Two years later (1138) Miles received, in his official capacity, King Stephen at Gloucester in May.[15] He has been said to have renounced his allegiance a few weeks later,[16] but careful investigation will show that he was with Stephen in August (1138) at the siege of Shrewsbury, and that his defection did not take place till 1139.[17]

    In February 1139 Stephen gave Gloucester Abbey to Miles's kinsman Gilbert Foliot at his request.[18] In the summer of 1139, however, he joined his lord, Robert, Earl of Gloucester, in inviting Empress Matilda to England.[19] On her arrival Miles met her at Bristol, welcomed her to Gloucester, recognised her as his rightful sovereign, and became thenceforth her ardent supporter. She at once gave him St. Briavels Castle and the Forest of Dean.[17]

    Miles's first achievement on behalf of Matilda was to relieve Brian Fitz Count who was blockaded in Wallingford Castle.[20] In November (1139) he again advanced from Gloucester and attacked and burnt Worcester.[21] He also captured the castles of Winchcombe, Cerne, and Hereford.[22] Meanwhile, he was deprived by Stephen of his office of constable.[23] He took part in the victory at Lincoln (2 February 1141),[24] and on the consequent triumph of the empress he accompanied her in her progress, and was one of her three chief followers on her entry (2 March) into Winchester.[25] He was with her at Reading when she advanced on London,[26] and on reaching St. Albans Matilda bestowed on him a house at Westminster.[27] He was among those who fled with her from London shortly after, and it was on his advice, when they reached Gloucester, that she ventured back to Oxford.[28] There, on 25 July 1141, she bestowed on him the town and castle of Hereford and made him earl of that shire,[29] as well as the forests of the Hay of Hereford and Trinela[30] in avowed consideration of his faithful service. With singular unanimity hostile chroniclers testify to his devotion to her cause.[22] He even boasted that she had lived at his expense throughout her stay in England.[31]

    As "Earl Miles" he now accompanied her to Winchester,[32] and on the rout of her forces on 14 September 1141 he escaped, with the greatest difficulty, to Gloucester, where he arrived "exhausted, alone, and with scarcely a rag to his back".[33] Towards the end of the year he was in Bristol making a grant to Llanthony Priory in the presence of the Empress Matilda and the Robert, Earl of Gloucester.[34] In 1142 he is proved by charters to have been with the Empress at Oxford and to have received her permission to hold Abergavenny Castle of Brian Fitz Count.[35] It is probably to the summer of this year that he made a formal deed of alliance with the Earl of Gloucester, and as a hostage for the performance of which he gave the Earl his son Mahel.[17]

    In 1143 his pressing want of money wherewith to pay his troops led him to demand large sums from the church lands. Robert de Bethune, Bishop of Hereford, withstood his demands, and, on the Earl invading his lands, excommunicated him and his followers, and laid the diocese under interdict.[36] The Earl's kinsman, Gilbert Foliot (Abbot of Gloucester),[37] appealed to the legate on his behalf against the bishop's severity.[38] On Christmas-eve of this year (1143) the Earl was slain while hunting by an arrow shot at a deer.[39] A dispute at once arose for possession of his body between the canons of Llanthony and the monks of Gloucester. The case was heard before the bishops of Worcester, Hereford, and St. David's, and was terminated by a compromise on 28 December. The Earl was then buried in the chapter-house at Llanthony.[40]

    With his death in 1143, Miles was succeeded by his son and heir, Roger.[17] Roger died without an heir twelve years later in 1155 so the Earldom of Hereford became extinct, but the shrievalty of Hereford and Gloucester passed to his brother Walter. On the death of the latter and two other brothers without issue the family possessions passed to their sisters, Bertha through her marriage bringing Abergavenny to Braose, but Margaret, the eldest sister, taking the bulk (Liber Niger) to the Bohuns afterwards (1199), in recognition of their descent from Miles, earls of Hereford, and constables of England.[41]

    Assessment

    John of Salisbury classes him with Geoffrey de Mandeville and others who were non tam comites regni quam hostes publici. The charge is justified by his public policy; but the materials for appraising his personal character do not exist.[42]

    Family

    In 1121, Miles married Sibyl de Neufmarchâe, daughter of Bernard de Neufmarchâe, Lord of Brecon and Nest, granddaughter of Gruffydd ap Llywelyn.[43] Miles and Sybil's children where:

    Margaret of Hereford,[5][44] married Humphrey II de Bohun, by whom she had issue.
    Bertha of Hereford,[45] married William de Braose before 1150, by whom she had issue.
    Roger Fitzmiles, 2nd Earl of Hereford.[46] Hereditary Sheriff of Gloucestershire until 1155.
    Walter de Hereford[46] died after 1159 in the Holy Land. He was hereditary Sheriff of Gloucestershire in 1155–1157 and High Sheriff of Herefordshire in 1155–1159.
    Henry Fitzmiles Henry of Hereford,[44] died 12 April 1165. He succeeded to the title of Baron Abergavenny in 1141/42.
    William de Hereford.[44] He died before 1160 without issue.
    Mahel de Hereford,[44] died October 1165 at Bronllys Castle, Breconshire, Wales, mortally hurt when a stone dropped from the tower during a fire; died without issue. Buried at Llanthony Priory.
    Lucy of Gloucester,[47] married Herbert FitzHerbert of Winchester, Lord Chamberlain, by whom she had issue. Buried at Llanthony Priory.

    Notes

    Jump up ^ In some sources Miles's name is not translated from the Latin Milo
    Jump up ^ "[This is known] from two charters there tested, one of which was printed by Madox (History of the Exchequer, p. 135), by which Stephen confirms to Miles, 'sicut baroni et justiciario meo', the shrievalty of Gloucestershire, the constableship of Gloucester Castle, and the 'honour' of Brecknock" (Round 1890, p. 438).
    Jump up ^ Cokayne 1926, pp. 451–452.
    ^ Jump up to: a b Morris 1918, p. 154, n. 62.
    ^ Jump up to: a b Round 1890, p. 438 cites Duchy of Lancaster: Royal Charters.
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 438 cites Rot. Pip.. 31 Hen. I.
    ^ Jump up to: a b c Walker 2012, "Gloucester, Miles of".
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 438.
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 438 cites Dugdale MSS.
    ^ Jump up to: a b Round 1890, p. 438 cites Gesta Stephani, p. 17.
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 438 cites Rymer, Fśdera, new ed. i. 16.
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 438 cites Rich. Hexham, p. 149.
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 439 cites Gesta, p. 13.
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 439 cites Duchy Charters.
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 439 cites Mon. Angl. vi. (1), 127, 132.
    Jump up ^ Ward1995, p. 107.
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 439 cites Cont. Flor. Wig. ii. 105.
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 439; Norgate 1887, p. 295.
    ^ Jump up to: a b c d Round 1890, p. 439.
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 439; Norgate 1887, pp. 493, 494.
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 439; Norgate 1887, pp. 294, 295.
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 439 cites Gesta, p. 59.
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 439 cites Cont. Flor. Wig. p. 119.
    ^ Jump up to: a b Round 1890, p. 439 cites Gesta, p. 60.
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 439 cites Cont. Flor. Wig. p. 121.
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 439 cites Gesta, p. 69.
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 439 cites Cont. Flor. Wig. p. 130; Will. Malm. p. 743.
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 439 cites Add. Cart. pp. 19, 576.
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 439 cites Duchy Charters, No. 16.
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 439 cites Cont. Flor. Wig. p. 132.
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 439 cites Fśdera, i. 14.
    Jump up ^ Francis Beaufort Palmer (February 2007), Peerage Law in England, Lawbook Exchange, ISBN 9781584777489, 1584777486 See Appendix, p242; also Theophilus Jones (1805), A history of the county of Brecknock (A history of the county of Brecknock. ed.), Brecknock: Printed and sold by Wm. & Geo. North ... for the author; and sold by J. Booth ... London. p67
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 439 cites Cont. Flor. Wig. p. 133.
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 439 cites Gesta, p. 79
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 439 cites Cont. Flor. Wig. p. 135.
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 439 cites Mon. Angl. vi. 137.
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 439 cites Duchy Charters, No. 17.
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 439 cites Gesta, p. 102; Mon. Angl. vi. (1), 133.
    Jump up ^ Knowles, Brooke & London 1972, p. 52–53.
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 439 cites Foliot, Letters, No. 3.
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 439 cites Symeon of Durham ii. 315; Gervase, i. 126; Gesta, pp. 16, 95, 103.
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 439 cites Gloucester Cartulary, i. lxxv; Foliot, Letters, No. 65.
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 440.
    Jump up ^ Chisholm 1911, pp. 479.
    Jump up ^ Roderick 1968, p. 5.
    ^ Jump up to: a b c d Lundy 2011, p. 10257 cite Cokayne 2000, p. 21
    Jump up ^ Lundy 2011, p. 10257 cite Cokayne 2000a, p. 457
    ^ Jump up to: a b Lundy 2011, p. 10257 cite Cokayne 2000, p. 20
    Jump up ^ Cawley 2012 cites Dugdale 1823, p. 615

