Sir John Talbot, 2nd Earl of Shrewsbury

Male 1413 - 1460  (46 years)


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Generation: 1

  1. 1.  Sir John Talbot, 2nd Earl of Shrewsbury was born 12 Dec 1413, Shrewsbury, Shropshire, England (son of John Talbot, 4th Earl Shrewsbury, Knight of the Garte and Maud Neville); died 10 Jul 1460, Northamptonshire, England.

    Notes:

    Died:
    during the Battle of Northampton -

    Battle of Northampton
    Part of the Wars of the Roses
    York victory over Lancaster.svg
    Date 10th July 1460
    Location Northampton in Northamptonshire, England
    Coordinates: 52°14'12?N 0°53'36.8?W
    Result Decisive Yorkist victory[1]
    Belligerents
    White Rose Badge of York.svg House of York Red Rose Badge of Lancaster.svg House of Lancaster
    Commanders and leaders
    Arms of Elizabeth of York (Princess).svg Edward, Earl of March
    Coat of Arms of Sir William Nevill, 6th Baron Fauconberg, KG.png William Neville, Lord Fauconberg
    Neville Warwick Arms.svg Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick Royal Arms of England (1470-1471).svg Henry VI (POW)
    Stafford Coat of Arms.jpg Humphrey Stafford, Duke of Buckingham †
    Coat of Arms of Sir John Talbot, 2nd Earl of Shrewsbury, KG.png John Talbot, Earl of Shrewsbury †
    Coat of Arms of Grey.svg Edmund, Lord Grey (switched sides)
    Strength
    unknown unknown
    Casualties and losses
    unknown 300 killed
    [show] v t e
    Wars of the Roses

    Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Northampton_(1460)

    John — Elizabeth Butler, Countess of Talbot. Elizabeth (daughter of James Butler, 4th Earl of Ormond and Joan de Beauchamp) was born 1420, Kilkenny Castle, Ormond, Ireland; died 8 Sep 1473, Shrewsbury, Shropshire, England. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. Gilbert Talbot, Knight of the Garter was born 1452; died 16 Aug 1517.

Generation: 2

  1. 2.  John Talbot, 4th Earl Shrewsbury, Knight of the Garte was born 1384-1392, Shrewsbury, Shropshire, England (son of Richard Talbot, 4th Baron Talbot and Ankaret le Strange, Baroness of Furnival); died 17 Jul 1453.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: 7th Lord Talbot
    • Also Known As: Count of Clermont
    • Also Known As: Old Talbot

    John — Maud Neville. [Group Sheet]


  2. 3.  Maud Neville
    Children:
    1. 1. John Talbot, 2nd Earl of Shrewsbury was born 12 Dec 1413, Shrewsbury, Shropshire, England; died 10 Jul 1460, Northamptonshire, England.


Generation: 3

  1. 4.  Richard Talbot, 4th Baron Talbot was born 0___ 1361, Goodrich Castle, Hereford, England (son of Gilbert Talbot, 3rd Baron Talbot and Petronella Butler); died 7 Sep 1396, London, Middlesex, England.

    Notes:

    Richard Talbot
    Also Known As: "Richard Talbat", "Sir Richard Talbot Baron of Blackmere"
    Birthdate: circa 1361 (35)
    Birthplace: Blackmere, Cornwall, England
    Death: Died September 7, 1396 in London, Middlesex, England
    Immediate Family:
    Son of Gilbert Talbot, 3rd Lord of Talbot and Petronella Talbot
    Husband of Ankaret Talbot, Baroness of Talbot
    Father of Sir Gilbert Talbot, of Irchingfield; Mary Green; Richard Talbot; Elizabeth Talbot; Lady Alice Talbot de la Barre and 7 others
    Brother of Elizabeth Grey, Baroness Grey of Wilton and Gilbert Talbot
    Managed by: Peter Scianna
    Last Updated: February 22, 2017
    View Complete Profile

    About Richard Talbot, 4th Baron Talbot
    Sir Richard Talbot, 4th Lord Talbot, Baron de Blackmere1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15
    M, #11084, b. circa 1361, d. 8 September 1396
    Father Sir Gilbert Talbot, 3rd Lord Talbot16,17,18 b. c 1332, d. 24 Apr 1387
    Mother Petronilla Butler16,17,18 b. c 1332, d. 1368
    Sir Richard Talbot, 4th Lord Talbot, Baron de Blackmere was born circa 1361 at of Eccleswall, Linton, Herefordshire, England; Age 26 in 1387.2,7,15 He married Ankaret le Strange, daughter of Sir John le Strange, 4th Lord Strange of Blackmere and Mary FitzAlan, before 23 August 1383; They had 5 sons (Sir Gilbert, 5th Lord Talbot, Lord Strange of Blackmere; Sir John, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury, 7th Lord Talbot; Richard, Archbishop of Dublin, Chancellor of Ireland; Sir Thomas; & Sir William) and 4 daughters (Elizabeth, contracted to marry Sir John, Lord Arundel & Mautravers; Anne, wife of Sir Hugh, 5th Lord Courtenay, 12th Earl of Devon, & of John Botreaux; Mary, wife of Sir Thomas Greene, & of John Nottingham, Esq; & Alice, wife of Sir Thomas Barre).2,19,3,4,5,7,8,9,10,12,13,15 Sir Richard Talbot, 4th Lord Talbot, Baron de Blackmere died on 8 September 1396 at London, Middlesex, England.2,7,8,13,15

    Family Ankaret le Strange b. c 1361, d. 1 Jun 1413

    Children

    Anne Talbot+20,2,5,6,7,12,14,15 d. 16 Jan 1441
    Richard Talbot, Archbishop of Dublin2
    Mary Talbot+21,2,22,7,23,15 b. c 1382, d. 13 Apr 1434
    Sir Gilbert Talbot, 5th Lord Talbot, Lord Strange of Blackmere, Chief Justice of Chester2,7,15 b. c 1383, d. 19 Oct 1418
    Elizabeth Talbot24,3,9 b. c 1387, d. b 1407
    Alice Talbot+2,11,15 b. c 1388, d. b 28 Sep 1436
    Sir John Talbot, 4th Earl Shrewsbury, Wexford, Waterford, 7th Lord Talbot, Count of Clermont+2,7,15 b. c 1392, d. 17 Jul 1453

    Citations

    1.[S2878] Unknown author, Lineage and Ancestry of HRH Prince Charles by Paget, Vol. II, p. 405; The Ancestry of Dorothea Poyntz, by Ronny O. Bodine, p. 66.
    2.[S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 702-704.
    3.[S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. I, p. 33.
    4.[S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. I, p. 211.
    5.[S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. I, p. 547.
    6.[S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. IV, p. 40.
    7.[S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. IV, p. 166-167.
    8.[S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. IV, p. 258-259.
    9.[S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. I, p. 152-153.
    10.[S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. I, p. 376.
    11.[S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. II, p. 310-311.
    12.[S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. II, p. 332.
    13.[S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. III, p. 52.
    14.[S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. IV, p. 644-645.
    15.[S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. V, p. 117-118.
    16.[S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 702.
    17.[S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. IV, p. 165-166.
    18.[S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. V, p. 116-117.
    19.[S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 737.
    20.[S11568] The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain, and the United Kingdom, by George Edward Cokayne, Vol. IV, p. 326.
    21.[S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 356.
    22.[S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. II, p. 260.
    23.[S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. III, p. 112.
    24.[S15] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, p. 11-12.
    From: http://our-royal-titled-noble-and-commoner-ancestors.com/p369.htm#i11084
    _______________________________

    Richard Talbot, 4th Lord Talbot
    M, #9289, d. 7 September 1396
    Last Edited=29 Mar 2013
    Richard Talbot, 4th Lord Talbot was the son of Gilbert Talbot, 3rd Lord Talbot and Petronilla Butler. He married Ankaret Lestrange, daughter of John Lestrange, 4th Lord Strange (of Blackmere) and Mary FitzAlan, before 1383.1 He died on 7 September 1396.
    But this is usually seen as a fresh created rather than as a summons to attend Parl as a peer in right of his wife issue.2 On 3 March 1383 who was called to Parl as LORD (Baron) TALBOT (of Blackmere) between /4 and 17 Dec 1387.2 He succeeded to the title of 4th Lord Talbot [E., 1332] in 1387.
    Child of Richard Talbot, 4th Lord Talbot
    1.Eleanor Talbot
    Children of Richard Talbot, 4th Lord Talbot and Ankaret Lestrange
    1.Anne Talbot+ d. 16 Jan 1440/41
    2.Richard Talbot
    3.Mary Talbot+ d. 1433
    4.Gilbert Talbot, 5th Lord Talbot+ b. 1383, d. 19 Oct 1419
    5.General John Talbot, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury+ b. c 1390, d. 20 Jul 1453
    Citations
    1.[S8] BP1999 volume 1, page 14. See link for full details for this source. Hereinafter cited as. [S8]
    2.[S37] BP2003 volume 3, page 3473. See link for full details for this source. Hereinafter cited as. [S37]
    From: http://www.thepeerage.com/p929.htm#i9289
    ____________________________

    Richard TALBOT (4º B. Talbot)
    Born: ABT 1361
    Died: 7 Sep 1383/ 9 Sep 1396, London (of Goodrich, Herefs)
    Father: Gilbert TALBOT (3° B. Talbot)
    Mother: Petronella BUTLER
    Married: Ankaret STRANGE (B. Strange of Blackmere) 23 Aug 1383
    Children:
    1. John TALBOT (1º E. Shrewsbury)
    2. Gilbert TALBOT of Irchingfield (5º B. Strange of Blackmere)
    3. Mary TALBOT
    4. Richard TALBOT (Archbishop of Dublin)
    5. George TALBOT
    6. Anne TALBOT (C. Devon)
    7. Thomas TALBOT of Wrockwardine (Sir Knight) (had no Children) (d. 1419/20)
    8. William TALBOT
    9. Alice TALBOT
    10. Elizabeth TALBOT
    From: http://www.tudorplace.com.ar/TALBOT.htm#Richard TALBOT (4º B. Talbot)
    ______________________________

    John Talbot, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury and 1st Earl of Waterford KG (1384/1387 Blakemere, Shropshire – 17 July 1453 Castillon, France), known as "Old Talbot" was an important English military commander during the Hundred Years' War, as well as the only Lancastrian Constable of France.
    He was descended from Richard Talbot, a tenant in 1086 of Walter Giffard at Woburn and Battledsen in Bedfordshire. The Talbot family were vassals of the Giffards in Normandy.[1] Hugh Talbot, probably Richard's son, made a grant to Beaubec Abbey, confirmed by his son Richard Talbot in 1153. This Richard (d. 1175) is listed in 1166 as holding three fees of the Honour of Giffard in Buckinghamshire. He also held a fee at Linton in Herefordshire, for which his son Gilbert Talbot (d. 1231) obtained a fresh charter in 1190.[2] Gilbert's grandson Gilbert (d. 1274) married Gwenlynn Mechyll, daughter and sole heiress of the Welsh Prince Rhys Mechyll, whose armorials the Talbots thenceforth assumed in lieu of their own former arms. Their son Sir Richard Talbot, who signed the Barons' Letter, 1301, held the manor of Eccleswall in Herefordshire in right of his wife Sarah, sister of William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick. In 1331 Richard's son Gilbert Talbot (1276–1346) was summoned to Parliament, which is considered evidence of his baronial status - see Baron Talbot.[3] Gilbert's son Richard married Elizabeth Comyn, bringing with her the inheritance of Goodrich Castle in Herefordshire.
    John Talbot was second son of Richard Talbot, 4th Baron Talbot, by Ankaret le Strange, 7th Baroness Strange of Blackmere. His younger brother Richard became Archbishop of Dublin and Lord Chancellor of Ireland and one of the most influential Irish statesmen of his time.
    His father died in 1396 when Talbot was just nine years old, and so it was Ankaret's second husband, Thomas Neville, Lord Furnival, who became the major influence in his early life. The marriage also gave the opportunity of a title for her second son as Neville had no sons with the title going through his eldest daughter Maud.[4] who would become John's 1st wife.
    Talbot was married before 12 March 1407 to Maud Neville, 6th Baroness Furnivall, daughter and heiress of Thomas Neville, 5th Baron Furnivall, the son of John Neville, 3rd Baron Neville de Raby. He was summoned to Parliament in her right from 1409.
    The couple are thought to have four children:
    Thomas Talbot (19 June 1416 Finglas, Ireland - 10 August 1416)
    John Talbot, 2nd Earl of Shrewsbury (c. 1417 – 11 July 1460)
    Sir Christopher Talbot (1419–10 August 1443),
    Lady Joan Talbot (c 1422), married James Berkeley, 1st Baron Berkeley.
    In 1421 by the death of his niece he acquired the Baronies of Talbot and Strange. His first wife, Maud died on 31 May 1422. It has been suggested as an indirect result of giving birth to daughter Joan, although due to a lack of evidence of her life before her marriage to Lord Berkeley has even led to a theory that she was actually Talbot's daughter-in-law through marriage to Sir Christopher Talbot.
    On 6 September 1425, he married Lady Margaret Beauchamp, eldest daughter of Richard de Beauchamp, 13th Earl of Warwick and Elizabeth de Berkeley in the chapel at Warwick Castle. They had five children:
    John Talbot, 1st Viscount Lisle (1426 – 17 July 1453)
    Sir Louis Talbot (c 1429-1458)
    Sir Humphrey Talbot (before 1434 – c. 1492)
    Lady Eleanor Talbot (c February/March 1436 - 30 June 1468) married to Sir Thomas Butler and mistress to King Edward IV.
    Lady Elizabeth Talbot (c December 1442/January 1443). She married John de Mowbray, 4th Duke of Norfolk.
    Talbot is known to have had at least one illegitimate child, Henry. He may have served in France with his father as it is known that a bastard son of the Earl of Shrewsbury was captured by the Dauphin on 14 August 1443.[5]
    From 1404 to 1413 he served with his elder brother Gilbert in the Welsh war or the rebellion of Owain Glyndwr. Then for five years from February 1414 he was Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, where he did some fighting. He had a dispute with the Earl of Ormond and Reginald Grey, 3rd Baron Grey de Ruthyn over the inheritance for the honour of Wexford which he held.[6] Complaints were made against him both for harsh government in Ireland and for violence in Herefordshire.[7]
    The dispute with the Earl of Ormond escalated into a long-running feud between Shrewsbury and his brother, the Archbishop of Dublin, on the one hand and the Butler family on the other and their allies the Berkeleys. The feud reached its height in the 1440s, and in the end just about every senior official in Ireland had taken sides in the quarrel; both sides were reprimanded by the Privy Council for weakening English rule in Ireland. Friendly relations were finally achieved by the marriage of Shrewsbury's son and heir to Ormond's daughter.[8]
    From 1420 to 1424 he served in France, apart from a brief return at the end of the first year to organise the festivities of celebrating the coronation of Catherine of France, the bride of Henry V.[9]
    He returned to France in May 1421 and took part in the Battle of Verneuil on 17 August 1424 earning him the Order of the Garter.
    In 1425, he was lieutenant again for a short time in Ireland;[7] he served again in 1446-7.
    So far his career was that of a turbulent Marcher Lord, employed in posts where a rough hand was useful. In 1427 he went again to France,[7] where he fought alongside the Duke of Bedford and the Earl of Warwick with distinction in Maine and at the Siege of Orlâeans. He fought at the Battle of Patay on 18 June 1429 where he was captured and held prisoner for four years.
    He was released in exchange for the French leader Jean Poton de Xaintrailles and returned to England in May 1433. He stayed until July when he returned to France under the Earl of Somerset.[10]
    Talbot was a daring and aggressive soldier, perhaps the most audacious captain of the age. He and his forces were ever ready to retake a town and to meet a French advance. His trademark was rapid aggressive attacks. He was rewarded by being appointed governor and lieutenant general in France and Normandy and, in 1434, the Duke of Bedford made him Count of Clermont.
    In January 1436, he led a small force including Kyriell and routed La Hire and Xaintrailles at Ry near Rouen. The following year at Crotoy, after a daring passage of the Somme, he put a numerous Burgundian force to flight. In December 1439, following a surprise flank attack on their camp, he dispersed the 6000 strong army of the Constable Richemont, and the following year he retook Harfleur. In 1441, he pursued the French army four times over the Seine and Oise rivers in an unavailing attempt to bring it to battle.
    Around February 1442, Talbot returned to England to request urgent reinforcements for the Duke of York in Normandy. In March, under king's orders, ships were requisitioned for this purpose with Talbot himself responsible for assembling ships from the Port of London and from Sandwich.[11]
    On Whit Sunday, 20 May, Henry VI awarded him the title of Comes Salopie, translated as Earl of Shropshire but despite this he popularly became Earl of Shrewsbury. Just five days later, with the requested re-inforcements, Talbot returned to France where in June they mustered at Harfleur. During that time, he met his six-old year daughter Eleanor for the first time and almost certainly left the newly created Countess Margaret pregnant with another child.[12]
    In June 1443, Talbot again returned to England on behalf of the Duke of York to plead for reinforcements, but this time the English Council refused, instead sending a separate force under Shrewsbury's brother-in-law, Edmund Beaufort. His son, Sir Christoper stayed in England where shortly afterwards he was murdered with a lance at the age of 23 by one of his own men, Griffin Vachan of Treflidian on 10 August at "Cawce, County Salop" (Caus Castle).[13]
    He was appointed in 1445 by Henry VI (as king of France) as Constable of France. Taken hostage at Rouen in 1449 he promised never to wear armour against the French King again, and he was true to his word. However, though he did not personally fight, he continued to command English forces against the French. He was defeated and killed in 1453 at the Battle of Castillon near Bordeaux, which effectively ended English rule in the duchy of Aquitaine, a principal cause of the Hundred Years' War. His heart was buried in the doorway of St Alkmund's Church, Whitchurch, Shropshire.[14]
    The victorious French generals raised a monument to Talbot on the field called Notre Dame de Talbot and a French Chronicler paid him handsome tribute:
    "Such was the end of this famous and renowned English leader who for so long had been one of the most formidable thorns in the side of the French, who regarded him with terror and dismay" - Matthew d'Escourcy
    Although Talbot is generally remembered as a great soldier, some have raised doubts as to his generalship. In particular, charges of rashness have been raised against him. Speed and aggression were key elements in granting success in medieval war, and Talbot's numerical inferiority necessitated surprise. Furthermore, he was often in the position of trying to force battle on unwilling opponents. At his defeat at Patay in 1429 he was advised not to fight there by Sir John Fastolf, who was subsequently blamed for the debacle, but the French, inspired by Joan of Arc, showed unprecedented fighting spirit - usually they approached an English position with trepidation. The charge of rashness is perhaps more justifiable at Castillon where Talbot, misled by false reports of a French retreat, attacked their entrenched camp frontally - facing wheel to wheel artillery.
    He is portrayed heroically in Shakespeare's Henry VI, Part 1: "Valiant Lord Talbot, Earl of Shrewsbury, Created, for his rare success in arms". Talbot's failures are all blamed on Fastolf and feuding factions in the English court. Thomas Nashe, commenting on the play in his booklet Pierce Penniless, stated that Talbot's example was inspiring Englishman anew, two centuries after his death,
    How would it have joyed brave Talbot, the terror of the French, to think that after he had lain two hundred years in his tomb, he should triumph again on the stage, and have his bones new embalmed with the tears of ten thousand spectators at least (at several times) who in the tragedian that represents his person imagine they behold him fresh bleeding. I will defend it against any collian or clubfisted usurer of them all, there is no immortality can be given a man on earth like unto plays.
    John Talbot is shown as a featured character in Koei's video game Bladestorm: The Hundred Years' War, appearing as the left-arm of Edward, the Black Prince, in which he assists the former and the respective flag of England throughout his many portrayals.
    Talbot appears as one of the primary antagonists in the PSP game Jeanne d'Arc.
    From: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Talbot,_1st_Earl_of_Shrewsbury
    _________________________

    BURGH, Hugh (d.1430), of Wattlesborough, Salop and Dinas Mawddwy, Merion.
    s. of Hugh Burgh. m. (1) by 1413, Elizabeth (c.1389-bef. Oct. 1429), da. of John Mawddwy (alias de la Pole) of Dinas Mawddwy, by Elizabeth, da. and h. of Sir Fulk Corbet of Wattlesborough and h. of her bro. Fulk Mawddwy, 1s. John†; (2) c.1429, Agnes.1
    Offices Held
    Treasurer, Ire. 23 Feb. 1414-Feb. 1420.2
    Commr. of inquiry, Ire. Jan., Aug. 1415,3 Salop May 1422 (concealments), Flints. July 1428 (claims to Mold castle); weirs, Salop Nov. 1424, Dec. 1427, to raise royal loans July 1426, May 1428.
    J.p. Salop 10 Feb. 1416-Mar. 1419, Dec. 1420-d.
    Sheriff, Salop 10 Feb. 1430-d.
    Burgh apparently came from a Westmorland family, and his earliest connexions with Shropshire were as a retainer of Thomas Neville, Lord Furnival, the brother of the earl of Westmorland, and his wife Ankaret, Lady Strange of Blackmere and widow of Richard, Lord Talbot. Burgh served as Neville’s feoffee in the lordship of Worksop, Nottinghamshire, but before Neville’s death in 1407 he entered the service of Lady Ankaret’s younger son, Sir John Talbot (who had married Neville’s elder daughter and coheir by his former wife and was subsequently to succeed him as Lord Furnival). In 1405 Burgh was Talbot’s second-in-command of the garrison of Montgomery, and he was still lieutenant in June 1407 when he collected 100 marks at the Exchequer for the soldiers’ wages. It seems likely that he continued in Talbot’s company throughout the pacification of Wales. In 1408 Lady Ankaret named him as a feoffee of the lordship of Corfham for the settlement of the estate on Talbot, and three years later he performed a similar service as an attorney for the transfer of certain lands in Yorkshire to his superior’s wife. Burgh was involved in other transactions relating to the Talbot and Strange estates and he evidently occupied a position of trust in the Talbot family’s affairs. There is no record of him receiving an annuity from his lord, but in 1414 he was granted by him two thirds of the manor of Alberbury, Shropshire, no doubt in lieu.4
    .... etc.
    From: http://www.historyofparliamentonline.org/volume/1386-1421/member/burgh-hugh-1430
    ___________________________________

    .... etc.
    Gilbert Talbot (1276–1346), Lord Chamberlain of the Household to King Edward III, was summoned to Parliament as Lord Talbot in 1331, which is accepted as evidence of his baronial status at that date.
    He was descended from Richard Talbot, a tenant in 1086 of Walter Giffard at Woburn and Battledsen in Bedfordshire. The Talbot family were vassals of the Giffards in Normandy.[4] Hugh Talbot, probably his son, made a grant to Beaubec Abbey, confirmed by his son Richard Talbot in 1153. This Richard (d. 1175) is listed in 1166 as holding three fees of the Honour of Giffard in Buckinghamshire. He also held a fee at Linton in Herefordshire, for which his son Gilbert Talbot (d. 1231) obtained a fresh charter in 1190.[5] Gilbert's grandson Gilbert (d. 1274) married Gwenlynn Mechyll, daughter and sole heiress of the Welsh Prince Rhys Mechyll, whose armorials the Talbots thenceforth assumed in lieu of their own former arms. Their son Sir Richard Talbot, who signed the Barons' Letter, 1301, held the manor of Eccleswall in Herefordshire in right of his wife Sarah, sister of William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick. In 1331 Richard's son Gilbert Talbot (1276–1346) was summoned to Parliament, which is considered evidence of his baronial status.[6]
    The first baron's grandson, the 3rd Baron Talbot, died in Spain supporting John of Gaunt's claim to the throne of Castile. Richard, the fourth Baron, married Ankaret, 7th Baroness Strange of Blackmere, daughter and heiress of John le Strange, 4th Baron Strange of Blackmere. In 1387, during his father's lifetime, Richard 4th Baron was summoned to Parliament as Ricardo Talbot de Blackmere in right of his wife. His son [Gilbert], the fifth Baron, also succeeded his mother as eighth Baron Strange of Blackmere.
    On the early death of the 5th Baron, the titles passed to his daughter, Ankaret, the sixth and ninth holder of the titles. However, she died a minor and was succeeded by her uncle, John seventh Baron Talbot. John married Maud Nevill, 6th Baroness Furnivall, and, in 1409, he was summoned to Parliament in right of his wife as Johann Talbot de Furnyvall. In 1442 John was created Earl of Shrewsbury in the Peerage of England and in 1446 Earl of Waterford in the Peerage of Ireland. .... etc.
    From: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baron_Talbot
    ___________________________

    Talbot, Baron (E, 1332 - abeyant 1777)
    Gilbert [Talbot], 3rd Baron Talbot
    born c. 1332
    mar. (1) bef. 8 Sep 1352 Lady Pernel Butler (d. c. 1368), only dau. of James [Butler], 1st Earl of Ormonde, by his wife Lady Eleanor de Bohun, 1st dau. of Humphrey [de Bohun], 4th Earl of Hereford and 9th Earl of Essex, by his wife and third cousin Princess Elizabeth, widow of John I, Count of Holland and Zealand, and 10th dau. by his first wife of King Edward I
    children by first wife
    1. Sir Richard Talbot, later 4th Baron Talbot
    1. Elizabeth Talbot (d. 10 Jan 1401/2), mar. bef. 3 Feb 1379/80 Henry [Grey], 5th Baron Grey of Wilton, and had issue
    mar. (2) bef. 16 Nov 1379 Lady Joan Cherleton (widow of John [Cherleton], 3rd Baron Cherleton; d. bef. 1397), 2nd dau. of Ralph [de Stafford], 1st Earl of Stafford, by his second wife Lady Margaret de Audley, suo jure Baroness Audley, only dau. and hrss. of Hugh [de Audley], 1st Earl of Gloucester, by his wife Lady Margaret de Gaveston, widow of Piers [de Gaveston], 1st Earl of Cornwall, and 2nd dau. of Gilbert [de Clare], 6th Earl of Gloucester, by his second wife the Princess Joan "of Acre", 5th dau. by his first wife of King Edward I
    died 24 Apr 1387
    suc. by son by first wife
    Richard [Talbot], 4th Baron Talbot
    born c. 1361
    mar. bef. 23 Aug 1383 Ankaret Lestrange, suo jure Baroness Strange of Blackmere (b. c. 1361; mar. betw. 8 Mar and 4 Jul 1401 as his second wife Thomas [Nevill], jure uxoris 5th and 4th Baron Furnivall; d. 1 Jun 1413), only dau. and eventual sole hrss. of John [Lestrange], 1st or 4th Baron Strange of Blackmere, by his wife Lady Mary FitzAlan, 2nd dau. of Richard [FitzAlan], 10th or 3rd Earl of Arundel, by his first wife Isabel le Despencer, 2nd dau. of Hugh [le Despencer], 1st and de jure 2nd Baron le Despencer, by his wife Lady Eleanor de Clare, sister and cohrss of Gilbert [de Clare], 7th Earl of Gloucester, and 1st dau. of Gilbert [de Clare], 6th Earl of Gloucester, by his second wife Princess Joan "of Acre", 2nd surv. dau. by his first wife of King Edward I
    children
    1. Sir Gilbert Talbot, later 5th Baron Talbot later 5th Baron Strange of Blackmere
    2. Sir John Talbot, later jure uxoris 6th and 5th Baron Furnivall later 7th Baron Strange of Blackmere and 7th Baron Talbot later 1st Earl of Shrewsbury
    3. Most Rev Richard Talbot, Archbishop of Dublin
    4. Thomas Talbot, of Wrockwardine, co. Shrewsbury
    died 8 or 9 Sepc1396
    suc. by son
    Gilbert [Talbot], 5th Baron Talbot later 5th Baron Strange of Blackmere, KG
    born 1383
    mar. (1)
    mar. (2) c. 1415 Beatrice ....., a lady of Portugal (mar. (2) bef. 1423 Thomas Fettiplace, of East Shefford, co. Berkshire; d. 25 Dec 1447; bur. at East Shefford, co. Berkshire)
    only child by second wife
    1. Ankaret Talbot, later suo jure Baroness Talbot and Baroness Strange of Blackmere
    died s.p.m. 19 Oct 1418
    suc. by daughter
    From: http://www.cracroftspeerage.co.uk/online/content/talbot1332.htm#TALBOT_1332_7
    ____________________________

    Shrewsbury, Earl of (E, 1442)
    John [Talbot], jure uxoris 6th and 5th Baron Furnival later 7th Baron Talbot and 10th Baron Strange of Blackmere later 1st Earl of Shrewsbury, KG
    2nd son of Richard [Talbot], 4th Baron Talbot, by his wife Ankaret Lestrange, suo jure Baroness Lestrange of Blackmere, dau. of John [Lestrange], 4th Baron Strange of Blackmere
    born c. 1384
    mar. (1) bef. 12 Mar 1406/7 Maud de Nevill, suo jure Baroness Furnivall (b. c. 1392; d. bef. 1425; bur. at Worksop Priory, co. Nottingham), only child of Thomas [de Nevill], jure uxoris 5th and 4th Baron Furnivall, by his first wife Joan de Furnival, suo jure Baroness Furnivall, only child of William [de Furnivall], 4th and 3rd Baron Furnivall
    children by first wife
    1. Sir John Talbot, later 2nd Earl of Shrewsbury
    2. Sir Christopher Talbot, of Treeton (d. 10 Jul 1460 at the Battle of Northampton)
    1. Lady Joan Talbot, mar. (1) 25 Jul 1457 as his fourth wife James [de Berkeley], 1st Baron Berkeley, and (2) bef. 26 May 1474 Edmund Hungerford
    mar. (2) 6 Sep 1425 Lady Margaret de Beauchamp (b. 1404; d. 14 Jun 1467; bur. in the Jesus Chapel, St Paul's Cathedral, London), 1st dau. and cohrss. of Richard [de Beauchamp], 13th Earl of Warwick, by his first wife Elizabeth de Berkeley, suo jure Baroness Berkeley, Baroness Lisle of Kingston and Baroness Teyes, only child of Thomas [de Berkeley], 5th Baron Berkeley, by his wife Margaret de Lisle, suo jure Baroness Lisle of Kingston and Baroness Teyes, only child of William [de Lisle], 2nd Baron de Lisle and Baron Teyes
    children by second wife
    3. John Talbot, later 1st Viscount Lisle
    4. Sir Humphrey Talbot, Marshal of Calais (d. 1492)
    5. Sir Lewis Talbot, of Penyard, co. Hereford
    2. Lady Elizabeth Talbot (d. bef. 10 May 1507), mar. bef. 27 Nov 1448 John [de Mowbray], 5th Duke of Norfolk, and had issue
    3. Lady Eleanor Talbot, allegedly precontracted to marry King Edward IV - on account of this the King's marriage to Lady Elizabeth Wydville was declared invalid on 25 Jun 1483 by the Act of Parliament known as "Titulus Regius" and at the same time their children were declared illegitimate and unfit to inherit the Crown - the marriage was ultimately recognised as valid in October 1485 by the first Parliament of King Henry VII and its issue were restored in blood accordingly - Lady Eleanor had an illegitimate son by King Edward, Edward de Wigmore, who died in infancy in 1468 (d. 30 Jun 1468), mar. Sir Thomas Boteler (dvp. and sp. betw. 1450 and 1468), only son and heir ap. of Ralph [Boteler], 7th and 1st Baron Sudeley, by his first wife Elizabeth Hende, widow of John Hende
    died 17 Jul 1453 (bur. at St Alkmund's, Whitchurch, co. Shropshire)
    created
    20 May 1442 Earl of Shrewsbury
    17 Jul 1446 Earl of Waterford and Hereditary Steward of Ireland
    suc. by son by first wife
    note King's Esquire bef. 1407; sum. to Parliament jure uxoris as Baron Furnivall from 26 Oct 1409 to 26 Feb 1420/21; knighted bef. 1413; Commissioner to arrest and imprison Lollards 1413/4; Commissioner to enforce the Statute of Leicester against the Lollards 1414; King's Lieutenant in Ireland 1414-20 and 1444/5-52; Knight of the Garter 1424; Justiciar of Ireland 1425; Captain of Coutances and Pont de l'Ache 1427/8; Captain of Falaise 1428; took part in the siege of Orleans 1428-29; suc. his niece 13 Dec 1431 as 10th Baron Strange of Blackmere and 7th Baron Talbot; cr. Count of Clermont Jun 1434; involved in the French campaign 1435-42; Keeper of the Castle and Town of Porchester and Governor of Portsmouth 1451/2-53; returned to the French Campaign 1451/2 and slain at the siege of Castillon with his son John, Lord Lisle
    From: http://www.cracroftspeerage.co.uk/online/content/shrewsbury1442.htm?zoom_highlight=talbot
    _________________________________

    'Talbot01'
    (1) Visitation (Yorkshire,1563-4, Talbot I) contains an illustrious pedigree for the early generations of this family, indicating that a John Talbot came into England from Normandy with the Conqueror and married the daughter of a Rychard, Lord Talbot, descended from a John, Lord Talbot of Eclesfeld, etc.. However, that pedigree appears to be largely spurious. Similarly, Visitation (Worcestershire, 1569, Talbot) provides a pedigree going back 8 generations before the 1st Earl much of which appears spurious. Collins reports that this family is 'said to be in England before the Norman Conquest' but starts with the following Richard. TCP is cautious about the origins of this family, pointing out that Talbot was a common Norman nickname. [A talbot was a long-eared dog used for tracking and hunting. Any reference to someone as 'de Talbot' should probably be read as 'le Talbot'.] BE1883 starts with the following Richard but, apart from mentioning that his son Geoffrey was ancestor of the Talbots of Bashall (which TCP appears to disagree with), then follows the descent of his son Hugh
    (2) On Temp44 we show the interesting additional connections shown by a large online database which we wish to investigate further but which we think important enough to draw attention to.
    Richard Talbot (a 1085)
    m. ?? de Gournay (dau of Gerard, Sire de Gournay, Lord of Yarmouth)
    1. Geoffrey Talbot (d c1129/30)
    His family is as reported in a note to TCP (Munchensy of Norfolk).
    m. Agnes de Lacy (dau of Walter de Laci)
    A. Geoffrey Talbot (d 1140)
    B. Sybil Talbot
    m. Payn FitzJohn of Ewyas, Sheriff of Hereford and Salop
    2. Hugh Talbot (a 1118)
    m. (div) Beatrix de Mandeville (d 19.04.1197, dau of William de Mandeville)
    A. Richard Talbot (d before 25.12.1175) first in the pedigree given by TCP (Talbot)
    m. _ Bulmer (dau of Stephen Bulmer of Appletreewick)
    i. Gilbert Talbot (d before 13.02.1230/1)
    a. Richard Talbot (d before 13.04.1234)
    m. (before 1124) Aline or Aliva Basset (dau of Alan Basset, Baron of Wycombe, widow of Drew de Montacute)
    (1) Gilbert Talbot (d 1274)
    m. Gwendaline (dau of Rhys ap Griffith ap Rhys ap ap Griffith ap Rhys ap Tewdwr Mawr, King of South Wales)
    (A) Richard Talbot, lord of Eccleswall, Sheriff of Gloucester (d 1306)
    m. Sarah de Beauchamp (dau of William de Beauchamp of Elmley, 1st Earl of Warwick)
    (i) Sir Gilbert Talbot, 1st Baron, Lord Chamberlain (d 1346)
    m. Anne Boteler (dau of William Boteler of Wemme)
    (a) Sir Richard Talbot, 2nd Baron (d 1356)
    m. (before 1325) Elizabeth Comyn (b 1299, a 1326, dau of Sir John Comyn, Lord of Badenoch)
    ((1)) Gilbert Talbot, 3rd Baron (d 24.04.1387)
    m1. Petronilla Butler (d 1387, dau of James Butler, 1st Earl of Ormonde)
    ((A)) Sir Richard Talbot, 4th Baron (d 07.09.1396)
    m. Ankaret le Strange (dau of John Strange, 4th Lord of Blackmere)
    ((i)) Gilbert Talbot, 5th Baron, Lord Strange of Blackmere (b 1383, d 19.10.1418-9)
    m1. (before 20.05.1392) Joan Plantagenet (b 1384, d 16.08.1400, dau of Thomas Plantagenet, Duke of Gloucester)
    m2. (c1415) Beatrix of Portugal (m2. Thomas Fettiplace of East Shefford) see here
    ((a)) Ankaret Talbot, Baroness (b c1416, d unm 13.12.1431)
    ((ii)) Sir John Talbot, 1st Earl of Shrewbury (b 1390, d 20.07.1453)
    m1. (12.03.1406) Maud, Baroness Furnivall (d before 1433, dau of Thomas Nevill, Lord Furnival)
    m2. Margaret Beauchamp (dau of Richard de Beauchamp, 5th Earl of Warwick)
    ((iii)) Richard Talbot, Archbishop of Dublin, Lord Deputy of Ireland
    ((iv)) Thomas Talbot of Wrockwardine
    ((v)) Anne Talbot
    m. Hugh Courtenay, 4th Earl of Devon (b 1389, d 16.06.1422)
    ((vi)) Mary Talbot probably of this generation
    m. Sir Thomas Greene of Green's Norton (d 1417)
    ((B)) Elizabeth Talbot
    m. Sir Henry de Grey, 5th Lord of Wilton (d 1395)
    m2. Joan Stafford (dau of Ralph, Earl of Stafford)
    (ii) .... etc.
    Main source(s): BP1934 (Shrewsbury), BE1883 (Talbot - various), Visitation (Surtees Society 1869, Yorkshire, Dugdale 1664-6, Talbot of Thorneton) with support from TCP (Talbot), Collins (1741, Talbot Earl of Shrewsbury).
    From: Stirnet.com
    http://www.stirnet.com/genie/data/british/tt/talbot01.php
    ____________________________

    Lord Talbot de Blackmere IV

    http://www.gordonbanks.com/gordon/family/2nd_Site/geb-p/p33.htm#i1611

    Sir Richard Talbot 4th Lord Talbot of Blackmere, M.P.1

    M, b. circa 1361, d. between 8 September 1396 and 9 September 1396, #1611

    Father Sir Gilbert Talbot M.P.2,3,4,5,6 b. circa 1332, d. 24 April 1387

    Mother Petronilla Butler7,4,5,6 d. 1368

    Birth* Sir Richard Talbot 4th Lord Talbot of Blackmere, M.P. was born circa 1361.7,8,9,10,1,5

    Knighted* He was knighted by Richard II at his coronation on 16 July 1377.5

    Event-Misc Was in Ireland with Edmund, Earl of March in January 1381 at Ireland.5

    Marriage* He married Ankaret le Strange, daughter of Sir John le Strange and Mary FitzAlan, before 23 August 1383.11,12,9,10,1,5

    Event-Misc* Summoned to Parliament in consequence of his marriage to the heiress of Strange of Blackmere. Between 3 March 1384 and 17 December 1387.10,1,5

    Event-Misc Summoned to be present 14 Jul for service against the Scots on 13 June 1385 at Newcastle-on-Tyne, Northumbria, England.5

    Event-Misc Seised of his father's lands on 18 June 1387.5

    Event-Misc Was summoned to Parliament by writ directed Ricard Talbot de Godriche Castell. Between 1 December 1387 and 13 November 1393.5

    Event-Misc Was (upon the death of the 3rd Earl of Pembroke) awarded the Honor of Wexford in Ireland, as coheir through Elizabeth Comyn, his grandmother. On 31 December 1389.5

    Event-Misc Was commissioner of array for Shropshire on 1 March 1392 at Shropshire, England.5

    Event-Misc Was in Ireland in the King's service. In February 1395 at Ireland.5

    Death* He died between 8 September 1396 and 9 September 1396.7,11,9,10,1,5

    Arms* His arms were Gules a lion and a border engrailed or.1

    Family Ankaret le Strange b. 1361, d. 1 June 1413

    Marriage* He married Ankaret le Strange, daughter of Sir John le Strange and Mary FitzAlan, before 23 August 1383.11,12,9,10,1,5

    Children

    Mary Talbot d. 13 Apr 1434

    Richard Talbot d. 15 Aug 1449

    Sir Thomas Talbot Knt.

