Jane Talbot

Female 1537 -


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Generation: 1

  1. 1.  Jane Talbot was born ~1537 (daughter of John Talbot and Frances Giffard).

    Jane married George Bowes, MP 1 Jul 1558. George (son of Richard Bowes, Esquire and Elizabeth Aske) was born ~1527, Streatlam, Durham, England; died 20 Aug 1580, Shetland Islands, Scotland. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. Thomas Bowes

Generation: 2

  1. 2.  John Talbot was born 1513 (son of Gilbert Talbot, Knight of the Garter and Elizabeth Greystoke); died 6 Jun 1555.

    John married Frances Giffard 18 Feb 1544. Frances was born ~1520; died <25 May 1558. [Group Sheet]


  2. 3.  Frances Giffard was born ~1520; died <25 May 1558.
    Children:
    1. 1. Jane Talbot was born ~1537.


Generation: 3

  1. 4.  Gilbert Talbot, Knight of the Garter was born 1452 (son of John Talbot, 2nd Earl of Shrewsbury and Elizabeth Butler, Countess of Talbot); died 16 Aug 1517.

    Gilbert — Elizabeth Greystoke. Elizabeth (daughter of Ralph de Greystoke, 5th Baron Greystoke and Elizabeth Fitzhugh) was born Abt 1426, Greystoke Manor, Penrith, England; died Aft 1488, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 5.  Elizabeth Greystoke was born Abt 1426, Greystoke Manor, Penrith, England (daughter of Ralph de Greystoke, 5th Baron Greystoke and Elizabeth Fitzhugh); died Aft 1488, England.
    Children:
    1. 2. John Talbot was born 1513; died 6 Jun 1555.


Generation: 4

  1. 8.  John Talbot, 2nd Earl of Shrewsbury was born 12 Dec 1413, Shrewsbury, Shropshire, England (son of John Talbot, 4th Earl Shrewsbury, Knight of the Garte and Maud Neville); died 10 Jul 1460, Northamptonshire, England.

    Notes:

    Died:
    during the Battle of Northampton -

    Battle of Northampton
    Part of the Wars of the Roses
    York victory over Lancaster.svg
    Date 10th July 1460
    Location Northampton in Northamptonshire, England
    Coordinates: 52°14'12?N 0°53'36.8?W
    Result Decisive Yorkist victory[1]
    Belligerents
    White Rose Badge of York.svg House of York Red Rose Badge of Lancaster.svg House of Lancaster
    Commanders and leaders
    Arms of Elizabeth of York (Princess).svg Edward, Earl of March
    Coat of Arms of Sir William Nevill, 6th Baron Fauconberg, KG.png William Neville, Lord Fauconberg
    Neville Warwick Arms.svg Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick Royal Arms of England (1470-1471).svg Henry VI (POW)
    Stafford Coat of Arms.jpg Humphrey Stafford, Duke of Buckingham †
    Coat of Arms of Sir John Talbot, 2nd Earl of Shrewsbury, KG.png John Talbot, Earl of Shrewsbury †
    Coat of Arms of Grey.svg Edmund, Lord Grey (switched sides)
    Strength
    unknown unknown
    Casualties and losses
    unknown 300 killed
    [show] v t e
    Wars of the Roses

    Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Northampton_(1460)

    John — Elizabeth Butler, Countess of Talbot. Elizabeth (daughter of James Butler, 4th Earl of Ormond and Joan de Beauchamp) was born 1420, Kilkenny Castle, Ormond, Ireland; died 8 Sep 1473, Shrewsbury, Shropshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 9.  Elizabeth Butler, Countess of Talbot was born 1420, Kilkenny Castle, Ormond, Ireland (daughter of James Butler, 4th Earl of Ormond and Joan de Beauchamp); died 8 Sep 1473, Shrewsbury, Shropshire, England.

    Notes:

    Elizabeth "Countess of" Talbot formerly Butler
    Born 1420 in Kilkenny Castle, Ormond, Kerry, Ireland
    HIDE ANCESTORS
    Daughter of James Butler and Joan (Beauchamp) Butler
    Sister of James Butler, Ellen Butler, John Butler and Thomas Butler
    Wife of John Maupas — married [date unknown] [location unknown]
    Wife of John Talbot KG — married [date unknown] [location unknown]

    DESCENDANTS descendants

    Mother of Anne (Talbot) Vernon, John Talbot KG, Gilbert Talbot KG and Sibell (Maupas) Berkeley

    Died 8 Sep 1473 in Shrewsbury Abbey, Shropshire, England

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    Butler-75 created 14 Apr 2010 | Last modified 16 Dec 2016
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    Elizabeth (Butler) Talbot has Irish ancestors.
    Elizabeth Butler[1]
    Birth: 1420 Ormond, Ireland[2]
    Death: 8 Sep 1473 Shrewsbury Abbey, Shropshire[3]
    Marriage: 1445-03 Ormond, Ireland[4]
    Sources

    ROYAL ANCESTRY by Douglas Richardson Vol. V, page 125
    JOHN TALBOT, K.G., 2nd Earl of Shrewsbury, Lord Furnival, Chancellor of Ireland, 1446, etc., son and heir by his father's 1st marriage, born about 1413. He married (2nd) before March 1444/5 ELIZABETH BUTLER, daughter of James Butler, 4th Earl of Ormond, by Joan, daughter of William Beauchamp, K.G., Lord Bergavenny [see BUTLER 10 for her ancestry]. She was born 21 Dec. 1421. They had five sons, John, Knt. [3rd Earl of Shrewsbury], James, Knt., Gilbert, K.G., Christopher [Archdeacon of Chester], and George, and two daughters, Anne and Margaret (wife of Thomas Chaworth, Esq.). SIR JOHN TALBOT, 2nd Earl of Shrewsbury, was slain with his brother, Sir Christopher Talbot, at the Battle of Northampton 10 July 1460, fighting on the Lancastrian side, and was buried at Worksop Priory, Nottinghamshire. Elizabeth, Countess of Shrewsbury, died 8 ( or 11) Sept. 1473, and was buried at Shrewsbury Abbey.

    ROYAL ANCESTRY by Douglas Richardson Vol. II page 50-52
    ? Truitt Family Tree again.ged on 13 Aug 2010 S-2090308147 S-2090308147. Heritage Consulting. The Millennium File. Salt Lake City, UT
    ? Truitt S-2090308147
    ? Truitt S-2090308147, S-2093685953; 104-B.ged on 12 Sep 2010
    ? 104-B.ged on 12 Sep 2010; 104-B.ged on 12 Sep 2010

    Children:
    1. 4. Gilbert Talbot, Knight of the Garter was born 1452; died 16 Aug 1517.

  3. 10.  Ralph de Greystoke, 5th Baron Greystoke was born 9 Sep 1406, Greystoke Manor, Penrith, England (son of John de Greystoke, 4th Baron of Greystock and Elizabeth de Ferrers, son of Ralph de Greystoke, 3rd Baron Greystoke and Catherine Clifford, Baroness of Ravensworth); died 1 Jun 1487, Kirkham, Yorkshire, England; was buried Monastery, Kirkham, Northumberland, England.

    Ralph married Elizabeth Fitzhugh 1 Jul 1436, Worcester, Worcestershire, England. Elizabeth (daughter of William Fitzhugh, 4th Baron FitzHugh and Margery Willoughby, Baroness of Ravensworth) was born ~ 1419, Ravensworth, Kirby, North Riding, Yorkshire, England; died 20 Mar 1468, Greystoke Manor, Northumberland, England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 11.  Elizabeth Fitzhugh was born ~ 1419, Ravensworth, Kirby, North Riding, Yorkshire, England (daughter of William Fitzhugh, 4th Baron FitzHugh and Margery Willoughby, Baroness of Ravensworth); died 20 Mar 1468, Greystoke Manor, Northumberland, England.

    Notes:

    Married:
    Map & history of Worcester... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Worcester,_England

    Children:
    1. 5. Elizabeth Greystoke was born Abt 1426, Greystoke Manor, Penrith, England; died Aft 1488, England.
    2. Ann Greystoke was born ~ 1440, Northumberlandshire, England.


Generation: 5

  1. 16.  John Talbot, 4th Earl Shrewsbury, Knight of the Garte was born 1384-1392, Shrewsbury, Shropshire, England (son of Richard Talbot, 4th Baron Talbot and Ankaret le Strange, Baroness of Furnival); died 17 Jul 1453.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: 7th Lord Talbot
    • Also Known As: Count of Clermont
    • Also Known As: Old Talbot

    John — Maud Neville. [Group Sheet]


  2. 17.  Maud Neville
    Children:
    1. 8. John Talbot, 2nd Earl of Shrewsbury was born 12 Dec 1413, Shrewsbury, Shropshire, England; died 10 Jul 1460, Northamptonshire, England.

  3. 18.  James Butler, 4th Earl of Ormond was born 23 May 1393, Kilkenny, Ireland (son of James Butler, 3rd Earl of Ormond and Anne Welles); died 23 Aug 1452, Dublin, Ireland; was buried St. Mary's Abbey, Dublin, Ireland.

    Notes:

    James Butler, 4th Earl of Ormond (23 May, 1393 – 23 August, 1452) was the son of James Butler, 3rd Earl of Ormond. He was called 'The White Earl' and was esteemed for his learning. He was the patron of the Irish literary work, 'The Book of the White Earl'. His political career was marked by his long and bitter feud with the Talbot family.

    Family

    James Butler was the second but eldest surviving son of James Butler, 3rd Earl of Ormond, and Anne Welles, daughter of John de Welles, 4th Baron Welles by Maude de Ros, daughter of William de Ros, 2nd Baron de Ros of Helmsley.[1]

    Career

    Ireland in 1450 showing the Earldom of Ormond.
    He prevailed upon Henry V to create a King of Arms in Ireland, with the title of Ireland King of Arms (altered by Edward VI to Ulster King of Arms), and he gave lands in perpetuity to the College of Heralds, London. He was appointed Lord Deputy of Ireland in 1405, and Lord Lieutenant of Ireland in 1420, 1425, and 1442. He appointed James FitzGerald, 6th Earl of Desmond as Seneschal of Imokilly in 1420.

    The Butler–Talbot feud

    His term as Lord Lieutenant was marked by a bitter feud with the Talbot family, headed by John Talbot, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury and his brother Richard, Archbishop of Dublin. The dispute reached its height in 1442 when Archbishop Talbot, supposedly acting on behalf of the Irish Parliament, presented the Privy Council with a long list of grievances against Ormonde, who was accused of being old and feeble (in fact he was only fifty, which was not considered a great age even in the fifteenth century), and of having lost most of his Irish estates through negligence; there were vague references to treason and "other crimes which could not be named".[2] The Council summoned Ormonde to account for his actions: he defended himself vigorously, and made detailed counter-charges against the Archbishop. The Council took no action against him but rebuked both sides to the dispute severely for disrupting the good governance of Ireland. The feud gradually cooled off, and friendly relations between the two families were finally established by the marriage of Ormonde's daughter Elizabeth to Shrewsbury's son and heir John.[3]

    Later years

    Ormonde remained an influential figure, although his last years were troubled by fresh quarrels with the Earl of Desmond, with Giles Thorndon, the Treasurer of Ireland, and with Richard Wogan, the Lord Chancellor of Ireland. Wogan in particular complained of Ormonde's "heavy lordship" and asked to be allowed to deputise his duties.[4]

    In 1440 he had a grant of the temporalities of the See of Cashel for ten years after the death of the Archbishop of Cashel, Richard O'Hedian. He built the castles of Nenagh, Roscrea and Templemore in north County Tipperary and Tulleophelim (or Tullowphelim) in County Carlow. He gave the manor and advowson of Hickcote in Buckinghamshire to the Hospital of St Thomas of Acre in London, which was confirmed by the Parliament of England (in the third year of Henry VI) at the suit of his son.[5]

    Since his father-in-law had no surviving son, Ormond, in right of his second wife, claimed possession of the Earldom of Kildare, and for some years was able to keep the legitimate heirs out of their inheritance.

    He died in Dublin on 23 August 1452 on his return from an expedition against Connor O'Mulrian, and was buried in St. Mary's Abbey near Dublin.

    Marriage and Children

    He married firstly, in 1413, Joan Beauchamp (1396-1430), the daughter of William de Beauchamp, 1st Baron Bergavenny and Joan Arundel, by whom he had three sons and two daughters:[6]

    James Butler, 5th Earl of Ormond, who died without any legitimate children
    John Butler, 6th Earl of Ormond, who died without any legitimate children
    Thomas Butler, 7th Earl of Ormond.
    Elizabeth Butler, who married John Talbot, 2nd Earl of Shrewsbury.
    Anne Butler, who died unmarried.
    He married secondly, by licence dated 18 July 1432, Elizabeth FitzGerald (c.1398 – 6 August 1452), widow of John Grey, 2nd Baron Grey of Codnor (d. 14 September 1430), and daughter of Gerald FitzGerald, 5th Earl of Kildare, by whom he had no children.

    *

    James — Joan de Beauchamp. Joan (daughter of William de Beauchamp, 1st Baron Bergavenny and Joan FitzAlan, Baroness Bergavenny) was born 0___ 1396, (Warwick, Warwickshire) England; died 5 Aug 1430. [Group Sheet]


  4. 19.  Joan de Beauchamp was born 0___ 1396, (Warwick, Warwickshire) England (daughter of William de Beauchamp, 1st Baron Bergavenny and Joan FitzAlan, Baroness Bergavenny); died 5 Aug 1430.
    Children:
    1. 9. Elizabeth Butler, Countess of Talbot was born 1420, Kilkenny Castle, Ormond, Ireland; died 8 Sep 1473, Shrewsbury, Shropshire, England.
    2. Thomas Butler, 7th Earl of Ormond was born 0___ 1426, Kilkenny, Ireland; died 3 Aug 1515, London, England.

  5. 20.  John de Greystoke, 4th Baron of Greystock was born 0___ 1389, Penrith, Cumbria, England (son of Ralph de Greystoke, 3rd Baron Greystoke and Catherine Clifford, Baroness of Ravensworth); died 8 Aug 1436, Northamptonshire, England; was buried Collegiate Church, Greystoke, Penrith, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Ralph Greystock

    Notes:

    Click here for photos & hsitory of Greystoke Castle - the family home... http://greystoke.com/

    son and heir, aged 28 and more at his father's death.

    On 9 May 1418 the King took his homage and fealty and he had livery of his father's lands.

    He was summoned to Parliament from 24 August 1419 to 5 July 1435, by writs directed Johanni baroni de Greystok', with the addition of chivaler on and after 24 February 1424/5.

    On 22 March 1420/1 he was appointed Keeper of Roxborough Castle, for 4 years, at a salary of ¹1,000 a year in time of peace and ¹2,000 a year in time of war.

    He was appointed a commissioner to treat of peace with the Scots, and concerning violations of the truces, &c ... http://www.celtic-casimir.com/webtree/18/53265.htm

    John married Elizabeth de Ferrers 28 Oct 1407, Greystoke Castle, Penrith, Cumbria, England. Elizabeth (daughter of Robert de Ferrers, III, Knight, 2nd Baron Ferrers of Wem and Joan Beaufort, Countess of Westmorland) was born 0___ 1393, (Suffolkshire) England; died 1434-1436, (Northumberland) England; was buried Black Friars Church, York, England. [Group Sheet]


  6. 21.  Elizabeth de Ferrers was born 0___ 1393, (Suffolkshire) England (daughter of Robert de Ferrers, III, Knight, 2nd Baron Ferrers of Wem and Joan Beaufort, Countess of Westmorland); died 1434-1436, (Northumberland) England; was buried Black Friars Church, York, England.

    Notes:

    Sir Thomas Wriothesley, the Garter King of Arms, recorded more details about the family in the century after their deaths. It is said that Sir Thomas was unable to record all the details of the family living at that time, but it leads the family historian with an interesting bit of research to do.

    The Pedigrees were printed in Collectanea topographica & genealogica , Vol 2, 1834-1843, edited by John Gough Nichols, and were derived from the volume written by Sir Thomas Wriothesley (National Archives MS. Addit. 5530 - note: this reference may need revising).

    Children:
    1. 10. Ralph de Greystoke, 5th Baron Greystoke was born 9 Sep 1406, Greystoke Manor, Penrith, England; died 1 Jun 1487, Kirkham, Yorkshire, England; was buried Monastery, Kirkham, Northumberland, England.
    2. Joan Greystoke was born 0___ 1408, Greystoke, Cumbria, England; died 0___ 1456, Hornby Castle, Hornby, Bedale, DL8 1NQ.

  7. 22.  William Fitzhugh, 4th Baron FitzHugh was born ~ 1399, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England (son of Henry FitzHugh, IV, Knight, 3rd Baron FitzHugh and Elizabeth Grey); died 22 Oct 1452, (Ravensworth) Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Member of Parliament

    Notes:

    William FitzHugh, 4th Baron FitzHugh (c. 1399 - 22 October 1452) was an English nobleman and Member of Parliament.

    Born at Ravensworth, North Riding of Yorkshire, England. He was the son of Henry FitzHugh, 3rd Baron FitzHugh and Elizabeth Grey. He served as a Member of Parliament from 1429-1450.

    FitzHugh married, before 18 November 1406, at Ravensworth, Margery Willoughby, daughter of William Willoughby, 5th Baron Willoughby de Eresby, and Lucy le Strange, by whom he had a son and seven daughters:[1]

    Henry FitzHugh, 5th Baron FitzHugh, who married Lady Alice Neville, daughter of Richard Neville, 5th Earl of Salisbury and Alice Montacute, 5th Countess of Salisbury, daughter and heiress of Thomas de Montacute, 4th Earl of Salisbury and Lady Eleanor Holland.[2] They were great-grandparents to queen consort Catherine Parr.

    Elizabeth FitzHugh, whom married Ralph Greystoke, 5th Baron Greystoke.[2]
    Eleanor FitzHugh, who married Ranulph Dacre, 1st Baron Dacre of Gilsland.[2]
    Maud FitzHugh, whom married Sir William Bowes (d. 28 July 1466) of Streatlam, Durham, by whom she was the grandmother of Sir Robert Bowes.[3][2]
    Lora FitzHugh, who married Sir John Constable of Halsham, Yorkshire.[2]
    Lucy, who became a nun.[2]
    Margery FitzHugh, who married John Melton.[2]
    Joan FitzHugh, who married John Scrope, 5th Baron Scrope of Bolton.[2]

    end of biography

    Sir William's 5-generation pedigree... http://www.ourfamilyhistories.org/ahnentafel.php?personID=I20341&tree=00&parentset=0&generations=5

    Photo, map & history of Ravensworth Castle, home of the Fitzhugh family... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ravensworth_Castle_(North_Yorkshire)

    end

    William married Margery Willoughby, Baroness of Ravensworth Bef 18 Nov 1406, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England. Margery (daughter of William Willoughby, 4th Baron Willoughby de Eresby and Lucy le Strange) was born ~ 1398, Willoughby Manor, Eresby, Spilsby, Lincoln, England; died Bef 1453, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  8. 23.  Margery Willoughby, Baroness of Ravensworth was born ~ 1398, Willoughby Manor, Eresby, Spilsby, Lincoln, England (daughter of William Willoughby, 4th Baron Willoughby de Eresby and Lucy le Strange); died Bef 1453, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Margaret Willoughby
    • Probate: 22 Oct 1452, Yorkshire, England

    Notes:

    Her lineage to William the Conqueror (1024-1087) ... http://www.ourfamilyhistories.org/ahnentafel.php?personID=I20303&tree=00&parentset=0&generations=12

    Birth:
    Map & history of Spilsby... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spilsby

    Children:
    1. 11. Elizabeth Fitzhugh was born ~ 1419, Ravensworth, Kirby, North Riding, Yorkshire, England; died 20 Mar 1468, Greystoke Manor, Northumberland, England.
    2. Margery Fitzhugh was born Ravensworth, Kirby, North Riding, Yorkshire, England; died Aft 1510, Kirkby, North Yorkshire, England.
    3. Henry FitzHugh, 5th Baron FitzHugh was born 1429-1435, Ravensworth, Kirby, Yorkshire, England; died 8 Jun 1472, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England.
    4. Lora FitzHugh was born (Ravensworth, Kirby, Yorkshire, England).
    5. Joan FitzHugh was born (Ravensworth, Kirby, Yorkshire, England).
    6. Maud FitzHugh was born ~1428, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England; died >1466, Streatlam, Durham, England.


Generation: 6

  1. 32.  Richard Talbot, 4th Baron Talbot was born 0___ 1361, Goodrich Castle, Hereford, England (son of Gilbert Talbot, 3rd Baron Talbot and Petronella Butler); died 7 Sep 1396, London, Middlesex, England.

    Notes:

    Richard Talbot
    Also Known As: "Richard Talbat", "Sir Richard Talbot Baron of Blackmere"
    Birthdate: circa 1361 (35)
    Birthplace: Blackmere, Cornwall, England
    Death: Died September 7, 1396 in London, Middlesex, England
    Immediate Family:
    Son of Gilbert Talbot, 3rd Lord of Talbot and Petronella Talbot
    Husband of Ankaret Talbot, Baroness of Talbot
    Father of Sir Gilbert Talbot, of Irchingfield; Mary Green; Richard Talbot; Elizabeth Talbot; Lady Alice Talbot de la Barre and 7 others
    Brother of Elizabeth Grey, Baroness Grey of Wilton and Gilbert Talbot
    Managed by: Peter Scianna
    Last Updated: February 22, 2017
    View Complete Profile

    About Richard Talbot, 4th Baron Talbot
    Sir Richard Talbot, 4th Lord Talbot, Baron de Blackmere1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15
    M, #11084, b. circa 1361, d. 8 September 1396
    Father Sir Gilbert Talbot, 3rd Lord Talbot16,17,18 b. c 1332, d. 24 Apr 1387
    Mother Petronilla Butler16,17,18 b. c 1332, d. 1368
    Sir Richard Talbot, 4th Lord Talbot, Baron de Blackmere was born circa 1361 at of Eccleswall, Linton, Herefordshire, England; Age 26 in 1387.2,7,15 He married Ankaret le Strange, daughter of Sir John le Strange, 4th Lord Strange of Blackmere and Mary FitzAlan, before 23 August 1383; They had 5 sons (Sir Gilbert, 5th Lord Talbot, Lord Strange of Blackmere; Sir John, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury, 7th Lord Talbot; Richard, Archbishop of Dublin, Chancellor of Ireland; Sir Thomas; & Sir William) and 4 daughters (Elizabeth, contracted to marry Sir John, Lord Arundel & Mautravers; Anne, wife of Sir Hugh, 5th Lord Courtenay, 12th Earl of Devon, & of John Botreaux; Mary, wife of Sir Thomas Greene, & of John Nottingham, Esq; & Alice, wife of Sir Thomas Barre).2,19,3,4,5,7,8,9,10,12,13,15 Sir Richard Talbot, 4th Lord Talbot, Baron de Blackmere died on 8 September 1396 at London, Middlesex, England.2,7,8,13,15

    Family Ankaret le Strange b. c 1361, d. 1 Jun 1413

    Children

    Anne Talbot+20,2,5,6,7,12,14,15 d. 16 Jan 1441
    Richard Talbot, Archbishop of Dublin2
    Mary Talbot+21,2,22,7,23,15 b. c 1382, d. 13 Apr 1434
    Sir Gilbert Talbot, 5th Lord Talbot, Lord Strange of Blackmere, Chief Justice of Chester2,7,15 b. c 1383, d. 19 Oct 1418
    Elizabeth Talbot24,3,9 b. c 1387, d. b 1407
    Alice Talbot+2,11,15 b. c 1388, d. b 28 Sep 1436
    Sir John Talbot, 4th Earl Shrewsbury, Wexford, Waterford, 7th Lord Talbot, Count of Clermont+2,7,15 b. c 1392, d. 17 Jul 1453

    Citations

    1.[S2878] Unknown author, Lineage and Ancestry of HRH Prince Charles by Paget, Vol. II, p. 405; The Ancestry of Dorothea Poyntz, by Ronny O. Bodine, p. 66.
    2.[S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 702-704.
    3.[S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. I, p. 33.
    4.[S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. I, p. 211.
    5.[S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. I, p. 547.
    6.[S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. IV, p. 40.
    7.[S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. IV, p. 166-167.
    8.[S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. IV, p. 258-259.
    9.[S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. I, p. 152-153.
    10.[S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. I, p. 376.
    11.[S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. II, p. 310-311.
    12.[S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. II, p. 332.
    13.[S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. III, p. 52.
    14.[S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. IV, p. 644-645.
    15.[S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. V, p. 117-118.
    16.[S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 702.
    17.[S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. IV, p. 165-166.
    18.[S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. V, p. 116-117.
    19.[S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 737.
    20.[S11568] The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain, and the United Kingdom, by George Edward Cokayne, Vol. IV, p. 326.
    21.[S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 356.
    22.[S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. II, p. 260.
    23.[S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. III, p. 112.
    24.[S15] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, p. 11-12.
    From: http://our-royal-titled-noble-and-commoner-ancestors.com/p369.htm#i11084
    _______________________________

    Richard Talbot, 4th Lord Talbot
    M, #9289, d. 7 September 1396
    Last Edited=29 Mar 2013
    Richard Talbot, 4th Lord Talbot was the son of Gilbert Talbot, 3rd Lord Talbot and Petronilla Butler. He married Ankaret Lestrange, daughter of John Lestrange, 4th Lord Strange (of Blackmere) and Mary FitzAlan, before 1383.1 He died on 7 September 1396.
    But this is usually seen as a fresh created rather than as a summons to attend Parl as a peer in right of his wife issue.2 On 3 March 1383 who was called to Parl as LORD (Baron) TALBOT (of Blackmere) between /4 and 17 Dec 1387.2 He succeeded to the title of 4th Lord Talbot [E., 1332] in 1387.
    Child of Richard Talbot, 4th Lord Talbot
    1.Eleanor Talbot
    Children of Richard Talbot, 4th Lord Talbot and Ankaret Lestrange
    1.Anne Talbot+ d. 16 Jan 1440/41
    2.Richard Talbot
    3.Mary Talbot+ d. 1433
    4.Gilbert Talbot, 5th Lord Talbot+ b. 1383, d. 19 Oct 1419
    5.General John Talbot, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury+ b. c 1390, d. 20 Jul 1453
    Citations
    1.[S8] BP1999 volume 1, page 14. See link for full details for this source. Hereinafter cited as. [S8]
    2.[S37] BP2003 volume 3, page 3473. See link for full details for this source. Hereinafter cited as. [S37]
    From: http://www.thepeerage.com/p929.htm#i9289
    ____________________________

    Richard TALBOT (4º B. Talbot)
    Born: ABT 1361
    Died: 7 Sep 1383/ 9 Sep 1396, London (of Goodrich, Herefs)
    Father: Gilbert TALBOT (3° B. Talbot)
    Mother: Petronella BUTLER
    Married: Ankaret STRANGE (B. Strange of Blackmere) 23 Aug 1383
    Children:
    1. John TALBOT (1º E. Shrewsbury)
    2. Gilbert TALBOT of Irchingfield (5º B. Strange of Blackmere)
    3. Mary TALBOT
    4. Richard TALBOT (Archbishop of Dublin)
    5. George TALBOT
    6. Anne TALBOT (C. Devon)
    7. Thomas TALBOT of Wrockwardine (Sir Knight) (had no Children) (d. 1419/20)
    8. William TALBOT
    9. Alice TALBOT
    10. Elizabeth TALBOT
    From: http://www.tudorplace.com.ar/TALBOT.htm#Richard TALBOT (4º B. Talbot)
    ______________________________

    John Talbot, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury and 1st Earl of Waterford KG (1384/1387 Blakemere, Shropshire – 17 July 1453 Castillon, France), known as "Old Talbot" was an important English military commander during the Hundred Years' War, as well as the only Lancastrian Constable of France.
    He was descended from Richard Talbot, a tenant in 1086 of Walter Giffard at Woburn and Battledsen in Bedfordshire. The Talbot family were vassals of the Giffards in Normandy.[1] Hugh Talbot, probably Richard's son, made a grant to Beaubec Abbey, confirmed by his son Richard Talbot in 1153. This Richard (d. 1175) is listed in 1166 as holding three fees of the Honour of Giffard in Buckinghamshire. He also held a fee at Linton in Herefordshire, for which his son Gilbert Talbot (d. 1231) obtained a fresh charter in 1190.[2] Gilbert's grandson Gilbert (d. 1274) married Gwenlynn Mechyll, daughter and sole heiress of the Welsh Prince Rhys Mechyll, whose armorials the Talbots thenceforth assumed in lieu of their own former arms. Their son Sir Richard Talbot, who signed the Barons' Letter, 1301, held the manor of Eccleswall in Herefordshire in right of his wife Sarah, sister of William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick. In 1331 Richard's son Gilbert Talbot (1276–1346) was summoned to Parliament, which is considered evidence of his baronial status - see Baron Talbot.[3] Gilbert's son Richard married Elizabeth Comyn, bringing with her the inheritance of Goodrich Castle in Herefordshire.
    John Talbot was second son of Richard Talbot, 4th Baron Talbot, by Ankaret le Strange, 7th Baroness Strange of Blackmere. His younger brother Richard became Archbishop of Dublin and Lord Chancellor of Ireland and one of the most influential Irish statesmen of his time.
    His father died in 1396 when Talbot was just nine years old, and so it was Ankaret's second husband, Thomas Neville, Lord Furnival, who became the major influence in his early life. The marriage also gave the opportunity of a title for her second son as Neville had no sons with the title going through his eldest daughter Maud.[4] who would become John's 1st wife.
    Talbot was married before 12 March 1407 to Maud Neville, 6th Baroness Furnivall, daughter and heiress of Thomas Neville, 5th Baron Furnivall, the son of John Neville, 3rd Baron Neville de Raby. He was summoned to Parliament in her right from 1409.
    The couple are thought to have four children:
    Thomas Talbot (19 June 1416 Finglas, Ireland - 10 August 1416)
    John Talbot, 2nd Earl of Shrewsbury (c. 1417 – 11 July 1460)
    Sir Christopher Talbot (1419–10 August 1443),
    Lady Joan Talbot (c 1422), married James Berkeley, 1st Baron Berkeley.
    In 1421 by the death of his niece he acquired the Baronies of Talbot and Strange. His first wife, Maud died on 31 May 1422. It has been suggested as an indirect result of giving birth to daughter Joan, although due to a lack of evidence of her life before her marriage to Lord Berkeley has even led to a theory that she was actually Talbot's daughter-in-law through marriage to Sir Christopher Talbot.
    On 6 September 1425, he married Lady Margaret Beauchamp, eldest daughter of Richard de Beauchamp, 13th Earl of Warwick and Elizabeth de Berkeley in the chapel at Warwick Castle. They had five children:
    John Talbot, 1st Viscount Lisle (1426 – 17 July 1453)
    Sir Louis Talbot (c 1429-1458)
    Sir Humphrey Talbot (before 1434 – c. 1492)
    Lady Eleanor Talbot (c February/March 1436 - 30 June 1468) married to Sir Thomas Butler and mistress to King Edward IV.
    Lady Elizabeth Talbot (c December 1442/January 1443). She married John de Mowbray, 4th Duke of Norfolk.
    Talbot is known to have had at least one illegitimate child, Henry. He may have served in France with his father as it is known that a bastard son of the Earl of Shrewsbury was captured by the Dauphin on 14 August 1443.[5]
    From 1404 to 1413 he served with his elder brother Gilbert in the Welsh war or the rebellion of Owain Glyndwr. Then for five years from February 1414 he was Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, where he did some fighting. He had a dispute with the Earl of Ormond and Reginald Grey, 3rd Baron Grey de Ruthyn over the inheritance for the honour of Wexford which he held.[6] Complaints were made against him both for harsh government in Ireland and for violence in Herefordshire.[7]
    The dispute with the Earl of Ormond escalated into a long-running feud between Shrewsbury and his brother, the Archbishop of Dublin, on the one hand and the Butler family on the other and their allies the Berkeleys. The feud reached its height in the 1440s, and in the end just about every senior official in Ireland had taken sides in the quarrel; both sides were reprimanded by the Privy Council for weakening English rule in Ireland. Friendly relations were finally achieved by the marriage of Shrewsbury's son and heir to Ormond's daughter.[8]
    From 1420 to 1424 he served in France, apart from a brief return at the end of the first year to organise the festivities of celebrating the coronation of Catherine of France, the bride of Henry V.[9]
    He returned to France in May 1421 and took part in the Battle of Verneuil on 17 August 1424 earning him the Order of the Garter.
    In 1425, he was lieutenant again for a short time in Ireland;[7] he served again in 1446-7.
    So far his career was that of a turbulent Marcher Lord, employed in posts where a rough hand was useful. In 1427 he went again to France,[7] where he fought alongside the Duke of Bedford and the Earl of Warwick with distinction in Maine and at the Siege of Orlâeans. He fought at the Battle of Patay on 18 June 1429 where he was captured and held prisoner for four years.
    He was released in exchange for the French leader Jean Poton de Xaintrailles and returned to England in May 1433. He stayed until July when he returned to France under the Earl of Somerset.[10]
    Talbot was a daring and aggressive soldier, perhaps the most audacious captain of the age. He and his forces were ever ready to retake a town and to meet a French advance. His trademark was rapid aggressive attacks. He was rewarded by being appointed governor and lieutenant general in France and Normandy and, in 1434, the Duke of Bedford made him Count of Clermont.
    In January 1436, he led a small force including Kyriell and routed La Hire and Xaintrailles at Ry near Rouen. The following year at Crotoy, after a daring passage of the Somme, he put a numerous Burgundian force to flight. In December 1439, following a surprise flank attack on their camp, he dispersed the 6000 strong army of the Constable Richemont, and the following year he retook Harfleur. In 1441, he pursued the French army four times over the Seine and Oise rivers in an unavailing attempt to bring it to battle.
    Around February 1442, Talbot returned to England to request urgent reinforcements for the Duke of York in Normandy. In March, under king's orders, ships were requisitioned for this purpose with Talbot himself responsible for assembling ships from the Port of London and from Sandwich.[11]
    On Whit Sunday, 20 May, Henry VI awarded him the title of Comes Salopie, translated as Earl of Shropshire but despite this he popularly became Earl of Shrewsbury. Just five days later, with the requested re-inforcements, Talbot returned to France where in June they mustered at Harfleur. During that time, he met his six-old year daughter Eleanor for the first time and almost certainly left the newly created Countess Margaret pregnant with another child.[12]
    In June 1443, Talbot again returned to England on behalf of the Duke of York to plead for reinforcements, but this time the English Council refused, instead sending a separate force under Shrewsbury's brother-in-law, Edmund Beaufort. His son, Sir Christoper stayed in England where shortly afterwards he was murdered with a lance at the age of 23 by one of his own men, Griffin Vachan of Treflidian on 10 August at "Cawce, County Salop" (Caus Castle).[13]
    He was appointed in 1445 by Henry VI (as king of France) as Constable of France. Taken hostage at Rouen in 1449 he promised never to wear armour against the French King again, and he was true to his word. However, though he did not personally fight, he continued to command English forces against the French. He was defeated and killed in 1453 at the Battle of Castillon near Bordeaux, which effectively ended English rule in the duchy of Aquitaine, a principal cause of the Hundred Years' War. His heart was buried in the doorway of St Alkmund's Church, Whitchurch, Shropshire.[14]
    The victorious French generals raised a monument to Talbot on the field called Notre Dame de Talbot and a French Chronicler paid him handsome tribute:
    "Such was the end of this famous and renowned English leader who for so long had been one of the most formidable thorns in the side of the French, who regarded him with terror and dismay" - Matthew d'Escourcy
    Although Talbot is generally remembered as a great soldier, some have raised doubts as to his generalship. In particular, charges of rashness have been raised against him. Speed and aggression were key elements in granting success in medieval war, and Talbot's numerical inferiority necessitated surprise. Furthermore, he was often in the position of trying to force battle on unwilling opponents. At his defeat at Patay in 1429 he was advised not to fight there by Sir John Fastolf, who was subsequently blamed for the debacle, but the French, inspired by Joan of Arc, showed unprecedented fighting spirit - usually they approached an English position with trepidation. The charge of rashness is perhaps more justifiable at Castillon where Talbot, misled by false reports of a French retreat, attacked their entrenched camp frontally - facing wheel to wheel artillery.
    He is portrayed heroically in Shakespeare's Henry VI, Part 1: "Valiant Lord Talbot, Earl of Shrewsbury, Created, for his rare success in arms". Talbot's failures are all blamed on Fastolf and feuding factions in the English court. Thomas Nashe, commenting on the play in his booklet Pierce Penniless, stated that Talbot's example was inspiring Englishman anew, two centuries after his death,
    How would it have joyed brave Talbot, the terror of the French, to think that after he had lain two hundred years in his tomb, he should triumph again on the stage, and have his bones new embalmed with the tears of ten thousand spectators at least (at several times) who in the tragedian that represents his person imagine they behold him fresh bleeding. I will defend it against any collian or clubfisted usurer of them all, there is no immortality can be given a man on earth like unto plays.
    John Talbot is shown as a featured character in Koei's video game Bladestorm: The Hundred Years' War, appearing as the left-arm of Edward, the Black Prince, in which he assists the former and the respective flag of England throughout his many portrayals.
    Talbot appears as one of the primary antagonists in the PSP game Jeanne d'Arc.
    From: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Talbot,_1st_Earl_of_Shrewsbury
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    BURGH, Hugh (d.1430), of Wattlesborough, Salop and Dinas Mawddwy, Merion.
    s. of Hugh Burgh. m. (1) by 1413, Elizabeth (c.1389-bef. Oct. 1429), da. of John Mawddwy (alias de la Pole) of Dinas Mawddwy, by Elizabeth, da. and h. of Sir Fulk Corbet of Wattlesborough and h. of her bro. Fulk Mawddwy, 1s. John†; (2) c.1429, Agnes.1
    Offices Held
    Treasurer, Ire. 23 Feb. 1414-Feb. 1420.2
    Commr. of inquiry, Ire. Jan., Aug. 1415,3 Salop May 1422 (concealments), Flints. July 1428 (claims to Mold castle); weirs, Salop Nov. 1424, Dec. 1427, to raise royal loans July 1426, May 1428.
    J.p. Salop 10 Feb. 1416-Mar. 1419, Dec. 1420-d.
    Sheriff, Salop 10 Feb. 1430-d.
    Burgh apparently came from a Westmorland family, and his earliest connexions with Shropshire were as a retainer of Thomas Neville, Lord Furnival, the brother of the earl of Westmorland, and his wife Ankaret, Lady Strange of Blackmere and widow of Richard, Lord Talbot. Burgh served as Neville’s feoffee in the lordship of Worksop, Nottinghamshire, but before Neville’s death in 1407 he entered the service of Lady Ankaret’s younger son, Sir John Talbot (who had married Neville’s elder daughter and coheir by his former wife and was subsequently to succeed him as Lord Furnival). In 1405 Burgh was Talbot’s second-in-command of the garrison of Montgomery, and he was still lieutenant in June 1407 when he collected 100 marks at the Exchequer for the soldiers’ wages. It seems likely that he continued in Talbot’s company throughout the pacification of Wales. In 1408 Lady Ankaret named him as a feoffee of the lordship of Corfham for the settlement of the estate on Talbot, and three years later he performed a similar service as an attorney for the transfer of certain lands in Yorkshire to his superior’s wife. Burgh was involved in other transactions relating to the Talbot and Strange estates and he evidently occupied a position of trust in the Talbot family’s affairs. There is no record of him receiving an annuity from his lord, but in 1414 he was granted by him two thirds of the manor of Alberbury, Shropshire, no doubt in lieu.4
    .... etc.
    From: http://www.historyofparliamentonline.org/volume/1386-1421/member/burgh-hugh-1430
    ___________________________________