    References

    Cawley, Charles (10 April 2012), English Earls 1067–1122: Miles of Gloucester (–1143), Medieval Lands database, Foundation for Medieval Genealogy
    Dugdale, William, Sir (1823), ""Priory of Bergavenny or Abergavenny in Monmouthshire, Cartµ I"", Monasticon Anglicanum, 4 (Revised ed.), London: Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme & Browne, p. 615
    Cokayne, George Edward (1926), Doubleday, H. A.; Walden, Howard de, eds., The Complete Peerage; or, a History of the House of Lords and all its members from the earliest times, 6, London: The St. Catherine Press
    Knowles, David; Brooke, Christopher; London, Veria (1972), The Heads of Religious Houses: England and Wales 940–1216, Cambridge University Press, pp. 52–53, ISBN 0-521-08367-2
    Lundy, Darryl (17 May 2011). "Miles of Gloucester". p. 10257 § 102564. Retrieved November 2012. Check date values in: |access-date= (help)
    Cokayne, George E (2000), The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, 1 (new, reprint in 6 volumes ed.), Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, pp. 20, 21
    Cokayne, George E (2000a), The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, 4 (new, reprint in 6 volumes ed.), Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, p. 457
    Morris, W.A (April 1918), "The Office of Sheriff in the Early Norman Period", The English Historical Review, 33 (130): 145–175, doi:10.1093/ehr/xxxiii.cxxx.145
    Norgate, Kate (1887), England under the Angevin Kings, 1, London: Macmillan
    Roderick, A. J. (June 1968), "Marriage and Politics in Wales, 1066–1282", The Welsh History Review, 4 (1): 1–20
    Ward, Jennifer C (1995), Women of the English nobility and gentry, 1066–1500, Manchester medieval sources series, Manchester: Manchester University Press, p. 107, ISBN 0-7190-4115-5, retrieved 25 October 2010
    Walker, David (May 2012) [2004]. "Gloucester, Miles of, earl of Hereford (d. 1143)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/10820. (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
    B Thorpe, 1848–1849) (ed.), Continuation of Florence of Worcester
    The Cartulary of Gloucester Abbey (Rolls series);
    Round, John Horace (1892), Geoffrey de Mandeville
    Domesday Book, (Record Commission);
    Rymer, Thomas, Fśdera, (Record Commission), i (new ed.);
    Pipe Roll, 31 Hen. I (Record Commission);
    Cartulary of St. Peter's, Gloucester, (Rolls Ser.);
    Symeon of Durham, Regum Historia, (Rolls Ser.);
    "Gesta Stephani", Chronicles of the Reigns of Stephen, &c, (Rolls Ser.), ii;
    Gervase of Canterbury, Chronica, (Rolls Ser.);
    Florence of Worcester (1848–49), Thorpe, Benjamin, ed., Florentii Wigorniensis monachi Chronicon ex chronicis (2 volumes ed.), English Historical Society
    William of Malmesbury, Chronicle of the Kings of England: From the Earliest Period to the Reign of King Stephen, English Historical Society;
    Dugdale, Sir William, Westrum Monasticum, Bodleian Library;
    Additional Charters, (British Museum);
    Duchy of Lancaster Charters, Public Record Office;
    Dugdale, William, Sir (1823), Monasticon Anglicanum
    Madox, Thomas, History of the Exchequer;
    Hearne, Thomas, ed. (1728), Liber Niger Scaccarii;
    Foliot, Gilbert, "Letters", in Giles, John Allen, Patres Ecclesiµ Anglicanµ;
    Crawley-Boevey, Arthur William, Cartulary of Flaxley Abbey;
    Ellis, A. S. (1879–1880). "On the Landholders of Gloucestershire named in Domesday Book". Bristol and Gloucestershire Archaeological Society. 4 vol.: 86–198.
    Walker, David (1958). "Miles of Gloucester, Earl of Hereford". Transactions of the Bristol and Gloucestershire Archaeological Society. 77: 66–84.

    Miles married Sibyl de Neufmarche, Countess of Hereford 1121, Gloucestershire, England. Sibyl (daughter of Bernard de Neufmarche, Lord of Brecknockshire and Nest Verch Osborn le Scrope) was born ~ 1100, Brecon Castle, Brecon, Wales; died 24 Dec 1143, Llanthony Secunda, Gloucestershire, England; was buried , Llanthony Secunda Priory, Gloucestershire, England. [Group Sheet]


  20. 36075.  Sibyl de Neufmarche, Countess of Hereford was born ~ 1100, Brecon Castle, Brecon, Wales (daughter of Bernard de Neufmarche, Lord of Brecknockshire and Nest Verch Osborn le Scrope); died 24 Dec 1143, Llanthony Secunda, Gloucestershire, England; was buried , Llanthony Secunda Priory, Gloucestershire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Burial: Hempsted, Gloucestershire, England
    • Also Known As: Lady of Brecknock
    • Also Known As: Sybil de Neufmarche NEWMARCH
    • Alt Birth: 0___ 1092, Aberhonddu, Breconshire, Wales

    Notes:

    Sibyl de Neufmarchâe, Countess of Hereford, suo jure Lady of Brecknock (c. 1100 – after 1143), was a Cambro-Norman noblewoman, heiress to one of the most substantial fiefs in the Welsh Marches. The great-granddaughter of Gruffydd ap Llywelyn, king of Wales, Sibyl was also connected to the nobility of England and Normandy. Sibyl inherited the titles and lands of her father, Bernard de Neufmarchâe, Lord of Brecon, after her mother, Nest ferch Osbern, had declared her brother Mahel to have been illegitimate. Most of these estates passed to Sibyl's husband, Miles de Gloucester, 1st Earl of Hereford, as her dowry. Their marriage had been arranged personally by King Henry I of England in the spring of 1121. Sibyl, with her extensive lands, was central to the King's plans of consolidating Anglo-Norman power in south-east Wales by the merging of her estates with those of Miles, his loyal subject on whom he relied to implement Crown policy.

    As an adult, Sibyl lived through King Stephen's turbulent reign, known to history as the Anarchy, in which her husband played a pivotal role. Following Miles' accidental death in 1143, Sibyl entered a religious life at Llanthony Secunda Priory, Gloucestershire, England, which she had endowed up to six years previously. Sibyl is buried at the priory, founded by Miles in 1136.

    Family

    Ancestry

    A small, ruined castle of rough stone comprising two connected, castellated towers, partly covered in ivy, surrounded by much vegetation. Numerous arrowslits indicate the walls to be three to four storeys tall. The upward direction of the image suggests that the castle is at the top of a hill
    Ruins of Brecon castle
    Sibyl's birthplace and a part of her vast inheritance
    Sibyl was born in about 1100 in Brecon Castle, Brecon, Wales, the only daughter of Marcher Lord Bernard de Neufmarchâe, Lord of Brecon, and Nest ferch Osbern.[1][2] Nest was the daughter of Osbern FitzRichard and Nest ferch Gruffydd.[2] Sybil's maternal great-grandparents were Gruffydd ap Llywelyn, king of Wales, and Ealdgyth (Edith of Mercia).[2][3] Ealdgyth, the daughter of Ąlfgar, Earl of Mercia, was briefly Queen consort of England by her second marriage to Harold Godwinson, the last Anglo-Saxon king of England, who was killed at the Battle of Hastings.[4]

    Sibyl's father, Bernard, was born at the castle of Le Neuf-Marchâe-en-Lions, on the frontier between Normandy and Beauvais.[5] Bernard was a knight who had fought under English kings William I, William Rufus and Henry I.[6] According to historian Lynn H Nelson, Bernard de Neufmarchâe was "the first of the original conquerors of Wales".[7] He led the Norman army at the Battle of Brecon in 1093, during which Rhys ap Tewdwr was killed.[6][8] Kingship in Wales ended with Rhys' death, and allowed Bernard to confirm his hold on Brycheiniog, becoming the first ruler of the lordship of Brecon.[8] The title and lands would remain in his family's possession until 1521.[9] The name Neufmarchâe, Novo Mercato in Latin, is anglicised into 'Newmarket' or 'Newmarch'.[10][a][11]

    Inheritance

    Sibyl had two brothers, Philip, who most likely died young, and Mahel. Nest had Mahel disinherited by swearing to King Henry I of England that Mahel had been fathered by another man. According to Giraldus Cambrensis, this was done out of vengeance when Mahel had multilated Nest's lover, a knight whose identity is not disclosed.[10] In the 19th century, Bernard Bolingbroke Woodward proposed that, after Bernard's death, Nest "disgraced herself with an intrigue" with one of his soldiers. Mahel, who had by this time inherited Bernard's estates, disapproved of the liaison to such an extent that he killed Nest's lover. Nest's revenge was to have Mahel disinherited by claiming that Bernard was not Mahel's father.[12] The maritagium (marriage charter) arranged by King Henry I in 1121 for the marriage between Sibyl and her future husband Miles, however, makes it clear that Bernard was still alive when it was written; showing Bernard Bolingbroke Woodward's version of the story to diverge from the known facts.[13] Author Jennifer C. Ward suggests that, although the marriage charter recorded that King Henry was acting at the request of Bernard, Nest, and the barons, it was probable he had put considerable pressure on the Neufmarchâes to disinherit Mahel in favour of Sibyl and, thereby, Miles.[14] Nevertheless, whatever the timing or reason, the outcome of Nest's declaration was that Sibyl (whom Nest acknowledged as Bernard's child) became the sole lawful heiress to the vast Lordship of Brecon, one of the most important and substantial fiefs in the Welsh Marches.[15] Henry's maritagium referred specifically to Sibyl's parents' lands as "comprising Talgarth, the forest of Ystradwy, the castle of Hay, the whole land of Brecknock, up to the boundaries of the land of Richard Fitz Pons,[b] namely up to Brecon and Much Cowarne, a vill in England";[16] the fees and services of several named individuals were also granted as part of the dowry.[16] This made her suo jure Lady of Brecknock on her father's death, and one of the wealthiest heiresses in south Wales.[17][18]

    Marriage

    Medieval illumination

    King Henry I of England who granted Sibyl in marriage to Miles de Gloucester Sometime in April or May 1121, Sibyl married Miles (or Milo) FitzWalter de Gloucester,[19] who on his father's death in 1129, became sheriff of Gloucester,[20] and Constable of England.[21][22] The marriage was personally arranged by King Henry I, to whom Miles was a trusted royal official.[13][23] A charter written in Latin (the maritagium), which dates to 10 April/29 May 1121, records the arrangements for the marriage of Sibyl and Miles.[13][24] Historian C. Warren Hollister found the charter's wording telling, noting that "the king gave the daughter as if he were making a grant of land": "Know that I [King Henry I] have given and firmly granted to Miles of Gloucester Sibyl, daughter of Bernard de Neufmarchâe, together with all the lands of Bernard her father and of her mother after their deaths … ".[13][25] Her parents' lands would be conveyed to Miles after their deaths or earlier during "their life if they so wish".[13] Henry also commanded that the fief's tenants were to pay Miles liege homage as their lord.[13]

    By arranging a series of matrimonial alliances, similar to that between Sibyl and Miles, King Henry I of England transformed "the map of territorial power in south-east Wales". Such arrangements were mutually advantageous. Hollister describes Miles' marriage to Sibyl as having been a "crucial breakthrough in his career". The new lords, in similar positions to Miles, were the King's own loyal vassals, on whom he could rely to implement royal policy.[25][26] Sibyl's father died sometime before 1128 (most probably in 1125), and Miles came into possession of her entire inheritance, which when merged with his own estates, formed one honour.[6][27]

    Children

    Together Sibyl and Miles had eight children:[original research?][28][not in citation given]

    Margaret of Hereford (1122/1123- 6 April 1197), married Humphrey II de Bohun, by whom she had children. She received the office of constable of England and exercised lordship of Herefordshire as a widow until her death.[29]

    Roger Fitzmiles, 2nd Earl of Hereford (before 1125- 22 September 1155). Roger's marriage settlement with Cecily FitzJohn (her first marriage), daughter of Payn FitzJohn and Sibyl de Lacy, was ratified by King Stephen in 1137.[18] The marriage was childless as were Cecily's subsequent marriages.

    Walter de Hereford (died 1159/60), whether he married is unknown; however, Walter departed for Palestine on Michaelmas 1159, and died shortly afterwards without leaving legitimate issue[30][31]

    Henry Fitzmiles (died c.1162), married a woman named Isabella, surname unknown; Henry died without legitimate issue.