    Sir William Talbot Knt.

    Elizabeth Talbot

    Anne Talbot

    Alice Talbot

    Eleanor Talbot

    Sir Gilbert Talbot K.G. b. 1383, d. 19 Oct 1418

    Sir John Talbot K.G. b. 1384, d. 17 Jul 1453

    Last Edited 5 Jan 2005

    Citations

    [S284] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, Talbot 11.

    [S183] Jr. Meredith B. Colket, Marbury Ancestry, p. 39.

    [S233] Frederick Lewis Weis, Magna Charta Sureties, 141-6.

    [S234] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry, Talbot 9.

    [S287] G. E. C[okayne], CP, XII - 616.

    [S284] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, Talbot 10.

    [S168] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots, 14-32.

    [S183] Jr. Meredith B. Colket, Marbury Ancestry, p.36.

    [S233] Frederick Lewis Weis, Magna Charta Sureties, 141-7.

    [S234] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry, Talbot 8.

    [S183] Jr. Meredith B. Colket, Marbury Ancestry, p. 36.

    [S233] Frederick Lewis Weis, Magna Charta Sureties, 34-8.

    Additional Source: "Pedigree Resource File," database, FamilySearch (http://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.2.1/SPCG-RNK : accessed 1 September 2012), entry for Richard /Talbot/.

    end

    Richard married Ankaret le Strange, Baroness of Furnival Abt 1371, Blakemere, Hereford, England. Ankaret (daughter of John le Strange, 4th Lord Blackmere and Mary de Arundel) was born Abt 1361, Blakemere, Hereford, England; died 1 Jun 1413, (London) England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 5.  Ankaret le Strange, Baroness of Furnival was born Abt 1361, Blakemere, Hereford, England (daughter of John le Strange, 4th Lord Blackmere and Mary de Arundel); died 1 Jun 1413, (London) England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Ankaret Talbot, 6th Baroness Talbot
    • Also Known As: Ankaret Talbot, 9th Baroness Strange of Blackmere

    Children:
    1. Alice Talbot was born Abt 1375, Blakemere, Hereford, England.
    2. Anne Talbot died 16 Jan 1441.
    3. Richard Talbot, Archbishop of Dublin
    4. Mary Talbot died 13 Apr 1434.
    5. Gilbert Talbot, 5th Lord Talbot
    6. Elizabeth Talbot was born ~1387; died 1407.
    7. 2. John Talbot, 4th Earl Shrewsbury, Knight of the Garte was born 1384-1392, Shrewsbury, Shropshire, England; died 17 Jul 1453.


Generation: 4

  1. 8.  Gilbert Talbot, 3rd Baron Talbot was born 0___ 1332, Goodrich Castle, Hereford, England; was christened Ecclesfield, West Riding, Yorkshire, England (son of Richard Talbot, 2nd Baron Talbot and Elizabeth Comyn); died 24 Apr 1386, Roales del Pan, Spain.

    Gilbert married Petronella Butler Bef 8 Sep 1352. Petronella (daughter of James Butler, 1st Earl of Ormond and Eleanor de Bohun, Countess of Ormonde) was born 0___ 1332, Ormonde, Kerry, Munster, Ireland; was christened Pollecott, Buckingham, England; died 23 Apr 1368. [Group Sheet]


  2. 9.  Petronella Butler was born 0___ 1332, Ormonde, Kerry, Munster, Ireland; was christened Pollecott, Buckingham, England (daughter of James Butler, 1st Earl of Ormond and Eleanor de Bohun, Countess of Ormonde); died 23 Apr 1368.
    Children:
    1. 4. Richard Talbot, 4th Baron Talbot was born 0___ 1361, Goodrich Castle, Hereford, England; died 7 Sep 1396, London, Middlesex, England.

  3. 10.  John le Strange, 4th Lord Blackmere was born 13 Jan 1331, Whitechurch, Shropshire, England; died 12 May 1361, Blakemere, Hereford, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: 4th Baron Strange of Blackmere

    Notes:

    Biography

    This biography is a rough draft. It was auto-generated by a GEDCOM import and needs to be edited.

    Occupation

    Occupation: 4th Baron Strange of Blackmere
    Name

    Name: John /le STRANGE/ [1][2][3]
    Birth

    Date: ca 1324/32
    Place: Whitechurch,Shropshire
    Date: BET 13 JAN 1331 AND 1332
    Place: Whitechurch, SAL, England[4]
    Marriage

    Date: ABT 1352[5]
    Death

    Date: 12 MAY 1361[6]
    Sources

    ROYAL ANCESTRY by Douglas Richardson Vol. I page 375
    www.geni.com/people/Baron-John-le-Strange/6000000000351064723
    Source: S1952 Title: Type: Ancestral File Number Abbreviation: Type: Ancestral File Number
    Source: S2 Title: Pedigree Resource File CD 49 Abbreviation: Pedigree Resource File CD 49 Publication: (Salt Lake City, UT: Intellectual Reserve, Inc., 2002)
    Source: S3 Title: Ancestral File (TM) Abbreviation: Ancestral File (TM) Author: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day SAINTS Publication: June 1998 (c), data as of 5 JAN 1998 Repository: #R1
    Repository: R1 Name: Unknown
    Source: S4 Title: hofundssonAnces.ged Abbreviation: hofundssonAnces.ged Repository: #R1
    Marlyn Lewis.
    Richardson, Douglas, and Kimball G. Everingham. Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families. (2nd edition, 4 vol.), Volume 1, page 209, BLACKMERE 7.
    Richardson, Douglas: Plantagenet Ancestry, 2nd edn. (2011), 3 vols, Volume 1, page 277, BLACKMERE 9.

    John married Mary de Arundel ~ 1352. Mary (daughter of Edmund FitzAlan, Knight, 9th Earl of Arundel and Alice de Warenne, Countess of Arundel) was born Corfham Castle, Diddlebury, Shropshire, England; died 29 Aug 1396, Corfham, Shropshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 11.  Mary de Arundel was born Corfham Castle, Diddlebury, Shropshire, England (daughter of Edmund FitzAlan, Knight, 9th Earl of Arundel and Alice de Warenne, Countess of Arundel); died 29 Aug 1396, Corfham, Shropshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Mary FitzAlan

    Children:
    1. 5. Ankaret le Strange, Baroness of Furnival was born Abt 1361, Blakemere, Hereford, England; died 1 Jun 1413, (London) England.


Generation: 5

  1. 16.  Richard Talbot, 2nd Baron Talbot was born 1302-1305, Wyke, Axminster, Devon, England (son of Gilbert Talbot, 1st Baron Talbot and Anne le Boteler); died 23 Oct 1356.

    Notes:

    Richard [Talbot], 2nd Baron Talbot
    born
    c. 1305
    mar.
    betw. 24 Jul 1326 and 23 Mar 1326/7 Elizabeth Comyn (b. 1 Nov 1299; mar. (2) betw. 21 Feb 1357/8 and 16 Feb 1360/1 Sir John Bromwych; d. 20 Nov 1372), 2nd dau. and cohrss. of John Comyn, Lord of Badenoch, by his wife Joan de Valence, sister and cohrss. of Aymer [de Valence], 1st Earl of Pembroke, and 3rd dau. of William de Valence, Lord of Valence, Montignac, Bellac, Rancon and Champagnac, by his wife Joan de Munchensy, dau. of Sir Warin de Munchensy, of Swanscombe, co. Kent, Winfarthing and Gooderstone, co. Norfolk, etc., by his first wife Lady Joan Marshal, sister and cohrss. in her issue of Anselm [Marshal], 9th Earl of Pembroke, and 2nd dau. of William [Marshal], jure uxoris 4th Earl of Pembroke
    children
    1. Sir Gilbert Talbot, later 3rd Baron Talbot
    died
    23 Oct 1356 (bur. at Flanesford Priory)
    created
    by writ v.p. 27 Jan 1331/2 Baron Talbot
    suc. by
    son


    end

    Richard married Elizabeth Comyn Abt 1325, Wyke, Axminster, Devon, England. Elizabeth (daughter of John "The Red" Comyn, III, Lord of Badenoch and Joan de Valence) was born 1 Nov 1299, Wyke, Axminster, Devon, England; died 20 Nov 1372. [Group Sheet]


  2. 17.  Elizabeth ComynElizabeth Comyn was born 1 Nov 1299, Wyke, Axminster, Devon, England (daughter of John "The Red" Comyn, III, Lord of Badenoch and Joan de Valence); died 20 Nov 1372.

    Notes:

    Elizabeth de Comyn (1 November 1299 - 20 November 1372) was a medieval noblewoman and heiress, notable for being kidnapped by the Despenser family towards the end of the reign of King Edward II.

    Background

    Elizabeth was born to John III Comyn, Lord of Badenoch, also known as the "Red Comyn", a powerful Scottish nobleman related to the Scottish crown, and Joan de Valence, the daughter of the French knight William de Valence, 1st Earl of Pembroke. She was the youngest of three children, with an elder sister, Joan de Comyn, and brother, John de Comyn. Her father was stabbed to death in 1306 by Robert the Bruce and Elizabeth and her siblings were sent south to England for their own safety. Joan married David II Strathbogie, the earl of Atholl, whilst her brother John later died at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314, fighting Robert.

    Inheritance and kidnap

    In 1324 Elizabeth's uncle on her father's side, Aymer de Valence, the earl of Pembroke, died. Since he had no surviving children, Aymer's considerable lands were then divided amongst his sisters; Isabel de Valence had died in 1305, leaving her share to her son, John Hastings, whilst Elizabeth's mother left lands to her daughters Joan and Elizabeth. Joan inherited the manor and castle of Mitford, the manor of Ponteland, and lands in Little Eland, and the manor of Foston. Elizabeth inherited the powerful fortress of Goodrich Castle and the manor of Painswick.

    By the mid-1320s, however, England was in the grip of the oppressive rule of the Marcher lords Hugh le Despenser the older and his son Hugh Despenser the younger, the royal favourites of King Edward II.[1] As part of a "sweeping revenge" on their rivals, especially in the Marches, the Despensers illegally seized a wide range of properties, particularly from vulnerable targets such as widows, or wives whose husbands were out of favour with the king.[2]


    Elizabeth de Comyn was held by the Despensers in an attempt to gain ownership of the powerful castle of Goodrich, shown here.
    John Hastings was effectively controlled by the Despensers and they ensured that he inherited an unequally large settlement of the Pembroke lands, anticipating that they would be able to marry him into their family and thereby acquire control of the estates themselves.[3] To deal with Elizabeth, however, stronger measures were necessary. Upon her inheritance, Hugh le Despenser the younger promptly kidnapped Elizabeth in London and transported her to Herefordshire to be imprisoned in her own castle at Goodrich.[4] Threatened with death, Elizabeth was finally forced to sign over the castle and other lands to the Despensers in April 1325.[5] She was also forced to sign a debt notice of ¹10,000, a huge sum,[6] which was witnessed by John de Bousser, a corrupt royal justice.[7]

    Released, Elizabeth then married the English knight Richard Talbot, the 2nd Baron Talbot. Queen Isabella of France landed in England in late 1326 and deposed both the Despensers and her husband Edward II; Richard promptly seized Goodrich Castle from the Despensers, and Talbot and Elizabeth regained their legal title to the castle the following year.[8] The Despensers were executed by Isabella, who killed Hugh the Younger in a particularly gruesome fashion.

    Later years

    Elizabeth and Richard did well in the coming years. They had a son, Gilbert, in 1332. Richard progressed at court under Edward III and eventually became a royal steward. After Richard's death in 1356, Elizabeth remarried to Sir John Bromwich. She died in 1372.[9] Elizabeth's heraldic device was three garbs, which she maintained as her own, rather than adopting her husbands'.[10]

    Bibliography

    Brayley, Edward William and William Tombleson. (1823) A Series of Views of the Most Interesting Remains of Ancient Castles of England and Wales. London: Longman.
    Doherty, P.C. (2003) Isabella and the Strange Death of Edward II. London: Robinson.
    Hull, Lise and Stephen Whitehorne. (2008) Great Castles of Britain & Ireland. London: New Holland Publishers.
    Fryde, Natalie. (2003) The Tyranny and Fall of Edward II 1321-1326. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    McAndrew, Bruce A. (2006) Scotland's historic heraldry. Woodbridge: Boydell Press.
    Prestwich, Michael. (2007) Plantagenet England 1225-1360. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    Rickard, John. (2002) The Castle Community: the Personnel of English and Welsh Castles, 1272-1422. Woodbridge: Boydell Press.
    Underhill, Frances Ann. (1999) For her good estate: the life of Elizabeth de Burgh. London: Palgrave Macmillna.
    Weir, Alison. (2006) Queen Isabella: She-Wolf of France, Queen of England. London: Pimlico Books.

    References

    Jump up ^ Doherty, pp.74-5.
    Jump up ^ Weir, p.138.
    Jump up ^ Underhill, p.34.
    Jump up ^ Hull and Whitehorne, p.37.
    Jump up ^ Rickard, p.37; Brayley and Tombleson, p.2.
    Jump up ^ Prestwich, p.207.
    Jump up ^ Fryde, p.115.
    Jump up ^ Rickard, p.242; Hull and Whitehorne, p.37.
    Jump up ^ McAndrew, p.158.
    Jump up ^ McAndrew, p.158.

    Children:
    1. 8. Gilbert Talbot, 3rd Baron Talbot was born 0___ 1332, Goodrich Castle, Hereford, England; was christened Ecclesfield, West Riding, Yorkshire, England; died 24 Apr 1386, Roales del Pan, Spain.

  3. 18.  James Butler, 1st Earl of OrmondJames Butler, 1st Earl of Ormond was born ~ 1305, Arlow, County Wicklow, Ireland (son of Edmund Butler, Knight, Earl of Carrick and Joan Fitzgerald, Countess of Carrick); died 6 Jan 1338, Gowran Castle, County Kilkenny, Ireland; was buried St. Mary's Collegiate Church Gowran, Gowran, County Kilkenny, Ireland.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Chief Butler of Ireland

    Notes:

    Father: Sir Edmund Butler of Gowran (1268-1321)

    Mother: Joan Fitzgerald, Lady Butler of Gowran (~1282-1320)

    Birth: 18 Mar 1305 Ireland

    “28 Feb. 1327, Westminster…Order to deliver to James le Botiller, son and heir of Edmund le Botiler of Ireland, the issues of his father’s lands from 2 December, in the 19th year of the late king’s reign, when the said king took his homage for his father’s land, and rendered the same to him…that although he entered the lands in Ireland that are of his inheritance by pretext of the said order, the issues thereof from the said 2 December until 18 March following are detained from him” [CCR 1327-1330]; “25 Oct. 1327, Nottingham…as well of the inheritance of James le Botiller, lately a minor, as of others” [CPR 1327-1330]; “He was ‘lately a minor,’ 25 Oct. 1327. Possibly he came of age 18 Mar. 1325/6, to which date the issues of his lands were retained by the King’s officers.”1

    Baptism:

    “James’s name may reflect his father’s devotion to Santiago de Compostela, for in 1320 Edmund, his wife, and son were released from a vow to visit the shrine of St James.”2

    Death: 16 Feb 1338 Gowran Castle, Co. Kilkenny, Ireland

    “1337…Item, eodem anno, obiit apud Baligaveran, dominus Jacobus le Botiller, primus comes Hermonie; vir liberalis et amicabilis, facetus et decorus, in flore juventutis flos emarcuit xii. Kal: Marcii, die Martis in sero” [Annalium Hiberniae Chronicon];3 “The account of James le Botiller, lately Earl of Ormond, father of James, now Earl, for the issues of the King’s prise of wines in Ireland from the feast of St. Hilary 8 Edward III…to February 16, 12 Edward III, on which day the said Earl died…August, 1364.”4 Friar Clyn stated the Earl died on 18 February, but the writs following his death were issued on that day, and instead 16 February, as reported by his son the second Earl in 1364, would seem to be the accurate date of death.

    Burial: St Mary Collegiate Church, Gowran, co. Kilkenny, Ireland

    “And was bur. at Gowran, the chief seat of the family before the purchase of Kilkenny Castle. His father had founded a chantry there (Journal, R. Soc. Antiq. [I.], vol. xl, p. 344; O.D., vol. i, no. 470).”1

    Occupation: 1st Earl of Ormond 1328-1338

    Spouse:



    Eleanor de Bohun, Countess of Ormond

    Marriage: 21 Nov 1328

    Date is of marriage pardon: “21 Nov. 1328, Westminster. Pardon and acquittance to James le Botiller, earl of Ormound, the king’s kinsman, who married Eleanor de Bohoun, the king’s kinswoman, with his consent, of the arrears of the fine of 2,000 marks, made by him with the late king for the marriage” [CPR 1327-1330]; “Having, in 1327, married Eleanor, fecond daughter of Humphrey Bohun, the fourth Earl of Hereford and Effex.”5 Lodge, whom CP follows, provides no source for his marriage date of 1327, and the Patent Rolls show Eleanor was unmarried as late as February 1328. The marriage likely took place in the autumn of that year, close to the time James was created Earl of Ormond.

    Children:

    John Butler (1330-by 1332)

    James Butler (1331-1382)

    Pernel Butler (~1335-1368)



    Sources

    1. The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain, and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct, or Dormant – New Edition, Revised and Much Enlarged, George Edward Cokayne et al (eds.), St. Catherine Press Limited (London: 1910-1959), 13 vols.

    2. Robin Frame, “Butler, James, first earl of Ormond (c.1305–1338),” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, 2004.

    3. The Annals of Ireland by Friar John Clyn, Together with the Annals of Ross, Very Rev. Richard Butler (ed.), Irish Archaeological Society (Dublin: 1849).

    4. Calendar of Ormond Deeds: Volume III, 1413-1509 A.D., Edmund Curtis (ed.), Irish Manuscripts Commission (Dublin: 1935).

    5. John Lodge, The Peerage of Ireland: or, a Genealogical History of the Present Nobility of that Kingdom: Revised, Enlarged and Continued to the Present Time, Mervyn Archdall (ed.), James Moore (Dublin: 1789), 7 vols.

    *

    James Butler, 1st Earl of Ormond (c. 1305 – 6 January 1338. James is buried in St. Mary's Collegiate Church Gowran, Gowran, Co. Kilkenny), was a noble in the Peerage of Ireland.

    Ancestry

    He was the son of Edmund Butler, Earl of Carrick, Justiciar of Ireland, (1268- 13 September 1321) and Joan FitzGerald, Countess of Carrick. His paternal grandparents were Theobald le Botiller (1242–1285), (son of Theobald le Botiller and Margery de Burgh), and Joan FitzJohn (FitzGeffrey) (died 4 April 1303), daughter of John FitzGeoffrey, Lord of Shere,[1] Justiciar of Ireland, and Isabel Bigod. His maternal grandfather was John FitzThomas FitzGerald, 1st Earl of Kildare.

    Titles

    Upon his father's death in 1321, the only hereditary title that James held was that of Chief Butler Of Ireland. As the 7th Chief Butler, he inherited the title from his ancestor Theobald Fitzwalter whose successors adopted the surname Butler.[2] A gap of 7 years was to follow before James was rewarded for his loyalty to the Crown with an earldom in his own right. His benefactor, King Edward III created him the first Earl of Ormond by patent, bearing date 2 November 1328 at Salisbury, the King then holding a Parliament there, with the creation fee of ¹10 a year.[3] Seven days afterwards, by patent dated at Wallingford, in consideration of his services, and the better to enable him to support the honour, the King gave to him the regalities, liberties, knights fees, and other royal privileges of the county of Tipperary, and the rights of a palatine in that county for life.

    At the same time, the king created Roger Mortimer as the 1st Earl of March.[4]

    In 1336 he founded the friary of Carrick-Begg (a townland on the River Suir opposite Carrick-on-Suir) for Franciscan Friars. On 3 June of that year, he gave the friars his castle and estate of Carrick, of which they took possession on Sunday the feast of SS. Peter and Paul.

    Marriage and issue

    In 1327, he married Eleanor de Bohun, daughter of The 4th Earl of Hereford and The Lady Elizabeth, herself a daughter of King Edward I of England, and they had two daughters and two sons:

    John Butler (born at Ardee on St. Leonard's day (6 November) 1330, died an infant)
    Petronella Butler (d. 23 April 1368), married Gilbert Talbot, 3rd Baron Talbot, son of Richard Talbot, 2nd Baron Talbot and Elizabeth Comyn, and had issue.
    Alianore Butler (died 1392), married after 20 July 1359, Gerald FitzGerald, Earl of Desmond, son of Maurice FitzThomas, Earl of Desmond and Aveline FitzMorice, and had issue.
    James Butler, 2nd Earl of Ormond (4 Oct 1331 – 18 Oct 1382), married Elizabeth Darcy daughter of Sir John Darcy, Lord Justice of Ireland, and Joan de Burgh, and had issue. James was born at Kilkenny and given in ward, 1 September 1344, to Maurice, Earl of Desmond, for the fine of 2306 marcs; and afterward to Sir John Darcy who married him to his daughter Elizabeth. He was usually called the noble Earl, on account of his descent from the Royal Family.[5]
    James' successors held the title Earl of Ormond, later merged with the higher title of Duke of Ormonde and held palatine rights in County Tipperary[4] until the County Palatine of Tipperary Act 1715.

    See also

    Barony of Iffa and Offa East
    Butler dynasty

    References

    Jump up ^ H.E. Malden (editor) (1911). "Parishes: Shere". A History of the County of Surrey: Volume 3. Institute of Historical Research. Retrieved 7 November 2013.
    Jump up ^ http://encyclopedia.farlex.com/Butlers+of+Ormond
    Jump up ^ Lodge, John The Peerage of Ireland or, A Genealogical History Of The Present Nobility Of That Kingdom, 1789, Vol IV, p 7.
    ^ Jump up to: a b Mountmorres of Castlemorres, Hervey Redmond Morres; Robert Southwell (1792). The History of the Principal Transactions of the Irish Parliament, from ... 1634 to 1666: Containing Proceedings of the Lords and Commons During the Administration of the Earl of Strafford, and of the First Duke of Ormond. New York Public Library: T. Cadell. p. 194.
    Jump up ^ Lodge, John The Peerage of Ireland or, A Genealogical History Of The Present Nobility Of That Kingdom, 1789, Vol IV, p 8.

    *

    History of The Butler Dynasty from Wikipedia ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Butler_dynasty

    *

    James Butler, 1st Earl of Ormond. Knight of the Garter, Knight of Knocktopher, Kilkeney, Nenah and Thurles, Tipperary, Aylesbury, Grewt Lindford and Rotherfield Peppard, Buckinghamshire. Of Sopley, Hampshire, of LaVacherie and Shere, Surrey, of Weeton, Lancashire. Hereditary Chief Butler of Ireland, Lieutenant of Ireland.

    Son and heir of Sir Edmund Butler, Earl of Carrick, Justiciar of Ireland and Joan FitzThomas.

    First husband of Eleanor de Bohun, 2nd surviving daughter of Humphrey de Bohun and Elizabeth of England. They had two sons and one daughter: John, James, Pernel.

    He was only three when he served as a hostage for his father, held in Dublin Castle in 1317. His father's will was dated 1321, and death the same year, listed James, who would be the 7th Chief Butler of Ireland, from long line of ancestors named FitzWalter, adopting the surname of Butler. He received protection (permission) to cross to Ireland in 1326. In 1327, Eleanor was offered to James with an arrangement of the castle and manor of Kilpeck, Herefordshire for life.

    King Edward III created him the first Earl of Ormond by patent, bearing date 2 November 1328 at Salisbury with the creation fee of ¹10 a year. At the same time, the king created Roger Mortimer as the 1st Earl of March.

    In 1336 he founded the friary of Carrick-Begg for Franciscan Friars. On 3 June of that year, he gave the friars his castle and estate of Carrick, of which they took possession on Sunday the feast of SS. Peter and Paul.

    James died 06 Jan 1338 and was buried at Gowran. His widow would remarry to Sir Thomas de Dagworth.

    *

    Buried:
    View images of St. Mary's ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gowran_Castle

    Died:
    View images of Gowran Castle ... https://www.google.com/search?q=gowran+castle+photos&rlz=1C1KMZB_enUS591US591&espv=2&biw=1440&bih=810&tbm=isch&imgil=w7j7d2V5JVh57M%253A%253BM-fhAzysf-CQqM%253Bhttp%25253A%25252F%25252Firishantiquities.bravehost.com%25252Fkilkenny%25252Fgowran%25252Fgowran_castle.html&source=iu&pf=m&fir=w7j7d2V5JVh57M%253A%252CM-fhAzysf-CQqM%252C_&usg=__7XMJd8-6FBq38sCx8x7KX4Vtg3k%3D&dpr=1&ved=0ahUKEwjJwf-5sIjPAhUCGz4KHRsmDYwQyjcINQ&ei=udzVV4mBKIK2-AGbzLTgCA#imgrc=w7j7d2V5JVh57M%3A

    James married Eleanor de Bohun, Countess of Ormonde 0___ 1327. Eleanor (daughter of Humphrey de Bohun, VII, 4th Earl of Hereford and Elizabeth Plantagenet, Princess of England) was born 17 Oct 1304, Knaresborough Castle, North Yorkshire, England; died 7 Oct 1363. [Group Sheet]


  4. 19.  Eleanor de Bohun, Countess of Ormonde was born 17 Oct 1304, Knaresborough Castle, North Yorkshire, England (daughter of Humphrey de Bohun, VII, 4th Earl of Hereford and Elizabeth Plantagenet, Princess of England); died 7 Oct 1363.

    Notes:

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Eleanor de Bohun, Countess of Ormond (17 October 1304 – 7 October 1363) was an English noblewoman born in Knaresborough Castle to Humphrey de Bohun, 4th Earl of Hereford, and Elizabeth, daughter of King Edward I of England and Eleanor of Castile. After the deaths of her parents, she was placed in the care of her aunt Mary Plantagenet and brought up at Amesbury Priory alongside various cousins including Joan Gaveston, Isabel of Lancaster and Joan de Monthermer. Edward II of England gave the priory a generous allowance of 100 marks annually for the upkeep of Eleanor and her younger cousin, Joan Gaveston.[1]

    Eleanor was married twice; first in 1327 to James Butler, 1st Earl of Ormond, (son of Edmund Butler, Earl of Carrick and Lady Joan FitzGerald) who died in 1337 and secondly, six years later in 1343, to Thomas de Dagworth, Lord Dagworth who was killed in an ambush in Brittany in 1352.

    By her first marriage, Eleanor was an ancestress of Anne Boleyn and Catherine Parr,[2] Queens consort of King Henry VIII of England. Other descendants include the Dukes of Beaufort, Newcastle, Norfolk, Earls of Ormond, Desmond, Shrewsbury, Dorset, Rochester, Sandwich, Arundel, and Stafford.[1]

    Children

    By James Butler:

    John Butler (born 6 November 1330, died young)
    Petronilla (or Perina) Butler, Baroness Talbot (died 1387) who married Gilbert Talbot, 3rd Baron Talbot and had a daughter, Elizabeth Talbot, who married Sir Henry de Grey of Wilton, 5th Lord Grey of Wilton.[3]
    James Butler, 2nd Earl of Ormond (4 October 1331 – 18 October 1382) who married Elizabeth Darcy

    By Thomas de Dagworth:

    Eleanor de Dagworth who married at Vachery (in Cranley), Surrey by license dated 23 June 1362 Walter Fitz Walter, Knt, 3rd Lord Fitz Walter. Eleanor was living 29 Nov 1375. At her death, she was buried in Dunmow Priory.[4]

    See also
    Butler dynasty

    References

    ^ Jump up to: a b http://edwardthesecond.blogspot.com/2007/02/eleanor-and-margaret-de-bohun.html
    Jump up ^ Weis, Frederick; Sheppard, Walter; Beall, William Ancestral roots of certain American colonists who came to America before 1700: lineages from Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and other historical individuals, pg 20.
    Jump up ^ Richardson, Douglas (2011). Magna Carta ancestry : a study in colonial and medieval families (2nd ed.). Salt Lake City, UT.: Douglas Richardson. pp. 165–166, 345–346. ISBN 9781460992708.
    Jump up ^ Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, p.347
    thepeerage.com Accessed 22 March 2008
    Eleanor de Bohun Accessed 23 March 2008

    Images of Knaresborough Castle ... https://www.google.com/search?q=Knaresborough+Castle&espv=2&rlz=1C1KMZB_enUS591US591&biw=1440&bih=815&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjj5KWR9bXJAhXJMSYKHVw7AcAQsAQIIw&dpr=1

    Birth:
    The castle was first built by a Norman baron in c.1100 on a cliff above the River Nidd. There is documentary evidence dating from 1130 referring to works carried out at the castle by Henry I.[1] In the 1170s Hugh de Moreville and his followers took refuge there after assassinating Thomas Becket.

    In 1205 King John took control of Knareborough Castle.[2] He regarded Knaresborough as an important northern fortress and spent ¹1,290 on improvements to the castle.[citation needed] The castle was later rebuilt at a cost of ¹2,174 between 1307 and 1312 by Edward I and later completed by Edward II, including the great keep.[3] John of Gaunt acquired the castle in 1372, adding it to the vast holdings of the Duchy of Lancaster.

    The castle was taken by Parliamentarian troops in 1644 during the Civil War, and largely destroyed in 1648 not as the result of warfare, but because of an order from Parliament to dismantle all Royalist castles. Indeed, many town centre buildings are built of 'castle stone'.

    The remains are open to the public and there is a charge for entry to the interior remains. The grounds are used as a public leisure space, with a bowling green and putting green open during summer. It is also used as a performing space, with bands playing most afternoons through the summer. It plays host to frequent events, such as FEVA.[4] The property is owned by the monarch as part of the Duchy of Lancaster holdings, but is administered by Harrogate Borough Council.

    The castle, now much ruined, comprised two walled baileys set one behind the other, with the outer bailey on the town side and the inner bailey on the cliff side. The enclosure wall was punctuated by solid towers along its length, and a pair, visible today, formed the main gate. At the junction between the inner and outer baileys, on the north side of the castle stood a tall five-sided keep, the eastern parts of which has been pulled down. The keep had a vaulted basement, at least three upper stories, and served as a residence for the lord of the castle throughout the castle's history. The castle baileys contained residential buildings, and some foundations have survived.

    The upper storey of the Courthouse features a museum that includes furniture from the original Tudor Court, as well as exhibits about the castle and the town.

    Map & Picture ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knaresborough_Castle

    Children:
    1. James Butler, 2nd Earl of Ormond was born 4 Oct 1331; died 18 Oct 1382, Knocktopher, Ireland; was buried St. Canice's Cathedral, Kilkenny, Ireland.
    2. 9. Petronella Butler was born 0___ 1332, Ormonde, Kerry, Munster, Ireland; was christened Pollecott, Buckingham, England; died 23 Apr 1368.

  5. 22.  Edmund FitzAlan, Knight, 9th Earl of Arundel was born 1 May 1285, Marlborough Castle, Marlborough, Wiltshire, England (son of Richard FitzAlan, Knight, 8th Earl of Arundel and Alice of Saluzzo, Countess of Arundel); died 17 Nov 1326, Hereford, Herefordshire, England; was buried Haughmond Abbey, Shropshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Residence: Paris, France
    • Also Known As: 3rd Earl of Arundel

    Notes:

    Edmund FitzAlan, 9th Earl of Arundel[a] (1 May 1285 – 17 November 1326) was an English nobleman prominent in the conflict between Edward II and his barons. His father, Richard FitzAlan, 2nd Earl of Arundel, died on 9 March 1301, while Edmund was still a minor. He therefore became a ward of John de Warenne, Earl of Surrey, and married Warenne's granddaughter Alice. In 1306 he was styled Earl of Arundel, and served under Edward I in the Scottish Wars, for which he was richly rewarded.

    After Edward I's death, Arundel became part of the opposition to the new king Edward II, and his favourite Piers Gaveston. In 1311 he was one of the so-called Lords Ordainers who assumed control of government from the king. Together with Thomas, Earl of Lancaster, he was responsible for the death of Gaveston in 1312. From this point on, however, his relationship to the king became more friendly. This was to a large extent due to his association with the king's new favourite Hugh Despenser the Younger, whose daughter was married to Arundel's son. Arundel supported the king in suppressing rebellions by Roger Mortimer and other Marcher Lords, and eventually also Thomas of Lancaster. For this he was awarded with land and offices.

    His fortune changed, however, when the country was invaded in 1326 by Mortimer, who had made common cause with the king's wife, Queen Isabella. Immediately after the capture of Edward II, the queen, Edward III's regent, ordered Arundel executed, his title forfeit and his property confiscated. Arundel's son and heir Richard only recovered the title and lands in 1331, after Edward III had taken power from the regency of Isabella and Mortimer. In the 1390s, a cult emerged around the late earl. He was venerated as a martyr, though he was never canonised.