    .... etc.
    Gilbert Talbot (1276–1346), Lord Chamberlain of the Household to King Edward III, was summoned to Parliament as Lord Talbot in 1331, which is accepted as evidence of his baronial status at that date.
    He was descended from Richard Talbot, a tenant in 1086 of Walter Giffard at Woburn and Battledsen in Bedfordshire. The Talbot family were vassals of the Giffards in Normandy.[4] Hugh Talbot, probably his son, made a grant to Beaubec Abbey, confirmed by his son Richard Talbot in 1153. This Richard (d. 1175) is listed in 1166 as holding three fees of the Honour of Giffard in Buckinghamshire. He also held a fee at Linton in Herefordshire, for which his son Gilbert Talbot (d. 1231) obtained a fresh charter in 1190.[5] Gilbert's grandson Gilbert (d. 1274) married Gwenlynn Mechyll, daughter and sole heiress of the Welsh Prince Rhys Mechyll, whose armorials the Talbots thenceforth assumed in lieu of their own former arms. Their son Sir Richard Talbot, who signed the Barons' Letter, 1301, held the manor of Eccleswall in Herefordshire in right of his wife Sarah, sister of William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick. In 1331 Richard's son Gilbert Talbot (1276–1346) was summoned to Parliament, which is considered evidence of his baronial status.[6]
    The first baron's grandson, the 3rd Baron Talbot, died in Spain supporting John of Gaunt's claim to the throne of Castile. Richard, the fourth Baron, married Ankaret, 7th Baroness Strange of Blackmere, daughter and heiress of John le Strange, 4th Baron Strange of Blackmere. In 1387, during his father's lifetime, Richard 4th Baron was summoned to Parliament as Ricardo Talbot de Blackmere in right of his wife. His son [Gilbert], the fifth Baron, also succeeded his mother as eighth Baron Strange of Blackmere.
    On the early death of the 5th Baron, the titles passed to his daughter, Ankaret, the sixth and ninth holder of the titles. However, she died a minor and was succeeded by her uncle, John seventh Baron Talbot. John married Maud Nevill, 6th Baroness Furnivall, and, in 1409, he was summoned to Parliament in right of his wife as Johann Talbot de Furnyvall. In 1442 John was created Earl of Shrewsbury in the Peerage of England and in 1446 Earl of Waterford in the Peerage of Ireland. .... etc.
    From: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baron_Talbot
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    Talbot, Baron (E, 1332 - abeyant 1777)
    Gilbert [Talbot], 3rd Baron Talbot
    born c. 1332
    mar. (1) bef. 8 Sep 1352 Lady Pernel Butler (d. c. 1368), only dau. of James [Butler], 1st Earl of Ormonde, by his wife Lady Eleanor de Bohun, 1st dau. of Humphrey [de Bohun], 4th Earl of Hereford and 9th Earl of Essex, by his wife and third cousin Princess Elizabeth, widow of John I, Count of Holland and Zealand, and 10th dau. by his first wife of King Edward I
    children by first wife
    1. Sir Richard Talbot, later 4th Baron Talbot
    1. Elizabeth Talbot (d. 10 Jan 1401/2), mar. bef. 3 Feb 1379/80 Henry [Grey], 5th Baron Grey of Wilton, and had issue
    mar. (2) bef. 16 Nov 1379 Lady Joan Cherleton (widow of John [Cherleton], 3rd Baron Cherleton; d. bef. 1397), 2nd dau. of Ralph [de Stafford], 1st Earl of Stafford, by his second wife Lady Margaret de Audley, suo jure Baroness Audley, only dau. and hrss. of Hugh [de Audley], 1st Earl of Gloucester, by his wife Lady Margaret de Gaveston, widow of Piers [de Gaveston], 1st Earl of Cornwall, and 2nd dau. of Gilbert [de Clare], 6th Earl of Gloucester, by his second wife the Princess Joan "of Acre", 5th dau. by his first wife of King Edward I
    died 24 Apr 1387
    suc. by son by first wife
    Richard [Talbot], 4th Baron Talbot
    born c. 1361
    mar. bef. 23 Aug 1383 Ankaret Lestrange, suo jure Baroness Strange of Blackmere (b. c. 1361; mar. betw. 8 Mar and 4 Jul 1401 as his second wife Thomas [Nevill], jure uxoris 5th and 4th Baron Furnivall; d. 1 Jun 1413), only dau. and eventual sole hrss. of John [Lestrange], 1st or 4th Baron Strange of Blackmere, by his wife Lady Mary FitzAlan, 2nd dau. of Richard [FitzAlan], 10th or 3rd Earl of Arundel, by his first wife Isabel le Despencer, 2nd dau. of Hugh [le Despencer], 1st and de jure 2nd Baron le Despencer, by his wife Lady Eleanor de Clare, sister and cohrss of Gilbert [de Clare], 7th Earl of Gloucester, and 1st dau. of Gilbert [de Clare], 6th Earl of Gloucester, by his second wife Princess Joan "of Acre", 2nd surv. dau. by his first wife of King Edward I
    children
    1. Sir Gilbert Talbot, later 5th Baron Talbot later 5th Baron Strange of Blackmere
    2. Sir John Talbot, later jure uxoris 6th and 5th Baron Furnivall later 7th Baron Strange of Blackmere and 7th Baron Talbot later 1st Earl of Shrewsbury
    3. Most Rev Richard Talbot, Archbishop of Dublin
    4. Thomas Talbot, of Wrockwardine, co. Shrewsbury
    died 8 or 9 Sepc1396
    suc. by son
    Gilbert [Talbot], 5th Baron Talbot later 5th Baron Strange of Blackmere, KG
    born 1383
    mar. (1)
    mar. (2) c. 1415 Beatrice ....., a lady of Portugal (mar. (2) bef. 1423 Thomas Fettiplace, of East Shefford, co. Berkshire; d. 25 Dec 1447; bur. at East Shefford, co. Berkshire)
    only child by second wife
    1. Ankaret Talbot, later suo jure Baroness Talbot and Baroness Strange of Blackmere
    died s.p.m. 19 Oct 1418
    suc. by daughter
    From: http://www.cracroftspeerage.co.uk/online/content/talbot1332.htm#TALBOT_1332_7
    ____________________________

    Shrewsbury, Earl of (E, 1442)
    John [Talbot], jure uxoris 6th and 5th Baron Furnival later 7th Baron Talbot and 10th Baron Strange of Blackmere later 1st Earl of Shrewsbury, KG
    2nd son of Richard [Talbot], 4th Baron Talbot, by his wife Ankaret Lestrange, suo jure Baroness Lestrange of Blackmere, dau. of John [Lestrange], 4th Baron Strange of Blackmere
    born c. 1384
    mar. (1) bef. 12 Mar 1406/7 Maud de Nevill, suo jure Baroness Furnivall (b. c. 1392; d. bef. 1425; bur. at Worksop Priory, co. Nottingham), only child of Thomas [de Nevill], jure uxoris 5th and 4th Baron Furnivall, by his first wife Joan de Furnival, suo jure Baroness Furnivall, only child of William [de Furnivall], 4th and 3rd Baron Furnivall
    children by first wife
    1. Sir John Talbot, later 2nd Earl of Shrewsbury
    2. Sir Christopher Talbot, of Treeton (d. 10 Jul 1460 at the Battle of Northampton)
    1. Lady Joan Talbot, mar. (1) 25 Jul 1457 as his fourth wife James [de Berkeley], 1st Baron Berkeley, and (2) bef. 26 May 1474 Edmund Hungerford
    mar. (2) 6 Sep 1425 Lady Margaret de Beauchamp (b. 1404; d. 14 Jun 1467; bur. in the Jesus Chapel, St Paul's Cathedral, London), 1st dau. and cohrss. of Richard [de Beauchamp], 13th Earl of Warwick, by his first wife Elizabeth de Berkeley, suo jure Baroness Berkeley, Baroness Lisle of Kingston and Baroness Teyes, only child of Thomas [de Berkeley], 5th Baron Berkeley, by his wife Margaret de Lisle, suo jure Baroness Lisle of Kingston and Baroness Teyes, only child of William [de Lisle], 2nd Baron de Lisle and Baron Teyes
    children by second wife
    3. John Talbot, later 1st Viscount Lisle
    4. Sir Humphrey Talbot, Marshal of Calais (d. 1492)
    5. Sir Lewis Talbot, of Penyard, co. Hereford
    2. Lady Elizabeth Talbot (d. bef. 10 May 1507), mar. bef. 27 Nov 1448 John [de Mowbray], 5th Duke of Norfolk, and had issue
    3. Lady Eleanor Talbot, allegedly precontracted to marry King Edward IV - on account of this the King's marriage to Lady Elizabeth Wydville was declared invalid on 25 Jun 1483 by the Act of Parliament known as "Titulus Regius" and at the same time their children were declared illegitimate and unfit to inherit the Crown - the marriage was ultimately recognised as valid in October 1485 by the first Parliament of King Henry VII and its issue were restored in blood accordingly - Lady Eleanor had an illegitimate son by King Edward, Edward de Wigmore, who died in infancy in 1468 (d. 30 Jun 1468), mar. Sir Thomas Boteler (dvp. and sp. betw. 1450 and 1468), only son and heir ap. of Ralph [Boteler], 7th and 1st Baron Sudeley, by his first wife Elizabeth Hende, widow of John Hende
    died 17 Jul 1453 (bur. at St Alkmund's, Whitchurch, co. Shropshire)
    created
    20 May 1442 Earl of Shrewsbury
    17 Jul 1446 Earl of Waterford and Hereditary Steward of Ireland
    suc. by son by first wife
    note King's Esquire bef. 1407; sum. to Parliament jure uxoris as Baron Furnivall from 26 Oct 1409 to 26 Feb 1420/21; knighted bef. 1413; Commissioner to arrest and imprison Lollards 1413/4; Commissioner to enforce the Statute of Leicester against the Lollards 1414; King's Lieutenant in Ireland 1414-20 and 1444/5-52; Knight of the Garter 1424; Justiciar of Ireland 1425; Captain of Coutances and Pont de l'Ache 1427/8; Captain of Falaise 1428; took part in the siege of Orleans 1428-29; suc. his niece 13 Dec 1431 as 10th Baron Strange of Blackmere and 7th Baron Talbot; cr. Count of Clermont Jun 1434; involved in the French campaign 1435-42; Keeper of the Castle and Town of Porchester and Governor of Portsmouth 1451/2-53; returned to the French Campaign 1451/2 and slain at the siege of Castillon with his son John, Lord Lisle
    From: http://www.cracroftspeerage.co.uk/online/content/shrewsbury1442.htm?zoom_highlight=talbot
    _________________________________

    'Talbot01'
    (1) Visitation (Yorkshire,1563-4, Talbot I) contains an illustrious pedigree for the early generations of this family, indicating that a John Talbot came into England from Normandy with the Conqueror and married the daughter of a Rychard, Lord Talbot, descended from a John, Lord Talbot of Eclesfeld, etc.. However, that pedigree appears to be largely spurious. Similarly, Visitation (Worcestershire, 1569, Talbot) provides a pedigree going back 8 generations before the 1st Earl much of which appears spurious. Collins reports that this family is 'said to be in England before the Norman Conquest' but starts with the following Richard. TCP is cautious about the origins of this family, pointing out that Talbot was a common Norman nickname. [A talbot was a long-eared dog used for tracking and hunting. Any reference to someone as 'de Talbot' should probably be read as 'le Talbot'.] BE1883 starts with the following Richard but, apart from mentioning that his son Geoffrey was ancestor of the Talbots of Bashall (which TCP appears to disagree with), then follows the descent of his son Hugh
    (2) On Temp44 we show the interesting additional connections shown by a large online database which we wish to investigate further but which we think important enough to draw attention to.
    Richard Talbot (a 1085)
    m. ?? de Gournay (dau of Gerard, Sire de Gournay, Lord of Yarmouth)
    1. Geoffrey Talbot (d c1129/30)
    His family is as reported in a note to TCP (Munchensy of Norfolk).
    m. Agnes de Lacy (dau of Walter de Laci)
    A. Geoffrey Talbot (d 1140)
    B. Sybil Talbot
    m. Payn FitzJohn of Ewyas, Sheriff of Hereford and Salop
    2. Hugh Talbot (a 1118)
    m. (div) Beatrix de Mandeville (d 19.04.1197, dau of William de Mandeville)
    A. Richard Talbot (d before 25.12.1175) first in the pedigree given by TCP (Talbot)
    m. _ Bulmer (dau of Stephen Bulmer of Appletreewick)
    i. Gilbert Talbot (d before 13.02.1230/1)
    a. Richard Talbot (d before 13.04.1234)
    m. (before 1124) Aline or Aliva Basset (dau of Alan Basset, Baron of Wycombe, widow of Drew de Montacute)
    (1) Gilbert Talbot (d 1274)
    m. Gwendaline (dau of Rhys ap Griffith ap Rhys ap ap Griffith ap Rhys ap Tewdwr Mawr, King of South Wales)
    (A) Richard Talbot, lord of Eccleswall, Sheriff of Gloucester (d 1306)
    m. Sarah de Beauchamp (dau of William de Beauchamp of Elmley, 1st Earl of Warwick)
    (i) Sir Gilbert Talbot, 1st Baron, Lord Chamberlain (d 1346)
    m. Anne Boteler (dau of William Boteler of Wemme)
    (a) Sir Richard Talbot, 2nd Baron (d 1356)
    m. (before 1325) Elizabeth Comyn (b 1299, a 1326, dau of Sir John Comyn, Lord of Badenoch)
    ((1)) Gilbert Talbot, 3rd Baron (d 24.04.1387)
    m1. Petronilla Butler (d 1387, dau of James Butler, 1st Earl of Ormonde)
    ((A)) Sir Richard Talbot, 4th Baron (d 07.09.1396)
    m. Ankaret le Strange (dau of John Strange, 4th Lord of Blackmere)
    ((i)) Gilbert Talbot, 5th Baron, Lord Strange of Blackmere (b 1383, d 19.10.1418-9)
    m1. (before 20.05.1392) Joan Plantagenet (b 1384, d 16.08.1400, dau of Thomas Plantagenet, Duke of Gloucester)
    m2. (c1415) Beatrix of Portugal (m2. Thomas Fettiplace of East Shefford) see here
    ((a)) Ankaret Talbot, Baroness (b c1416, d unm 13.12.1431)
    ((ii)) Sir John Talbot, 1st Earl of Shrewbury (b 1390, d 20.07.1453)
    m1. (12.03.1406) Maud, Baroness Furnivall (d before 1433, dau of Thomas Nevill, Lord Furnival)
    m2. Margaret Beauchamp (dau of Richard de Beauchamp, 5th Earl of Warwick)
    ((iii)) Richard Talbot, Archbishop of Dublin, Lord Deputy of Ireland
    ((iv)) Thomas Talbot of Wrockwardine
    ((v)) Anne Talbot
    m. Hugh Courtenay, 4th Earl of Devon (b 1389, d 16.06.1422)
    ((vi)) Mary Talbot probably of this generation
    m. Sir Thomas Greene of Green's Norton (d 1417)
    ((B)) Elizabeth Talbot
    m. Sir Henry de Grey, 5th Lord of Wilton (d 1395)
    m2. Joan Stafford (dau of Ralph, Earl of Stafford)
    (ii) .... etc.
    Main source(s): BP1934 (Shrewsbury), BE1883 (Talbot - various), Visitation (Surtees Society 1869, Yorkshire, Dugdale 1664-6, Talbot of Thorneton) with support from TCP (Talbot), Collins (1741, Talbot Earl of Shrewsbury).
    From: Stirnet.com
    http://www.stirnet.com/genie/data/british/tt/talbot01.php
    ____________________________

    Lord Talbot de Blackmere IV

    http://www.gordonbanks.com/gordon/family/2nd_Site/geb-p/p33.htm#i1611

    Sir Richard Talbot 4th Lord Talbot of Blackmere, M.P.1

    M, b. circa 1361, d. between 8 September 1396 and 9 September 1396, #1611

    Father Sir Gilbert Talbot M.P.2,3,4,5,6 b. circa 1332, d. 24 April 1387

    Mother Petronilla Butler7,4,5,6 d. 1368

    Birth* Sir Richard Talbot 4th Lord Talbot of Blackmere, M.P. was born circa 1361.7,8,9,10,1,5

    Knighted* He was knighted by Richard II at his coronation on 16 July 1377.5

    Event-Misc Was in Ireland with Edmund, Earl of March in January 1381 at Ireland.5

    Marriage* He married Ankaret le Strange, daughter of Sir John le Strange and Mary FitzAlan, before 23 August 1383.11,12,9,10,1,5

    Event-Misc* Summoned to Parliament in consequence of his marriage to the heiress of Strange of Blackmere. Between 3 March 1384 and 17 December 1387.10,1,5

    Event-Misc Summoned to be present 14 Jul for service against the Scots on 13 June 1385 at Newcastle-on-Tyne, Northumbria, England.5

    Event-Misc Seised of his father's lands on 18 June 1387.5

    Event-Misc Was summoned to Parliament by writ directed Ricard Talbot de Godriche Castell. Between 1 December 1387 and 13 November 1393.5

    Event-Misc Was (upon the death of the 3rd Earl of Pembroke) awarded the Honor of Wexford in Ireland, as coheir through Elizabeth Comyn, his grandmother. On 31 December 1389.5

    Event-Misc Was commissioner of array for Shropshire on 1 March 1392 at Shropshire, England.5

    Event-Misc Was in Ireland in the King's service. In February 1395 at Ireland.5

    Death* He died between 8 September 1396 and 9 September 1396.7,11,9,10,1,5

    Arms* His arms were Gules a lion and a border engrailed or.1

    Family Ankaret le Strange b. 1361, d. 1 June 1413

    Marriage* He married Ankaret le Strange, daughter of Sir John le Strange and Mary FitzAlan, before 23 August 1383.11,12,9,10,1,5

    Children

    Mary Talbot d. 13 Apr 1434

    Richard Talbot d. 15 Aug 1449

    Sir Thomas Talbot Knt.

    Sir William Talbot Knt.

    Elizabeth Talbot

    Anne Talbot

    Alice Talbot

    Eleanor Talbot

    Sir Gilbert Talbot K.G. b. 1383, d. 19 Oct 1418

    Sir John Talbot K.G. b. 1384, d. 17 Jul 1453

    Last Edited 5 Jan 2005

    Citations

    [S284] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, Talbot 11.

    [S183] Jr. Meredith B. Colket, Marbury Ancestry, p. 39.

    [S233] Frederick Lewis Weis, Magna Charta Sureties, 141-6.

    [S234] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry, Talbot 9.

    [S287] G. E. C[okayne], CP, XII - 616.

    [S284] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, Talbot 10.

    [S168] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots, 14-32.

    [S183] Jr. Meredith B. Colket, Marbury Ancestry, p.36.

    [S233] Frederick Lewis Weis, Magna Charta Sureties, 141-7.

    [S234] David Faris, Plantagenet Ancestry, Talbot 8.

    [S183] Jr. Meredith B. Colket, Marbury Ancestry, p. 36.

    [S233] Frederick Lewis Weis, Magna Charta Sureties, 34-8.

    Additional Source: "Pedigree Resource File," database, FamilySearch (http://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.2.1/SPCG-RNK : accessed 1 September 2012), entry for Richard /Talbot/.

    end

    Richard married Ankaret le Strange, Baroness of Furnival Abt 1371, Blakemere, Hereford, England. Ankaret (daughter of John le Strange, 4th Lord Blackmere and Mary de Arundel) was born Abt 1361, Blakemere, Hereford, England; died 1 Jun 1413, (London) England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 33.  Ankaret le Strange, Baroness of Furnival was born Abt 1361, Blakemere, Hereford, England (daughter of John le Strange, 4th Lord Blackmere and Mary de Arundel); died 1 Jun 1413, (London) England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Ankaret Talbot, 6th Baroness Talbot
    • Also Known As: Ankaret Talbot, 9th Baroness Strange of Blackmere

    Children:
    1. Alice Talbot was born Abt 1375, Blakemere, Hereford, England.
    2. Anne Talbot died 16 Jan 1441.
    3. Richard Talbot, Archbishop of Dublin
    4. Mary Talbot died 13 Apr 1434.
    5. Gilbert Talbot, 5th Lord Talbot
    6. Elizabeth Talbot was born ~1387; died 1407.
    7. 16. John Talbot, 4th Earl Shrewsbury, Knight of the Garte was born 1384-1392, Shrewsbury, Shropshire, England; died 17 Jul 1453.

  3. 36.  James Butler, 3rd Earl of Ormond was born ~ 1359, Kilkenny, Ireland (son of James Butler, 2nd Earl of Ormond and Elizabeth Darcy, Countess of Ormonde); died 7 Sep 1405, Dublin, Ireland; was buried St. Mary's Collegiate Church, Gowran, Ireland.

    Notes:

    James Butler, 3rd Earl of Ormond (c. 1359 - 7 September 1405), was a noble in the Peerage of Ireland. He acceded to the title in 1382 and built Gowran Castle three years later in 1385 close to the centre of Gowran making it his usual residence, whence his common epithet, The Earl of Gowran. James died in Gowran Castle in 1405 and is buried in St. Mary's Collegiate Church Gowran together with his father James Butler, 2nd Earl of Ormond, his grandfather James Butler, 1st Earl of Ormond and his great great grandfather Edmund Butler, Earl of Carrick and 6th Chief Butler of Ireland.[1] James the 2nd Earl was usually called The Noble Earl, being a great-grandson, through his mother, of King Edward I of England.

    Career

    In 1391 he purchased Kilkenny Castle[2] by deed from Sir Thomas le Despencer, 1st Earl of Gloucester and Isabel his wife, daughter of Gilbert de Clare[disambiguation needed][verification needed]. He also built the castle of Dunfert (also called Danefort) and in 1386 founded a Friary of minorities at Aylesbury in Buckinghamshire.[3]

    In 1384 he was deputy to Sir Philip Courtenay the then Lieutenant of Ireland who was the nephew of the Archbisop of Canterbury, William Courtenay. Butler's title was Governor of Ireland. A rift occurred between them over the disagreement between the Archbishop of Canterbury and Richard II with Butler taking the side of the latter. Insurrection followed which prompted Richard II to send an expedition under the banner of his close friend Robert de Vere, Duke of Ireland to quell it. This enterprise was led by John I Stanley of the Isle of Man who was accompanied by Bishop Alexander de Balscot of Meath and Sir Robert Crull.[4] Butler joined them upon their arrival in Ireland. The result of its success was Stanley's appointment as Lieutenant of Ireland, Bishop Alexander as chancellor, Crull as treasurer, and Butler again as governor.[5] On 25 July 1392, he was appointed Lord Justice of Ireland as he was again in 1401. On the departure of Sir Stephen Scrope to England on 26 October 1404, by commission, dated at Carlow, 12 February 1388-9, he was appointed keeper of the peace and governor of counties Kilkenny and Tipperary. He was vested with full power to treat with, to execute, to protect, and to give safe conduct to any rebels, etc. In 1397 he assisted Edmond Earl of March, L.L. against O Brien, and in 1390 took prisoner Teige O Carrol, Prince of Elye.

    Marriage and Children

    Some time before 17 June 1386, he married Anne Welles, the daughter of John de Welles, 4th Baron Welles by his spouse Maud (nâee de Roos). Anne Welles died on 13 November 1397, around the age of 37. They had five children:

    James Butler, 4th Earl of Ormond (1392–1452), married firstly Joan de Beauchamp, daughter of William Beauchamp, 1st Baron Bergavenny and Lady Joan FitzAlan, and had issue. He married secondly, Lady Joan, widow of Jenico Grey, and daughter and heiress of Gerald FitzGerald, 5th Earl of Kildare, but had no children.
    Sir Richard Butler of Polestown, county Kilkenny, (b. b 1396). His godfather was King Richard II of England. He married Catherine, daughter of Gildas O'Reilly of Cavar, Lord of East Breffny, and had issue.
    Anne Butler, married John Wogan, and had issue.
    Sir Philip Butler, married Elizabeth, daughter of Sir John Cockayne, Chief Baron of the Exchequer, by his wife Ida de Grey, and had issue. Ancestor of Barons Boteler of Brantfield.[6][7][8]
    Sir Ralph Butler, married Margaret de Berwick, and had issue.
    In 1399 the Earl married Katherine FitzGerald of Desmond. They had four children:

    James "Gallda" Butler,
    Edmund Butler
    Gerald Butler
    Theobald Butler
    By an unknown mistress he had at least one illegitimate son, Thomas Le Boteller (died 1420) aka Thomas Bacach (the lame). Thomas joined the order of Knights Hospitaller. He was Lord Deputy of Ireland and Prior of Kilmainham, a distinguished soldier who led an Irish force of 700 men at the Siege of Rouen in 1419.

    *

    James married Anne Welles Bef 17 Jun 1386. Anne (daughter of John Welles, Knight, 4th Lord Welles and Maud de Ros, Lady Welles) died 13 Nov 1397. [Group Sheet]


  4. 37.  Anne Welles (daughter of John Welles, Knight, 4th Lord Welles and Maud de Ros, Lady Welles); died 13 Nov 1397.
    Children:
    1. 18. James Butler, 4th Earl of Ormond was born 23 May 1393, Kilkenny, Ireland; died 23 Aug 1452, Dublin, Ireland; was buried St. Mary's Abbey, Dublin, Ireland.

  5. 38.  William de Beauchamp, 1st Baron Bergavenny was born 1343-1345, Warwick, Warwickshire, England (son of Thomas de Beauchamp, Knight, 11th Earl of Warwick and Katherine de Mortimer, Countess of Warwick); died 8 May 1411, Warwick, Warwickshire, England; was buried Black Friars Churchyard, Hereford, Herefordshire, England.

    Notes:

    William de Beauchamp, 1st Baron Bergavenny, KG (circa 1343 - 8 May 1411) was an English peer.

    A younger son of Thomas de Beauchamp, 11th Earl of Warwick and Katherine Mortimer, he was summoned to Parliament on 23 July 1392 as "Willilmo Beauchamp de Bergavenny", by which he is held to have become Baron Bergavenny.

    Marriage and heirs

    On 23 July 1392, he married Lady Joan FitzAlan, daughter of the Richard FitzAlan, 11th Earl of Arundel and Elizabeth de Bohun, and they had the following children:

    Richard de Beauchamp (c.1394-1422), later 2nd Baron Bergavenny and then 1st Earl of Worcester
    Joan de Beauchamp, married the 4th Earl of Ormond

    *

    Sir William Beauchamp, 1st Lord Bergavenny. Knight, Knight of the Garter, of Feckenham, Worcestershire. Constable of Castle and County of Pembroke. King's Chamberlain, Captain of Calais, Justice of South Wales.

    Fourth of fifteen children and fourth of five sons of Thomas de Beauchamp and Katherine de Mortimer, born after 1344. Husband of Lady Joan FitzAlan Arundel, daughter of Richard de Arundel, beheaded for high treason against Richard II, and Elizabeth Bohun, married before 04 Mar 1393, the date of her father's will. They had one son and two daughters:
    * Sir Richard, Knight of the Garter m Isabel Despenser
    * Joan m James Butler
    * Elizabeth

    1358 - studied at Oxford until 1361
    1358 - granted canonry of Sarum, but would give up a clerical career around 1361
    1367 - served with John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster at the Battle of Najera in April
    1367 - set out with his brother to join the crusades with the Knights of the Teutonic Order
    1370 - Gascony campaign with John of Gaunt
    1371 - at the capture of Limoges
    1372 - siege of Montpaon
    1373 - served John of Gaunt in France
    1376 - vested as a Knight of the Garter
    1380 - to Brittany to aid John de Montfort
    1382 - commanded the assault and capture on Figueras
    1383 - Captain of Calais
    1386 - in Portugal with John of Gaunt
    1386 - acquired the manors of Snitterfield, Warwickshire from Sir Thomas West
    1389 - acquired the Castle of Abergavenny, Monmouthsire, titled Lord Abergavenny
    1399 - Governor of Pembroke, Justiciar of South Wales

    William died testate 08 May 1411, (inquest held June 5) and his will directed his remains to be buried next to and beneath the tomb of John Hastings, Earl of Pembroke at the Black Friars in Hereford.

    His widow, Lady Joan, was found by inquisition to have "raised a murderous affray at Birmingham." She died in 1435 and was buried next to her husband at Black Friars.

    William married Joan FitzAlan, Baroness Bergavenny 23 Jul 1392. Joan (daughter of Richard FitzAlan, Knight, 11th Earl of Arundel and Elizabeth de Bohun, Countess of Arundel, Countess of Surrey) was born 0___ 1375, Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England; died 14 Nov 1435, Herefordshire, England; was buried Black Friars Churchyard, Hereford, Herefordshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  6. 39.  Joan FitzAlan, Baroness Bergavenny was born 0___ 1375, Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England (daughter of Richard FitzAlan, Knight, 11th Earl of Arundel and Elizabeth de Bohun, Countess of Arundel, Countess of Surrey); died 14 Nov 1435, Herefordshire, England; was buried Black Friars Churchyard, Hereford, Herefordshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Baptism: Black Friars, Hereford, England

    Notes:

    Family and lineage

    Lady Joan FitzAlan was born in 1375, at Arundel Castle, Sussex, England, one of the seven children of Richard Fitzalan, 11th Earl of Arundel, Earl of Surrey, and his first wife Elizabeth de Bohun. Her only surviving brother was Thomas Fitzalan, 12th Earl of Arundel, of whom Joan was his co-heiress. She had an older sister Lady Elizabeth FitzAlan who married as her second husband Thomas Mowbray, 1st Duke of Norfolk. Her paternal grandparents were Richard Fitzalan, 10th Earl of Arundel and Eleanor of Lancaster, and her maternal grandparents were William de Bohun, 1st Earl of Northampton and Elizabeth de Badlesmere.

    On 3 April 1385, her mother died. Joan was about ten years old. Her father married secondly, Philippa Mortimer on 15 August 1390, by whom he had a son, John Fitzalan, who was born in 1394.[1] John died sometime after 1397.[2]

    On 21 September 1397, Joan's father, the Earl of Arundel, who was also one of the Lords Appellant, was beheaded on Tower Hill, London, on charges of high treason against King Richard II of England. The Earl had always enjoyed much popularity with the citizens of London. His titles and estates were forfeited to the Crown.[3]

    In October 1400, the new king Henry IV who had ascended the throne following Richard's deposition in 1399, restored the titles and estates to Thomas Fitzalan, Joan's brother. He became the 12th Earl of Arundel and Earl of Surrey. Although he married Beatrice, an illegitimate daughter of King John I of Portugal and Inez Perez Esteves, he died childless on 13 October 1415. The Earldom and castle of Arundel passed to a cousin John Fitzalan, 13th Earl of Arundel, the remainder of his inheritance was divided among Joan and her two surviving sisters, Elizabeth and Margaret.[citation needed]

    Marriage and issue

    On 23 July 1392, Joan was married to William de Beauchamp, 1st Baron Bergavenny (c.1344 - 8 May 1411) the son of Thomas de Beauchamp, 11th Earl of Warwick and Katherine Mortimer. He was more than thirty years Joan's senior.[citation needed]

    The marriage produced a son and a daughter:

    Richard de Beauchamp, 1st Earl of Worcester, 2nd Baron Bergavenny (born before 1397 – died 1422), married Isabel le Despenser, daughter of Thomas le Despenser, 1st Earl of Gloucester and Constance of York, by whom he had one daughter Elizabeth de Beauchamp, Lady of Abergavenny.
    Joan de Beauchamp (1396 – 3 August 1430), married 28 August 1413 James Butler, 4th Earl of Ormond, son of James Butler, 3rd Earl of Ormond and Anne Welles, by whom she had five children, including Thomas Butler, 7th Earl of Ormond. Anne Boleyn and Mary Boleyn were notable descendants.

    Death

    Joan, Baroness Bergavenny, died on 14 November 1435, at the age of 60. She was buried in Black Friars, Hereford.[2]

    Children:
    1. Richard Beauchamp, Knight, 1st Earl of Worcester was born 0___ 1394, (Warwick, Warwickshire) England; died 0___ 1422, Meaux, France.
    2. 19. Joan de Beauchamp was born 0___ 1396, (Warwick, Warwickshire) England; died 5 Aug 1430.

  7. 40.  Ralph de Greystoke, 3rd Baron GreystokeRalph de Greystoke, 3rd Baron Greystoke was born 18 Oct 1353, Ravensworth Castle, Yorkshire, England; was christened 18 Oct 1353, Kirkby Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England (son of William de Greystoke, 2nd Baron Greystoke and Joane FitzHugh); died 6 Apr 1418, Kirkby Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England.

    Notes:

    Ralph de Greystoke, 3rd Baron Greystoke, (18 October 1353 – 6 April 1418) was an English peer and landowner.

    Life

    Greystoke was the son of William de Greystoke, 2nd Baron Greystoke, and Joane, daughter of Lord Fitzhugh, his second wife.[3][1] He was born on 18 October 1353 at Ravensworth Castle, North Yorkshire, the home of his maternal uncle Henry.[1] As he was still a child when his father died, his estates were placed under the guardianship of Roger de Clifford, 5th Baron de Clifford.[4]

    He was summoned to Parliament between 28 November 1375 and 5 October 1417,[5] and, in the 1370s and 1380s, served as a warden of the Scottish Marches.[1]

    In 1384, he led an English force that was defeated by the Scots, under the command of George I, Earl of March, while they were travelling to Roxburgh.[2] Greystoke was captured and taken to Dunbar Castle, where he was provided with a meal in the great hall, served upon his own dining-ware, which had been seized from his baggage train along with hangings that now decorated the walls of the great hall.[2] Greystoke's ransom was 3,000 marks,[5] and his younger brother William was his hostage in the exchange.[6] While at Dunbar, William took ill with fever and died.[6] William was buried at the castle, but two years later his remains were moved to Newminster Abbey in Northumberland, where his grandfather Ralph de Greystoke, 1st Baron Greystoke, was buried.[6] Greystoke returned to fight the Scots in 1402 at the Battle of Humbleton Hill in Northumberland.[7]

    In the 1390s, "disillusioned" with the reign of Richard II, Greystoke backed the return of the exiled Henry of Bolingbroke, son of John of Gaunt and grandson of Edward III.[1] Greystoke brought his own men to join those of the exile at Doncaster in 1399 and, after Richard II was deposed, with other northern English lords he remained loyal to Bolingbroke, who succeeded to the crown as Henry IV.[8]

    Personal

    Greystoke married Katherine, the daughter of his former guardian Roger de Clifford, 5th Baron de Clifford.[4] They had two children: John, his heir,[1] and Maude, who married Eudo de Welles, son of John de Welles, 5th Baron Welles.[6]

    Greystoke died on 6 April 1418.[1] At inquisitions following his death, his estate was assessed to include messuages, or "dwelling-houses", and land holdings in Westmorland, Northumberland, and Yorkshire, as well as the manors and castles of Greystoke and Morpeth.[9]

    References

    ^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h Dockray, Keith (2004). "Greystoke family (per. 1321–1487)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/54524. Retrieved 19 December 2013.
    ^ Jump up to: a b c David R. Perry; Mark A. S. Blackburn (2000). Castle Park, Dunbar: Two Thousand Years on a Fortified Headland. Society Antiquaries Scotland. p. 12. ISBN 978-0-903903-16-5.
    Jump up ^ John Burke (1831). A general and heraldic dictionary of the peerages of England, Ireland, and Scotland, extinct, dormant, and in abeyance. England. p. 244.
    ^ Jump up to: a b Summerson, Henry (2004). "Clifford, Roger, fifth Baron Clifford (1333–1389)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/5660. Retrieved 19 December 2013.
    ^ Jump up to: a b John Burke (1831). A general and heraldic dictionary of the peerages of England, Ireland, and Scotland, extinct, dormant, and in abeyance. England. p. 245.
    ^ Jump up to: a b c d Samuel Jefferson (1840). The history and antiquities of Leath Ward: in the county of Cumberland: with biographical notices and memoirs. S. Jefferson. pp. 342–343.
    Jump up ^ Wm. E. Baumgaertner (January 2010). Squires, Knights, Barons, Kings: War and Politics in Fifteenth Century England. Trafford Publishing. p. 25. ISBN 978-1-4269-0769-2.
    Jump up ^ Gwilym Dodd; Douglas Biggs (1 January 2003). Henry IV: The Establishment of the Regime, 1399–1406. Boydell & Brewer Ltd. p. 130. ISBN 978-1-903153-12-3.
    Jump up ^ Great Britain. Public Record Office (2002). Calendar of Inquisitions Post Mortem and Other Analogous Documents Preserved in the Public Record Office: Henry V. Boydell & Brewer Ltd. pp. 28–31. ISBN 978-0-85115-899-0.

    endo of biography

    Baron Ralph de Greystoke (1353-1418) is the 21st great-grandfather of the grand-children of Ma Byars (1894-1985)

    Baron Ralph de Greystoke (1353-1418) is the 12th great-grandson of William the Conqueror (1024-1087) ... http://www.ourfamilyhistories.org/ahnentafel.php?personID=I14874&tree=00&parentset=0&generations=12

    History and development of Brougham Castle... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brougham_Castle

    Do you remember the 1984 Bristish film, "Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan, Lord of the Apes"... go to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greystoke:_The_Legend_of_Tarzan,_Lord_of_the_Apes

    General Notes:

    on and heir, by 2nd wife, born and baptized at Kirkby Ravensworth, co. York, 18 October 1353. He was appointed Warden of the West Marches, 12 February 1373 /4. The King took his homage and fealty and he had livery of his father's lands, 19 May 1374, and of those which Alice, his grandmother, had held in dower, 20 May 1375. He was summoned, for Military Service, 13 June 1385, and to Parliament from 28 December 1375 to 5 October 1417, by writs directed Radulpho haroni de Graystok'. He was appointed Warden of the West Marches, 16 July 1376; Constable of the castle of Lochmaben, and Justice, Steward, and Keeper of the lordship of Annandale, for three years, 1 December 1376; Warden of the West Marches, 16 July 1377; Warden of the East and West Marches, 12 December 1377; Warden of the West Marches, 4 June and 4 November 1379; Warden of the East Marches, 10 March 1379/80, 29 May 1380, and 16 June 1382; and of the West Marches, 27 March 1386. He was taken prisoner by George, Earl of Dunbar [SCT], in a skirmish at Horseridge in Glendale ward, Northumberland, 25 June 1380. He was one of the Lords who gave his assent in Parliament, 23 October 1399, to the secret imprisonment of Richard II. On 8 November 1403 the King took his homage and fealty and he had livery of the lands which Joan, his mother, had held in dower. He married Katherine, daughter of Roger (DE CLIFFORD), LORD CLIFFORD, by Maud, daughter of Thomas (DE BEAUCHAMP), EARL OF WARWICK. She died 23 April 1413. He died 6 April 1418, aged 64. [Complete Peerage VI:195-6, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)] ... http://www.celtic-casimir.com/webtree/18/53249.htm

    Ancestral File Number: 8J5R-02.

    end of profile

    Birth:
    Image, map & history ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ravensworth_Castle_(North_Yorkshire)

    Ralph married Catherine Clifford, Baroness of Ravensworth 0___ 1377, Brougham Castle, Westmorland, England. Catherine (daughter of Roger de Clifford, Knight, 5th Baron de Clifford and Maud Beauchamp) was born ~1367, Brougham Castle, Westmorland, England; was christened Ravensworth, Kirby, North Riding, Yorkshire, England; died 23 Apr 1413, (North Riding, Yorkshire) England. [Group Sheet]


  8. 41.  Catherine Clifford, Baroness of Ravensworth was born ~1367, Brougham Castle, Westmorland, England; was christened Ravensworth, Kirby, North Riding, Yorkshire, England (daughter of Roger de Clifford, Knight, 5th Baron de Clifford and Maud Beauchamp); died 23 Apr 1413, (North Riding, Yorkshire) England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Katherine de Clifford

    Children:
    1. 20. John de Greystoke, 4th Baron of Greystock was born 0___ 1389, Penrith, Cumbria, England; died 8 Aug 1436, Northamptonshire, England; was buried Collegiate Church, Greystoke, Penrith, England.
    2. Maud Greystoke was born ~1390, Greystoke, Cumbria, England; died ~1416, Welles Lincolnshire, England.
    3. Joan Greystoke was born ~1394, Cumbria, England; died ~1415, Durham, England.
    4. Ralph de Greystoke, 5th Baron Greystoke was born 9 Sep 1406, Greystoke Manor, Penrith, England; died 1 Jun 1487, Kirkham, Yorkshire, England; was buried Monastery, Kirkham, Northumberland, England.