    Mahel de Hereford (died 1164), no record of marriage; died without legitimate issue.

    William de Hereford (died 1166), no record of marriage; died without legitimate issue.

    Bertha of Hereford (c.1130-), married William de Braose, 3rd Lord of Bramber, by whom she had issue.

    Lucy of Hereford, Lady of Blaen Llyfni and Bwlch y Dinas (died 1219/20), married Herbert FitzHerbert of Winchester, by whom she had issue.

    The Anarchy

    Medieval illumination
    Stephen of Blois
    whose chaotic reign in England became known as the Anarchy
    After Henry I's death in 1135, the throne of England was seized by Stephen of Blois, a grandson of William I of England. Henry's daughter, Empress Matilda (Maud), also claimed the throne, and had the support of the Marcher Lords. On the death of her husband, the Holy Roman Emperor, Henry V, in 1125, Matilda had returned to England for the first time in 16 years. At the insistence of her father, the barons (including Stephen) swore to uphold Matilda's rights as his heir. Matilda married Geoffrey of Anjou in 1128. They lived together in France, having three sons; the eldest of whom was to become King Henry II of England.[32] Initially, Miles supported Stephen.[33] In about 1136, Stephen granted Sibyl's husband the entire honour of Gloucester and Brecknock, and appointed him Constable of Gloucester Castle,[34] whereby Miles became known as one of Stephen's "henchmen".[33]

    Llanthony Priory had been established near Crucorney, in the Vale of Ewyas, in 1118; Wales' earliest Augustine monastery. Miles' father, Walter de Gloucester, had retired there by 1126.[23] The unrest that had been simmering in Wales during the last years of Henry's reign, boiled over in 1135 on his death. The area around the priory returned to Welsh rule, coming under such “hostile mollestation” from the Welsh that the non-Welsh canons decided to leave.[18][35][36][37] Miles established a new Priory for them in Gloucester, England, which they called Llanthony Secunda, in 1136.[38] Sometime after 1137, Sibyl, together with her husband, made a further endowment to Llanthony Secunda.[34]

    Medieval illumination
    Empress Matilda
    whom Sibyl supported
    in opposition to King Stephen
    Miles transferred his allegiance to Empress Matilda, on her return to England in 1139.Matthew 2002, pp. 95, 96 According to Professor Edmund King, Miles' decision to support Matilda was guided by expediancy rather than principle, and the necessity of joining forces with Matilda's illegitimate half-brother, the powerful Robert, Earl of Gloucester, who was the overlord of some of Miles' fiefs.[17] Stephen stripped Miles of the title 'Constable of England' in punishment for having deserted him. On 25 July 1141, in gratitude for his support and military assistance and, according to historian R.H.C. Davis, possibly to compensate Miles for having appeared to have lost the constableship, Matilda invested him as 1st Earl of Hereford.[39] He also received St. Briavels Castle and the Forest of Dean. At the time Matilda was the de facto ruler of England, Stephen having been imprisoned at Bristol following his capture the previous February after the Battle of Lincoln. Sibyl was styled Countess of Hereford, until Miles' unexpected death over two years later. In 1141, Miles received the honour of Abergavenny from Brien FitzCount, the (likely illegitimate) son of Duke Alan IV of Brittany. This was in appreciation of the skilled military tactics Miles had deployed which had spared Brien's castle of Wallingford during King Stephen's besiegement in 1139/1140. Matilda gave her permission for the transfer.[40]

    During the Anarchy, which the period of Stephen's reign as King of England was to become known, life was greatly disrupted in her husband's lands. Sibyl would have doubtless suffered as a result, especially after Miles' decision to support Matilda's claim to the throne and to oppose Stephen.[33] When Matilda was defeated at Winchester in late 1141, Miles was compelled to return to Gloucester in disgrace: "weary, half-naked and alone".[41] In November of that same year, Stephen was released from prison and restored to the English throne.[18]

    Sibyl's distress would have been heightened in 1143 after the Bishop of Hereford, Robert de Bethune placed an interdict upon Hereford, blocked all the cathedral's entrances with thorns, and excommunicated Miles. In order to raise money to pay his troops and to assist Matilda financially, Miles had imposed a levy on all the churches in his earldom, an act which the bishop had regarded as unlawful.[23][42] When the bishop protested and threatened Miles with excommunication, Miles in response, sent his men to plunder the diocese of its resources.[23] In retaliation against Miles' earlier attacks on the royalist city of Worcester and the castles of Hereford and Wallingford, King Stephen bestowed the title "Earl of Hereford" on Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester; Miles, however, never surrendered the earldom nor the title to Robert de Beaumont.[42]

    Widowhood and death

    While on a deer-hunting expedition in his own Forest of Dean, Sibyl's husband was accidentally shot in the chest by an arrow which killed him on 24 December 1143.[41][43] He had been involved in legal proceedings against the bishop's jurisdiction when he died.[42] Their eldest son, Roger succeeded him in the earldom.[22] In protest against his father's excommunication, Roger remained an outspoken enemy of the Church until close to the end of his life when he entered a Gloucester monastery as a monk.[43][44] After her husband's death, Sibyl entered a religious life at Llanthony Secunda Priory, Gloucester,[38] which she had previously endowed.[34] Sibyl was buried in the same priory,[45] the dates of death and burial unrecorded.[citation needed]

    Sibyl's legacy

    Upon the childless death of Roger in 1155, the Earldom of Hereford fell into abeyance until 1199 when King John bestowed the title on Henry de Bohun, Sibyl's grandson through her eldest daughter, Margaret. As her sons all died without legitimate offspring, Sibyl's three daughters became co-heirs to the Brecon honour, with Bertha, the second daughter, passing Sibyl's inheritance on (through marriage) to the de Braoses, thereby making them one of the most powerful families in the Welsh Marches.[46][47]

    The Brecknock lordship would eventually go to the de Bohuns, by way of Eleanor de Braose. Eleanor, a descendant of Sibyl's through Bertha of Hereford,[c] married Humphrey de Bohun, son of the 2nd Earl of Hereford. Eleanor and Humphrey's son, Humphrey de Bohun, succeeded his grandfather to the titles in 1275.[48]

    Through the advantageous marriages of her daughters, Sibyl was an ancestress of many of England and Ireland's noblest families including among others, the de Bohun's, de Beauchamps, Mortimers, Fitzalans, de Burghs, de Lacy's, and Bonvilles. Four of her descendants, Humphrey de Bohun, 4th Earl of Hereford, Elizabeth de Burgh, 4th Countess of Ulster, Eleanor de Bohun, and Mary de Bohun married into the English royal family, while another, Anne Mortimer was the grandmother of Yorkist kings Edward IV and Richard III. By way of Edward's daughter, Elizabeth of York, every monarch of England and, subsequently, the United Kingdom, from Henry VIII up to and including Elizabeth II, descended from Sibyl de Neufmarchâe, as did the various royal sovereigns of Europe who shared a common descent from Mary, Queen of Scots.[49]

    Notes

    Jump up ^ According to Gerald of Wales, when Bernard witnessed a charter issued by William I in 1086-87, he signed his name in Latin as Bernardus de Novo Mercato (Gerald of Wales, p.88)
    Jump up ^ Richard Fitz Pons was Miles' brother-in-law, being the husband of his sister, Matilda (Cawley 2012a, "English Earls 1067-1122: Matilda"; Cawley 2012b, "Richard FitzPons" cites Round 1888, Part I, 12, p. 20).
    Jump up ^ Cawley 2012d gives the lineage as:
    Bertha daughter of Sibylle de Neufmarchâe married William [II] de Briouse (died after 1175))
    William [III] de Briouse (died 1211)
    Reynold de Briouse (died 1227)
    William de Briouse (hanged 1230)
    Eleanor de Briouse

    end of biography

    Children:
    1. Bertha of Hereford was born 1107, Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England; died ~ 1180, Bramber, Sussex, England.
    2. Margaret of Hereford was born 1122-1123, England; died 6 Apr 1197; was buried , Llanthony Secunda, Gloucestershire, England.
    3. 18037. Lucy FitzMiles was born ~1136, Brecknockshire, Wales; died ~1220.

  21. 36076.  Roger FitzRichard was born 1139, England; died 1178.

    Roger married Adeliza de Vere. Adeliza (daughter of Aubrey de Vere, II and Adeliza de Clare) was born ~1125, Essex, England; died 1185, Saffron Walden, Essex, England. [Group Sheet]


  22. 36077.  Adeliza de Vere was born ~1125, Essex, England (daughter of Aubrey de Vere, II and Adeliza de Clare); died 1185, Saffron Walden, Essex, England.
    Children:
    1. 18038. Robert FitzRoger, Knight, 2nd Baron of Warkworth was born ~ 1161, (Warkworth, Northumberland, England); died 0___ 1214, (Warkworth, Northumberland, England).

  23. 36078.  William de Chesney, Knight, Baron of Horsford was born ~ 1136, Horsford, Norfolkshire, England; died 1174, Colne Engaine, Halstead, Essex, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: William Chesney
    • Also Known As: William de Cheney

    Notes:

    William de Chesney (sometimes William of Norwich or William fitzRobert;[1] died 1174) was a medieval Anglo-Norman nobleman and sheriff. Son of landholder in Norfolk, William inherited after the death of his two elder brothers. He was the founder of Sibton Abbey, as well as a benefactor of other monasteries in England. In 1157, Chesney acquired the honour of Blythburgh, and was sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk during the 1150s and 1160s. On Chesney's death in 1174, he left three unmarried daughters as his heirs.