    Family and early life

    Edmund FitzAlan was born in the Castle of Marlborough, in Wiltshire, on 1 May 1285.[1] He was the son of Richard FitzAlan, 8th Earl of Arundel, and his wife, Alice of Saluzzo, daughter of Thomas I of Saluzzo in Italy. Richard had been in opposition to the king during the political crisis of 1295, and as a result he had incurred great debts and had parts of his land confiscated.[2] When Richard died in 09/03/1301, Edmund's wardship was given to John de Warenne, Earl of Surrey. Warenne's only son, William, had died in 1286, so his daughter Alice was now heir apparent to the Warenne earldom. Alice was offered in marriage to Edmund, who for unknown reasons initially refused her. By 1305 he had changed his mind, however, and the two were married.[3]

    In April 1306, shortly before turning twenty-one, Edmund was granted possession of his father's title and land. On 22 May 1306, he was knighted by Edward I, along with the young Prince Edward – the future Edward II.[1] The knighting was done in expectation of military service the Scottish Wars, and after the campaign was over, Arundel was richly rewarded. Edward I pardoned the young earl a debt of ¹4,234. This flow of patronage continued after the death of Edward I in 1307; in 1308 Edward II returned the hundred of Purslow to Arundel, an honour that Edward I had confiscated from Edmund's father.[4] There were also official honours in the early years of Edward II's reign. At the new king's coronation on 25 February 1308, Arundel officiated as chief butler (or pincerna), a hereditary office of the earls of Arundel.[3]

    Opposition to Edward II

    Though the reign of Edward II was initially harmonious, he soon met with opposition from several of his earls and prelates.[5] At the source of the discontent was the king's relationship with the young Gascon knight Piers Gaveston, who had been exiled by Edward I, but was recalled immediately upon Edward II's accession.[6] Edward's favouritism towards the upstart Gaveston was an offence to the established nobility, and his elevation to the earldom of Cornwall was particularly offensive to the established nobility.[7] A group of magnates led by Henry de Lacy, Earl of Lincoln, forced Gaveston into exile in 1308.[8] By 1309, however, Edward had reconciled himself with the opposition, and Gaveston was allowed to return.[9]

    Arundel joined the opposition at an early point, and did not attend the Stamford parliament in July 1309, where Gaveston's return was negotiated.[10] After Gaveston returned, his behaviour became even more offensive, and opposition towards him grew.[11] In addition to this, there was great discontent with Edward II's failure to follow up his father's Scottish campaigns.[12] On 16 March 1310, the king had to agree to the appointment of a committee known as the Lords Ordainers, who were to be in charge of the reform of the royal government. Arundel was one of eight earls among the twenty-one Ordainers.[13]

    The Ordainers once more sent Gaveston into exile in 1311, but by 1312 he was back.[14] Now the king's favourite was officially an outlaw, and Arundel was among the earls who swore to hunt him down. The leader of the opposition – after Lincoln's death the year before – was now Thomas, Earl of Lancaster.[15] In June 1312 Gaveston was captured, tried before Lancaster, Arundel and the earls of Warwick and Hereford, and executed.[16] A reconciliation was achieved between the king and the offending magnates, and Arundel and the others received pardons, but animosity prevailed. In 1314 Arundel was among the magnates who refused to assist Edward in a campaign against the Scottish, resulting in the disastrous English defeat at the Battle of Bannockburn.[10]

    Return to loyalty

    Around the time of Bannockburn, however, Arundel's loyalty began to shift back towards the king. Edward's rapprochement towards the earl had in fact started earlier, when on 2 November 1313, the king pardoned Arundel's royal debts.[17] The most significant factor in this process though, was the marriage alliance between Arundel and the king's new favourites, the Despensers. Hugh Despenser the Younger and his father Hugh Despenser the elder were gradually taking over control of the government, and using their power to enrich themselves.[18] While this alienated most of the nobility, Arundel's situation was different. At some point in 1314–1315, his son Richard was betrothed to Isabel, daughter of Hugh Despenser the Younger.[17] Now that he found himself back in royal favour, Arundel started receiving rewards in the form of official appointments. In 1317 he was appointed Warden of the Marches of Scotland, and in August 1318, he helped negotiate the Treaty of Leake, which temporarily reconciled the king with Thomas of Lancaster.[10]


    Clun Castle was the source of the personal animosity between Arundel and Roger Mortimer.
    With Arundel's change of allegiance came a conflict of interest. In August 1321, a demand was made to the king that Hugh Despenser and his father, Hugh Despenser the elder, be sent into exile.[19] The king, facing a rebellion in the Welsh Marches, had no choice but to assent.[20] Arundel voted for the expulsion, but later he claimed that he did so under compulsion, and also supported their recall in December.[10] Arundel had suffered personally from the rebellion, when Roger Mortimer seized his castle of Clun.[21][22] Early in 1322, Arundel joined King Edward in a campaign against the Mortimer family.[20] The opposition soon crumbled, and the king decided to move against Thomas of Lancaster, who had been supporting the marcher rebellion all along. Lancaster was defeated at the Battle of Boroughbridge in March, and executed.[23]

    In the aftermath of the rebellion, the Despensers enriched themselves on the forfeited estates of the rebels, and Hugh Despenser the elder was created Earl of Winchester in May 1322.[24] Also Arundel, who was now one of the king's principal supporters, was richly rewarded. After the capture of Roger Mortimer in 1322, he received the forfeited Mortimer lordship of Chirk in Wales.[10] He was also trusted with important offices: he became Chief Justiciar of North and South Wales in 1323, and in 1325 he was made Warden of the Welsh Marches, responsible for the array in Wales.[1] He also extended his influence through marriage alliances; in 1325 he secured marriages between two of his daughters and the sons and heirs of two of Lancaster's main allies: the deceased earls of Hereford and Warwick.[b]

    Final years and death

    In 1323, Roger Mortimer, who had been held in captivity in the Tower of London, escaped and fled to France.[22] Two years later, Queen Isabella travelled to Paris on an embassy to the French king. Here, Isabella and Mortimer developed a plan to invade England and replace Edward II on the throne with his son, the young Prince Edward, who was in the company of Isabella.[25] Isabella and Mortimer landed in England on 24 September 1326, and due to the virulent resentment against the Despenser regime, few came to the king's aid.[26] Arundel initially escaped the invading force in the company of the king, but was later dispatched to his estates in Shropshire to gather troops.[27] At Shrewsbury he was captured by his old enemy John Charlton of Powys, and brought to Queen Isabella at Hereford. On 17 November – the day after Edward II had been taken captive – Arundel was executed, allegedly on the instigation of Mortimer.[10] According to a chronicle account, the use of a blunt sword was ordered, and the executioner needed 22 strokes to sever the earl's head from his body.[28]


    The ruins of Haughmond Abbey, Arundel's final resting place.
    Arundel's body was initially interred at the Franciscan church in Hereford. It had been his wish, however, to be buried at the family's traditional resting place of Haughmond Abbey in Shropshire, and this is where he was finally buried.[29] Though he was never canonised, a cult emerged around the late earl in the 1390s, associating him with the 9th-century martyr king St Edmund. This veneration may have been inspired by a similar cult around his grandson, Richard FitzAlan, 11th Earl of Arundel, who was executed by Richard II in 1397.[30]

    Arundel was attainted at his execution; his estates were forfeited to the crown, and large parts of these were appropriated by Isabella and Mortimer.[31] The castle and honour of Arundel was briefly held by Edward II's half-brother Edmund, Earl of Kent, who was executed on 3 September 1330.[1] Edmund FitzAlan's son, Richard, failed in an attempted rebellion against the crown in June 1330, and had to flee to France. In October the same year, the guardianship of Isabella and Mortimer was supplanted by the personal rule of King Edward III. This allowed Richard to return and reclaim his inheritance, and on 8 February 1331, he was fully restored to his father's lands, and created Earl of Arundel.[32]

    Issue

    Edmund and Alice had at least seven children:[33]

    Name Birth date Death date Notes
    Richard FitzAlan, 10th Earl of Arundel c. 1313 24 January 1376 Married (1) Isabel le Despenser, (2) Eleanor of Lancaster
    Edmund — c. 1349
    Michael — —
    Mary — 29 August 1396 Married John le Strange, 4th Baron Strange of Blackmere[34]
    Aline — 20 January 1386 Married Roger le Strange, 5th Baron Strange of Knockin[35]
    Alice — 1326 Married John de Bohun, 5th Earl of Hereford
    Katherine — d. 1375/76 Married (1) Henry Hussey, 2nd Baron Hussey, (2) Andrew Peverell
    Eleanor — — Married Gerard de Lisle, 1st Baron Lisle
    Elizabeth - - Married William Latimer, 4th Baron Latimer
    Ancestry[edit]

    Residence:
    in exile...

    Died:
    executed...

    Edmund married Alice de Warenne, Countess of Arundel 0___ 1305. Alice (daughter of William de Warenne and Joan de Vere) was born 15 Jun 1287, Warren, Sussex, England; died 23 May 1338. [Group Sheet]


  6. 23.  Alice de Warenne, Countess of Arundel was born 15 Jun 1287, Warren, Sussex, England (daughter of William de Warenne and Joan de Vere); died 23 May 1338.

    Notes:

    Alice de Warenne, Countess of Arundel (15 June 1287 -23 May 1338) was an English noblewoman and heir apparent to the Earldom of Surrey. In 1305, she married Edmund FitzAlan, 9th Earl of Arundel.

    Family

    Alice, the only daughter of William de Warenne (1256-1286) and Joan de Vere, was born on 15 June 1287 in Warren, Sussex, six months after her father was accidentally killed in a tournament on 15 December 1286. On the death of her paternal grandfather, John de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey in 1304, her only sibling John de Warenne, 7th Earl of Surrey succeeded to the earldom. He became estranged from his childless wife and they never reconciled, leaving Alice as the heir presumptive to the Surrey estates and title.

    Marriage to the Earl of Arundel

    In 1305, Alice married Edmund Fitzalan, 9th Earl of Arundel,[1] the son of Richard Fitzalan, 8th Earl of Arundel and Alice of Saluzzo.[2] He had initially refused her, for reasons which were not recorded;[citation needed] however, by 1305, he had changed his mind and they were wed.[1] They had nine recorded children,[citation needed] and their chief residence was Arundel Castle in Sussex. Arundel inherited his title on 9 March 1302 upon his father's death.[2] He was summoned to Parliament as Lord Arundel in 1306, and was later one of the Lords Ordainers. He also took part in the Scottish wars.

    The Earl of Arundel and his brother-in-law John de Warenne were the only nobles who remained loyal to King Edward II, after Queen Isabella and her lover Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March returned to England in 1326. He had allied himself to the King's favourite Hugh le Despenser, and agreed to the marriage of his son to Despenser's granddaughter. Arundel had previously been granted many of the traitor Mortimer's forfeited estates, and was appointed Justice of Wales in 1322 and Warden of the Welsh Marches in 1325. He was also made Constable of Montgomery Castle which became his principal base.

    The Earl of Arundel was captured in Shropshire by the Queen's party.[3] On 17 November 1326 in Hereford, Arundel was beheaded by order of the Queen, leaving Alice de Warenne a widow. Her husband's estates and titles were forfeited to the Crown following Arundel's execution, but later restored to her eldest son, Richard.[citation needed]

    Alice died before 23 May 1338,[1] aged 50. Her brother died in 1347 without legitimate issue, thus the title of Surrey eventually passed to Alice's son, Richard.

    Issue

    Richard FitzAlan, 10th Earl of Arundel, known as Copped Hat, (1306 Arundel Castle, Sussex – 24 January 1376), also succeeded to the title of Earl of Surrey on 12 April 1361. He married firstly Isabel le Despenser, whom he later repudiated, and was granted an annulment by Pope Clement VI. He had a son Edmund who was bastardised by the annulment. His second wife, whom he married on 5 February 1345, by Papal dispensation, was Eleanor of Lancaster, the daughter of Henry, 3rd Earl of Lancaster and Maud Chaworth. She was the widow of John de Beaumont, 2nd Lord Beaumont. Richard and Eleanor had three sons and four daughters, including Richard FitzAlan, 11th Earl of Arundel and Joan de Bohun, Countess of Hereford.
    Edward FitzAlan (1308–1398)
    Alice FitzAlan (born 1310), married John de Bohun, 5th Earl of Hereford.
    Joan FitzAlan (born 1312), married Warin Gerard, Baron L'Isle.
    Aline FitzAlan (1314–1386), married Roger le Strange, 5th Baron Strange of Knockyn, by whom she had issue.
    John FitzAlan (born 1315)
    Catherine FitzAlan (died 1376), married firstly Andrew Peverell, and secondly Henry Hussey of Cockfield. Had issue by her second husband.
    Elizabeth FitzAlan (1320–1389), married William Latimer, 4th Baron Latimer, by whom she had one daughter, Elizabeth.
    Eleanor FitzAlan

    Notes:

    Residence (Family):
    Arundel Castle is a restored and remodeled medieval castle in Arundel, West Sussex, England. It was established by Roger de Montgomery on Christmas Day 1067. Roger became the first to hold the earldom of Arundel by the graces of William the Conqueror. The castle was damaged in the English Civil War and then restored in the 18th and 19th centuries.

    View image, history & source ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arundel_Castle

    Children:
    1. Richard FitzAlan, Knight, 10th Earl of Arundel was born 1306-1313, Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England; died 24 Jan 1376, Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England; was buried Lewes Priory, Southover, Sussex, England.
    2. 11. Mary de Arundel was born Corfham Castle, Diddlebury, Shropshire, England; died 29 Aug 1396, Corfham, Shropshire, England.
    3. Aline FitzAlan was born 0___ 1314, Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England; died 20 Jan 1386.
    4. Elizabeth FitzAlan was born 0___ 1320, (England); died 0___ 1389.


Generation: 6

  1. 32.  Gilbert Talbot, 1st Baron Talbot was born 18 Oct 1276, Wyke, Cornwall, England (son of Richard Talbot, Lord of Eccleswall and Sarah de Beauchamp); died 13 Feb 1346, Herefordshire, England.

    Notes:

    Gilbert Talbot
    Birthdate: October 18, 1276 (69)
    Birthplace: Wyke, Cornwall, England
    Death: Died February 13, 1346 in Eccleswall, Herefordshire, England
    Immediate Family:
    Son of Richard Talbot, 4th Lord and Sarah Talbot
    Husband of Anne le Boteler
    Father of Joan Talbot; Philippa de Talbot and Sir Richard Talbot, 2nd Lord Talbot, of Goodrich
    Brother of Gwenllian Talbot; Joan Talbot; Sir Richard Talbot, of Richard's Castle; Catherine Talbot and Thomas Talbot, priest
    Occupation: Justice of South Wales
    Managed by: Private User
    Last Updated: October 31, 2014

    About Sir Gilbert Talbot, 1st Lord Talbot
    Gilbert Talbot, 1st Lord Talbot1

    M, #203466, b. 18 October 1276, d. 13 February 1346

    Gilbert Talbot, 1st Lord Talbot was born on 18 October 1276.
    1 He was the son of Sir Richard Talbot and Sarah de Beauchamp.

    3 He died on 13 February 1346 at age 69.

    Gilbert Talbot, 1st Lord Talbot was created 1st Lord Talbot [England by writ] on 27 January 1331/32.4
    Child of Gilbert Talbot, 1st Lord Talbot

    1.Joan Talbot+1

    Child of Gilbert Talbot, 1st Lord Talbot and Ann le Botiler

    1.Richard Talbot, 2nd Lord Talbot+3 b. 1305, d. 23 Oct 1356

    http://thepeerage.com/p20347.htm#i203466

    Sir Gilbert Talbot1

    M, b. 18 October 1276, d. 24 February 1346, #10943

    Father Richard Talbot2,3 b. circa 1250, d. before 3 September 1306

    Mother Sarah de Beauchamp2 d. after July 1317

    Arms His arms were de goules a un lion rampand de or od la bordur' endente de or (Parl.).3

    Name Variation Sir Gilbert Talbot was also styled Talebot.3

    Birth* He was born on 18 October 1276.1,4,3

    Marriage* He married Anne le Boteler, daughter of Sir William le Boteler of Wem and Ankaret verch Griffith.1,4

    Event-Misc He had livery of his father's lands on 21 October 1306.3

    Event-Misc* He was a commissioner to view St. Briavel's Castle and the vert and venison of Dene Forest on 22 March 1311.5,3

    Note* He was given a pardon for his part in the death of Piers de Gavaston on 16 October 1313.5,3

    Event-Misc He was called to serve against the Scots between 1314 and 1315.5

    Summoned* He was summoned to serve against the Scots on 30 June 1314.3

    Feudal* He held Longhope and Blechesdon, Glou., Credenhill and Linton, Hereford on 5 March 1316.3

    Criminal* He was An order for his arrest was dated. The charges included attacking the King's subjects in Warwicckshire and attacking and burning Bridgnorth. His lands were taken into the King's (Edward II) hands. On 15 January 1321/22.6,3

    (Rebel) Battle-Boroughbridge On 16 Mar 1322, Sir John Gifford, Sir Hugh de Audley, Sir Gilbert Talbot, Sir Bartholomew de Burghersh, Sir Bartholomew de Badlesmere and Sir Humphrey VIII de Bohun fought on the side of the Earl of Lancaster at the Battle of Boroughbridge in Yorkshire He was captured, but allowed to ransom his life and lands for ¹2000.7,3,8

    Event-Misc He was released from prison on 11 July 1322.6

    Event-Misc He was empowered to arrest malefactors in Gloucestershire. On 28 October 1322 at Gloucestershire, England.6

    Event-Misc He was pardoned. On 1 November 1322.6

    Event-Misc He is to arrest disturbers of peace in Glou., Worc., and Here. He is made Custos of Gloucester Caslte, town, and barton under Hugh le Despenser, jun. On 1 November 1322.3

    Event-Misc* He is not to aggrieve Aymer, Earl of Pembroke for fishing in his ponds and taking his goods. On 27 December 1322.3

    Event-Misc He was among the knights to attend the Great Council on 9 May 1324 at Westminster.6,3

    Summoned He was summoned to serve in Guienne on 7 January 1325.3

    Event-Misc* His fines were cancelled by King Edward III on 13 February 1326/27.6,3

    Event-Misc He was styled Banneret on 24 November 1327.6

    Event-Misc He was the king's chamberlain in March 1327/28.6

    Event-Misc He obtained grants for Eccleswall and Credenhill, Hereford, and Longhope in Gloucstershire. In April 1328.6

    Event-Misc He was Justice of South Wales on 23 October 1330.6

    Event-Misc Summoned to Parliament between 27 January 1332 and 20 April 1343.6

    Event-Misc He and Hugh le Despenser were appointed to be captains against the King's enemies. On 13 July 1337.6

    Death* He died on 24 February 1346 at Eccleswall, Herefordshire, England, at age 69.1,5

    Title* He held the title of 1st Lord Talbot.6

    Inquisition Post Mor* At the inquisition post mortem of Sir Gilbert Talbot, on 1 March 1346, leaving s. h. Richard.3

    Family Anne le Boteler

    Marriage* He married Anne le Boteler, daughter of Sir William le Boteler of Wem and Ankaret verch Griffith.1,4

    Children

    Philippa Talbot

    Sir Richard Talbot M.P. b. c 1305, d. 23 Oct 1356

    Last Edited 5 Feb 2005

    Citations

    [S168] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots, 84A-30.

    [S168] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots, 84A-29.

    [S325] Rev. C. Moor, Knights of Edward I, v. 5, p. 3.

    [S301] Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Robert Abell, p. 242.

    [S301] Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Robert Abell, p. 246.

    [S301] Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Robert Abell, p. 243.

    [S325] Rev. C. Moor, Knights of Edward I, v. 2, p. 114.

    [S301] Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Robert Abell, p. 31.

    Chamberlain to Edward III. Summoned to parliament by writ directed 'Gilberto Talbot' whereby he is held to have become Baron Talbot 27 Jan 1331/2

    end

    Gilbert [Talbot], 1st Baron Talbot
    son and heir of Richard Talbot, feudal Lord of Eccleswall, co. Hereford, by his wife Sarah de Beauchamp, sister of William [de Beauchamp], 9th Earl of Warwick, and dau. of William de Beauchamp, of Elmley, co. Worcester, by his wife Isabel Mauduit, sister and hrss. of William [Mauduit], 8th Earl of Warwick, and dau. of William Mauduit, of Hanslope, co. Buckingham, by his wife Lady Alice de Beaumont, only dau. by his second wife of Waleran [de Beaumont], 4th Earl of Warwick
    born
    18 Oct 1276
    mar.
    Anne le Botiler, dau. of William le Botiler, of Wem, co. Shrewsbury
    children
    1. Sir Richard Talbot, later 2nd Baron Talbot
    died
    24 Feb 1345/6
    created
    by writ 27 Jan 1331/2 Baron Talbot
    suc. by
    son

    end

    Died:
    in Eccleswall Manor...

    Gilbert — Anne le Boteler. Anne (daughter of William le Boteler and Ankaret verch Griffith) was born ~ 1278, (Wemme) Shropshire, England; died 0___ 1340, Linton, Herefordshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 33.  Anne le Boteler was born ~ 1278, (Wemme) Shropshire, England (daughter of William le Boteler and Ankaret verch Griffith); died 0___ 1340, Linton, Herefordshire, England.

    Notes:

    Anne le Boteler
    Also Known As: "Anne le Botiler"
    Birthdate: circa 1278 (62)
    Birthplace: Probably Wemme, Shropshire, England
    Death: Died 1340 in Linton, Herefordshire, England
    Immediate Family:
    Daughter of Sir William le Boteler of Wem and Angharad verch Griffith
    Wife of Sir Gilbert Talbot, 1st Lord Talbot
    Mother of Joan Talbot; Philippa de Talbot and Sir Richard Talbot, 2nd Lord Talbot, of Goodrich
    Sister of John le Boteler; Sir Nigel le Boteler; Gawine Le Boteler; William le Boteler, 1st Baron Boteler and Denise de Cokesey
    Managed by: Noah Tutak
    Last Updated: September 23, 2016

    About Anne le Boteler
    Ann le Botiler1

    F, #213398 Last Edited=4 Dec 2006

    Ann le Botiler is the daughter of William le Botiler.1

    Child of Ann le Botiler and Gilbert Talbot, 1st Lord Talbot

    1.Richard Talbot, 2nd Lord Talbot+1 b. 1305, d. 23 Oct 1356

    notes

    He [Gilbert Talbot] is said to have married Anne, daughter of William LE BOTILER, of Wem. He died 24 February 1345/6 at Eccleswall. [Complete Peerage XII/1:610-12, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)]

    Links

    http://www.celtic-casimir.com/webtree/14/24795.htm
    http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=jweber&id=I08897
    http://thepeerage.com/p21340.htm#i213398

    Anne le Boteler1

    F, #10944

    Father Sir William le Boteler of Wem2 d. before 11 December 1283

    Mother Ankaret verch Griffith1 b. circa 1248, d. after 22 June 1308

    Name Variation Anne le Boteler was also styled Anne le Botiler.2

    Marriage* She married Sir Gilbert Talbot, son of Richard Talbot and Sarah de Beauchamp.2,3

    Family Sir Gilbert Talbot b. 18 October 1276, d. 24 February 1346

    Children

    Philippa Talbot

    Sir Richard Talbot M.P. b. c 1305, d. 23 Oct 1356

    Last Edited 5 Feb 2005

    Citations

    [S301] Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Robert Abell, p. 33.

    [S168] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots, 84A-30.

    [S301] Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Robert Abell, p. 242.

    Anne le Boteler1

    F, #10944

    Father Sir William le Boteler of Wem2 d. before 11 December 1283

    Mother Ankaret verch Griffith1 b. circa 1248, d. after 22 June 1308

    Name Variation Anne le Boteler was also styled Anne le Botiler.2

    Marriage* She married Sir Gilbert Talbot, son of Richard Talbot and Sarah de Beauchamp.2,3

    Family Sir Gilbert Talbot b. 18 October 1276, d. 24 February 1346

    Children

    Philippa Talbot

    Sir Richard Talbot M.P. b. c 1305, d. 23 Oct 1356

    Last Edited 5 Feb 2005

    Citations

    [S301] Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Robert Abell, p. 33.

    [S168] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots, 84A-30.

    [S301] Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Robert Abell, p. 242.

    end

    Children:
    1. Joanna Talbot
    2. 16. Richard Talbot, 2nd Baron Talbot was born 1302-1305, Wyke, Axminster, Devon, England; died 23 Oct 1356.

  3. 34.  John "The Red" Comyn, III, Lord of Badenoch was born Abt 1269, Badenoch, Isle of Skye, Inverness, Scotland (son of John "Black Comyn" Comyn, II, Lord of Badenoch and Eleanor de Balliol); died 10 Feb 1306, Dumfries, Scotland.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Guardian of Scotland
    • Occupation: 1296-1306; Guardian of Scotland

    Notes:

    Red Comyn was the son of John Comyn, ‘the Black Comyn’, one of the claimants for the Scots throne. His mother was Eleanor Balliol so King John Balliol was his uncle. The Comyns sided with the Balliols and became the enemies of the Bruces.

    John Comyn married an English noblewoman, Joan de Valence. Her father was an uncle of King Edward I.

    When Scotland was plunged into war, Robert the Bruce’s father was constable of Carlisle Castle under Edward I. The Black Comyn and the Comyn Earl of Buchan attacked Carlisle Castle in support of the Scots King Balliol.

    Red Comyn was among the Scots captured at the Battle of Dunbar in 1296. He was imprisoned in the Tower of London. After agreeing to fight for Edward in Flanders, Red Comyn deserted and sailed to Scotland. It is said that he led the cavalry at the Battle of Falkirk. The Scots cavalry at Falkirk were vastly outnumbered by English knights and mounted men at arms. They turned and rode away, leaving the Scots foot soldiers to be slaughtered by Edward I’s army.

    Red Comyn was made a guardian of Scotland alongside Robert the Bruce, after the resignation of William Wallace and the death of Andrew Moray. In 1299, at a council in Peebles, a fight broke out between Comyn and Bruce - it was reported that Comyn grabbed Bruce by the throat. Within a year Bruce had resigned the guardianship.

    When his father, the Black Comyn, died, John Comyn became Lord of Badenoch.

    In February 1303, Red Comyn and Sir Simon Fraser defeated three successive English forces at the Battle of Roslin. It is said that Wallace may have fought at the battle. The Scots drove the English knights over the steep sides of Roslin Glen and cut down their English prisoners as a second then a third force arrived. In 1304 Red Comyn was forced to make peace with Edward I.

    On 10 February 1306, Robert the Bruce and the Red Comyn fought by the high altar at Greyfriars Kirk in Dumfries. Comyn was killed and Bruce went on to become king.

    *
    .

    more...

    Robert the Bruce met John Comyn, his rival for the crown of Scotland, at Greyfriars monastery in Dumfries. A row erupts and Comyn is murdered. Bruce becomes an outlaw.

    Video: A history of Scotland: Bishop Makes King. http://www.bbc.co.uk/scotland/history/wars_of_independence/bruce_kills_comyn_at_greyfriars_church_dumfries/

    *

    more...

    Fascinating biography of Red Comyn and his family's influence on Scotland's history... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_III_Comyn,_Lord_of_Badenoch

    More on John... http://www.educationscotland.gov.uk/scotlandshistory/warsofindependence/johncomyn/index.asp or
    http://www.undiscoveredscotland.co.uk/usbiography/c/johniiicomyn.html

    *

    John married Joan de Valence Abt 1289, Badenoch, Isle of Skye, Inverness, Scotland. Joan (daughter of William de Valence, Knight, 1st Earl of Pembroke and Joan de Munchensi, Lady of Swanscombe and Countess of Pembr) died 0___ 1326. [Group Sheet]


  4. 35.  Joan de Valence (daughter of William de Valence, Knight, 1st Earl of Pembroke and Joan de Munchensi, Lady of Swanscombe and Countess of Pembr); died 0___ 1326.
    Children:
    1. Joan Comyn was born ~ 1292, (Badenoch, Isle of Skye, Inverness, Scotland); died Bef 1327.
    2. 17. Elizabeth Comyn was born 1 Nov 1299, Wyke, Axminster, Devon, England; died 20 Nov 1372.

  5. 36.  Edmund Butler, Knight, Earl of Carrick was born 0___ 1268, Gowran, County Kilkenny, Ireland (son of Theobald Butler, 4th Chief Butler of Ireland and Joan FitzJohn); died 13 Sep 1321, London, Middlesex, England; was buried St. Mary's Collegiate Church Gowran, Gowran, County Kilkenny, Ireland.

    Notes:

    Edmund Butler, Earl of Carrick and 6th Chief Butler of Ireland (1268 – 13 September 1321) was a noble in the Peerage of Ireland. He was the second son of Theobald Butler, 4th Chief Butler of Ireland. Edmund went on pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela in 1321 but died in London on 13 September 1321. He was buried in St. Mary's Collegiate Church Gowran, County Kilkenny on the 10th of November 1321.

    Career

    Edmund succeeded to his father’s lands upon the death of his elder brother Theobald, the 5th Chief Butler of Ireland, in 1299. He was created Justiciar of Ireland in 1303 with a fee of ¹500 per annum. In 1309 was knighted by Edward II in London. Three years later he defeated the O'Byrne and O'Toole clans in Glenmalure.

    At a great feast in Dublin on Sunday 29 of September 1313, he created 30 Knights, by patent, dated at Langley 4 January 1314.[1]

    Having distinguished himself during the Bruce campaign in Ireland alongside John de Bermingham, 1st Earl of Louth and Roger Mortimer, Edmund was granted a charter of the castle and manor of Karryk Macgryffin and Roscrea to hold to him and his heirs sub nomine et honore comitis de Karryk. The patent was dated at Lincoln 1 September that year, 1315; on that date, he was given the return of all the King's writs in the cantreds of Oreman (sic Ormond), Elyogerth (sic Eliogarty), and Elyocarroll in County Tipperary. To these was added, on 12 November 1320, all the lands of William de Carran in Finagh and Favmolin in County Waterford.[2]

    However, the charter, while creating an earldom, failed to make Edmund's heir James Earl of Carrick. James was later created Earl of Ormond (Ireland) in his own right in 1328 alongside Roger Mortimer, who was created Earl of March, and the newly created John of Eltham, Earl of Cornwall), brother of King Edward III.

    In 1317, after suffering a military defeat in a rebellion led by Edward Bruce, brother of Robert Bruce, he was replaced as Justiciar by Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March.[3]

    Marriage and Children

    By his wife Joan FitzGerald whom he married in 1302, daughter of the John FitzGerald, 1st Earl of Kildare, he had several children, the eldest of whom succeeded him as Chief Butler of Ireland but not as Earl of Carrick.

    James Butler, 1st Earl of Ormond (1305–1337)
    John Butler of Clonamicklon (or Limallon) (c. 1305–1330) was the ancestor of the later creation of Viscount Ikerrin and Earl of Carrick (Ireland). By his wife Johanna, he had issue, Edmond.[4]
    Lawrence Butler (1306-January 6 1338)
    Joan Butler (1309- November 3 1405) who was married in 1321 to Roger Mortimer (second son of Roger, brother to Edward, Earl of March.)
    Margaret who married Sir Thomas Dillon of Drumrany, ancestor to Viscount Dillon.[5]
    Alice (1290-March 15 1356)
    William ( September 8 1296-1361)
    See also[edit]
    Butler dynasty

    References

    Jump up ^ Lodge, John The Peerage of Ireland or, A Genealogical History Of The Present Nobility Of That Kingdom, 1789, Vol IV, p 6.
    Jump up ^ Lodge, John The Peerage of Ireland or, A Genealogical History Of The Present Nobility Of That Kingdom, 1789, Vol IV, p 7.
    Jump up ^ O'Mahony, Charles (1912). The Viceroys of Ireland. p. 25.
    Jump up ^ Lodge, John, The Peerage of Ireland or, A Genealogical History Of The Present Nobility Of That Kingdom, 1789, Vol II, pg 313.
    Jump up ^ Lodge, John The Peerage of Ireland or, A Genealogical History Of The Present Nobility Of That Kingdom, 1789, Vol IV, p 7.
    Robert the Bruce's Irish Wars: The Invasions of Ireland 1306–1329, Sean Duffy, 2004.
    The Greatest Traitor: The Life of Sir Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March, Ian Mortimer, 2004.
    Ormond, Duke of, Life 1610-'88: Thomas A. Carte, M.A. 6 vols. Oxford, 1851
    The Complete Peerage v.XIIpII,p246,note g

    Edmund married Joan Fitzgerald, Countess of Carrick 0___ 1302. Joan (daughter of John FitzThomas FitzGerald, 1st Earl of Kildare and Blanche de la Roche) was born ~ 1282, Fermoy, County Cork, Ireland; died 2 May 1320, Laraghbryan, County Kildare, Ireland. [Group Sheet]


  6. 37.  Joan Fitzgerald, Countess of Carrick was born ~ 1282, Fermoy, County Cork, Ireland (daughter of John FitzThomas FitzGerald, 1st Earl of Kildare and Blanche de la Roche); died 2 May 1320, Laraghbryan, County Kildare, Ireland.

    Notes:

    Joan FitzGerald, Countess of Carrick (1281 – 2 May 1320) was an Irish noblewoman, and the wife of Edmund Butler, Earl of Carrick, Justiciar of Ireland (1268 – 13 September 1321). She was the mother of James Butler, 1st Earl of Ormond.

    Family

    Joan FitzGerald was born in Fermoy, Co. Cork, Ireland, in 1281, the daughter of John FitzThomas FitzGerald, 1st Earl of Kildare, Baron of Offaly, and Blanche de La Roche. She had two brothers, Gerald (died 1303), and Thomas FitzGerald, 2nd Earl of Kildare (died 5 April 1328), who married Joan de Burgh (c. 1300 – 23 April 1359), daughter of Richard Óg de Burgh, 2nd Earl of Ulster and Margaret de Burgh of Lanvalley, by whom he had issue. Joan had one sister, Elizabeth, who married Nicholas Netterville, by whom she had issue.

    Joan FitzGerald's paternal grandparents were Thomas FitzMaurice FitzGerald and Rohesia de St. Michael, and her maternal grandparents were John de La Roche, Lord of Fermoy, and Maud de Waleys (Walsh). The latter was a daughter of Henry le Walleis, Mayor of London.

    Marriage and issue

    In 1302, Joan married Sir Edmund Butler, Earl of Carrick, the son of Theobald le Botiller (1242–1285) and Joan FitzJohn (FitzGeoffrey) (died 4 April 1303). The marriage produced two sons:

    James Butler, 1st Earl of Ormond (1305 – 6 January 1338), who married Lady Eleanor de Bohun (17 October 1304 – 7 October 1363), by whom he had four children, including James Butler, 2nd Earl of Ormond who in his turn married Elizabeth Darcy and had issue, from whom descended the subsequent Earls of Ormond.
    John Butler of Clonamicklon
    In 1307, Sir Edmund and Joan's father dispersed rebels in Offaly who had burnt the town of Leix and destroyed the castle of Geashill.

    In 1315, Sir Edmund Butler was appointed Justiciar of Ireland.

    That same year, in July, Joan's husband and her father led the Munster and Leinster contingent of armed forces who were allied with the combined armies of Richard de Burgh, 2nd Earl of Ulster and Felim mac Aedh Ua Conchobair, King of Connacht against the Scottish and Irish troops of Edward Bruce who had been crowned King Of Ireland at Carrickfergus. They were repelled by Bruce, at the River Bann near Coleraine and forced to retreat. Sir Edmund, due to lack of supplies, returned to Ormond.

    Edward Bruce was later killed in 1318, at the Battle of Faughart.

    On 1 September 1315, for services against the Scottish raiders and Ulster rebels, Edmund Butler was granted a charter of the castle and manor of Karryk Macgryffin and Roscrea to hold to him and his heirs sub nomine et honore comitis de Karryk. However, the charter, while creating an Earldom, failed to make Edmund Butler's issue Earls of Carrick.[1]

    Joan's father, John FitzThomas FitzGerald, died a year later on 10 September 1316, several months after being created Earl of Kildare by King Edward II.

    Death

    Joan FitzGerald died on 2 May 1320 in Laraghbryan, County Kildare. She was the ancestress of the earls of Ormond, the queen consort Anne Boleyn and Diana, Princess of Wales.

    *

    Children:
    1. 18. James Butler, 1st Earl of Ormond was born ~ 1305, Arlow, County Wicklow, Ireland; died 6 Jan 1338, Gowran Castle, County Kilkenny, Ireland; was buried St. Mary's Collegiate Church Gowran, Gowran, County Kilkenny, Ireland.

  7. 38.  Humphrey de Bohun, VII, 4th Earl of HerefordHumphrey de Bohun, VII, 4th Earl of Hereford was born ~ 1276, Pleshey Castle, Essex, England (son of Humphrey de Bohun, V, Knight, 3rd Earl of Hereford and Maud de Fiennes); died 16 Mar 1322, Boroughbridge, Yorkshire, England; was buried Friars Minor, York, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Lord High Constable of England
    • Also Known As: Count of Holland
    • Also Known As: Earl of Essex
    • Military: Battle of Bannockburn, June 1314
    • Military: Battle of Boroughbridge

    Notes:

    Sir Humphrey (VII) de Bohun, 4th Earl of Hereford (1276 - 16 March 1322) was a member of a powerful Anglo-Norman family of the Welsh Marches and was one of the Ordainers who opposed Edward II's excesses.

    Family background

    Arms of Bohun: Azure, a bend argent cotised or between six lions rampant or

    Counter seal of Humphrey de Bohun, 4th Earl of Hereford, showing the so-called "Bohun swan" above the escutcheon
    Humphrey de Bohun's birth year is uncertain although several contemporary sources indicate that it was 1276. His father was Humphrey de Bohun, 3rd Earl of Hereford and his mother was Maud de Fiennes, daughter of Enguerrand II de Fiennes, chevalier, seigneur of Fiennes. He was born at Pleshey Castle, Essex.

    Humphrey (VII) de Bohun succeeded his father as Earl of Hereford and Earl of Essex, and Constable of England (later called Lord High Constable). Humphrey held the title of Bearer of the Swan Badge, a heraldic device passed down in the Bohun family. This device did not appear on their coat of arms, (az, a bend ar cotised or, between 6 lioncels or) nor their crest (gu, doubled erm, a lion gardant crowned), but it does appear on Humphrey's personal seal (illustration).

    Scotland

    Humphrey was one of several earls and barons under Edward I who laid siege to Caerlaverock Castle in Scotland in 1300 and later took part in many campaigns in Scotland. He also loved tourneying and gained a reputation as an "elegant" fop. In one of the campaigns in Scotland Humphrey evidently grew bored and departed for England to take part in a tournament along with Piers Gaveston and other young barons and knights. On return all of them fell under Edward I's wrath for desertion, but were forgiven. It is probable that Gaveston's friend, Edward (the future Edward II) had given them permission to depart. Later Humphrey became one of Gaveston's and Edward II's bitterest opponents.

    He would also have been associating with young Robert Bruce during the early campaigns in Scotland, since Bruce, like many other Scots and Border men, moved back and forth from English allegiance to Scottish. Robert Bruce, King Robert I of Scotland, is closely connected to the Bohuns. Between the time that he swore his last fealty to Edward I in 1302 and his defection four years later, Bruce stayed for the most part in Annandale, rebuilding his castle of Lochmaben in stone, making use of its natural moat. Rebelling and taking the crown of Scotland in February 1306, Bruce was forced to fight a war against England which went poorly for him at first, while Edward I still lived. After nearly all his family were killed or captured he had to flee to the isle of Rathlin, Ireland. His properties in England and Scotland were confiscated.

    Humphrey de Bohun received many of Robert Bruce's forfeited properties. It is unknown whether Humphrey was a long-time friend or enemy of Robert Bruce, but they were nearly the same age and the lands of the two families in Essex and Middlesex lay very close to each other. After Bruce's self-exile, Humphrey took Lochmaben, and Edward I awarded him Annandale and the castle. During this period of chaos, when Bruce's queen, Elizabeth de Burgh, daughter of the Earl of Ulster, was captured by Edward I and taken prisoner, Hereford and his wife Elizabeth became her custodians. She was exchanged for Humphrey after Bannockburn in 1314. Lochmaben was from time to time retaken by the Scots but remained in the Bohun family for many years, in the hands of Humphrey's son William, Earl of Northampton, who held and defended it until his death in 1360.

    Battle of Bannockburn

    At the Battle of Bannockburn (23-24 June 1314), Humphrey de Bohun should have been given command of the army because that was his responsibility as Constable of England. However, since the execution of Piers Gaveston in 1312 Humphrey had been out of favour with Edward II, who gave the Constableship for the 1314 campaign to the youthful and inexperienced Earl of Gloucester, Gilbert de Clare. Nevertheless, on the first day, de Bohun insisted on being one of the first to lead the cavalry charge. In the melee and cavalry rout between the Bannock Burn and the Scots' camp he was not injured although his rash young cousin Henry de Bohun, who could have been no older than about 22, charged alone at Robert Bruce and was killed by Bruce's axe.