  9. 42.  Robert de Ferrers, III, Knight, 2nd Baron Ferrers of Wem was born ~ 1373, Willisham, Suffolkshire, England (son of Robert de Ferrers, 4th Baron Ferrers of Wem and Elizabeth Boteler, 4th Baroness Boteler of Wem); died Bef 29 Nov 1396.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: 5th Baron Boteler of Wem

    Notes:

    Robert Ferrers, 2nd Baron Ferrers of Wem (c. 1373 - bef. 29 November 1396). He was born in Willisham, Suffolk.

    Robert was the son of Sir Robert Ferrers, 1st Baron Ferrers of Wem (created by Writ of Summons dated December 28, 1375[1]), and Elizabeth Boteler, 4th Baroness Boteler of Wem, who died in June 1411, and paternal grandson of Robert de Ferrers, 2nd Baron Ferrers of Chartley and Agnes or Aeneas de Bohun. Upon the death of his father in December 1380, he became Baron Boteler of Wem jure matris (he predeceased his mother, so never actually became the 5th baron; after his death, his mother's 3rd husband assumed this title jure uxoris[2]) as well as 2nd Baron Ferrers of Wem. He had no son but two daughters. Female siblings being co-heiresses in England, both baronies are still abeyant between the descendants of these two sisters.[2]

    Family

    Robert Ferrers married Joan Beaufort in 1391 at Beaufort-en-Vallâee, Anjou. They had two daughters:

    Elizabeth (1393 – 1434). She is buried at Black Friars Church, York. She married John de Greystoke, 4th Baron Greystoke (1389 – 1436) on 28 October 1407 in Greystoke Castle, Greystoke, Cumberland, and had issue. They had 12 children.[3] One of their daughters, Anne married Sir Ralph Bigod, descendant of Hugh Bigod (Justiciar)[4] and his wife Joan de Stuteville (daughter of Dervorguilla I of Galloway, daughter of Lochlann of Galloway), and became ancestress of George Gascoigne, poet, and Zachary Taylor,[5] 12th president of the U.S.A.

    Mary or Margery (1394 – 25 January 1457/1458). She married her stepbrother, Sir Ralph Neville, son of Ralph Neville, 1st Earl of Westmoreland, c. 1413 in Oversley, Warwickshire and had issue. Her granddaughter Joan was the mother of Sir William Gascoigne (c. 1450 – 1486) who married Margaret Percy and became ancestor of many notable persons including Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother, Diana, Princess of Wales, Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, George Washington and William Howard Taft (see entry on Margaret Percy for further details).

    *

    Robert married Joan Beaufort, Countess of Westmorland 0___ 1391, Anjou, France. Joan (daughter of John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster and Katherine de Roet, Duchess of Lancaster) was born ~ 1379, Chateau Beaufort, Anjou, France; died 13 Nov 1440, Howden, Yorkshire, England; was buried Lincoln Cathedral, Lincoln, Lincolnshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  10. 43.  Joan Beaufort, Countess of Westmorland was born ~ 1379, Chateau Beaufort, Anjou, France (daughter of John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster and Katherine de Roet, Duchess of Lancaster); died 13 Nov 1440, Howden, Yorkshire, England; was buried Lincoln Cathedral, Lincoln, Lincolnshire, England.

    Notes:

    Joan Beaufort, Countess of Westmorland (c. 1379 - 13 November 1440), was the fourth of the four children (and only daughter) of John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster, and his mistress, later wife, Katherine Swynford. In her widowhood, she was a powerful landowner in the North of England.

    Early life and marriages

    She was probably born at the Swynford manor of Kettlethorpe in Lincolnshire. Her surname probably reflects her father's lordship of Beaufort in Champagne, France, where she might also have been born.[2] In 1391, at the age of twelve, Joan married at Beaufort-en-Vallâee, Anjou, Robert Ferrers, 5th Baron Boteler of Wem, and they had two daughters before he died in about 1395.

    Legitimation

    Along with her three brothers, Joan had been privately declared legitimate by their cousin Richard II of England in 1390. Her parents were married in Lincoln Cathedral in February 1396.[3] Joan was already an adult when she was legitimized by the marriage of her mother and father with papal approval. The Beauforts were later barred from inheriting the throne by a clause inserted into the legitimation act by their half-brother, Henry IV of England, although it is not clear that Henry IV possessed sufficient authority to alter an existing parliamentary statute by himself, without the further approval of Parliament. Soon after the legitimation, on 3 February 1397, when she was eighteen, Joan married Ralph de Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland, who had also been married once before.

    Inheritance

    When Ralph de Neville died in 1425, his lands and titles should, by law of rights, have passed on to his grandson through his first marriage, another Ralph Neville. Instead, while the title of Earl of Westmorland and several manors were passed to Ralph, the bulk of his rich estate went to his wife, Joan Beaufort. Although this may have been done to ensure that his widow was well provided for, by doing this Ralph essentially split his family into two and the result was years of bitter conflict between Joan and her stepchildren who fiercely contested her acquisition of their father's lands. Joan however, with her royal blood and connections, was far too powerful to be called to account, and the senior branch of the Nevilles received little redress for their grievances. Inevitably, when Joan died, the lands would be inherited by her own children.

    Death

    Joan died on 13 November 1440 at Howden in Yorkshire.[3] Rather than be buried with her husband Ralph (who was not buried with his first wife, though his monument has effigies of himself and his two wives) she was entombed next to her mother in the magnificent sanctuary of Lincoln Cathedral. Joan's is the smaller of the two tombs; both were decorated with brass plates – full-length representations of them on the tops, and small shields bearing coats of arms around the sides — but those were damaged or destroyed in 1644 by Roundheads during the English Civil War. A 1640 drawing of them survives, showing what the tombs looked like when they were intact, and side-by-side instead of end-to-end, as they are now.

    Descendants

    Joan Beaufort was mother to Cecily, Duchess of York and thus grandmother of Edward IV of England, and of Richard III of England, whom Henry VII defeated to take the throne. Henry then married Elizabeth of York, daughter of Edward IV, and their son became Henry VIII of England. Henry VIII's sixth wife, Catherine Parr, was also a descendant through Joan and Ralph's eldest son, Richard Neville, 5th Earl of Salisbury, and thus Henry's third cousin. The Earl of Salisbury was father to Richard Neville, 16th Earl of Warwick, "the Kingmaker" (father of Queen consort Anne Neville).

    Children of Joan Beaufort and Robert Ferrers

    In 1391, at the age of twelve, Joan married Robert Ferrers, 5th Baron Boteler of Wem, at Beaufort-en-Vallâee, Anjou. They had 2 children:

    Elizabeth Ferrers, 6th Baroness Boteler of Wem (1393–1474). She is buried at Black Friars Church, York. She married John de Greystoke, 4th Baron Greystoke (1389–1436), on 28 October 1407 in Greystoke Castle, Greystoke, Cumberland, and had issue.
    Margaret (or Mary) Ferrers (1394 – 25 January 1457/1458). She married her stepbrother, Sir Ralph Neville, son of Ralph Neville, 1st Earl of Westmoreland, c. 1413 in Oversley, Warwickshire, and had issue

    Children of Joan Beaufort and Ralph Neville

    They had 14 children:

    Lady Katherine Neville, married first on 12 January 1411 John Mowbray, 2nd Duke of Norfolk; married second Sir Thomas Strangways; married third John Beaumont, 1st Viscount Beaumont; married fourth Sir John Woodville (d. 12 August 1469).
    Lady Eleanor Neville (d. 1472), married first Richard le Despenser, 4th Baron Burghersh, married second Henry Percy, 2nd Earl of Northumberland
    Richard Neville, 5th Earl of Salisbury (1400–1460), married Alice Montacute, suo jure 5th Countess of Salisbury. Had issue. Their descendants include Richard Neville, 16th Earl of Warwick; queen consort Anne Neville, wife of Richard III; and queen consort Catherine Parr, sixth wife of King Henry VIII (great-grandson of Richard's sister, Cecily).
    Robert Neville (d. 1457), Bishop of Durham
    William Neville, 1st Earl of Kent (c.1410–1463)
    Lady Anne Neville (?1411–20 September 1480), married Humphrey Stafford, 1st Duke of Buckingham
    Edward Neville, 3rd Baron Bergavenny (d. 1476)
    Lady Cecily Neville (1415–1495) ("Proud Cis"), married Richard, 3rd Duke of York, and mothered Kings Edward IV of England and Richard III of England
    George Neville, 1st Baron Latimer (d. 1469)
    Joan Neville, became a nun
    John Neville, died young
    Cuthbert Neville, died young
    Thomas Neville, died young
    Henry Neville, died young

    Birth:
    She was probably born at the Swynford manor of Kettlethorpe in Lincolnshire. Her surname probably reflects her father's lordship of Beaufort in Champagne, France, where she might also have been born.[2] In 1391, at the age of twelve, Joan married Robert Ferrers, 5th Baron Boteler of Wem, at Beaufort-en-Vallâee, Anjou. They had two daughters before he died in about 1395.

    Buried:
    St Paul's Cathedral, London, is an Anglican cathedral, the seat of the Bishop of London and the mother church of the Diocese of London. It sits on Ludgate Hill at the highest point of the City of London. Its dedication to Paul the Apostle dates back to the original church on this site, founded in AD 604.[1] The present church, dating from the late 17th century, was designed in the English Baroque style by Sir Christopher Wren. Its construction, completed in Wren's lifetime, was part of a major rebuilding programme in the City after the Great Fire of London.[2]

    The cathedral is one of the most famous and most recognisable sights of London. Its dome, framed by the spires of Wren's City churches, dominated the skyline for 300 years.[3] At 365 feet (111 m) high, it was the tallest building in London from 1710 to 1962. The dome is among the highest in the world. St Paul's is the second largest church building in area in the United Kingdom after Liverpool Cathedral.

    St Paul's Cathedral occupies a significant place in the national identity.[4] It is the central subject of much promotional material, as well as of images of the dome surrounded by the smoke and fire of the Blitz.[4] Services held at St Paul's have included the funerals of Lord Nelson, the Duke of Wellington and Sir Winston Churchill; Jubilee celebrations for Queen Victoria; peace services marking the end of the First and Second World Wars; the wedding of Charles, Prince of Wales and Lady Diana Spencer, the launch of the Festival of Britain and the thanksgiving services for the Golden Jubilee, the 80th Birthday and the Diamond Jubilee of Elizabeth II.

    St Paul's Cathedral is a working church with hourly prayer and daily services.

    more ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Paul%27s_Cathedral

    Notes:

    Married:
    at Beaufort-en-Vallâee

    Children:
    1. 21. Elizabeth de Ferrers was born 0___ 1393, (Suffolkshire) England; died 1434-1436, (Northumberland) England; was buried Black Friars Church, York, England.
    2. Mary de Ferrers was born 0___ 1394; died 25 Jan 1457.

  11. 44.  Henry FitzHugh, IV, Knight, 3rd Baron FitzHughHenry FitzHugh, IV, Knight, 3rd Baron FitzHugh was born 1359-1363, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England (son of Henry FitzHugh, KG, 2nd Baron FitzHugh of Ravensworth and Joan Scrope); died 14 Jan 1425, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England; was buried Jervaulx Abbey, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Chamberlain of the Household for King Henry VI, 1413-1425
    • Occupation: Diplomat, 1420
    • Occupation: Member of Parliament, 1388
    • Occupation: Treasurer of England, 1416-1421
    • Residence: Vadstena Abbey, Vadstena, Sweden
    • Also Known As: Henry Scrope
    • Military: Battle of Agincourt (October 25, 1415)
    • Military: Battle of Homildon Hill, Wooler, Northumberland, England

    Notes:

    Henry FitzHugh, 3rd Baron FitzHugh KG (c.?1363 - 11 January 1425) was an English administrator and diplomat who served under Henry IV and Henry V.

    Royal service

    Summoned to parliament in 1388, FitzHugh became active in public affairs following Henry IV's succession. He was engaged in Anglo-Scottish diplomacy, taking part in the Battle of Humbleton Hill in 1402 and negotiating the surrender of his uncle, Archbishop of York Richard le Scrope, in 1405. The next year he travelled to Denmark as part of the escort of Philippa, Henry's daughter, for her marriage to Eric of Pomerania, king of Denmark, Norway and Sweden.[1]

    At the coronation of Henry V in 1413, FitzHugh was Constable.[2] During Henry's reign, he served as Chamberlain of the Household (1413–1425, into the reign of Henry VI), and Treasurer of England (1416–1421). He participated in the Battle of Agincourt in 1415 and subsequent diplomacy with the French, which led to the Treaty of Troyes in 1420. He travelled with the king to France, and he escorted the king's remains back to England following his death in 1422. He was an executor of Henry's will and was a feoffee of lands in the will.[1]

    He became a Knight of the Garter about 1409.[3]

    After his death on 11 January 1425, FitzHugh was buried at Jervaulx Abbey in Yorkshire at his request.[1]

    Religion

    During his travels to the Scandinavian Peninsula in 1406, he visited the Bridgettine Vadstena Abbey in Sweden, where he volunteered to help establish a Bridgettine community in England, including the promise of a manor at Cherry Hinton in Cambridgeshire. An English order was established in 1415 at Twickenham with the assistance of Henry V.[1][4] He also attended the Council of Constance in 1415.[1]

    Family

    A descendant of Akarius Fitz Bardolph,[2] FitzHugh was the first son of Hugh FitzHugh, 2nd Baron FitzHugh, and Joan, daughter of Henry Scrope, 1st Baron Scrope of Masham. He married Elizabeth Grey (born c. 1363), daughter of Sir Robert de Grey and his wife, Lora St Quentin. Robert was a son of John de Grey, 1st Baron Grey de Rotherfield and Avice Marmion (a descendant of John, King of England).[5] They had eight sons and six daughters, including:[5]

    William FitzHugh, 4th Baron FitzHugh, married to Margery Willoughby, daughter of William Willoughby, 5th Baron Willoughby de Eresby.[5] They were parents to Henry FitzHugh, 5th Baron FitzHugh who became a brother-in-law to "Warwick, the Kingmaker" by his marriage to Lady Alice Neville; they were great-grandparents to queen consort Catherine Parr.[5]

    Hon. Robert FitzHugh, Bishop of London[5]

    Eleanor FitzHugh, who married firstly to Philip Darcy, 6th Lord Darcy of Knayth; they were parents to Elizabeth Darcy, wife of Sir James Strangeways. Eleanor married secondly to Thomas Tunstall and thirdly to Henry Bromflete, 1st Baron Vesci.[5][6]

    Elizabeth FitzHugh, married firstly on 10 December 1427 to Sir Ralph Gray of Chillingham (d.17 March 1442/3) and secondly, in 1445, Sir Edmund Montfort.[5] Her only issue was by her first husband.[5] Elizabeth was a lady-in-waiting to queen consort Margaret of Anjou.[5]

    Maud FitzHugh, wife of Sir William Eure of Witton.[5]

    References

    ^ Jump up to: a b c d e Reeves, A. C. (January 2008). "Fitzhugh, Henry, third Baron Fitzhugh (1363?–1425)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/50151. Retrieved 5 June 2011. (subscription or UK public library membership required)
    ^ Jump up to: a b Burke, John (1831). A general and heraldic dictionary of the peerages of England, Ireland, and Scotland, extinct, dormant, and in abeyance. London: Henry Colburn and Richard Bentley. p. 202. Retrieved 30 May 2011.
    Jump up ^ "Knights of the Garter". leighrayment.com. 30 April 2011. Retrieved 5 June 2011.
    Jump up ^ "History of the Bridgettine Order in the UK". Bridgettine Order in the UK. Retrieved 5 June 2011.
    ^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h i j editor, Douglas Richardson ; Kimball G. Everingham,. Plantagenet ancestry : a study in colonial and medieval families (2nd ed.). Salt Lake City, UT.: Douglas Richardson. p. 83. ISBN 9781449966348.
    Jump up ^ Richardson, Douglas (2011). Magna Carta ancestry : a study in colonial and medieval families, Vol II (2nd ed.). Salt Lake City, UT.: Douglas Richardson. p. 27. ISBN 9781449966386.

    Occupation:
    The Lord Chamberlain or Lord Chamberlain of the Household is the senior officer of the Royal Household of the United Kingdom, overseeing the departments which support and provide advice to the Sovereign of the United Kingdom.

    The Lord Chamberlain is always sworn of the Privy Council, is usually a peer and before 1782 the post was of Cabinet rank. Until 1924 the position was a political one. The office dates from the Middle Ages, when the King's Chamberlain often acted as the King's spokesman in Council and Parliament.[1]

    Occupation:
    The post of Lord High Treasurer or Lord Treasurer was an English government position and has been a British government position since the Acts of Union of 1707. A holder of the post would be the third highest ranked Great Officer of State, below the Lord High Chancellor and above the Lord President of the Council.

    Occupation:
    led to the Treaty of Troyes in 1420...

    The Treaty of Troyes was an agreement that King Henry V of England and his heirs would inherit the throne of France upon the death of King Charles VI of France. It was signed in the French city of Troyes on 21 May 1420 in the aftermath of Henry's successful military campaign in France. It forms a part of the backdrop of the latter phase of the Hundred Years' War finally won by the French at the Battle of Castillon in 1453, and in which various English kings tried to establish their claims to the French throne.

    Residence:
    The Abbey of Our Lady and of St. Bridget (Latin: Monasterium sanctarum Mariµ Virgáinis et Brigidµ in Vatzstena), more commonly referred to as Vadstena Abbey, situated on Lake Vèattern, in the Diocese of Linkèoping, Sweden, was the motherhouse of the Bridgettine Order. The abbey started on one of the farms donated to it by the king, but the town of Vadstena grew up around it. It was active from 1346 until 1595.

    Military:
    The Battle of Agincourt (Azincourt in French) was a major English victory in the Hundred Years' War.[a] The battle took place on Friday, 25 October 1415 (Saint Crispin's Day), near Azincourt, in northern France.[5][b] Henry V's victory at Agincourt, against a numerically superior French army, crippled France and started a new period in the war during which Henry V married the French king's daughter, and their son, later Henry VI of England and Henry II of France, was made heir to the throne of France as well as of England. English speakers found it easier to pronounce "Agincourt" with a "g" instead of the original "z". For all historians in the non-English speaking world, the battle is referred to with the toponymy of Azincourt, whereas English-only speaking historians kept the modified spelling of Agincourt.

    Henry V led his troops into battle and participated in hand-to-hand fighting. The French king of the time, Charles VI, did not command the French army himself as he suffered from severe psychotic illnesses with moderate mental incapacitation. Instead, the French were commanded by Constable Charles d'Albret and various prominent French noblemen of the Armagnac party.

    This battle is notable for the use of the English longbow in very large numbers, with English and Welsh archers forming most of Henry's army. The battle is the centrepiece of the play Henry V by William Shakespeare.

    more ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Agincourt

    Military:
    The Battle of Homildon Hill was a conflict between English and Scottish armies on 14 September 1402 in Northumberland, England. The battle was recounted in Shakespeare’s Henry IV, part 1. Although Humbleton Hill is the modern name of the site, over the centuries it has been variously named Homildon, Hameldun, Holmedon, and Homilheugh.

    more ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Homildon_Hill

    Henry married Elizabeth Grey ~ 1380, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England. Elizabeth (daughter of Robert de Grey and Lora St. Quintin) was born ~ 1363, Wilcote, Oxfordshire, England; died 12 Dec 1427, (Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England); was buried Jervaulx Abbey, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  12. 45.  Elizabeth Grey was born ~ 1363, Wilcote, Oxfordshire, England (daughter of Robert de Grey and Lora St. Quintin); died 12 Dec 1427, (Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England); was buried Jervaulx Abbey, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Will: 24 Sep 1427
    • Probate: 29 Dec 1427

    Notes:

    Elizabeth Grey1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17
    F, #12937, b. between 1363 and 1366, d. 12 December 1427
    Father Sir Robert de Grey2,3,4,5,6,7,18,9,10,19,12,13,14,15,16,20 d. 19 Aug 1367
    Mother Lora de St. Quentin2,6,18,19,15,20 b. c 1342, d. 1369
    Elizabeth Grey was born between 1363 and 1366 at of Wilcote, Oxfordshire, England; Age 21 or 24 in 1387.2,6,15 She married Sir Henry FitzHugh, 3rd Lord FitzHugh, Lord High Treasurer, Chamberlain to King Henry V, son of Henry FitzHugh, 2nd Lord FitzHugh and Joan le Scrope, before 1391; They had 8 sons (Henry; John; Sir William, 4th Lord FitzHugh; Sir Geoffrey; Robert, Bishop of London; Ralph; Herbert; & Richard) & 6 daughters (Elizabeth; Joan, wife of Sir Robert, 6th Lord Willoughby; Eleanor, wife of Sir Philip, 6th Lord Darcy of Knaith, of Sir Thomas Tunstall, & of Sir Henry Bromflete, Lord Vescy; Maud, wife of Sir William Eure; Elizabeth, wife of Sir Ralph Gray, & of Sir Edmund Montfort; & Lora, wife of Sir Maurice Berkeley).2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17 Elizabeth Grey left a will on 24 September 1427.6,15 She wrote a codicil on 10 December 1427.6,15 She died on 12 December 1427; Buried at Jervaulx Abbey, Yorkshire.2,6,15 Her estate was probated on 29 December 1427.15
    Family
    Sir Henry FitzHugh, 3rd Lord FitzHugh, Lord High Treasurer, Chamberlain to King Henry V b. c 1358, d. 11 Jan 1425

    Children

    Matilda (Maud) FitzHugh+21,22,4,6,13,15 d. 17 Mar 1467
    Henry FitzHugh23
    John FitzHugh23
    Ralph FitzHugh23
    Herbert FitzHugh23
    Richard FitzHugh23
    Joan FitzHugh23
    Lora FitzHugh+23,24,22,5,6,14,15 d. a 12 Mar 1461
    Robert FitzHugh, Bishop of London23 d. 15 Jan 1436
    Eleanor FitzHugh+25,26,22,27,3,6,9,28,10,29,12,15,30 b. c 1391, d. 30 Sep 1457
    Sir William FitzHugh, 4th Lord FitzHugh+6,15 b. c 1399, d. 22 Oct 1452
    Geoffrey FitzHugh+ b. c 1405
    Elizabeth FitzHugh+23,22,31,6,7,15,16 b. c 1410, d. a 1453

    Citations

    [S3657] Unknown author, The Complete Peerage, by Cokayne, Vol. V, p. 422-425; Lineage and Ancestry of HRH Prince Charles by Paget, Vol. II, p. 405.
    [S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 324.
    [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. II, p. 27-28.
    [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. II, p. 126.
    [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. II, p. 172-173.
    [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. II, p. 198-199.
    [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. II, p. 258.
    [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. III, p. 272.
    [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. IV, p. 97-98.
    [S6] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: 2nd Edition, Vol. I, p. 407-408.
    [S6] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: 2nd Edition, Vol. II, p. 83-84.
    [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. II, p. 391.
    [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. II, p. 526.
    [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. II, p. 591.
    [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. II, p. 630-631.
    [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. III, p. 109-110.
    [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. IV, p. 275.
    [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. III, p. 271-272.
    [S6] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: 2nd Edition, Vol. II, p. 83.
    [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. IV, p. 274-275.
    [S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 295-296.
    [S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 325.
    [S11568] The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain, and the United Kingdom, by George Edward Cokayne, Vol. V, p. 434, chart.
    [S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 312.
    [S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 158-159.
    [S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 256.
    [S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 731.
    [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. IV, p. 237.
    [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. I, p. 571-572.
    [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. V, p. 217.
    [S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 354-355.

    Children:
    1. Eleanor Fitzhugh was born ~ 1391; died 30 Sep 1457, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England.
    2. 22. William Fitzhugh, 4th Baron FitzHugh was born ~ 1399, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England; died 22 Oct 1452, (Ravensworth) Yorkshire, England.
    3. Lora Fitzhugh was born ~ 1400, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England.

  13. 46.  William Willoughby, 4th Baron Willoughby de EresbyWilliam Willoughby, 4th Baron Willoughby de Eresby was born 1370-1375, Eresby, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England (son of Robert Willoughby, 4th Baron Willoughby de Eresby and Margery la Zouche, Baroness of Willoughby); died 4 Dec 1409, Edgefield, Linconshire, England; was buried St. James Church, Willoughby Chapel, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Ordained: 0Jan 1400

    Notes:

    William Willoughby, 5th Baron Willoughby de Eresby KG (c.1370 - 4 December 1409) was an English baron.

    Origins

    William Willoughby was the son of Robert Willoughby, 4th Baron Willoughby de Eresby, by his first wife,[1] Margery la Zouche, the daughter of William la Zouche, 2nd Baron Zouche of Harringworth, by Elizabeth de Roos, daughter of William de Roos, 2nd Baron de Roos of Hemsley, and Margery de Badlesmere (130-–1363), eldest sister and co-heir of Giles de Badlesmere, 2nd Baron Badlesmere. He had four brothers: Robert, Sir Thomas (died c. 20 August 1417), John and Brian.[2]

    After the death of Margery la Zouche, his father the 4th Baron married, before 9 October 1381, Elizabeth le Latimer (d. 5 November 1395), suo jure 5th Baroness Latimer, daughter of William Latimer, 4th Baron Latimer, and widow of John Neville, 3rd Baron Neville de Raby, by whom the 4th Baron had a daughter, Margaret Willoughby, who died unmarried. By her first marriage Elizabeth Latimer had a son, John Neville, 6th Baron Latimer (c.1382 – 10 December 1430), and a daughter, Elizabeth Neville, who married her step-brother, Sir Thomas Willoughby (died c. 20 August 1417).[3]

    Career

    The 4th Baron died on 9 August 1396, and Willoughby inherited the title as 5th Baron, and was given seisin of his lands on 27 September.[4]

    Hicks notes that the Willoughby family had a tradition of military service, but that the 5th Baron 'lived during an intermission in foreign war and served principally against the Welsh and northern rebels of Henry IV'.[5] Willoughby joined Bolingbroke, the future King Henry IV, soon after his landing at Ravenspur, was present at the abdication of Richard II in the Tower on 29 September 1399, and was one of the peers who consented to King Richard's imprisonment. In the following year he is said to taken part in Henry IV's expedition to Scotland.[6]

    In 1401 he was admitted to the Order of the Garter, and on 13 October 1402 was among those appointed to negotiate with the Welsh rebel, Owain Glyndwr. When Henry IV's former allies, the Percys, rebelled in 1403, Willoughby remained loyal to the King, and in July of that year was granted lands that had been in the custody of Henry Percy (Hotspur), who was killed at the Battle of Shrewsbury on 21 July 1403. Willoughby was appointed to the King's council in March 1404. On 21 February 1404 he was among the commissioners appointed to expel aliens from England.[7]

    In 1405 Hotspur's father, Henry Percy, 1st Earl of Northumberland, again took up arms against the King, joined by Lord Bardolf, and on 27 May Archbishop Scrope, perhaps in conjunction with Northumberland's rebellion, assembled a force of some 8000 men on Shipton Moor. Scrope was tricked into disbanding his army on 29 May, and he and his allies were arrested. Henry IV denied them trial by their peers, and Willoughby was among the commissioners[8] who sat in judgment on Scrope in his own hall at his manor of Bishopthorpe, some three miles south of York. The Chief Justice, Sir William Gascoigne, refused to participate in such irregular proceedings and to pronounce judgment on a prelate, and it was thus left to the lawyer Sir William Fulthorpe to condemn Scrope to death for treason. Scrope was beheaded under the walls of York before a great crowd on 8 June 1405, 'the first English prelate to suffer judicial execution'.[9] On 12 July 1405 Willoughby was granted lands forfeited by the rebel Earl of Northumberland.[10]

    In 1406 Willoughby was again appointed to the Council. On 7 June and 22 December of that year he was among the lords who sealed the settlement of the crown.[11]

    Marriages and issue

    Willoughby married twice:

    Firstly, soon after 3 January 1383, Lucy le Strange, daughter of Roger le Strange, 5th Baron Strange of Knockin, by Aline, daughter of Edmund FitzAlan, 9th Earl of Arundel, by whom he had two sons and three daughters:[12]

    Robert Willoughby, 6th Baron Willoughby de Eresby, who married firstly, Elizabeth Montagu, and secondly, Maud Stanhope.

    Sir Thomas Willoughby, who married Joan Arundel, daughter and co-heiress of Sir Richard Arundel by his wife, Alice. Their descendants, who include Catherine Willoughby, Duchess of Suffolk, inherited the Barony. Catherine became the 12th Baroness and the title descended through her children by her second husband, Richard Bertie.

    Elizabeth Willoughby, who married Henry Beaumont, 5th Baron Beaumont (d.1413).

    Margery Willoughby, who married William FitzHugh, 4th Baron FitzHugh. Their son, the 5th Baron, would marry Lady Alice Neville, sister of Warwick, the Kingmaker. Alice was a grandniece of Willoughby's second wife, Lady Joan Holland. The 5th Baron and his wife Alice were great-grandparents to queen consort Catherine Parr.

    Margaret Willoughby, who married Sir Thomas Skipwith.

    Secondly to Lady Joan Holland (d. 12 April 1434), widow of Edmund of Langley, 1st Duke of York, and daughter of Thomas Holland, 2nd Earl of Kent, by Lady Alice FitzAlan, daughter of Richard FitzAlan, 10th Earl of Arundel, by whom he had no issue.[13] After Willoughby's death his widow married thirdly Henry Scrope, 3rd Baron Scrope of Masham, who was beheaded on 5 August 1415 after the discovery of the Southampton Plot on the eve of King Henry V's invasion of France. She married fourthly, Henry Bromflete, Lord Vescy (d. 16 January 1469).[14]

    Death & burial

    Church of St. James, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, burial place of William Willoughby, 5th Baron
    Willoughby died at Edgefield, Norfolk on 4 December 1409 and was buried in the Church of St James in Spilsby, Lincolnshire, with his first wife.[15] A chapel in the church at Spilsby still contains the monuments and brasses of several early members of the Willoughby family, including the 5th Baron and his first wife.[16]

    Sources

    Cokayne, George Edward (1936). The Complete Peerage, edited by H.A Doubleday and Lord Howard de Walden IX. London: St. Catherine Press.
    Cokayne, G.E. (1959). The Complete Peerage, edited by Geoffrey H. White. XII (Part II). London: St. Catherine Press.
    Harriss, G.L. (2004). Willoughby, Robert (III), sixth Baron Willoughby (1385–1452). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Retrieved 5 December 2012. (subscription required)
    Hicks, Michael (2004). Willoughby family (per. c.1300–1523). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Retrieved 6 December 2012. (subscription required)
    Holmes, George (2004). Latimer, William, fourth Baron Latimer (1330–1381). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Retrieved 6 December 2012. (subscription required)
    McNiven, Peter (2004). Scrope, Richard (c.1350–1405). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Retrieved 7 December 2012. (subscription required)
    Richardson, Douglas (2011). Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, ed. Kimball G. Everingham I (2nd ed.). Salt Lake City. ISBN 1449966373
    Richardson, Douglas (2011). Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, ed. Kimball G. Everingham III (2nd ed.). Salt Lake City. ISBN 144996639X
    Richardson, Douglas (2011). Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, ed. Kimball G. Everingham IV (2nd ed.). Salt Lake City. ISBN 1460992709

    References

    Jump up ^ Cokayne and Hicks state that Margery was the 4th Baron's second wife; however Richardson states that recent research establishes that Margery was his first wife.
    Jump up ^ Cokayne 1959, pp. 661–2; Richardson III 2011, pp. 450–2; Richardson IV 2011, pp. 332–3, 422–5; Hicks 2004.
    Jump up ^ Cokayne 1936, p. 503; Cokayne 1959, pp. 661–2; Richardson I 2011, p. 333; Richardson III 2011, pp. 242–6; Richardson IV 2011, pp. 332–3; Holmes 2004.

    *

    Biography of Sir William... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Willoughby,_5th_Baron_Willoughby_de_Eresby

    The Most Noble Order of the Garter... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Order_of_the_Garter

    A listing of the "Knights of the Garter"... http://www.tudorplace.com.ar/Documents/Knights%20of%20the%20Garter.htm

    A panorama of St. James Church... http://www.panoramio.com/photo/53324562

    Willoughby Chapel in St. James Church... http://homepage.ntlworld.com/peter.fairweather/docs/spilsby.htm

    19th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Jesse D Hennessee (1880-1952)

    *

    Birth:
    Map & history of Spilsby... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spilsby

    Ordained:
    as a "Knight of the Garter"...

    Buried:
    William the fifth Lord ( Died 1410 ) and his wife are portrayed as 3’ 10" brasses and each has a canopy engraved

    William married Lucy le Strange Aft 3 Jan 1383, Dudley, Worcester, England. Lucy (daughter of Roger le Strange, 5th Baron Strange of Knockin and Aline FitzAlan) was born ~ 1365, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England; died 28 Apr 1398, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England; was buried St. James Church, Willoughby Chapel, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  14. 47.  Lucy le Strange was born ~ 1365, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England (daughter of Roger le Strange, 5th Baron Strange of Knockin and Aline FitzAlan); died 28 Apr 1398, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England; was buried St. James Church, Willoughby Chapel, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alt Birth: Abt 1367, Knockyn, Shropshire, England
    • Alt Death: 28 Apr 1405, Lincolnshire, England

    Notes:

    Baroness Lucy's 5-generation pedigree... http://www.ourfamilyhistories.org/ahnentafel.php?personID=I20302&tree=00&parentset=0&generations=5

    Notes

    Some details of Lucy Strange were provided by Adrian Hill in hisHill-Dickson-Lamotte genealogy.

    Lucy Le Strange
    ?Birth about 1367 - Knockyn, Shropshire, England
    ?Died 28 April 1398 - Eresby, Lincolnshire, England; age at death:possibly 31 years old

    Parents

    ?Roger Strange Jr. ca 1327-1381
    ?Aline FitzAlan ca 1309-1385

    Spouse

    ?Married to William Willoughby ca 1370-1410
    (Parents: Robert Willoughby 1349-1396 & Alice Skipwith ca 1355-ca1412)

    Children

    ?Robert Willoughby 1385-1452
    ?Thomas Willoughby 1387-1432
    ?Elizabeth Willoughby 1388-1428
    ?Margaret Willoughby 1388
    ?Marjory Willoughby 1397-1452
    -- Alan Hill,http://gw0.geneanet.org/index.php3?b=aahill&lang=en;p=lucy;n=le+strange

    Sources

    1. GeneaNet
    Alan Hill,
    2. Angel Streur, GeneaNet genealogy
    http://gw.geneanet.org/index.php3?b=dragonladys&lang=en&n=N&v=Le%20Str
    3. Le Strange Website
    Descent, http://www.ls.u-net.com/le_Strange/Seat-H2.htm

    *

    Birth: 1367
    Shropshire, England
    Death: Apr. 28, 1405
    Lincolnshire, England

    Daughter of Roger Le Strange and Aline (Fitzalan) Le Strange,( the daughter of Edmund Fitzalan (Earl of Arundel). Married Lord William Willoughby Apr. 23, 1383. Mother of Margaret Willoughby (Skipwith).


    Family links:
    Spouse:
    William 5th Lord Willoughby (1370 - 1409)

    Children:
    Margaret Willoughby Oldhall*
    Thomas Willoughby*
    Margaret Willoughby Oldhall (____ - 1455)*
    Robert Willoughby (1385 - 1452)*

    *Calculated relationship

    Burial:
    Saint James Churchyard
    Spilsby
    East Lindsey District
    Lincolnshire, England

    Created by: Kaaren Crail Vining
    Record added: Mar 05, 2010
    Find A Grave Memorial# 49143946

    Birth:
    Map & history of Spilsby... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spilsby

    Children:
    1. 23. Margery Willoughby, Baroness of Ravensworth was born ~ 1398, Willoughby Manor, Eresby, Spilsby, Lincoln, England; died Bef 1453, Yorkshire, England.


Generation: 7

  1. 64.  Gilbert Talbot, 3rd Baron Talbot was born 0___ 1332, Goodrich Castle, Hereford, England; was christened Ecclesfield, West Riding, Yorkshire, England (son of Richard Talbot, 2nd Baron Talbot and Elizabeth Comyn); died 24 Apr 1386, Roales del Pan, Spain.

    Gilbert married Petronella Butler Bef 8 Sep 1352. Petronella (daughter of James Butler, 1st Earl of Ormond and Eleanor de Bohun, Countess of Ormonde) was born 0___ 1332, Ormonde, Kerry, Munster, Ireland; was christened Pollecott, Buckingham, England; died 23 Apr 1368. [Group Sheet]


  2. 65.  Petronella Butler was born 0___ 1332, Ormonde, Kerry, Munster, Ireland; was christened Pollecott, Buckingham, England (daughter of James Butler, 1st Earl of Ormond and Eleanor de Bohun, Countess of Ormonde); died 23 Apr 1368.
    Children:
    1. 32. Richard Talbot, 4th Baron Talbot was born 0___ 1361, Goodrich Castle, Hereford, England; died 7 Sep 1396, London, Middlesex, England.

  3. 66.  John le Strange, 4th Lord Blackmere was born 13 Jan 1331, Whitechurch, Shropshire, England; died 12 May 1361, Blakemere, Hereford, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: 4th Baron Strange of Blackmere

    Notes:

    Biography

    This biography is a rough draft. It was auto-generated by a GEDCOM import and needs to be edited.

    Occupation

    Occupation: 4th Baron Strange of Blackmere
    Name

    Name: John /le STRANGE/ [1][2][3]
    Birth

    Date: ca 1324/32
    Place: Whitechurch,Shropshire
    Date: BET 13 JAN 1331 AND 1332
    Place: Whitechurch, SAL, England[4]
    Marriage

    Date: ABT 1352[5]
    Death

    Date: 12 MAY 1361[6]
    Sources

    ROYAL ANCESTRY by Douglas Richardson Vol. I page 375
    www.geni.com/people/Baron-John-le-Strange/6000000000351064723
    Source: S1952 Title: Type: Ancestral File Number Abbreviation: Type: Ancestral File Number
    Source: S2 Title: Pedigree Resource File CD 49 Abbreviation: Pedigree Resource File CD 49 Publication: (Salt Lake City, UT: Intellectual Reserve, Inc., 2002)
    Source: S3 Title: Ancestral File (TM) Abbreviation: Ancestral File (TM) Author: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day SAINTS Publication: June 1998 (c), data as of 5 JAN 1998 Repository: #R1
    Repository: R1 Name: Unknown
    Source: S4 Title: hofundssonAnces.ged Abbreviation: hofundssonAnces.ged Repository: #R1
    Marlyn Lewis.
    Richardson, Douglas, and Kimball G. Everingham. Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families. (2nd edition, 4 vol.), Volume 1, page 209, BLACKMERE 7.
    Richardson, Douglas: Plantagenet Ancestry, 2nd edn. (2011), 3 vols, Volume 1, page 277, BLACKMERE 9.