    Early life

    Chesney was the son of Robert fitzWalter and Sybil de Chesney, and a younger brother of John de Chesney.[2] Sybil was the daughter of Ralph de Chesney.[3] Robert fitzWalter was lord of Horsford in Norfolk,[2] which was originally held by Walter de Caen, Robert's father. The barony was assessed at 10 knight's fees.[4][a]

    Roger was the eldest brother of William, but died childless during their father's lifetime.[6] The next son, John, inherited the family lands, but died around 1149[2] without children.[7] William then inherited the lands.[2] John and William had a sister called Margaret, who was the wife of Haimo de St Clair.[7] Their father married a second time, and had a son named Simon by that marriage. William took his surname from his mother's family, as did his half-brother Simon, who was not related to the Chesney family except by marriage.[8] Two further children of Robert's, Elias and Peter, are known, but whether they were the children of the first marriage or the second is unclear.[9] Chesney should be distinguished from another William de Chesney,[2] who controlled the town of Oxford and its castle as well as the town of Deddington and its castle in the same time period.[10][b]

    Career

    Chesney founded Sibton Abbey,[2] and after his brother John's death he confirmed the foundation of that Cistercian monastery,[7] which was the only Cistercian house in Suffolk.[1] Besides founding that monastery, he also gave lands or other gifts to Colne Priory, Essex, Thetford Priory, Castle Acre Priory, St John's Abbey, Stoke-by-Clare Priory, and Blythburgh Priory.[12]

    Chesney acquired the barony of Blythburgh in Suffolk in 1157.[2] These lands were recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086 as being held by the king, and when Chesney was granted them they were assessed at one knight's fee in feudal service.[13] Besides Blythburgh, Chesney also acquired lands in Norfolk and Essex which he added to the family lands in Norfolk and Suffolk.[14]

    In 1153 or 1154, Chesney was the recipient of the lordship of a hundred and a half in Norfolk,[c] possibly in compensation for the loss of the manor of Mileham. Chesney likely lost Mileham to another noble family, the fitzAlans, as part of the settlement resulting from the Treaty of Wallingford which settled the civil war in England.[16] Both William's father Robert and his elder brother John had held these offices before him.[9]

    Chesney was Sheriff of Norfolk in the late 1140s and the 1150s, being recorded as holding that office in two documents – one dated to between 1146 and 1149 and the other dated to between 1146 and 1153.[17] The same documents record him as holding the office of Sheriff of Suffolk at concurrent times.[18] He held both offices again between 1156 and 1163.[2]

    Death and legacy

    Chesney died in 1174, having had three daughters with his wife Gilla.[2] Her ancestry is unknown, and it is possible that William married another time, to Aubrey de Poynings, because a Lewes Priory charter dated to around 1165 names a William de Chesney and Aubrey his wife, but it is not clear whether this charter is referring to William de Chesney the sheriff or to another William.[8] William and Gilla's daughters were Margaret, Clemence, and Sara,[2] all of whom were unmarried at the time of their father's death.[19] Margaret married twice – first to Hugh de Cressy and second to Robert fitzRoger. Clemence married Jordan de Sackville, and Sara married Richard Engaine.[2] Margaret inherited the majority of her father's estates.[20]

    At his death, Chesney had outstanding debts, both to the king and to Jewish moneylenders. In 1214, his daughter Margaret was exempted from repaying any of her father's debts to those moneylenders by a royal grant.[14]

    Notes

    Jump up ^ A knight's fee was the amount of land that was granted to someone in exchange for a knight's military service of 40 days per year.[5]
    Jump up ^ Sybil was the daughter of Ralph de Chesney,[3] The other William was the son of Roger de Chesney and Alice de Langetot,[2] who were the parents of Ralph de Chesney,[11] who was Sybil's father, making William de Chesney of Oxford the great-uncle of William de Chesney the sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk.[3]
    Jump up ^ A hundred was a sub-division of a county.[15]

    Citations

    ^ Jump up to: a b Brown "Introduction" Sibton Abbey Cartularies p. 1
    ^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h i j k l Keats-Rohan Domesday Descendants p. 370
    ^ Jump up to: a b c Keats-Rohan Domesday Descendants p. 369
    Jump up ^ Brown "Introduction" Sibton Abbey Cartularies p. 7
    Jump up ^ Coredon Dictionary of Medieval Terms & Phrases p. 170
    Jump up ^ Round "Early Sheriffs" English Historical Review p. 483–484
    ^ Jump up to: a b c Keats-Rohan Domesday Descendants pp. 363–364
    ^ Jump up to: a b Brown "Introduction" Sibton Abbey Cartularies p. 13
    ^ Jump up to: a b Brown "Introduction" Sibton Abbey Cartularies pp. 11–12
    Jump up ^ Crouch Reign of King Stephen p. 205
    Jump up ^ Keats-Rohan Domesday Descendants p. 368
    Jump up ^ Brown "Introduction" Sibton Abbey Cartularies p. 16–17
    Jump up ^ Sanders English Baronies p. 16
    ^ Jump up to: a b Brown, "Introduction" to Sibton Abbey Cartularies, pp. 14–16
    Jump up ^ Coredon Dictionary of Medieval Terms & Phrases p. 159
    Jump up ^ Crouch Reign of King Stephen p. 276 footnote 76
    Jump up ^ Green English Sheriffs p. 62
    Jump up ^ Green English Sheriffs p. 77
    Jump up ^ Brown "Introduction" Sibton Abbey Cartularies p. 21
    Jump up ^ Green Aristocracy of Norman England p. 380

    References

    Brown, Philippa (1985). "Introduction". In Brown, Philippa. Sibton Abbey Cartularies and Charters. Suffolk Charters. 7. Woodbridge, UK: Boydell and Brewer for the Suffolk Records Society. ISBN 0-85115-413-1.
    Coredon, Christopher (2007). A Dictionary of Medieval Terms & Phrases (Reprint ed.). Woodbridge: D. S. Brewer. ISBN 978-1-84384-138-8.
    Crouch, David (2000). The Reign of King Stephen: 1135–1154. New York: Longman. ISBN 0-582-22657-0.
    Green, Judith A. (1997). The Aristocracy of Norman England. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-52465-2.
    Green, Judith A. (1990). English Sheriffs to 1154. Public Record Office Handbooks Number 24. London: Her Majesty's Stationery Office. ISBN 0-11-440236-1.
    Keats-Rohan, K. S. B. (1999). Domesday Descendants: A Prosopography of Persons Occurring in English Documents, 1066–1166: Pipe Rolls to Cartae Baronum. Ipswich, UK: Boydell Press. ISBN 0-85115-863-3.
    Round, J. H. (October 1920). "Early Sheriffs of Norfolk". The English Historical Review. 35 (140). doi:10.1093/ehr/XXXV.CXL.481. JSTOR 552094.
    Sanders, I. J. (1960). English Baronies: A Study of Their Origin and Descent 1086–1327. Oxford, UK: Clarendon Press. OCLC 931660.

    *

    Baron of Horsford William de Cheney
    b. circa 1136
    Pop-up Pedigree
    Father Robert fitz Walter de Cheney b. circa 1110
    Mother Sibyl (?) b. circa 1113
    Baron of Horsford William de Cheney was a witness where Margaret de Cheney only child and heiress of William de Cheney.1 Also called William Cayneto. Baron of Horsford William de Cheney was born circa 1136 at Horsford, Norfolk, England. He was the son of Robert fitz Walter de Cheney and Sibyl (?). Baron of Horsford at Norfolk circa 1162.1
    Family
    Child
    Margaret de Cheney+ b. c 1162, d. a 12142

    Citations

    [S603] C.B., LL.D., Ulster King of Arms Sir Bernard Burke, B:xP, pg. 121.
    [S1191] Esq. John Burke B:C of GB&I, I:238.

    William married Albreda Poynings. Albreda was born ~1137, Poynings, Sussex, England; died ~1174. [Group Sheet]


  24. 36079.  Albreda Poynings was born ~1137, Poynings, Sussex, England; died ~1174.
    Children:
    1. 18039. Margaret de Cheney was born ~ 1162, (Horsford, Norfolkshire, England); died Aft 1214.

  25. 36696.  Walter FitzRobert, Knight, 2nd Loard of Little Dunmow was born ~ 1124, Woodham Walter, Essex, England; died 0___ 1198, Essex, England; was buried , Little Dunmow Priory, Essex, England.

    Notes:

    Walter Fitz Robert, 2nd Lord of Little Dunmow
    Born c.1124
    Died 1198
    Essex, England
    Family de Clare

    Walter Fitz Robert of Woodham Walter[a] (c.1124–1198), 2nd Lord of Little Dunmow, Essex, was steward under Stephen of England ,[1] having succeeded to that position upon the death of his father, Robert Fitz Richard. Baron Walter died in 1198, and was buried at Little Dunmow, in the choir of the priory of Austin canons.

    Marriage and children

    Walter Fitz Robert was married twice. Sources conflict as to which of the two wives (Maud de Lucy or Margaret de Bohun, daughter of Humphrey I de Bohun) was the first wife.[b] He and Maud de Lucy, daughter of Richard de Luci, had the following children:

    Robert Fitzwalter, a Magna Carta Surety
    Alice Fitz Walter, married Gilbert Peche. His father, Hamon Peche, was sheriff of Cambridgeshire. His mother, Alice Peverel, inherited, with her sisters, the estate of Picot of Cambridge from their father, who was the son of Pain Peverel (standard bearer to Robert Curthose in the Holy Land). The sisters inherited when their only brother, William, died in Jerusalem. Descendants include Elizabeth de Burgh and Dionisie de Munchensi.[5][6]
    When Robert, and his co-conspirators, fled after being implicated in the 1212 plot against King John, John required that the Barons present hostages to show their loyalty. Alice and Gilbert Peche had the same requirement placed against them; one of their hostages was their daughter, Alice.[7]

    Notes

    Footnotes

    Jump up ^ Alternately spelled "Walter FitzRobert"
    Jump up ^ Compare [2] and [3] and [4]
    Citations
    Jump up ^ Amt 1993, p. 66.
    Jump up ^ Burke 1831, p. 208.
    Jump up ^ Burke 1866.
    Jump up ^ Blomefield 1805.
    Jump up ^ Richarson 2005, p. 497.
    Jump up ^ Eyton 1859, p. 71.
    Jump up ^ Powlett 1889, p. 395.

    References

    Amt, Emilie (1993). The Accession of Henry II in England: Royal Government Restored, 1149-1159. Boydell & Brewer. p. 66. ISBN 0-85115-348-8.
    Blomefield, Francis; Charles Parkin (1805). An Essay Towards a Topographical History of the County of Norfolk. Norfolk (England). p. 4.
    Burke, John (1831). A general and heraldic dictionary of the peerages of England, Ireland, and Scotland: Extinct, Dormant, and in Abeyance. London: Henry Colburn and Richard Bentley. p. 208.
    Burke, Bernard (1866). A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct. Harrison.
    Eyton, Robert (1859). Antiquities of Shropshire, Volume 9. J.R. Smith. p. 71.
    Powlett, C. L. W. (1889). The Battle Abbey Roll: With Some Account of the Norman Lineages. 2.
    Richardson, Douglas (2005). Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families. Genealogical Publishing Com. p. 497. ISBN 0-8063-1759-0.

    Walter married Maude de Lucy. [Group Sheet]


  26. 36697.  Maude de Lucy (daughter of Richard de Luci, Knight and Rohese de Boulogne).

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Maud de Luci

    Children:
    1. 18348. Robert FitzWalter, Knight, Baron FitzWalter was born , Woodham Walter, Essex, England; died 9 Dec 1235, Little Dunmow, Essex, England; was buried , Little Dunmow Priory, Essex, England.