    On the second day Gloucester was killed at the start of battle. Hereford fought throughout the day, leading a large company of Welsh and English knights and archers. The archers might have had success at breaking up the Scots schiltrons until they were overrun by the Scots cavalry. When the battle was lost Bohun retreated with the Earl of Angus and several other barons, knights and men to Bothwell Castle, seeking a safe haven. However, all the refugees who entered the castle were taken prisoner by its formerly pro-English governor Walter fitz Gilbert who, like many Lowland knights, declared for Bruce as soon as word came of the Scottish King's victory. Humphrey de Bohun was ransomed by Edward II, his brother-in-law, on the pleading of his wife Isabella. This was one of the most interesting ransoms in English history. The Earl was traded for Bruce's queen, Elizabeth de Burgh and daughter, Marjorie Bruce, two bishops amongst other important Scots captives in England. Isabella MacDuff, Countess of Buchan, who had crowned Robert Bruce in 1306 and for years had been locked in a cage outside Berwick, was not included; presumably she had died in captivity.[1]

    Ordainer

    Like his father, grandfather, and great-great-grandfather, this Humphrey de Bohun was careful to insist that the king obey Magna Carta and other baronially-established safeguards against monarchic tyranny. He was a leader of the reform movements that promulgated the Ordinances of 1311 and fought to insure their execution.

    The subsequent revival of royal authority and the growing ascendancy of the Despensers (Hugh the elder and younger) led de Bohun and other barons to rebel against the king again in 1322. De Bohun had special reason for opposing the Despensers, for he had lost some of his estates in the Welsh Marches to their rapacity and he felt they had besmirched his honour. In 1316 De Bohun had been ordered to lead the suppression of the revolt of Llywelyn Bren in Glamorgan which he did successfully. When Llewelyn surrendered to him the Earl promised to intercede for him and fought to have him pardoned. Instead Hugh the younger Despenser had Llewelyn executed without a proper trial. Hereford and the other marcher lords used Llywelyn Bren's death as a symbol of Despenser tyranny.

    Death at Boroughbridge

    Main article: Battle of Boroughbridge
    The rebel forces were halted by loyalist troops at the wooden bridge at Boroughbridge, Yorkshire, where Humphrey de Bohun, leading an attempt to storm the bridge, met his death on 16 March 1322.

    Although the details have been called into question by a few historians, his death may have been particularly gory. As recounted by Ian Mortimer:[2]

    "[The 4th Earl of] Hereford led the fight on the bridge, but he and his men were caught in the arrow fire. Then one of de Harclay's pikemen, concealed beneath the bridge, thrust upwards between the planks and skewered the Earl of Hereford through the anus, twisting the head of the iron pike into his intestines. His dying screams turned the advance into a panic."'
    Humphrey de Bohun may have contributed to the failure of the reformers' aims. There is evidence that he suffered for some years, especially after his countess's death in 1316, from clinical depression.[3]

    Marriage and children

    His marriage to Elizabeth of Rhuddlan (Elizabeth Plantagenet), daughter of King Edward I of England and his first wife, Eleanor of Castile, on 14 November 1302, at Westminster gained him the lands of Berkshire.

    Elizabeth had an unknown number of children, probably ten, by Humphrey de Bohun.

    Until the earl's death the boys of the family, and possibly the girls, were given a classical education under the tutelage of a Sicilian Greek, Master "Digines" (Diogenes), who may have been Humphrey de Bohun's boyhood tutor.[citation needed] He was evidently well-educated, a book collector and scholar, interests his son Humphrey and daughter Margaret (Courtenay) inherited.

    Mary or Margaret (the first-born Margaret) and the first-born Humphrey were lost in infancy and are buried in the same sarcophagus in Westminster Abbey. Since fraternal twins were known in the Castilian royal family of Elizabeth Bohun, who gave birth to a pair who lived to manhood, Mary (Margaret?) and Humphrey, see next names, may have been twins, but that is uncertain. The name of a possible lost third child, if any, is unknown—and unlikely.

    Hugh de Bohun? This name appears only in one medieval source, which gives Bohun names (see Flores Historiarum) and was a probably a copyist's error for "Humphrey". Hugh was never used by the main branch of the Bohuns in England.[4] Date unknown, but after 1302, since she and Humphrey did not marry until late in 1302.

    Eleanor de Bohun (17 October 1304 – 1363),[5] married James Butler, 1st Earl of Ormonde and Thomas Dagworth, 1st Baron Dagworth.

    Humphrey de Bohun (birth and death dates unknown. Buried in Westminster Abbey with Mary or Margaret) Infant.

    Mary or Margaret de Bohun (birth and death dates unknown. Buried in Westminster Abbey with Humphrey) Infant.

    John de Bohun, 5th Earl of Hereford (About 1307 – 1336)

    Humphrey de Bohun, 6th Earl of Hereford (About 1309 to 1311 – 1361).

    Margaret de Bohun (3 April 1311 – 16 December 1391), married Hugh Courtenay, 2nd Earl of Devon. Gave birth to about 16 to 18 children (including an Archbishop, a sea commander and pirate, and more than one Knight of the Garter) and died at the age of eighty.

    William de Bohun, 1st Earl of Northampton (About 1310-1312 –1360). Twin of Edward. Married Elizabeth de Badlesmere, daughter of Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 1st Baron Badlesmere and Margaret de Clare, by whom he had issue.

    Edward de Bohun (About 1310-1312 –1334). Twin of William. Married Margaret, daughter of William de Ros, 2nd Baron de Ros, but they had no children. He served in his ailing elder brother's stead as Constable of England. He was a close friend of young Edward III, and died a heroic death attempting to rescue a drowning man-at-arms from a Scottish river while on campaign.

    Eneas de Bohun, (Birth date unknown, died after 1322, when he's mentioned in his father's will). Nothing known of him.

    Isabel de Bohun (b. ? May 1316). Elizabeth died in childbirth, and this child died on that day or very soon after. Buried with her mother in Waltham Abbey, Essex.

    Notes

    This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (November 2012)
    Jump up ^ Ronald McNair Scott, Robert the Bruce - King of Scots, Canongate, 1988; pp. 75-76 and 164.
    Jump up ^ Mortimer, The Greatest Traitor, page 124.
    Jump up ^ See Conway-Davies, 115, footnote 2, from a contemporary chronicler's account of Humphrey de Bohun, Cotton MS. Nero C. iii, f. 181, "De ce qe vous auez entendu qe le counte de Hereford est moreis pensifs qil ne soleit." "There were some. . . [fine] qualities about the earl of Hereford, and he was certainly a bold and able warrior, though gloomy and thoughtful."
    Jump up ^ Le Melletier, 16-17, 38-45, 138, in his comprehensive research into this family, cites no one named Hugh Bohun.
    Jump up ^ See Cokayne, Complete Peerage, s.v. "Dagworth" p. 28, footnote j.: "She was younger than her sister, Margaret, Countess of Devon (Parl. Rolls. vol. iv., p. 268), not older, as stated by genealogists."
    References[edit]
    Cokayne, G. (ed. by V. Gibbs). Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom (Vols II, IV, V, VI, IX: Bohun, Dagworth, Essex, Hereford, Earls of, Montague), London: 1887–1896.
    Conway-Davies, J. C. The Baronial Opposition to Edward II: Its Character and Policy. (Many references, esp. 42 footnote 1, 114, 115 & footnote 2, 355-367, 426–9, 435–9, 473–525) Cambridge(UK): 1918.
    Le Melletier, Jean, Les Seigneurs de Bohun, 1978, p. 16, 39–40.
    Mortimer, Ian. The Greatest Traitor: The Life of Sir Roger Mortimer, Ruler of England 1327–1330 (100–9, 114, 122–6), London: 2003
    Scott, Ronald McNair. Robert the Bruce: King of Scots (144–164) NY: 1989
    Further reading[edit]
    Wikisource has the text of the 1885–1900 Dictionary of National Biography's article about Bohun, Humphrey VIII de.

    Secondary sources

    Altschul, Michael. A Baronial Family in Medieval England: The Clares 1217–1314. (132–3, ) Baltimore:1965.
    Barron, Evan MacLeod. The Scottish War of Independence. (443, 455) Edinburgh, London:1914, NY:1997 (reprint).
    Barrow, G. W. S. Robert Bruce and the Community of the Realm of Scotland. (222, 290, 295–6, 343–4) Berkeley, Los Angeles:1965.
    Beltz, George Frederick. Memorials of the Order of the Garter. (148–150) London:1841.
    Bigelow, M[elville] M. "The Bohun Wills" I. American Historical Review (v.I, 1896). 415–41.
    Dictionary of National Biography. [Vol II: Bohun; Vol. VI: Edward I, Edward II; Vol. XI: Lancaster]. London and Westminster. Various dates.
    Eales, Richard and Shaun Tyas, eds., Family and Dynasty in Late Medieval England, Shaun Tyas, Donington:2003, p. 152.
    Fryde, E. B. and Edward Miller. Historical Studies of the English Parliament vol. 1, Origins to 1399, (10–13, 186, 285–90, 296) Cambridge (Eng.): 1970.
    Hamilton, J. S. Piers Gaveston Earl of Cornwall 1307-1312: Politics and Patronage in the Reign of Edward II (69, 72, 95–98, 104–5) Detroit: 1988
    Hutchison, Harold F. Edward II. (64–86, 104–5, 112–3) London: 1971.
    Jenkins, Dafydd. "Law and Government in Wales Before the Act of Union". Celtic Law Papers (37–38) Aberystwyth:1971.
    McNamee, Colin. The Wars of the Bruces. (51, 62–66) East Linton (Scotland):1997.
    Tout, T. F. and Hilda Johnstone. The Place of the Reign of Edward II in English History. (86, 105–6, 125 & footnote 3, 128–34) Manchester: 1936.
    Primary sources[edit]
    Flores historiarum. H. R. Luard, ed. (vol. iii, 121) London: 1890.
    Vita Edwardi Secundi. (117–119) N. Denholm-Young, Ed. and Tr.
    External links[edit]

    Birth:
    Pleshey Castle was originally a motte and bailey castle, which consisted of a wooden palisade and tower on a high man-made hill (motte) surrounded by two baileys (castle yard or ward), which at some time in the castle's early history was surrounded by a moat. Later, probably in the 12th century, the motte was fortified with a stone castle. The motte at Pleshey is now about 15 metres high, and is one of the largest mottes in England.[citation needed] The castle was dismantled in 1158 but was subsequently rebuilt at the end of the 12th century.[citation needed] The castle was passed to the Dukes of Gloucester through marriage and after Thomas of Woodstock, 1st Duke of Gloucester had been executed by Richard II in 1397, it decayed and became ruined. Most of the masonry was dismantled for building material in 1629, leaving just the motte and other earthworks.[citation needed]

    Map and more history ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pleshey

    Occupation:
    The Lord High Constable of England is the seventh of the Great Officers of State, ranking beneath the Lord Great Chamberlain and above the Earl Marshal. His office is now called out of abeyance only for coronations. The Lord High Constable was originally the commander of the royal armies and the Master of the Horse. He was also, in conjunction with the Earl Marshal, president of the Court of Chivalry or Court of Honour. In feudal times, martial law was administered in the court of the Lord High Constable.

    The constableship was granted as a grand serjeanty with the Earldom of Hereford by the Empress Matilda to Miles of Gloucester, and was carried by his heiress to the Bohuns, Earls of Hereford and Essex. They had a surviving male heir, and still have heirs male, but due to the power of the monarchy the constableship was irregularly given to the Staffords, Dukes of Buckingham; and on the attainder of Edward Stafford, the third Duke, in the reign of King Henry VIII, it became merged into the Crown. Since that point it has not existed as a separate office, except as a temporary appointment for the Coronation of a monarch; in other circumstances the Earl Marshal exercises the traditional duties of the office.

    more ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lord_High_Constable_of_England

    Military:
    The Battle of Bannockburn (Bláar Allt nam Báanag, often mistakenly called Bláar Allt a' Bhonnaich in Scottish Gaelic) (24 June 1314) was a significant Scottish victory in the First War of Scottish Independence, and a landmark in Scottish history.

    Stirling Castle, a Scots royal fortress, occupied by the English, was under siege by the Scottish army. The English king, Edward II, assembled a formidable force to relieve it. This attempt failed, and his army was defeated in a pitched battle by a smaller army commanded by the King of Scots, Robert the Bruce.

    More ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Bannockburn

    Military:
    The Battle of Boroughbridge was a battle fought on 16 March 1322 between a group of rebellious barons and King Edward II of England, near Boroughbridge, north-west of York. The culmination of a long period of antagonism between the King and Thomas, Earl of Lancaster, his most powerful subject, it resulted in Lancaster's defeat and execution. This allowed Edward to re-establish royal authority, and hold on to power for another five years.

    Not in itself a part of the Wars of Scottish Independence, the battle is significant for its employment of tactics learned in the Scottish wars in a domestic, English conflict. Both the extensive use of foot soldiers rather than cavalry, and the heavy impact caused by the longbow, represented significant steps in military developments.

    More ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Boroughbridge

    Humphrey married Elizabeth Plantagenet, Princess of England 14 Nov 1302, Westminster Abbey, 20 Deans Yd, London SW1P 3PA, United Kingdom. Elizabeth (daughter of Edward I, King of England and Eleanor de Castile, Queen of England) was born 7 Aug 1282, Rhuddlan Castle, Denbighshire, Wales; died 5 May 1316, Quendon, Essex, England; was buried 23 May 1316, Waltham Abbey, Essex, England. [Group Sheet]


  8. 39.  Elizabeth Plantagenet, Princess of England was born 7 Aug 1282, Rhuddlan Castle, Denbighshire, Wales (daughter of Edward I, King of England and Eleanor de Castile, Queen of England); died 5 May 1316, Quendon, Essex, England; was buried 23 May 1316, Waltham Abbey, Essex, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Elizabeth of Rhuddlan

    Notes:

    Elizabeth of Rhuddlan (7 August 1282 - 5 May 1316) was the eighth and youngest daughter of King Edward I and Queen Eleanor of Castile. Of all of her siblings, she was closest to her younger brother King Edward II, as they were only two years apart in age.

    First marriage

    In April 1285 there were negotiations with Floris V for Elizabeth's betrothal to his son John I, Count of Holland. The offer was accepted and John was sent to England to be educated. On 8 January 1297 Elizabeth was married to John at Ipswich. In attendance at the marriage were Elizabeth's sister Margaret, her father, Edward I of England, her brother Edward, and Humphrey de Bohun. After the wedding Elizabeth was expected to go to Holland with her husband, but did not wish to go, leaving her husband to go alone.

    After some time travelling England, it was decided Elizabeth should follow her husband. Her father accompanied her, travelling through the Southern Netherlands between Antwerp, Mechelen, Leuven and Brussels, before ending up in Ghent. There they remained for a few months, spending Christmas with her two sisters Eleanor and Margaret. On 10 November 1299, John died of dysentery, though there were rumours of his murder. No children had been born from the marriage.

    Second marriage

    On her return trip to England, Elizabeth went through Brabant to see her sister Margaret. When she arrived in England, she met her stepmother Margaret, whom Edward had married while she was in Holland. On 14 November 1302 Elizabeth was married to Humphrey de Bohun, 4th Earl of Hereford, 3rd of Essex, also Constable of England, at Westminster Abbey.[citation needed]

    Offspring

    The children of Elizabeth and Humphrey de Bohun, 4th Earl of Hereford were:

    Hugh de Bohun (September 1303 – 1305)
    Lady Eleanor de Bohun (17 October 1304 – 1363)
    Humphrey de Bohun (b&d 1305) (buried with Mary or Margaret)
    Mary or Margaret de Bohun (b&d 1305) (buried with Humphrey)
    John de Bohun, 5th Earl of Hereford (23 November 1306 – 1335)
    Humphrey de Bohun, 6th Earl of Hereford (6 December c. 1309 – 1361)
    Margaret de Bohun, 2nd Countess of Devon (3 April 1311 – 1391)
    William de Bohun, 1st Earl of Northampton (1312–1360).
    Edward de Bohun (1312–1334), twin of William
    Eneas de Bohun, (1314 - after 1322); he is mentioned in his father's will
    Isabel de Bohun (b&d 5 May 1316)

    Later life

    During Christmas 1315, Elizabeth, who was pregnant with her eleventh child, was visited by her sister-in-law, Queen Isabella of France. This was a great honour, but the stress of it may have caused unknown health problems that later contributed to Elizabeth's death in childbirth.[citation needed] On 5 May 1316 she went into labour, giving birth to her daughter Isabella. Both Elizabeth and her daughter Isabella died shortly after the birth, and were buried together in Waltham Abbey.

    Birth:
    Rhuddlan Castle (Welsh: Castell Rhuddlan) is a castle located in Rhuddlan, Denbighshire, Wales. It was erected by Edward I in 1277 following the First Welsh War.

    View images, map & history ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhuddlan_Castle

    Buried:
    Waltham Abbey is a market town of about 20,400 people in Epping Forest District in the southwest of the county of Essex, 24 km (15 mi) NNE of central London on the Greenwich Meridian, between the River Lea in the west and Epping Forest in the east.

    Waltham Abbey takes its name from the Abbey Church of Waltham Holy Cross, a scheduled ancient monument that was prominent in the town's early history.

    more ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waltham_Abbey_(town)

    Died:
    shortly after childbirth...

    Notes:

    Married:
    Westminster Abbey, formally titled the Collegiate Church of St Peter at Westminster, is a large, mainly Gothic abbey church in the City of Westminster, London, located just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. It is one of the most notable religious buildings in the United Kingdom and has been the traditional place of coronation and burial site for English and, later, British monarchs. Between 1540 and 1556 the abbey had the status of a cathedral. Since 1560, however, the building is no longer an abbey nor a cathedral, having instead the status of a Church of England "Royal Peculiar"—a church responsible directly to the sovereign. The building itself is the original abbey church.

    According to a tradition first reported by Sulcard in about 1080, a church was founded at the site (then known as Thorn Ey (Thorn Island)) in the 7th century, at the time of Mellitus, a Bishop of London. Construction of the present church began in 1245, on the orders of King Henry III.

    Since 1066, when Harold Godwinson and William the Conqueror were crowned, the coronations of English and British monarchs have been held there. There have been at least 16 royal weddings at the abbey since 1100. Two were of reigning monarchs (Henry I and Richard II), although, before 1919, there had been none for some 500 years.

    more ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Westminster_Abbey

    Children:
    1. 19. Eleanor de Bohun, Countess of Ormonde was born 17 Oct 1304, Knaresborough Castle, North Yorkshire, England; died 7 Oct 1363.
    2. Margaret de Bohun, Countess of Devon was born 3 Apr 1311; died 16 Dec 1391.
    3. William de Bohun, Knight, 1st Earl of Northampton was born 0___ 1312, Caldecot, Rutland, Northampton, England; died 16 Sep 1360, (England).
    4. Agnes (Margaret) de Bohun, Baroness Ferrers of Chartley was born 0___ 1313, Caldecot, Rutland, Northampton, England.

  9. 44.  Richard FitzAlan, Knight, 8th Earl of ArundelRichard FitzAlan, Knight, 8th Earl of Arundel was born 2 Mar 1266, Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England (son of John FitzAlan, Knight, 7th Earl of Arundel and Isabella Mortimer); died 9 Mar 1302, Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England; was buried Haughmond Abbey, Shropshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Baron Arundel

    Notes:

    Richard FitzAlan, 8th Earl of Arundel (7th Earl of Arundel per Ancestral Roots) (3 February 1266/7 – 9 March 1301/2) was an English Norman medieval nobleman.

    Lineage

    He was the son of John FitzAlan, 7th Earl of Arundel (6th Earl of Arundel per Ancestral Roots) and Isabella Mortimer, daughter of Roger Mortimer, 1st Baron Wigmore and Maud de Braose. His paternal grandparents were John Fitzalan, 6th Earl of Arundel and Maud le Botiller.

    Richard was feudal Lord of Clun and Oswestry in the Welsh Marches. After attaining his majority in 1289 he became the 8th Earl of Arundel, by being summoned to Parliament by a writ directed to the Earl of Arundel.

    He was knighted by King Edward I of England in 1289.

    Fought in Wales, Gascony & Scotland

    He fought in the Welsh wars, 1288 to 1294, when the Welsh castle of Castell y Bere (near modern-day Towyn) was besieged by Madog ap Llywelyn. He commanded the force sent to relieve the siege and he also took part in many other campaigns in Wales ; also in Gascony 1295-97; and furthermore in the Scottish wars, 1298-1300.

    Marriage & Issue

    He married sometime before 1285, Alice of Saluzzo (also known as Alesia di Saluzzo), daughter of Thomas I of Saluzzo in Italy. Their issue:

    Edmund FitzAlan, 9th Earl of Arundel.
    John, a priest.
    Alice FitzAlan, married Stephen de Segrave, 3rd Lord Segrave.
    Margaret FitzAlan, married William le Botiller (or Butler).
    Eleanor FitzAlan, married Henry de Percy, 1st Baron Percy.[a]

    Burial

    Richard and his mother are buried together in the sanctuary of Haughmond Abbey, long closely associated with the FitzAlan family.

    Ancestry

    [show]Ancestors of Richard FitzAlan, 8th Earl of Arundel

    Notes

    Jump up ^ Standard accounts of the Percy family identify Eleanor as the daughter of the "Earl of Arundel". Arrangements for Eleanor's marriage to Lord Percy are found in the recognizance made in 1300 by Eleanor's father, Richard, Earl of Arundel, for a debt of 2,000 marks which he owed Sir Henry Percy. Eleanor was styled as a "kinswoman" of Edward II on two separate occasions; once in 1318 and again in 1322 presumably by her descent from Amadeus IV, Count of Savoy who was the brother of Edward II's great-grandmother, Beatrice of Savoy. Eleanor's brothers, Edmund and John were also styled as "kinsmen" of the king. Eleanor's identity is further indicated by the presence of the old and new arms of FitzAlan (or Arundel) at her tomb.

    References

    Jump up ^ www.briantimms.net, Charles's Roll
    Jump up ^ Debrett's Peerage, 1968, p.833
    Wikisource link to Fitzalan, Richard (1267-1302) (DNB00). Wikisource.
    Weis, Frederick Lewis. Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700.
    External links[edit]
    Medieval Lands Project on Richard FitzAlan

    Richard married Alice of Saluzzo, Countess of Arundel Bef 1285. Alice (daughter of Thomas of Saluzzo, Marquis of Saluzzo and Luigia de Ceva) was born 0___ 1269, Saluzzo, Italy; died 25 Sep 1292, Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England; was buried Haughmond Abbey, Shropshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  10. 45.  Alice of Saluzzo, Countess of Arundel was born 0___ 1269, Saluzzo, Italy (daughter of Thomas of Saluzzo, Marquis of Saluzzo and Luigia de Ceva); died 25 Sep 1292, Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England; was buried Haughmond Abbey, Shropshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Alesia di Saluzzo
    • Also Known As: Alisona de Saluzzo

    Notes:

    Alice of Saluzzo, Countess of Arundel (died 25 September 1292),[1] also known as Alesia di Saluzzo, was an Italian-born noblewoman and an English countess. She was a daughter of Thomas I of Saluzzo, and the wife of Richard Fitzalan, 8th Earl of Arundel. Alice was one of the first Italian women to marry into an English noble family. She assumed the title of Countess of Arundel in 1289.

    Family

    Alesia was born on an unknown date in Saluzzo (present-day Province of Cuneo, Piedmont); the second eldest daughter of Thomas I, 4th Margrave of Saluzzo, and Luigia di Ceva (died 22 August 1291/1293), daughter of Giorgio, Marquis of Ceva[2] and Menzia d'Este.[1] Alesia had fifteen siblings. Her father was a very wealthy and cultured nobleman under whose rule Saluzzo achieved a prosperity, freedom, and greatness it had never known previously.[citation needed]

    Marriage and issue

    Sometime before 1285, Alice married Richard Fitzalan, feudal Lord of Clun and Oswestry in the Welsh Marches, the son of John Fitzalan, 7th Earl of Arundel and Isabella Mortimer. Richard would succeed to the title of Earl of Arundel in 1289, thus making Alice the 8th Countess of Arundel. Along with her aunt, Alasia of Saluzzo who married Edmund de Lacy, 2nd Earl of Lincoln in 1247, Alice was one of the first Italian women to marry into an English noble family. Her marriage had been arranged by the late King Henry III's widowed Queen consort Eleanor of Provence.

    Richard and Alice's principal residence was Marlborough Castle in Wiltshire, but Richard also held Arundel Castle in Sussex and the castles of Clun and Oswestry in Shropshire. Her husband was knighted by King Edward I in 1289, and fought in the Welsh Wars (1288–1294), and later in the Scottish Wars. The marriage produced four children:[3]

    Edmund Fitzalan, 9th Earl of Arundel (1 May 1285- 17 November 1326 by execution), married Alice de Warenne, by whom he had issue.
    John Fitzalan, a priest
    Alice Fitzalan (died 7 September 1340), married Stephen de Segrave, 3rd Lord Segrave, by whom she had issue.
    Margaret Fitzalan, married William le Botiller, by whom she had issue.
    Eleanor Fitzalan, married Henry de Percy, 1st Baron Percy, by whom she had issue.
    Alice died on 25 September 1292 and was buried in Haughmond Abbey, Shropshire. Her husband Richard died on 09/03/1301 and was buried alongside Alice. In 1341, provision was made for twelve candles to be burned beside their tombs.[2] The Abbey is now a ruin as the result of a fire during the English Civil War. Her many descendants included the Dukes of Norfolk, the English queen consorts of Henry VIII, Sir Winston Churchill, Diana, Princess of Wales, and the current British Royal Family.

    References

    ^ Jump up to: a b Cawley, Charles, Saluzzo, Medieval Lands database, Foundation for Medieval Genealogy,[better source needed]
    ^ Jump up to: a b The Complete Peerage, vol.1, page 241.[full citation needed]
    Jump up ^ Cawley, Charles, Earls of Arundel, Medieval Lands database, Foundation for Medieval Genealogy,[better source needed]

    Categories: 13th-century births1292 deathsPeople from SaluzzoWomen of medieval Italy

    end of biography

    Children of Alisona di Saluzzo and Richard FitzAlan Baron of Arundel are:

    i. Edmund FitzAlan 9th Earl of Arundel was born 1 MAY 1285 in Marlborough Castle, Marlborough, Wiltshire, England, and died 17 NOV 1326 in Hereford, Herefordshire, England. He married Alice Warenne 1305 in Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England, daughter of William de Warenne Earl of Surrey and Joan de Vere. She was born ABT 1286 in Warren, Sussex, England, and died BEF 23 MAY 1338.
    21. ii. Margaret FitzAlan was born 1302 in Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England. She married William 2nd Baron le Boteler Sir of Wemme in Shropshire, England, son of William 1st Baron le Boteler Sir of Wemme and Beatrice de Herdeburgh. He was born 8 SEP 1296 in Wem, Shropshire, England, and died DEC 1361 in Oversley, Alcester, Warwickshire, England.
    iii. Alice FitzAlan. She married Stephen 3rd Lord de Seagrave, son of John 2nd Baron de Segrave & Penn Sir and Christian de Plessis Heir of Stottesdon. He was born 1285 in Seagrave, Leicestershire, England, and died 1326.
    iv. Thomas FitzAlan Baron of Arundel.

    Children:
    1. Eleanor FitzAlan was born 0___ 1282; died 0___ 1328; was buried Beverley Minster, Yorkshire, England.
    2. 22. Edmund FitzAlan, Knight, 9th Earl of Arundel was born 1 May 1285, Marlborough Castle, Marlborough, Wiltshire, England; died 17 Nov 1326, Hereford, Herefordshire, England; was buried Haughmond Abbey, Shropshire, England.
    3. Alice FitzAlan was born 0___ 1291, Arundel, Sussex, England; died 7 Feb 1340, Northamptonshire, England; was buried Chacombe Priory, Chacombe, Northamptonshire, England.
    4. Margaret FitzAlan was born 1302, Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England.

  11. 46.  William de Warenne was born 9 Feb 1256, Lewes Castle, Lewes, East Sussex, England (son of John de Warenne, Knight, 6th Earl of Surrey and Alice de Lusignan); died 15 Dec 1296, Croydon, England.

    Notes:

    William de Warenne (9 February 1256 - 15 December 1286) was the only son of John de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey and his wife Alice de Lusignan.[1]

    Life

    William married Joan, daughter of Robert de Vere, 5th Earl of Oxford. They had the following children:

    John de Warenne, 7th Earl of Surrey (30 June 1286 – June 1347)
    Alice de Warenne (15 June 1287 - 23 May 1338), wife of Edmund FitzAlan, 9th Earl of Arundel.
    William was killed in a tournament at Croydon in 1286,[1] predeceasing his father. It has been suggested that this was murder, planned in advance by William's enemies.[2][3] On the 5th Earl's death the title went to John, the only son of William. John died without legitimate children, so on his death the title passed to Richard FitzAlan, 10th Earl of Arundel, eldest son of Edmund FitzAlan and John' sister Alice.

    William — Joan de Vere. [Group Sheet]


  12. 47.  Joan de Vere (daughter of Robert de Vere, Knight, 5th Earl of Oxford and Alice de Sanford).
    Children:
    1. John de Warenne, Knight, 7th Earl of Surrey was born 30 Jun 1286; died 0Jun 1347.
    2. 23. Alice de Warenne, Countess of Arundel was born 15 Jun 1287, Warren, Sussex, England; died 23 May 1338.


Generation: 7

  1. 64.  Richard Talbot, Lord of Eccleswall was born ~ 1250, Linton Manor, Bromyard, Herefordshire, England (son of Gilbert Talbot and Gwenllian ferch Rhys); died Bef 3 Sep 1306, Herefordshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Richard de Talbot

    Notes:

    Baron Talbot is a title that has been created twice. The title was created first in the Peerage of England. On 5 June 1331, Sir Gilbert Talbot was summoned to Parliament, by which he was held to have become Baron Talbot.

    The title Lord Talbot, Baron of Hensol, in the County of Glamorgan, was created in the Peerage of Great Britain in 1733 for Charles Talbot, a descendant of the John Talbot, 2nd Earl of Shrewsbury (the 8th Baron of the first creation), the Earl Talbot.

    Barons Talbot (1331)

    Gilbert Talbot (1276–1346), Lord Chamberlain of the Household to King Edward III, was summoned to Parliament as Lord Talbot in 1331, which is accepted as evidence of his baronial status at that date.

    Ancestry

    He was descended from Richard Talbot, a tenant in 1086 of Walter Giffard at Woburn and Battledsen in Bedfordshire. The Talbot family were vassals of the Giffards in Normandy.[4] Hugh Talbot, probably his son, made a grant to Beaubec Abbey, confirmed by his son Richard Talbot in 1153. This Richard (d. 1175) is listed in 1166 as holding three fees of the Honour of Giffard in Buckinghamshire. He also held a fee at Linton in Herefordshire, for which his son Gilbert Talbot (d. 1231) obtained a fresh charter in 1190.[5] Gilbert's grandson Gilbert (d. 1274) married Gwenlynn Mechyll, daughter and sole heiress of the Welsh Prince Rhys Mechyll, whose armorials the Talbots thenceforth assumed in lieu of their own former arms. Their son Sir Richard Talbot, who signed and sealed[6] the Barons' Letter, 1301 held the manor of Eccleswall in Herefordshire in right of his wife Sarah, sister of William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick. In 1331 Richard's son Gilbert Talbot (1276–1346) was summoned to Parliament, which is considered evidence of his baronial status.[7]

    Succession

    The first baron's grandson, the 3rd Baron Talbot, died in Spain supporting John of Gaunt's claim to the throne of Castile. Richard, the fourth Baron, married Ankaret, 7th Baroness Strange of Blackmere, daughter and heiress of John le Strange, 4th Baron Strange of Blackmere. In 1387, during his father's lifetime, Richard 4th Baron was summoned to Parliament as Ricardo Talbot de Blackmere in right of his wife. His son [Gilbert], the fifth Baron, also succeeded his mother as eighth Baron Strange of Blackmere.

    On the early death of the 5th Baron, the titles passed to his daughter, Ankaret, the sixth and ninth holder of the titles. However, she died a minor and was succeeded by her uncle, John seventh Baron Talbot. John married Maud Nevill, 6th Baroness Furnivall, and, in 1409, he was summoned to Parliament in right of his wife as Johann Talbot de Furnyvall. In 1442 John was created Earl of Shrewsbury in the Peerage of England and in 1446 Earl of Waterford in the Peerage of Ireland.

    Barons Talbot (1733)

    The title was created in 1733 when Charles Talbot was raised to the Peerage of Great Britain as Lord Talbot, Baron of Hensol, in the County of Glamorgan. He was eldest the son of William Talbot, Bishop of Oxford, of Salisbury and of Durham and a descendant of Sir Gilbert Talbot (died 1518), third son of John Talbot, 2nd Earl of Shrewsbury.

    The title fell into abeyance between the three daughters of Gilbert Talbot, 7th Earl of Shrewsbury until the deaths of two of them without issue.

    List of titleholders

    Barons Talbot (1331)
    Gilbert Talbot, 1st Baron Talbot (1276–1346)
    Richard Talbot, 2nd Baron Talbot (c.1305–1356)
    Gilbert Talbot, 3rd Baron Talbot (c.1332–1387)
    Richard Talbot, 4th Baron Talbot (c.1361–1396)
    Gilbert Talbot, 5th Baron Talbot, 8th Baron Strange of Blackmere (c.1383–1419)
    Ankaret Talbot, 6th Baroness Talbot, 9th Baroness Strange of Blackmere (d. 1421)
    John Talbot, 7th Baron Talbot, 10th Baron Strange of Blackmere (1390–1453) (created Earl of Shrewsbury in 1442)
    John Talbot, 2nd Earl of Shrewsbury, 8th Baron Talbot (1413–1460)
    John Talbot, 3rd Earl of Shrewsbury, 9th Baron Talbot (1448–1473)
    George Talbot, 4th Earl of Shrewsbury, 10th Baron Talbot (1468–1538)
    Francis Talbot, 5th Earl of Shrewsbury, 11th Baron Talbot (1500–1560)
    George Talbot, 6th Earl of Shrewsbury, 12th Baron Talbot (1528–1590)
    Gilbert Talbot, 7th Earl of Shrewsbury, 13th Baron Talbot (1552–1616)
    abeyant 1616-1651
    Alethea Howard, Countess of Arundel, 13th Baroness Furnivall and 14th Baroness Talbot (d. 1654)
    Thomas Howard, 5th Duke of Norfolk, 15th Baron Talbot (1627–1677)
    Henry Howard, 6th Duke of Norfolk, 16th Baron Talbot (1628–1684)
    Henry Howard, 7th Duke of Norfolk, 17th Baron Talbot (1655–1701)
    Thomas Howard, 8th Duke of Norfolk, 18th Baron Talbot (1683–1732)
    Edward Howard, 9th Duke of Norfolk, 19th Baron Talbot (1685–1777)
    abeyant since 1777

    end

    Died:
    at Eccleswall Manor...

    Richard married Sarah de Beauchamp Aft 1268. Sarah (daughter of Walter de Beauchamp and Joan Mortimer) was born 0___ 1255, Elmley Castle, Worcester, England; died Aft 1316. [Group Sheet]


  2. 65.  Sarah de Beauchamp was born 0___ 1255, Elmley Castle, Worcester, England (daughter of Walter de Beauchamp and Joan Mortimer); died Aft 1316.
    Children:
    1. 32. Gilbert Talbot, 1st Baron Talbot was born 18 Oct 1276, Wyke, Cornwall, England; died 13 Feb 1346, Herefordshire, England.

  3. 66.  William le Boteler was born ~ 1245, Wem, Shropshire, England; died 11 Dec 1283, Wem, Shropshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: William le Botiller

    Notes:

    William le BOTILLER and Ankaret verch GRUFFYDD

    HUSBAND:
    William le BOTILLER. (Boteler).
    Born (in 1230)(about 1245) in Wemme, Shropshire, England; son of Ralph le BOTELER and Maud PANTULF.

    He married Ankaret verch Gruffydd after 1261.

    He died on 11 December 1283.

    WIFE:
    Ankaret verch GRUFFYDD Maelor.
    Born (in 1236)(about 1248) (in Powys)(at Bromfield; Lower Powys), Montgomeryshire, Wales; daughter of Gruffydd ap Madog and Emma de Aldithley. (Audley). She died on 22 June 1308.

    Genealogy of Ankaret:
    Ankaret verch Gruffydd (Gruffydd "Griffith" ap Madoc79, Madoc ap Gruffydd Maelor78, Angharad77, Cristin verch Gronwy76, Gronwy75, Owain74, Eadwine "Edwin" ap Gronwy73, Gronwy ap Einion72, Einion ap Owain71, Owain ap Hywel "Dda"70, Hywel "Dda" ap Cadell69, Cadell ap Rhodri Mawr68, Rhodri Mawr ap Merfyn67, Merfyn "the Freckled" ap Gwriad66, Gwriad ap Elidir of Man65, Elidir ap Sandde64, Sandde ap Alewn63, Alewn ap Tegid62, Tegid ap Gwair61, Gwair ap Dwywg60, Dwywg ap Llywarch59, Llywarch Hen ap Elidir58, Elidir ap Meirchion57, Meirchion Gul ap Gwrst56, Gwrst Lledlwin ap Ceneu55, Ceneu54, Coel *53, Tegfan Gloff52, Deheuwaint51, Telpwyll50, Urban49, Gradd "Grat"48, Remetel "Jumetel" Rhyfedel47, Rhydeyrn Rhyfedel46, Euddigan45, Eudeyrn44, Eifudd43, Eudos42, Euddolen41, Eugein40, Afallach39, Beli "Mawr" * the Great38, Manogan * ap Eneid37, Eneid *36, Cerwyd *35, Crydon *34, Dyfnarth Cynfarch *33, Prydain *32, Aedd * Mawr31, Antonius *30, Sisillius *29, Gwrst ? *28, Rhiwallon *27, Cunedda *26, Henwyn * ap Bleiddud25, Bleiddud Cyngen ap Asser24, Asser ap Cyngen23, Cyngen Bleiddud22, Dyfnwal ap Gorbonian21, Gorbonian20, Cymryw Camber19, Brutus *18, Silivius *17, Iulus * Ascanius16, Aeneas *15, Anchisa Anchises14, Capps13, Assaracus12, Tros11, Erichthonius10, Dardanus9, Zerah8, Judah *7, Jacob *6, Isaac *5, Abraham *4, Terah *3, Nahor.