    John married Mary de Arundel ~ 1352. Mary (daughter of Edmund FitzAlan, Knight, 9th Earl of Arundel and Alice de Warenne, Countess of Arundel) was born Corfham Castle, Diddlebury, Shropshire, England; died 29 Aug 1396, Corfham, Shropshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 67.  Mary de Arundel was born Corfham Castle, Diddlebury, Shropshire, England (daughter of Edmund FitzAlan, Knight, 9th Earl of Arundel and Alice de Warenne, Countess of Arundel); died 29 Aug 1396, Corfham, Shropshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Mary FitzAlan

    Children:
    1. 33. Ankaret le Strange, Baroness of Furnival was born Abt 1361, Blakemere, Hereford, England; died 1 Jun 1413, (London) England.

  5. 72.  James Butler, 2nd Earl of Ormond was born 4 Oct 1331 (son of James Butler, 1st Earl of Ormond and Eleanor de Bohun, Countess of Ormonde); died 18 Oct 1382, Knocktopher, Ireland; was buried St. Canice's Cathedral, Kilkenny, Ireland.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Lord Justice of Ireland

    Notes:

    James Butler, 2nd Earl of Ormond (4 October 1331 – 18 October 1382) was a noble in the Peerage of Ireland. He was Lord Justice of Ireland in 1359, 1364, and 1376, and a dominant political leader in Ireland in the 1360s and 1370s.

    The son of James Butler, 1st Earl of Ormond and Lady Eleanor de Bohun. James was born at Kilkenny and given in ward, 1 September 1344, to Maurice FitzGerald, 1st Earl of Desmond for the fine of 2306 marks; and afterward to Sir John Darcy who married him to his daughter Elizabeth. He was usually called The Noble Earl, being a great-grandson, through his mother, of King Edward I of England.[1]

    Career

    In 1362, he slew 600 of Mac Murrough's followers at Teigstaffen (County Kilkenny). On 22 April 1364, was appointed Lord Deputy of Ireland to Lionel of Antwerp, Duke of Clarence: Clarence, from his first arrival in Ireland, placed great trust in him, and for a few years it seems that as Deputy he was almost all-powerful. In the 1360s he clashed with Maurice FitzGerald, 4th Earl of Kildare. In 1364 the Irish House of Commons sent a delegation to England, headed by Kildare, to complain of misgovernment, and to ask for the removal of "corrupt" officials, some of whom had links to Ormond. A number of these officials were removed, but Ormomd's position was not seriously threatened.

    He was Lord Justice by 24 July 1376, with a salary of ¹500 a year, in which office he was continued by King Richard II of England. On 2 April 1372, he was made constable of Dublin Castle, with the fee of ¹18 5s. a year.[2] He was summoned to the Parliaments held by Richard II.

    He died 18 October 1382 in his castle of Knocktopher (near which he had, in 1356, founded a Friary for Carmelite friars). He was buried in St. Canice's Cathedral, Kilkenny.

    Marriage and Children

    On 15 May 1346, he married Elizabeth Darcy, daughter of Sir John Darcy, Knight of Knaith (another Lord Justice of Ireland) and Joan de Burgh. They had four children:

    James Butler, 3rd Earl of Ormond (1359–1405).
    Thomas Butler, Justice of Cork
    Eleanor Butler who married Gerald FitzGerald, 3rd Earl of Desmond. She died in 1404.
    Jean Butler who married Teige O'Carroll, Prince of âEile. She died of the plague in 1383.

    *

    Buried:
    Images and history ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Canice%27s_Cathedral

    James married Elizabeth Darcy, Countess of Ormonde 14 May 1346, Ormonde, Ireland. Elizabeth (daughter of John Darcy, 1st Baron Darcy, Knight of Knaith and Joan de Burgh) was born 13 Apr 1332, County Meath, Ireland; died 24 Mar 1389, Kilkenny Castle, Leinster, Kildare, Ireland. [Group Sheet]


  6. 73.  Elizabeth Darcy, Countess of Ormonde was born 13 Apr 1332, County Meath, Ireland (daughter of John Darcy, 1st Baron Darcy, Knight of Knaith and Joan de Burgh); died 24 Mar 1389, Kilkenny Castle, Leinster, Kildare, Ireland.

    Notes:

    Elizabeth DARCY (C. Ormonde)

    Born: ABT 1332, probably Platten Meath, Ireland

    Died: 24 Mar 1389

    Father: John DARCY (1° B. Darcy of Knaith)

    Mother: Joan BURGH (B. Darcy of Knaith)

    Married: James BUTLER (2° E. Ormonde) 14 May 1346, Ormonde, Ireland

    Children:

    1. Ralph BUTLER

    2. Eleanor BUTLER (C. Desmond)

    3. James BUTLER (3° E. Ormonde)

    4. Thomas BUTLER

    5. Catherine BUTLER

    *

    Children:
    1. 36. James Butler, 3rd Earl of Ormond was born ~ 1359, Kilkenny, Ireland; died 7 Sep 1405, Dublin, Ireland; was buried St. Mary's Collegiate Church, Gowran, Ireland.

  7. 74.  John Welles, Knight, 4th Lord Welles was born 23 Aug 1334, Bonthorpe, Lincolnshire, England; died 11 Oct 1361, Welles, Lincolnshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: 4th Baron Welles
    • Also Known As: John de Welles

    Notes:

    John de Welles, 4th Lord Welles1

    M, #189143, b. 23 August 1334, d. 11 October 1361
    Last Edited=16 Sep 2014
    John de Welles, 4th Lord Welles was born on 23 August 1334 at Bonthorpe, Lincolnshire, England.2 He was the son of Adam de Welle, 3rd Lord Welles and Margaret (?).2 He married Maud de Ros, daughter of William de Ros, 2nd Lord de Ros of Helmsley and Margery de Badlesmere, circa 1344/45. He died on 11 October 1361 at age 27.2
    He gained the title of 4th Lord Welles.
    Children of John de Welles, 4th Lord Welles and Maud de Ros

    Anne de Welles+1 d. a 1396
    Margery de Welles+3 d. 29 May 1422
    John de Welles, 5th Baron Welles+4 b. 20 Apr 1352, d. 26 Aug 1421
    Citations

    [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume X, page 122. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
    [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume XII/2, page 441.
    [S474] FamilySearch, online http://www.familysearch.com. Hereinafter cited as FamilySearch.
    [S22] Sir Bernard Burke, C.B. LL.D., A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire, new edition (1883; reprint, Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1978), page 572. Hereinafter cited as Burkes Extinct Peerage.

    John married Maud de Ros, Lady Welles 1344-1345. Maud (daughter of William de Ros, Knight, 2nd Baron de Ros and Margery de Badlesmere) was born (Helmsley, Yorkshire, England); died 9 Dec 1388. [Group Sheet]


  8. 75.  Maud de Ros, Lady Welles was born (Helmsley, Yorkshire, England) (daughter of William de Ros, Knight, 2nd Baron de Ros and Margery de Badlesmere); died 9 Dec 1388.
    Children:
    1. Margery Welles, Baroness of Masham died 29 May 1422.
    2. 37. Anne Welles died 13 Nov 1397.
    3. John de Welles died 8 Apr 1426.

  9. 76.  Thomas de Beauchamp, Knight, 11th Earl of WarwickThomas de Beauchamp, Knight, 11th Earl of Warwick was born 14 Feb 1313, Warwick Castle, Warwick, Warwickshire, England (son of Guy de Beauchamp, Knight, 10th Earl of Warwick and Alice de Toeni, Countess of Warwick); died 13 Nov 1369, (Warwickshire) England; was buried St. Mary's Church, Warwick, Warwickshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Thomas de Beauchamp

    Notes:

    Thomas de Beauchamp, 11th Earl of Warwick, KG (c. 14 February 1313 – 13 November 1369) was an English nobleman and military commander during the Hundred Years' War. In 1348 he became one of the founders and the third Knight of the Order of the Garter.

    Early life

    Thomas de Beauchamp, 11th Earl of Warwick depicted in 1347 as one of the 8 mourners attached to the monumental brass of Sir Hugh Hastings (d. 1347) at St Mary's Church, Elsing, Norfolk. He displays the arms of Beauchamp on his tunic
    Thomas de Beauchamp was born at Warwick Castle, Warwickshire, England to Guy de Beauchamp, 10th Earl of Warwick and Alice de Toeni. He served in Scotland frequently during the 1330s, being captain of the army against the Scots in 1337. He was hereditary High Sheriff of Worcestershire from 1333 until his death (in 1369). In 1344 he was also made High Sheriff of Warwickshire and Leicestershire for life.[citation needed]

    Victor at Crâecy and Poitiers


    Left:Seal (obverse) of Thomas de Beauchamp, 11th Earl of Warwick, dated 1344: S(IGILLUM) THO(M)E COMITIS WARRWYCHIE ANNO REGNI REGIS E(DWARDII) TE(RT)II...(continued on counter-seal) ("Seal of Thomas, Count (Earl) of Warwick in the year of the reign of King Edward the Third..."). He displays on his surcoat, shield and horse's caparison the arms of Beauchamp, and carries on his helm as crest a swan's head and neck; right: Counter-seal/reverse: (legend continued from face of seal) ...POST CO(N)QUESTU(M) ANGLIE SEPTI(M)O DECIM(0) ET REGNI SUI FRANCIE QUARTO ("...after the Conquest of England the seventeenth and of his reign of the Kingdom of France the fourth"). This dates the seal to 1344. The arms are those of de Newburgh, the family of the Beaumont Earls of Warwick: Checky azure and or, a chevron ermine. This same display of double arms was used on the seal of his father Guy de Beauchamp, 10th Earl of Warwick on his seal affixed to the Barons' Letter, 1301
    Warwick was Marshall of England from 1343/4 until 1369, and was one of the commanders at the great English victories at Crâecy and Poitiers.

    Thomas de Beauchamp fought in all the French wars of King Edward III; he commanded the center at the Battle of Crecy (where many of his relatives were killed including his younger half-brother Alan la Zouche de Mortimer). He was trusted to be guardian of the sixteen-year-old Black Prince. Beauchamp fought at Poitiers in 1356 and at the Siege of Calais (1346).

    He began the rebuilding of the Collegiate Church of Saint Mary in Warwick using money received from the ransom of a French Archbishop. He died of plague in Calais on 13 November 1369 and was entombed in the Beauchamp Chapel. The chapel contains the finest example of the use of brisures for cadency in medieval heraldry -- seven different Beauchamp coats of arms.

    Marriage and children

    He married Katherine Mortimer, daughter of Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March. They had five sons and ten daughters:[1]

    Thomas b. 16 Mar 1338 d. 8 Aug 1401, who married Margaret Ferrers and had descendants. His son Richard succeeded him as Earl and inherited most of his property.
    Guy (d. 28 April 1360). He had two daughters who by entail were excluded from their grandfather's inheritance: Elizabeth (d. c.1369), and Katherine, who became a nun.
    Reinbrun, (d. 1361); he was named for a character in Guy of Warwick.
    William (c. 1343–1411), who inherited the honour of Abergavenny. Married Joan FitzAlan.
    Roger (d. 1361)
    Maud (d. 1403), who married Roger de Clifford, 5th Baron de Clifford.
    Philippa de Beauchamp who married Hugh de Stafford, 2nd Earl of Stafford.
    Alice (d. 1383), who married first John Beauchamp, 3rd Baron Beauchamp and then Sir Matthew Gournay.
    Joan, who married Ralph Basset, 4th Baron Basset de Drayton.
    Isabell (d. 1416) who married first John le Strange, 5th Baron Strange, and then to William de Ufford, 2nd Earl of Suffolk. After the latter's death she became a nun.
    Margaret, who married Guy de Montfort and after his death became a nun.
    Elizabeth, married Thomas de Ufford, KG
    Anne, married Walter de Cokesey
    Juliana
    Katherine, became a nun at Shouldham

    Catherine Montacute, Countess of Salisbury was not his daughter, although she is presented as such in William Painter's Palace of Pleasure and in the Elizabethan play, Edward III that may be by William Shakespeare.

    Thomas married Katherine de Mortimer, Countess of Warwick 19 Apr 1319, (Warwickshire) England. Katherine (daughter of Roger de Mortimer, 1st Earl of March and Joan de Geneville, 2nd Baroness Geneville) was born 0___ 1314, Wigmore Castle, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England; died 4 Aug 1369, (Warwickshire) England; was buried St. Mary's Church, Warwick, Warwickshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  10. 77.  Katherine de Mortimer, Countess of Warwick was born 0___ 1314, Wigmore Castle, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England (daughter of Roger de Mortimer, 1st Earl of March and Joan de Geneville, 2nd Baroness Geneville); died 4 Aug 1369, (Warwickshire) England; was buried St. Mary's Church, Warwick, Warwickshire, England.

    Notes:

    Katherine Mortimer, Countess of Warwick (1314 - 4 August 1369) was the wife of Thomas de Beauchamp, 11th Earl of Warwick KG, an English peer, and military commander during the Hundred Years War. She was a daughter and co-heiress of Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March and Joan de Geneville, Baroness Geneville.

    Sometime before 1355, she became an important figure at the royal court of King Edward III.

    Family and lineage

    Katherine Mortimer was born at Ludlow Castle, Shropshire, England, in 1314, one of the twelve children and a co-heiress of Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March and Joan de Geneville, Baroness Geneville. Her paternal grandparents were Edmund Mortimer, 2nd Baron Mortimer and Margaret de Fiennes, and her maternal grandparents were Sir Piers de Geneville, of Trim Castle and Ludlow, and Jeanne of Lusignan.

    Her father was de facto ruler of England together with his mistress Isabella of France, Queen consort of King Edward II, until his eventual capture and execution by the orders of King Edward III, eldest son of Isabella and King Edward II. The latter had been deposed in November 1326, and afterwards cruelly murdered by assassins acting under the orders of Mortimer and Queen Isabella. Katherine was sixteen years old when her father was hanged, Tyburn, London on 29 November 1330. Roger Mortimer was NOT Hanged drawn and quartered as stated but only hanged and his body was left until monks from Greyfriars in London took it down.

    Marriage

    On 19 April 1319, when she was about five years old, Katherine married Thomas de Beauchamp, 11th Earl of Warwick, eldest son of Guy de Beauchamp, 10th Earl of Warwick and Alice de Toeni.[1] Their marriage required a Papal dispensation as they were related within the prohibited third and fourth degrees. Beauchamp had succeeded to the earldom at the age of two, therefore Katherine was styled Countess of Warwick from the time of her marriage until her death. The marriage had been arranged in July 1318 in order to settle a quarrel between the two families over the lordship of Elfael, which was thus given to Katherine as her marriage portion.[2] For the term of his minority, Beauchamp's custody had been granted to Katherine's father, Roger Mortimer.[3]

    Katherine later became an important personage at the court of King Edward III. As a sign of royal favour she was chosen to stand as one of the godmothers, along with Queen Philippa of Hainault, to the latter's granddaughter, Philippa, Countess of Ulster in 1355. This honour bestowed on Katherine is described by 19th century author Agnes Strickland according to the Friar's Genealogy: "Her [Philippa, Countess of Ulster] godmother also was of Warwick Countess, a lady likewise of great worthiness".[4]

    Issue

    Katherine and Beauchamp together had fifteen children:[5]

    Guy de Beauchamp (died 28 April 1360), married Philippa de Ferrers, daughter of Henry de Ferrers, 2nd Lord Ferrers of Groby and Isabel de Verdun, by whom he had two daughters.[6]
    Thomas de Beauchamp, 12th Earl of Warwick (16 March 1339- 1401), married Margaret Ferrers, daughter of William Ferrers, 3rd Lord of Groby and Margaret de Ufford, by whom he had issue, including Richard de Beauchamp, 13th Earl of Warwick.
    Reinbrun de Beauchamp
    William de Beauchamp, 1st Baron Bergavenny (c. 1343- 8 May 1411), on 23 July 1392, married Lady Joan FitzAlan, daughter of Richard Fitzalan, 11th Earl of Arundel and Elizabeth de Bohun, by whom he had a son Richard de Beauchamp, 1st Earl of Worcester, and a daughter, Joan de Beauchamp, 4th Countess of Ormond. Queen consort Anne Boleyn was a notable descendant of the latter.
    Roger de Beauchamp (died 1361)
    Maud de Beauchamp (died 1403), married Roger de Clifford, 5th Baron Clifford, by whom she had issue, including Thomas de Clifford, 6th Baron Clifford.
    Philippa de Beauchamp, married Hugh de Stafford, 2nd Earl of Stafford, by whom she had nine children.
    Alice Beauchamp (died 1383), married firstly John Beauchamp, 3rd Baron Beauchamp of Somerset, and secondly Sir William Gournay.[7] She died childless.
    Joan de Beauchamp, married Ralph Basset, 3rd Baron Basset of Drayton. She died childless.
    Isabella de Beauchamp (died 29 September 1416), married firstly John le Strange, 5th Baron Strange, and secondly, William de Ufford, 2nd Earl of Suffolk. Upon the latter's death, she became a nun. She died childless.
    Margaret de Beauchamp, married Guy de Montfort, and after his death, she became a nun. She died childless.
    Elizabeth de Beauchamp, married Thomas de Ufford KG,
    Anne de Beauchamp, married Walter de Cokesey.
    Juliana de Beauchamp
    Katherine de Beauchamp, became a nun at Shouldham Priory.

    Death and effigy

    Katherine Mortimer died on 4 August 1369 at the age of about fifty-five. Two years before her death, in 1367, Katherine was a legatee in the will of her sister Agnes de Hastings, Countess of Pembroke.[8] Katherine was buried in St. Mary's Church, Warwick, Warwickshire. She lies alongside her husband, who died three months after her of the Black Death. Their tomb with well-preserved, alabaster effigies can be seen in the centre of the quire. Katherine is depicted wearing a frilled veil with a honeycomb pattern and she is holding hands with Beauchamp. The sides of the tomb chest are decorated with figures of mourners, both male and female.

    Children:
    1. Maud Beauchamp was born 0___ 1335, Warwickshire, England; died 0Feb 1403, Brougham Castle, Westmorland, England.
    2. Thomas de Beauchamp, Knight, 12th Earl of Warwick was born 16 Mar 1338, Warwick Castle, Warwick, Warwickshire, England; died 10 Apr 1401, (Warwickshire) England.
    3. Philippa Beauchamp was born 1334-1344, Elmley, Gloucestershire, England; died 6 Apr 1386.
    4. 38. William de Beauchamp, 1st Baron Bergavenny was born 1343-1345, Warwick, Warwickshire, England; died 8 May 1411, Warwick, Warwickshire, England; was buried Black Friars Churchyard, Hereford, Herefordshire, England.
    5. Guy de Beauchamp

  11. 78.  Richard FitzAlan, Knight, 11th Earl of ArundelRichard FitzAlan, Knight, 11th Earl of Arundel was born 25 Mar 1346, Arundel, Sussex, England (son of Richard FitzAlan, Knight, 10th Earl of Arundel and Eleanor Plantagenet, Countess of Arundel); died 21 Sep 1397, London, Middlesex, England; was buried Augustin Friars, Bread Street, London, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Governor of Brest
    • Also Known As: Arundel
    • Also Known As: Earl of Surrey
    • Military: Admiral of the West and South
    • Military: Knight of the Garter

    Notes:

    Lineage

    Born in 1346, he was the son of Richard FitzAlan, 10th Earl of Arundel and Eleanor of Lancaster.[2] He succeeded his father to the title of Earl of Arundel on 24 January 1376.

    His brother was Thomas Arundel, the Bishop of Ely from 1374 to 1388, Archbishop of York from 1388 to 1397, and Archbishop of Canterbury in 1397 and from 1399 until his death in 1414.[3]

    At the coronation of Richard II, Richard FitzAlan carried the crown.[2]

    Admiral

    Richard FitzAlan, 11th Earl of Arundel; Thomas of Woodstock, 1st Duke of Gloucester; Thomas de Mowbray, Earl of Nottingham; Henry, Earl of Derby (later Henry IV); and Thomas de Beauchamp, 12th Earl of Warwick, demand Richard II to let them prove by arms the justice for their rebellion
    In 1377, Richard FitzAlan held the title of Admiral of the West and South.[2] In this capacity, he attacked Harfleur at Whitsun 1378, but was forced to return to his ships by the defenders. Later, he and John of Gaunt attempted to seize Saint-Malo but were unsuccessful.[4]

    Power Struggle

    FitzAlan was closely aligned with Thomas, Duke of Gloucester, who was uncle of King Richard II. Thomas was opposed to Richard II's desire for peace with France in the Hundred Years War and a power struggle ensued between him and Gloucester. In late 1386, Gloucester forced King Richard II to name himself and Richard FitzAlan to the King's Council.[5] This Council was to all intents and purposes a Regency Council for Richard II. However, Richard limited the duration of the Council's powers to one year.[6]

    Knight of the Garter

    In 1386, Richard II named Richard FitzAlan Admiral of England, as well as being made a Knight of the Garter.[2] As Admiral of England, he defeated a Franco-Spanish-Flemish fleet off Margate in March 1387, along with Thomas de Mowbray, Earl of Nottingham.[6]

    New favourites

    In August of 1387, the King dismissed Gloucester and FitzAlan from the Council and replaced them with his favourites - including the Archbishop of York, Alexander Neville; the Duke of Ireland, Robert de Vere; Michael de la Pole; the Earl of Suffolk, Sir Robert Tresilian, who was the Chief Justice; and the former Mayor of London Nicholas Brembre.[7]

    Radcot Bridge

    The King summoned Gloucester and FitzAlan to a meeting. However, instead of coming, they raised troops and defeated the new Council at Radcot Bridge on 22 December 1387. During that battle, they took the favourites prisoner. The next year, the Merciless Parliament condemned the favourites.

    FitzAlan was one of the Lords Appellant who accused and condemned Richard II's favorites.[5] He made himself particularly odious to the King by refusing, along with Gloucester, to spare the life of Sir Simon Burley who had been condemned by the Merciless Parliament. This was even after the queen, Anne of Bohemia, went down on her knees before them to beg for mercy. King Richard never forgave this humiliation and planned and waited for his moment of revenge.

    In 1394, FitzAlan further antagonized the King by arriving late for the queen's funeral. Richard II, in a rage, snatched a wand and struck FitzAlan in the face and drew blood. Shortly after that, the King feigned a reconciliation but he was only biding his time for the right moment to strike. Arundel was named Governor of Brest in 1388.[2]

    Opposed to peace

    Peace was concluded with France in 1389. However, Richard FitzAlan followed Gloucester's lead and stated that he would never agree with the peace that had been concluded.[5]

    Marriage and children

    Arundel married twice.

    His first wife was Elizabeth de Bohun, daughter of William de Bohun, Lord High Constable of England, 8th Earl of Hereford, 6th Earl of Essex, 1st Earl of Northampton and Elizabeth de Badlesmere. They married around 28 September 1359 and had seven children:[2][8]

    Thomas FitzAlan, 12th Earl of Arundel[2]
    Lady Eleanor FitzAlan (c.1365 – 1375), on 28 October 1371, at the age of about six, married Robert de Ufford. Died childless.
    Elizabeth FitzAlan (c.1366 – 8 July 1425), married first William Montacute (before December 1378); no issue. Married second, in 1384, Thomas Mowbray, 1st Duke of Norfolk; had issue. Married third, before August 1401, Sir Robert Goushill of Hoveringham; had issue. Married fourth, before 1411, Sir Gerard Afflete; no issue.[2][9]
    Joan FitzAlan (1375 – 14 November 1435), who married William Beauchamp, 1st Baron Bergavenny;[2]
    Alice FitzAlan (1378 – before October 1415), married before March 1392, John Charleton, 4th Baron Cherleton. (not mentioned as an heir of Thomas in the Complete Peerage). Had an affair with Cardinal Henry Beaufort, by whom she had an illegitimate daughter, Jane Beaufort.[4]
    Margaret FitzAlan, who married Sir Rowland Lenthall;[2] by whom she had two sons.
    William (or Richard) FitzAlan

    After the death of his first wife in 1385, Arundel married Philippa Mortimer, daughter of Edmund Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March. Her mother was Philippa Plantagenet, the only daughter of Lionel of Antwerp and thus a granddaughter of Edward III. They had no children.[2]

    Death and succession

    On 12 July 1397, Richard FitzAlan was arrested for his opposition to Richard II,[2] as well as plotting with Gloucester to imprison the king.[10] He stood trial at Westminster and was attainted.[11] He was beheaded on 21 September 1397 and was buried in the church of the Augustin Friars, Bread Street, London.[2] Tradition holds that his final words were said to the executioner, "Torment me not long, strike off my head in one blow".[12]

    In October 1400, the attainder was reversed, and Richard's son Thomas succeeded to his father's estates and honors.[2]

    Military:
    In 1377, Richard FitzAlan held the title of Admiral of the West and South.[2] In this capacity, he attacked Harfleur at Whitsun 1378, but was forced to return to his ships by the defenders. Later, he and John of Gaunt attempted to seize Saint-Malo but were unsuccessful.

    Died:
    He was beheaded on 21 September 1397...

    Richard married Elizabeth de Bohun, Countess of Arundel, Countess of Surrey 28 Sep 1365, (Derbyshire) England. Elizabeth (daughter of William de Bohun, Knight, 1st Earl of Northampton and Elizabeth Badlesmere, Countess of Northampton) was born ~ 1350, Derbyshire, England; died 3 Apr 1385, Arundel, West Sussex, England. [Group Sheet]


  12. 79.  Elizabeth de Bohun, Countess of Arundel, Countess of Surrey was born ~ 1350, Derbyshire, England (daughter of William de Bohun, Knight, 1st Earl of Northampton and Elizabeth Badlesmere, Countess of Northampton); died 3 Apr 1385, Arundel, West Sussex, England.

    Other Events:

    • Baptism: Lewes Priory, Sussex, England

    Notes:

    Lady Elizabeth de Bohun, Countess of Arundel, Countess of Surrey (c. 1350 – 3 April 1385) was a member of the Anglo-Norman Bohun family, which wielded much power in the Welsh Marches and the English government. She was the first wife of Richard FitzAlan, a powerful English nobleman and military commander in the reigns of Edward III and Richard II. She was the mother of seven of his children, and as the wife of one of the most powerful nobles in the realm, enjoyed much prestige and took precedence over most of the other peers' wives.

    Family and lineage

    Lady Elizabeth de Bohun was born around 1350, the daughter of William de Bohun, 1st Earl of Northampton and Elizabeth de Badlesmere. Her older brother Humphrey de Bohun, 7th Earl of Hereford married Joan FitzAlan, a sister of the 11th Earl of Arundel, by whom he had two daughters. Elizabeth had a half-brother, Roger Mortimer, 2nd Earl of March, by her mother's first marriage to Sir Edmund Mortimer.

    Her paternal grandparents were Humphrey de Bohun, 4th Earl of Hereford and Elizabeth of Rhuddlan, daughter of King Edward I of England and Eleanor of Castile. Her maternal grandparents were Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 1st Baron Badlesmere and Margaret de Clare.

    Lady Elizabeth's parents both died when she was young, her mother having died in 1356, and her father in 1360.


    Arundel Castle, principal residence of Richard Fitzalan and Elizabeth de Bohun

    Marriage and issue

    On 28 September 1359, by Papal dispensation,[1] Elizabeth married Richard FitzAlan, who succeeded to the earldoms of Arundel and Surrey upon the death of his father, Richard FitzAlan, 3rd Earl of Arundel in 1376. Their marriage was especially advantageous as it united two of the most powerful families in England. The alliance was further strengthened by the marriage of Elizabeth's brother, Humphrey to FitzAlan's sister Joan.

    As the Countess of Arundel, Elizabeth was one of the most important women in England, who enjoyed much prestige, and after the Queen, the Duchesses of Lancaster and York, and the Countess of Buckingham, took precedence over the other noble ladies in the realm.

    At the coronation of King Richard II, FitzAlan carried the crown. In the same year, 1377, he was made Admiral of the South and West. The following year, 1378, he attacked Harfleur, but was repelled by the French.

    FitzAlan allied himself with the King's uncle Thomas of Woodstock, Duke of Gloucester, who was married to FitzAlan's niece Eleanor de Bohun, who was also Elizabeth's niece. The two men eventually became members of the Council of Regency, and formed a strong and virulent opposition to the King. This would later prove fatal to both men.

    Richard and Elizabeth had seven children:[1]

    Thomas FitzAlan, 5th Earl of Arundel, Earl of Surrey KG (13 October 1381- 13 October 1415), married 26 November 1405, Beatrice, illegitimate daughter of King John I of Portugal and Inez Perez Esteves.[2] The marriage was childless.
    Lady Eleanor FitzAlan (c.1365- 1375), on 28 October 1371, at the age of about six, married Robert de Ufford. Died childless.
    Lady Elizabeth FitzAlan (1366- 8 July 1425), married firstly before 1378, Sir William de Montagu, secondly in 1384, Thomas Mowbray, 1st Duke of Norfolk, by whom she had four children, thirdly before 19 August 1401, Sir Robert Goushill, by whom she had two daughters, and fourthly before 1411, Sir Gerard Afflete. The Howard Dukes of Norfolk descend from her daughter Margaret Mowbray who married Sir Robert Howard. Joan Goushill, daughter from the 3rd marriage, was ancestress of James Madison,[3] 4th President of the U.S.A.
    Lady Joan FitzAlan (1375- 14 November 1435), married William de Beauchamp, 1st Baron Bergavenny, by whom she had a son, Richard de Beauchamp, 1st Earl of Worcester and a daughter Joan de Beauchamp, wife of James Butler, 4th Earl of Ormonde.
    Lady Alice Fitzalan (1378- before October 1415), married before March 1392, John Cherlton, Lord Cherlton. Had an affair with Cardinal Henry Beaufort, by whom she had an illegitimate daughter, Jane Beaufort.[4]
    Lady Margaret FitzAlan (1382- after 1423), married Sir Rowland Lenthall, of Hampton Court, Herefordshire, by whom she had two sons.
    Son FitzAlan (his name is given as either Richard or William).

    Death

    Elizabeth de Bohun died on 3 April 1385 at the age of about thirty-five. She was buried at Lewes in Sussex. Her husband married secondly Philippa Mortimer on 15 August 1390, by whom he had a son: John FitzAlan (1394- after 1397).

    Richard FitzAlan was executed by decapitation on 21 September 1397 at Tower Hill Cheapside, London for having committed high treason against King Richard.[5] His titles and estates were attainted until October 1400, when they were restored to his son and heir, Thomas FitzAlan, 5th Earl of Arundel, by the new king, Henry IV, who had ascended to the English throne upon the deposition of King Richard in 1399.

    Notes:

    Residence (Family):
    Click here to view many images of Arundel Castle ... http://bit.ly/1J6YiEy

    Children:
    1. Elizabeth FitzAlan, Duchess of Norfolk was born 0___ 1366, Derbyshire, England; died 8 Jul 1425, Hoveringham, Nottinghamshire, England; was buried (St Michael's Church) Hoveringham, Nottinghamshire, England.
    2. 39. Joan FitzAlan, Baroness Bergavenny was born 0___ 1375, Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England; died 14 Nov 1435, Herefordshire, England; was buried Black Friars Churchyard, Hereford, Herefordshire, England.

  13. 80.  William de Greystoke, 2nd Baron Greystoke was born 6 Jan 1321, Grimthorpe, Cumbria, England (son of Ralph de Greystoke, 1st Baron Audley and Alice de Audley); died 10 Jul 1359, Brancepeth Castle, Durham, England; was buried St. Andrews Church, Greystoke, Cumbria, England.

    Notes:

    William de Greystoke, 2nd Baron Greystoke, (6 January 1321 – 10 July 1359) of Greystoke in Cumbria, was an English peer and landowner.

    Origins

    Greystoke was the son of Ralph de Greystoke, 1st Baron Greystoke, and his wife Alice, daughter of Hugh, Lord Audley.[1]

    Career

    He was born at the family home in Grimthorpe, on 6 January 1321.[1] Greystoke's father died while he was still a child and he became a ward of his mother's second husband, Ralph Neville, 2nd Baron Neville de Raby,[2] until he reached his majority in 1342.[1] During the next ten years he was involved, on the English side, in the Hundred Years' War between the Kingdom of England and the Kingdom of France and was present at the Siege of Calais in 1346.[1] He served under Edward, the Black Prince, in France.[3] He participated in the Northern Crusades of Henry of Grosmont, 1st Duke of Lancaster to Prussia in 1351–2.[1] In the early 1350s he was involved in the negotiations to secure the release of King David II of Scotland, who had been taken prisoner at the Battle of Neville's Cross on 17 October 1346.[1] Greystoke was made a captain of Berwick-upon-Tweed, but due to his service in France, he was not present when the town fell to the Scots in August 1355.[1] In October 1353 Greystoke received a royal licence to crenellate "his dwelling place", later known as Greystoke Castle.[4] He was also responsible for renovations on Morpeth Castle which he also owned.[4]

    Marriages and children

    He married twice and had children by his second wife only:

    Firstly to Lucy de Lucie,[3] daughter of Thomas de Lucy, 2nd Baron Lucy (died 1365),[5] but the marriage was childless,[2] and they divorced.[3] During this time, his stepfather, Ralph Neville, unsuccessfully proposed that Greystoke should name his half-brothers, Ralph, Robert, and William Neville, as his heirs.[2]
    Secondly he married Joane FitzHugh, daughter of Baron Fitzhugh, by whom he had four children:
    Ralph de Greystoke, 3rd Baron Greystoke, eldest son and heir.
    Robert de Greystoke;
    William de Greystoke;
    Alice de Greystoke,[3] the first wife of Robert Harington, 3rd Baron Harington (1356–1406)[6] of Gleaston Castle in the manor of Aldingham in Furness, Lancashire.
    Death and burial[edit]
    Greystoke died on 10 July 1359, at Brancepeth Castle, the seat of his step-father Ralph Neville, 2nd Baron Neville de Raby,[5] and was buried in the parish church of St. Andrew's in Greystoke, Cumbria,[1] with a mass conducted by Gilbert de Welton, Bishop of Carlisle.[5] His funeral took place with "great pomp and solemnity", and was attended by great personages including: Roger de Clifford, 5th Baron de Clifford,[7] Henry Scrope, 1st Baron Scrope of Masham, Thomas, Baron Musgrave, the Abbot of Holmcultram Abbey and the Abbot of Shap Abbey.[5]

    end of biography

    William — Joane FitzHugh. [Group Sheet]


  14. 81.  Joane FitzHugh
    Children:
    1. 40. Ralph de Greystoke, 3rd Baron Greystoke was born 18 Oct 1353, Ravensworth Castle, Yorkshire, England; was christened 18 Oct 1353, Kirkby Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England; died 6 Apr 1418, Kirkby Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England.

  15. 82.  Roger de Clifford, Knight, 5th Baron de Clifford was born 10 Jul 1333, Brougham Castle, Westmorland, England (son of Robert de Clifford, Knight, 3rd Baron de Clifford and Isabel de Berkeley); died 13 Jul 1389, Brougham Castle, Westmorland, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: 5th Baron of Westmorland

    Notes:

    Roger de Clifford, 5th Baron de Clifford, ninth Lord Clifford, fifth Baron of Westmoreland (10 July 1333[1] - 13 July 1389), was the son of Robert de Clifford, 3rd Baron de Clifford (d. 20 May 1344), second son of Robert de Clifford, 1st Baron de Clifford (1273–1314), the founder of the northern branch of the family. His mother was Isabella (d. 25 July 1362), daughter of Maurice, 2nd Lord Berkeley. He succeeded his elder brother, Robert de Clifford, 4th Baron de Clifford in 1350, on which day he made proof of his age.[2]

    Military career

    Clifford entered on his military career when hardly more than twelve, being armed at the time of Jacob van Artevelde's death on 17 July 1345.[3]

    In August 1350 he was engaged in the seafight with the Spaniards near Winchelsea; and in 1355 he accompanied his father-in-law, Thomas de Beauchamp, 11th Earl of Warwick, on the expedition to Gascony.[4] He again served in Gascony in 1359, 1360, and in the French expedition of the Duke of Lancaster in 1373.

    A document dated at Brougham 10 July 1369 shows him engaging the services of Richard le Fleming and his company for a year. In the same way he retained Sir Roger de Mowbray; and was himself retained, with his company of nearly eighty men, by Edmund Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March, on 25 September 1379.[5]

    On 15 March 1361 he was called upon to assist Lionel, duke of Clarence, in his great Irish expedition on pain of forfeiting his Irish estates. A similar summons to defend his lands in Ireland was issued on 28 July 1368.[6]

    His chief services, however, were rendered on the Scotch borders. In July 1370 he was appointed one of the wardens of the west marches; but according to Sir H. Nicolas he is found defending the northern borders fourteen years earlier.[7] Resigned the truce with Scotland on 24 August 1369, and was warden of both east and west marches on five occasions between 1380 and 1385.

    In August 1385 he accompanied Richard II's expedition against Scotland with sixty men-at-arms and forty archers. His last border sendee seems to have been in October 1388, when he was ordered to adopt measures of defence for the Scotch Marches.[8] In May 1388 he accompanied Richard FitzAlan, 11th Earl of Arundel, in his naval expedition to Brittany.[9]

    Political Offices

    He was hereditary High Sheriff of Westmorland from 1350? until his death in 1389. In 1377 he was made High Sheriff of Cumberland and governor of Carlisle, a city whose walls he appears to have inspected and found weak in the preceding year. To the last two offices he was reappointed on Richard II's accession.

    He was made a commissioner of array against the Scots (26 February 1372), and one of a body of commissioners to correct truce-breakers and decide border disputes 26 May 1373, having sat on a similar commission in September 1367.

    Parliament

    Clifford was summoned to all parliaments from 15 December 1356 to 28 July 1388.[10] He was trier of petitions in many parliaments from November 1373 to September 1377. In August 1374 he was appointed one of the commissioners to settle the dispute between Henry de Percy and William, Earl of Douglas, relative to the possession of Jedworth Forest. In the parliament of November 1381 he was member of a committee to confer with the House of Commons. On 12 October 1386 he gave evidence in the great Scrope and Grosvenor case at St. Margaret's Church, Westminster.

    Death and Succession

    Roger de Clifford died 13 July 1389, being then possessed of enormous estates, chiefly situated in Yorkshire, Northumberland, Cumberland, and Westmoreland, but spread over several other counties.[11] He was succeeded by his son Thomas de Clifford, 6th Baron de Clifford.

    Marriage and Issue

    He married Maud (d. 1403), daughter of Thomas de Beauchamp, 11th Earl of Warwick.[12]

    Thomas de Clifford, 6th Baron de Clifford (d. 1391 ?)
    William Clifford, the Governor of Berwick (d. 1419)
    Margaret, married Sir John Melton, knight
    Katherine, married Ralph, lord Greystock
    Philippa, married William Ferrers, 5th Baron Ferrers of Groby (Lewis, Ancestral Roots, 8th ed. (2006), line 11, no. 34)
    Dugdale gives him a third son, the Lollard, Sir Lewis Clifford (d. 1404), whom, however, Sir H. Nicolas shows to have been probably his brother, but certainly not his son[13]

    Magna Carta Ancestry by Douglas Richardson lists three sons, including a Roger, no additional information.

    Genealogy

    The genealogical table in Whitaker gives Clifford two brothers, John de Clifford and Thomas de Clifford, said to have been the ancestor of Richard de Clifford, Bishop of London, and three sisters.