  27. 36700.  Henry II, King of EnglandHenry II, King of England was born 5 Mar 1133, Le Mans, France; was christened 25 Mar 1133, Le Mans, France (son of Geoffrey "Le Bon" Plantagenet, Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy and Matilda of England, Queen of England); died 6 Jul 1189, Chinon Castle, France; was buried 7 Jul 1189, Fontevraud Abbey, France.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Count of Anjou
    • Also Known As: Count of Nantes
    • Also Known As: Curt Mantel
    • Also Known As: Duke of Aquitaine
    • Also Known As: Duke of Normandy
    • Also Known As: Henry Curtmantle
    • Also Known As: Henry FitzEmpress
    • Also Known As: Henry II, King of England

    Notes:

    Henry founded the Plantagenet Dynasty...

    Henry II (5 March 1133 – 6 July 1189), also known as Henry Curtmantle (French: Court-manteau), Henry FitzEmpress or Henry Plantagenet, ruled as Count of Anjou, Count of Maine, Duke of Normandy, Duke of Aquitaine, Count of Nantes, King of England and Lord of Ireland; at various times, he also controlled Wales, Scotland and Brittany. Henry was the son of Geoffrey of Anjou and Matilda, daughter of Henry I of England. He became actively involved by the age of 14 in his mother's efforts to claim the throne of England, then occupied by Stephen of Blois, and was made Duke of Normandy at 17. He inherited Anjou in 1151 and shortly afterwards married Eleanor of Aquitaine, whose marriage to Louis VII of France had recently been annulled. Stephen agreed to a peace treaty after Henry's military expedition to England in 1153, and Henry inherited the kingdom on Stephen's death a year later.

    Henry was an energetic and sometimes ruthless ruler, driven by a desire to restore the lands and privileges of his grandfather Henry I. During the early years of his reign the younger Henry restored the royal administration in England, re-established hegemony over Wales and gained full control over his lands in Anjou, Maine and Touraine. Henry's desire to reform the relationship with the Church led to conflict with his former friend Thomas Becket, the Archbishop of Canterbury. This controversy lasted for much of the 1160s and resulted in Becket's murder in 1170. Henry soon came into conflict with Louis VII and the two rulers fought what has been termed a "cold war" over several decades. Henry expanded his empire, often at Louis' expense, taking Brittany and pushing east into central France and south into Toulouse; despite numerous peace conferences and treaties, no lasting agreement was reached. By 1172, he controlled England, large parts of Wales, the eastern half of Ireland and the western half of France, an area that would later come to be called the Angevin Empire.

    Henry and Eleanor had eight children. As they grew up, tensions over the future inheritance of the empire began to emerge, encouraged by Louis and his son King Philip II. In 1173 Henry's heir apparent, "Young Henry", rebelled in protest; he was joined by his brothers Richard and Geoffrey and by their mother, Eleanor. France, Scotland, Brittany, Flanders, and Boulogne allied themselves with the rebels. The Great Revolt was only defeated by Henry's vigorous military action and talented local commanders, many of them "new men" appointed for their loyalty and administrative skills. Young Henry and Geoffrey revolted again in 1183, resulting in Young Henry's death. The Norman invasion of Ireland provided lands for his youngest son John, but Henry struggled to find ways to satisfy all his sons' desires for land and immediate power. Philip successfully played on Richard's fears that Henry would make John king, and a final rebellion broke out in 1189. Decisively defeated by Philip and Richard and suffering from a bleeding ulcer, Henry retreated to Chinon castle in Anjou, where he died.

    Henry's empire quickly collapsed during the reign of his youngest son John. Many of the changes Henry introduced during his long rule, however, had long-term consequences. Henry's legal changes are generally considered to have laid the basis for the English Common Law, while his intervention in Brittany, Wales and Scotland shaped the development of their societies and governmental systems. Historical interpretations of Henry's reign have changed considerably over time. In the 18th century, scholars argued that Henry was a driving force in the creation of a genuinely English monarchy and, ultimately, a unified Britain. During the Victorian expansion of the British Empire, historians were keenly interested in the formation of Henry's own empire, but they also expressed concern over his private life and treatment of Becket. Late-20th-century historians have combined British and French historical accounts of Henry, challenging earlier Anglo-centric interpretations of his reign.

    Who could forget Peter O'Toole's magnificient protrayal of Henry II in the 1968 movie production of "The Lion in Winter" and Katherine Hepburn's Eleanor of Aquitaine? ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Lion_in_Winter_(1968_film)

    end of biography

    Source: 'The World Book Encyclopedia', 1968, p H178. 'Royalty for Commoners', Roderick W. Stuart, 1993, p 37-38. Reigned 1154-1189.

    He ruled an empire that stretched from the Tweed to the Pyrenees. In spite of frequent hostitilties with the French King his own family and rebellious Barons (culminating in the great revolt of 1173-74) and his quarrel with Thomas Becket, Henry maintained control over his possessions until shortly before his death. His judicial and administrative reforms which increased Royal control and influence at the expense of the Barons were of great constitutional importance. Introduced trial by Jury. Duke of Normandy. Henry II 'Curt Mantel,' Duke of Normandy, Count of Maine and Anjou, King Of England became king in 1154.

    At the height of his power, Henry ruled England and almost all western France. His marriage to Eleanor of Aquitaine, the most famous woman of the age, brought the duchy of Aquitaine under his control. Henry also claimed to rule Scotland, Wales, and eastern Ireland. Henry II carried on his grandfather's policy of limiting the power of the nobles. He also tried to make the Roman Catholic Church in England submit to his authority. This policy brought him into conflict with Thomas a Becket, Achbishop of Canterbury. Four of the king's knights murdered Becket while he was at vespers in his cathedral. Henry made Anglo-Saxon common law, rather than the revised Roman law, the supreme law of the land. He introduced trial by jury and circuit courts. In his later years, Henry's sons often rebelled against him. Two of them, Richard the Lion-Hearted and John, became the next two kings of England.

    REF: "Falls the Shadow" Sharon Kay Penman: William the Conqueror requested a large number of Jews to move to England after his conquest. They spoke Norman & did well under his reign. They continued to thrive under William's grandson Henry II.

    REF: British Monarchy Official Website: Henry II (reigned 1154-89)

    ruled over an empire which stretched from the Scottish border to the Pyrenees. Married to Eleanor, the heiress of Aquitaine, the king spent only 13 years of his reign in England; the other 21 years were spent on the continent in his territories in what is now France. By 1158, Henry had restored to the crown some of the lands and royal power lost by Stephen. For example, locally chosen sheriffs were changed into royally appointed agents charged with enforcing the law and collecting taxes in the counties. Personally interested in government and law, Henry strengthened royal justice, making use of juries and re-introduced the sending of justices (judges) on regular tours of the country to try cases for the Crown. His legal reforms have led him to be seen as the founder of English Common Law. Henry's disagreements with his Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Becket, over Church/State relations ended in Becket's murder in 1170. Family disputes almost wrecked the king's achievements and he died in 1189 at war with his sons.

    Reigned 25 Oct 1154-1189. Invested As Duke Of Nomandy By His Parents In 1150.

    Ruled An Empire That Stretched From The Tweed To The Pyrenees.

    Numerous Quarrels With French King, & His Own Family.

    Quarreled With Thomas Becket.

    Beat Rebellious Barons (Culminating In The Great Revolt Of 1173-74).

    Retained Control Of His Possessions Until Shortly Before His Death.

    Important Judicial & Admin. Reforms Incr. Power Of King At The Expense Of Barons

    Introduced Trial By Jury.

    Count Of Anjou & Aquitaine.

    Buried:
    Click on this link to view images of Fontevraud Abbey ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fontevraud_Abbey

    Died:
    Images and commentary for Chinon Castle ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ch%C3%A2teau_de_Chinon

    Henry married Ida de Tosny, Countess of Norfolk. Ida (daughter of Ralph de Tosny, V, Knight, Earl and Margaret de Beaumont) was born <1160, Flamstead, Hertfordshire, England; died Aft 1185. [Group Sheet]


  28. 36701.  Ida de Tosny, Countess of Norfolk was born <1160, Flamstead, Hertfordshire, England (daughter of Ralph de Tosny, V, Knight, Earl and Margaret de Beaumont); died Aft 1185.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Ida de Toesny

    Notes:

    Ida de Tosny, Countess of Norfolk was very likely a daughter of Ralph V de Tosny (died 1162) and his wife Margaret (born circa 1125 and living in 1185), a daughter of Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester.[1]

    Relationship to Henry II

    Ida de Tosny was a royal ward and mistress of King Henry II, by whom she was mother of one of his illegitimate sons, William Longespâee, 3rd Earl of Salisbury, (b c. 1176-March 7, 1226). For many years, until the discovery of a charter of William mentioning "Comitissa Ida, mater mea" (Countess Ida, my mother),[2] it was assumed that Rosamund Clifford, a previous mistress of Henry's, was the mother, but painstaking genealogical detective work [3] has since shown otherwise. Ida was not the first English royal ward to be taken as a royal mistress. Isabel de Beaumont (Elizabeth de Beaumont), daughter of Robert de Beaumont, who fought at the Battle of Hastings with the Conqueror, was the ward of King Henry I and the mistress of one of his sons.[4]

    Marriage

    Around Christmas 1181, Ida de Tosny was given in marriage to Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk by Henry II, together with the manors of Acle, Halvergate and South Walsham, which had been confiscated from his inheritance after his father's death (Hugh Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk).[5] Ida and Roger had a number of children including:

    Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk who married in 1206 or 1207, Maud Marshal, a daughter of William Marshal
    William Bigod
    Ralph Bigod
    Roger Bigod
    Margery Bigod, married William de Hastings
    Mary Bigod, married Ralph fitz Robert

    Many historians, including Marc Morris have speculated that the couple had a third daughter, Alice, who married Aubrey de Vere IV, 2nd Earl of Oxford as his second wife. If so, the marriage would have been well within the bounds of consanguinity, for the couple would have been quite closely related, a daughter of the second earl of Norfolk being first cousin once removed to the second earl of Oxford.

    Ida de Tosney in fiction

    Ida de Tosny and her husband Roger are the main characters in Elizabeth Chadwick's The Time of Singing (Sphere, 2008), published in the USA as For the King's Favor. They appear as minor characters in other of her books set at the same time, notably To Defy a King, which concerns the marriage of their son Hugh to Maud, a daughter of William Marshal

    *

    more ...

    Ida de Tosny was a royal ward who became the mistress of King Henry II. The first evidence of contemporary information about Ida came to light in 1979 with the publication in the of two charters found in the Bradenstoke Priory Cartulary where he mentions "Comitissa Ida, mater mea" (Countess Ida, my mother), until then, it was assumed that Rosamund Clifford, a previous and more famous mistress of King Henry II's, was William's mother.

    Notes:

    Not married:
    she was mother of one of his illegitimate sons, William Longespâee, 3rd Earl of Salisbury, (b c. 1176-March 7, 1226)

    Children:
    1. 18350. William (Plantagenet) Longespee, 3rd Earl of Salisbury was born ~ 1176, (Salisbury, Wiltshire) England; died 7 Mar 1226, Salisbury Castle, Salisbury, Wiltshire, England; was buried , Salisbury Cathedral, Salisbury, Wiltshire, England.