    CHILDREN of William le BOTILLER and Ankaret verch GRUFFYDD.
    (Sir) William le BOTILER. First Baron Boteler. Born on 11 January 1274, (of Wemme, Shropshire)(in Oversley, Warwickshire), England. He married (1) Beatrice about 1295. He married (2) Ela de HERDEBURGH before February 1316. He died before 14 September 1334, when an inquest post mortem was held for him.
    Anne le BOTELER. Born (in 1272)(in 1280) in Wemme, Shropshire, England. She married Gilbert TALBOT.
    John Le Boteler was born on 17 Jul 1266.
    Gawaine Le Boteler was born on 2 Feb 1269/1270.
    Ralph le BOTELER. Born about 1244. Died before 5 June 1307.


    SOURCES:
    [S1]. McMahan/Kilsdonk Ancestors. RootsWeb. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=REG&db=kmcmahan&id=I12491.
    [S2]. Wikipedia, the Free Ecyclopedia.

    end

    William married Ankaret verch Griffith Aft 1261. Ankaret (daughter of Gruffydd ap Madog and Emma de Aldithley) was born 1236-1248, Powys, Wales; died 22 Jun 1308. [Group Sheet]


  4. 67.  Ankaret verch Griffith was born 1236-1248, Powys, Wales (daughter of Gruffydd ap Madog and Emma de Aldithley); died 22 Jun 1308.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Ankaret verch Gruffydd
    • Also Known As: Lady Angharad ferch Gruffydd

    Notes:

    Genealogy of Ankaret:

    Ankaret verch Gruffydd (Gruffydd "Griffith" ap Madoc79, Madoc ap Gruffydd Maelor78, Angharad77, Cristin verch Gronwy76, Gronwy75, Owain74, Eadwine "Edwin" ap Gronwy73, Gronwy ap Einion72, Einion ap Owain71, Owain ap Hywel "Dda"70, Hywel "Dda" ap Cadell69, Cadell ap Rhodri Mawr68, Rhodri Mawr ap Merfyn67, Merfyn "the Freckled" ap Gwriad66, Gwriad ap Elidir of Man65, Elidir ap Sandde64, Sandde ap Alewn63, Alewn ap Tegid62, Tegid ap Gwair61, Gwair ap Dwywg60, Dwywg ap Llywarch59, Llywarch Hen ap Elidir58, Elidir ap Meirchion57, Meirchion Gul ap Gwrst56, Gwrst Lledlwin ap Ceneu55, Ceneu54, Coel *53, Tegfan Gloff52, Deheuwaint51, Telpwyll50, Urban49, Gradd "Grat"48, Remetel "Jumetel" Rhyfedel47, Rhydeyrn Rhyfedel46, Euddigan45, Eudeyrn44, Eifudd43, Eudos42, Euddolen41, Eugein40, Afallach39, Beli "Mawr" * the Great38, Manogan * ap Eneid37, Eneid *36, Cerwyd *35, Crydon *34, Dyfnarth Cynfarch *33, Prydain *32, Aedd * Mawr31, Antonius *30, Sisillius *29, Gwrst ? *28, Rhiwallon *27, Cunedda *26, Henwyn * ap Bleiddud25, Bleiddud Cyngen ap Asser24, Asser ap Cyngen23, Cyngen Bleiddud22, Dyfnwal ap Gorbonian21, Gorbonian20, Cymryw Camber19, Brutus *18, Silivius *17, Iulus * Ascanius16, Aeneas *15, Anchisa Anchises14, Capps13, Assaracus12, Tros11, Erichthonius10, Dardanus9, Zerah8, Judah *7, Jacob *6, Isaac *5, Abraham *4, Terah *3, Nahor.

    CHILDREN of William le BOTILLER and Ankaret verch GRUFFYDD.
    (Sir) William le BOTILER. First Baron Boteler. Born on 11 January 1274, (of Wemme, Shropshire)(in Oversley, Warwickshire), England. He married (1) Beatrice about 1295. He married (2) Ela de HERDEBURGH before February 1316. He died before 14 September 1334, when an inquest post mortem was held for him.
    Anne le BOTELER. Born (in 1272)(in 1280) in Wemme, Shropshire, England. She married Gilbert TALBOT.
    John Le Boteler was born on 17 Jul 1266.
    Gawaine Le Boteler was born on 2 Feb 1269/1270.
    Ralph le BOTELER. Born about 1244. Died before 5 June 1307.


    SOURCES:
    [S1]. McMahan/Kilsdonk Ancestors. RootsWeb. http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=REG&db=kmcmahan&id=I12491.
    [S2]. Wikipedia, the Free Ecyclopedia.

    Children:
    1. Noel le Boteler was born 1258, Wem, Shropshire, England; died 14 Sep 1334, St. Mary, Devonshire, England.
    2. William le Boteler, 1st Baron Boteler was born 11 Jun 1274, Oversley, Warwickshire, England; died 14 Sep 1334, Wem, Shropshire, England.
    3. 33. Anne le Boteler was born ~ 1278, (Wemme) Shropshire, England; died 0___ 1340, Linton, Herefordshire, England.

  5. 68.  John "Black Comyn" Comyn, II, Lord of Badenoch (son of John Comyn, I, Lord of Badenoch and Alice de Roos); died 0___ 1302, Lochindorb Castle, Strathspey, Scotland.

    Other Events:

    • Ordained: Guardian of Scotland

    Notes:

    John II Comyn, Lord of Badenoch and Lord of Lochaber (died 1302) or John "the Black", also known as Black Comyn, a Scottish nobleman, was a Guardian of Scotland, and one of the six Regents for Margaret, Maid of Norway. His father was John I Comyn, Lord of Badenoch.

    Competitor for the Crown

    In 1284 he joined with other Scottish noblemen who acknowledged Margaret of Norway as the heir of King Alexander.[1] He was a Guardian of the Realm from 1286 to 1292.[2] Comyn submitted to the English king in July 1296 at Montrose.[3]

    As a descendant of King Donald III, Comyn was one of the thirteen Competitors for the Crown of Scotland. He did not aggressively push his claim for fear of jeopardising that of his brother-in-law John de Balliol, King of Scotland.[3]

    Comyn, head of the most powerful noble family in Scotland, was a committed ally of Balliol and assisted him in his struggle against Edward I of England. It has even been suggested that the Comyn family were the driving force behind both the Balliol kingship and the revolt against Edward's demands. John Comyn is credited with the building of several large castles or castle houses in and around Inverness. Parts of Mortlach (Balvenie Castle) and Inverlochy Castle still stand today. John Comyn as his father was before him was entrusted by Alexander III of Scotland with the defense of Scotland's northern territories from invasion by the Vikings and the Danes.

    Family

    Comyn married Eleanor de Balliol, daughter of John I de Balliol of Barnard Castle, sister of King John of Scotland. Together they had several children, which included:

    John III Comyn, Lord of Badenoch.,[4][5] who married Lady Joan de Valence of Pembroke, daughter of William de Valence, 1st Earl of Pembroke, who was the half-brother to Henry III of England, and uncle of Edward I of England.
    One of their daughters, Euphemia, married Sir Andrew Moray of Petty.
    Their other daughter, whose given name is not known, married Sir William Galbraith, Chief of that Ilk. It is commonly accepted that Sir William Galbraith and the unnamed Princess of Badenoch are the common progenitures of the Kincaid Family of Scotland and all of their descendents.

    Death

    John II Comyn, Lord of Badenoch died at Lochindorb Castle,[3] in 1302.

    John — Eleanor de Balliol. Eleanor (daughter of John de Balliol, King of Scotland and Dervorguilla of Galloway) was born 0___ 1246. [Group Sheet]


  6. 69.  Eleanor de Balliol was born 0___ 1246 (daughter of John de Balliol, King of Scotland and Dervorguilla of Galloway).

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Alianora de Balliol
    • Also Known As: Mary de Balliol

    Children:
    1. 34. John "The Red" Comyn, III, Lord of Badenoch was born Abt 1269, Badenoch, Isle of Skye, Inverness, Scotland; died 10 Feb 1306, Dumfries, Scotland.

  7. 70.  William de Valence, Knight, 1st Earl of PembrokeWilliam de Valence, Knight, 1st Earl of Pembroke was born 1225-1230, Cistercian Abbey, Valence, France (son of Hugh of Lusignan, X, Knight, Count of La Marche and Isabelle of Angouleme, Queen of England); died 18 May 1296, Bayonne, Gascony, France; was buried Westminster Abbey, 20 Deans Yd, London SW1P 3PA, United Kingdom.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Guillaume de Lusignan

    Notes:

    William de Valence (died 18 May 1296), born Guillaume de Lusignan, was a French nobleman and knight who became important in English politics due to his relationship to Henry III. He was heavily involved in the Second Barons' War, supporting the King and Prince Edward against the rebels led by Simon de Montfort. He took the name de Valence ("of Valence").

    He was the fourth son of Isabella of Angoulãeme, widow of king John of England, and her second husband, Hugh X of Lusignan, Count of La Marche, and was thus a half-brother to Henry III of England, and uncle to Edward I. William was born in the Cistercian abbey in Valence, Couhâe-Vâerac, Vienne, Poitou, near Lusignan,[1] sometime in the late 1220s (his elder sister Alice was born in 1224).

    Move to England

    Coat of Arms of William de Valence before he became Earl of Pembroke, showing for difference a label gules of five points each charged with three lions rampant argent
    The French conquest of Poitou in 1246 created great difficulties for William's family, and so he and his brothers, Guy de Lusignan and Aymer, accepted Henry III's invitation to come to England in 1247. The king found important positions for all of them; William was soon married to a great heiress, Joan de Munchensi or Munchensy (c. 1230 – after 20 September 1307), the only surviving child of Warin de Munchensi, lord of Swanscombe, and his first wife Joan Marshal, who was one of the five daughters of William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke and Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke suo jure. As an eventual co-heiress of the Marshal estates, Joan de Munchensi's portion included the castle and lordship of Pembroke and the lordship erected earldom of Wexford in Ireland. The custody of Joan's property was entrusted to her husband, who apparently assumed the lordships of Pembroke and Wexford between 1250 and 1260.

    The Second Barons' War

    This favouritism to royal relatives was unpopular with many of the English nobility, a discontent which would culminate in the Second Barons' War. It did not take long for William to make enemies in England. From his new lands in South Wales, he tried to regain the palatine rights which had been attached to the Earldom of Pembroke, but his energies were not confined to this. The King heaped lands and honours upon him, and he was soon thoroughly hated as one of the most prominent of the rapacious foreigners. Moreover, some trouble in Wales led to a quarrel between him and Simon de Montfort, who was to become the figurehead for the rebels. He refused to comply with the provisions imposed on the King at Oxford in 1258, and took refuge in Wolvesey Castle at Winchester, where he was besieged and compelled to surrender and leave the country.

    However, in 1259 William and de Montfort were formally reconciled in Paris, and in 1261 Valence was again in England and once more enjoying the royal favour. He fought for Henry at the disastrous Battle of Lewes, and after the defeat again fled to France, while de Montfort ruled England. However, by 1265 he was back, landing in Pembrokeshire, and taking part in the Siege of Gloucester and the final royalist victory at Evesham. After the battle he was restored to his estates and accompanied Prince Edward, afterwards Edward I, to Palestine.

    Welsh wars and death

    From his base in Pembrokeshire he was a mainstay of the English campaigns against Llywelyn ap Gruffudd and later Dafydd ap Gruffudd; in the war of 1282–3 that led to the conquest of Wales he negotiated the surrender of one of Dafydd's last remaining castles, Castell-y-Bere, with its custodian, Cynfrig ap Madog. He also went several times to France on public business and he was one of Edward's representatives in the famous suit over the succession to the crown of Scotland in 1291 and 1292.

    William de Valence died at Bayonne on the 13 June 1296; his body is buried at Westminster Abbey.

    Descendants

    William and Joan de Munchensi (described above) had the following children:

    Isabel de Valence (died 5 October 1305), married before 1280 John Hastings, 1st Baron Hastings (6 May 1262 – 10 February 1313). Their grandson Lawrence later became earl of Pembroke. They had:

    William Hastings (1282–1311)
    John Hastings, 2nd Baron Hastings (29 September 1286 – 20 January 1325), married to Juliane de Leybourne (died 1367)
    Sir Hugh Hastings of Sutton (died 1347)
    Elizabeth Hastings (1294 - 6 March 1353), married Roger Grey, 1st Baron Grey de Ruthyn.

    Joan de Valence, married to John Comyn (the "Red Comyn"), Lord of Badenoch (died 10 February 1306, murdered), and had
    John Comyn (k.1314 at Bannockburn), married to Margaret Wake, 3rd Baroness Wake of Liddell
    Joan Comyn (c.1296-1326), married to David II Strathbogie, Earl of Atholl
    Elizabeth Comyn (1 November 1299 – 20 November 1372), married to Richard Talbot, Lord Talbot

    John de Valence (died January 1277)
    William de Valence (died 16 June 1282, in the Battle of Llandeilo Fawr in Wales), created Seigneur de Montignac and Bellac
    Aymer de Valence, 2nd Earl of Pembroke and Wexford in 1296 (c. 1270 – 23 June 1324), married firstly to Beatrice de Clermont and married secondly to Marie de Chatillon
    Margaret de Valence, died young. Buried at Westminster Abbey.
    Agnes de Valence (born c. 1250, date of death unknown), married (1) Maurice FitzGerald, Baron of Offaly, (2) Hugh de Balliol, son of John de Balliol, and brother of John Balliol, King of Scotland, and (3) John of Avesnes, Lord of Beaumont son of Baldwin of Avesnes. Agnes had children from her first and third marriage:[2]
    Gerald FitzMaurice, Baron of Offaly
    John of Avesnes
    Baldwin of Avesnes, Lord of Beaumont.
    Felicite of Avesnes
    Jeanne of Avesnes, Abbess of Flines.

    *

    Click here for photos, maps & history of the great Westminister Abbey... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Westminster_Abbey#Burials_and_memorials

    William married Joan de Munchensi, Lady of Swanscombe and Countess of Pembr 6 Aug 1247, England. Joan (daughter of Warin de Munchesi, Knight, Lord Swanscombe and Joan Marshal) was born ~ 1230, (Kent, England); died Aft 20 Sep 1307, (England). [Group Sheet]


  8. 71.  Joan de Munchensi, Lady of Swanscombe and Countess of Pembr was born ~ 1230, (Kent, England) (daughter of Warin de Munchesi, Knight, Lord Swanscombe and Joan Marshal); died Aft 20 Sep 1307, (England).

    Notes:

    Joan de Munchensi or Munchensy (or Joanna), Lady of Swanscombe and Countess of Pembroke (c. 1230 - aft. September 20, 1307), was the daughter of Joan Marshal and granddaughter of William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke and Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke suo jure.

    Family[edit]
    William Marshal was the great Lord Marshal who served five successive Kings of England and died in 1219. William's five sons each in turn became Earl of Pembroke, but all died childless. His inheritance was thus divided among his daughters. Joan Marshal, the fourth daughter, married Warin de Munchensi (or Munchensy), Lord of Swanscombe. They were survived by one daughter, Joan de Munchensi, who (owing to Joan Marshal's death soon after her daughter's birth) was brought up by her stepmother, Warin's second wife, Dionisie de Munchensi.

    Marriage and children

    In 1247 three sons of Hugh X of Lusignan, in difficulties after the French annexation of their territories, accepted Henry III's invitation to come to England. The three were William of Valence, Guy of Lusignan and Aymer. The king found important positions for all of them and William was soon married to Joan. Her portion of the Marshal estates included the castle and lordship of Pembroke and the lordship of Wexford in Ireland. The custody of Joan's property was entrusted to her husband. She also, apparently, transmitted to him the title of Earl of Pembroke; he thus became the first of the de Valence holders of the earldom.

    William of Valence died in 1296. Accounts of the offspring of William and Joan vary, but all say that there were five children, others[citation needed] seven including the last two:

    Isabel de Valence (d. October 5, 1305), married before 1280 John Hastings, 1st Baron Hastings (May 6, 1262 – February 10, 1313). Their grandson Lawrence later became earl of Pembroke. They had:
    William Hastings (1282 – 1311)
    John Hastings, 2nd Baron Hastings (September 29, 1286 – January 20, 1325), married to Juliane de Leybourne (d. 1367)
    Sir Hugh Hastings of Sutton (d. 1347)
    Joan de Valence, married to John Comyn (the "Red Comyn"), Lord of Badenoch (d. murdered, February 10, 1306), and had
    Elizabeth Comyn (November 1, 1299 – November 20, 1372), married to Richard Talbot, Lord Talbot
    John de Valence (d. January, 1277)
    William de Valence (d. in battle in Wales on June 16, 1282), created Seigneur de Montignac and Bellac
    Aymer de Valence, 2nd Earl of Pembroke and Wexford in 1296 (c. 1270 – June 23, 1324), married firstly to Beatrice de Clermont and married secondly to Marie de Chãatillon
    Margaret de Valence
    Agnes de Valence (b. about 1250)

    Children:
    1. 35. Joan de Valence died 0___ 1326.
    2. Isabel de Valence was born 0___ 1262; died 5 Oct 1305.

  9. 72.  Theobald Butler, 4th Chief Butler of Ireland was born 0___ 1242, (Ireland) (son of Theobald Butler, 3rd Chief Butler of Ireland and Margery de Burgh); died 26 Sep 1285.

    Notes:

    Theobald Butler, 4th Chief Butler of Ireland (1242 – 26 September 1285) was the son of Theobald Butler, 3rd Chief Butler of Ireland and Margery de Burgh, daughter of Richard Mor de Burgh, 1st Lord of Connacht. He assisted King Edward I of England in his wars in Scotland. He died at the castle of Arklow, County Wicklow, Ireland, and was buried at Arklow Monastery.[1]

    Marriage and Children

    He married Joan FitzJohn in 1268, the fourth and youngest daughter of John Fitzgeoffrey, Lord of Kirtling, Sheriff of Yorkshire, and Isobel Bigod and the granddaughter of Geoffrey FitzPeter, Earl of Essex.[2] She was co-heir with her three sisters to her brothers John and Richard.[3] On her marriage, she brought Theobald the manor of Faubridge in Essex, the hamlet of Shippeley in Hants, the manor of Shire in Surrey, the hamlet of Vacherie and the manor of Ailesbury (in Buckinghamshire). Joan died 4 April 1303. Their children were:

    Theobald Butler, 5th Chief Butler of Ireland (1269–1299)
    Edmund Butler, Earl of Carrick and 6th Chief Butler of Ireland (1268 – 1321)
    Thomas Butler, 1st Baron Dunboyne (1271-1329)
    Margaret Butler (1294–1344), she married John de Trenouth
    John Butler (1270-1321)
    Richard Butler (b.1275)
    Gilbert Butler (b.1275)
    Nicholas Butler (b.1277), elected Archbishop of Dublin by the Prior and Convent of the Holy Trinity in January 1306, but was never consecrated.
    James Butler (1278-1337)

    References

    Jump up ^ Lodge, John The Peerage of Ireland or, A Genealogical History Of The Present Nobility Of That Kingdom, 1789, Vol IV, p 5.
    Jump up ^ The Peerage.
    Jump up ^ Lodge, John The Peerage of Ireland or, A Genealogical History Of The Present Nobility Of That Kingdom, 1789, Vol IV, p 5.

    *

    Theobald married Joan FitzJohn 0___ 1268. Joan (daughter of John FitzGeoffrey, Justicar of Ireland and Isabelle Bigod, Countess of Essex) died 4 Apr 1303. [Group Sheet]


  10. 73.  Joan FitzJohn (daughter of John FitzGeoffrey, Justicar of Ireland and Isabelle Bigod, Countess of Essex); died 4 Apr 1303.
    Children:
    1. 36. Edmund Butler, Knight, Earl of Carrick was born 0___ 1268, Gowran, County Kilkenny, Ireland; died 13 Sep 1321, London, Middlesex, England; was buried St. Mary's Collegiate Church Gowran, Gowran, County Kilkenny, Ireland.

  11. 74.  John FitzThomas FitzGerald, 1st Earl of Kildare was born ~ 1250; died 10 Sep 1316.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: 4th Lord of Offaly
    • Also Known As: Baron of Offaly

    Notes:

    John FitzThomas FitzGerald (c. 1250 - d. 10 September 1316) was an Irish nobleman in the Peerage of Ireland, as 4th Lord of Offaly from 1287 and subsequently as 1st Earl of Kildare from 1316.[1]

    Life

    He was the eldest son of Thomas FitzMaurice FitzGerald (died 1271) and Rohesia de St.Michel, he is noticed in 1291 in serious dispute with William Vescy, Lord of Kildare, Lord Justice of Ireland, about whom there were many complaints of oppression and neglect of the country's defences. As champion of the complainants John Fitzgerald, by then 4th Lord of Offaly (having succeeded to the title in 1287, upon the death of his uncle Maurice FitzGerald, 3rd Lord of Offaly), their paths crossed and instead of addressing the issues Vescy charged Fitzgerald with minor charges of slander and libel. Fitzgerald appealed to King Edward I of England, who, to examine and judge the matter impartially, summoned them both to London to hear the cases, where it appears FitzGerald had the advantage, challenging the Lord Justice to clear his name by combat, which was accepted. However, Vescy fled to France, whereupon the King pronounced Lord Offaly innocent, and settled upon him Vescy's lordships and manors of Kildare, Rathangan, &c., which were forfeited to the Crown.

    In 1296 and 1299 he was summoned to fight for the Crown in the Scottish campaigns of Edward II. With John Wogan, Lord Justice, and others he went a third time to war in Scotland in 1301-2.[2]

    In 1307, with his son-in-law Sir Edmund Butler, he dispersed rebels in Offaly[2] who had razed the castle of Geashill and burnt the town of Leix. In 1312 he was sent as General at the head of an army into Munster to suppress armed Irish rebels. On May 25, 1315, Edward Bruce, brother to King Robert the Bruce of Scotland, entered the north of Ireland with 6000 men, was crowned King of Ireland at Dundalk, and wasted the country. Lord Offaly, among others, commenced vigorous sporadic warfare to resist Bruce, leaving "great slaughter" of Scots and the Irish irregulars in his service. Edward Bruce was eventually defeated and killed in the battle of Dundalk.

    King Edward II created Fitzgerald Earl of Kildare by Letters Patent dated May 14, 1316,[2] the year in which he founded the friary at Adare, county Limerick.[citation needed]

    However he died that same year, on Sunday September 12, 1316, at Laraghbryan, near Maynooth and was interred in the Franciscan Friary of Clan.[3] Kildare.

    Family

    He had married Blanche de La Roche, daughter of John de La Roche, Lord Fermoy and Maud Waley (daughter of Henry Waley),[4] by whom he had two sons and two daughters:

    Gerald (d.1303)
    Thomas FitzGerald, 2nd Earl of Kildare, his successor.
    Joan FitzGerald, married in 1302 to Edmund Butler, Earl of Carrick.
    Elizabeth FitzGerald, married to Nicholas Netterville, ancestor of Viscount Netterville.

    *

    John — Blanche de la Roche. Blanche (daughter of John de la Roche, Lord Fermoy and Maud Waley) was born (Ireland). [Group Sheet]


  12. 75.  Blanche de la Roche was born (Ireland) (daughter of John de la Roche, Lord Fermoy and Maud Waley).
    Children:
    1. 37. Joan Fitzgerald, Countess of Carrick was born ~ 1282, Fermoy, County Cork, Ireland; died 2 May 1320, Laraghbryan, County Kildare, Ireland.

  13. 76.  Humphrey de Bohun, V, Knight, 3rd Earl of Hereford was born ~ 1249 (son of Humphrey de Bohun, VI, 2nd Earl of Hereford and Eleanor de Braose); died 31 Dec 1298, Pleshey Castle, Essex, England; was buried Walden Priory, Essex, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alt Birth: ~ 1256, Herefordshire, England

    Notes:

    Humphrey (V) de Bohun (c. 1249[nb 1] – 31 December 1298), 3rd Earl of Hereford and 2nd Earl of Essex, was an English nobleman known primarily for his opposition to King Edward I over the Confirmatio Cartarum.[1] He was also an active participant in the Welsh Wars and maintained for several years a private feud with the earl of Gloucester.[2] His father, Humphrey (V) de Bohun, fought on the side of the rebellious barons in the Barons' War. When Humphrey (V) predeceased his father, Humphrey (VI) became heir to his grandfather, Humphrey (IV). At Humphrey (IV)'s death in 1275, Humphrey (VI) inherited the earldoms of Hereford and Essex. He also inherited major possessions in the Welsh Marches from his mother, Eleanor de Braose.

    Bohun's spent most of his early career reconquering Marcher lands captured by Llywelyn ap Gruffudd during the Welsh war in England. This was finally accomplished through Edward I's war in Wales in 1277. Hereford also fought in Wales in 1282–83 and 1294–95. At the same time he also had private feuds with other Marcher lords, and his conflict with Gilbert de Clare, Earl of Gloucester, eventually ended with the personal intervention of King Edward himself. Hereford's final years were marked by the opposition he and Roger Bigod, Earl of Norfolk, mounted against the military and fiscal policy of Edward I. The conflict escalated to a point where civil war threatened, but was resolved when the war effort turned towards Scotland. The king signed the Confirmatio Cartarum – a confirmation of Magna Carta – and Bohun and Bigod agreed to serve on the Falkirk Campaign. Bohun died in 1298, and was succeeded by his son, Humphrey de Bohun, 4th Earl of Hereford.

    Family background and inheritance

    Humphrey (VI) de Bohun was part of a line of Anglo-Norman aristocrats going back to the Norman Conquest, most of whom carried the same name.[3] His grandfather was Humphrey (IV) de Bohun, who had been part of the baronial opposition of Simon de Montfort, but later gone over to the royal side. He was taken prisoner at the Battle of Lewes in May 1264, but was restored to favour after the royalist victory at the Battle of Evesham the next year.[4] Humphrey (IV)'s son, Humphrey (V) de Bohun, remained loyal to the baronial side throughout the Barons' War, and was captured at Evesham on 4 August 1265. In October that year Humphrey (V) died in captivity at Beeston Castle in Cheshire from injuries he had sustained in the battle.[5]

    Humphrey (V) had been excluded from succession as a result of his rebellion, but when Humphrey (IV) died in 1275, Humphrey (VI) inherited the earldoms of Hereford and Essex.[6] Humphrey (VI) had already served as deputy Constable of England under Humphrey (IV).[7] Humphrey (IV) had reserved the honour of Pleshey for his younger son Henry, but the remainder of his lands went to Humphrey (VI).[4] The inheritance Humphrey (VI) received – in addition to land in Essex and Wiltshire from Humphrey (IV) – also consisted of significant holdings in the Welsh Marches from his mother.[8] His mother Eleanor was a daughter and coheir of William de Braose and his wife Eva Marshal, who in turn was the daughter and coheir of William Marshal, regent to Henry III.[6]

    Since Humphrey (VI) was only sixteen years old at the time of his father's death, the Braose lands were taken into the king's custody until 1270.[1] Part of this inheritance, the Marcher lordship of Brecon, was in the meanwhile given to the custody of Gilbert de Clare, Earl of Hertford. Humphrey technically regained his lordship from Clare in 1270, but by this time these lands had effectively been taken over by the Welsh prince Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, who had taken advantage of the previous decade's political chaos in England to extend his territory into the Marches.[9]

    He granted his brother Gilbert de Bohun all of their mother's lands in Ireland and some land in England and Wales.

    Welsh Wars

    See also: Conquest of Wales by Edward I
    Over the next years, much of Hereford's focus was on reconquering his lost lands in the Marches, primarily through private warfare against Llywelyn.[10] Henry III died in 1272, while his son – now Edward I – was crusading; Edward did not return until 1274.[11] Llywelyn refused to pay homage to the new king, partly because of the military actions of Bohun and other Marcher lords, which Llywelyn saw as violations of the Treaty of Montgomery.[12] On 12 November 1276, Hereford was present at a royal assembly where judgment was passed on Llewelyn,[7] and in 1277, Edward I declared war on the Welsh prince.[13] Rebellion in his own Brecon lands delayed Hereford's participation in the early days of the Welsh war. He managed, however, to both suppress the rebellion, and conquer lands further west.[14] He then joined up with the royal army and served for a while in Anglesey, before returning to Brecon, where he received the surrender of certain Welsh lords.[15] After the campaign was over, on 2 January 1278, he received protection from King Edward to go on pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela in Spain.[7]

    In 1282, war with Wales broke out again; this time it would not be simply a punitive campaign, but a full-scale war of conquest.[16] Initially, the king wanted to fight the war with paid forces, but the nobility insisted on the use of the feudal summons. To men like Hereford, this was preferable, because as part of a feudal army the participants would have both a stake in the war and a justifiable claim on conquered land. In the end, although the earls won, none of them were paid for the war effort.[17] Hereford jealously guarded his authority as hereditary Constable of England, and protested vigorously when the Gilbert de Clare, Earl of Gloucester was appointed commander of the forces in South Wales.[18] In the post war settlement, however, neither Hereford nor Gloucester received any significant rewards of land, the way several other magnates did.[19] Hereford fought again in Wales, in the suppression of the rebellion of 1294–95, when he again had to pacify the territory of Brecon before joining the king in the north.[20]

    Private war in the Marches

    The historic county of Brecknockshire, which corresponds roughly to Hereford's lordship of Brecon.
    Parallel with the Welsh Wars, Hereford was also struggling to assert his claims to lands in the Marches against other Marcher lords. In 1284 Edward I granted the hundred of Iscennen in Carmarthenshire to John Giffard. Hereford believed the land belonged to him by right of conquest, and started a campaign to win the lands back, but the king took Giffard's side.[21] Problems also arose with the earl of Gloucester. As Gloucester's former ward, Hereford had to buy back his own right of marriage, but Gloucester claimed he had not received the full sum.[6] There was also remaining resentment on Hereford's part for his subordination to Gloucester in the 1282–83 campaign. The conflict came to a head when Gloucester's started construction of a castle at Morlais, which Hereford claimed was his land.[22] In 1286, the Crown ordered Gloucester to cease, but to no avail.[23]

    It had long been established Marcher custom to solve conflicts through private warfare.[1] Hereford's problem, however, was his relative weakness in the Marches, and now he was facing open conflict with two different enemies. He therefore decided to take the issue to the king instead, in a break with tradition.[6] King Edward again ordered Gloucester to stop, but the earl ignored the order and initiated raids on Hereford's lands.[24] Hostilities continued and Hereford responded, until both earls were arrested and brought before the king.[25] The real offense was not the private warfare in itself, but the fact that the earls had not respected the king's injunction to cease.[2] In the parliament of January 1292, Gloucester was fined 10,000 marks and Hereford 1,000. Gloucester's liberty of Glamorgan was declared forfeit, and confiscated by the crown, as was Hereford's of Brecon.[26]

    In the end the fines were never paid, and the lands were soon restored.[22] Edward had nevertheless demonstrated an important point. After the conquest of Wales, the strategic position of the Marcher lordships was less vital to the English crown, and the liberty awarded to the Marcher lords could be curtailed.[2] For Edward this was therefore a good opportunity to assert the royal prerogative, and to demonstrate that it extended also into the Marches of Wales.[27]

    Opposition to Edward I

    In 1294 the French king declared the English duchy of Aquitaine forfeit, and war broke out between the two countries.[28] Edward I embarked on a wide-scale and costly project of building alliances with other princes on the Continent, and preparing an invasion.[29] When the king, at the parliament of March 1297 in Salisbury, demanded military service from his earls, Roger Bigod, Earl of Norfolk, refused in his capacity of marshal of England. The argument was that the king's subjects were not obliged to serve abroad if not in the company of the king, but Edward insisted on taking his army to Flanders while sending his earls to Gascony.[30]


    Bohun and Bigod confront King Edward. Early 20th-century imaginary illustration
    At the time of the Salisbury parliament, Hereford was accompanying two of the king's daughters to Brabant, and could not be present.[31] On his return, however, as Constable of England, he joined Bigod in July in refusing to perform feudal service.[6] The two earls were joined in their opposition by the earls of Arundel and Warwick.[32] The main reasons for the magnates' defiance was the heavy burden of taxation caused by Edward's continuous warfare in Wales, France and Scotland. In this they were also joined by Robert Winchelsey, the Archbishop of Canterbury, who was in the midst of an ongoing dispute with the king over clerical taxation.[33] At one point Bohun and Bigod turned up in person at the Exchequer to protest a tax they claimed did not have the consent of the community of the realm.[34] For Hereford there was also a personal element in the opposition to the king, after the humiliation and the affront to his liberties he had suffered over the dispute in the Marches.[35][36] At a meeting just outside London, Bohun gave an impassioned speech objecting to the king's abuse of power and demanding the restoration of ancient liberties. The grievances were summarised in a document known as the Remonstrances.[37]

    Neither party showed any inclination to back down, and the nation seemed on the brink of another civil war.[38] Just as the conflict was coming to a head, however, external events intervened to settle it. In September 1297, the English suffered a heavy defeat to the Scots at the Battle of Stirling Bridge.[39] The Scottish victory exposed the north of England to Scottish raids led by William Wallace. The war with Scotland received wider support from the English magnates, now that their own homeland was threatened, than did the war in France to protect the king's continental possessions.[40] Edward abandoned his campaign in France and negotiated a truce with the French king. He agreed to confirm Magna Carta in the so-called Confirmatio Cartarum (Confirmation of the Charters).[41] The earls consequently consented to serve with the king in Scotland, and Hereford was in the army that won a decisive victory over the Scots in the Battle of Falkirk in 1298.[7] Hereford, not satisfied that the king had upheld the charter, withdrew after the battle, forcing Edward to abandon the campaign.[2]

    Death and family

    The earthwork remains of Pleshey Castle where Humphrey de Bohun died.
    In 1275 Bohun married Maud de Fiennes, daughter of Enguerrand de Fiennes, chevalier, seigneur of Fiennes, by his 2nd wife, Isabel (kinswoman of Queen Eleanor of Provence). She predeceased him, and was buried at Walden Priory in Essex. Hereford himself died at Pleshey Castle on 31 December 1298, and was buried at Walden alongside his wife.[6] They had one son Humphrey de Bohun, 4th Earl of Hereford, born around 1276.[42] The son was given possession of his father's lands and titles on 16 February 1299.[43] The young Humphrey also inherited his father's title of Constable of England.[44]

    A common theme in Humphrey de Bohun's actions was his fierce protection of what he regarded as his feudal privileges.[1] His career was marked by turbulence and political strife, particularly in the Marches of Wales, but eventually he left a legacy of consolidated possessions there. In 1297, at the height of the conflict between Edward I and rebellious barons, the king had actively tried to undermine Hereford's authority in the Marches, but failed due to the good relations the earl enjoyed with the local men.[45]

    Notes

    Jump up ^ He was reported to be 18 ½ years old in the 51st year of the reign of Henry III, and 24 or 26 after the death of his grandfather in 1275. Cokayne (1910–59), pp. 463–6.

    References

    ^ Jump up to: a b c d Fritze and Robison, (2002).
    ^ Jump up to: a b c d Hicks (1991).
    Jump up ^ White, Graeme (2004). "Bohun, Humphrey (III) de (b. before 1144, d. 1181)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford: Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/2774.
    ^ Jump up to: a b Vincent (2004).
    Jump up ^ Powicke (1953), p. 202.
    ^ Jump up to: a b c d e f Waugh (2004).
    ^ Jump up to: a b c d Cokayne (1910–59), pp. 463–6.
    Jump up ^ Morris (1901), p. 21.
    Jump up ^ Morris (1901), p. 112.
    Jump up ^ Davies (2000), pp. 322–3.
    Jump up ^ Powicke (1952), pp. 225–6.
    Jump up ^ Prestwich (1997), pp. 174–5.
    Jump up ^ Powicke (1952), p. 408.
    Jump up ^ Morris (1901), p. 171.
    Jump up ^ Morris (1901), pp. 178–9, 194.
    Jump up ^ Prestwich (1997), p. 188.
    Jump up ^ Prestwich (1972), pp. 71–3.
    Jump up ^ Prestwich (1972), p. 72.
    Jump up ^ Prestwich (1997), p. 204.
    Jump up ^ Morris (1901), p. 256.
    Jump up ^ Morris (1901), pp. 201–2.
    ^ Jump up to: a b Prestwich (2007), p. 136.
    Jump up ^ Prestwich (1997), p. 348.
    Jump up ^ Morris (1901), p. 226.
    Jump up ^ Carpenter (2003), p. 478.
    Jump up ^ Powicke (1952), p. 350
    Jump up ^ Davies (1978), pp. 259–60, 255–7.
    Jump up ^ Prestwich (1997), pp. 378–9.
    Jump up ^ Prestwich (1997), pp. 387–8.
    Jump up ^ Powicke (1952), pp. 666, 678.
    Jump up ^ Powicke (1952), p. 680 n.
    Jump up ^ Prestwich (1997), p. 419.
    Jump up ^ Prestwich (1997), p. 420.
    Jump up ^ Carpenter (2003), p. 485.
    Jump up ^ Morris (2008), p. 297.
    Jump up ^ Morris (1901), pp. 274–5.
    Jump up ^ Prestwich (1997), pp. 420–1.
    Jump up ^ Davies (1978), p. 269.
    Jump up ^ Morris (1901), p. 283.
    Jump up ^ Prestwich (2007), p. 170.
    Jump up ^ Prestwich (1997), pp. 427–8.
    Jump up ^ Cokayne (1910–59), p. 467.
    Jump up ^ Fryde, E. B. (1961). Handbook of British Chronology (Second ed.). London: Royal Historical Society. p. 431.
    Jump up ^ Morris (1901), p. 300.
    Jump up ^ Davies (1978), p. 290.