    References

    Jump up ^ (Scr. and Gros. Roll, text, i. 197)
    Jump up ^ (Dugdale, i. 240; Whitaker, pp. 310-11; Hist. Peerage, 117; Hist. of Westmoreland, i. 279; Escheat Rolls, ii. 118, 248)
    Jump up ^ (Scr. and Gros. Roll, i. 197)
    Jump up ^ (Whitaker, 314- 315; Dugdale, i. 340)
    Jump up ^ (Dugdale, i. 340; Whitaker, 317)
    Jump up ^ (Rymer, vi. 319, 595)
    Jump up ^ (Rymer, vi. 657; Dugdale, i. 340; Scrope Roll, ii. 469, &c.)
    Jump up ^ (Rymer, vi. 570, 637, 714, vii. 9, 475; Nicolas, Scr. and Gros. Roll, ii. 469, &c.)
    Jump up ^ (Scr. and Gros. Roll, i. 197, ii. 469, &c.; Rymer, vii. 45)
    Jump up ^ (Dugdale, i. 340; Hist. Peerage, 117)
    Jump up ^ (Dugdale, i. 341; Escheat Rolls, iii. 113)
    Jump up ^ (cf. Escheat Rolls, iii. 286)
    Jump up ^ (Dugdale, i. 340-2; Whitaker, 314-16; Nicolas, Scr. and Gros. Roll, ii. 427, &c.)
    This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: "Clifford, Roger de (1333-1389)". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900.

    *

    Roger — Maud Beauchamp. Maud (daughter of Thomas de Beauchamp, Knight, 11th Earl of Warwick and Katherine de Mortimer, Countess of Warwick) was born 0___ 1335, Warwickshire, England; died 0Feb 1403, Brougham Castle, Westmorland, England. [Group Sheet]


  16. 83.  Maud Beauchamp was born 0___ 1335, Warwickshire, England (daughter of Thomas de Beauchamp, Knight, 11th Earl of Warwick and Katherine de Mortimer, Countess of Warwick); died 0Feb 1403, Brougham Castle, Westmorland, England.
    Children:
    1. Margaret Clifford was born Brougham Castle, Westmorland, England.
    2. Thomas Clifford, Knight, 6th Baron de Clifford was born 1363-1364, Cumbria, England; died 18 Aug 1391.
    3. 41. Catherine Clifford, Baroness of Ravensworth was born ~1367, Brougham Castle, Westmorland, England; was christened Ravensworth, Kirby, North Riding, Yorkshire, England; died 23 Apr 1413, (North Riding, Yorkshire) England.
    4. Phillippa Clifford, Baroness Ferrers of Groby was born 0___ 1371, Brougham Castle, Westmorland, England; died Bef 9 Aug 1416.

  17. 84.  Robert de Ferrers, 4th Baron Ferrers of Wem was born 1341-1350, Chartley, Stafford, England (son of Robert de Ferrers, 3rd Baron Ferrers of Chartley and Joan de la Note, Lady of Willisham); died 31 Dec 1380.

    Robert married Elizabeth Boteler, 4th Baroness Boteler of Wem ~ 1369. Elizabeth (daughter of William Boteler, 3rd Baron Boteler of Wem and Elizabeth de Handsacre, Baroness Boteler of Wemme) was born 1345-1350, Wem, Shropshire, England; died 19 Jun 1411, London, Middlesex, England; was buried Brothers of the Holy Cross, London, Middlesex, England. [Group Sheet]


  18. 85.  Elizabeth Boteler, 4th Baroness Boteler of Wem was born 1345-1350, Wem, Shropshire, England (daughter of William Boteler, 3rd Baron Boteler of Wem and Elizabeth de Handsacre, Baroness Boteler of Wemme); died 19 Jun 1411, London, Middlesex, England; was buried Brothers of the Holy Cross, London, Middlesex, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: "Botiller/le Botelir/Botiler"

    Notes:

    About Elizabeth le Boteler, Baroness Boteler of Wemme
    'Elizabeth le Botiller1,2,3
    'F, b. circa 1345, d. 19 June 1411

    Father Sir William le Botiller, 3rd Lord le Botiller of Wem and Oversley2,3 b. c 1331, d. 14 Aug 1369
    Mother Elizabeth de Handesacre2,3 d. a May 1361

    Elizabeth le Botiller was born circa 1345 at of Wemme, Whixall, Hinstock, & Loppington, Shropshire, England; Age 24 in 1369.2,3 She and Sir Robert de Ferrers, 1st Baron Ferrers of Wemme obtained a marriage license on 27 September 1369 at Acton Burnell, Shropshire, England; They had 1 son, Robert.2,4,3
    Elizabeth le Botiller married Sir John Say before 24 November 1381.2,3
    Elizabeth le Botiller married Sir Thomas Molington before 25 October 1398; Date of Papal indult.5,2,3
    Elizabeth le Botiller died on 19 June 1411;
    Requested to be buried in the Church of the Crutched Friars next to the Tower of London.2,3

    'Family 1 Sir Robert de Ferrers, 1st Baron Ferrers of Wemme b. c 1350, d. 31 Dec 1380

    Child

    ?Sir Robert de Ferrers, 2nd Lord Ferrers of Wem+2,3 b. c 1372, d. b 29 Nov 1396
    'Family 2 Sir John Say d. bt 5 Jul 1395 - 25 Oct 1398
    'Family 3 Sir Thomas Molington d. 7 May 1408

    Citations

    1.[S3676] Unknown author, The Complete Peerage, by Cokayne, Vol. II, p. 232, 233; Magna Charta Sureties, 1215, 4th Ed., by F. L. Weis, p. 148; Wallop Family, p. 117.
    2.[S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 134.
    3.[S15] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, p. 877-878.
    4.[S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 308.
    5.[S11568] The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain, and the United Kingdom, by George Edward Cokayne, Vol. V, p. 334, chart.

    http://our-royal-titled-noble-and-commoner-ancestors.com/p432.htm#i12957

    Children:
    1. 42. Robert de Ferrers, III, Knight, 2nd Baron Ferrers of Wem was born ~ 1373, Willisham, Suffolkshire, England; died Bef 29 Nov 1396.

  19. 86.  John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of LancasterJohn of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster was born 6 Mar 1340, St. Bavo's Abbey, Ghent, Belgium (son of Edward III, King of England and Phillipa d'Avesnes, Queen of England); died 3 Feb 1399, Leicester Castle, Leicester, Leicestershire, England; was buried 15 Mar 1399, St. Paul's Cathedral, London, Middlesex, England..

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Duke of Aquitaine
    • Also Known As: King of Castile

    Notes:

    John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster, KG (6 March 1340 – 3 February 1399) was a member of the House of Plantagenet, the third surviving son of King Edward III of England and Philippa of Hainault. He was called "John of Gaunt" because he was born in Ghent, then rendered in English as Gaunt. When he became unpopular later in life, scurrilous rumours and lampoons circulated that he was actually the son of a Ghent butcher, perhaps because Edward III was not present at the birth. This story always drove him to fury.[2]

    As a younger brother of Edward, Prince of Wales (Edward, the Black Prince), John exercised great influence over the English throne during the minority of Edward's son, who became King Richard II, and the ensuing periods of political strife. Due to some generous land grants, John was one of the richest men in his era. He made an abortive attempt to enforce a claim to the Crown of Castile that came courtesy of his second wife Constance, who was an heir to the Castillian Kingdom, and for a time styled himself as such.

    John of Gaunt's legitimate male heirs, the Lancasters, include Kings Henry IV, Henry V, and Henry VI. His other legitimate descendants include his daughters Queen Philippa of Portugal and Elizabeth, Duchess of Exeter (by his first wife Blanche of Lancaster), and Queen Catherine of Castile (by his second wife Constance of Castile). John fathered five children outside marriage, one early in life by a lady-in-waiting to his mother, and four by Katherine Swynford, Gaunt's long-term mistress and third wife. The children of Katherine Swynford, surnamed "Beaufort," were legitimised by royal and papal decrees after John and Katherine married in 1396. Descendants of this marriage include Joan Beaufort, Countess of Westmorland, a grandmother of Kings Edward IV and Richard III; John Beaufort, 1st Earl of Somerset, a great-grandfather of King Henry VII; and Joan Beaufort, Queen of Scots, from whom are descended all subsequent sovereigns of Scotland beginning in 1437 and all sovereigns of England, Great Britain and the United Kingdom from 1603 to the present day. The three houses of English sovereigns that succeeded the rule of Richard II in 1399 — the Houses of Lancaster, York and Tudor — were all descended from John's children Henry IV, Joan Beaufort and John Beaufort, respectively. In addition, John's daughter Catherine of Lancaster was married to King Henry III of Castile, which made him the grandfather of King John II of Castile and the ancestor of all subsequent monarchs of the Crown of Castile and united Spain. Through John II of Castile's great-granddaughter Joanna the Mad, John of Gaunt is also an ancestor of the Habsburg rulers who would reign in Spain and much of central Europe.

    John of Gaunt's eldest son and heir, Henry Bolingbroke, Duke of Hereford, the son of his first wife Blanche of Lancaster, was exiled for ten years by King Richard II in 1398 as resolution to a dispute between Henry and Thomas de Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk.[3] When John of Gaunt died in 1399, his estates and titles were declared forfeit to the crown, since King Richard II had named Henry a traitor and changed his sentence to exile for life.[3] Henry Bolingbroke returned from exile to reclaim his inheritance and depose Richard. Bolingbroke then reigned as King Henry IV of England (1399–1413), the first of the descendants of John of Gaunt to hold the throne of England.

    Duke of Lancaster

    Kenilworth Castle, a massive fortress extensively modernised and given a new Great Hall by John of Gaunt after 1350
    John was the fourth son of King Edward III of England. His first wife, Blanche of Lancaster, was also his third cousin, both as great-great-grandchildren of King Henry III. They married in 1359 at Reading Abbey as a part of the efforts of Edward III to arrange matches for his sons with wealthy heiresses. Upon the death of his father-in-law, the 1st Duke of Lancaster, in 1361, John received half his lands, the title "Earl of Lancaster", and distinction as the greatest landowner in the north of England as heir of the Palatinate of Lancaster. He also became the 14th Baron of Halton and 11th Lord of Bowland. John inherited the rest of the Lancaster property when Blanche's sister Maud, Countess of Leicester (married to William V, Count of Hainaut), died without issue on 10 April 1362.

    John received the title "Duke of Lancaster" from his father on 13 November 1362. By then well established, he owned at least thirty castles and estates across England and France and maintained a household comparable in scale and organisation to that of a monarch. He owned land in almost every county in England, a patrimony that produced a net income of between ¹8,000 and ¹10,000 a year.[4]

    After the death in 1376 of his older brother Edward of Woodstock (also known as the "Black Prince"), John of Gaunt contrived to protect the religious reformer John Wycliffe, possibly to counteract the growing secular power of the church.[5] However, John's ascendancy to political power coincided with widespread resentment of his influence. At a time when English forces encountered setbacks in the Hundred Years' War against France, and Edward III's rule was becoming unpopular due to high taxation and his affair with Alice Perrers, political opinion closely associated the Duke of Lancaster with the failing government of the 1370s. Furthermore, while King Edward and the Prince of Wales were popular heroes due to their successes on the battlefield, John of Gaunt had not won equivalent military renown that could have bolstered his reputation. Although he fought in the Battle of Nâajera (1367), for example, his later military projects proved unsuccessful.

    When Edward III died in 1377 and John's ten-year-old nephew succeeded as Richard II of England, John's influence strengthened. However, mistrust remained, and some[who?] suspected him of wanting to seize the throne himself. John took pains to ensure that he never became associated with the opposition to Richard's kingship. As de facto ruler during Richard's minority, he made unwise decisions on taxation that led to the Peasants' Revolt in 1381, when the rebels destroyed his home in London, the Savoy Palace. Unlike some of Richard's unpopular advisors, John was away from London at the time of the uprising and thus avoided the direct wrath of the rebels.

    In 1386 John left England to seek the throne of Castile, claimed in Jure uxoris by right of his second wife, Constance of Castile, whom he had married in 1371. However, crisis ensued almost immediately in his absence, and in 1387 King Richard's misrule brought England to the brink of civil war. Only John, on his return to England in 1389, succeeded in persuading the Lords Appellant and King Richard to compromise to usher in a period of relative stability. During the 1390s, John's reputation of devotion to the well-being of the kingdom was largely restored.

    Sometime after the death of Blanche of Lancaster in 1368 and the birth of their first son, John Beaufort, in 1373, John of Gaunt and Katherine Swynford, the daughter of an ordinary knight, entered into an extra-marital love affair that would produce four children for the couple. All of them were born out of wedlock, but legitimized upon their parents' eventual marriage. The adulterous relationship endured until 1381, when it was broken out of political necessity.[6] On 13 January 1396, two years after the death of Constance of Castile, Katherine and John of Gaunt married in Lincoln Cathedral. The children bore the surname "Beaufort" after a former French possession of the duke. The Beaufort children, three sons and a daughter, were legitimised by royal and papal decrees after John and Katherine married. A later proviso that they were specifically barred from inheriting the throne, the phrase excepta regali dignitate ("except royal status"), was inserted with dubious authority by their half-brother Henry IV.

    John died of natural causes on 3 February 1399 at Leicester Castle, with his third wife Katherine by his side.

    Military commander in France

    Because of his rank, John of Gaunt was one of England's principal military commanders in the 1370s and 1380s, though his enterprises were never rewarded with the kind of dazzling success that had made his elder brother Edward the Black Prince such a charismatic war leader.

    On the resumption of war with France in 1369, John was sent to Calais with the Earl of Hereford and a small English army with which he raided into northern France. On 23 August, he was confronted by a much larger French army under Philip the Bold, Duke of Burgundy. Exercising his first command, John dared not attack such a superior force and the two armies faced each other across a marsh for several weeks until the English were reinforced by the Earl of Warwick, at which the French withdrew without offering battle. John and Warwick then decided to strike Harfleur, the base of the French fleet on the Seine. Further reinforced by German mercenaries, they marched on Harfleur, but were delayed by French guerilla operations while the town prepared for a siege. John invested the town for four days in October, but he was losing so many men to dysentery and bubonic plague that he decided to abandon the siege and return to Calais. During this retreat, the army had to fight its way across the Somme at the ford of Blanchetaque against a French army led by Hugh de Chãatillon, who was captured and sold to Edward III. By the middle of November, the survivors of the sickly army returned to Calais, where the Earl of Warwick died of plague. Though it seemed an inglorious conclusion to the campaign, John had forced the French king, Charles V, to abandon his plans to invade England that autumn.[7]

    In the summer of 1370, John was sent with a small army to Aquitaine to reinforce his ailing elder brother, the Black Prince, and his younger brother Edmund of Langley, Earl of Cambridge. With them, he participated in the Siege of Limoges (September 1370). He took charge of the siege operations and at one point engaging in hand-to-hand fighting in the undermining tunnels.[8] After this event, the Black Prince surrendered his lordship of Aquitaine and sailed for England, leaving John in charge. Though he attempted to defend the duchy against French encroachment for nearly a year, lack of resources and money meant he could do little but husband what small territory the English still controlled, and he resigned the command in September 1371 and returned to England.[9] Just before leaving Aquitaine, he married the Infanta Constance of Castile on September 1371 at Roquefort, near Bordeaux, Guienne. The following year he took part with his father, Edward III, in an abortive attempt to invade France with a large army, which was frustrated by three months of unfavourable winds.

    Probably John's most notable feat of arms occurred in August–December 1373, when he attempted to relieve Aquitaine by the landward route, leading an army of some 9,000 mounted men from Calais on a great chevauchâee from north-eastern to south-western France on a 900 kilometre raid. This four-month ride through enemy territory, evading French armies on the way, was a bold stroke that impressed contemporaries but achieved virtually nothing. Beset on all sides by French ambushes and plagued by disease and starvation, John of Gaunt and his raiders battled their way through Champagne, east of Paris, into Burgundy, across the Massif Central, and finally down into Dordogne. Unable to attack any strongly fortified forts and cities, the raiders plundered the countryside, which weakened the French infrastructure, but the military value of the damage was only temporary. Marching in winter across the Limousin plateau, with stragglers being picked off by the French, huge numbers of the army, and even larger numbers of horses, died of cold, disease or starvation. The army reached English-occupied Bordeaux on 24 December 1373, severely weakened in numbers with the loss of least one-third of their force in action and another third to disease. Upon arrival in Bordeaux, many more succumbed to the bubonic plague that was raging in the city. Sick, demoralised and mutinous, the army was in no shape to defend Aquitaine, and soldiers began to desert. John had no funds with which to pay them, and despite his entreaties, none were sent from England, so in April 1374, he abandoned the enterprise and sailed for home.[10]

    John's final campaign in France took place in 1378. He planned a 'great expedition' of mounted men in a large armada of ships to land at Brest and take control of Brittany. Not enough ships could be found to transport the horses, and the expedition was tasked with the more limited objective of capturing St. Malo. The English destroyed the shipping in St. Malo harbour and began to assault the town by land on 14 August, but John was soon hampered by the size of his army, which was unable to forage because French armies under Olivier de Clisson and Bertrand du Guesclin occupied the surrounding countryside, harrying the edges of his force. In September, the siege was simply abandoned and the army returned ingloriously to England. John of Gaunt received most of the blame for the debãacle.[11]

    Partly as a result of these failures, and those of other English commanders at this period, John was one of the first important figures in England to conclude that the war with France was unwinnable because of France's greater resources of wealth and manpower. He began to advocate peace negotiations; indeed, as early as 1373, during his great raid through France, he made contact with Guillaume Roger, brother and political adviser of Pope Gregory XI, to let the pope know he would be interested in a diplomatic conference under papal auspices. This approach led indirectly to the Anglo-French Congress of Bruges in 1374–77, which resulted in the short-lived Truce of Bruges between the two sides.[12] John was himself a delegate to the various conferences that eventually resulted in the Truce of Leulinghem in 1389. The fact that he became identified with the attempts to make peace added to his unpopularity at a period when the majority of Englishmen believed victory would be in their grasp if only the French could be defeated decisively as they had been in the 1350s. Another motive was John's conviction that it was only by making peace with France would it be possible to release sufficient manpower to enforce his claim to the throne of Castile.

    Head of government

    On his return from France in 1374, John took a more decisive and persistent role in the direction of English foreign policy. From then until 1377, he was effectively the head of the English government due to the illness of his father and elder brother, who were unable to exercise authority. His vast estates made him the richest man in England, and his great wealth, ostentatious display of it, autocratic manner and attitudes, enormous London mansion (the Savoy Palace on the Strand) and association with the failed peace process at Bruges combined to make him the most visible target of social resentments. His time at the head of government was marked by the so-called Good Parliament of 1376 and the Bad Parliament of 1377. The first, called to grant massive war taxation to the Crown, turned into a parliamentary revolution, with the Commons (supported to some extent by the Lords) venting their grievances at decades of crippling taxation, misgovernment, and suspected endemic corruption among the ruling classes. John was left isolated (even the Black Prince supported the need for reform) and the Commons refused to grant money for the war unless most of the great officers of state were dismissed and the king's mistress Alice Perrers, another focus of popular resentment, was barred from any further association with him. But even after the government acceded to virtually all their demands, the Commons then refused to authorise any funds for the war, losing the sympathy of the Lords as a result.

    The death of the Black Prince on 8 June 1376 and the onset of Edward III's last illness at the closing of Parliament on 10 July left John with all the reins of power. He immediately had the ailing king grant pardons to all the officials impeached by the Parliament; Alice Perrers too was reinstated at the heart of the king's household. John impeached William of Wykeham and other leaders of the reform movement, and secured their conviction on old or trumped-up charges. The parliament of 1377 was John's counter-coup: crucially, the Lords no longer supported the Commons and John was able to have most of the acts of 1376 annulled. He also succeeded in forcing the Commons to agree to the imposition of the first Poll Tax in English history — a viciously regressive measure that bore hardest on the poorest members of society.[13] There was organised opposition to his measures and rioting in London; John of Gaunt's arms were reversed or defaced wherever they were displayed, and protestors pasted up lampoons on his supposedly dubious birth. At one point he was forced to take refuge across the Thames, while his Savoy Palace only just escaped looting.[14] It was rumoured (and believed by many people in England and France) that he intended to seize the throne for himself and supplant the rightful heir, his nephew Richard, the son of the Black Prince, but there seems to have been no truth in this and on the death of Edward III and the accession of the child Richard II, John sought no position of regency for himself and withdrew to his estates.[15]

    John's personal unpopularity persisted, however, and the failure of his expedition to Saint-Malo in 1378 did nothing for his reputation. By this time, too, some of his possessions were taken from him by the Crown. For example, his ship, the Dieulagarde, was seized and bundled with other royal ships to be sold (to pay off the debts of Sir Robert de Crull, who during the latter part of King Edward III's reign had been the Clerk of the King's Ships, and had advanced monies to pay for the king's ships .[16] During the Peasants' Revolt of 1381, John of Gaunt was far from the centre of events, on the March of Scotland, but he was among those named by the rebels as a traitor to be beheaded as soon as he could be found. The Savoy Palace was systematically destroyed by the mob and burned to the ground. Nominally friendly lords and even his own fortresses closed their gates to him, and John was forced to flee into Scotland with a handful of retainers and throw himself on the charity of King Robert II of Scotland until the crisis was over.[17]

    King of Castile

    Upon his marriage to the Infanta Constance of Castile in 1371, John assumed (officially from 29 January 1372) the title of King of Castile and Leâon in right of his wife, and insisted his fellow English nobles henceforth address him as 'my lord of Spain'.[18] He impaled his arms with those of the Spanish kingdom. From 1372, John gathered around himself a small court of refugee Castilian knights and ladies and set up a Castilian chancery that prepared documents in his name according to the style of Peter of Castile, dated by the Castilian era and signed by himself with the Spanish formula 'Yo El Rey' ("I, the King").[19] He hatched several schemes to make good his claim with an army, but for many years these were still-born due to lack of finance or the conflicting claims of war in France or with Scotland. It was only in 1386, after Portugal under its new King John I had entered into full alliance with England, that he was actually able to land with an army in Spain and mount a campaign for the throne of Castile (that ultimately failed). John sailed from England on 9 July 1386 with a huge Anglo-Portuguese fleet carrying an army of about 5,000 men plus an extensive 'royal' household and his wife and daughters. Pausing on the journey to use his army to drive off the French forces who were then besieging Brest, he landed at Corunna in northern Spain on 29 July.


    John of Gaunt dines with John I of Portugal, to discuss a joint Anglo-Portuguese invasion of Castile (from Jean de Wavrin's Chronique d'Angleterre).
    The Castilian king, John of Trastâamara, had expected John would land in Portugal and had concentrated his forces on the Portuguese border. He was wrong-footed by John's decision to invade Galicia, the most distant and disaffected of Castile's kingdoms. From August to October, John of Gaunt set up a rudimentary court and chancery at Ourense and received the submission of the Galician nobility and most of the towns of Galicia, though they made their homage to him conditional on his being recognised as king by the rest of Castile. While John of Gaunt had gambled on an early decisive battle, the Castilians were in no hurry to join battle, and he began to experience difficulties keeping his army together and paying it. In November, he met King John I of Portugal at Ponte do Mouro on the south side of the Minho River and concluded an agreement with him to make a joint Anglo-Portuguese invasion of central Castile early in 1387. The treaty was sealed by the marriage of John's eldest daughter Philippa to the Portuguese king. A large part of John's army had succumbed to sickness, however, and when the invasion was mounted, they were far outnumbered by their Portuguese allies. The campaign of April–June 1387 was an ignominious failure. The Castilians refused to offer battle and the Galician-Anglo-Portuguese troops, apart from time-wasting sieges of fortified towns, were reduced to foraging for food in the arid Spanish landscape. They were harried mainly by French mercenaries of the Castilian king. Many hundreds of English, including close friends and retainers of John of Gaunt, died of disease or exhaustion. Many deserted or abandoned the army to ride north under French safe-conducts. Shortly after the army returned to Portugal, John of Gaunt concluded a secret treaty with John of Trastâamara under which he and his wife renounced all claim to the Castilian throne in return for a large annual payment and the marriage of their daughter Catherine to John of Trastâamara's son Henry.

    Duke of Aquitaine

    John left Portugal for Aquitaine, and he remained in that province until he returned to England in November 1389. This effectively kept him off the scene while England endured the major political crisis of the conflict between Richard II and the Lords Appellant, who were led by John of Gaunt's younger brother Thomas of Woodstock, Duke of Gloucester. Only four months after his return to England, in March 1390, Richard II formally invested Gaunt with the Duchy of Aquitaine, thus providing him with the overseas territory he had long desired. However he did not immediately return to the province, but remained in England and mainly ruled through seneschals as an absentee duke. His administration of the province was a disappointment, and his appointment as duke was much resented by the Gascons, since Aquitaine had previously always been held directly by the king of England or his heir; it was not felt to be a fief that a king could bestow on a subordinate. In 1394–95, he was forced to spend nearly a year in Gascony to shore up his position in the face of threats of secession by the Gascon nobles. He was one of England's principal negotiators in the diplomatic exchanges with France that led to the Truce of Leulingham in 1396, and he initially agreed to join the French-led Crusade that ended in the disastrous Battle of Nicopolis, but withdrew due to ill-health and the political problems in Gascony and England.[20] For the remainder of his life, John of Gaunt occupied the role of valued counsellor of the king and loyal supporter of the Crown. He did not even protest, it seems, when his younger brother Thomas was murdered at Richard's behest. It may be that he felt he had to maintain this posture of loyalty to protect his son Henry Bolingbroke (the future Henry IV), who had also been one of the Lords Appellant, from Richard's wrath; but in 1398 Richard had Bolingbroke exiled, and on John of Gaunt's death the next year he disinherited Bolingbroke completely, seizing John's vast estates for the Crown.

    Relationship to Chaucer

    John of Gaunt was a patron and close friend of the poet Geoffrey Chaucer, most famously known for his work The Canterbury Tales. Near the end of their lives, Lancaster and Chaucer became brothers-in-law. Chaucer married Philippa (Pan) de Roet in 1366, and Lancaster took his mistress of nearly 30 years, Katherine Swynford (de Roet), who was Philippa Chaucer's sister, as his third wife in 1396. Although Philippa died c. 1387, the men were bound as brothers and Lancaster's children by Katherine – John, Henry, Thomas and Joan Beaufort – were Chaucer's nephews and niece.

    Chaucer's Book of the Duchess, also known as the Deeth of Blaunche the Duchesse,[21] was written in commemoration of Blanche of Lancaster, John of Gaunt's first wife. The poem refers to John and Blanche in allegory as the narrator relates the tale of "A long castel with walles white/Be Seynt Johan, on a ryche hil" (1318–1319) who is mourning grievously after the death of his love, "And goode faire White she het/That was my lady name ryght" (948–949). The phrase "long castel" is a reference to Lancaster (also called "Loncastel" and "Longcastell"), "walles white" is thought to likely be an oblique reference to Blanche, "Seynt Johan" was John of Gaunt's name-saint, and "ryche hil" is a reference to Richmond; these thinly veiled references reveal the identity of the grieving black knight of the poem as John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster and Earl of Richmond. "White" is the English translation of the French word "blanche", implying that the white lady was Blanche of Lancaster.[22]

    Believed to have been written in the 1390s, Chaucer's short poem Fortune, is also inferred to directly reference Lancaster.[23][24] "Chaucer as narrator" openly defies Fortune, proclaiming he has learned who his enemies are through her tyranny and deceit, and declares "my suffisaunce" (15) and that "over himself hath the maystrye" (14). Fortune, in turn, does not understand Chaucer's harsh words to her for she believes she has been kind to him, claims that he does not know what she has in store for him in the future, but most importantly, "And eek thou hast thy beste frend alyve" (32, 40, 48). Chaucer retorts that "My frend maystow nat reven, blind goddesse" (50) and orders her to take away those who merely pretend to be his friends. Fortune turns her attention to three princes whom she implores to relieve Chaucer of his pain and "Preyeth his beste frend of his noblesse/That to som beter estat he may atteyne" (78–79). The three princes are believed to represent the dukes of Lancaster, York, and Gloucester, and a portion of line 76, "as three of you or tweyne," to refer to the ordinance of 1390 which specified that no royal gift could be authorised without the consent of at least two of the three dukes.[23] Most conspicuous in this short poem is the number of references to Chaucer's "beste frend". Fortune states three times in her response to the plaintiff, "And also, you still have your best friend alive" (32, 40, 48); she also references his "beste frend" in the envoy when appealing to his "noblesse" to help Chaucer to a higher estate. A fifth reference is made by "Chaucer as narrator" who rails at Fortune that she shall not take his friend from him. While the envoy playfully hints to Lancaster that Chaucer would certainly appreciate a boost to his status or income, the poem Fortune distinctively shows his deep appreciation and affection for John of Gaunt.

    Marriages

    Coat of arms of John of Gaunt asserting his kingship over Castile and Leâon, combining the Castilian castle and lion with lilies of France, the lions of England and his heraldic difference

    On 19 May 1359 at Reading Abbey, John married his third cousin, Blanche of Lancaster, daughter of Henry of Grosmont, 1st Duke of Lancaster. The wealth she brought to the marriage was the foundation of John's fortune. Blanche died on 12 September 1368 at Tutbury Castle, while her husband was overseas. Their son Henry Bolingbroke became Henry IV of England, after the duchy of Lancaster was taken by Richard II upon John's death while Henry was in exile. Their daughter Philippa became Queen of Portugal by marrying King John I of Portugal in 1387. All subsequent kings of Portugal were thus descended from John of Gaunt.

    In 1371, John married Infanta Constance of Castile, daughter of King Peter of Castile, thus giving him a claim to the Crown of Castile, which he would pursue. Though John was never able to make good his claim, his daughter by Constance, Catherine of Lancaster, became Queen of Castile by marrying Henry III of Castile. Catherine of Aragon is descended from this line.

    During his marriage to Constance, John of Gaunt had fathered four children by a mistress, the widow Katherine Swynford (whose sister Philippa de Roet was married to Chaucer). Prior to her widowhood, Katherine had borne at least two, possibly three, children to Lancastrian knight Sir Hugh Swynford. The known names of these children are Blanche and Thomas. (There may have been a second Swynford daughter.) John of Gaunt was Blanche Swynford's godfather.[25]
    Constance died in 1394.

    John married Katherine in 1396, and their children, the Beauforts, were legitimised by King Richard II and the Church, but barred from inheriting the throne. From the eldest son, John, descended a granddaughter, Margaret Beaufort, whose son, later King Henry VII of England, would nevertheless claim the throne.

    Queen Elizabeth II and her predecessors since Henry IV are descended from John of Gaunt.

    Children

    1640 drawing of tombs of Katherine Swynford and daughter Joan Beaufort

    By Blanche of Lancaster:

    Philippa (1360–1415) married King John I of Portugal (1357–1433).
    John (1362–1365) was the first-born son of John and Blanche of Lancaster and lived possibly at least until after the birth of his brother Edward of Lancaster in 1365 and died before his second brother another short lived boy called John in 1366.[26] He was buried at the Church of St Mary de Castro, Leicester.
    Elizabeth (1364–1426), married (1) in 1380 John Hastings, 3rd Earl of Pembroke (1372–1389), annulled 1383; married (2) in 1386 John Holland, 1st Duke of Exeter (1350–1400); (3) Sir John Cornwall, 1st Baron Fanhope and Milbroke (d. 1443)
    Edward (1365) died within a year of his birth and was buried at the Church of St Mary de Castro, Leicester.
    John (1366–1367) most likely died after the birth of his younger brother Henry, the future Henry IV of England; he was buried at the Church of St Mary de Castro, Leicester
    Henry IV of England (1367–1413) married (1) Mary de Bohun (1369–1394); (2) Joanna of Navarre (1368–1437)
    Isabel (1368–1368)[27][28]

    By Constance of Castile:

    Catherine (1372–1418), married King Henry III of Castile (1379–1406)
    John (1374–1375)[28][29]

    By Katherine Swynford (nâee de Roet/Roelt), mistress and later wife (children legitimised 1397):

    John Beaufort, 1st Earl of Somerset (1373–1410)—married Margaret Holland.
    Henry Beaufort, Bishop of Winchester and Cardinal (1375–1447)
    Thomas Beaufort, Duke of Exeter (1377–1427), married Margaret Neville, daughter of Sir Thomas de Neville and Joan Furnivall.
    Joan Beaufort (1379–1440)—married first Robert Ferrers, 5th Baron Boteler of Wem and second Ralph Neville, 1st Earl of Westmoreland.

    By Marie de St. Hilaire of Hainaut, mistress:

    Blanche (1359–1388/89), illegitimate, married Sir Thomas Morieux (1355–1387) in 1381, without issue. Blanche was the daughter of John's mistress, Marie de St. Hilaire of Hainaut (1340-after 1399), who was a lady-in-waiting to his mother, Queen Philippa. The affair apparently took place before John's first marriage to Blanche of Lancaster. John's daughter, Blanche, married Sir Thomas Morieux in 1381. Morieux held several important posts, including Constable of the Tower the year he was married, and Master of Horse to King Richard II two years later. He died in 1387 after six years of marriage.

    Buried:
    St Paul's Cathedral, London, is an Anglican cathedral, the seat of the Bishop of London and the mother church of the Diocese of London. It sits on Ludgate Hill at the highest point of the City of London. Its dedication to Paul the Apostle dates back to the original church on this site, founded in AD 604.[1] The present church, dating from the late 17th century, was designed in the English Baroque style by Sir Christopher Wren. Its construction, completed in Wren's lifetime, was part of a major rebuilding programme in the City after the Great Fire of London.[2]

    The cathedral is one of the most famous and most recognisable sights of London. Its dome, framed by the spires of Wren's City churches, dominated the skyline for 300 years.[3] At 365 feet (111 m) high, it was the tallest building in London from 1710 to 1962. The dome is among the highest in the world. St Paul's is the second largest church building in area in the United Kingdom after Liverpool Cathedral.

    St Paul's Cathedral occupies a significant place in the national identity.[4] It is the central subject of much promotional material, as well as of images of the dome surrounded by the smoke and fire of the Blitz.[4] Services held at St Paul's have included the funerals of Lord Nelson, the Duke of Wellington and Sir Winston Churchill; Jubilee celebrations for Queen Victoria; peace services marking the end of the First and Second World Wars; the wedding of Charles, Prince of Wales and Lady Diana Spencer, the launch of the Festival of Britain and the thanksgiving services for the Golden Jubilee, the 80th Birthday and the Diamond Jubilee of Elizabeth II.

    St Paul's Cathedral is a working church with hourly prayer and daily services.

    more ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Paul%27s_Cathedral

    Died:
    Leicester Castle was built over the Roman town walls.

    According to Leicester Museums, the castle was probably built around 1070 (soon after the Norman Conquest in 1066)[2] under the governorship of Hugh de Grantmesnil. The remains now consist of a mound, along with ruins. Originally the mound was 40 ft (12.2 m) high. Kings sometimes stayed at the castle (Edward I in 1300, and Edward II in 1310 and 1311), and John of Gaunt and his second wife Constance of Castile both died here in 1399 and 1394 respectively.

    more ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leicester_Castle

    John married Katherine de Roet, Duchess of Lancaster 0___ 1396, Lincoln, Lincolnshire, England. Katherine (daughter of Paon de Roet, Knight and unnamed spouse) was born 25 Nov 1350, Picardie, France; died 10 May 1403, Lincoln, Lincolnshire, England; was buried Lincoln Cathedral, Lincoln, Lincolnshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  20. 87.  Katherine de Roet, Duchess of LancasterKatherine de Roet, Duchess of Lancaster was born 25 Nov 1350, Picardie, France (daughter of Paon de Roet, Knight and unnamed spouse); died 10 May 1403, Lincoln, Lincolnshire, England; was buried Lincoln Cathedral, Lincoln, Lincolnshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Katherine Swynford

    Notes:

    Katherine Swynford, Duchess of Lancaster (also spelled Katharine or Catherine[2]), was the third wife of John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster, a son of King Edward III. She had been the Duke's lover for many years before their marriage. The couple's children, born before the marriage, were later legitimated during the reign of the Duke's nephew, Richard II, although with the provision that neither they nor their descendants could ever claim the throne of England.

    Their descendants were members of the Beaufort family, which played a major role in the Wars of the Roses. Henry VII, who became King of England in 1485, derived his claim to the throne from his mother Margaret Beaufort, who was a great-granddaughter of Gaunt and Katherine Swynford. His legal claim to the throne, however, was through a matrilineal and previously illegitimate line and Henry's first action was to declare himself king "by right of conquest" retroactively from 21 August 1485, the day before his army defeated King Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth.[3]

    Family

    Katherine was the daughter of Paon de Roet, a herald, and later knight, who was "probably christened as Gilles".[4] She had two sisters, Philippa and Isabel (also called Elizabeth) de Roet, and a brother, Walter. Isabel later became Canoness of the convent of St. Waudru's, Mons, c. 1366. Katherine is generally held to have been his youngest child. However, Alison Weir argues that Philippa was the junior and that both were children of a second marriage.[4] Katherine's sister Philippa, a lady of Queen Philippa's household, married the poet Geoffrey Chaucer.

    Life

    She was probably born in Hainaut in 1349 or 1350. Katherine's birth date may have been 25 November, as that is the feast day of her patron, St. Catherine of Alexandria.[citation needed] The family returned to England in 1351, and it is likely that Katherine stayed there during her father's continued travels.

    In about 1366, at St Clement Danes Church, Westminster, Katherine, aged sixteen or seventeen, contracted an advantageous marriage with "Hugh" Ottes Swynford, a Knight from the manor of Kettlethorpe in Lincolnshire, the son of Thomas Swynford by his marriage to Nicole Druel. She had the following children by him: Blanche (born 1 May 1367), Thomas (21 September 1368 – 1432), and possibly Margaret Swynford (born about 1369), later recorded as a nun of the prestigious Barking Abbey nominated by command of King Richard II.

    Katherine became attached to the household of John of Gaunt as governess to his daughters Philippa of Lancaster and Elizabeth of Lancaster. The ailing duchess Blanche had Katherine's daughter Blanche (her namesake) placed within her own daughters' chambers and afforded the same luxuries as her daughters; additionally, John of Gaunt stood as godfather to the child.

    Some time after Blanche's death in 1368 and the birth of their first son in 1373, Katherine and John of Gaunt entered into a love affair that would produce four children for the couple, born out of wedlock but legitimized upon their parents' eventual marriage; the adulterous relationship endured until 1381 when it was truncated out of political necessity[5] and ruined Katherine's reputation. On 13 January 1396, two years after the death of the Duke's second wife, Infanta Constance of Castile, Katherine and John of Gaunt married in Lincoln Cathedral. Records of their marriage kept in the Tower and elsewhere list: 'John of Ghaunt, Duke of Lancaster, married Katharine daughter of Guyon King of Armes in the time of K. Edward the 3, and Geffrey Chaucer her sister'.

    On John of Gaunt's death, Katherine became known as dowager Duchess of Lancaster. She outlived him by four years, dying on 10 May 1403, in her early fifties, an age that most of the women in the 15th century did not reach.

    Tomb

    Katherine Swynford's tomb in 1809
    Katherine's tomb and that of her daughter, Joan Beaufort, are under a carved-stone canopy in the sanctuary of Lincoln Cathedral. Joan's is the smaller of the two tombs; both were decorated with brass plates — full-length representations of them on the tops, and small shields bearing coats of arms around the sides and on the top — but those were damaged or destroyed in 1644 during the English Civil War. A hurried drawing by William Dugdale records their appearance.