  29. 36702.  William of Salisbury, Knight, 2nd Earl of Salisbury was born ~ 1150, (Salisbury, Wiltshire, England) (son of Patrick of Salisbury, Knight, 1st Earl of Salisbury and Adelia de Talvaise, Countess of Montreuil); died 17 Apr 1196.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Sheriff of Wiltshire
    • Also Known As: Earl of Wiltshire
    • Also Known As: William D'Evereux
    • Also Known As: William FitzPatrick
    • Also Known As: William of Salisbury

    Notes:

    William of Salisbury, 2nd Earl of Salisbury (died 1196) was an Anglo-Norman peer. Though he is generally known as such, his proper title was Earl of Wiltshire, which title was conferred on his father by the Empress Maud around 1143. He was also called William FitzPatrick. (No relation to the Irish medieval dynasts who bore the surname "Fitzpatrick", which itself is a later anglicization of the Irish "Mac Giolla Phâadraig".)

    He was the son and heir of Patrick of Salisbury, Earl of Wiltshire, styled Earl of Salisbury, and of Ela Talvas.[1]

    Family

    He married Elâeonore, daughter of Robert III de Vitrâe of Tilliers. He died without male issue in 1196. Their only daughter and heiress, was Ela of Salisbury, 3rd Countess of Salisbury who married William Longespâee, 3rd Earl of Salisbury, who was half-brother to the king.

    Service to Richard

    William bore the golden sceptre at the coronation of King Richard I, but the next year when the king became a prisoner in Almaine, he was one of those who adhered to the then Count of Mortain, who later became King John of England. In 1194 he served as High Sheriff of Somerset and Dorset. In 1195, William was back with King Richard in the expedition into Normandy and upon his return to England was one of Richard's great council assembled at Nottingham. The Earl of Salisbury was one of the four earls who supported the canopy of state at the second coronation of Richard that same year [2]

    William married Eleonore de Vitre, Countess of Salisbury. Eleonore was born ~ 1158, Bretagne, France; died 0___ 1232, (Salisbury, Wiltshire, England). [Group Sheet]


  30. 36703.  Eleonore de Vitre, Countess of Salisbury was born ~ 1158, Bretagne, France; died 0___ 1232, (Salisbury, Wiltshire, England).

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Alianore de Vitre

    Children:
    1. 18351. Ela FitzPatrick, 3rd Countess of Salisbury was born 0___ 1187, Amesbury, Wiltshire, England; died 24 Aug 1261, Lacock Abbey, Wiltshire, England.

  31. 4416.  Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of NorfolkRoger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk was born 1144-1150, Norfolk, England (son of Hugh Bigod, Knight, 1st Earl of Norfolk and Juliane de Vere, Countess of Norfolk); died 0___ 1221, (Norfolk, England); was buried , Thetford, Norfolk, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Ambassador to France
    • Military: 17 Oct 1173; Battle of Fornham

    Notes:

    Roger Bigod (c.?1144/1150 - 1221) was the son of Hugh Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk and his first wife, Juliana de Vere. Although his father died 1176 or 1177, Roger did not succeed to the earldom of Norfolk until 1189 for his claim had been disputed by his stepmother for her sons by Earl Hugh in the reign of Henry II. Richard I confirmed him in his earldom and other honours, and also sent him as an ambassador to France in the same year. Roger inherited his father's office as royal steward. He took part in the negotiations for the release of Richard from prison, and after the king's return to England became a justiciar.

    During the Revolt of 1173-74, Roger remained loyal to the king while his father sided with the king's rebellious sons. Roger fought at the Battle of Fornham on 17 October 1173, where the royalist force defeated a rebel force led by Robert de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester.[1]

    In most of the years of the reign of King John, the earl was frequently with the king or on royal business. Yet Roger was to be one of the leaders of the baronial party which obtained John's assent to Magna Carta, and his name and that of his son and heir Hugh II appear among the twenty-five barons who were to ensure the king's adherence to the terms of that document. The pair were excommunicated by the pope in December 1215, and did not make peace with the regents of John's son Henry III until 1217.

    Around Christmas 1181, Roger married Ida, apparently Ida de Tosny (or Ida de Toesny),[2] and by her had a number of children including:

    Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk who married in 1206/ 1207, Maud, a daughter of William Marshal
    William Bigod
    Ralph Bigod
    Roger Bigod
    Margery, married William de Hastings
    Mary Bigod, married Ralph fitz Robert[3]

    Many historians, including Marc Morris have speculated that the couple had a third daughter, Alice, who married Aubrey de Vere IV, Earl of Oxford as his second wife. If so, the marriage would have been well within the bounds of consanguinity, for the couple would have been quite closely related, a daughter of the second earl of Norfolk being first cousin once removed to the second earl of Oxford.

    Roger Bigod in fiction

    Roger Bigod and his wife Ida de Tosny are the main characters in Elizabeth Chadwick's The Time of Singing (Sphere, 2008), published in the USA as For the King's Favor. They appear as minor characters in other of her books set at the same time, notably To Defy a King, which concerns the marriage of their son Hugh to Maud, a daughter of William Marshal

    References

    Jump up ^ Bartlett, Robert C. (2000). England Under the Norman and Angevin Kings: 1075–1225. Oxford: Clarendon Press. pp. 257–258. ISBN 0-19-822741-8.
    Jump up ^ For Ida's ancestry, see "Some corrections and additions to the Complete Peerage: Volume 9: Summary" and Marc Morris's The Bigod Earls of Norfolk in the Thirteenth Century
    Jump up ^ S. D. Church, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography
    Liber Vitae Ecclesiae Dunelmensis, Vol. 13
    Morris, Marc. The Bigod Earls of Norfolk in the Thirteenth Century (2005)
    Cawley, Charles, Medieval Lands Project on Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk, Foundation for Medieval Genealogy, retrieved August 2012,[better source needed]

    *

    more ...

    Four years after William's birth, in 1181, Ida de Tosny was married to Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk, by whom she had a number of children.

    Roger married Ida de Tosny, Countess of Norfolk 0___ 1181, (Norfolk, England). Ida (daughter of Ralph de Tosny, V, Knight, Earl and Margaret de Beaumont) was born <1160, Flamstead, Hertfordshire, England; died Aft 1185. [Group Sheet]


  32. 4417.  Ida de Tosny, Countess of Norfolk was born <1160, Flamstead, Hertfordshire, England (daughter of Ralph de Tosny, V, Knight, Earl and Margaret de Beaumont); died Aft 1185.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Ida de Toesny

    Notes:

    Ida de Tosny, Countess of Norfolk was very likely a daughter of Ralph V de Tosny (died 1162) and his wife Margaret (born circa 1125 and living in 1185), a daughter of Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester.[1]

    Relationship to Henry II

    Ida de Tosny was a royal ward and mistress of King Henry II, by whom she was mother of one of his illegitimate sons, William Longespâee, 3rd Earl of Salisbury, (b c. 1176-March 7, 1226). For many years, until the discovery of a charter of William mentioning "Comitissa Ida, mater mea" (Countess Ida, my mother),[2] it was assumed that Rosamund Clifford, a previous mistress of Henry's, was the mother, but painstaking genealogical detective work [3] has since shown otherwise. Ida was not the first English royal ward to be taken as a royal mistress. Isabel de Beaumont (Elizabeth de Beaumont), daughter of Robert de Beaumont, who fought at the Battle of Hastings with the Conqueror, was the ward of King Henry I and the mistress of one of his sons.[4]

    Marriage

    Around Christmas 1181, Ida de Tosny was given in marriage to Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk by Henry II, together with the manors of Acle, Halvergate and South Walsham, which had been confiscated from his inheritance after his father's death (Hugh Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk).[5] Ida and Roger had a number of children including:

    Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk who married in 1206 or 1207, Maud Marshal, a daughter of William Marshal
    William Bigod
    Ralph Bigod
    Roger Bigod
    Margery Bigod, married William de Hastings
    Mary Bigod, married Ralph fitz Robert

    Many historians, including Marc Morris have speculated that the couple had a third daughter, Alice, who married Aubrey de Vere IV, 2nd Earl of Oxford as his second wife. If so, the marriage would have been well within the bounds of consanguinity, for the couple would have been quite closely related, a daughter of the second earl of Norfolk being first cousin once removed to the second earl of Oxford.

    Ida de Tosney in fiction

    Ida de Tosny and her husband Roger are the main characters in Elizabeth Chadwick's The Time of Singing (Sphere, 2008), published in the USA as For the King's Favor. They appear as minor characters in other of her books set at the same time, notably To Defy a King, which concerns the marriage of their son Hugh to Maud, a daughter of William Marshal

    *

    more ...

    Ida de Tosny was a royal ward who became the mistress of King Henry II. The first evidence of contemporary information about Ida came to light in 1979 with the publication in the of two charters found in the Bradenstoke Priory Cartulary where he mentions "Comitissa Ida, mater mea" (Countess Ida, my mother), until then, it was assumed that Rosamund Clifford, a previous and more famous mistress of King Henry II's, was William's mother.

    Notes:

    Married:
    around Christmas...

    Children:
    1. 2208. Hugh Bigod, Knight, 3rd Earl of Norfolk was born ~ 1182, Thetford, Norfolk, England; died 18 Feb 1225, (Norfolk, England); was buried , Thetford Priory, Thetford, Norfolk, England.
    2. Margaret Bigod was born 1182, Thetford, Norfolk, England; died 31 Mar 1237, Ashill, Swaffham, Norfolk, England.

  33. 4418.  William Marshal, Templar Knight, 1st Earl PembrokeWilliam Marshal, Templar Knight, 1st Earl Pembroke was born 1146-1147, (Berkshire, England) (son of John FitzGilbert and Sibyl of Salisbury); died 14 Apr 1219, Caversham, Berkshire, England; was buried , Temple Church, London, Middlesex, England.

    Notes:

    William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke (1146 or 1147 - 14 May 1219), also called William the Marshal (Norman French: Williame le Mareschal), was an Anglo-Norman soldier and statesman.[1] He served five English kings – The "Young King" Henry, Henry II, Richard I, John, and Henry III.

    Knighted in 1166, he spent his younger years as a knight errant and a successful tournament fighter; Stephen Langton eulogized him as the "best knight that ever lived."[2] In 1189, he received the title of Earl of Pembroke through marriage during the second creation of the Pembroke Earldom. In 1216, he was appointed protector for the nine-year-old Henry III, and regent of the kingdom.