    Sources

    Carpenter, David (2003). The Struggle for Mastery: Britain, 1066-1284. Oxford: Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-522000-5.
    Cokayne, George (1910–59). The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom. VI (New ed.). London: The St. Catherine Press.
    Davies, R. R. (1978). Lordship and Society in the March of Wales, 1282-1400. Oxford: Clarendon Press. ISBN 0-19-822454-0.
    Davies, R. R. (2000). The Age of Conquest: Wales, 1063-1415. Oxford: Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-820878-2.
    Fritze, Ronald H.; William Baxter Robison (2002). "Bohoun, Humphrey de, 3rd Earl of Hereford and 2nd Earl of Essex (c. 1249-98)". Historical dictionary of late medieval England, 1272-1485. Westport, London: Greenwood Publishing Group. pp. 61–3. ISBN 0-313-29124-1. Retrieved 2009-04-11.
    Hicks, Michael (1991). Who's Who in Late Medieval England (1272-1485). Who's Who in British History Series. 3. London: Shepheard-Walwyn. pp. 29–30. ISBN 0-85683-092-5.
    Morris, J. E. (1901). The Welsh Wars of Edward I. Oxford: Clarendon Press.
    Morris, Marc (2008). A Great and Terrible King: Edward I and the Forging of Britain (updated ed.). London: Hutchinson. ISBN 978-0-09-179684-6.
    Prestwich, Michael (1972). War, Politics and Finance under Edward I. London: Faber and Faber. ISBN 0-571-09042-7.
    Prestwich, Michael (1997). Edward I (updated ed.). New Haven: Yale University Press. ISBN 0-300-07209-0.
    Prestwich, Michael (2007). Plantagenet England: 1225-1360 (new ed.). Oxford: Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-822844-9.
    Powicke, F. M. (1953). The Thirteenth Century: 1216-1307. Oxford: Clarendon. ISBN 0-19-285249-3.
    Vincent, Nicholas (2004). "Bohun, Humphrey (IV) de, second earl of Hereford and seventh earl of Essex (d. 1275)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford: Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/2775.
    Waugh, Scott L. (2004). "Bohun, Humphrey (VI) de, third earl of Hereford and eighth earl of Essex (c.1249–1298)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford: Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/2776.

    Humphrey married Maud de Fiennes 20 Jul 1275. Maud (daughter of Enguerrand de Fiennes, Knight, Seigneur of Fiennes and Isabelle de Conde) was born ~ 1251, Wendover, Buckinghamshire, England; died 6 Nov 1298; was buried Saffron Walden, Essex, England. [Group Sheet]


  14. 77.  Maud de Fiennes was born ~ 1251, Wendover, Buckinghamshire, England (daughter of Enguerrand de Fiennes, Knight, Seigneur of Fiennes and Isabelle de Conde); died 6 Nov 1298; was buried Saffron Walden, Essex, England.
    Children:
    1. 38. Humphrey de Bohun, VII, 4th Earl of Hereford was born ~ 1276, Pleshey Castle, Essex, England; died 16 Mar 1322, Boroughbridge, Yorkshire, England; was buried Friars Minor, York, Yorkshire, England.

  15. 78.  Edward I, King of EnglandEdward I, King of England was born 17 Jun 1239, Westminster, London, Middlesex, England; was christened 22 Jun 1239, Westminster Abbey, 20 Deans Yd, London SW1P 3PA, United Kingdom (son of Henry III, King of England and Eleanor of Provence, Queen of England, Princess of Castile); died 7 Jul 1307, Burgh by Sands, Carlisle, Cumbria, England; was buried 28 Oct 1307, Westminster Abbey, 20 Deans Yd, London SW1P 3PA, United Kingdom.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Edward Longshanks

    Notes:

    More on King Edward I ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_I_of_England

    Remember Mel Gibson's role as William Wallace in his 1995 movie, "Braveheart", about the 13th c. Scottish Rebellion? Here is the fellow he battled, brilliantly portrayed by Patrick McGoohan... Here's a clip of that movie... http://www.cinemagia.ro/trailer/braveheart-braveheart-inima-neinfricata-1054/

    Edward I, called Longshanks (1239-1307), king of England (1272-1307), Lord of Gascony, of the house of Plantagenet. He was born in Westminster on June 17, 1239, the eldest son of King Henry III, and at 15 married Eleanor of Castile. In the struggles of the barons against the crown for constitutional and ecclesiastical reforms, Edward took a vacillating course. When warfare broke out between the crown and the nobility, Edward fought on the side of the king, winning the decisive battle of Evesham in 1265. Five years later he left England to join the Seventh Crusade.

    Following his father's death in 1272, and while he was still abroad, Edward was recognized as king by the English barons; in 1273, on his return to England, he was crowned.

    The first years of Edward's reign were a period of the consolidation of his power. He suppressed corruption in the administration of justice, restricted the jurisdiction of the ecclesiastical courts to church affairs, and eliminated the papacy's overlordship over England. On the refusal of Llewelyn ab Gruffydd (died 1282), ruler of Wales, to submit to the English crown, Edward began the military conflict that resulted, in 1284, in the annexation of Llewelyn's principality to the English crown. In 1290 Edward expelled all Jews from England. War between England and France broke out in 1293 as a result of the efforts of France to curb Edward's power in Gascony. Edward lost Gascony in 1293 and did not again come into possession of the duchy until 1303. About the same year in which he lost Gascony, the Welsh rose in rebellion.
    Greater than either of these problems was the disaffection of the people of Scotland. In agreeing to arbitrate among the claimants to the Scottish throne, Edward, in 1291, had exacted as a prior condition the recognition by all concerned of his overlordship of Scotland. The Scots later repudiated him and made an alliance with France against England. To meet the critical situations in Wales and Scotland, Edward summoned a parliament, called the Model Parliament by historians because it was a representative body and in that respect was the forerunner of all future parliaments. Assured by Parliament of support at home, Edward took the field and suppressed the Welsh insurrection. In 1296, after invading and conquering Scotland, he declared himself king of that realm. In 1298 he again invaded Scotland to suppress the revolt led by Sir William Wallace. In winning the Battle of Falkirk in 1298, Edward achieved the greatest military triumph of his career, but he failed to crush Scottish opposition.

    The conquest of Scotland became the ruling passion of his life. He was, however, compelled by the nobles, clergy, and commons to desist in his attempts to raise by arbitrary taxes the funds he needed for campaigns. In 1299 Edward made peace with France and married Margaret, sister of King Philip III of France. Thus freed of war, he again undertook the conquest of Scotland in 1303. Wallace was captured and executed in 1305. No sooner had Edward established his government in Scotland, however, than a new revolt broke out and culminated in the coronation of Robert Bruce as king of Scotland. In 1307 Edward set out for the third time to subdue the Scots, but he died en route near Carlisle on July 7, 1307. He also had a daughter with Eleanor of Castile that died young.

    Edward I, while on his way to war against the Scots, died on the marshes near Burgh, and his corpse lay at the village's 12th-century church until its eventual removal to Westminster Abbey.

    There is an impressive monument on the marshes erected in 1685 to mark the place where he died. It is 11/4 miles NNW of the village, is signposted and can be reached on foot.

    Edward I [37370] Burgh by Sands, Cumbria, England

    is the 22nd great-grandfather of David Hennessee:

    http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=I3&secondpersonID=&maxrels=1&disallowspouses=0&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I37370

    and also of Sheila Ann Mynatt Hennessee (1945-2016):

    http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=I3&secondpersonID=I27517&maxrels=1&disallowspouses=0&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I37370

    Died:
    Edward I, while on his way to war against the Scots, died on the marshes near Burgh, and his corpse lay at the village's 12th-century church, St. Michael's, until its eventual removal to Westminster Abbey.

    There is an impressive monument on the marshes erected in 1685 to mark the place where he died. It is 11/4 miles NNW of the village, is signposted and can be reached on foot.

    Photos, maps & source ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burgh_by_Sands

    Edward married Eleanor de Castile, Queen of England 18 Oct 1254, Burgos, Segovia, Castile, Spain. Eleanor (daughter of Fernando III, King of Castile and Leon and Jeanne de Dammartin, Countess of Ponthieu) was born 0___ 1241, Burgos, Segovia, Castile, Spain; died 28 Nov 1290, Hardby, Nottinghamshire, England; was buried 16 Dec 1290, Westminster Abbey, 20 Deans Yd, London SW1P 3PA, United Kingdom. [Group Sheet]


  16. 79.  Eleanor de Castile, Queen of England was born 0___ 1241, Burgos, Segovia, Castile, Spain (daughter of Fernando III, King of Castile and Leon and Jeanne de Dammartin, Countess of Ponthieu); died 28 Nov 1290, Hardby, Nottinghamshire, England; was buried 16 Dec 1290, Westminster Abbey, 20 Deans Yd, London SW1P 3PA, United Kingdom.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Countess of Ponthieu

    Notes:

    Eleanor of Castile (1241 - 28 November 1290) was the first queen consort of Edward I of England. She was also Countess of Ponthieu in her own right from 1279 until her death in 1290, succeeding her mother and ruling together with her husband.

    Eleanor was better-educated than most medieval queens, and exerted a strong cultural influence on the nation. She was a keen patron of literature, and encouraged the use of tapestries, carpets and tableware in the Spanish style, as well as innovative garden designs. She was also a successful businesswoman, endowed with her own fortune as Countess of Ponthieu.

    Issue

    Daughter, stillborn in May 1255 in Bordeaux, France. Buried in Dominican Priory Church, Bordeaux, France.
    Katherine (c 1261 – 5 September 1264) and buried in Westminster Abbey.
    Joanna (January 1265 - before 7 September 1265), buried in Westminster Abbey.
    John (13 July 1266 – 3 August 1271), died at Wallingford, in the custody of his granduncle, Richard, Earl of Cornwall. Buried in Westminster Abbey.
    Henry (before 6 May 1268 – 16 October 1274), buried in Westminster Abbey.
    Eleanor (18 June 1269 – 29 August 1298). She was long betrothed to Alfonso III of Aragon, who died in 1291 before the marriage could take place, and in 1293 she married Count Henry III of Bar, by whom she had one son and one daughter.
    Daughter (1271 Palestine ). Some sources call her Juliana, but there is no contemporary evidence for her name.
    Joan (April 1272 – 7 April 1307). She married (1) in 1290 Gilbert de Clare, 6th Earl of Hertford, who died in 1295, and (2) in 1297 Ralph de Monthermer, 1st Baron Monthermer. She had four children by each marriage.
    Alphonso (24 November 1273 - 19 August 1284), Earl of Chester.
    Margaret (15 March 1275 – after 1333). In 1290 she married John II of Brabant, who died in 1318. They had one son.
    Berengaria (1 May 1276 – before 27 June 1278), buried in Westminster Abbey.
    Daughter (December 1277/January 1278 - January 1278), buried in Westminster Abbey. There is no contemporary evidence for her name.
    Mary (11 March 1279 – 29 May 1332), a Benedictine nun in Amesbury.
    Son, born in 1280 or 1281 who died very shortly after birth. There is no contemporary evidence for his name.
    Elizabeth (7 August 1282 – 5 May 1316). She married (1) in 1297 John I, Count of Holland, (2) in 1302 Humphrey de Bohun, 4th Earl of Hereford & 3rd Earl of Essex. The first marriage was childless; by Bohun, Elizabeth had ten children.
    Edward II of England, also known as Edward of Caernarvon (25 April 1284 – 21 September 1327). In 1308 he married Isabella of France. They had two sons and two daughters.
    It is often said, on the basis of antiquarian genealogies from the 15th-17th centuries, that Eleanor delivered 2 daughters in the years after Edward II's birth. The names most often associated with these ephemeral daughters are "Beatrice" and "Blanche"; later writers also mention "Juliana" and "Euphemia," and even a "Berenice," probably by confusion with the historical daughter Berengaria. At least one eighteenth-century writer made "Beatrice" and Berengaria into twins, presumably because of the alliteration of names; but Berengaria's birth in 1276 (not the 1280s) was noted by more than one chronicler of the day, and none of them reports that Berengaria had a twin sister. Queen Eleanor's wardrobe and treasury accounts survive almost intact for the years 1288-1290 and record no births in those years, nor do they ever refer to daughters with any of those names. Even more records survive from King Edward's wardrobe between 1286 and 1290 than for his wife's, and they too are silent on any such daughters. It is most unlikely that they ever existed in historical fact. It is more likely that there were other pregnancies and short-lived children in the years prior to 1266, when records for Eleanor's movements are very slight.

    Eleanor as a mother

    It has been suggested that Eleanor and Edward were more devoted to each other than to their children. As king and queen, however, it was impossible for them to spend much time in one place, and when they were very young, the children could not travel constantly with their parents. The children had a household staffed with attendants carefully chosen for competence and loyalty, with whom the parents corresponded regularly. The children lived in this comfortable establishment until they were about seven years old; then they began to accompany their parents, if at first only on important occasions. By their teens they were with the king and queen much of the time. In 1290, Eleanor sent one of her scribes to join her children's household, presumably to help with their education. She also sent gifts to the children regularly, and arranged for the entire establishment to be moved near to her when she was in Wales. In 1306 Edward sharply scolded Margerie de Haustede, Eleanor's former lady in waiting who was then in charge of his children by his second wife, because Margerie had not kept him well informed of their health. Edward also issued regular instructions for the care and guidance of these children.

    Two incidents cited to imply Eleanor's lack of interest in her children are easily explained in the contexts of royal childrearing in general, and of particular events surrounding Edward and Eleanor's family. When their six-year-old son Henry lay dying at Guildford in 1274, neither parent made the short journey from London to see him; but Henry was tended by Edward's mother Eleanor of Provence. The boy had lived with his grandmother while his parents were absent on crusade, and since he was barely two years old when they left England in 1270, he could not have had many worthwhile memories of them at the time they returned to England in August 1274, only weeks before his last illness and death. In other words, the dowager queen was a more familiar and comforting presence to her grandson than his parents would have been at that time, and it was in all respects better that she tended him then. Furthermore, Eleanor was pregnant at the time of his final illness and death; exposure to a sickroom would probably have been discouraged. Similarly, Edward and Eleanor allowed her mother, Joan of Dammartin, to raise their daughter Joan in Ponthieu (1274–78). This implies no parental lack of interest in the girl; the practice of fostering noble children in other households of sufficient dignity was not unknown and Eleanor's mother was, of course, dowager queen of Castile. Her household was thus safe and dignified, but it does appear that Edward and Eleanor had cause to regret their generosity in letting Joan of Dammartin foster young Joan. When the girl reached England in 1278, aged six, it turned out that she was badly spoiled. She was spirited and at times defiant in childhood, and in adulthood remained a handful for Edward, defying his plans for a prestigious second marriage for her by secretly marrying one of her late first husband's squires. When the marriage was revealed in 1297 because Joan was pregnant, Edward was enraged that his dignity had been insulted by her marriage to a commoner of no importance. Joan, at twenty-five, reportedly defended her conduct to her father by saying that nobody saw anything wrong if a great earl married a poor woman, so there could be nothing wrong with a countess marrying a promising young man. Whether or not her retort ultimately changed his mind, Edward restored to Joan all the lands he had confiscated when he learned of her marriage, and accepted her new husband as a son-in-law in good standing. Joan marked her restoration to favour by having masses celebrated for the soul of her mother Eleanor.

    Birth:
    Maps & History of Burgos ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Province_of_Burgos

    Children:
    1. Joan (Plantagenet) of Acre was born 0Apr 1272, Acre, Israel; died 23 Apr 1307, Clare Castle, Clare, Suffolk, England; was buried Clare Priory, Clare, Suffolk, England.
    2. 39. Elizabeth Plantagenet, Princess of England was born 7 Aug 1282, Rhuddlan Castle, Denbighshire, Wales; died 5 May 1316, Quendon, Essex, England; was buried 23 May 1316, Waltham Abbey, Essex, England.
    3. Edward II, King of England was born 25 Apr 1284, Caernarfon Castle, Gwynedd, Wales; died 21 Sep 1327, Berkeley Castle, Gloucestershire, England.

  17. 88.  John FitzAlan, Knight, 7th Earl of Arundel was born 14 Sep 1246, Clun, Shropshire, England (son of John FitzAlan, Knight, 6th Earl of Arundel and Maud de Verdon); died 18 Mar 1272, Arundel, Sussex, England; was buried Haughmond Abbey, Shropshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Baron of Clun and Oswestry

    Notes:

    Biography

    John FitzAlan was born on the day of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross, 30 Henry III (14 September, 1246),[1] or 1245,[2] in Arundel, Sussex.

    John was the oldest son and heir of his parents, John son of Alan[1] or Fitz Alan, feudal Lord of Clun and Oswestry, Salop, and his wife Maud, who was the daughter of Theobald le Botiller, 2nd Baron Butler, and his second wife, Rohese de Verndun; Rohese's children were known by their mother's surname, Verdun.[3]

    John married Isabel, the daughter of Roger de Mortimer of Wigmore and his wife, Maud, the daughter and coheir of William de Briouze of Brecknock,[3] before 14 May 1260.[2]

    John and Isabel had children:

    Richard, only son and heir.[3]
    His father died before 10 November, 52 Henry III, when a writ was issued, resulting in Inquisitions held in Sussex and Salop in the same year, which found that John, aged 22 on his last birthday, was his heir, and the properties his father held included Oswestry, Westhope, Clawne, La Hethe, and Halchameston, and he held of the king in chief the two whole baronies of Cloun and Blaunkmoster and 1/4 of the earldom of Arundel.[1]

    After his father's death, his mother was married to Richard d'Amundeville.[3]

    John son of Alan died on the Friday before the Annunciation in 56 Henry III, (18 Mar 1272), Inquisitions were taken in Sussex and Salop that year and found his son Richard, aged 5 on the day of St Blaise, was his heir to extensive properties including Arundel castle with the honour, held for 1/4 of a barony.[4]

    He was buried at Haughmond Abbey, Shropshire, England.[2]

    Neither John nor his father were known as earls of Arundel in their lifetimes.[3]

    Sources

    ? 1.0 1.1 1.2 The Deputy Keeper of the Records, Calendar of Inquisitions Post Mortem and other Analogous Documents preserved in the Public Record Office, Vol I Henry III, (London: His Majesty's Principal Secretary of State for the Home Department, 1904), accessed 6 September 2014, https://archive.org/stream/calendarinquisi00offigoog#page/n275/mode/2up pp.216. Abstract No 684 John son of Alan - very damaged.
    ? 2.0 2.1 2.2 Medieval Lands: John Fitzalan
    ? 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 George Edward Cockayne, The Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland and Great Britain and the United Kingdom Extant Extinct or Dormant, Ed. Hon Vicary Gibbs, Vol I AB-ADAM to Basing, (London: The St Catherine Press LTD, 1910), accessed 6 September 2014, http://www.archive.org/stream/completepeerageo01coka#page/238/mode/2up pp.239-40.
    ? The Deputy Keeper of the Records, Calendar of Inquisitions Post Mortem and other Analogous Documents preserved in the Public Record Office, Vol I Henry III, (London: His Majesty's Principal Secretary of State for the Home Department, 1904), accessed 6 September 2014, https://archive.org/stream/calendarinquisi00offigoog#page/n337/mode/2up pp.278-9. Abstract No 812 John son of Alan.

    See also:

    Wikipedia: John FitzAlan, 7th Earl of Arundel

    end of biography

    Children

    Has No Children Joan FitzAlan b: ABT 1262 in Winchester, Hampshire, England
    Has Children Maud FitzAlan b: ABT 1264 in Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England
    Has Children Richard FitzAlan Baron of Arundel b: 3 FEB 1267 in Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England
    Has No Children John FitzAlan b: ABT 1271 in Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England
    Has No Children Amy FitzAlan b: ABT 1273 in Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England
    Has Children Eleanor FitzAlan b: ABT 1275 in Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England

    Marriage 2 Robert de Hastings b: 1247
    Married: 3rd husband 2 SEP 1285 in Poling, Sussex, England 4

    John married Isabella Mortimer 0___ 1260. Isabella (daughter of Roger Mortimer, Knight, 1st Baron Mortimer and Maud de Braose, Lady Mortimer) was born 0___ 1248, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England; died 0___ 1292. [Group Sheet]


  18. 89.  Isabella Mortimer was born 0___ 1248, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England (daughter of Roger Mortimer, Knight, 1st Baron Mortimer and Maud de Braose, Lady Mortimer); died 0___ 1292.

    Other Events:

    • Alt Death: 0___ 1274

    Children:
    1. 44. Richard FitzAlan, Knight, 8th Earl of Arundel was born 2 Mar 1266, Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England; died 9 Mar 1302, Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England; was buried Haughmond Abbey, Shropshire, England.

  19. 90.  Thomas of Saluzzo, Marquis of Saluzzo was born Saluzzo, Italy; died (Saluzzo, Italy).

    Thomas married Luigia de Ceva (Saluzzo, Italy). Luigia was born (Saluzzo, Italy). [Group Sheet]


  20. 91.  Luigia de Ceva was born (Saluzzo, Italy).
    Children:
    1. 45. Alice of Saluzzo, Countess of Arundel was born 0___ 1269, Saluzzo, Italy; died 25 Sep 1292, Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England; was buried Haughmond Abbey, Shropshire, England.

  21. 92.  John de Warenne, Knight, 6th Earl of Surrey was born 0___ 1231, Lewes Castle, Lewes, East Sussex, England (son of William de Warenne, Knight, 5th Earl of Surrey and Maud Marshal, Countess of Norfolk); died 29 Sep 1304, Kennington, Kent, England; was buried Lewes Priory, Southover, Sussex, England.

    Notes:

    Birth:
    Lewes Castle stands at the highest point of Lewes, East Sussex, England on an artificial mound constructed with chalk blocks. It was originally called Bray Castle.

    Photos, history & source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lewes_Castle

    John married Alice de Lusignan 0Aug 1247, Surrey, England. [Group Sheet]


  22. 93.  Alice de Lusignan (daughter of Hugh of Lusignan, X, Knight, Count of La Marche and Isabelle of Angouleme, Queen of England).
    Children:
    1. Isabella de Warenne, Baroness of Bywell was born 23 Sep 1253; died Bef 1292.
    2. Eleanor de Warenne was born 0___ 1251.
    3. 46. William de Warenne was born 9 Feb 1256, Lewes Castle, Lewes, East Sussex, England; died 15 Dec 1296, Croydon, England.

  23. 94.  Robert de Vere, Knight, 5th Earl of Oxford was born ~ 1240, Hedingham Castle, Essex, England (son of Hugh de Vere, Knight, 4th Earl of Oxford and Hawise de Quincy); died Bef 7 SEPT 1296; was buried Earls Coine, Essex, England.

    Notes:

    Robert de Vere, 5th Earl of Oxford (c. 1240 – 1296) was the son and heir of Hugh de Vere, 4th Earl of Oxford.

    Early life

    Robert de Vere was born about 1240, the only son of Hugh de Vere, 4th Earl of Oxford, and Hawise de Quincy, daughter of Saer de Quincy, 1st Earl of Winchester. He had three sisters, Isabel, Lora and Margaret.[1]

    Career

    He was among the followers of Simon de Montfort during the Second Barons' War, and was with Simon's son, Hugh, when Edward I of England attacked Kenilworth Castle prior to the Battle of Evesham. De Vere's title and property were forfeited, but restored shortly afterwards by the Dictum of Kenilworth.

    Marriage and issue

    Before 22 February 1252 he married Alice de Sanford, daughter and heiress of Gilbert de Sanford. They had six sons and two daughters:[2]

    Robert de Vere, 6th Earl of Oxford, who married Margaret de Mortimer, daughter of Roger Mortimer, 1st Baron Wigmore
    Sir Hugh de Vere, who married Denise de Munchensy, daughter and heiress of Sir William de Munchensy of Swanscombe, Kent
    Sir Alphonse de Vere, who married Jane Foliot, daughter of Sir Jordan Foliot, Lord Foliot, and by her was father of John de Vere, 7th Earl of Oxford
    Thomas de Vere
    Gilbert de Vere, a cleric
    Philip de Vere, a cleric
    Joan de Vere, who married Sir William de Warenne
    Hawise de Vere

    Death

    Robert de Vere died before 7 September 1296. His widow, Alice, died at Canfield, Essex on 7 September 1312. They were both buried at Earls Colne, Essex.[3]

    *

    Robert married Alice de Sanford Bef 22 Feb 1252. Alice died 7 Sep 1312, Canfield, Essex, England. [Group Sheet]


  24. 95.  Alice de Sanford died 7 Sep 1312, Canfield, Essex, England.
    Children:
    1. 47. Joan de Vere
    2. Alphonse de Vere was born Bef 1262, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England; died Bef 20 Dec 1328, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England; was buried St. Albans Abbey, Hertfordshire, England.


Generation: 8

  1. 128.  Gilbert Talbot was born ~ 1222 (son of Richard de Talbot and Aliva Basset); died 8 Sep 1274; was buried Womersley Priory, Herefordshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Gilbert de Talbot

    Notes:

    grandfather of Gilbert Talbot, 1st Baron Talbot (died 1345/6),[3] to whom passed the ancient armorials of the House of Dinefwr, assumed as arms of alliance to a great princess in place of his own paternal arms.

    Gilbert — Gwenllian ferch Rhys. [Group Sheet]


  2. 129.  Gwenllian ferch Rhys (daughter of Rhys Mechyll and Matilda de Braose).

    Notes:

    Married:
    (dau. and heir of Rhys Mechyll, lord of Dynevor, son and heir of Rhys Grig, son of Rhys ap Griffith, Prince of Wales)

    Children:
    1. 64. Richard Talbot, Lord of Eccleswall was born ~ 1250, Linton Manor, Bromyard, Herefordshire, England; died Bef 3 Sep 1306, Herefordshire, England.

  3. 130.  Walter de Beauchamp was born 1195-1197, Worcestershire, England; died 0___ 1236.

    Notes:

    Walter de Beauchamp (1195/97–1236) was an English judge, son and heir of William de Beauchamp and Amice de Beauchamp, lord of Elmley, Worcester, and hereditary castellan of Worcester and sheriff of the county.

    A minor at his father's death, he did not obtain his shrievalty till February 1216. Declaring for Louis of France on his arrival (May 1216), he was excommunicated by the legate at Whitsuntide, and his lands seized by the Marchers. But hastening to make his peace, on the accession of Henry, he was one of the witnesses to his reissue of the charter, and was restored to his shrievalty and castellanship.

    He also Attested Henry's 'Third Charter,' on 11 February 1225. In May 1226 and in January 1227 he was appointed an itinerant justice, and 14 April 1236 he died, leaving by his wife Joane Mortimer, daughter of his guardian, Roger de Mortimer, whom he had married in 1212, and who died in 1225, a son and heir, William, who married the eventual heiress of the earls of Warwick, and was grandfather of Guy de Beauchamp, 10th Earl of Warwick.

    *

    Walter married Joan Mortimer 0May 1212. Joan (daughter of Roger de Mortimer and Isabel de Ferrers) was born (Wigmore Castle, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England); died 0___ 1225. [Group Sheet]


  4. 131.  Joan Mortimer was born (Wigmore Castle, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England) (daughter of Roger de Mortimer and Isabel de Ferrers); died 0___ 1225.
    Children:
    1. William de Beauchamp was born ~ 1215, Elmley Castle, Worcestershire, England; died 0___ 1268, Elmley Castle, Worcestershire, England.
    2. 65. Sarah de Beauchamp was born 0___ 1255, Elmley Castle, Worcester, England; died Aft 1316.

  5. 134.  Gruffydd ap Madog was born (Wales).

    Gruffydd — Emma de Aldithley. Emma was born (Wales). [Group Sheet]


  6. 135.  Emma de Aldithley was born (Wales).

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Emma Audley

    Children:
    1. 67. Ankaret verch Griffith was born 1236-1248, Powys, Wales; died 22 Jun 1308.

  7. 136.  John Comyn, I, Lord of Badenoch was born ~ 1215, Buchan, Aberdeenshire, Scotland (son of Richard Comyn and unnamed spouse); died ~ 1275.

    Notes:

    John Comyn (Cumyn) (c. 1215 – c. 1275) was Lord of Badenoch in Scotland. He was justiciar of Galloway in 1258.[1][2] He held lands in Nithsdale[3] (Dalswinton, a Comyn stronghold,[4][5] and Duncow[6]) and Tynedale.

    Life[edit]
    The Comyn family were in effective power in Scotland from 1249 to 1255, when Alexander III of Scotland was a minor; John was one of those with court influence.[3] The Comyns were ousted, by Alan Durward, but returned to power in 1257-8, before provoking a strong English reaction.[3][7]

    He fought for Henry III of England at the Battle of Lewes (1265), with John Baliol the elder and Robert Bruce the elder,[8] and was captured.[9] In 1267 he was given license to crenellate Tarset Castle in Tynedale (by present-day Lanehead, near Hexham), by Henry III;[10] Tarset had previously been held by Walter Comyn.[11]

    He started castle construction at Blair Castle with a tower built in 1269.[12] The place was soon taken back by David, Earl of Atholl.[13]

    Family

    John was the son of a Richard Comyn and was the grandson (through Richard) of William Comyn, jure uxoris Earl of Buchan.

    According to the 1911 Encyclopµdia Britannica he died in 1274, and was nephew of Alexander Comyn, Earl of Buchan, Constable of Scotland), and of Walter Comyn, Earl of Mentieth.[14] His date of death is also given as 1277.[15]

    He succeeded his uncle Walter, in 1258, as Lord of Badenoch, and was succeeded by his son John II, the "Black Comyn". John I was known as the "Red Comyn", the nickname more commonly applied to his grandson.[16]

    His second wife is given as Alice de Roos (Ros),[17] or Alice de Lindsay of Lamberton.[15] His first wife was called Eva.

    His children, at least four sons and four daughters, included:

    John II
    a daughter who married Alexander of Argyll[15]
    a daughter who married Sir William Galbraith, 4th Chief of that Ilk, Lord of Kyncaith[18]
    a daughter who married Galfrid de Mowbray[19]
    a daughter who married Sir Andrew Moray[20]

    John married Alice de Roos 0___ 1260. [Group Sheet]


  8. 137.  Alice de Roos

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Alice de Ros

    Children:
    1. 68. John "Black Comyn" Comyn, II, Lord of Badenoch died 0___ 1302, Lochindorb Castle, Strathspey, Scotland.

  9. 138.  John de Balliol, King of Scotland was born Bef 1208, Bernard Castle, Gainford, Durham, England; died 25 Oct 1268, St Waast, Bailleul, Nord, France.

    Notes:

    John de Balliol (died 25 October 1268) was a leading figure of Scottish and Anglo-Norman life of his time. Balliol College, in Oxford, is named after him.

    Life

    John de Balliol was born before 1208 to Hugh de Balliol, Lord of Balliol and of Barnard Castle and Gainford (c. 1177-February 2, 1229) and Cecily de Fontaines, daughter of Alâeaume de Fontaines, chevalier, seigneur of Fontaines and Longprâe-les-Corps-Saints. It is believed that he was educated at Durham School in the city of Durham.

    In 1223, Lord John married Dervorguilla of Galloway, the daughter of Alan, Lord of Galloway and Margaret of Huntingdon. By the mid-thirteenth century, he and his wife had become very wealthy, principally as a result of inheritances from Dervorguilla's family. This wealth allowed Balliol to play a prominent public role, and, on Henry III's instruction, he served as joint protector of the young king of Scots, Alexander III. He was one of Henry III's leading counsellors between 1258 and 1265.[1] and was appointed Sheriff of Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire from 1261 to 1262. He was captured at the Battle of Lewes in 1264 but escaped and rejoined King Henry. In 1265 Thomas de Musgrave owed him a debt of 123 marks. About 1266 Baldwin Wake owed him a debt of 100 marks and more.

    Following a dispute with the Bishop of Durham, he agreed to provide funds for scholars studying at Oxford. Support for a house of students began in around 1263; further endowments after his death, supervised by Dervorguilla, resulted in the establishment of Balliol College.

    Issue

    John and Dervorguilla had issue:

    Sir Hugh de Balliol, who died without issue before 10 April 1271. He married Agnes de Valence, daughter of William de Valence, 1st Earl of Pembroke.[2]
    Alan de Balliol, who died before 10 April 1271 without issue.[2]
    Sir Alexander de Balliol, who died without issue before 13 November 1278. He married Eleanor de Genoure.[2]
    King John I of Scotland, successful competitor for the Crown in 1292.[2]
    Ada de Balliol, who married in 1266, William Lindsay, of Lambarton, and had a daughter, Christian de Lindsay.[2]
    Margaret de Balliol, who may have married Thomas de Moulton.
    Cecily de Balliol (d. before 1273), who married Sir John de Burgh (d. before 3 March 1280) of Wakerley, Northamptonshire, by whom she had three daughters, Devorguille de Burgh (c.1256 – 1284), who in 1259 married Robert FitzWalter, 1st Baron FitzWalter; Hawise de Burgh (d. before 24 March 1299), who married Sir Robert de Grelle (or Grelley) (d. 15 February 1282) of Manchester; and Margery de Burgh, who became a nun.[3][4][2]
    Mary (or Alianora) de Balliol, who married John II Comyn, Lord of Badenoch, and had a son, John 'The Red Comyn, Lord of Badenoch (d. 1306).[2]
    Maud (or Matilda) de Balliol, married to Bryan FitzAlan, Lord FitzAlan, and feudal Baron of Bedale. They were parents to Agnes FitzAlan (b. 1298), who married Sir Gilbert Stapleton, Knt., of Bedale [5] (1291-1324). Gilbert is better known for his participation in the assassination of Piers Gaveston, Earl of Cornwall.

    John married Dervorguilla of Galloway ~ 1223. Dervorguilla (daughter of Alan of Galloway and Margaret of Huntingdon, Lady of Galloway) was born ~ 1210, (Galloway, Scotland); died 28 Jan 1290. [Group Sheet]


  10. 139.  Dervorguilla of GallowayDervorguilla of Galloway was born ~ 1210, (Galloway, Scotland) (daughter of Alan of Galloway and Margaret of Huntingdon, Lady of Galloway); died 28 Jan 1290.

    Notes:

    Dervorguilla of Galloway (c. 1210 - 28 January 1290) was a 'lady of substance' in 13th century Scotland, the wife from 1223 of John, 5th Baron de Balliol, and mother of John I, a future king of Scotland.

    The name Dervorguilla or Devorgilla was a Latinization of the Gaelic Dearbhfhorghaill (alternative spellings, Derborgaill or Dearbhorghil).

    Family

    Dervorguilla was one of the three daughters and heiresses of the Gaelic prince Alan, Lord of Galloway. She was born to Alan's second wife Margaret of Huntingdon, who was the eldest daughter of David of Scotland, 8th Earl of Huntingdon and Matilda (or Maud) of Chester. David in turn was the youngest brother to two Kings of Scotland, Malcolm IV and William the Lion. Thus, through her mother, Dervorguilla was descended from the Kings of Scotland, including David I.

    Dervorguilla's father died in 1234 without a legitimate son (he had an illegitimate son Thomas). According to both Anglo-Norman feudal laws and to ancient Gaelic customs, Dervorguilla was one of his heiresses, her two sisters Helen and Christina being older and therefore senior. This might be considered an unusual practice in England, but it was more common in Scotland and in Western feudal tradition. Because of this, Dervorguilla bequeathed lands in Galloway to her descendants, the Balliol and the Comyns. Dervorguilla's son John of Scotland was briefly a King of Scots too, known as Toom Tabard (Scots: 'puppet king' literally "empty coat").

    Life

    The Balliol family into which Devorguilla married was based at Barnard Castle in County Durham, England. Although the date of her birth is uncertain, her apparent age of 13 was by no means unusually early for betrothal and marriage at the time.

    In 1263, her husband Sir John was required to make penance after a land dispute with Walter Kirkham, Bishop of Durham. Part of this took the very expensive form of founding a College for the poor at the University of Oxford. Sir John's own finances were less substantial than those of his wife, however, and long after his death it fell to Devorguilla to confirm the foundation, with the blessing of the same Bishop as well as the University hierarchy. She established a permanent endowment for the College in 1282, as well as its first formal Statutes. The college still retains the name Balliol College, where the history students' society is called the Devorguilla society and an annual seminar series featuring women in academia is called the Dervorguilla Seminar Series. While a Requiem Mass in Latin was sung at Balliol for the 700th anniversary of her death, it is believed that this was sung as a one-off, rather than having been marked in previous centuries.

    Devorguilla founded a Cistercian Abbey 7 miles south of Dumfries in South West Scotland, in April 1273. It still stands as a picturesque ruin of red sandstone.

    When Sir John died in 1269, his widow, Dervorguilla, had his heart embalmed and kept in a casket of ivory bound with silver. The casket travelled with her for the rest of her life. In 1274–5 John de Folkesworth arraigned an assize of novel disseisin against Devorguilla and others touching a tenement in Stibbington, Northamptonshire. In 1275–6 Robert de Ferrers arraigned an assize of mort d'ancestor against her touching a messuage in Repton, Derbyshire. In 1280 Sir John de Balliol's executors, including his widow, Devorguilla, sued Alan Fitz Count regarding a debt of ¹100 claimed by the executors from Alan. In 1280 she was granted letters of attorney to Thomas de Hunsingore and another in England, she staying in Galloway. The same year Devorguilla, Margaret de Ferrers, Countess of Derby, Ellen, widow of Alan la Zouche, and Alexander Comyn, Earl of Buchan, and Elizabeth his wife sued Roger de Clifford and Isabel his wife and Roger de Leybourne and Idoine his wife regarding the manors of Wyntone, King’s Meaburn, Appleby, and Brough-under-Stainmore, and a moiety of the manor of Kyrkby-Stephan, all in Westmorland. The same year Devorguilla sued John de Veer for a debt of ¹24. In 1280–1 Laurence Duket arraigned an assize of novel disseisin again Devorguilla and others touching a hedge destroyed in Cotingham, Middlesex. In 1288 she reached agreement with John, Abbot of Ramsey, regarding a fishery in Ellington.

    In her last years, the main line of the royal House of Scotland was threatened by a lack of male heirs, and Devorguilla, who died just before the young heiress Margaret, the Maid of Norway, might, if she had outlived her, have been one of the claimants to her throne. Devorguilla was buried beside her husband at New Abbey, which was christened 'Sweetheart Abbey', the name which it retains to this day. The depredations suffered by the Abbey in subsequent periods have caused both graves to be lost.