    Children and descendants

    Katherine's children by Hugh Swynford were:

    Margaret Swynford (born c. 1369), became a nun at the prestigious Barking Abbey in 1377 with help from her future stepfather John of Gaunt, where she lived the religious life with her cousin Elizabeth Chaucer, daughter of the famous Geoffrey Chaucer and Katherine's sister Philippa de Roet.[4]
    Sir Thomas Swynford (1367–1432), born in Lincoln while his father Sir Hugh Swynford was away on a campaign with the Duke of Lancaster in Castile fighting for Peter of Castile.[4][6]
    Blanche Swynford, named after the Duchess of Lancaster and a godchild of John of Gaunt. (If, as suggested, she was born after 1375, this date is too late for her to have been fathered by Hugh Swynford, who died in 1371/2. However, since John of Gaunt obtained a dispensation for his marriage to Katherine for being Blanche Swynford's godchild, this theory can be discarded).[4]
    In 1846 Thomas Stapleton suggested that there was a further daughter named Dorothy Swynford, born c. 1366, who married Thomas Thimelby of Poolham near Horncastle, Lincolnshire, Sheriff of Lincolnshire in 1380, but there is no current evidence to support this claim.[4]

    Katherine's children by John of Gaunt were:

    John Beaufort, 1st Earl of Somerset (1373–1410)
    Henry, Cardinal Beaufort (1375–1447)
    Thomas Beaufort, Duke of Exeter (1377–1426)
    Joan Beaufort, Countess of Westmorland (1379–1440)
    The descendants of Katherine Swynford and John of Gaunt are significant in English and Scottish history. Their four children had been given the surname "Beaufort" and with the approval of King Richard II and the Pope were legitimated as adults by their parents' marriage in 1396. Despite this, the Beauforts were barred from inheriting the throne of England by a clause in the legitimation act inserted by their half-brother, Henry IV, although modern scholarship disputes the authority of a monarch to alter an existing parliamentary statute on his own authority, without the further approval of Parliament. This provision was later revoked by Edward IV, placing Katherine's descendants (including himself) back within the legitimate line of inheritance; the Tudor dynasty was directly descended from John and Katherine's eldest child, John Beaufort, great-grandfather of Henry VII, who based his claim to the throne on his mother's descent from John of Gaunt, a son of Edward III. John Beaufort also had a daughter named Joan Beaufort, who married James I of Scotland and thus was an ancestress of the House of Stuart.[7] John and Katherine's daughter, Joan Beaufort, was grandmother of the English kings Edward IV and Richard III, the latter of whom Henry Tudor (thus becoming by conquest Henry VII) defeated at the Battle of Bosworth Field; Henry's claim was strengthened by marrying Elizabeth of York, eldest daughter of Edward IV. It was also through Joan Beaufort, Countess of Westmoreland that the sixth queen of Henry VIII, Catherine Parr, descended.[8] John of Gaunt's son — Katherine's stepson Henry of Bolingbroke — became Henry IV after deposing Richard II (who was imprisoned and died in Pontefract Castle, where Katherine's son, Thomas Swynford, was constable and is said to have starved Richard to death for his step-brother). John of Gaunt's daughter by his first marriage to Blanche of Lancaster, Philippa of Lancaster, was great-great-grandmother to Catherine of Aragon, first wife of Henry VIII and mother of Mary I of England. John of Gaunt's child by his second wife Constance, Catherine (or Catalina), was great-grandmother of Catherine of Aragon as well.

    In literature

    Katherine Swynford is the subject of Anya Seton's novel Katherine (published in 1954) and of Alison Weir's 2008 biography Katherine Swynford: The Story of John of Gaunt and his Scandalous Duchess (ISBN 0-224-06321-9). Swynford is also the subject of Jeannette Lucraft's historical biography Katherine Swynford: The History of a Medieval Mistress. This book seeks to establish Swynford as a powerful figure in the politics of 14th-century England and an example of a woman's ability to manipulate contemporary social mores for her own interests.

    Coat of arms of Katherine Swynford as Duchess of Lancaster, after her marriage to John of Gaunt : three gold Catherine wheels ("roet" means "little wheel" in Old French) on a red field. The wheel emblem shows Katherine's devotion to her patron saint, Catherine of Alexandria, also known as Saint Catherine of the Wheel.,[4] although there was once extant a copy of her seal's impression, ca. 1377, showing her arms of three Catherine wheels of gold on a field Gules, a molet in fess point empaling the arms of Swynford (Birch's Catalogue of Seals

    Buried:
    Lincoln Cathedral (in full The Cathedral Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary of Lincoln, or sometimes St. Mary's Cathedral) is a cathedral located in Lincoln in England and seat of the Bishop of Lincoln in the Church of England. Building commenced in 1088 and continued in several phases throughout the medieval period. It was reputedly the tallest building in the world for 238 years (1311–1549).[1][2][3] The central spire collapsed in 1549 and was not rebuilt. The cathedral is the third largest in Britain (in floor space) after St Paul's and York Minster, being 484 by 271 feet (148 by 83 m). It is highly regarded by architectural scholars; the eminent Victorian writer John Ruskin declared: "I have always held... that the cathedral of Lincoln is out and out the most precious piece of architecture in the British Isles and roughly speaking worth any two other cathedrals we have."

    more ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lincoln_Cathedral

    Notes:

    Married:
    formerly his mistress...

    Children:
    1. John Beaufort, III, Knight, 1st Earl of Somerset was born 1371-1373, Chateau de Beaufrot, Anjou, France; died 14 Mar 1410, Hospital of St. Katherine's by the Tower, London, England; was buried Canterbury Cathedral, Canterbury, Kent, England.
    2. Thomas Beaufort, Duke of Exeter was born 0___ 1377; died 0___ 1427.
    3. 43. Joan Beaufort, Countess of Westmorland was born ~ 1379, Chateau Beaufort, Anjou, France; died 13 Nov 1440, Howden, Yorkshire, England; was buried Lincoln Cathedral, Lincoln, Lincolnshire, England.

  21. 88.  Henry FitzHugh, KG, 2nd Baron FitzHugh of Ravensworth was born 0___ 1338, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England (son of Henry FitzHugh, 1st Baron FitzHugh of Ravensworth and Joan Fourneux); died 29 Aug 1368, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England.

    Henry married Joan Scrope Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England. Joan (daughter of Henry le Scrope, Knight, 1st Baron Scrope of Masham and Joan LNU) was born 0___ 1336, Masham, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1386, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  22. 89.  Joan Scrope was born 0___ 1336, Masham, Yorkshire, England (daughter of Henry le Scrope, Knight, 1st Baron Scrope of Masham and Joan LNU); died 0___ 1386, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England.
    Children:
    1. 44. Henry FitzHugh, IV, Knight, 3rd Baron FitzHugh was born 1359-1363, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England; died 14 Jan 1425, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England; was buried Jervaulx Abbey, Yorkshire, England.
    2. Eleanor FitzHugh was born Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England.

  23. 90.  Robert de Grey was born ~ 1333 (son of John de Grey, KG, 2nd Baron Grey of Rotherfield and Avice Marmion); died Bef 30 Nov 1367, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Marmion

    Robert — Lora St. Quintin. Lora was born ~ 1342; died 0___ 1369, Brandesburton in Holderness, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  24. 91.  Lora St. Quintin was born ~ 1342; died 0___ 1369, Brandesburton in Holderness, Yorkshire, England.
    Children:
    1. 45. Elizabeth Grey was born ~ 1363, Wilcote, Oxfordshire, England; died 12 Dec 1427, (Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England); was buried Jervaulx Abbey, Yorkshire, England.

  25. 92.  Robert Willoughby, 4th Baron Willoughby de Eresby was born 1343-1350, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England (son of John Willoughby and Cecily Ufford); died 9 Aug 1396, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England; was buried Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England.

    Notes:

    Alice Skipworth is also cited as a spouse...

    Robert married Margery la Zouche, Baroness of Willoughby Abt 1369. Margery (daughter of William la Zouche, 2nd Baron Zouche of Haryngworth and Elizabeth de Ros) was born Abt 1355, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England; died 18 Oct 1391. [Group Sheet]


  26. 93.  Margery la Zouche, Baroness of Willoughby was born Abt 1355, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England (daughter of William la Zouche, 2nd Baron Zouche of Haryngworth and Elizabeth de Ros); died 18 Oct 1391.

    Other Events:

    • Alt Death: Bef 1412, (Lincolnshire) England

    Notes:

    Married:
    He [Robert de Willoughby] married, 3rdly, Elizabeth, de jure suo jure (according to modern doctrine) BARONESS LATIMER, widow of John (DE NEVILLE), 3rd LORD NEVILLE (of Raby), daughter and heir of William (LE LATIMER), 4th LORD LATIMER, by his wife Elizabeth.

    Children:
    1. 46. William Willoughby, 4th Baron Willoughby de Eresby was born 1370-1375, Eresby, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England; died 4 Dec 1409, Edgefield, Linconshire, England; was buried St. James Church, Willoughby Chapel, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England.
    2. Thomas Willoughby was born Bef 1378, Eresby, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England; died Bef 20 Aug 1417.

  27. 94.  Roger le Strange, 5th Baron Strange of Knockin was born ~ 1327, Knockyn, Shropshire, England (son of Roger le Strange, 4th Baron Strange of Knockin and Joan de Ingham, Baroness Ingham); died 26 Aug 1382, Monmouthshire, Wales.

    Roger married Aline FitzAlan ~ 1350, Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England. Aline (daughter of Edmund FitzAlan, Knight, 9th Earl of Arundel and Alice de Warenne, Countess of Arundel) was born 0___ 1314, Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England; died 20 Jan 1386. [Group Sheet]


  28. 95.  Aline FitzAlan was born 0___ 1314, Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England (daughter of Edmund FitzAlan, Knight, 9th Earl of Arundel and Alice de Warenne, Countess of Arundel); died 20 Jan 1386.
    Children:
    1. 47. Lucy le Strange was born ~ 1365, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England; died 28 Apr 1398, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England; was buried St. James Church, Willoughby Chapel, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England.


Generation: 8

  1. 128.  Richard Talbot, 2nd Baron Talbot was born 1302-1305, Wyke, Axminster, Devon, England (son of Gilbert Talbot, 1st Baron Talbot and Anne le Boteler); died 23 Oct 1356.

    Notes:

    Richard [Talbot], 2nd Baron Talbot
    born
    c. 1305
    mar.
    betw. 24 Jul 1326 and 23 Mar 1326/7 Elizabeth Comyn (b. 1 Nov 1299; mar. (2) betw. 21 Feb 1357/8 and 16 Feb 1360/1 Sir John Bromwych; d. 20 Nov 1372), 2nd dau. and cohrss. of John Comyn, Lord of Badenoch, by his wife Joan de Valence, sister and cohrss. of Aymer [de Valence], 1st Earl of Pembroke, and 3rd dau. of William de Valence, Lord of Valence, Montignac, Bellac, Rancon and Champagnac, by his wife Joan de Munchensy, dau. of Sir Warin de Munchensy, of Swanscombe, co. Kent, Winfarthing and Gooderstone, co. Norfolk, etc., by his first wife Lady Joan Marshal, sister and cohrss. in her issue of Anselm [Marshal], 9th Earl of Pembroke, and 2nd dau. of William [Marshal], jure uxoris 4th Earl of Pembroke
    children
    1. Sir Gilbert Talbot, later 3rd Baron Talbot
    died
    23 Oct 1356 (bur. at Flanesford Priory)
    created
    by writ v.p. 27 Jan 1331/2 Baron Talbot
    suc. by
    son


    end

    Richard married Elizabeth Comyn Abt 1325, Wyke, Axminster, Devon, England. Elizabeth (daughter of John "The Red" Comyn, III, Lord of Badenoch and Joan de Valence) was born 1 Nov 1299, Wyke, Axminster, Devon, England; died 20 Nov 1372. [Group Sheet]


  2. 129.  Elizabeth ComynElizabeth Comyn was born 1 Nov 1299, Wyke, Axminster, Devon, England (daughter of John "The Red" Comyn, III, Lord of Badenoch and Joan de Valence); died 20 Nov 1372.

    Notes:

    Elizabeth de Comyn (1 November 1299 - 20 November 1372) was a medieval noblewoman and heiress, notable for being kidnapped by the Despenser family towards the end of the reign of King Edward II.

    Background

    Elizabeth was born to John III Comyn, Lord of Badenoch, also known as the "Red Comyn", a powerful Scottish nobleman related to the Scottish crown, and Joan de Valence, the daughter of the French knight William de Valence, 1st Earl of Pembroke. She was the youngest of three children, with an elder sister, Joan de Comyn, and brother, John de Comyn. Her father was stabbed to death in 1306 by Robert the Bruce and Elizabeth and her siblings were sent south to England for their own safety. Joan married David II Strathbogie, the earl of Atholl, whilst her brother John later died at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314, fighting Robert.

    Inheritance and kidnap

    In 1324 Elizabeth's uncle on her father's side, Aymer de Valence, the earl of Pembroke, died. Since he had no surviving children, Aymer's considerable lands were then divided amongst his sisters; Isabel de Valence had died in 1305, leaving her share to her son, John Hastings, whilst Elizabeth's mother left lands to her daughters Joan and Elizabeth. Joan inherited the manor and castle of Mitford, the manor of Ponteland, and lands in Little Eland, and the manor of Foston. Elizabeth inherited the powerful fortress of Goodrich Castle and the manor of Painswick.

    By the mid-1320s, however, England was in the grip of the oppressive rule of the Marcher lords Hugh le Despenser the older and his son Hugh Despenser the younger, the royal favourites of King Edward II.[1] As part of a "sweeping revenge" on their rivals, especially in the Marches, the Despensers illegally seized a wide range of properties, particularly from vulnerable targets such as widows, or wives whose husbands were out of favour with the king.[2]


    Elizabeth de Comyn was held by the Despensers in an attempt to gain ownership of the powerful castle of Goodrich, shown here.
    John Hastings was effectively controlled by the Despensers and they ensured that he inherited an unequally large settlement of the Pembroke lands, anticipating that they would be able to marry him into their family and thereby acquire control of the estates themselves.[3] To deal with Elizabeth, however, stronger measures were necessary. Upon her inheritance, Hugh le Despenser the younger promptly kidnapped Elizabeth in London and transported her to Herefordshire to be imprisoned in her own castle at Goodrich.[4] Threatened with death, Elizabeth was finally forced to sign over the castle and other lands to the Despensers in April 1325.[5] She was also forced to sign a debt notice of ¹10,000, a huge sum,[6] which was witnessed by John de Bousser, a corrupt royal justice.[7]

    Released, Elizabeth then married the English knight Richard Talbot, the 2nd Baron Talbot. Queen Isabella of France landed in England in late 1326 and deposed both the Despensers and her husband Edward II; Richard promptly seized Goodrich Castle from the Despensers, and Talbot and Elizabeth regained their legal title to the castle the following year.[8] The Despensers were executed by Isabella, who killed Hugh the Younger in a particularly gruesome fashion.

    Later years

    Elizabeth and Richard did well in the coming years. They had a son, Gilbert, in 1332. Richard progressed at court under Edward III and eventually became a royal steward. After Richard's death in 1356, Elizabeth remarried to Sir John Bromwich. She died in 1372.[9] Elizabeth's heraldic device was three garbs, which she maintained as her own, rather than adopting her husbands'.[10]

    Bibliography

    Brayley, Edward William and William Tombleson. (1823) A Series of Views of the Most Interesting Remains of Ancient Castles of England and Wales. London: Longman.
    Doherty, P.C. (2003) Isabella and the Strange Death of Edward II. London: Robinson.
    Hull, Lise and Stephen Whitehorne. (2008) Great Castles of Britain & Ireland. London: New Holland Publishers.
    Fryde, Natalie. (2003) The Tyranny and Fall of Edward II 1321-1326. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    McAndrew, Bruce A. (2006) Scotland's historic heraldry. Woodbridge: Boydell Press.
    Prestwich, Michael. (2007) Plantagenet England 1225-1360. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    Rickard, John. (2002) The Castle Community: the Personnel of English and Welsh Castles, 1272-1422. Woodbridge: Boydell Press.
    Underhill, Frances Ann. (1999) For her good estate: the life of Elizabeth de Burgh. London: Palgrave Macmillna.
    Weir, Alison. (2006) Queen Isabella: She-Wolf of France, Queen of England. London: Pimlico Books.

    References

    Jump up ^ Doherty, pp.74-5.
    Jump up ^ Weir, p.138.
    Jump up ^ Underhill, p.34.
    Jump up ^ Hull and Whitehorne, p.37.
    Jump up ^ Rickard, p.37; Brayley and Tombleson, p.2.
    Jump up ^ Prestwich, p.207.
    Jump up ^ Fryde, p.115.
    Jump up ^ Rickard, p.242; Hull and Whitehorne, p.37.
    Jump up ^ McAndrew, p.158.
    Jump up ^ McAndrew, p.158.

    Children:
    1. 64. Gilbert Talbot, 3rd Baron Talbot was born 0___ 1332, Goodrich Castle, Hereford, England; was christened Ecclesfield, West Riding, Yorkshire, England; died 24 Apr 1386, Roales del Pan, Spain.

  3. 130.  James Butler, 1st Earl of OrmondJames Butler, 1st Earl of Ormond was born ~ 1305, Arlow, County Wicklow, Ireland (son of Edmund Butler, Knight, Earl of Carrick and Joan Fitzgerald, Countess of Carrick); died 6 Jan 1338, Gowran Castle, County Kilkenny, Ireland; was buried St. Mary's Collegiate Church Gowran, Gowran, County Kilkenny, Ireland.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Chief Butler of Ireland

    Notes:

    Father: Sir Edmund Butler of Gowran (1268-1321)

    Mother: Joan Fitzgerald, Lady Butler of Gowran (~1282-1320)

    Birth: 18 Mar 1305 Ireland

    “28 Feb. 1327, Westminster…Order to deliver to James le Botiller, son and heir of Edmund le Botiler of Ireland, the issues of his father’s lands from 2 December, in the 19th year of the late king’s reign, when the said king took his homage for his father’s land, and rendered the same to him…that although he entered the lands in Ireland that are of his inheritance by pretext of the said order, the issues thereof from the said 2 December until 18 March following are detained from him” [CCR 1327-1330]; “25 Oct. 1327, Nottingham…as well of the inheritance of James le Botiller, lately a minor, as of others” [CPR 1327-1330]; “He was ‘lately a minor,’ 25 Oct. 1327. Possibly he came of age 18 Mar. 1325/6, to which date the issues of his lands were retained by the King’s officers.”1

    Baptism:

    “James’s name may reflect his father’s devotion to Santiago de Compostela, for in 1320 Edmund, his wife, and son were released from a vow to visit the shrine of St James.”2

    Death: 16 Feb 1338 Gowran Castle, Co. Kilkenny, Ireland

    “1337…Item, eodem anno, obiit apud Baligaveran, dominus Jacobus le Botiller, primus comes Hermonie; vir liberalis et amicabilis, facetus et decorus, in flore juventutis flos emarcuit xii. Kal: Marcii, die Martis in sero” [Annalium Hiberniae Chronicon];3 “The account of James le Botiller, lately Earl of Ormond, father of James, now Earl, for the issues of the King’s prise of wines in Ireland from the feast of St. Hilary 8 Edward III…to February 16, 12 Edward III, on which day the said Earl died…August, 1364.”4 Friar Clyn stated the Earl died on 18 February, but the writs following his death were issued on that day, and instead 16 February, as reported by his son the second Earl in 1364, would seem to be the accurate date of death.

    Burial: St Mary Collegiate Church, Gowran, co. Kilkenny, Ireland

    “And was bur. at Gowran, the chief seat of the family before the purchase of Kilkenny Castle. His father had founded a chantry there (Journal, R. Soc. Antiq. [I.], vol. xl, p. 344; O.D., vol. i, no. 470).”1

    Occupation: 1st Earl of Ormond 1328-1338

    Spouse:



    Eleanor de Bohun, Countess of Ormond

    Marriage: 21 Nov 1328

    Date is of marriage pardon: “21 Nov. 1328, Westminster. Pardon and acquittance to James le Botiller, earl of Ormound, the king’s kinsman, who married Eleanor de Bohoun, the king’s kinswoman, with his consent, of the arrears of the fine of 2,000 marks, made by him with the late king for the marriage” [CPR 1327-1330]; “Having, in 1327, married Eleanor, fecond daughter of Humphrey Bohun, the fourth Earl of Hereford and Effex.”5 Lodge, whom CP follows, provides no source for his marriage date of 1327, and the Patent Rolls show Eleanor was unmarried as late as February 1328. The marriage likely took place in the autumn of that year, close to the time James was created Earl of Ormond.

    Children:

    John Butler (1330-by 1332)

    James Butler (1331-1382)

    Pernel Butler (~1335-1368)



    Sources

    1. The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain, and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct, or Dormant – New Edition, Revised and Much Enlarged, George Edward Cokayne et al (eds.), St. Catherine Press Limited (London: 1910-1959), 13 vols.

    2. Robin Frame, “Butler, James, first earl of Ormond (c.1305–1338),” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, 2004.

    3. The Annals of Ireland by Friar John Clyn, Together with the Annals of Ross, Very Rev. Richard Butler (ed.), Irish Archaeological Society (Dublin: 1849).

    4. Calendar of Ormond Deeds: Volume III, 1413-1509 A.D., Edmund Curtis (ed.), Irish Manuscripts Commission (Dublin: 1935).

    5. John Lodge, The Peerage of Ireland: or, a Genealogical History of the Present Nobility of that Kingdom: Revised, Enlarged and Continued to the Present Time, Mervyn Archdall (ed.), James Moore (Dublin: 1789), 7 vols.

    *

    James Butler, 1st Earl of Ormond (c. 1305 – 6 January 1338. James is buried in St. Mary's Collegiate Church Gowran, Gowran, Co. Kilkenny), was a noble in the Peerage of Ireland.

    Ancestry

    He was the son of Edmund Butler, Earl of Carrick, Justiciar of Ireland, (1268- 13 September 1321) and Joan FitzGerald, Countess of Carrick. His paternal grandparents were Theobald le Botiller (1242–1285), (son of Theobald le Botiller and Margery de Burgh), and Joan FitzJohn (FitzGeffrey) (died 4 April 1303), daughter of John FitzGeoffrey, Lord of Shere,[1] Justiciar of Ireland, and Isabel Bigod. His maternal grandfather was John FitzThomas FitzGerald, 1st Earl of Kildare.

    Titles

    Upon his father's death in 1321, the only hereditary title that James held was that of Chief Butler Of Ireland. As the 7th Chief Butler, he inherited the title from his ancestor Theobald Fitzwalter whose successors adopted the surname Butler.[2] A gap of 7 years was to follow before James was rewarded for his loyalty to the Crown with an earldom in his own right. His benefactor, King Edward III created him the first Earl of Ormond by patent, bearing date 2 November 1328 at Salisbury, the King then holding a Parliament there, with the creation fee of ¹10 a year.[3] Seven days afterwards, by patent dated at Wallingford, in consideration of his services, and the better to enable him to support the honour, the King gave to him the regalities, liberties, knights fees, and other royal privileges of the county of Tipperary, and the rights of a palatine in that county for life.

    At the same time, the king created Roger Mortimer as the 1st Earl of March.[4]

    In 1336 he founded the friary of Carrick-Begg (a townland on the River Suir opposite Carrick-on-Suir) for Franciscan Friars. On 3 June of that year, he gave the friars his castle and estate of Carrick, of which they took possession on Sunday the feast of SS. Peter and Paul.

    Marriage and issue

    In 1327, he married Eleanor de Bohun, daughter of The 4th Earl of Hereford and The Lady Elizabeth, herself a daughter of King Edward I of England, and they had two daughters and two sons:

    John Butler (born at Ardee on St. Leonard's day (6 November) 1330, died an infant)
    Petronella Butler (d. 23 April 1368), married Gilbert Talbot, 3rd Baron Talbot, son of Richard Talbot, 2nd Baron Talbot and Elizabeth Comyn, and had issue.
    Alianore Butler (died 1392), married after 20 July 1359, Gerald FitzGerald, Earl of Desmond, son of Maurice FitzThomas, Earl of Desmond and Aveline FitzMorice, and had issue.
    James Butler, 2nd Earl of Ormond (4 Oct 1331 – 18 Oct 1382), married Elizabeth Darcy daughter of Sir John Darcy, Lord Justice of Ireland, and Joan de Burgh, and had issue. James was born at Kilkenny and given in ward, 1 September 1344, to Maurice, Earl of Desmond, for the fine of 2306 marcs; and afterward to Sir John Darcy who married him to his daughter Elizabeth. He was usually called the noble Earl, on account of his descent from the Royal Family.[5]
    James' successors held the title Earl of Ormond, later merged with the higher title of Duke of Ormonde and held palatine rights in County Tipperary[4] until the County Palatine of Tipperary Act 1715.

    See also

    Barony of Iffa and Offa East
    Butler dynasty

    References

    Jump up ^ H.E. Malden (editor) (1911). "Parishes: Shere". A History of the County of Surrey: Volume 3. Institute of Historical Research. Retrieved 7 November 2013.
    Jump up ^ http://encyclopedia.farlex.com/Butlers+of+Ormond
    Jump up ^ Lodge, John The Peerage of Ireland or, A Genealogical History Of The Present Nobility Of That Kingdom, 1789, Vol IV, p 7.
    ^ Jump up to: a b Mountmorres of Castlemorres, Hervey Redmond Morres; Robert Southwell (1792). The History of the Principal Transactions of the Irish Parliament, from ... 1634 to 1666: Containing Proceedings of the Lords and Commons During the Administration of the Earl of Strafford, and of the First Duke of Ormond. New York Public Library: T. Cadell. p. 194.
    Jump up ^ Lodge, John The Peerage of Ireland or, A Genealogical History Of The Present Nobility Of That Kingdom, 1789, Vol IV, p 8.

    *

    History of The Butler Dynasty from Wikipedia ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Butler_dynasty

    *

    James Butler, 1st Earl of Ormond. Knight of the Garter, Knight of Knocktopher, Kilkeney, Nenah and Thurles, Tipperary, Aylesbury, Grewt Lindford and Rotherfield Peppard, Buckinghamshire. Of Sopley, Hampshire, of LaVacherie and Shere, Surrey, of Weeton, Lancashire. Hereditary Chief Butler of Ireland, Lieutenant of Ireland.

    Son and heir of Sir Edmund Butler, Earl of Carrick, Justiciar of Ireland and Joan FitzThomas.

    First husband of Eleanor de Bohun, 2nd surviving daughter of Humphrey de Bohun and Elizabeth of England. They had two sons and one daughter: John, James, Pernel.

    He was only three when he served as a hostage for his father, held in Dublin Castle in 1317. His father's will was dated 1321, and death the same year, listed James, who would be the 7th Chief Butler of Ireland, from long line of ancestors named FitzWalter, adopting the surname of Butler. He received protection (permission) to cross to Ireland in 1326. In 1327, Eleanor was offered to James with an arrangement of the castle and manor of Kilpeck, Herefordshire for life.

    King Edward III created him the first Earl of Ormond by patent, bearing date 2 November 1328 at Salisbury with the creation fee of ¹10 a year. At the same time, the king created Roger Mortimer as the 1st Earl of March.

    In 1336 he founded the friary of Carrick-Begg for Franciscan Friars. On 3 June of that year, he gave the friars his castle and estate of Carrick, of which they took possession on Sunday the feast of SS. Peter and Paul.

    James died 06 Jan 1338 and was buried at Gowran. His widow would remarry to Sir Thomas de Dagworth.

    *

    Buried:
    View images of St. Mary's ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gowran_Castle

    Died:
    View images of Gowran Castle ... https://www.google.com/search?q=gowran+castle+photos&rlz=1C1KMZB_enUS591US591&espv=2&biw=1440&bih=810&tbm=isch&imgil=w7j7d2V5JVh57M%253A%253BM-fhAzysf-CQqM%253Bhttp%25253A%25252F%25252Firishantiquities.bravehost.com%25252Fkilkenny%25252Fgowran%25252Fgowran_castle.html&source=iu&pf=m&fir=w7j7d2V5JVh57M%253A%252CM-fhAzysf-CQqM%252C_&usg=__7XMJd8-6FBq38sCx8x7KX4Vtg3k%3D&dpr=1&ved=0ahUKEwjJwf-5sIjPAhUCGz4KHRsmDYwQyjcINQ&ei=udzVV4mBKIK2-AGbzLTgCA#imgrc=w7j7d2V5JVh57M%3A

    James married Eleanor de Bohun, Countess of Ormonde 0___ 1327. Eleanor (daughter of Humphrey de Bohun, VII, 4th Earl of Hereford and Elizabeth Plantagenet, Princess of England) was born 17 Oct 1304, Knaresborough Castle, North Yorkshire, England; died 7 Oct 1363. [Group Sheet]


  4. 131.  Eleanor de Bohun, Countess of Ormonde was born 17 Oct 1304, Knaresborough Castle, North Yorkshire, England (daughter of Humphrey de Bohun, VII, 4th Earl of Hereford and Elizabeth Plantagenet, Princess of England); died 7 Oct 1363.

    Notes:

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Eleanor de Bohun, Countess of Ormond (17 October 1304 – 7 October 1363) was an English noblewoman born in Knaresborough Castle to Humphrey de Bohun, 4th Earl of Hereford, and Elizabeth, daughter of King Edward I of England and Eleanor of Castile. After the deaths of her parents, she was placed in the care of her aunt Mary Plantagenet and brought up at Amesbury Priory alongside various cousins including Joan Gaveston, Isabel of Lancaster and Joan de Monthermer. Edward II of England gave the priory a generous allowance of 100 marks annually for the upkeep of Eleanor and her younger cousin, Joan Gaveston.[1]

    Eleanor was married twice; first in 1327 to James Butler, 1st Earl of Ormond, (son of Edmund Butler, Earl of Carrick and Lady Joan FitzGerald) who died in 1337 and secondly, six years later in 1343, to Thomas de Dagworth, Lord Dagworth who was killed in an ambush in Brittany in 1352.

    By her first marriage, Eleanor was an ancestress of Anne Boleyn and Catherine Parr,[2] Queens consort of King Henry VIII of England. Other descendants include the Dukes of Beaufort, Newcastle, Norfolk, Earls of Ormond, Desmond, Shrewsbury, Dorset, Rochester, Sandwich, Arundel, and Stafford.[1]

    Children

    By James Butler:

    John Butler (born 6 November 1330, died young)
    Petronilla (or Perina) Butler, Baroness Talbot (died 1387) who married Gilbert Talbot, 3rd Baron Talbot and had a daughter, Elizabeth Talbot, who married Sir Henry de Grey of Wilton, 5th Lord Grey of Wilton.[3]
    James Butler, 2nd Earl of Ormond (4 October 1331 – 18 October 1382) who married Elizabeth Darcy

    By Thomas de Dagworth:

    Eleanor de Dagworth who married at Vachery (in Cranley), Surrey by license dated 23 June 1362 Walter Fitz Walter, Knt, 3rd Lord Fitz Walter. Eleanor was living 29 Nov 1375. At her death, she was buried in Dunmow Priory.[4]

    See also
    Butler dynasty

    References

    ^ Jump up to: a b http://edwardthesecond.blogspot.com/2007/02/eleanor-and-margaret-de-bohun.html
    Jump up ^ Weis, Frederick; Sheppard, Walter; Beall, William Ancestral roots of certain American colonists who came to America before 1700: lineages from Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and other historical individuals, pg 20.
    Jump up ^ Richardson, Douglas (2011). Magna Carta ancestry : a study in colonial and medieval families (2nd ed.). Salt Lake City, UT.: Douglas Richardson. pp. 165–166, 345–346. ISBN 9781460992708.
    Jump up ^ Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, p.347
    thepeerage.com Accessed 22 March 2008
    Eleanor de Bohun Accessed 23 March 2008

    Images of Knaresborough Castle ... https://www.google.com/search?q=Knaresborough+Castle&espv=2&rlz=1C1KMZB_enUS591US591&biw=1440&bih=815&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjj5KWR9bXJAhXJMSYKHVw7AcAQsAQIIw&dpr=1

    Birth:
    The castle was first built by a Norman baron in c.1100 on a cliff above the River Nidd. There is documentary evidence dating from 1130 referring to works carried out at the castle by Henry I.[1] In the 1170s Hugh de Moreville and his followers took refuge there after assassinating Thomas Becket.

    In 1205 King John took control of Knareborough Castle.[2] He regarded Knaresborough as an important northern fortress and spent ¹1,290 on improvements to the castle.[citation needed] The castle was later rebuilt at a cost of ¹2,174 between 1307 and 1312 by Edward I and later completed by Edward II, including the great keep.[3] John of Gaunt acquired the castle in 1372, adding it to the vast holdings of the Duchy of Lancaster.

    The castle was taken by Parliamentarian troops in 1644 during the Civil War, and largely destroyed in 1648 not as the result of warfare, but because of an order from Parliament to dismantle all Royalist castles. Indeed, many town centre buildings are built of 'castle stone'.

    The remains are open to the public and there is a charge for entry to the interior remains. The grounds are used as a public leisure space, with a bowling green and putting green open during summer. It is also used as a performing space, with bands playing most afternoons through the summer. It plays host to frequent events, such as FEVA.[4] The property is owned by the monarch as part of the Duchy of Lancaster holdings, but is administered by Harrogate Borough Council.

    The castle, now much ruined, comprised two walled baileys set one behind the other, with the outer bailey on the town side and the inner bailey on the cliff side. The enclosure wall was punctuated by solid towers along its length, and a pair, visible today, formed the main gate. At the junction between the inner and outer baileys, on the north side of the castle stood a tall five-sided keep, the eastern parts of which has been pulled down. The keep had a vaulted basement, at least three upper stories, and served as a residence for the lord of the castle throughout the castle's history. The castle baileys contained residential buildings, and some foundations have survived.

    The upper storey of the Courthouse features a museum that includes furniture from the original Tudor Court, as well as exhibits about the castle and the town.

    Map & Picture ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knaresborough_Castle

    Children:
    1. 72. James Butler, 2nd Earl of Ormond was born 4 Oct 1331; died 18 Oct 1382, Knocktopher, Ireland; was buried St. Canice's Cathedral, Kilkenny, Ireland.
    2. 65. Petronella Butler was born 0___ 1332, Ormonde, Kerry, Munster, Ireland; was christened Pollecott, Buckingham, England; died 23 Apr 1368.

  5. 134.  Edmund FitzAlan, Knight, 9th Earl of Arundel was born 1 May 1285, Marlborough Castle, Marlborough, Wiltshire, England (son of Richard FitzAlan, Knight, 8th Earl of Arundel and Alice of Saluzzo, Countess of Arundel); died 17 Nov 1326, Hereford, Herefordshire, England; was buried Haughmond Abbey, Shropshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Residence: Paris, France
    • Also Known As: 3rd Earl of Arundel

    Notes:

    Edmund FitzAlan, 9th Earl of Arundel[a] (1 May 1285 – 17 November 1326) was an English nobleman prominent in the conflict between Edward II and his barons. His father, Richard FitzAlan, 2nd Earl of Arundel, died on 9 March 1301, while Edmund was still a minor. He therefore became a ward of John de Warenne, Earl of Surrey, and married Warenne's granddaughter Alice. In 1306 he was styled Earl of Arundel, and served under Edward I in the Scottish Wars, for which he was richly rewarded.

    After Edward I's death, Arundel became part of the opposition to the new king Edward II, and his favourite Piers Gaveston. In 1311 he was one of the so-called Lords Ordainers who assumed control of government from the king. Together with Thomas, Earl of Lancaster, he was responsible for the death of Gaveston in 1312. From this point on, however, his relationship to the king became more friendly. This was to a large extent due to his association with the king's new favourite Hugh Despenser the Younger, whose daughter was married to Arundel's son. Arundel supported the king in suppressing rebellions by Roger Mortimer and other Marcher Lords, and eventually also Thomas of Lancaster. For this he was awarded with land and offices.

    His fortune changed, however, when the country was invaded in 1326 by Mortimer, who had made common cause with the king's wife, Queen Isabella. Immediately after the capture of Edward II, the queen, Edward III's regent, ordered Arundel executed, his title forfeit and his property confiscated. Arundel's son and heir Richard only recovered the title and lands in 1331, after Edward III had taken power from the regency of Isabella and Mortimer. In the 1390s, a cult emerged around the late earl. He was venerated as a martyr, though he was never canonised.