    Before him, his father's family held an hereditary title of Marshal to the king, which by his father's time had become recognized as a chief or master Marshalcy, involving management over other Marshals and functionaries. William became known as 'the Marshal', although by his time much of the function was actually delegated to more specialized representatives (as happened with other functions in the King's household). Because he was an Earl, and also known as the Marshal, the term "Earl Marshal" was commonly used and this later became an established hereditary title in the English Peerage.


    Early life

    Tomb effigy of William Marshal in Temple Church, London
    William's father, John Marshal, supported King Stephen when he took the throne in 1135, but in about 1139 he changed sides to back the Empress Matilda in the civil war of succession between her and Stephen which led to the collapse of England into "the Anarchy".[4]

    When King Stephen besieged Newbury Castle in 1152, according to William's biographer, he used the young William as a hostage to ensure that John kept his promise to surrender the castle. John, however, used the time allotted to reinforce the castle and alert Matilda's forces. When Stephen ordered John to surrender immediately or William would be hanged, John replied that he should go ahead saying, "I still have the hammer and the anvil with which to forge still more and better sons!" Subsequently there was a bluff made to launch William from a pierriáere, a type of trebuchet towards the castle. Fortunately for the child, Stephen could not bring himself to harm young William.[5] William remained a crown hostage for many months, only being released following the peace that resulted from the terms agreed at Winchester on 6 November 1153 that ended the civil war.

    Knight-Errant

    As a younger son of a minor nobleman, William had no lands or fortune to inherit, and had to make his own way in life. Around the age of twelve, when his father's career was faltering, he was sent to Normandy to be brought up in the household of William de Tancarville, a great magnate and cousin of young William's mother. Here he began his training as a knight. This would have included basic biblical stories and prayers written in Latin, as well as exposure to French romances, which conferred the basic precepts of chivalry to the budding knight.[6] In addition, while in Tancarville’s household, it is likely that Marshal also learned important and lasting practical lessons concerning the politics of courtly life. According to his thirteenth-century biography, L'Histoire de Guillaume le Marechal, Marshal had a number of adversaries in court who machinated to his disadvantage—these individuals likely would have been threatened by the boy’s close relationship with the magnate.[7] He was knighted in 1166 on campaign in Upper Normandy, then being invaded from Flanders. His first experience in battle came with mixed reviews. According to L'Histoire, everyone who witnessed the young knight in action agreed that he had acquitted himself well in combat. However, as medieval historian David Crouch explains, “War in the twelfth century was not fought wholly for honour. Profit was there to be made…”[8] On this front, Marshal was not so successful, as he was unable to parlay his combat victories into profit from either ransom or seized booty. As described in L'Histoire, the Earl of Essex, who was expecting the customary tribute from his valorous knight following battle, jokingly remarked: “Oh? But Marshal, what are you saying? You had forty or sixty of them — yet you refuse me so small a thing!”[9] In 1167 he was taken by William de Tancarville to his first tournament where he found his true mâetier. Quitting the Tancarville household he then served in the household of his mother's brother, Patrick, Earl of Salisbury. In 1168 his uncle was killed in an ambush by Guy de Lusignan. William was injured and captured in the same skirmish. It is known that William received a wound to his thigh and that someone in his captor's household took pity on the young knight. He received a loaf of bread in which were concealed several lengths of clean linen bandages with which he could dress his wounds. This act of kindness by an unknown person perhaps saved Marshal's life as infection setting into the wound could have killed him. After a period of time, he was ransomed by Eleanor of Aquitaine, who was apparently impressed by tales of his bravery.

    Thereafter he found he could make a good living out of winning tournaments, dangerous, often deadly, staged battles in which money and valuable prizes could be won by capturing and ransoming opponents, their horses and armour. His record is legendary: on his deathbed he recalled besting 500 knights during his tourneying career.[10]

    Royal favour

    13th-century depiction by Matthew Paris of the Earl of Pembroke's coat of arms[11]
    Upon his return during the course of 1185 William rejoined the court of King Henry II, and now served the father as a loyal captain through the many difficulties of his final years. The returns of royal favour were almost immediate. The king gave William the large royal estate of Cartmel in Cumbria, and the keeping of Heloise, the heiress of the northern barony of Lancaster. It may be that the king expected him to take the opportunity to marry her and become a northern baron, but William seems to have had grander ambitions for his marriage. In 1188 faced with an attempt by Philip II to seize the disputed region of Berry, Henry II summoned the Marshal to his side. The letter by which he did this survives, and makes some sarcastic comments about William's complaints that he had not been properly rewarded to date for his service to the king. Henry therefore promised him the marriage and lands of Dionisia, lady of Chăateauroux in Berry. In the resulting campaign, the king fell out with his heir Richard, count of Poitou, who consequently allied with Philip II against his father. In 1189, while covering the flight of Henry II from Le Mans to Chinon, William unhorsed the undutiful Richard in a skirmish. William could have killed the prince but killed his horse instead, to make that point clear. He is said to have been the only man ever to unhorse Richard. Nonetheless after Henry's death, Marshal was welcomed at court by his former adversary, now King Richard I, who was wise to include a man whose legendary loyalty and military accomplishments were too useful to ignore, especially in a king who was intending to go on Crusade.[1]

    During the old king's last days he had promised the Marshal the hand and estates of Isabel de Clare (c.1172–1220), but had not completed the arrangements. King Richard however, confirmed the offer and so in August 1189, at the age of 43, the Marshal married the 17-year-old daughter of Richard de Clare (Strongbow). Her father had been Earl of Pembroke, and Marshal acquired large estates and claims in England, Wales, Normandy and Ireland. Some estates however were excluded from the deal. Marshal did not obtain Pembroke and the title of earl, which his father-in-law had enjoyed, until 1199, as it had been taken into the king's hand in 1154. However, the marriage transformed the landless knight from a minor family into one of the richest men in the kingdom, a sign of his power and prestige at court. They had five sons and five daughters, and have numerous descendants.[1] William made numerous improvements to his wife's lands, including extensive additions to Pembroke Castle and Chepstow Castle.[citation needed]

    William was included in the council of regency which the King appointed on his departure for the Third Crusade in 1190. He took the side of John, the king's brother, when the latter expelled the justiciar, William Longchamp, from the kingdom, but he soon discovered that the interests of John were different from those of Richard. Hence in 1193 he joined with the loyalists in making war upon him. In spring 1194, during the course of the hostilities in England and before King Richard's return, William Marshal's elder brother John Marshal (who was serving as seneschal) was killed while defending Marlborough for the king's brother John. Richard allowed Marshal to succeed his brother in the hereditary marshalship, and his paternal honour of Hamstead Marshall. The Marshal served the king in his wars in Normandy against Philip II. On Richard's death-bed the king designated Marshal as custodian of Rouen and of the royal treasure during the interregnum.[1]

    King John and Magna Carta

    A 13th-century depiction of the Second Battle of Lincoln, which occurred at Lincoln Castle on 20 May 1217; the illustration shows the death of Thomas du Perche, the Comte de la Perche

    William supported King John when he became king in 1199, arguing against those who maintained the claims of Arthur of Brittany, the teenage son of John's elder brother Geoffrey Plantagenet. William was heavily engaged with the defence of Normandy against the growing pressure of the Capetian armies between 1200 and 1203. He sailed with King John when he abandoned the duchy in December 1203. He and the king had a falling out in the aftermath of the loss of the duchy, when he was sent with the earl of Leicester as ambassadors to negotiate a truce with King Philip II of France in 1204. The Marshal took the opportunity to negotiate the continued possession of his Norman lands.

    Before commencing negotiations with King Philip, William had been generously permitted to do homage to the King of France by King John so he might keep his possessions in Normandy; land which must have been of sentimental value due to the time spent there in his youth and adolescence. However, once official negotiations began, Philip demanded that such homage be paid exclusively to him, which King John had not consented to.[12] When William paid homage to King Philip, John took offence and there was a major row at court which led to cool relations between the two men. This became outright hostility in 1207 when John began to move against several major Irish magnates, including William. Though he left for Leinster in 1207 William was recalled and humiliated at court in the autumn of 1208, while John's justiciar in Ireland Meilyr fitz Henry invaded his lands, burning the town of New Ross.

    Meilyr's defeat by Countess Isabel led to her husband's return to Leinster. He was once again in conflict with King John in his war with the Braose and Lacy families in 1210, but managed to survive. He stayed in Ireland until 1213, during which time he had Carlow Castle erected[13] and restructured his honour of Leinster. Taken back into favour in 1212, he was summoned in 1213 to return to the English court. Despite their differences, William remained loyal throughout the hostilities between John and his barons which culminated on 15 June 1215 at Runnymede with the sealing of Magna Carta. William was one of the few English earls to remain loyal to the king through the First Barons' War. It was William whom King John trusted on his deathbed to make sure John's nine-year-old son Henry would get the throne. It was William who took responsibility for the king's funeral and burial at Worcester Cathedral.[1]

    On 11 November 1216 at Gloucester, upon the death of King John, William Marshal was named by the king's council (the chief barons who had remained loyal to King John in the First Barons' War) to serve as protector of the nine-year-old King Henry III, and regent of the kingdom. In spite of his advanced age (around 70) he prosecuted the war against Prince Louis and the rebel barons with remarkable energy. In the battle of Lincoln he charged and fought at the head of the young King's army, leading them to victory. He was preparing to besiege Louis in London when the war was terminated by the naval victory of Hubert de Burgh in the straits of Dover. [1]

    William was criticised for the generosity of the terms he accorded to Louis and the rebels in September 1217; but his desire for an expeditious settlement was dictated by sound statesmanship. Self-restraint and compromise were the keynote of Marshal's policy, hoping to secure peace and stability for his young liege. Both before and after the peace of 1217 he reissued Magna Carta, in which he is a signatory as one of the witnessing barons.