    Successors

    Dervorguilla and John de Balliol had issue:

    Sir Hugh de Balliol, who died without issue before 10 April 1271.[1]
    Alan de Balliol, who died without issue.[1]
    Sir Alexander de Balliol, who died without issue before 13 November 1278.[1][2]
    King John of Scotland, successful competitor for the Crown in 1292.[1]
    Cecily de Balliol, who married John de Burgh, Knt., of Walkern, Hertfordshire.[1]
    Ada de Balliol, who married in 1266, William de Lindsay, of Lamberton.[1][3]
    Margaret (died unmarried)
    Eleanor de Balliol, who married John II Comyn, Lord of Badenoch.[1][4]
    Maud, who married Sir Bryan FitzAlan, Lord FitzAlan, of Bedale, Knt., (d. 1 June 1306),[5][6][7] who succeeded the Earl of Surrey as Guardian and Keeper of Scotland for Edward I of England.
    Owing to the deaths of her elder three sons, all of whom were childless, Dervorguilla's fourth and youngest surviving son John of Scotland asserted a claim to the crown in 1290 when queen Margaret died. He won in arbitration against the rival Robert Bruce, 5th Lord of Annandale in 1292, and subsequently was king of Scotland for four years (1292–96).

    Aunt and niece

    She should not be confused with her father's sister,[8][9][10] Dervorguilla of Galloway, heiress of Whissendine, who married Nicholas II de Stuteville. Her daughter Joan de Stuteville married 1stly Sir Hugh Wake, Lord of Bourne and 2ndly Hugh Bigod (Justiciar). Her other daughter Margaret married William de Mastac but died young.[11]

    *

    Children:
    1. Cecilia de Balliol was born ~ 1240, Bernard Castle, Gainford, Durham, England; died 0___ 1289.
    2. 69. Eleanor de Balliol was born 0___ 1246.
    3. John Balliol, I, King of Scots was born ~ 1249, London, Middlesex, England; died 25 Nov 1314, Picardy, France.
    4. Maud Balliol was buried Church of the Black Friars, York, England.

  11. 140.  Hugh of Lusignan, X, Knight, Count of La MarcheHugh of Lusignan, X, Knight, Count of La Marche was born ~ 1183, Angouleme, France; died 5 Jun 1249, Angouleme, France.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Hugh I of Angoulãeme
    • Also Known As: Hugh V of La Marche
    • Also Known As: Hugh X de Lusignan
    • Also Known As: Hugues X & V & I de Lusignan

    Notes:

    Hugh X de Lusignan, Hugh V of La Marche or Hugh I of Angoulãeme or Hugues X & V & I de Lusignan (c. 1183 or c. 1195 – c. 5 June 1249, Angoulãeme) succeeded his father Hugh IX as Seigneur de Lusignan and Count of La Marche in November 1219 and was Count of Angoulãeme by marriage.

    His father, Hugh IX de Lusignan was betrothed to marry 12-year-old Isabel of Angoulãeme in 1200,[2] when King John of England took her for his Queen, an action which resulted in the entire de Lusignan family rebelling against the English king. Following John's death, Queen Isabella returned to her native France, where she married Hugh X de Lusignan on 10 May 1220 [3]

    By Hugh's marriage to Isabella, he became Count of Angoulãeme until her death in 1246. Together they founded the abbey of Valence. They had nine children:

    Hugues XI & III & II de Lusignan, seigneur of Lusignan, Count of La Marche and Count of Angoulãeme (1221–1250)
    Aymer de Lusignan, Bishop of Winchester c. 1250 (c. 1222 – Paris, 5 December 1260 and buried there)
    Agathe de Lusignan (c. 1223 – aft. 7 April 1269), married Guillaume II de Chauvigny, seigneur of Chãateauroux (1224 – Palermo, 3 January 1271)
    Alice de Lusignan (1224 – 9 February 1256), married 1247 John de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey
    Guy de Lusignan (d. 1264), seigneur of Couhe, Cognac, and Archiac in 1249, killed at the Battle of Lewes.[citation needed] (Prestwich states he fled after the Battle of Lewes)[4]
    Geoffroi de Lusignan (d. 1274), seigneur of Jarnac, married in 1259 Jeanne de Chãatellerault, Vicomtess of Chãatellerault (d. 16 May 1315) and had issue:
    Eustachie de Lusignan (d. Carthage, Tunisia, 1270), married 1257 Dreux III de Mello (d. 1310)
    William (or Guillaume) de Valence (d. 1296)
    Marguerite de Lusignan (c. 1226/1228–1288), married (1st) 1240/1241 Raymond VII of Toulouse (1197–1249), married (2nd) c. 1246 Aimery IX de Thouars, Viscount of Thouars (d. 1256), and married (3rd) Geoffrey V de Chateaubriant, seigneur of Chateubriant
    Isabella of Lusignan (1224 – 14 January 1299), lady of Beauvoir-sur-Mer et de Mercillac, married (1st) Maurice IV de Craon (1224/1239 – soon before 27 May 1250/1277) (2nd) Geoffrey de Rancon, seigneur of Taillebourg.
    Hugh X was succeeded by his eldest son, Hugh XI of Lusignan.

    According to explanations in the manuscripts of Gaucelm Faidit's poems, this troubadour was a rival of Hugh X of Lusignan for the love of Marguerite d'Aubusson.

    He was buried at Angoulãeme.

    Hugh married Isabelle of Angouleme, Queen of England 10 May 1220, (Angouleme) France. Isabelle was born 0___ 1188, Angouleme, France; died 31 May 1246, Fontevrault L'abbe, Maine-Ete-Loire, France; was buried 31 May 1246, Fontevrault L'abbe, Maine-Ete-Loire, France. [Group Sheet]


  12. 141.  Isabelle of Angouleme, Queen of EnglandIsabelle of Angouleme, Queen of England was born 0___ 1188, Angouleme, France; died 31 May 1246, Fontevrault L'abbe, Maine-Ete-Loire, France; was buried 31 May 1246, Fontevrault L'abbe, Maine-Ete-Loire, France.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Countess of Angouleme
    • Also Known As: Isabella de Taillefer, Queen of England
    • Alt Birth: Abt 1173
    • Alt Death: 14 Oct 1217
    • Alt Death: 4 Jun 1246

    Notes:

    Isabel of Gloucester (c. 1173 - 14 October 1217) was the first wife of John of England . She is known by an exceptionally large number of alternative names: Hadwisa, Hawisia, Hawise, Joan, Eleanor, Avise and Avisa.

    *

    Isabella of Angoulãeme (French: Isabelle d'Angoulãeme, IPA: [izab?l d?~gul?m]; c.1188 – 4 June 1246) was queen consort of England as the second wife of King John from 1200 until John's death in 1216. She was also reigning Countess of Angoulãeme from 1202 until 1246.

    She had five children by the king including his heir, later Henry III. In 1220, Isabella married Hugh X of Lusignan, Count of La Marche, by whom she had another nine children.

    Some of her contemporaries, as well as later writers, claim that Isabella formed a conspiracy against King Louis IX of France in 1241, after being publicly snubbed by his mother, Blanche of Castile for whom she had a deep-seated hatred.[1] In 1244, after the plot had failed, Isabella was accused of attempting to poison the king. To avoid arrest, she sought refuge in Fontevraud Abbey where she died two years later, but none of this can be confirmed.

    Queen of England

    She was the only daughter and heir of Aymer Taillefer, Count of Angoulãeme, by Alice of Courtenay, who was sister of Peter II of Courtenay, Latin Emperor of Constantinople and granddaughter of King Louis VI of France.

    Isabella became Countess of Angoulãeme in her own right on 16 June 1202, by which time she was already queen of England. Her marriage to King John took place on 24 August 1200, in Angoulãeme,[2] a year after he annulled his first marriage to Isabel of Gloucester. She was crowned queen in an elaborate ceremony on 8 October at Westminster Abbey in London. Isabella was originally betrothed to Hugh IX le Brun, Count of Lusignan,[3] son of the then Count of La Marche. As a result of John's temerity in taking her as his second wife, King Philip II of France confiscated all of their French lands, and armed conflict ensued.

    At the time of her marriage to John, the blonde and blue-eyed 12-year-old Isabella was already renowned by some for her beauty[4] and has sometimes been called the Helen of the Middle Ages by historians.[5] Isabella was much younger than her husband and possessed a volatile temper similar to his own. King John was infatuated with his young, beautiful wife; however, his acquisition of her had as much, if not more to do with spiting his enemies, than romantic love. She was already engaged to Hugh IX le Brun, when she was taken by John. It had been said that he neglected his state affairs to spend time with Isabella, often remaining in bed with her until noon. However, these were rumors, ignited by John's enemies to discredit him as being a weak and grossly irresponsible ruler. Given that at the time they were made John was engaging in a desperate war with King Phillip of France to hold on to the remaining Plantagenet dukedoms. The common people began to term her a "siren" or "Messalina", which spoke volumes as to common opinion .[6] Her mother-in-law, Eleanor of Aquitaine readily accepted her as John's wife.[7]

    On 1 October 1207 at Winchester Castle, Isabella gave birth to a son and heir who was named Henry after the King's father, Henry II. He was quickly followed by another son, Richard, and three daughters, Joan, Isabel, and Eleanor. All five children survived into adulthood, and would make illustrious marriages; all but Joan would produce offspring of their own.

    Second marriage

    When King John died in October 1216, Isabella's first act was to arrange the speedy coronation of her nine-year-old son at the city of Gloucester on 28 October. As the royal crown had recently been lost in The Wash, along with the rest of King John's treasure, she supplied her own golden circlet to be used in lieu of a crown.[8] The following July, less than a year after his crowning as King Henry III of England, she left him in the care of his regent, William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke and returned to France to assume control of her inheritance of Angoulãeme.

    In the spring of 1220, she married Hugh X of Lusignan, "le Brun", Seigneur de Luisignan, Count of La Marche, the son of her former fiancâe, Hugh IX, to whom she had been betrothed before her marriage to King John. It had been previously arranged that her eldest daughter Joan should marry Hugh, and the little girl was being brought up at the Lusignan court in preparation for her marriage. Hugh, however, upon seeing Isabella, whose beauty had not diminished,[9] preferred the girl's mother. Princess Joan was provided with another husband, King Alexander II of Scotland, whom she wed in 1221.

    Isabella had married Hugh without waiting to receive the consent of the King's council in England, which was the required procedure for a former Queen of England, as the Council had the power to not only choose the Queen Dowager's second husband, but to decide whether or not she should be allowed to marry at all. Isabella's flouting of this law caused the Council to confiscate her dower lands and stop the payment of her pension.[10] Isabella and her husband retaliated by threatening to keep Princess Joan, who had been promised in marriage to the King of Scotland, in France. The council first responded by sending furious letters, signed in the name of young King Henry, to the Pope, urging him to excommunicate Isabella and her husband, but then decided to come to terms with Isabella, as to avoid conflict with the Scottish king, who was eager to receive his bride. Isabella was granted, in compensation for her dower lands in Normandy, the stannaries in Devon and the revenue of Aylesbury for a period of four years. She also received ¹3000 as payment for arrears in her pension.[11]

    By Hugh X, Isabella had nine more children. Their eldest son Hugh XI of Lusignan succeeded his father as Count of La Marche and Count of Angoulãeme in 1249.

    Isabella's children from her past marriage continued their lives in England.

    Rebellion and death[edit]
    Described by some contemporaries as "vain, capricious, and troublesome,"[12] Isabella could not reconcile herself with her less prominent position in France. Though Queen dowager of England, Isabella was now mostly regarded as a mere Countess of La Marche and had to give precedence to other women.[13] In 1241, when Isabella and Hugh were summoned to the French court to swear fealty to King Louis IX of France's brother, Alphonse, who had been invested as Count of Poitou, their mother, the Queen Dowager Blanche openly snubbed her. This so infuriated Isabella, who had a deep-seated hatred of Blanche due to the latter having fervently supported the French invasion of England during the First Barons' War in May 1216, that she began to actively conspire against King Louis. Isabella and her husband, along with other disgruntled nobles, including her son-in-law Raymond VII of Toulouse, sought to create an English-backed confederacy which united the provinces of the south and west against the French king.[14] She encouraged her son Henry in his invasion of Normandy in 1230, but then did not provide him the support she had promised.[15]

    In 1244, after the confederacy had failed and Hugh had made peace with King Louis, two royal cooks were arrested for attempting to poison the King; upon questioning they confessed to having been in Isabella's pay.[16] Before Isabella could be taken into custody, she fled to Fontevraud Abbey, where she died on 4 June 1246.[17]

    By her own prior arrangement, she was first buried in the Abbey's churchyard, as an act of repentance for her many misdeeds. On a visit to Fontevraud, her son King Henry III of England was shocked to find her buried outside the Abbey and ordered her immediately moved inside. She was finally placed beside Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine. Afterwards, most of her many Lusignan children, having few prospects in France, set sail for England and the court of Henry, their half-brother.

    Issue

    With King John of England: 5 children, all of whom survived into adulthood, including:
    King Henry III of England (1 October 1207 – 16 November 1272). Married Eleanor of Provence, by whom he had issue, including his heir, King Edward I of England.
    Richard, Earl of Cornwall and King of the Romans (5 January 1209 – 2 April 1272). Married firstly Isabel Marshal, secondly Sanchia of Provence, and thirdly Beatrice of Falkenburg. Had issue.
    Joan (22 July 1210 – 1238), the wife of King Alexander II of Scotland. Her marriage was childless.
    Isabella (1214–1241), the wife of Emperor Frederick II, by whom she had issue.
    Eleanor (1215–1275), who would marry firstly William Marshal, 2nd Earl of Pembroke; and secondly Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester, by whom she had issue.

    With Hugh X of Lusignan, Count of La Marche: nine children, all of whom survived into adulthood, including:

    Hugh XI of Lusignan (1221–1250), Count of La Marche and Count of Angoulãeme. Married Yolande de Dreux, Countess of Penthiáevre and of Porhoet, by whom he had issue.
    Aymer of Lusignan (1222–1260), Bishop of Winchester
    Agnáes de Lusignan (1223–1269). Married William II de Chauvigny (d. 1270), and had issue.
    Alice of Lusignan (1224 – 9 February 1256). Married John de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey, by whom she had issue.
    Guy of Lusignan (c. 1225 – 1264), killed at the Battle of Lewes. (Tufton Beamish maintains that he escaped to France after the Battle of Lewes and died there in 1269).
    Geoffrey of Lusignan (c. 1226 – 1274). Married in 1259 Jeanne, Viscountess of Chãatellerault, by whom he had issue.
    Isabella of Lusignan (c.1226/1227 14 January 1299). Married firstly before 1244 Maurice IV, seigneur de Craon (1224–1250),[18] by whom she had issue; she married secondly, Geoffrey de Rancon.[19]
    William of Lusignan (c. 1228 – 1296). 1st Earl of Pembroke. Married Joan de Munchensi, by whom he had issue.
    Marguerite de Lusignan (c. 1229 – 1288). Married firstly in 1243 Raymond VII of Toulouse; secondly c. 1246 Aimery IX de Thouars, Viscount of Thouars and had issue

    Birth:
    Aquitaine, Charente department...

    Children:
    1. 70. William de Valence, Knight, 1st Earl of Pembroke was born 1225-1230, Cistercian Abbey, Valence, France; died 18 May 1296, Bayonne, Gascony, France; was buried Westminster Abbey, 20 Deans Yd, London SW1P 3PA, United Kingdom.
    2. 93. Alice de Lusignan

  13. 142.  Warin de Munchesi, Knight, Lord Swanscombe was born 0___ 1192, (Swanscombe, Kent, England); died 0___ 1255.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Warin de Munchensy

    Warin married Joan Marshal (England). Joan (daughter of William Marshal, Templar Knight, 1st Earl Pembroke and Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke) was born 0___ 1210, (England); died 0___ 1234, (England). [Group Sheet]


  14. 143.  Joan Marshal was born 0___ 1210, (England) (daughter of William Marshal, Templar Knight, 1st Earl Pembroke and Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke); died 0___ 1234, (England).

    Other Events:

    • Alt Birth: 1202

    Children:
    1. 71. Joan de Munchensi, Lady of Swanscombe and Countess of Pembr was born ~ 1230, (Kent, England); died Aft 20 Sep 1307, (England).

  15. 144.  Theobald Butler, 3rd Chief Butler of Ireland was born 0___ 1224, (Ireland) (son of Theobald le Botiller, 2nd Chief Butler of Ireland and Joan du Marais); died 26 Dec 1248; was buried Abbey of Arklow, County Wicklow, Ireland.

    Notes:

    Theobald Butler, 3rd Chief Butler of Ireland (1224 – December 26 1248) was 6 years old when his father, Theobald died. His mother was Joan de Marisco, daughter of the Justiciar of Ireland, Geoffrey de Marisco.

    Like his infamous father-in-law, Theobald was created Justiciar of Ireland in 1247. He supported King Henry III in his wars with his barons. He was buried beside his father at Arklow.

    Marriage and Children

    He married Margery de Burgh, in 1242, daughter of Justiciar of Ireland Richard Mâor de Burgh, 1st Lord of Connacht. With his wife he had, besides other lands, the manors of Ardmaile and Killmorarkill. Their children were:

    Theobald Butler, 4th Chief Butler of Ireland
    Edmond Butler (d.1321)
    Joanna Butler (1244-1301)
    William Butler (1248-1306) he marries and has four surviving children
    See also[edit]
    Butler dynasty

    References

    Ormond, Duke of, Life 1610-'88: Thomas A. Carte, M.A. 6 vols. Oxford, 1851

    *

    Theobald married Margery de Burgh 0___ 1242, (Ireland). Margery (daughter of Richard Mor de Burgh, 1st Baron of Connaught and Egidia de Lacy) was born (Ireland); died Aft March 1253. [Group Sheet]


  16. 145.  Margery de Burgh was born (Ireland) (daughter of Richard Mor de Burgh, 1st Baron of Connaught and Egidia de Lacy); died Aft March 1253.
    Children:
    1. 72. Theobald Butler, 4th Chief Butler of Ireland was born 0___ 1242, (Ireland); died 26 Sep 1285.

  17. 146.  John FitzGeoffrey, Justicar of Ireland was born ~ 1213, Shere, Surrey, England (son of Geoffrey FitzPiers, Knight, Earl of Essex and Aveline de Clare); died 23 Nov 1253, (Surrey) England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Lord of Kirtling
    • Also Known As: Sheriff of Yorkshire
    • Alt Birth: ~ 1205, Shere, Surrey, England

    Notes:

    John FitzGeoffrey, Lord of Shere and Justiciar of Ireland (1205? in Shere, Surrey, England – 23 November 1258) was an English nobleman.

    John Fitz Geoffrey was the son of Geoffrey Fitz Peter, 1st Earl of Essex and Aveline de Clare, daughter of Roger de Clare, 2nd Earl of Hertford and his wife Maud de Saint-Hilaire.

    He was appointed Justiciar of Ireland, serving from 1245 to 1255.[1]

    He was not entitled to succeed his half-brother as Earl of Essex in 1227, the Earldom having devolved from his father's first wife. He was the second husband of Isabel Bigod, daughter of Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk and his wife Maud Marshal of Pembroke. They had six children, one being Maud who married William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick.

    Children

    Note: The males took the FitzJohn surname ("fitz" mean "son of").

    John FitzJohn of Shere (?–1275). Married Margary, daughter of Philip Basset of Wycombe (?–1271).
    Richard FitzJohn of Shere (?–1297). Lord FitzJohn 1290. Married as her first husband, Emma (?-1332).
    Maud FitzJohn (? – 16/18 April 1301). Married firstly to Gerard de Furnivalle, Lord of Hallamshire (?–1261). Married secondly to William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick, son of William de Beauchamp of Elmley, Worcestershire and his wife Isabel Mauduit. Had issue.
    Isabel. Married Robert de Vespont, Lord of Westmoreland (?–1264). Had issue.
    Aveline (1229–1274). Married Walter de Burgh, Earl of Ulster (1230–1271). Had issue, including Richard Óg de Burgh, 2nd Earl of Ulster who in turn married Margaret de Burgh, by whom he had ten children.
    Joan (? – 4 April 1303). Married Theobald le Botiller. Had issue, from whom descend the Butler Earls of Ormond.

    John FitzGeoffrey
    Spouse(s) Isabel Bigod
    Father Geoffrey Fitz Peter, 1st Earl of Essex
    Mother Aveline de Clare
    Born 1205?
    Shere, Surrey,
    Kingdom of England
    Died 23 November 1258

    *

    John — Isabelle Bigod, Countess of Essex. Isabelle (daughter of Hugh Bigod, Knight, 3rd Earl of Norfolk and Maud Marshal, Countess of Norfolk) was born ~ 1211, Thetford, Norfolk, England; died 0___ 1239. [Group Sheet]


  18. 147.  Isabelle Bigod, Countess of Essex was born ~ 1211, Thetford, Norfolk, England (daughter of Hugh Bigod, Knight, 3rd Earl of Norfolk and Maud Marshal, Countess of Norfolk); died 0___ 1239.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Isabel Bigod
    • Alt Birth: ~ 1212
    • Alt Death: 0___ 1250

    Children:
    1. Aveline FitzJohn was born 0___ 1236, Shere, Surrey, England; died 20 May 1274.
    2. 73. Joan FitzJohn died 4 Apr 1303.
    3. Maud FitzGeoffrey was born ~ 1238, Shere, Surrey, England; died 18 Apr 1301; was buried Friars Minor, Worcester, England.

  19. 150.  John de la Roche, Lord Fermoy was born (Ireland).

    John — Maud Waley. Maud (daughter of Henry Waley and unnamed spouse) was born (Ireland). [Group Sheet]


  20. 151.  Maud Waley was born (Ireland) (daughter of Henry Waley and unnamed spouse).
    Children:
    1. 75. Blanche de la Roche was born (Ireland).

  21. 152.  Humphrey de Bohun, VI, 2nd Earl of Hereford was born ~ 1219, Hungerford, Berkshire, England (son of Humphrey de Bohun, IV, Knight, 2nd Earl of Hereford and Maud de Lusignan); died 27 Oct 1265.

    Humphrey married Eleanor de Braose Aft 1241, Breconshire, Wales. Eleanor (daughter of William de Braose, Lord of Brycheiniog and Eva Marshal, Countess of Abergavenny) was born ~ 1228, Breconshire, Wales; died 0___ 1251; was buried Llanthony Priory, Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England. [Group Sheet]


  22. 153.  Eleanor de Braose was born ~ 1228, Breconshire, Wales (daughter of William de Braose, Lord of Brycheiniog and Eva Marshal, Countess of Abergavenny); died 0___ 1251; was buried Llanthony Priory, Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England.

    Notes:

    Eleanor de Braose (c. 1228–1251) was a Cambro-Norman noblewoman and a wealthy co-heiress of her father, who was the powerful Marcher lord William de Braose, and of her mother, Eva Marshal, a co-heiress of the Earls of Pembroke. Her husband was Humphrey de Bohun, heir of the 2nd Earl of Hereford, by whom she had children, including Humphrey de Bohun, 3rd Earl of Hereford.

    Family

    Eleanor was born in about 1228.[citation needed] She was the youngest of four daughters[1] and a co-heiress of the powerful Marcher lord William de Braose, and Eva Marshal,[2] both of whom held considerable lordships and domains in the Welsh Marches and Ireland.[citation needed] Eva was one of the daughters of William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke by Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke, daughter of Richard de Clare, 2nd Earl of Pembroke, "Strongbow".[3][4] Eleanor's three sisters were Isabella de Braose, Maud de Braose, Baroness Mortimer, and Eva de Braose, wife of William de Cantelou.[5]

    While Eleanor was a young girl, her father - known to the Welsh as Gwilym Ddu (Black William) - was hanged on the orders of Llewelyn the Great, Prince of Wales for alleged adultery with Llewelyn's wife, Joan, Lady of Wales.[6] Following the execution, her mother held de Braose lands and castles in her own right.[citation needed]

    Marriage and issue

    On an unknown date after August 1241, Eleanor became the first wife of Humphrey de Bohun,[5] the son of Humphrey de Bohun, 2nd Earl of Hereford and Maud de Lusignan. The marriage took place after the death of Humphrey's mother, Maud.[3]

    Humphrey and Eleanor had the following children:

    Humphrey de Bohun, 3rd Earl of Hereford (c.1249- 31 December 1298), married Maud de Fiennes, daughter of Enguerrand II de Fiennes and Isabelle de Conde, by whom he had issue, including Humphrey de Bohun, 4th Earl of Hereford.[7]
    Gilbert de Bohun. His brother granted him Eleanor's lands in Ireland. [8]
    Eleanor de Bohun (died 20 February 1314, buried Walden Abbey). She married Robert de Ferrers, 6th Earl of Derby on 26 June 1269. They had at least two sons and one daughter.[9]
    Margery de Bohun (fl.1265 – 1280) married Theobald de Verdun and had a son also Theobald de Verdun, both of whom were hereditary Constables of Ireland.[10]
    Eleanor died in 1251,[citation needed] and was buried at Llanthony Secunda Priory.[11] She passed on her considerable possessions in the Welsh Marches to her eldest son Humphrey.[12] Her husband survived her, married Joan de Quincy,[13] and died in 1265.[14]

    Notes

    Jump up ^ Dugdale 1894, p. 134.
    Jump up ^ Lundy 2010, p. 19081 § 190805 cites Cokayne 2000a, p. 462.
    ^ Jump up to: a b Lundy 2012, p. 63 § 623 cites Cokayne 2000, p. 22
    Jump up ^ Cawley 2012, "Humphrey [VI] de Bohun" cites Dugdale 1894, pp. 134,135
    ^ Jump up to: a b Cawley 2012a, "William de Briouse" cites Dugdale 1894, p. 134.
    Jump up ^ Cawley 2012a, "William de Briouse" cites several sources including Brut y Tywysogion (Williams), p. 319.
    Jump up ^ Lundy 2010, p. 19081 § 190805 cites Cokayne 2000a, p. 463.
    Jump up ^ Cawley 2012, "Humphrey [VI] de Bohun" cites Cokayne 2000a, p. 463 footnote g, citing Lambeth Library, Carew MS, no. 613, fol. 66.
    Jump up ^ Richardson 2004, p. 307
    Jump up ^ Richardson 2004, p. 734
    Jump up ^ Cawley 2012, "Humphrey [VI] de Bohun" cites Collectanea Topographica et Genealogica, Vol. I (1834), XX, p. 168.
    Jump up ^ Cokayne 2000a, p. 464
    Jump up ^ Cawley 2012, "Humphrey [VI] de Bohun" cites Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. I, Henry III, 587, p. 187.
    Jump up ^ Cawley 2012, "Humphrey [VI] de Bohun" cites Dugdale 1894, p. 135

    References

    Cawley, Charles (10 April 2012), England, earls created 1067-1122: Humphrey [VI] de Bohun, Medieval Lands database, Foundation for Medieval Genealogy,[better source needed]
    Cawley, Charles (23 September 2012a), Untitled English Nobility A - C: William de Briouse (-hanged 2 May 1230), Medieval Lands database, Foundation for Medieval Genealogy,[better source needed]
    Cokayne, George E (2000), The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, I (new, 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes ed.), Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, p. 22
    Cokayne, George E (2000a), The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, VI (new, 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes ed.), Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, p. 462
    Dugdale, William, Sir (1894), "Lanthony Abbey, Gloucestershire: Num. II: Fundatorum Progenies", Monasticon Anglicanum, 6, T.G. March, pp. 134, 135
    Lundy, Darryl (20 February 2010), Eleanor de Briouze, The Peerage, p. 19081 § 190805, retrieved November 2012 Check date values in: |access-date= (help)
    Lundy, Darryl (10 Apr 2012), Eve Marshal, The Peerage, p. 63 § 623, retrieved November 2012 Check date values in: |access-date= (help)
    Richardson, Douglas (2004), Plantagenet Ancestry, Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.A.: Genealogical Publishing Company, p. 734

    Children:
    1. 76. Humphrey de Bohun, V, Knight, 3rd Earl of Hereford was born ~ 1249; died 31 Dec 1298, Pleshey Castle, Essex, England; was buried Walden Priory, Essex, England.
    2. Eleanor de Bohun died 20 Feb 1314; was buried Walden Abbey, Essex, England.
    3. Margaret de Bohun was born ~ 1252, Bisley, Stroud, Gloucestershire, England.

  23. 154.  Enguerrand de Fiennes, Knight, Seigneur of Fiennes was born 0___ 1192, Tolleshunt, Essex, England (son of Guillaume de Fiennes, Seigneur de Tingry and Agnes Dammartin); died 0___ 1265, Wendover Manor, Buckinghamshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Enguerrand Ingelram II de Fiennes, Baron de Tingry
    • Also Known As: Lord of Wendover

    Notes:

    Enguerrand Ingelram de Fiennes, Seigneur de Fiennes
    Also Known As: "Ingelram /De Fiennes/"
    Birthdate: 1192
    Birthplace: Tolleshunt, Essex, England
    Death: Died 1265 in Wendover Manor, Buckinghamshire, England
    Place of Burial: Was Civil War in time of Henry III
    Immediate Family:
    Son of Guillaume, seigneur de Fiennes et de Tingry and Agnes Dammartin
    Husband of Agnáes de Condâe and Isabelle Fiennes (de Condâe)
    Father of Elisabeth de Fiennes; Robert I de Fiennes, seigneur de Heuchin; Enguerrand de Fiennes; Guillaume II de Fiennes, baron de Tingry, Lord of Wendover; Maude de Fiennes and 2 others
    Brother of Michel de Fiennes; Baudouin de Fiennes; William de la Plaunche Bastard Fiennes and Mahaut de Fiennes
    Half brother of William de Fiennes
    Occupation: Baron de Tingry & de Ruminghen, Seigneur de Fiennes, Lord of Wendover; Seigneur de Fiennes; Baron de Tingry
    Managed by: James Fred Patin, Jr.
    Last Updated: June 29, 2016
    View Complete Profile
    view all 17
    Immediate Family

    Agnáes de Condâe
    wife

    Elisabeth de Fiennes
    daughter

    Isabelle Fiennes (de Condâe)
    wife

    Robert I de Fiennes, seigneur de...
    son

    Enguerrand de Fiennes
    son

    Guillaume II de Fiennes, baron d...
    son

    Maude de Fiennes
    daughter

    Reginald de Fiennes
    son

    Jean de Fiennes
    son

    Guillaume, seigneur de Fiennes e...
    father

    Agnes Dammartin
    mother

    Michel de Fiennes
    sister
    About Enguerrand Ingelram II de Fiennes, baron de Tingry
    The line goes further back. When I get time, I'll continue to check it out & add what I can confirm. It is listed at http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=chan83&id=I003489

    ID: P26622 Birth: 1192 in Conde, France _APID: 1,7249::109510975 1 Death: Age: 75 1267 _APID: 1,7249::109510975 1 Name: *INGELRAM ENGUERRAND II DE FIENNES _APID: 1,7249::109510975 1 Sex: M 2

    HintsAncestry Hints for *INGELRAM ENGUERRAND II DE FIENNES

    1 possible matches found on Ancestry.com Ancestry.com
    Father: *GUILLAUME WILLIAM DE FIENNES SHERIFF OF WENDOVER SIR LORD BARON b: 1160 in Wendover, Buckinghamshire, England Mother: *AGNES DE MELLO DEDAMMARTIN b: 1185 in Dampmartin, I-de-F, France

    Marriage 1 *ISABEL DE CONDE b: 1210 in of Bucks, England

    Children

    Has Children *WILLIAM II DE FIENNES BARON TINGRY b: 1245 in Wendover, Bucks, England Has No Children Maud De Fiennes b: 1246 Has No Children Giles De Fiennes Sir b: 1250 in Wendover Manor, Bucks, England
    Sources:

    Repository: Name: Ancestry.co.uk Note:
    Title: Millennium File Author: Heritage Consulting Publication: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2003.Original data - Heritage Consulting. The Millennium File. Salt Lake City, UT, USA: Heritage Consulting.Original data: Heritage Consulting. The Millennium File. Salt Lake City, UT, USA: Note: Repository: Name: Ancestry.com Note:
    Title: Ancestry Family Trees Publication: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members. Note: This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created. Page: Ancestry Family Tree Text: http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=11811357&pid=26622

    Enguerrand — Isabelle de Conde. [Group Sheet]


  24. 155.  Isabelle de Conde

    Other Events:

    • Residence: Buckinghamshire, England
    • Also Known As: Agnes de Conde

    Children:
    1. William de Fiennes, II, Knight, Baron Tingy was born 0___ 1245, Wendover, Buckinghamshire, England.
    2. 77. Maud de Fiennes was born ~ 1251, Wendover, Buckinghamshire, England; died 6 Nov 1298; was buried Saffron Walden, Essex, England.

  25. 156.  Henry III, King of EnglandHenry III, King of England was born 1 Oct 1207, Winchester Castle, Hampshire, United Kingdom; was christened 0___ 1207, Bermondsey, London, Middlesex, England (son of John I, King of England and Isabelle of Angouleme, Queen of England); died 16 Nov 1272, Westminster Palace, Westminster, London, Middlesex, England; was buried 20 Nov 1272, Westminster Abbey, 20 Deans Yd, London SW1P 3PA, United Kingdom.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Duke of Aquitaine
    • Also Known As: Henry III, King of England
    • Also Known As: Henry of Winchester
    • Also Known As: Lord of Ireland

    Notes:

    King Henry III biography... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_III_of_England

    Henry married Eleanor of Provence, Queen of England, Princess of Castile 14 Jan 1236, Canterbury Cathedral, Canterbury, Kent, England. Eleanor was born 0___ 1222, Aix-En-Provence, Bouches-Du-Rhone, France; died 24 Jun 1291, Amesbury, Wiltshire, England; was buried 11 Sep 1291, Amesbury Abbey, Wiltshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  26. 157.  Eleanor of Provence, Queen of England, Princess of Castile was born 0___ 1222, Aix-En-Provence, Bouches-Du-Rhone, France; died 24 Jun 1291, Amesbury, Wiltshire, England; was buried 11 Sep 1291, Amesbury Abbey, Wiltshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Eleonore Berenger

    Notes:

    Eleanor of Provence (c. 1223 - 24/25 June 1291[1]) was Queen consort of England, as the spouse of King Henry III of England, from 1236 until his death in 1272.

    Although she was completely devoted to her husband, and staunchly defended him against the rebel Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester, she was very much hated by the Londoners. This was because she had brought a large number of relatives with her to England in her retinue; these were known as "the Savoyards", and they were given influential positions in the government and realm. On one occasion, Eleanor's barge was attacked by angry citizens who pelted her with stones, mud, pieces of paving, rotten eggs and vegetables.

    Eleanor was the mother of five children including the future King Edward I of England. She also was renowned for her cleverness, skill at writing poetry, and as a leader of fashion.

    Family[edit]
    Born in Aix-en-Provence, she was the second daughter of Ramon Berenguer IV, Count of Provence (1198–1245) and Beatrice of Savoy (1205–1267), the daughter of Thomas I of Savoy and his second wife Margaret of Geneva. She was well educated as a child, and developed a strong love of reading. Her three sisters also married kings.[2] After her elder sister Margaret married Louis IX of France, their uncle William corresponded with Henry III of England to persuade him to marry Eleanor. Henry sought a dowry of up to twenty thousand silver marks to help offset the dowry he had just paid for his sister Isabella, but Eleanor's father was able to negotiate this down to no dowry, just a promise to leave her ten thousand when he died.

    Like her mother, grandmother, and sisters, Eleanor was renowned for her beauty. She was a dark-haired brunette with fine eyes.[3] Piers Langtoft speaks of her as "The erle's daughter, the fairest may of life".[4] On 22 June 1235, Eleanor was betrothed to King Henry III (1207–1272).[1] Eleanor was probably born in 1223; Matthew Paris describes her as being "jamque duodennem" (already twelve) when she arrived in the Kingdom of England for her marriage.

    Marriage and issue

    13th century costume depicting Eleanor of Provence, Queen of Henry III of England - illustration by Percy Anderson for Costume Fanciful, Historical and Theatrical, 1906
    Eleanor was married to King Henry III of England on 14 January 1236.[5] She had never seen him prior to the wedding at Canterbury Cathedral and had never set foot in his kingdom.[6] Edmund Rich, Archbishop of Canterbury, officiated. She was dressed in a shimmering golden gown which was tightly-fitted to the waist, and then flared out in wide pleats to her feet. The sleeves were long and lined with ermine.[7] After riding to London the same day where a procession of citizens greeted the bridal pair, Eleanor was crowned queen consort of England in a ceremony at Westminster Abbey which was followed by a magnificent banquet with the entire nobility in full attendance.[8]

    Eleanor and Henry together had five children:

    Edward I (1239–1307), married Eleanor of Castile (1241–1290) in 1254, by whom he had issue, including his heir Edward II. His second wife was Margaret of France, by whom he had issue.
    Margaret (1240–1275), married King Alexander III of Scotland, by whom she had issue.
    Beatrice (1242–1275), married John II, Duke of Brittany, by whom she had issue.
    Edmund Crouchback, 1st Earl of Lancaster (1245–1296), married Aveline de Forz in 1269, who died four years later without issue; married Blanche of Artois in 1276, by whom he had issue.
    Katherine (25 November 1253 – 3 May 1257)
    Four others are listed, but their existence is in doubt as there is no contemporary record of them. These are:

    Richard (1247–1256)
    John (1250–1256)
    William (1251–1256)
    Henry (1256–1257)
    Eleanor seems to have been especially devoted to her eldest son, Edward; when he was deathly ill in 1246, she stayed with him at the abbey at Beaulieu in Hampshire for three weeks, long past the time allowed by monastic rules.[9] It was because of her influence that King Henry granted the duchy of Gascony to Edward in 1249.[citation needed] Her youngest child, Katherine, seems to have had a degenerative disease that rendered her deaf. When the little girl died at the age of three, both her royal parents suffered overwhelming grief.[10]

    Unpopularity

    Eleanor was a loyal and faithful consort to Henry, but she brought in her retinue a large number of uncles and cousins, "the Savoyards," and her influence with the King and her unpopularity with the English barons created friction during Henry's reign.[11] Her uncle William of Savoy became a close advisor of her husband, displacing and displeasing English barons.[12] Though Eleanor and Henry supported different factions at times, she was made regent of England when her husband left for Normandy in 1253. Eleanor was devoted to her husband's cause, stoutly contested Simon de Montfort, raising troops in France for Henry's cause. On 13 July 1263, she was sailing down the Thames when her barge was attacked by citizens of London.[13] Eleanor stoutly hated the Londoners who returned her hatred; in revenge for their dislike Eleanor had demanded from the city all the back payments due on the monetary tribute known as queen-gold, by which she received a tenth of all fines which came to the Crown. In addition to the queen-gold other such fines were levied on the citizens by the Queen on the thinnest of pretexts.[14] In fear for her life as she was pelted with stones, loose pieces of paving, dried mud, rotten eggs and vegetables, Eleanor was rescued by Thomas Fitzthomas, the Mayor of London, and took refuge at the bishop of London's home.