    Family and early life

    Edmund FitzAlan was born in the Castle of Marlborough, in Wiltshire, on 1 May 1285.[1] He was the son of Richard FitzAlan, 8th Earl of Arundel, and his wife, Alice of Saluzzo, daughter of Thomas I of Saluzzo in Italy. Richard had been in opposition to the king during the political crisis of 1295, and as a result he had incurred great debts and had parts of his land confiscated.[2] When Richard died in 09/03/1301, Edmund's wardship was given to John de Warenne, Earl of Surrey. Warenne's only son, William, had died in 1286, so his daughter Alice was now heir apparent to the Warenne earldom. Alice was offered in marriage to Edmund, who for unknown reasons initially refused her. By 1305 he had changed his mind, however, and the two were married.[3]

    In April 1306, shortly before turning twenty-one, Edmund was granted possession of his father's title and land. On 22 May 1306, he was knighted by Edward I, along with the young Prince Edward – the future Edward II.[1] The knighting was done in expectation of military service the Scottish Wars, and after the campaign was over, Arundel was richly rewarded. Edward I pardoned the young earl a debt of ¹4,234. This flow of patronage continued after the death of Edward I in 1307; in 1308 Edward II returned the hundred of Purslow to Arundel, an honour that Edward I had confiscated from Edmund's father.[4] There were also official honours in the early years of Edward II's reign. At the new king's coronation on 25 February 1308, Arundel officiated as chief butler (or pincerna), a hereditary office of the earls of Arundel.[3]

    Opposition to Edward II

    Though the reign of Edward II was initially harmonious, he soon met with opposition from several of his earls and prelates.[5] At the source of the discontent was the king's relationship with the young Gascon knight Piers Gaveston, who had been exiled by Edward I, but was recalled immediately upon Edward II's accession.[6] Edward's favouritism towards the upstart Gaveston was an offence to the established nobility, and his elevation to the earldom of Cornwall was particularly offensive to the established nobility.[7] A group of magnates led by Henry de Lacy, Earl of Lincoln, forced Gaveston into exile in 1308.[8] By 1309, however, Edward had reconciled himself with the opposition, and Gaveston was allowed to return.[9]

    Arundel joined the opposition at an early point, and did not attend the Stamford parliament in July 1309, where Gaveston's return was negotiated.[10] After Gaveston returned, his behaviour became even more offensive, and opposition towards him grew.[11] In addition to this, there was great discontent with Edward II's failure to follow up his father's Scottish campaigns.[12] On 16 March 1310, the king had to agree to the appointment of a committee known as the Lords Ordainers, who were to be in charge of the reform of the royal government. Arundel was one of eight earls among the twenty-one Ordainers.[13]

    The Ordainers once more sent Gaveston into exile in 1311, but by 1312 he was back.[14] Now the king's favourite was officially an outlaw, and Arundel was among the earls who swore to hunt him down. The leader of the opposition – after Lincoln's death the year before – was now Thomas, Earl of Lancaster.[15] In June 1312 Gaveston was captured, tried before Lancaster, Arundel and the earls of Warwick and Hereford, and executed.[16] A reconciliation was achieved between the king and the offending magnates, and Arundel and the others received pardons, but animosity prevailed. In 1314 Arundel was among the magnates who refused to assist Edward in a campaign against the Scottish, resulting in the disastrous English defeat at the Battle of Bannockburn.[10]

    Return to loyalty

    Around the time of Bannockburn, however, Arundel's loyalty began to shift back towards the king. Edward's rapprochement towards the earl had in fact started earlier, when on 2 November 1313, the king pardoned Arundel's royal debts.[17] The most significant factor in this process though, was the marriage alliance between Arundel and the king's new favourites, the Despensers. Hugh Despenser the Younger and his father Hugh Despenser the elder were gradually taking over control of the government, and using their power to enrich themselves.[18] While this alienated most of the nobility, Arundel's situation was different. At some point in 1314–1315, his son Richard was betrothed to Isabel, daughter of Hugh Despenser the Younger.[17] Now that he found himself back in royal favour, Arundel started receiving rewards in the form of official appointments. In 1317 he was appointed Warden of the Marches of Scotland, and in August 1318, he helped negotiate the Treaty of Leake, which temporarily reconciled the king with Thomas of Lancaster.[10]


    Clun Castle was the source of the personal animosity between Arundel and Roger Mortimer.
    With Arundel's change of allegiance came a conflict of interest. In August 1321, a demand was made to the king that Hugh Despenser and his father, Hugh Despenser the elder, be sent into exile.[19] The king, facing a rebellion in the Welsh Marches, had no choice but to assent.[20] Arundel voted for the expulsion, but later he claimed that he did so under compulsion, and also supported their recall in December.[10] Arundel had suffered personally from the rebellion, when Roger Mortimer seized his castle of Clun.[21][22] Early in 1322, Arundel joined King Edward in a campaign against the Mortimer family.[20] The opposition soon crumbled, and the king decided to move against Thomas of Lancaster, who had been supporting the marcher rebellion all along. Lancaster was defeated at the Battle of Boroughbridge in March, and executed.[23]

    In the aftermath of the rebellion, the Despensers enriched themselves on the forfeited estates of the rebels, and Hugh Despenser the elder was created Earl of Winchester in May 1322.[24] Also Arundel, who was now one of the king's principal supporters, was richly rewarded. After the capture of Roger Mortimer in 1322, he received the forfeited Mortimer lordship of Chirk in Wales.[10] He was also trusted with important offices: he became Chief Justiciar of North and South Wales in 1323, and in 1325 he was made Warden of the Welsh Marches, responsible for the array in Wales.[1] He also extended his influence through marriage alliances; in 1325 he secured marriages between two of his daughters and the sons and heirs of two of Lancaster's main allies: the deceased earls of Hereford and Warwick.[b]

    Final years and death

    In 1323, Roger Mortimer, who had been held in captivity in the Tower of London, escaped and fled to France.[22] Two years later, Queen Isabella travelled to Paris on an embassy to the French king. Here, Isabella and Mortimer developed a plan to invade England and replace Edward II on the throne with his son, the young Prince Edward, who was in the company of Isabella.[25] Isabella and Mortimer landed in England on 24 September 1326, and due to the virulent resentment against the Despenser regime, few came to the king's aid.[26] Arundel initially escaped the invading force in the company of the king, but was later dispatched to his estates in Shropshire to gather troops.[27] At Shrewsbury he was captured by his old enemy John Charlton of Powys, and brought to Queen Isabella at Hereford. On 17 November – the day after Edward II had been taken captive – Arundel was executed, allegedly on the instigation of Mortimer.[10] According to a chronicle account, the use of a blunt sword was ordered, and the executioner needed 22 strokes to sever the earl's head from his body.[28]


    The ruins of Haughmond Abbey, Arundel's final resting place.
    Arundel's body was initially interred at the Franciscan church in Hereford. It had been his wish, however, to be buried at the family's traditional resting place of Haughmond Abbey in Shropshire, and this is where he was finally buried.[29] Though he was never canonised, a cult emerged around the late earl in the 1390s, associating him with the 9th-century martyr king St Edmund. This veneration may have been inspired by a similar cult around his grandson, Richard FitzAlan, 11th Earl of Arundel, who was executed by Richard II in 1397.[30]

    Arundel was attainted at his execution; his estates were forfeited to the crown, and large parts of these were appropriated by Isabella and Mortimer.[31] The castle and honour of Arundel was briefly held by Edward II's half-brother Edmund, Earl of Kent, who was executed on 3 September 1330.[1] Edmund FitzAlan's son, Richard, failed in an attempted rebellion against the crown in June 1330, and had to flee to France. In October the same year, the guardianship of Isabella and Mortimer was supplanted by the personal rule of King Edward III. This allowed Richard to return and reclaim his inheritance, and on 8 February 1331, he was fully restored to his father's lands, and created Earl of Arundel.[32]

    Issue

    Edmund and Alice had at least seven children:[33]

    Name Birth date Death date Notes
    Richard FitzAlan, 10th Earl of Arundel c. 1313 24 January 1376 Married (1) Isabel le Despenser, (2) Eleanor of Lancaster
    Edmund — c. 1349
    Michael — —
    Mary — 29 August 1396 Married John le Strange, 4th Baron Strange of Blackmere[34]
    Aline — 20 January 1386 Married Roger le Strange, 5th Baron Strange of Knockin[35]
    Alice — 1326 Married John de Bohun, 5th Earl of Hereford
    Katherine — d. 1375/76 Married (1) Henry Hussey, 2nd Baron Hussey, (2) Andrew Peverell
    Eleanor — — Married Gerard de Lisle, 1st Baron Lisle
    Elizabeth - - Married William Latimer, 4th Baron Latimer
    Ancestry[edit]

    Residence:
    in exile...

    Died:
    executed...

    Edmund married Alice de Warenne, Countess of Arundel 0___ 1305. Alice (daughter of William de Warenne and Joan de Vere) was born 15 Jun 1287, Warren, Sussex, England; died 23 May 1338. [Group Sheet]


  6. 135.  Alice de Warenne, Countess of Arundel was born 15 Jun 1287, Warren, Sussex, England (daughter of William de Warenne and Joan de Vere); died 23 May 1338.

    Notes:

    Alice de Warenne, Countess of Arundel (15 June 1287 -23 May 1338) was an English noblewoman and heir apparent to the Earldom of Surrey. In 1305, she married Edmund FitzAlan, 9th Earl of Arundel.

    Family

    Alice, the only daughter of William de Warenne (1256-1286) and Joan de Vere, was born on 15 June 1287 in Warren, Sussex, six months after her father was accidentally killed in a tournament on 15 December 1286. On the death of her paternal grandfather, John de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey in 1304, her only sibling John de Warenne, 7th Earl of Surrey succeeded to the earldom. He became estranged from his childless wife and they never reconciled, leaving Alice as the heir presumptive to the Surrey estates and title.

    Marriage to the Earl of Arundel

    In 1305, Alice married Edmund Fitzalan, 9th Earl of Arundel,[1] the son of Richard Fitzalan, 8th Earl of Arundel and Alice of Saluzzo.[2] He had initially refused her, for reasons which were not recorded;[citation needed] however, by 1305, he had changed his mind and they were wed.[1] They had nine recorded children,[citation needed] and their chief residence was Arundel Castle in Sussex. Arundel inherited his title on 9 March 1302 upon his father's death.[2] He was summoned to Parliament as Lord Arundel in 1306, and was later one of the Lords Ordainers. He also took part in the Scottish wars.

    The Earl of Arundel and his brother-in-law John de Warenne were the only nobles who remained loyal to King Edward II, after Queen Isabella and her lover Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March returned to England in 1326. He had allied himself to the King's favourite Hugh le Despenser, and agreed to the marriage of his son to Despenser's granddaughter. Arundel had previously been granted many of the traitor Mortimer's forfeited estates, and was appointed Justice of Wales in 1322 and Warden of the Welsh Marches in 1325. He was also made Constable of Montgomery Castle which became his principal base.

    The Earl of Arundel was captured in Shropshire by the Queen's party.[3] On 17 November 1326 in Hereford, Arundel was beheaded by order of the Queen, leaving Alice de Warenne a widow. Her husband's estates and titles were forfeited to the Crown following Arundel's execution, but later restored to her eldest son, Richard.[citation needed]

    Alice died before 23 May 1338,[1] aged 50. Her brother died in 1347 without legitimate issue, thus the title of Surrey eventually passed to Alice's son, Richard.

    Issue

    Richard FitzAlan, 10th Earl of Arundel, known as Copped Hat, (1306 Arundel Castle, Sussex – 24 January 1376), also succeeded to the title of Earl of Surrey on 12 April 1361. He married firstly Isabel le Despenser, whom he later repudiated, and was granted an annulment by Pope Clement VI. He had a son Edmund who was bastardised by the annulment. His second wife, whom he married on 5 February 1345, by Papal dispensation, was Eleanor of Lancaster, the daughter of Henry, 3rd Earl of Lancaster and Maud Chaworth. She was the widow of John de Beaumont, 2nd Lord Beaumont. Richard and Eleanor had three sons and four daughters, including Richard FitzAlan, 11th Earl of Arundel and Joan de Bohun, Countess of Hereford.
    Edward FitzAlan (1308–1398)
    Alice FitzAlan (born 1310), married John de Bohun, 5th Earl of Hereford.
    Joan FitzAlan (born 1312), married Warin Gerard, Baron L'Isle.
    Aline FitzAlan (1314–1386), married Roger le Strange, 5th Baron Strange of Knockyn, by whom she had issue.
    John FitzAlan (born 1315)
    Catherine FitzAlan (died 1376), married firstly Andrew Peverell, and secondly Henry Hussey of Cockfield. Had issue by her second husband.
    Elizabeth FitzAlan (1320–1389), married William Latimer, 4th Baron Latimer, by whom she had one daughter, Elizabeth.
    Eleanor FitzAlan

    Notes:

    Residence (Family):
    Arundel Castle is a restored and remodeled medieval castle in Arundel, West Sussex, England. It was established by Roger de Montgomery on Christmas Day 1067. Roger became the first to hold the earldom of Arundel by the graces of William the Conqueror. The castle was damaged in the English Civil War and then restored in the 18th and 19th centuries.

    View image, history & source ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arundel_Castle

    Children:
    1. Richard FitzAlan, Knight, 10th Earl of Arundel was born 1306-1313, Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England; died 24 Jan 1376, Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England; was buried Lewes Priory, Southover, Sussex, England.
    2. 67. Mary de Arundel was born Corfham Castle, Diddlebury, Shropshire, England; died 29 Aug 1396, Corfham, Shropshire, England.
    3. 95. Aline FitzAlan was born 0___ 1314, Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England; died 20 Jan 1386.
    4. Elizabeth FitzAlan was born 0___ 1320, (England); died 0___ 1389.

  7. 146.  John Darcy, 1st Baron Darcy, Knight of Knaith was born ~1275, Knaith, Gainsborough, Lincolnshire DN21, England; died 30 May 1347, Knaith, Gainsborough, Lincolnshire DN21, England; was buried Gisborough Priory, Cleveland, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Lord Justice of Ireland
    • Alt Birth: 1280-1285, Knaith, Gainsborough, Lincolnshire DN21, England

    Notes:

    John DARCY (1° B. Darcy of Knaith)

    Born: BET 1280/85, probably Knaith, Lincolnshire, England

    Died: 30 May 1347, Knaith, Lincolnshire, England

    Buried: Gisborough Priory, Yorkshire, England

    Notes: styled le neveu and le cosyn, and (long afterwards) le piere, of Knaith, Kexby, and Upton, co. Lincoln, son and heir of Sir Roger Darcy, of Oldcotes and Styrrup, Notts. (who died before 12 May 1284), by Isabel, daughter of Sir William D'Aton, of West Ayton, Flanders, &c., 3 Oct, and with the King of Scots, 7 Oct 1337. Sheriff of Lancashire 1323. A proxy to sign the treaty with the Flemings, 10 Jun 1338. Appointed Justiciar of Ireland for life, 3 Mar 1339/40; as the King could not dispense with his continual attendance, a deputy was appointed, 16 Mar 1340/1: he resigned the office, 10 Feb 1343/4. Chamberlain to the King from 1341 to Sep 1346 or later. He accompanied the Earl of Northampton in his expedition to Brittany in Aug 1342. Appointed Constable of Nottingham Castle, 2 Mar 1343/4, and of the Tower of London, 12 Mar 1345/6, both for life. He was at the Battle of Crecy, and was one of those sent from before Calais, 8 Sep 1346, to announce the victory in Parl. He married firstly, Emmeline, daughter and heir of Walter Heron of Silkstone, co. York (son and heir apparent of Sir William Heron of Hadstone, Northumberland, and Notton, co. York), by Alice, daughter of Sir Nicholas De Hastinges, of Allerston, co. York, and Gissing, Norfolk. She was aged 7 1/2 years May 1297. He married secondly, 3 Jul 1329, at Maynooth, co. Kildare, Joan, widow of Thomas (FitzJohn), Earl of Kildare (who died 5 Apr 1328, at Maynooth, being then Justiciar), and 4th daughter of Richard De Burgh, Earl of Ulster, by Margaret, his wife. He died 30 May 1347, on which day he had received a pardon for all homicides, felonies, robberies, &c., for all oppressions by colour of any office he had held, for all trespasses of vert and venison, and of any consequent outlawries, and for all arrears and debts. His widow died 23 Apr 1359, and was buried, with her 1st husband, in the Church of the Friars Minors at Kildare
    Father: Roger DARCY

    Mother: Isabel D'ATON

    Married 1: Emeline HERON ABT 1308, Hedlestone, Northumberland, England

    Children:

    1. John DARCY (2° B. Darcy of Knaith)

    2. Aymer DARCY

    3. Roger DARCY
    4. Eleanor DARCY

    5. Robert DARCY

    6. Edward DARCY

    7. William DARCY

    8. Henry DARCY

    Married 2: Joan BURGH (B. Darcy of Knaith) 3 Jul 1329, Maynooth, Kildate, Ireland

    Children:

    2. Elizabeth DARCY (C. Ormonde)

    3. William DARCY (Sir Knight)

    end of biography

    Name John Darcy
    Suffix 1st Baron
    Born Abt 1275 of Knaith, Lincolnshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location
    Gender Male
    Died 23 Jun 1347
    Notes
    M L Call: The Royal Ancestry Bible Vol 2: 983
    Person ID I14251 penrose
    Last Modified 21 Jul 2015

    Father Norman Darcy, 2nd Baron, b. Abt 1235, 928:1263) of Nocton, Lincolnshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location, d. 1340 (Age ~ 105 years)
    Mother Margaret
    Married Abt 1256
    Family ID F10528 Group Sheet | Family Chart

    Father Roger Darcy, (Ld d'Arcy), b. Abt 1240, of Nocton, , Lincolnshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location, d. Bef 2 Jun 1284 (Age ~ 44 years)
    Mother Isabelle de Aton, b. Abt 1257, of Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location
    Married Abt 1270 of Aton, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location
    Family ID F10529 Group Sheet | Family Chart

    Family 1 Emlyn Heron, b. 1291, of Hedleston, Northumberland, England Find all individuals with events at this location, d. Bef 30 Sep 1323 (Age < 32 years)
    Children
    + 1. John Darcy, 2nd Baron, b. 1317, of Knaith, Lincolnshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location, d. Abt 29 Mar 1356, , , Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location (Age 39 years)
    2. Roger Darcy
    3. Adomar Darcy
    Last Modified 22 Nov 2017
    Family ID F9129 Group Sheet | Family Chart

    Family 2 Joan de Burgh, b. Abt 1300, of Ulster, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location, d. 17 May 1359, Friars Church, Minors, Kildare, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location (Age ~ 59 years)
    Married 27 Jul 1329 Maynooth, Kildare, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location
    Children
    + 1. Lady Elizabeth D'arcy, Countess of Ormonde, b. 13 Apr 1332, Platten, Co. Meath, Leinster Prov, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location, d. 24 Mar 1390, Kilkenny Castle, Leinster, Kildare, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location (Age 57 years)
    Last Modified 22 Nov 2017
    Family ID F10527

    end of profile

    John married Joan de Burgh 3 Jul 1329, Maynooth, Kildare, Ireland. Joan (daughter of Richard de Burgh, 2nd Earl of Ulster and Margaret de Burgh, Countess of Ulster) was born 1300, Ulster, Ireland; died 17 May 1359, Kildare, Ireland. [Group Sheet]


  8. 147.  Joan de Burgh was born 1300, Ulster, Ireland (daughter of Richard de Burgh, 2nd Earl of Ulster and Margaret de Burgh, Countess of Ulster); died 17 May 1359, Kildare, Ireland.
    Children:
    1. 73. Elizabeth Darcy, Countess of Ormonde was born 13 Apr 1332, County Meath, Ireland; died 24 Mar 1389, Kilkenny Castle, Leinster, Kildare, Ireland.

  9. 150.  William de Ros, Knight, 2nd Baron de RosWilliam de Ros, Knight, 2nd Baron de Ros was born 0___ 1288, Helmsley, Yorkshire, England (son of William de Ros, Knight, 1st Baron de Ros of Hamlake and Maud de Vaux); died 3 Feb 1343, Kirkham, Yorkshire, England; was buried Kirkham Priory, Kirkham, North Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Member of Parliament
    • Also Known As: 3rd Baron de Ros of Hamlake, Werke, Trusbot & Belvoir
    • Also Known As: Lord Ross of Werke
    • Military: Lord High Admiral

    Notes:

    William de Ros, 2nd Baron de Ros of Helmsley (c.1288 - 3 February 1343) was the son of William de Ros, 1st Baron de Ros.

    Biography

    As 2nd Baron de Ros of Hamlake, Werke, Trusbut & Belvoir, he was summoned to Parliament during the reigns of Edward II and Edward III of England. In 1321 he completed the religious foundation which his father had begun at Blakeney. He was created Lord Ross of Werke. He was appointed Lord High Admiral and was one of the commissioners with the Archbishop of York, and others, to negotiate peace between the king and Robert de Bruce, who had assumed the title of king of Scotland.

    William de Ros was buried at Kirkham Priory, near the great altar.

    Family

    William de Ros married, before 25 November 1316, Margery De Badlesmere (c.1306 - 18 October 1363), eldest daughter of Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 1st Baron Badlesmere, with Margaret, daughter of Sir Thomas de Clare, with whom he had two sons and three daughters:[2]

    William, who succeeded his father as Baron.
    Thomas, who succeeded his brother as Baron.
    Margaret, who married Sir Edward de Bohun.
    Maud, who married John de Welles, 4th Baron Welles.
    Elizabeth, who married William la Zouche, 2nd Lord Zouche of Haryngworth, a descendant of Breton nobility.

    Maud survived her husband by many years and was one of the very few English people present at the Jubilee, at Rome, in 1350; the king had tried to prevent the attendance of his subjects at this ceremony on account of the large sums of money usually taken out of the kingdom on such occasions.

    *

    Biography

    more...

    Residing in Wark Castle in August 1310. He was summoned for service in Scotland 1316-19, 1322, 1323, 1327, and 1335, and to Parliament 20 November 1317 to 21 Feb 1339/40. Received the surrender of Knaresborough, as a joint commander in January 1317/18, and remained loyal during the Earl of Lancaster's rebellion in 1321-22. Summoned for service in Gascony in December of 1324. He was appointed, by Prince Edward's government, Sheriff of Yorkshire (Nov 1326) and was a member of the Council of Regency in February 1326/27. In November 1327, he served as a commissioner to negotiate with the Scots for peace, as well as a similar role with France in February 1329/30. In 1334, he entertained the King at Helmsley, and during the King's absence in Flanders, he was one of the commissioners to preserve the peace in that country. He took part in the defense of Newcastle against the Scots. Buried at Kirkham in Lancashire.

    Children

    They had two sons, William, Knt. [3rd Lord Roos of Helmsley] and Thomas, Knt. [4th Lord Roos of Helmsley], and three daughters, Margaret, Maud, and Elizabeth. (Ref: Magna Carta Ancestry)

    William de Ros, 3rd Baron de Ros

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    William de Ros, 3rd Baron de Ros (died February 16, 1342) was the son of William de Ros, 2nd Baron de Ros.

    As 3rd Baron de Ros of Hamlake, Werke, Trusbut & Belvoir, he was summoned to Parliament during the reigns of Edward II and Edward III of England. In 1321 he completed the religious foundation which his father had begun at Blakeney. He was created Lord Ross of Werke. He was appointed Lord High Admiral and was one of the commissioners with the Archbishop of York, and others, to negotiate peace between the king and Robert de Bruce, who had assumed the title of king of Scotland.
    He married Margery De Badlesmere (1306-1363), the eldest sister and co-heir of Giles de Badlesmere, 2nd Baron Badlesmere of Leeds Castle, county of Kent. She survived her husband by many years and was one of the very few English people present at the Jubilee, at Rome, in 1350; the king had tried to prevent the attendance of his subjects at this ceremony on account of the large sums of money usually taken out of the kingdom on such occasions.

    Their children were:

    * William de Ros, 4th Baron de Ros
    * Thomas de Ros, 5th Baron de Ros
    * Sir John De Ros
    * Margaret de Ros
    * Matilda de Ros

    William de Ros was buried at Kirkham Priory, near the great altar.

    *

    more...

    Baron de Ros (pronounced "Roose") is one of the most ancient baronial titles in the Peerage of England . (The spelling of the title and of the surname of the original holders has been rendered differently in various texts. The word "Ros" is sometimes spelt "Roos", and the word "de" is sometimes dropped.)


    Barons de Ros of Helmsley (1264)[edit]
    William de Ros, 1st Baron de Ros (d. 1317)
    William de Ros, 2nd Baron de Ros (d. 1343)
    William de Ros, 3rd Baron de Ros (c. 1326–1352)
    Thomas de Ros, 4th Baron de Ros (1336–1384)
    John de Ros, 5th Baron de Ros (c. 1360–1394)
    William de Ros, 6th Baron de Ros (c. 1369–1414)
    John de Ros, 7th Baron de Ros (d. 1421)
    Thomas de Ros, 8th Baron de Ros (c. 1405–1431)
    Thomas de Ros, 9th Baron de Ros (c. 1427–1464) (forfeit 1464)
    Edmund de Ros, 10th Baron de Ros (d. 1508) (restored 1485, barony abeyant in 1508)
    George Manners, 11th Baron de Ros (d. 1513) (abeyance terminated about 1512)
    Thomas Manners, 1st Earl of Rutland, 12th Baron de Ros (d. 1543)
    Henry Manners, 2nd Earl of Rutland, 13th Baron de Ros (1526–1563)
    Edward Manners, 3rd Earl of Rutland, 14th Baron de Ros (1549–1587)
    Elizabeth Cecil, 16th Baroness de Ros (c. 1572–1591)
    William Cecil, 17th Baron de Ros (1590–1618)
    Francis Manners, 6th Earl of Rutland, 18th Baron de Ros (1578–1632)
    Katherine Villiers, Duchess of Buckingham, 19th Baroness de Ros (d. 1649)
    George Villiers, 2nd Duke of Buckingham, 20th Baron de Ros (1628–1687) (barony abeyant 1687)
    Charlotte FitzGerald-de Ros, 21st Baroness de Ros (1769–1831) (abeyance terminated 1806)
    Henry William FitzGerald-de Ros, 22nd Baron de Ros (1793–1839)
    William Lennox Lascelles FitzGerald-de Ros, 23rd Baron de Ros (1797–1874)
    Dudley Charles FitzGerald-de Ros, 24th Baron de Ros (1827–1907)
    Mary Dawson, Countess of Dartrey, 25th Baroness de Ros (1854–1939) (abeyant 1939)
    Una Mary Ross, 26th Baroness de Ros (1879–1956) (abeyance terminated 1943; abeyant 1956)
    Georgiana Angela Maxwell, 27th Baroness de Ros (1933–1983) (abeyance terminated 1958)
    Peter Trevor Maxwell, 28th Baron de Ros (b. 1958)
    The heir apparent is the present holder's son Hon. Finbar James Maxwell (b. 1988).

    Footnotes

    Jump up ^ Debrett's Peerage, 1968, p.347
    Jump up ^ The British herald; or, Cabinet of armorial bearings of the nobility & gentry of Great Britain & Ireland, from the earliest to the present time: with a complete glossary of heraldic terms: to which is prefixed a History of heraldry, collected and arranged ...
    Jump up ^ Cokayne 1949, p. 95; Richardson III 2011, p. 448.
    Jump up ^ Cokayne 1949, p. 95.
    Jump up ^ http://www.cracroftspeerage.co.uk/online/content/Ros1299.htm

    References

    Cokayne, George Edward (1949). The Complete Peerage, edited by Geoffrey H. White XI. London: St. Catherine Press.
    Richardson, Douglas (2011). Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, ed. Kimball G. Everingham III (2nd ed.). Salt Lake City. ISBN 144996639X

    Birth:
    (pronounced "Roose")

    Buried:
    The ruins of Kirkham Priory are situated on the banks of the River Derwent, at Kirkham, North Yorkshire, England. The Augustinian priory was founded in the 1120s by Walter l'Espec, lord of nearby Helmsley, who also built Rievaulx Abbey ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kirkham_Priory

    Images for Kirkham Priory ... https://www.google.com/search?q=Kirkham+Priory&rlz=1C1KMZB_enUS591US591&espv=2&biw=1440&bih=810&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjYj6LQuIzPAhXCJiYKHVRGC3wQsAQIMA

    William married Margery de Badlesmere Bef 25 Nov 1316. Margery (daughter of Bartholomew de Badlesmere, Knight, 1st Baron Badlesmere and Margaret de Clare, Baroness Badlesmere) was born 0___ 1306, Badlesmere Manor, Kent, England; died 18 Oct 1363. [Group Sheet]


  10. 151.  Margery de Badlesmere was born 0___ 1306, Badlesmere Manor, Kent, England (daughter of Bartholomew de Badlesmere, Knight, 1st Baron Badlesmere and Margaret de Clare, Baroness Badlesmere); died 18 Oct 1363.
    Children:
    1. Elizabeth de Ros was born 0___ 1325, Helmsley, Yorkshire, England; died 24 May 1380, Harringworth, Northamptonshire, , England.
    2. Thomas de Ros, Knight, 4th Baron de Ros was born 13 Jan 1335, Helmsley, Yorkshire, England; died 8 Jun 1383, Uffington, Lincolnshire, England; was buried Rievaulx Abbey, Helmsley, North Yorkshire, England.
    3. 75. Maud de Ros, Lady Welles was born (Helmsley, Yorkshire, England); died 9 Dec 1388.

  11. 152.  Guy de Beauchamp, Knight, 10th Earl of Warwick was born 0___ 1262, Elmley Castle, Worcester, England (son of William de Beauchamp and Isabel Mauduit); died 12 Aug 1315, Warwick Castle, Warwickshire, England; was buried Bordesley Abbey, Worcester, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alt Birth: 0___ 1272, Warwickshire, England

    Notes:

    Guy de Beauchamp, 10th Earl of Warwick

    Guy had already distinguished himself in the Scottish Wars and was one of the Ordainers, who sought to restrict the powers of the King.

    Guy was one of the chief adversaries of Piers Gaveston, King Edward's favourite, who often referred to Guy as "The Mad Hound", due to the Earl's habit of foaming at the mouth when angry. In 1312, Guy de Beauchamp captured Gaveston and took him to his principal residence, Warwick Castle, where Gaveston was held prisoner and afterwards murdered.

    Guy first married Isabel de Clare, the daughter of Gilbert de Clare, 6th Earl of Gloucester and Alice de Lusignan of Angoulãeme, but the marriage, which had produced no children, was annulled.

    On 28 February 1310, less than three years after the death of her first husband, Guy married Alice de Toeni, daughter of Ralph VII de Toeni.

    Child of Guy de Beauchamp and unnamed partner (mistress): Maud de Beauchamp (died 1366), married Geoffrey de Say, 2nd Lord Say, by whom she had issue.

    Children of Guy de Beauchamp and Alice de Toeni:

    Thomas de Beauchamp, 11th Earl of Warwick (14 February 1313/1314 – 13 November 1369), married Katherine Mortimer, by whom he had fifteen children.
    John de Beauchamp, Lord Beauchamp KG (1315 – 2 December 1360), carried the royal standard at the Battle of Crecy
    Elizabeth de Beauchamp (c. 1316–1359), married in 1328, Thomas Astley, 3rd Lord Astley, by whom she had a son William, 4th Lord Astley.
    Isabella de Beauchamp, married John de Clinton.
    Emma de Beauchamp, married Rowland Odingsells.
    Lucia de Beauchamp, married Robert de Napton.

    Following the sudden death of Guy de Beauchamp at Warwick Castle on 28 July 1315, which was rumoured to have been caused by poisoning, Alice married thirdly on 26 October 1316, William la Zouche de Mortimer, 1st Lord Zouche de Mortimer. [1]

    Father of Thomas de Beauchamp, 11th Earl of Warwick; Isabel Beauchamp; Elizabeth de Beauchamp, Baroness Astley; John de Beauchamp; Emma de Beauchamp; Lucia de Beauchamp Maud de Beauchamp

    Brother of Isabella de Beauchamp, Countess Winchester; John de Beauchamp; Roger Beauchamp; Anne de Beauchamp; Margaret de Beauchamp; Amy de Beauchamp; Maud de Beauchamp Robert de BEAUCHAMP

    Half brother of Isabel Blount; Alice Foljambe (Furnival); Thomas FURNIVAL; Eleanor FURNIVAL Christine Furnival

    Burial: Bordesley Abbey, Warwickshire, England

    Foundation for Medieval Genealogy's Medieval Lands Index entry for : Guy.

    Husband: Guy Beauchamp
    Wife: Alice de Toeni
    Child: Maud Beauchamp
    Child: Thomas Beauchamp

    Marriage:

    Date: BEF 28 FEB 1309/10
    Husband: Guy de BEAUCHAMP
    Wife: Alice de TOENI
    Child: John de BEAUCHAMP
    Child: Isabel de BEAUCHAMP
    Child: Elizabeth de BEAUCHAMP
    Child: Emma de BEAUCHAMP
    Child: Maud de BEAUCHAMP
    Child: Thomas de BEAUCHAMP
    Child: Lucia (Jane) de BEAUCHAMP

    Marriage:

    Date: ABT 1303
    Place: of Warwick Castle, Warwick, Warwickshire, England

    Sources

    Royal Ancestry 2013 Vol. I p. 287-293
    Royal Ancestry by Douglas Richardson Vol. V. p. 178
    Ancestral Roots of Certain American Collonists RJCW 296b
    Marlyn Lewis.
    Royal and Noble Genealogical Data, Author: Brian Tompsett, Copyright 1994-2001, Version March 25, 2001
    Ancestry family trees
    ? Entered by Jean Maunder.

    *

    Guy married Alice de Toeni, Countess of Warwick 28 Feb 13091264, England. Alice (daughter of Ralp de Toeni, VI, Lord of Flamstead and Mary Clarissa de Brus) was born 8 Jan 1283, Castle Maud, Flamstead, Hertfordshire, England; died 1 Jan 1325, Warwick Castle, Warwick, Warwickshire, England; was buried Flamstead, Hertfordshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  12. 153.  Alice de Toeni, Countess of Warwick was born 8 Jan 1283, Castle Maud, Flamstead, Hertfordshire, England (daughter of Ralp de Toeni, VI, Lord of Flamstead and Mary Clarissa de Brus); died 1 Jan 1325, Warwick Castle, Warwick, Warwickshire, England; was buried Flamstead, Hertfordshire, England.

    Notes:

    Children of Alice de Toeni Countess of Warwick and Guy of Beauchamp 2nd Earl of Warwick are:

    9. i. Maud de Beauchamp was born 1311 in Warwick Castle, Warwick, Warwickshire, England, and died 25 JUL 1369 in Sawbridgeworth, Hertfordshire, England. She married Geoffrey IV 2nd Baron de Say, son of Geoffrey III 1st Baron de Say and Idonea de Leybourne. He was born BEF 4 JUN 1305 in Sawbridgeworth, Bishop's Stortford, Hertfordshire, England, and died 26 JUN 1359. She married Edmund HusbandofMaud Beauchamp AFT 1359. He was born ABT 1307 in England.
    ii. Emma of Beauchamp was born ABT 1311 in Warwick Castle, Warwick, Warwickshire, England. She married Rowland Odingsels.
    iii. Giles de Beauchamp Sir of Powick & Acton was born 1313 in Warwick Castle, Warwick, Warwickshire, England, and died 12 OCT 1361 in Beauchamp's Court, Alcester, Warwickshire, England. He married Catherine de Bures 1329, daughter of John de Bures Sir and Hawise de Muscegros. She was born BEF 1315 in Bures St. Mary, Sudbury, Suffolk, England, and died AFT OCT 1355.
    iv. Thomas of Beauchamp 4th Earl of Warwick was born 14 FEB 1313/14 in Warwick Castle, Warwick, Warwickshire, England, and died 13 NOV 1369 in Calais, Pas-de-Calais, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France. He married Katherine de Mortimer ABT 1333 in Warwickshire, England, daughter of Roger de Mortimer 1st Earl of March and Joan de Geneville Countess of March. She was born OCT 1309 in Wigmore, Herefordshire, England, and died BET 4 AUG AND 6 SEP 1369 in Warwick Castle, Warwick, Warwickshire, England.
    v. Lucia Jane de Beauchamp was born ABT 1315 in Warwick Castle, Warwick, Warwickshire, England. She married Robert or Roger de Napton.
    vi. Elizabeth de Beauchamp was born ABT 1315 in Warwick Castle, Warwick, Warwickshire, England, and died 1359 in Warwick Castle, Warwick, Warwickshire, England. She married Thomas 3rd Baron de Astley in England, son of Giles Astley Sir and Alice de Wolvey. He was born ABT 1305 in Astley, Warwickshire, England, and died AFT 3 MAY 1366. She married William Fortescue ABT 1339 in Sheepham, Devon, England. He was born 1300 in Whympston Estate, Modbury, Devon, England, and died ABT 1342.

    Children:
    1. Maud de Beachamp was born 1311, Warwick Castle, Warwick, Warwickshire, England; died 25 Jul 1369, Sawbridgeworth, Hertfordshire, England; was buried London, England.
    2. 76. Thomas de Beauchamp, Knight, 11th Earl of Warwick was born 14 Feb 1313, Warwick Castle, Warwick, Warwickshire, England; died 13 Nov 1369, (Warwickshire) England; was buried St. Mary's Church, Warwick, Warwickshire, England.

  13. 154.  Roger de Mortimer, 1st Earl of March was born 25 Apr 1287, Wigmore Castle, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England (son of Edmund Mortimer, Knight, 2nd Baron Mortimer and Margaret de Fiennes, Baroness Mortimer); died 29 Nov 1330, Tyburn, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Lord Lieutenant of Ireland
    • Also Known As: Baron Mortimer
    • Military:
    • Military: Despencer War

    Notes:

    Early life

    Mortimer, grandson of Roger Mortimer, 1st Baron Mortimer and Maud de Braose, Baroness Mortimer, was born at Wigmore Castle, Herefordshire, England, the firstborn of Marcher Lord Edmund Mortimer, 2nd Baron Mortimer, and Margaret de Fiennes. Edmund Mortimer had been a second son, intended for minor orders and a clerical career, but on the sudden death of his elder brother Ralph, Edmund was recalled from Oxford University and installed as heir. According to his biographer Ian Mortimer, Roger was possibly sent as a boy away from home to be fostered in the household of his formidable uncle, Roger Mortimer de Chirk.[2] It was this uncle who had carried the severed head of Llywelyn ap Gruffudd of Wales to King Edward I in 1282.[3] Like many noble children of his time, Roger was betrothed young, to Joan de Geneville (born 1286), the wealthy daughter of Sir Piers de Geneville, of Trim Castle and Ludlow. They were married on 20 September 1301. Their first child was born in 1302.[4]

    Marriage

    Through his marriage with Joan de Geneville, Roger not only acquired increased possessions in the Welsh Marches, including the important Ludlow Castle, which became the chief stronghold of the Mortimers, but also extensive estates and influence in Ireland. However, Joan de Geneville was not an "heiress" at the time of her marriage. Her grandfather Geoffrey de Geneville, at the age of eighty in 1308, conveyed most, but not all, of his Irish lordships to Roger Mortimer, and then retired, notably alive: he finally died in 1314, with Joan succeeding as suo jure 2nd Baroness Geneville. During his lifetime Geoffrey also conveyed much of the remainder of his legacy, such as Kenlys, to his younger son Simon de Geneville, who had meanwhile become Baron of Culmullin through marriage to Joanna FitzLeon. Roger Mortimer therefore succeeded to the eastern part of the Lordship of Meath, centred on Trim and its stronghold of Trim Castle. He did not succeed, however, to the Lordship of Fingal.[5]

    Military adventures in Ireland and Wales

    Roger Mortimer's childhood came to an abrupt end when his father was mortally wounded in a skirmish near Builth in July 1304. Since Roger was underage at the death of his father, he was placed by King Edward I under the guardianship of Piers Gaveston, 1st Earl of Cornwall. However, on 22 May 1306, in a lavish ceremony in Westminster Abbey with two hundred and fifty-nine others, he was knighted by Edward and granted livery of his full inheritance.[6]

    His adult life began in earnest in 1308, when he went to Ireland in person to enforce his authority. This brought him into conflict with the de Lacys, who turned for support to Edward Bruce, brother of Robert Bruce, King of Scots. Mortimer was appointed Lord Lieutenant of Ireland by Edward II on 23 November 1316. Shortly afterwards, at the head of a large army, he drove Bruce to Carrickfergus and the de Lacys into Connaught, wreaking vengeance on their adherents whenever they were to be found. He returned to England and Wales in 1318[7] and was then occupied for some years with baronial disputes on the Welsh border.

    Opposition to Edward II

    Main article: Despenser War
    Mortimer became disaffected with his king and joined the growing opposition to Edward II and the Despensers. After the younger Despenser was granted lands belonging to him, he and the Marchers began conducting devastating raids against Despenser property in Wales. He supported Humphrey de Bohun, 4th Earl of Hereford, in refusing to obey the king's summons to appear before him in 1321. Mortimer led a march against London, his men wearing the Mortimer uniform which was green with a yellow sleeve.[8] He was prevented from entering the capital, although his forces put it under siege. These acts of insurrection compelled the Lords Ordainers led by Thomas, 2nd Earl of Lancaster, to order the king to banish the Despensers in August. When the king led a successful expedition in October against Margaret de Clare, Baroness Badlesmere, after she had refused Queen Isabella admittance to Leeds Castle, he used his victory and new popularity among the moderate lords and the people to summon the Despensers back to England. Mortimer, in company with other Marcher Lords, led a rebellion against Edward, which is known as the Despenser War, at the end of the year.[citation needed]

    Forced to surrender to the king at Shrewsbury in January 1322, Mortimer was consigned to the Tower of London, but by drugging the constable, escaped to France in August 1323, pursued by warrants for his capture dead or alive.[9] In the following year Queen Isabella, anxious to escape from her husband, obtained his consent to her going to France to use her influence with her brother, King Charles IV, in favour of peace. At the French court the queen found Roger Mortimer, who became her lover soon afterwards. At his instigation, she refused to return to England so long as the Despensers retained power as the king's favourites.

    Historians have speculated as to the date at which Mortimer and Isabella actually became lovers.[10] The modern view is that it began while both were still in England, and that after a disagreement, Isabella abandoned Roger to his fate in the Tower. His subsequent escape became one of medieval England's most colourful episodes. However almost certainly Isabella risked everything by chancing Mortimer's companionship and emotional support when they first met again at Paris four years later (Christmas 1325). King Charles IV's protection of Isabella at the French court from Despenser's would-be assassins played a large part in developing the relationship.[11] In 1326, Mortimer moved as Prince Edward's guardian to Hainault, but only after a furious dispute with the queen, demanding she remain in France.[12] Isabella retired to raise troops in her County of Ponthieu; Mortimer arranged the invasion fleet supplied by the Hainaulters.