    Death and legacy

    William Marshal was interred in Temple Church, London
    Marshal's health finally failed him early in 1219. In March 1219 he realised that he was dying, so he summoned his eldest son, also William, and his household knights, and left the Tower of London for his estate at Caversham in Berkshire, near Reading, where he called a meeting of the barons, Henry III, the Papal legate Pandulf Verraccio, the royal justiciar (Hubert de Burgh), and Peter des Roches (Bishop of Winchester and the young King's guardian). William rejected the Bishop's claim to the regency and entrusted the regency to the care of the papal legate; he apparently did not trust the Bishop or any of the other magnates that he had gathered to this meeting. Fulfilling the vow he had made while on crusade, he was invested into the order of the Knights Templar on his deathbed. He died on 14 May 1219 at Caversham, and was buried in the Temple Church in London, where his tomb can still be seen.[1]

    Descendants of William Marshal and Isabel de Clare

    William Marshal, 2nd Earl of Pembroke (1190–6 April 1231), married (1) Alice de Bâethune, daughter of Earl of Albemarle; (2) 23 April 1224 Eleanor Plantagenet, daughter of King John of England. They had no children.
    Richard Marshal, 3rd Earl of Pembroke (1191–16 April 1234), married Gervase le Dinant. He died in captivity. They had no children.
    Maud Marshal (1194–27 March 1248), married (1) Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk, they had four children; (2) William de Warenne, 5th Earl of Surrey, they had two children; (3) Walter de Dunstanville.
    Gilbert Marshal, 4th Earl of Pembroke (1197–27 June 1241), married (1) Marjorie of Scotland, youngest daughter of King William I of Scotland; by an unknown mistress he had one illegitimate daughter:
    Isabel Marshal, married to Rhys ap Maeldon Fychan.
    Walter Marshal, 5th Earl of Pembroke (c. 1199 – November 1245), married Margaret de Quincy, Countess of Lincoln, granddaughter of Hugh de Kevelioc, 3rd Earl of Chester. No children.
    Isabel Marshal (9 October 1200 – 17 January 1240), married (1) Gilbert de Clare, 5th Earl of Hertford, whose daughter Isabel de Clare married Robert Bruce, 5th Lord of Annandale, the grandfather of Robert the Bruce; (2) Richard Plantagenet, Earl of Cornwall
    Sibyl Marshal (c. 1201–27 April 1245), married William de Ferrers, 5th Earl of Derby–they had seven daughters.
    Agnes Ferrers (died 11 May 1290), married William de Vesci.

    Isabel Ferrers (died before 26 November 1260)
    Maud Ferrers (died 12 March 1298), married (1) Simon de Kyme, and (2) William de Vivonia (de Forz), and (3) Amaury IX of Rochechouart.
    Sibyl Ferrers, married Sir Francis or Franco de Bohun.
    Joan Ferrers (died 1267)
    Agatha Ferrers (died May 1306), married Hugh Mortimer, of Chelmarsh.
    Eleanor Ferrers (died 16 October 1274), married to:

    Eva Marshal (1203–1246), married William de Braose, Lord of Abergavenny

    Isabella de Braose (b.1222), married Prince Dafydd ap Llywelyn. She died childless.
    Maud de Braose (1224–1301), in 1247, she married Roger Mortimer, 1st Baron Mortimer and they had descendants.
    Eva de Braose (1227 – 28 July 1255), married Sir William de Cantelou and had descendants.
    Eleanor de Braose (c.1228–1251). On an unknown date after August 1241, she married Sir Humphrey de Bohun and had descendants.

    Anselm Marshal, 6th Earl of Pembroke (c. 1208–22 December 1245), married Maud de Bohun, daughter of Humphrey de Bohun, 2nd Earl of Hereford. They had no children.
    Joan Marshal (1210–1234), married Warin de Munchensi (d. 1255), Lord of Swanscombe
    Joan de Munchensi (1230–20 September 1307) married William of Valence, the fourth son of King John's widow, Isabella of Angoulăeme, and her second husband, Hugh X of Lusignan, Count of La Marche. Valence was half-brother to Henry III and Edward I's uncle.

    The fate of the Marshal family

    During the civil wars in Ireland, William had taken two manors that the Bishop of Ferns claimed but could not get back. Some years after William's death, that bishop is said[14] to have laid a curse on the family that William's sons would have no children, and the great Marshal estates would be scattered. Each of William's sons did become earl of Pembroke and marshal of England, and each died without legitimate issue. William's vast holdings were then divided among the husbands of his five daughters. The title of "Marshal" went to the husband of the oldest daughter, Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk, and later passed to the Mowbray dukes of Norfolk and then to the Howard dukes of Norfolk, becoming "Earl Marshal" along the way. The title of "Earl of Pembroke" passed to William of Valence, the husband of Joan Marshal's daughter, Joan de Munchensi; he became the first of the de Valence line of earls of Pembroke.

    Through his daughter Isabel, William is ancestor to the both the Bruce and Stewart kings of Scots. Through his granddaughter Maud de Braose, William is ancestor to the last Plantagenet kings, Edward IV through Richard III, and all English monarchs from Henry VIII and afterward.

    Buried:
    at Temple Church...

    The Temple Church is a late 12th-century church in the City of London located between Fleet Street and the River Thames, built by the Knights Templar as their English headquarters. During the reign of King John (1199-1216) it served as the royal treasury, supported by the role of the Knights Templars as proto-international bankers. It is jointly owned by the Inner Temple and Middle Temple[1] Inns of Court, bases of the English legal profession. It is famous for being a round church, a common design feature for Knights Templar churches, and for its 13th and 14th century stone effigies. It was heavily damaged by German bombing during World War II and has since been greatly restored and rebuilt. The area around the Temple Church is known as the Temple and nearby formerly in the middle of Fleet Street stood the Temple Bar, an ornamental processional gateway. Nearby is the Temple Underground station.

    Photo, history & source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Temple_Church

    Died:
    Caversham is a suburb in the Borough of Reading...

    Map, history & source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caversham,_Berkshire

    William married Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke 0Aug 1189, London, England. Isabel (daughter of Richard de Clare, Knight, 2nd Earl Pembroke and Eva Aoife Mac Murchada, Countess Pembroke) was born 0___ 1172, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales; died 14 Oct 1217, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales; was buried , Tintern Abbey, Tintern, Monmouthshire, Wales. [Group Sheet]


  34. 4419.  Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke was born 0___ 1172, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales (daughter of Richard de Clare, Knight, 2nd Earl Pembroke and Eva Aoife Mac Murchada, Countess Pembroke); died 14 Oct 1217, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales; was buried , Tintern Abbey, Tintern, Monmouthshire, Wales.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Isabel Clare
    • Alt Death: 0___ 1220, Pembrokeshire, Wales

    Notes:

    F Isabel De CLAREPrint Family Tree
    Born in 1172 - Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales
    Deceased 14 October 1217 - Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales , age at death: 45 years old
    Buried in 1217 - Monmouth, Monmouthshire, Wales

    Parents
    Richard (Strongbow) De ( 2nd Earl Pembroke, Lord Marshall) CLARE, born in 1125 - Tonbridge, Kent, England, Deceased 20 April 1176 - Dublin, Ireland age at death: 51 years old , buried in 1176 - Dublin, Ireland
    Married 26 August 1171, Waterford, Waterford, Ireland, to
    Eva Aoife Mac (Countess Pembroke) MURCHADA, born 26 April 1141 - Dublin, Ireland, Deceased in 1188 - Waterford, Ireland age at death: 47 years old , buried - Tintern, Monmouthshire, Wales

    Spouses, children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren
    Married in August 1189, London, England, to William (SIR - Knight Templar)(Earl Pembroke) MARSHALL, born 12 May 1146 - Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales, Deceased 14 May 1219 - Reading, Berkshire, England age at death: 73 years old , buried in 1219 - London, England (Parents : M John (Fitzgilbert) (Earl of Pembroke, Marshall of England) MARSHALL 1105-1165 & F Sibilla De SALISBURY 1109-1155) with
    F Maud (Countess of Norfolk Countess of Surrey) MARSHALL 1192-1248 married to William (de Warenne) WARREN 1166-1240 with
    M John De (SIR - Earl of Surrey) WARREN 1231-1304 married before 1244, England, to Alice (Le Brun) De (Countess of Surrey) LUSIGNAN 1224-1291 with :
    F Eleanor (Plantagenet) De WARREN 1244-1282
    M William De (SIR) WARREN 1256-1286

    John De (SIR - Earl of Surrey) WARREN 1231-1304 married in 1247, Surrey, England, to Isabel De Surrey 1234-
    Maud (Countess of Norfolk Countess of Surrey) MARSHALL 1192-1248 married to Hugh (Magna Charta Baron - EARL of NORFOLK) BIGOD 1175-1225 with
    F Isabel BIGOD ca 1215-1239 married before 1235, Shere, Surrey, England, to John (Fitzgeoffrey) (SIR - Lord of Shere) (Justiciar of England) FITZPIERS 1215-1258 with :
    F Aveline (Fitzjohn) FITZPIERS ca 1235-1274
    F Maud (Fitzjohn) (Countess of WARWICK) FITZPIERS 1237-1301
    F Eve (Baroness of Abergavenny) MARSHALL 1194-1246 married 2 May 1230, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales, to William "Black William" (de Braose) BRUCE 1204-1230 with
    M William (de Braose) BRUCE 1210-1292 married to Maud De Fay 1180-1249 with :
    F Eleanor (de Braose) BRUCE 1230-
    F Isabella (de Braose) BRUCE 1220/- married to Dafydd (Ap Llywelyn) (Prince of WALES) TUDOR 1208-1246
    F Eva (de Braose) BRUCE 1220-1255 married 25 July 1238, Calne, Wiltshire, England, to William De CANTILUPE 1216-1254 with :
    F Joane CANTILUPE 1240-1271
    F Sybilla De Cantilupe ca 1240-
    F Millicent (Cauntelo) De CANTILUPE ca 1250-/1299
    F Maud (de Braose) (BARONESS WIGMORE) BRUCE 1226-1300 married in 1247, King's Stanley, Gloucestershire, England, to Roger De (SIR) MORTIMER 1231-1282 with :
    F Isabella De MORTIMER 1248-1274
    M Edmund De (Sir - 7th Lord) MORTIMER 1252-1303
    F Isolde De MORTIMER 1267-1338
    Eve (Baroness of Abergavenny) MARSHALL 1194-1246 married in 1230, England, to Milo (de Saint Maur) (SIR) SEYMOUR ca 1200-1245 with
    M Richard SEYMOUR 1230-1271 married in 1250 to Isabel (Lady) MARSHALL 1238-1268 with :
    M Roger (de Saint Maur) SEYMOUR 1258-1300
    F Katherine SEYMOUR ca 1265-ca 1335
    M Gilbert MARSHALL 1196-1241 married to Marjorie Of SCOTLAND 1204-1244 with
    F Isabel (Lady) MARSHALL 1238-1268 married in 1250 to Richard SEYMOUR 1230-1271 with :
    M Roger (de Saint Maur) SEYMOUR 1258-1300
    F Katherine SEYMOUR ca 1265-ca 1335
    M William (4th Earl of Pembroke/ChiefJusticar of Ireland) MARSHALL 1198-1231 married 23 April 1224, Hampshire, England, to Eleanor (Princess of England) PLANTAGENET ca 1205-1275 with
    F Isabel Marshall 1225/-1239
    M X MARSHALL ca 1230- married to ? ? with :
    M X MARSHALL ca 1260-
    F Isabel (Fitzgilbert) (Countess MARSHALL) MARSHALL 1200-1239 married 9 October 1217, Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England, to Gilbert III De (Earl of Gloucester - Hertford) CLARE, MAGNA CARTA BARON ca 1180-1230 with
    M Richard De (Earl of Herts - Gloucs) CLARE 1222-1262 married 25 January 1238, Linco