    Later life

    In 1272 Henry died, and her son Edward, who was 33 years old, became Edward I, King of England. She remained in England as queen dowager, and raised several of her grandchildren—Edward's son Henry and daughter Eleanor, and Beatrice's son John. When her grandson Henry died in her care in 1274, Eleanor went into mourning and gave orders for his heart to be buried at the priory at Guildford which she founded in his memory. In 1275 Eleanor's two remaining daughters died Margaret 26 February and Beatrice 24 March.

    She retired to a convent; however, she remained in contact with her son, King Edward, and her sister, Queen Margaret of France.

    Eleanor died on 24/25 June 1291 in Amesbury, eight miles north of Salisbury, England. She was buried on 11 September 1291 in the Abbey of St Mary and St Melor, Amesbury on 9 December. The exact site of her grave at the abbey is unknown making her the only English queen without a marked grave. Her heart was taken to London where it was buried at the Franciscan priory.[15]

    Cultural legacy

    Eleanor was renowned for her learning, cleverness, and skill at writing poetry,[6] as well as her beauty; she was also known as a leader of fashion, continually importing clothes from France.[4] She often wore parti-coloured cottes (a type of tunic), gold or silver girdles into which a dagger was casually thrust, she favoured red silk damask, and decorations of gilt quatrefoil, and to cover her dark hair she wore jaunty pillbox caps. Eleanor introduced a new type of wimple to England, which was high, "into which the head receded until the face seemed like a flower in an enveloping spathe".[4]

    She had developed a love for the songs of the troubadors as a child, and continued this interest. She bought many romantic and historical books, covering stories from ancient times to modern romances.

    Eleanor is the protagonist of The Queen From Provence, a historical romance by British novelist Jean Plaidy which was published in 1979. Eleanor is a main character in the novel Four Sisters, All Queens by author Sherry Jones, as well as in the novel The Sister Queens by Sophie Perinot. She is also the subject of Norwegian Symphonic metal band Leave's Eyes in their song "Eleonore De Provence" from their album Symphonies of the Night.

    Children:
    1. 78. Edward I, King of England was born 17 Jun 1239, Westminster, London, Middlesex, England; was christened 22 Jun 1239, Westminster Abbey, 20 Deans Yd, London SW1P 3PA, United Kingdom; died 7 Jul 1307, Burgh by Sands, Carlisle, Cumbria, England; was buried 28 Oct 1307, Westminster Abbey, 20 Deans Yd, London SW1P 3PA, United Kingdom.
    2. Edmund "Crouchback" Plantagenet, Prince of England was born 16 Jan 1245, London, Middlesex, England; died 5 Jun 1296, Bayonne, Pyrennes-Atlantiques, France; was buried 15 Jul 1296, Westminster Abbey, 20 Deans Yd, London SW1P 3PA, United Kingdom.
    3. Margaret of England, Queen of Scots was born 29 Sep 1251, Windsor Castle, Windsor, Berkshire, England; died 26 Feb 1275, Cupar Castle, Cupar, Fife, Scotland; was buried Dunfermline Abbey, Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland.
    4. Mary Elizabeth Plantagenet, Princess of England was born 1255, Elsenham Manor, Essex, England; died 16 Sep 1295, West Greenwich, London, England.

  27. 158.  Fernando III, King of Castile and LeonFernando III, King of Castile and Leon was born 5 Aug 1201, Castile, Spain (son of Alfonso IX, King of Leon and Galacia and Berengaria of Castile, Queen of Castile); died 30 May 1252, Seville, Spain; was buried Seville Cathedral, Seville, Spain.

    Other Events:

    • Religion: Roman Catholic
    • Also Known As: Ferdinand III of Castile
    • Also Known As: King of Castile and Toledo
    • Also Known As: King of Leon
    • Also Known As: Saint Ferdinand, T.O.S.F.
    • Also Known As: San Fernando
    • Baptism: 19 Aug 1201

    Notes:

    Ferdinand III, also called Saint Ferdinand, Spanish San Fernando (born 1201?- died May 30, 1252, Sevilla; canonized February 4, 1671; feast day May 30), king of Castile from 1217 to 1252 and of Leon from 1230 to 1252 and conqueror of the Muslim cities of Câordoba (1236), Jaâen (1246), and Sevilla (1248). During his campaigns, Murcia submitted to his son Alfonso (later Alfonso X), and the Muslim kingdom of Granada became his vassal.

    Ferdinand was the son of Alfonso IX of Leon and Berenguela, daughter of Alfonso VIII of Castile. At birth, he was the heir to Leon, but his uncle, Henry I of Castile, died young, and his mother inherited the crown of Castile, which she conferred on him. His father, like many Leonese, opposed the union, and Ferdinand found himself at war with him. By his will Alfonso IX tried to disinherit his son, but the will was set aside, and Castile and Leon were permanently united in 1230.

    Ferdinand married Beatrice of Swabia, daughter of the Holy Roman emperor, a title that Ferdinand’s son Alfonso X was to claim. His conquest of Lower Andalusia was the result of the disintegration of the Almohad state. The Castilians and other conquerors occupied the cities, driving out the Muslims and taking over vast estates.

    Ferdinand’s second wife was Joan of Ponthieu, whom he married in 1237; their daughter Eleanor married the future Edward I of England in 1254. Ferdinand settled in Sevilla, where he is buried.

    Buried:
    Images & History ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seville_Cathedral

    Fernando married Jeanne de Dammartin, Countess of Ponthieu 0___ 1237. Jeanne was born 0___ 1220, Dammartin-en-Goele, Seine-et-Marne, France; died 16 Mar 1279, Abbeville, Somme, France. [Group Sheet]


  28. 159.  Jeanne de Dammartin, Countess of Ponthieu was born 0___ 1220, Dammartin-en-Goele, Seine-et-Marne, France; died 16 Mar 1279, Abbeville, Somme, France.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Joan, Countess of Ponthieu
    • Also Known As: Queen Consort of Castile and Leon

    Notes:

    Joan of Dammartin (French: Jeanne de Dammartin; c. 1220[1] – 16 March 1279) was Queen consort of Castile and Leâon (1252), suo jure Countess of Ponthieu (1251–1279) and Aumale (1237–1279). Her daughter, the English queen Eleanor of Castile, was her successor in Ponthieu. Her son and co-ruler in Aumale, Ferdinand II, Count of Aumale, predeceased her, so she was succeeded by her grandson John I, Count of Aumale, deceased at the Battle of Courtrai, 11 July 1302.

    Family

    Joan was the eldest daughter of Simon of Dammartin, Count of Ponthieu (1180- 21 September 1239) and his wife Marie of Ponthieu, Countess of Montreuil (17 April 1199- 1251). Her paternal grandparents were Alberic II, Count de Dammartin and Mahaut de Clermont, daughter of Renaud de Clermont, Count of Clermont-en-Beauvaisis, and Clâemence de Bar.[2] Her maternal grandparents were William IV of Ponthieu and Alys, Countess of the Vexin, daughter of Louis VII of France and Constance of Castile.

    Henry III of England

    After secret negotiations were undertaken in 1234, it was agreed that Joan would marry King Henry III of England. This marriage would have been politically unacceptable to the French, however, since Joan stood to inherit not only her mother's county of Ponthieu but also the county of Aumale that was vested in her father's family. Ponthieu bordered on the duchy of Normandy, and Aumale lay within Normandy itself. The French king Philip Augustus had seized Normandy from King John of England as recently as 1205, and Philip's heirs could not risk the English monarchy recovering any land in that area, since it might allow the Plantagenets to re-establish control in Normandy.

    As it happened, Joan's father Simon had become involved in a conspiracy of northern French noblemen against Philip Augustus and to win pardon from Philip's son Louis VIII, Simon—who had only daughters—was compelled to promise that he would marry off neither of his two eldest daughters without the permission of the king of France. In 1235, the queen-regent of France, Blanche of Castile, invoked that promise on behalf of her son, King Louis IX of France, and threatened to deprive Simon of all his lands if Joan married Henry III.[citation needed] Blanch also petitioned the Pope to deny the marriage based on consanguinity. He agreed, denying the dispensation which Henry had sought and paid for. Henry therefore abandoned the project for his marriage to Joan and in January 1236 married instead Eleanor of Provence, the sister of Louis IX's wife.

    Queen of Castile

    In November 1235, Blanche of Castile's nephew, King Ferdinand III of Castile, lost his wife, Elisabeth of Hohenstaufen, and Blanche's sister Berengaria of Castile, Ferdinand's mother, was concerned that her widowed son might involve himself in liaisons that were unsuited to his dignity as king. Berengaria determined to find Ferdinand another wife, and her sister Blanche suggested Joan of Dammartin, whose marriage to the king of Castile would keep her inheritance from falling into hostile hands.[3] In October 1237, at the age of about seventeen, Joan and Ferdinand were married in Burgos. Since Ferdinand already had seven sons from his first marriage to Elisabeth of Hohenstaufen, there was little chance of Ponthieu being absorbed by Castile.

    They had four sons and one daughter:

    Ferdinand II, Count of Aumale (1239–ca 1265) m. (after 1256) Laure de Montfort, Lady of Espernon (d before 08.1270), and had issue:
    Eleanor of Castile, Countess of Ponthieu, who married king Edward I of England and had issue
    Louis (1243–ca 1275), who married Juana de Manzanedo, Lady of Gaton, and had issue
    Simon (1244), died young and buried in a monastery in Toledo
    John (1246), died young and buried at the cathedral in Câordoba
    She accompanied Ferdinand to Andalucia and lived with him in the army camp as he besieged Seville in 1248.[4]

    Upon her mother's death in 1251, Joan succeeded as Countess of Ponthieu and Montreuil, which she held in her own right.

    After Ferdinand III died in 1252, Joan did not enjoy a cordial relationship with his heir, her stepson Alfonso X of Castile, with whom she quarreled over the lands and income she should have received as dowager queen of Castile. Sometime in 1253, she became the ally and supporter of another of her stepsons, Henry of Castile, who also felt Alfonso had not allowed him all the wealth their father had meant him to have. Joan unwisely attended secret meetings with Henry and his supporters, and it was rumored that she and Henry were lovers. This further strained her relations with Alfonso and in 1254, shortly before her daughter Eleanor was to marry Edward of England, Joan and her eldest son Ferdinand left Castile and returned to her native Ponthieu.

    Children:
    1. 79. Eleanor de Castile, Queen of England was born 0___ 1241, Burgos, Segovia, Castile, Spain; died 28 Nov 1290, Hardby, Nottinghamshire, England; was buried 16 Dec 1290, Westminster Abbey, 20 Deans Yd, London SW1P 3PA, United Kingdom.

  29. 176.  John FitzAlan, Knight, 6th Earl of Arundel was born 6 May 1223, Oswestry Castle, Shropshire, England (son of John FitzAlan, Knight, 3rd Lord of Oswestry and Isabel d'Aubigny); died 10 Nov 1267, Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Earl of Arundel
    • Also Known As: Lord of Clun and Oswestry

    Notes:

    John FitzAlan (1223–1267), Lord of Oswestry and Clun, and de jure matris Earl of Arundel, was a Breton-English nobleman and Marcher Lord with lands in the Welsh Marches.

    Family

    The son and heir of John Fitzalan, Lord of Oswestry and Clun, from Shropshire. His mother was Isabel, and she was the daughter of William d'Aubigny, 3rd Earl of Arundel by his wife, Mabel of Chester. John obtained possession of his paternal estates on 26 May 1244, aged 21 years.

    After the death of his mother's brother Hugh d'Aubigny, 5th Earl of Arundel, and without direct heirs, he inherited jure matris the castle and honour of Arundel in 1243, which, according to the admission of 1433, he was held to have become de jure Earl of Arundel.[1]

    Welsh Conflicts

    In 1257 the Welsh Lord Gruffydd ap Gwenwynwyn, in the southern realm of the Kingdom of Powys, sought the aid of the Lord of Oswestry against Llywelyn ap Gruffudd. John Fitzalan was a surviving member of the English force that was defeated at the hands of the Welsh at Cymerau in Carmarthenshire.

    In 1258 he was one of the key English military commanders in the Welsh Marches and was summoned yet again in 1260 for further conflict against the Welsh.

    As Earl of Arundel, John vacillated in the conflicts between Henry III and the Barons. He fought on the King's side at the Battle of Lewes in 1264, where he was taken prisoner.

    By 1278 to 1282 his sons were engaged in Welsh border hostilities, attacking the lands of Llywelyn.

    Marriage

    He married Maud de Verdon, daughter of Theobald le Botiller (Boteler) by his wife Rohesia de Verdon (alias Rohese), by whom he had progeny including:

    John FitzAlan, 7th Earl of Arundel, eldest son and heir.
    Joan FitzAlan (c.1267-after 6 October 1316), wife of Sir Richard of Cornwall (d.1296), an illegitimate son of Richard of England, 1st Earl of Cornwall and King of the Romans (1209-1272) (the second son of King John (1199-1216)) by his mistress Joan de Bath (alias de Valletort).
    References[edit]
    Jump up ^ "The complete peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain, and the United Kingdom : extant, extinct, or dormant". Archive.org. pp. Volume 1, 239–40, as corrected by Vol. 14, p. 38. Retrieved 2013-05-10.
    Weis, Frederick Lewis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700, Lines: 70A-29, 149-29.

    *

    Sir John FitzAlan 6th Earl of Arundel[1]
    Name: John III Fitz Alan[2][3][4][5][6]
    Name: John, 6th Earl Arundel Lord of Oswestry and Clun FitzAlan[7]
    Birth Date: May 1223, Arundel, Sussex, England[8][9]
    Title: Earl Arundel, Lord Clun
    John FitzAlan (1223-1267), Lord of Oswestry and Clun, and de jure Earl of Arundel, was a Breton-English nobleman and Marcher Lord with lands in the Welsh Marches.[10]
    Marriage: 1242, England
    Sir John married Maud le Botiller (Maud de Verdun), daughter of Theobald le Botiller (Boteler) and Rohese or Rohesia de Verdon. His son and successor was:
    John Fitzalan, 7th Earl of Arundel
    Death: bef. 10 Nov 1267, Arundel, Sussex, England[11][12][13]
    Burial: Before 10 Nov 1267[14]
    Citations
    Source: ^ Cockayne, G. E., edited by the Hon. Vicary Gibbs, & H. A. Doubleday,London, 1926, vol.v, p.392
    Source: Weis, Frederick Lewis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700, Lines: 70A-29, 149-29.
    Family

    The son and heir of John Fitzalan, Lord of Oswestry and Clun, in Shropshire, and Isabel, daughter of William d'Aubigny, 3rd Earl of Arundel by his wife, Mabel of Chester, he obtained possession of his paternal estates on May 26, 1244, aged 21 years.
    After the death without direct heirs of his mother's brother Hugh d'Aubigny, 5th Earl of Arundel, he inherited 'jure matris' the castle and honour of Arundel in 1243, which, according to the admission of 1433, he was held to have become 'de jure' Earl of Arundel.[1]
    Sir John was succeeded by right of his mother, the 27 Nov 1243, to the Castle and Honor of Arundel. In 26 May 1244 he obtained possession of his paternal estates in Shropshire. According to some early accounts he married Maud de Verdon[15], daughter of Rhys de Verdon, 6th Earl of Arundel; Lord of Oswestry and Clun. Burial BEF 10 Nov 1267
    Welsh Conflicts

    In 1257 the Welsh Lord of Gwenwynwyn, in the southern realm of the Welsh Kingdom of Powys, sought the aid of the Lord of Oswestry against Llywelyn ap Gruffydd and John FitzAlan was a member of the English Force that was defeated at the hands of the Welsh at Cymerau in Carmarthenshire, which he survived.
    In 1258 he was one of the key English military commanders in the Welsh Marches and was summoned yet again in 1260 for further conflict against the Welsh.
    Arundel vacillated in the conflicts between Henry III and the Barons, and fought on the King's side at the Battle of Lewes in 1264, where he was taken prisoner.
    By 1278 to 1282 his own sons were also engaged in Welsh border hostilities, attacking the lands of Llywelyn the son of Gruffydd ap Madog.
    Sources

    Source: Ancestral File Number: 8JDT-WP
    Source: http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=225892&pid=4891
    Source: http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=document&guid=5be12808-996e-45e5-beff-db793b00550a&tid=13078823&pid=332637204
    Source: The Magna Charta Sureties, 1215, Edition: 4th ed., Record Number: CS55 A31979 Abbreviation: Magna Charta, 4th ed. Author: Weis, Frederick Lewis Publication: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, MD, 1991
    Source: S2375940657 Repository: #R2375940656 Title: Ancestry Family Trees Publication: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry member. Page: Ancestry Family Trees; Text: http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=27624422&pid=970
    Source: S-2024265482 Royal and Noble Genealogical Data: Brian Tompsett: Copyright 1994-2001, Version March 25, 2001 http://www.dcs.hull.ac.uk/public/genealogy/GEDCOM.html, Department of Computer Science, University of Hull, Hull, UK, HU6 7RX, B.C.Tompsett@dcs.hull.ac.uk
    Source: S-1968866219 Repository #R-1969211483 Title: Ancestry Family Trees; Publication: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members.
    Source: Repository: R-1969211483 Name: Ancestry.com; Address: http://www.Ancestry.com
    Source: S96 Record ID Number: MH:S96 User ID: CCD7662F-AD30-47C8-B9BC-6B348174ACE3 Title: Eula Maria McKeaig II - 061204.FTW Note: Other
    Footnotes

    ? Source: #S-1968866219 Page: Ancestry Family Trees; Text: http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=2886322&pid=1757493331
    ? Source: #S004330 Birth date: May 1223 Birthplace: Clun/Oswestry, Salop, England Death date: 1267 Death place:
    ? Source: #S004444 Page: Ancestry Family Trees; Text: http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=13078823&pid=332637204
    ? Source: #S004444 Page: Ancestry Family Trees Data: Text: http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=13078823&pid=332637204
    ? Source: #S004444 Page: Ancestry Family Trees Data: Text: http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=13078823&pid=332637204
    ? Source: #S004444 Page: Ancestry Family Trees Data: Text: http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=13078823&pid=332637204
    ? Text: http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=6835128&pid=-1207650802
    ? Source: #S004330 Text: Birth Date: May 1223; Birth Place: Clun/Oswestry, Salop, England Death Date: 1267
    ? Source: #S27185
    ? Source: John FitzAlan. Wikipedia. Commons. Accessed: 30 March 2015
    ? Source: #S004330 Birth Date: May 1223; Birthplace: Clun/Oswestry, Salop, England; Death Date: 1267
    ? Source: #S37 Page: 134
    ? Source: #S27185
    ? Source: #S96 Date of Import: Jul 25, 2005; ID: 74386626-64E7-433B-91B6-677D4331906C; ID Number: MH:IF7037
    ? Richardson's Royal Ancestry, Vol. V, page 154 succinctly states John FitzAlan married Maud de Verdun
    See also:

    Note: Shropshire Map
    Note: Coronet for an Earl
    Note: Arundel Castle
    Note: Shropshire COA
    Note: England COA
    Note: Arundel Family Crest
    Note: FitzAlan Arms
    Note: Sussex COA
    Note: Clun Castle
    Note: England Flag
    Note: Map of England
    Note: Coronet for a Baron
    Note: Sussex Map
    Note: Oswestry Castle
    Note: FitzAlan COA
    Acknowledgments

    Created through the import of Rodney Timbrook Ancestors and Relatives_2010-09-10.ged on 10 September 2010.
    Fitz Alan-48 created through the import of WILLIAMS 2011.GED on Jun 22, 2011 by Ted Williams.
    Created through the import of Acrossthepond.ged on 21 February 2011.
    Created through the import of Bwiki.ged on 03 April 2011. Fitz-Alan-13 created through the import of wikitree.ged on Aug 1, 2011 by Abby Brown.
    Created through the import of LJ Pellman Consolidated Family_2011-03-21.ged on 21 March 2011.
    FitzAlan-35 created through the import of MOORMAN FAMILY.GED on May 31, 2011 by Mary Elizabeth Stewart.
    Fitzalan-341 created through the import of FISCUS Family Tree.ged on Jun 6, 2011 by Liisa Small.
    Created through the import of master 11_12.ged on 21 October 2010.
    Created through the import of GerwingLoueyFamilyTree2009_2011-04-27.ged on 28 April 2011.
    FitzAlan-415 created through the import of The BTM Tree.ged on Jun 26, 2011 by Carolyn Trenholm.
    FitzAlan-479 created through the import of Bierbrodt.GED on Jul 14, 2011 by Becky Bierbrodt.
    fitzrandtocharlemange.FTW. Fitz alan-61 created through the import of heinakuu2011-6.ged on Jul 5, 2011 by Johanna Amnelin.
    Thank you to Tracy Conrad for creating WikiTree profile Fitzalan-554 through the import of Pedersen Family Tree.ged on May 19, 2013. Click to the Changes page for the details of edits by Tracy and others.
    Thank you to Steve Woods for creating WikiTree profile Fitz Alan-120 through the import of Woods Beedle Wiki.GED on Mar 1, 2013.
    This person was created through the import of Hooker Family Tree.ged on 30 March 2011.
    Record ID Number

    ID Number: MH:I3935
    User ID

    ID: 11A6FA5B-8E15-40F3-8FF5-A43B6A0BB55B

    Notes

    [Eula Maria McKeaig II - 061204.FTW] Burke's Peerage, p. 2098, on Lineage of FitzAlan:

    The d'Aubigny male line died out by 1243, whereupon the huge family estates were parcelled out between the last d'Aubigny, Earl of Arundel's sisters. Isabel, the second eldest, was wife of John FitzAlan, who through her came into possession of Arundel Castle but, perhaps significantly, did not style himself Earl of Arundel and was not so referred to by third parties. A contributory factor here seems to have been the longevity of the last d'Aubigny Earl of Arundel's widow, who survived her husband almost forty years, and who may in some sense therefore have been regarded as Countess of Arundel in her own right.

    Note: I assume the d'Aubigny widow who survived her husband almost 40 years was wife of Hugh d'Aubigny, 5th Earl of Arundel, brother of Isabel. - Jim Weber
    Note NI4017!SOURCES: 1. A9C7 p. 234; 2. Eng 116, p. 107-08; 3. Bucks 1 Vol 1 p. 455

    John — Maud de Verdon. Maud (daughter of Theobald le Botiller, 2nd Chief Butler of Ireland and Rohesia de Verdon) died 27 Nov 1283. [Group Sheet]


  30. 177.  Maud de Verdon (daughter of Theobald le Botiller, 2nd Chief Butler of Ireland and Rohesia de Verdon); died 27 Nov 1283.
    Children:
    1. 88. John FitzAlan, Knight, 7th Earl of Arundel was born 14 Sep 1246, Clun, Shropshire, England; died 18 Mar 1272, Arundel, Sussex, England; was buried Haughmond Abbey, Shropshire, England.
    2. Joan FitzAlan was born ~ 1267; died Aft 6 October 1316.

  31. 178.  Roger Mortimer, Knight, 1st Baron Mortimer was born 0___ 1231, (Wigmore Castle, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England) (son of Ralph de Mortimer, Knight and Gwladus Ddu); died 30 Oct 1292; was buried Wigmore Abbey, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Roger de Mortimer

    Notes:

    Roger Mortimer, 1st Baron Mortimer, of Wigmore (1231 – 30 October 1282), was a famous and honoured knight from Wigmore Castle in Herefordshire. He was a loyal ally of King Henry III of England. He was at times an enemy, at times an ally, of Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, Prince of Wales.

    Early career

    Born in 1231, Roger was the son of Ralph de Mortimer and his Welsh wife, Princess Gwladys Ddu, daughter of Llywelyn ab Iorwerth and Joan Plantagenet, daughter of John "Lackland", King of England.

    In 1256 Roger went to war with Llywelyn ap Gruffudd when the latter invaded his lordship of Gwrtheyrnion or Rhayader. This war would continue intermittently until the deaths of both Roger and Llywelyn in 1282. They were both grandsons of Llywelyn ab Iorwerth.

    Mortimer fought for the King against the rebel Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester, and almost lost his life in 1264 at the Battle of Lewes fighting Montfort's men. In 1265 Mortimer's wife, Maud de Braose helped rescue Prince Edward; and Mortimer and the Prince made an alliance against de Montfort.

    Victor at Evesham

    In August 1265, de Montfort's army was surrounded by the River Avon on three sides, and Prince Edward's army on the fourth. Mortimer had sent his men to block the only possible escape route, at the Bengeworth bridge. The Battle of Evesham began in earnest. A storm roared above the battle field. Montfort's Welsh soldiers broke and ran for the bridge, where they were slaughtered by Mortimer's men. Mortimer himself killed Hugh Despencer and Montfort, and crushed Montfort's army. Mortimer was awarded Montfort's severed head and other parts of his anatomy, which he sent home to Wigmore Castle as a gift for his wife, Lady Mortimer.

    Welsh wars and death

    See also: Conquest of Wales by Edward I

    Mortimer took part in Edward I's 1282 campaign against Llewelyn the Last, and was put in charge of operations in mid-Wales.[1] It was a major setback for Edward when Mortimer died in October 1282.[1]

    Marriage and children

    Lady Mortimer was Maud de Braose, daughter of William de Braose, Lord of Abergavenny by Eva Marshal. Roger Mortimer had married her in 1247. She was, like him, a scion of a Welsh Marches family. Their six known children were:[2]

    Ralph Mortimer, died 10 August 1274, Sheriff of Shropshire and Staffordshire.
    Edmund Mortimer, 2nd Baron Mortimer (1251–1304), married Margaret de Fiennes, the daughter of William II de Fiennes and Blanche de Brienne. Had issue, including Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March
    Isabella Mortimer, died 1292. She married (1) John Fitzalan, 7th Earl of Arundel,[2] (2) Ralph d'Arderne and (3) Robert de Hastang;[3]
    Margaret Mortimer, died 1297. She married Robert de Vere, 6th Earl of Oxford
    Roger Mortimer, 1st Baron Mortimer of Chirk, died 1326.
    Geoffrey Mortimer, died 1273.
    William Mortimer, died before June 1297, a knight, married Hawise, daughter and heir of Robert de Mucegros. Died childless.
    Their eldest son, Ralph, was a famed knight but died in his youth. The second son, Edmund, was recalled from Oxford University and appointed his father's heir.

    Epitaph

    Roger Mortimer died on 30 October 1282, and was buried at Wigmore Abbey, where his tombstone read:

    Here lies buried, glittering with praise, Roger the pure, Roger Mortimer the second, called Lord of Wigmore by those who held him dear. While he lived all Wales feared his power, and given as a gift to him all Wales remained his. It knew his campaigns, he subjected it to torment.

    Buried:
    his tombstone read:

    Here lies buried, glittering with praise, Roger the pure, Roger Mortimer the second, called Lord of Wigmore by those who held him dear. While he lived all Wales feared his power, and given as a gift to him all Wales remained his. It knew his campaigns, he subjected it to torment.

    Roger married Maud de Braose, Lady Mortimer 0___ 1247, King's Stanley, Gloucestershire, England. Maud (daughter of William de Braose, Lord of Brycheiniog and Eva Marshal, Countess of Abergavenny) was born ~ 1224, (Wales); died 0___ 1301. [Group Sheet]


  32. 179.  Maud de Braose, Lady Mortimer was born ~ 1224, (Wales) (daughter of William de Braose, Lord of Brycheiniog and Eva Marshal, Countess of Abergavenny); died 0___ 1301.
    Children:
    1. 89. Isabella Mortimer was born 0___ 1248, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England; died 0___ 1292.
    2. Edmund Mortimer, Knight, 2nd Baron Mortimer was born 0___ 1251, (Wigmore Castle, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England); died 17 Jul 1304, Wigmore Castle, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England.

  33. 184.  William de Warenne, Knight, 5th Earl of Surrey was born (England) (son of Hamelin de Warenne, Knight, Earl of Surrey and Isabel de Warenne, 4th Countess of Surrey); died 27 May 1240.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: High Sheriff of Surrey, 1217-1226
    • Occupation: Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports, 1204-1206
    • Residence: Normandie, France

    Notes:

    William de Warenne, 5th Earl of Surrey (died 27 May 1240[1]) was the son of Hamelin de Warenne and Isabel,[2] daughter of William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey. His father Hamelin granted him the manor of Appleby, North Lincolnshire.

    De Warenne was present at the coronation of John, King of England on 27 May 1199. When Normandy was lost to the French in 1204 he lost his Norman holdings, (in 1202 he was lieutenant of Gascony), but John recompensed him with Grantham and Stamford.

    His first tenure of office as Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports began in 1204, and lasted until 1206. He was also a Warden of the Welsh Marches between 1208 and 1213.

    William was one of the few barons who remained loyal to King John (who was his cousin) during the king’s difficulties with the barons, when they sought for the French prince to assume the English throne, and is listed as one of those who advised John to accede to the Magna Carta. His allegiance only faltered a few times when the king’s cause looked hopeless.

    In March 1217 he again demonstrated his loyalty to England by supporting the young King Henry III, and he was also responsible for the establishment of Salisbury Cathedral.

    Between the years 1200 and 1208, and during 1217–1226 he was to serve as the High Sheriff of Surrey. In 1214 he was again appointed Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports.

    William married Maud Marshal,[3] on 13 October 1225. They had a son and a daughter.[4] The son John (1231–1304) succeeded his father as earl, while the daughter, Isabel de Warenne (c. 1228–1282), married Hugh d'Aubigny, 5th Earl of Arundel.

    William may also have had an earlier, childless marriage to another Matilda, daughter of William d'Aubigny, 2nd Earl of Arundel.[5]

    William married Maud Marshal, Countess of Norfolk 13 Oct 1225, (England). Maud (daughter of William Marshal, Templar Knight, 1st Earl Pembroke and Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke) was born ~ 1193, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales; died 27 Mar 1248, Tintern Abbey, Chapel Hill, Monmouthshire, Wales. [Group Sheet]


  34. 185.  Maud Marshal, Countess of Norfolk was born ~ 1193, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales (daughter of William Marshal, Templar Knight, 1st Earl Pembroke and Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke); died 27 Mar 1248, Tintern Abbey, Chapel Hill, Monmouthshire, Wales.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Countess of Surrey

    Notes:

    Maud Marshal, Countess of Norfolk, Countess of Surrey (1192 – 27 March 1248) was an Anglo-Norman noblewoman and a wealthy co-heiress of her father William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke, and her mother Isabel de Clare suo jure 4th Countess of Pembroke. Maud was their eldest daughter.[1] She had two husbands: Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk, and William de Warenne, 5th Earl of Surrey.

    Maud was also known as Matilda Marshal.

    Family

    Maud's birthdate is unknown other than being post 1191. She was the eldest daughter of William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke and Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke, herself one of the greatest heiresses in Wales and Ireland. Maud had five brothers and four younger sisters. She was a co-heiress to her parents' extensive rich estates.

    Her paternal grandparents were John FitzGilbert Marshal and Sybilla of Salisbury, and her maternal grandparents were Richard de Clare, 2nd Earl of Pembroke, known as "Strongbow", and Aoife of Leinster.

    Marriages and issue

    Sometime before Lent in 1207, Maud married her first husband, Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk. It was through this marriage between Maud and Hugh that the post of Earl Marshal of England came finally to the Howard (Dukes of Norfolk).[2] In 1215, Hugh was one of the twenty-five sureties of the Magna Carta. He came into his inheritance in 1221, thus Maud became the Countess of Norfolk at that time. Together they had five children:[3]

    Roger Bigod, 4th Earl of Norfolk (1209–1270) He died childless.
    Hugh Bigod (1212–1266), Justiciar of England. Married Joan de Stuteville, by whom he had issue.
    Isabel Bigod (c. 1215–1250), married firstly Gilbert de Lacy of Ewyas Lacy, by whom she had issue; she married secondly John Fitzgeoffrey, Lord of Shere, by whom she had issue.
    Ralph Bigod (born c. 1218, date of death unknown), married Bertha de Furnival, by whom he had one child.
    William Bigod
    Hugh Bigod died in 1225. Maud married her second husband, William de Warenne, 5th Earl of Surrey before 13 October that same year. Together they had two children:

    Isabella de Warenne (c. 1228 – before 20 September 1282), married Hugh d'Aubigny, 5th Earl of Arundel. She died childless.
    John de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey (August 1231 – c. 29 September 1304), in 1247 married Alice de Lusignan, a half-sister of King Henry III of England, by whom he had three children.
    Maud's second husband died in 1240. Her youngest son John succeeded his father as the 6th Earl of Surrey, but as he was a minor, Peter of Savoy, uncle of Queen consort Eleanor of Provence, was guardian of his estates.

    Death

    Maud died on 27 March 1248 at the age of about fifty-six years and was buried at Tintern Abbey with her mother, possibly her maternal grandmother, and two of her brothers.

    Maud Marshal in literature

    Maud Marshal is the subject of a novel by Elizabeth Chadwick, titled To Defy a King. In the book she is called Mahelt rather than Maud. She and her first husband Hugh Bigod appear as secondary characters in books chronicling their parents's lives: The Time of Singing (UK: Sphere, 2008) published in the USA as For the King's Favor; The Greatest Knight; and The Scarlet Lion.

    Ancestors[edit]
    [show]Ancestors of Maud Marshal

    References

    Jump up ^ Thomas B. Costain, The Magnificent Century, pp. 103-104
    Jump up ^ Costain, The Magnificent Century, pp. 103-104
    Jump up ^ Charles Cawley, Medieval Lands, Earls of Norfolk, Bigod
    Thomas B. Costain, The Magnificent Century, published by Doubleday and Company, Garden City, New York, 1959
    Charles Cawley, Medieval Lands, Earls of Pembroke
    thePeerage.com/p 10677.htm#106761

    Children:
    1. 92. John de Warenne, Knight, 6th Earl of Surrey was born 0___ 1231, Lewes Castle, Lewes, East Sussex, England; died 29 Sep 1304, Kennington, Kent, England; was buried Lewes Priory, Southover, Sussex, England.

  35. 188.  Hugh de Vere, Knight, 4th Earl of Oxford was born ~ 1208, (Essex, England) (son of Robert de Vere, Knight, 3rd Earl of Oxford and Isabel de Bolebec, Countess of Oxford); died 0Dec 1263, (Essex, England).

    Notes:

    Hugh de Vere, 4th Earl of Oxford (c. 1208 – December 1263) was the only son and heir of Robert de Vere, 3rd Earl of Oxford and Isabel de Bolebec, daughter and eventual sole heiress of Hugh de Bolebec.

    Early life

    Hugh de Vere was born about 1208, soon after the marriage of his parents. He was a minor when his father died in autumn 1221. Hugh's mother, Isabel de Bolebec, Countess of Oxford, purchased her son's wardship from the crown for 6000 marks.[1] Hugh did homage to King Henry III in October 1231, and was knighted by the King at Gloucester on 22 May 1233.[2] Two days later the King 'girt him with the sword of the Earldom of Oxford and directed the sheriff to let him have what he ought to have in the name of the Earldom of Oxford as his predecessors had had'.[3]

    Career

    He inherited the office of Master Chamberlain of England which had been granted to his great-grandfather Aubrey de Vere II. By right of that office, he participated in the coronation of Queen Eleanor in 1236. Earl Hugh was a critic of King Henry from 1246, and in 1258 and 1259 was elected to serve on various baronial committees attempting to reform royal government.[4] The earl purchased the right to hold a market at the town on his primary estate, Castle Hedingham in Essex, and founded a chantry there.[5]

    Marriage and issue

    Hugh de Vere married Hawise de Quincy,[6] daughter of Saer de Quincy, 1st Earl of Winchester, and his wife, Margaret de Beaumont. They had a son and three daughters:[7]

    Robert de Vere, 5th Earl of Oxford.
    Isabel de Vere, who married firstly, Sir John de Courtenay of Okehampton, Devon, and secondly, Oliver de Dinham, Lord Dinham.
    Lora de Vere, who married Reynold d'Argentine of Melbourn, Cambridgeshire.
    Margaret de Vere, who married Hugh de Cressy (d. shortly before 24 April 1263).[8]
    Hugh de Vere died before 23 December 1263 and was buried at Earls Colne. His widow was living in 1273 and died on 3 February thereafter. She was buried at Earls Colne Priory.[9]

    Footnotes

    Jump up ^ Cokayne 1945, p. 213.
    Jump up ^ Richardson IV 2011, p. 262.
    Jump up ^ Cokayne 1945, p. 214.
    Jump up ^ Cokayne 1945, p. 214.
    Jump up ^ Victoria County History of Essex, vol. II, p. 184.
    Jump up ^ Richardson IV 2011, p. 262.
    Jump up ^ Complete Peerage, X, 215 note 'h'.
    Jump up ^ Richardson IV 2011, pp. 262-e.
    Jump up ^ Richardson IV 2011, p. 262.

    References

    Cokayne, George Edward (1945). The Complete Peerage, edited by H.A. Doubleday. X. London: St. Catherine Press.
    Richardson, Douglas (2011). Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, ed. Kimball G. Everingham. IV (2nd ed.). Salt Lake City. ISBN 1460992709

    Hugh married Hawise de Quincy (Essex, England). [Group Sheet]


  36. 189.  Hawise de Quincy (daughter of Saer de Quincy, Knight, 1st Earl of Winchester and Margaret de Beaumont).

    Notes:

    Residence (Family):
    Hedingham Castle, in the village of Castle Hedingham, Essex, is the best preserved Norman keep in England.

    Picture, history & source ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hedingham_Castle

    Children:
    1. 94. Robert de Vere, Knight, 5th Earl of Oxford was born ~ 1240, Hedingham Castle, Essex, England; died Bef 7 SEPT 1296; was buried Earls Coine, Essex, England.
    2. Isabel de Vere was born ~ 1222, (Essex, England); died Aft 11 Aug 1299.
    3. Lora De Vere was born (Essex, England).
    4. Margaret de Vere was born (Essex, England).