    Invasion of England and defeat of Edward II

    The scandal of Isabella's relations with Mortimer compelled them both to withdraw from the French court to Flanders, where they obtained assistance for an invasion of England from Count William of Hainaut, although Isabella did not arrive from Ponthieu until the fleet was due to sail. Landing in the River Orwell on 24 September 1326, they were accompanied by Prince Edward and Henry, Earl of Lancaster. London rose in support of the queen, and Edward took flight to the west, pursued by Mortimer and Isabella. After wandering helplessly for some weeks in Wales, the king was taken prisoner on 16 November, and was compelled to abdicate in favour of his son. Though the latter was crowned as Edward III of England on 25 January 1327, the country was ruled by Mortimer and Isabella, who were widely believed to have arranged the murder of Edward II the following September at Berkeley Castle.[citation needed]

    Historian and biographer of Roger Mortimer and Edward III, Ian Mortimer, retells the old story that the ex-king was not killed and buried in 1327, but secretly remained alive at Corfe Castle. When Mortimer besieged the castle, Edward II was said to escape to Rome, where he stayed under papal protection.[13]

    Powers won and lost

    Rich estates and offices of profit and power were now heaped on Mortimer. He was made constable of Wallingford Castle and in September 1328 he was created Earl of March. However, although in military terms he was far more competent than the Despensers, his ambition was troubling to all. His own son Geoffrey, the only one to survive into old age, mocked him as "the king of folly." During his short time as ruler of England he took over the lordships of Denbigh, Oswestry, and Clun (the first of which belonged to Despenser, the latter two had been the Earl of Arundel's). He was also granted the marcher lordship of Montgomery by the queen.[citation needed]


    The "Tyburn Tree"

    The jealousy and anger of many nobles were aroused by Mortimer's use of power. Henry, Earl of Lancaster, one of the principals behind Edward II's deposition, tried to overthrow Mortimer, but the action was ineffective as the young king passively stood by. Then, in March 1330, Mortimer ordered the execution of Edmund, Earl of Kent, the half-brother of Edward II. After this execution Henry Lancaster prevailed upon the young king, Edward III, to assert his independence. In October 1330, a Parliament was summoned to Nottingham, just days before Edward's eighteenth birthday, and Mortimer and Isabella were seized by Edward and his companions from inside Nottingham Castle. In spite of Isabella's entreaty to her son, "Fair son, have pity on the gentle Mortimer," Mortimer was conveyed to the Tower. Accused of assuming royal power and of various other high misdemeanours, he was condemned without trial and ignominiously hanged at Tyburn on 29 November 1330, his vast estates forfeited to the crown. His body hung at the gallows for two days and nights in full view of the populace. Mortimer's widow Joan received a pardon in 1336 and survived till 1356. She was buried beside Mortimer at Wigmore, but the site was later destroyed.[14]

    In 2002, the actor John Challis, the current owner of the remaining buildings of Wigmore Abbey, invited the BBC programme House Detectives at Large to investigate his property. During the investigation, a document was discovered in which Mortimer's widow Joan petitioned Edward III for the return of her husband's body so she could bury it at Wigmore Abbey. Mortimer's lover Isabella had buried his body at Greyfriars in Coventry following his hanging. Edward III replied, "Let his body rest in peace." The king later relented, and Mortimer's body was transferred to Wigmore Abbey, where Joan was later buried beside him.[citation needed]

    Children of Roger and Joan

    The marriages of Mortimer's children (three sons and eight daughters) cemented Mortimer's strengths in the West.

    Sir Edmund Mortimer knt (1302-1331), married Elizabeth de Badlesmere; they produced Roger Mortimer, 2nd Earl of March, who was restored to his grandfather's title.
    Margaret Mortimer (1304 - 5 May 1337), married Thomas de Berkeley, 3rd Baron Berkeley
    Maud Mortimer (1307 - aft. 1345), married John de Charlton, Lord of Powys[15]
    Geoffrey Mortimer (1309-1372/6)
    John Mortimer (1310-1328)
    Joan Mortimer (c. 1312-1337/51), married James Audley, 2nd Baron Audley
    Isabella Mortimer (c. 1313 - aft. 1327)
    Katherine Mortimer (c. 1314-1369), married Thomas de Beauchamp, 11th Earl of Warwick
    Agnes Mortimer (c. 1317-1368), married Laurence Hastings, 1st Earl of Pembroke
    Beatrice Mortimer (d. 16 October 1383), who married firstly, Edward of Norfolk (d. before 9 August 1334), son and heir apparent of Thomas of Brotherton, by whom she had no issue, and secondly, before 13 September 1337, Thomas de Brewes (d. 9 or 16 June 1361), by whom she had three sons and three daughters.[16]
    Blanche Mortimer (c. 1321-1347), married Peter de Grandison, 2nd Baron Grandison

    Royal descendants

    Through his son Sir Edmund Mortimer, he is an ancestor of the last Plantagenet monarchs of England from King Edward IV to Richard III. By Edward IV's daughter, Elizabeth of York, the Earl of March is an ancestor to King Henry VIII and to all subsequent monarchs of England.

    Roger Mortimer, 1st earl of March, (born 1287?—died Nov. 29, 1330, Tyburn, near London, Eng.), lover of the English king Edward II’s queen, Isabella of France, with whom he contrived Edward’s deposition and murder (1327). For three years thereafter he was virtual king of England during the minority of Edward III.

    The descendant of Norman knights who had accompanied William the Conqueror, he inherited wealthy family estates and fortunes, principally in Wales and Ireland, and in 1304 became 8th Baron of Wigmore on the death of his father, the 7th baron. He devoted the early years of his majority to obtaining effective control of his Irish lordships against his wife’s kinsmen, the Lacys, who summoned to their aid Edward Bruce, brother of King Robert I of Scotland, when he was fighting to become king of Ireland. In 1316 Mortimer was defeated at Kells and withdrew to England, but afterward, as King Edward II’s lieutenant in Ireland (November 1316), he was largely instrumental in overcoming Bruce and in driving the Lacys from Meath.

    In 1317 he was associated with the Earl of Pembroke’s “middle party” in English politics; but distrust of the Despensers (see Despenser, Hugh Le and Hugh Le) drove him, in common with other marcher lords, into opposition and violent conflict with the Despensers in South Wales in 1321. But, receiving no help from Edward II’s other enemies, Roger and his uncle Roger Mortimer of Chirk made their submission in January 1322. Imprisoned in the Tower of London, Roger escaped in 1323 and fled to France, where in 1325 he was joined by Queen Isabella, who became his mistress. The exiles invaded England in September 1326; the fall of the Despensers was followed by the deposition of Edward II and his subsequent murder (1327), in which Mortimer was deeply implicated.

    Thereafter, as the queen’s paramour, Mortimer virtually ruled England. He used his position to further his own ends. Created Earl of March in October 1328, he secured for himself the lordships of Denbigh, Oswestry, and Clun, formerly belonging to the Earl of Arundel; the marcher lordships of the Mortimers of Chirk; and Montgomery, granted to him by the queen. His insatiable avarice, his arrogance, and his unpopular policy toward Scotland aroused against Mortimer a general revulsion among his fellow barons, and in October 1330 the young king Edward III, at the instigation of Henry of Lancaster, had him seized at Nottingham and conveyed to the Tower. Condemned for crimes declared to be notorious by his peers in Parliament, he was hanged at Tyburn as a traitor, and his estates were forfeited to the crown.

    One night in August 1323, a captive rebel baron, Sir Roger Mortimer, drugged his guards and escaped from the Tower of London. With the king's men-at-arms in pursuit he fled to the south coast and sailed to France. There he was joined by Isabella, the Queen of England, who threw herself into his arms.

    A year later, as lovers, they returned with an invading army: King Edward II's forces crumbled before them and Mortimer took power. He removed Edward II in the first deposition of a monarch in British history. Then the ex-king was apparently murdered, some said with a red-hot poker, in Berkeley Castle.

    Birth:
    History, map & images of Wigmore Castle ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wigmore_Castle

    Military:
    Military adventures in Ireland and Wales

    Roger Mortimer's childhood came to an abrupt end when his father was mortally wounded in a skirmish near Builth in July 1304. Since Roger was underage at the death of his father, he was placed by King Edward I under the guardianship of Piers Gaveston, 1st Earl of Cornwall. However, on 22 May 1306, in a lavish ceremony in Westminster Abbey with two hundred and fifty-nine others, he was knighted by Edward and granted livery of his full inheritance.[6]

    His adult life began in earnest in 1308, when he went to Ireland in person to enforce his authority. This brought him into conflict with the de Lacys, who turned for support to Edward Bruce, brother of Robert Bruce, King of Scots. Mortimer was appointed Lord Lieutenant of Ireland by Edward II on 23 November 1316. Shortly afterwards, at the head of a large army, he drove Bruce to Carrickfergus and the de Lacys into Connaught, wreaking vengeance on their adherents whenever they were to be found. He returned to England and Wales in 1318[7] and was then occupied for some years with baronial disputes on the Welsh border.

    Died:
    hanged as a traitor...

    Roger married Joan de Geneville, 2nd Baroness Geneville 20 Sep 1301. Joan (daughter of Piers de Geneville and Joan of Lusigman, 2nd Baroness Geneville) was born 2 Feb 1286, Ludlow Castle, Shropshire, England; died 19 Oct 1396, King's Stanley, Gloucestershire, England; was buried Wigmore Abbey, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  14. 155.  Joan de Geneville, 2nd Baroness Geneville was born 2 Feb 1286, Ludlow Castle, Shropshire, England (daughter of Piers de Geneville and Joan of Lusigman, 2nd Baroness Geneville); died 19 Oct 1396, King's Stanley, Gloucestershire, England; was buried Wigmore Abbey, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Baroness Mortimer
    • Also Known As: Countess of March
    • Also Known As: Jeanne de Joinville

    Notes:

    Joan de Geneville, 2nd Baroness Geneville, Countess of March, Baroness Mortimer (2 February 1286 – 19 October 1356), also known as Jeanne de Joinville, was the daughter of Sir Piers de Geneville and Joan of Lusignan. She inherited the estates of her grandparents, Geoffrey de Geneville, 1st Baron Geneville, and Maud de Lacy, Baroness Geneville. She was one of the wealthiest heiresses in the Welsh Marches and County Meath, Ireland. She was the wife of Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March, the de facto ruler of England from 1327 to 1330. She succeeded as suo jure 2nd Baroness Geneville on 21 October 1314 upon the death of her grandfather, Geoffrey de Geneville.[1][2]

    As a result of her husband's insurrection against King Edward II of England, she was imprisoned in Skipton Castle for two years. Following the execution of her husband in 1330 for usurping power in England, Joan was once more taken into custody. In 1336, her lands were restored to her after she received a full pardon for her late husband's crimes from Edward II's son and successor, Edward III of England.

    Family and inheritance

    Ludlow Castle in Shropshire, the birthplace of Joan de Geneville
    Joan was born on 2 February 1286 at Ludlow Castle in Shropshire.[3] She was the eldest child of Sir Piers de Geneville, of Trim Castle and Ludlow, whose father Sir Geoffrey de Geneville, 1st Baron Geneville, was Justiciar of Ireland. Her mother Jeanne of Lusignan was part of one of the most illustrious French families, daughter of Hugh XII of Lusignan, Count of La Marche and of Angoulãeme, and sister of Yolanda of Lusignan, the suo jure Countess of La Marche. Joan had two younger sisters, Matilda and Beatrice who both became nuns at Aconbury Priory.[4] She also had two half-sisters from her mother's first marriage to Bernard Ezi III, Lord of Albret: Mathe, Dame d'Albret (died 1283), and Isabelle, Dame d'Albret (died 1 December 1294), wife of Bernard VI, Count of Armagnac.

    When her father died in Ireland shortly before June 1292, Joan became one of the wealthiest and most eligible heiresses in the Welsh Marches, with estates that included the town and castle of Ludlow, the lordship of Ewyas Lacy, the manors of Wolferlow, Stanton Lacy, and Mansell Lacy in Shropshire and Herefordshire as well as a sizeable portion of County Meath in Ireland.[5][6] She was due to inherit these upon the death of her grandfather, but in 1308, Baron Geneville conveyed most of the Irish estates which had belonged to his late wife Maud de Lacy to Joan and her husband Roger Mortimer. They both went to Ireland where they took seisin of Meath on 28 October of that same year. The baron died on 21 October 1314 at the House of the Friars Preachers at Trim, and Joan subsequently succeeded him, becoming the suo jure 2nd Baroness Geneville.[1][2]

    Marriage

    Joan married Roger Mortimer, eldest son of Edmund Mortimer, 2nd Baron Wigmore, and Margaret de Fiennes on 20 September 1301 at the manor of Pembridge.[7] Marriage to Joan was highly beneficial to Mortimer as it brought him much influence and prestige in addition to the rich estates he gained through their matrimonial alliance.[8][9] Three years later in 1304 he succeeded as Baron Mortimer, making Joan Baroness Mortimer. He was knighted on Whitsunday 22 May 1306 by King Edward I. The knighting ceremony took place in Westminster Abbey and was known as the Feast of the Swan as all those present made their personal vows upon two swans.[10] Two hundred and fifty-nine other young men received knighthoods along with Mortimer including the Prince of Wales who would shortly afterwards succeed his father as Edward II. Following the ceremony was a magnificent banquet held at the Great Hall of Westminster.[11]

    Upon taking seizen of her Irish lands in 1308, Joan and Mortimer travelled back and forth between their estates in Ireland and those in the Welsh Marches. Given that Joan opted to accompany her husband to Ireland rather than remain at home, and that she produced 12 surviving children over a period of just 17 years led Roger Mortimer's biographer Ian Mortimer to suggest they enjoyed a closer and more affectionate relationship than was typical of noble couples in the 14th-century. He described their union as having been " a mutually beneficial secure medieval partnership".[12]

    Issue

    Together Joan and Mortimer had twelve surviving children:[12][13][14]


    Effigies of Joan's daughter, Katherine Mortimer and her husband Thomas de Beauchamp, 11th Earl of Warwick. St. Mary's Church, Warwick

    Margaret Mortimer (2 May 1304- 5 May 1337), married Thomas de Berkeley, 3rd Baron Berkeley, by whom she had issue.
    Sir Edmund Mortimer (died 16 December 1331), married Elizabeth de Badlesmere, daughter of Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 1st Baron Badlesmere, and Margaret de Clare, by whom he had two sons, Roger Mortimer, 2nd Earl of March, and John, who died young.
    Roger Mortimer, married Joan Le Botiller
    Geoffrey Mortimer, Lord of Towyth (died 1372/5 May 1376), married Jeanne de Lezay, by whom he had issue.
    John Mortimer. He was killed in a tournament at Shrewsbury sometime after 1328.
    Katherine Mortimer (1314- 4 August 1369), married Thomas de Beauchamp, 11th Earl of Warwick, by whom she had fifteen children, including Thomas de Beauchamp, 12th Earl of Warwick, and William de Beauchamp, 1st Baron Bergavenny, who married Lady Joan FitzAlan.
    Joan Mortimer (died between 1337–1351), married James Audley, 2nd Baron Audley, by whom she had issue.
    Agnes Mortimer, married Laurence Hastings, 1st Earl of Pembroke, by whom she had issue
    Isabella Mortimer (died after 1327)
    Beatrice Mortimer (died 16 October 1383), married firstly Edward of Norfolk, and secondly, Thomas de Braose, 1st Baron Braose. She had issue by her second husband.
    Maud Mortimer (died after August 1345), married John de Charlton, Lord of Powys, by whom she had issue.
    Blanche Mortimer (c.1321- 1347), married Peter de Grandison, 2nd Baron Grandison, by whom she had issue.
    Mortimer's affair with Queen Isabella[edit]

    Joan's husband Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March, is allegedly depicted in the foreground with Queen Isabella in this 14th-century manuscript illustration
    Mortimer was appointed Lord Lieutenant of Ireland on 23 November 1316 and left for Ireland with a large force in February 1317.[15] While there, he fought against the Scots Army led by Edward Bruce, the younger brother of Robert the Bruce (who hoped to make Edward king of Ireland), and Bruce's Norman-Irish allies, the de Lacy's. Joan accompanied her husband to Ireland. They returned to England in 1318 after Mortimer had driven the Scots north to Carrickfergus, and dispersed the de Lacys, who were Joan's relatives. For the next few years, Mortimer occupied himself with baronial disputes on the Welsh border; nevertheless, on account of the increasing influence of Hugh Despenser, the Elder, and Hugh Despenser the Younger over King Edward II, Roger Mortimer became strongly disaffected with his monarch, especially after the younger Despenser had been granted lands which rightfully belonged to Mortimer.[16]

    In October 1321 King Edward and his troops besieged Leeds Castle, after the governor's wife, Margaret de Clare, Baroness Badlesmere, refused Queen Isabella admittance and subsequently ordered her archers to fire upon Isabella and her escort after the latter attempted to gain entry to the castle. Elizabeth, the third Badlesmere daughter, was married to Joan and Mortimer's eldest son, Edmund. King Edward exploited his new popularity in the wake of his military victory at Leeds to recall to England the Despensers, whom the Lords Ordainers, led by Thomas, 2nd Earl of Lancaster, had forced him to banish in August 1321.[17] The Marcher lords, already in a state of insurrection for some time prior to the Despensers' banishment,[n 1] immediately rose up against the King in full force, with Mortimer leading the confederation alongside Ordainer Humphrey de Bohun, 4th Earl of Hereford.[18] The King quelled the rebellion, which is also known as the Despenser War; Mortimer and his uncle Roger Mortimer de Chirk both surrendered to him at Shrewsbury on 22 January 1322. Mortimer and his uncle were dispatched as prisoners to the Tower of London,[16] where they were kept in damp, unhealthy quarters. This was likely a factor in Roger Mortimer de Chirk's death in 1326. Joan's husband had fared better; by drugging the constable and the Tower guards, he managed to escape to France on 1 August 1323.[19] It was there that he later became the lover of Queen Isabella, who was estranged from the King as a result of the Despensers' absolute control over him. She had been sent to France on a peace mission by Edward but used the occasion to seek help from her brother, Charles IV to oust the Despensers.[20] The scandal of their love affair forced them to leave the French court for Flanders, where they obtained help for an invasion of England.[21]

    Joan's imprisonment

    Skipton Castle, Yorkshire, where Joan was imprisoned from 1324 to 1326

    While the couple were still in France, King Edward had retaliated against Mortimer by taking Joan and all of their children into custody, and "treating them with severity".[22] In April 1324 Joan was removed from Hampshire where she had been confined in a lodging under house arrest and sent to Skipton Castle in Yorkshire; there she was imprisoned in a cell and endured considerable suffering and hardship.[23] Most of her household had been dismissed and she was permitted a small number of attendants to serve her. She was granted just one mark per day for her necessities, and out of this sum she had to feed her servants.[24] She was additionally allowed ten marks per annum at Easter and Michaelmas for new clothes.[25] Her daughters suffered worse privations having been locked up inside various religious houses with even less money at their disposal.[24] Joan was transferred from Skipton to Pontefract Castle in July 1326.[26]

    Countess of March

    Mortimer and Isabella landed in England two months later in September 1326, and they joined forces with Henry, 3rd Earl of Lancaster. On 16 November, King Edward was taken prisoner and eventually murdered at Berkeley Castle, presumably by Mortimer's hired assassins.[27] From 1327 to 1330, Mortimer and Isabella jointly held the Office of Regent for her son, King Edward III who was duly crowned following his father's death. Mortimer was made constable of Wallingford Castle; in September 1328, Mortimer was created Earl of March. This made Joan henceforth, the Countess of March; although it is not known what she thought about her husband's illegal assumption of power and flagrant affair with the Queen. What has been established is that Joan was never an active participant in her husband's insurrection against King Edward.[28]

    Mortimer and Queen Isabella were the de facto rulers of England. Hostility against the power Mortimer wielded over the kingdom and the young King Edward III, increased; his former friend Henry of Lancaster encouraged the King to assert his authority to oust Mortimer. When Mortimer ordered the execution of Edmund, Earl of Kent, half-brother of the late King Edward, anger and outrage engulfed the country. The King deposed his mother and her lover; Roger Mortimer was seized, arrested, and on 29 November 1330, hanged at Tyburn, London.[29]

    Following her husband's execution, Joan – as the wife of a traitor – was imprisoned again, this time in Hampshire where years before she had been placed under house arrest; her children were also taken into custody. In 1331, she was given an allowance for household expenses; however, her lands were only restored to her in 1336 after King Edward III granted her a full pardon for her late husband's crimes. In 1347 she received back the Liberty of Trim.[30]

    Death

    Joan de Geneville, Baroness Geneville, the widowed Countess of March, died on 19 October 1356 at the age of seventy. She was buried in Wigmore Abbey beside her husband, whose body had been returned to her by Edward III as she had requested. Her tomb no longer exists as the abbey was destroyed during the Dissolution of the Monasteries and only the ruins remain to this day.

    Lady Geneville's numerous direct descendants include the current British Royal Family, Sir Winston Churchill, and the 1st American President George Washington.

    Birth:
    Click this link to view images, history & map of the massive Ludlow Castle in Shropshire ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ludlow_Castle

    Children:
    1. Edmund Mortimer was born ~ 1304, Wigmore Castle, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England; died 16 Dec 1331, Wigmore Castle, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England.
    2. Margaret Mortimer, Baroness Berkeley was born 2 May 1304, (Wigmore Castle, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England); died 5 May 1337; was buried St. Augustine's Abbey, Bristol, Gloucestershire, England.
    3. Joan de Mortimer, 2nd Baroness Geneville was born 2 Feb 1286, Ludlow Castle, Ludlow, Shropshire, England; died 19 Oct 1356.
    4. 77. Katherine de Mortimer, Countess of Warwick was born 0___ 1314, Wigmore Castle, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England; died 4 Aug 1369, (Warwickshire) England; was buried St. Mary's Church, Warwick, Warwickshire, England.

  15. 156.  Richard FitzAlan, Knight, 10th Earl of ArundelRichard FitzAlan, Knight, 10th Earl of Arundel was born 1306-1313, Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England (son of Edmund FitzAlan, Knight, 9th Earl of Arundel and Alice de Warenne, Countess of Arundel); died 24 Jan 1376, Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England; was buried Lewes Priory, Southover, Sussex, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Governor of Caernarfon Castle
    • Occupation: High Sheriff of Caernarvonshire
    • Occupation: Justiciar of North Wales
    • Also Known As: 8th Earl of Surrey
    • Military: Commander of the English Army in the North
    • Will: 5 Dec 1375

    Notes:

    Richard FitzAlan, 10th Earl of Arundel and 8th Earl of Surrey (c. 1306/1313 – 24 January 1376) was an English nobleman and medieval military leader.

    Family and early life

    Richard's birth date was uncertain perhaps 1313 or maybe 1306 in Sussex, England. FitzAlan was the eldest son of Edmund FitzAlan, 9th Earl of Arundel (8th Earl of Arundel per Ancestral Roots), and his wife Alice de Warenne.[1] His maternal grandparents were William de Warenne and Joan de Vere. William was the only son of John de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey (himself son of Maud Marshal by her second marriage), and his wife Alice de Lusignan (d. 1356), half-sister of Henry III of England.

    Alliance with the Despensers

    Around 1321, FitzAlan's father allied with King Edward II's favorites, Hugh le Despenser, 1st Earl of Winchester and his namesake son, and Richard was married to Isabel le Despenser, daughter of Hugh the Younger. Fortune turned against the Despenser party, and on 17 November 1326, FitzAlan's father was executed, and he did not succeed to his father's estates or titles.

    Gradual restoration

    However, political conditions had changed by 1330, and over the next few years Richard was gradually able to reacquire the Earldom of Arundel as well as the great estates his father had held in Sussex and in the Welsh Marches.

    Beyond this, in 1334 he was made Justiciar of North Wales (later his term in this office was made for life), High Sheriff of Caernarvonshire for life and Governor of Caernarfon Castle. He was one of the most trusted supporters of Edward the Black Prince in Wales.

    Military service in Scotland

    Despite his high offices in Wales, in the following decades Arundel spent much of his time fighting in Scotland (during the Second Wars of Scottish Independence) and France (during the Hundred Years' War). In 1337, Arundel was made Joint Commander of the English army in the north, and the next year he was made the sole Commander.

    Notable victories

    In 1340 he fought at the Battle of Sluys, and then at the siege of Tournai. After a short term as Warden of the Scottish Marches, he returned to the continent, where he fought in a number of campaigns, and was appointed Joint Lieutenant of Aquitaine in 1340.

    Arundel was one of the three principal English commanders at the Battle of Crâecy. He spent much of the following years on various military campaigns and diplomatic missions.

    In a campaign of 1375, at the end of his life, he destroyed the harbour of Roscoff.

    Great wealth

    In 1347, he succeeded to the Earldom of Surrey (or Warenne), which even further increased his great wealth. (He did not however use the additional title until after the death of the Dowager Countess of Surrey in 1361.) He made very large loans to King Edward III but even so on his death left behind a great sum in hard cash.

    Marriages and children

    This section does not cite any references or sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (December 2012)
    He married firstly February 9, 1321 at Havering-atte-Bower, Isabel le Despenser (born 1312). At that time, the future earl was eight (or fifteen) and his bride nine. He later repudiated this bride, and was granted an annulment by Pope Clement VI in December 1344 on the grounds that he had been underaged and unwilling. He had a son Edmund (b. 1327) when he was fourteen (or twenty-one) and his wife fifteen; this son was bastardized by the annulment.

    His second wife, whom he married on 5 April 1345, was a young widow Eleanor of Lancaster, the second youngest daughter and sixth child of Henry, 3rd Earl of Lancaster and Maud Chaworth; by Papal dispensation he was allowed to marry his first wife's first cousin by their common grandmother Isabella de Beauchamp. Eleanor was the widow of John de Beaumont, 2nd Lord Beaumont. The king, Edward III, himself a kinsman of both wives, attended this second marriage. By now, the Earl of Arundel had rebuilt the family wealth and was apparently a major financier of the Crown, and financial sweeteners may have been used to reconcile both the Church and the Crown.[2] By his first marriage to Isabel le Despenser (living 1356, and may have died circa 1376-7), which marriage he had annulled December 1344 [1], he had one son:

    Sir Edmund de Arundel, knt (b ca 1327; d 1376-1382), bastardized by the annulment. Edmund was nevertheless knighted, married at the age of twenty, in the summer of 1347 [2] Sybil de Montacute, a younger daughter of William Montacute, 1st Earl of Salisbury and Catherine Grandison, whose elder sister Elizabeth was married to his maternal uncle (the uncle may have arranged this marriage). Edmund protested his bastardization bitterly in 1347, but was apparently ignored. After his father's death in 1376, Edmund disputed his half-brother Richard's inheritance of the earldom and associated lands and titles in 1376 and apparently tried to claim the six manors allotted to his deceased mother. He was imprisoned in the Tower of London in 1377, and finally freed through the intervention of two of his brothers-in-law (his wife's brother John de Montacute and the second husband of Elizabeth de Montacute, Lady Le Despencer).[3] They had three daughters who were his co-heiresses and who brought a failed suit in 1382 against their half-uncle the Earl:

    Elizabeth de Arundel, who married Sir Leonard Carew and has descendants

    Philippa de Arundel (died 18 May 1452), married (as his 2nd wife) Sir Richard Sergeaux, Knt, of Colquite, Cornwall.[4] A Victorian historical novel ascribes the following five children to her: a) Richard, born December 21, 1376, and died issueless, June 24, 1396; b) Elizabeth, born 1379, wife of Sir William Marny; c) Philippa, born 1381, wife of Robert Passele; d) Alice, born at Kilquyt, September 1, 1384, wife of Guy de Saint Albino [this ; e) Joan, born 1393, died February 21, 1400. "Philippa became a widow, September 30, 1393, and died September 13, 1399." (I.P.M., 17 Ric. II., 53; 21 Ric. II., 50; 1 H. IV., 14, 23, 24.)[5]

    Alice Sergeaux later Countess of Oxford (c. 1386 - 18 May 1452), married 1stly Guy de St Aubyn of St. Erme, Cornwall, and 2ndly about 1406-7 as his 2nd wife, the 11th Earl of Oxford and widower of Alice de Holand (dsp. 1406, niece of Henry IV, and mother of two sons by him
    John de Vere, 12th Earl of Oxford
    Robert de Vere, whose grandson, John, became the 15th Earl of Oxford.[7]

    Mary (died 29 Aug 1396), married John le Strange, 4th Lord Blackmere (from Genealogy of Fitzalans).
    By the second marriage 5 February 1345, by Papal dispensation,[6] to Eleanor of Lancaster, he had 3 sons and 3 surviving daughters:

    Richard FitzAlan, 11th Earl of Arundel, who succeeded him as 11th Earl of Arundel as his "eldest legitimate" son.
    John FitzAlan, 1st Baron Arundel, 1st Baron Maltravers, who was a Marshall of England, and drowned in 1379.
    Thomas Arundel, who became Archbishop of Canterbury
    Lady Joan FitzAlan (1348 - 7 April 1419) who married Humphrey de Bohun, 7th Earl of Hereford. They were the maternal grandparents of Henry V of England through their daughter Mary de Bohun.
    Lady Alice FitzAlan (1350 - 17 March 1416), who married Thomas Holland, 2nd Earl of Kent, uterine brother of King Richard II. They were ancestors to Queen consorts Anne Neville (wife of King Richard III), Elizabeth of York (wife of King Henry VII), and Catherine Parr (wife of King Henry VIII).
    Lady Eleanor Fitzalan (1356 - before 1366).

    The current Dukes of Norfolk descend from Lady Mary, Duchess of Norfolk, a daughter and co-heiress of Henry FitzAlan, 19th Earl of Arundel; the 19th Earl descended from John FitzAlan, 1st Baron Arundel.

    Death and legacy

    Richard died on 24 January 1376 in Sussex, England. (Another source says he wrote his will on 5 December 1375, and died on 14 January 1376 at Arundel Castle).[3]. In his will, he mentioned his three surviving sons by his second wife, his two surviving daughters Joan, Dowager Countess of Hereford and Alice, Countess of Kent, his grandchildren by his second son John, etc., but left out his bastardized eldest son Edmund.

    The memorial effigies attributed to Richard FitzAlan and his second wife Eleanor of Lancaster in Chichester Cathedral are the subject of the poem "An Arundel Tomb" by Philip Larkin.

    FitzAlan died an incredibly wealthy man, despite his various loans to Edward III

    Birth:
    Arundel Castle is a restored and remodeled medieval castle in Arundel, West Sussex, England. It was established by Roger de Montgomery on Christmas Day 1067. Roger became the first to hold the earldom of Arundel by the graces of William the Conqueror. The castle was damaged in the English Civil War and then restored in the 18th and 19th centuries.

    From the 11th century, the castle has served as a home and has been in the ownership of the family of the Duke of Norfolk for over 400 years. It is the principal seat of the Norfolk family. It is a Grade I listed building.

    Photos, history & source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arundel_Castle

    Occupation:
    The Justiciar of North Wales was responsible for the royal administration in these counties as well as the administration of justice. English law was applied to criminal law, but in other matters Welsh law was allowed to continue.

    List of Justiciars

    Otton de Grandson, 1284–1294
    Robert Tibetot, 1295–1301
    Richard FitzAlan, 10th Earl of Arundel, 1334–1352
    Arundel sold the office to Edward the Black Prince in 1352
    John de Beauchamp, 1st Baron Beauchamp 1385–1388
    Henry Percy (Hotspur) 1399?–1403?

    Occupation:
    Caernarfon Castle (Welsh: Castell Caernarfon) is a medieval fortress in Caernarfon, Gwynedd, north-west Wales. Click here to view its history, map & picture ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caernarfon_Castle

    Buried:
    Lewes Priory is a ruined medieval Cluniac priory in Southover, East Sussex in the United Kingdom. The ruins have been designated a Grade I listed building.

    The Priory of St Pancras was the first Cluniac house in England and had one of the largest monastic churches in the country. It was set within an extensive walled and gated precinct laid out in a commanding location fronting the tidal shore-line at the head of the Ouse valley to the south of Lewes in the County of Sussex. The Priory had daughter houses, including Castle Acre Priory in Norfolk, and was endowed with churches and extensive holdings throughout England. In Lewes it had hospitiums dedicated to St James and to St Nicholas.

    In 1264, during the Battle of Lewes, King Henry III installed his forces in the Priory precinct which came under attack from those of Simon de Montfort after his victory over Henry in battle. Henry was forced, in the Mise of Lewes, to accept the Council that was the start of Parliamentary government in England.

    Photos, history & source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lewes_Priory

    Richard married Eleanor Plantagenet, Countess of Arundel 5 Feb 1344, Ditton Church, Stoke Poges, Buckinghamshire, England. Eleanor (daughter of Henry Plantagenet, 3rd Earl of Lancaster and Leicester and Maud Chaworth) was born 11 Sep 1318, Castle, Grosmont, Monmouth, Wales; died 11 Jan 1372, Arundel, West Sussex, England; was buried Lewes Priory, Sussex, England. [Group Sheet]


  16. 157.  Eleanor Plantagenet, Countess of Arundel was born 11 Sep 1318, Castle, Grosmont, Monmouth, Wales (daughter of Henry Plantagenet, 3rd Earl of Lancaster and Leicester and Maud Chaworth); died 11 Jan 1372, Arundel, West Sussex, England; was buried Lewes Priory, Sussex, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Eleanor of Lancaster

    Notes:

    On 5 February 1344 at Ditton Church, Stoke Poges, Buckinghamshire, she married Richard FitzAlan, 10th Earl of Arundel.[4]

    His previous marriage, to Isabel le Despenser, had taken place when they were children. It was annulled by Papal mandate as she, since her father's attainder and execution, had ceased to be of any importance to him. Pope Clement VI obligingly annulled the marriage, bastardized the issue, and provided a dispensation for his second marriage to the woman with whom he had been living in adultery (the dispensation, dated 4 March 1344/1345, was required because his first and second wives were first cousins).

    The children of Eleanor's second marriage were:

    Richard (1346–1397), who succeeded as Earl of Arundel
    John Fitzalan (bef 1349 - 1379)
    Thomas Arundel, Archbishop of Canterbury (c. 1353 - 19 February 1413)
    Lady Joan FitzAlan (1347/1348 - 7 April 1419), married Humphrey de Bohun, 7th Earl of Hereford
    Lady Alice FitzAlan (1350 - 17 March 1416), married Thomas Holland, 2nd Earl of Kent (Thomas Holand)
    Lady Mary FitzAlan (died 29 August 1396), married John Le Strange, 4th Lord Strange of Blackmere, by whom she had issue
    Lady Eleanor FitzAlan (1356 - before 1366)

    Notes:

    Married:
    Richard married Isabel's first cousin Eleanor of Lancaster, with whom he had apparently been having an affair.

    Children:
    1. 78. Richard FitzAlan, Knight, 11th Earl of Arundel was born 25 Mar 1346, Arundel, Sussex, England; died 21 Sep 1397, London, Middlesex, England; was buried Augustin Friars, Bread Street, London, England.
    2. John FitzAlan, 1st Baron Arundel was born ~ 1348, Etchingham, Sussex, England; died 16 Dec 1379; was buried Lewes Priory, Sussex, England.
    3. Alice FitzAlan, Countess of Kent was born 1350-1352, Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England; died 17 Mar 1415, (Arundel, West Sussex, England).
    4. Joan FitzAlan was born 0___ 1347, Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England; died 7 Apr 1419, Saffron Walden, Essex, England; was buried Walden Abbey, Essex, England.

  17. 158.  William de Bohun, Knight, 1st Earl of Northampton was born 0___ 1312, Caldecot, Rutland, Northampton, England (son of Humphrey de Bohun, VII, 4th Earl of Hereford and Elizabeth Plantagenet, Princess of England); died 16 Sep 1360, (England).

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Diplomat
    • Military: 30 Sep 1342; Battle of Morlaix, France

    Notes:

    William de Bohun, 1st Earl of Northampton, KG (c. 1312 – 16 September 1360) was an English nobleman and military commander.

    Lineage

    He was the fifth son of Humphrey de Bohun, 4th Earl of Hereford and Elizabeth of Rhuddlan. He had a twin brother, Edward. His maternal grandparents were Edward I of England and his first Queen consort Eleanor of Castile.

    Life

    William de Bohun assisted at the arrest of Roger Mortimer in 1330, allowing Edward III to take power. After this, he was a trusted friend and commander of the king and he participated in the renewed wars with Scotland.[1]

    In 1332, he received many new properties: Hinton and Spaine in Berkshire; Great Haseley, Ascott, Deddington, Pyrton and Kirtlington in Oxfordshire; Wincomb in Buckinghamshire; Longbenington in Lincolnshire; Kneesol in Nottinghamshire; Newnsham in Gloucestershire, Wix in Essex, and Bosham in Sussex.

    In 1335, he married Elizabeth de Badlesmere (1313 - 8 June 1356). Her parents Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 1st Baron Badlesmere, and Margaret de Clare had both turned against Edward II the decade before. Elizabeth and William were granted some of the property of Elizabeth's first husband, who had also been Mortimer's son and heir.

    William was created Earl of Northampton in 1337, one of the six earls created by Edward III to renew the ranks of the higher nobility. Since de Bohun was a younger son, and did not have an income suitable to his rank, he was given an annuity until suitable estates could be found.

    In 1349 he became a Knight of the Garter. He served as High Sheriff of Rutland from 1349 until his death in 1360.[2]

    Campaigns in Flanders, Brittany, Scotland, Victor at Sluys & Crecy

    In 1339 he accompanied the King to Flanders. He served variously in Brittany and in Scotland, and was present at the great English victories at Sluys and was a commander at Crâecy.

    His most stunning feat was commanding an English force to victory against a much bigger French force at the Battle of Morlaix in 1342. Some of the details are in dispute, but it is clear that he made good use of pit traps, which stopped the French cavalry.

    Renowned Diplomat

    In addition to being a warrior, William was also a renowned diplomat. He negotiated two treaties with France, one in 1343 and one in 1350. He was also charged with negotiating in Scotland for the freedom of King David Bruce, King of Scots, who was held prisoner by the English.

    Issue

    1. Humphrey de Bohun, 7th Earl of Hereford (1341-1373)

    Mary de Bohun (1368-1394); mother of Henry V of England
    2. Elizabeth de Bohun (c. 1350-1385); married Richard FitzAlan, 11th Earl of Arundel

    In Historical Fiction

    In Bernard Cornwell's series the Grail Quest, the Earl of Northampton plays a minor role as Thomas of Hookton's lord.

    Notes

    Jump up ^ Mortimer, Ian (2008). The Perfect King The Life of Edward III, Father of the English Nation. Vintage. p. 138.
    Jump up ^ The history of the worthies of England, Volume 3 By Thomas Fuller. Retrieved 2011-07-13.

    *

    William de Bohun, 1st Earl of Northampton, KG (c. 1312 – 16 September 1360) was an English nobleman and military commander.


    Lineage

    He was the fifth son of Humphrey de Bohun, 4th Earl of Hereford and Elizabeth of Rhuddlan. He had a twin brother, Edward. His maternal grandparents were Edward I of England and his first Queen consort Eleanor of Castile.

    Life

    William de Bohun assisted at the arrest of Roger Mortimer in 1330, allowing Edward III to take power. After this, he was a trusted friend and commander of the king and he participated in the renewed wars with Scotland.[1]

    In 1332, he received many new properties: Hinton and Spaine in Berkshire; Great Haseley, Ascott, Deddington, Pyrton and Kirtlington in Oxfordshire; Wincomb in Buckinghamshire; Longbenington in Lincolnshire; Kneesol in Nottinghamshire; Newnsham in Gloucestershire, Wix in Essex, and Bosham in Sussex.

    In 1335, he married Elizabeth de Badlesmere (1313 – 8 June 1356). Her parents Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 1st Baron Badlesmere, and Margaret de Clare had both turned against Edward II the decade before. Elizabeth and William were granted some of the property of Elizabeth's first husband, who had also been Mortimer's son and heir.

    William was created Earl of Northampton in 1337, one of the six earls created by Edward III to renew the ranks of the higher nobility. Since de Bohun was a younger son, and did not have an income suitable to his rank, he was given an annuity until suitable estates could be found.

    In 1349 he became a Knight of the Garter. He served as High Sheriff of Rutland from 1349 until his death in 1360.[2]

    Campaigns in Flanders, Brittany, Scotland, Victor at Sluys & Crecy[edit]
    In 1339 he accompanied the King to Flanders. He served variously in Brittany and in Scotland, and was present at the great English victories at Sluys and was a commander at Crâecy.

    His most stunning feat was commanding an English force to victory against a much bigger French force at the Battle of Morlaix in 1342. Some of the details are in dispute, but it is clear that he made good use of pit traps, which stopped the French cavalry.

    Renowned Diplomat

    In addition to being a warrior, William was also a renowned diplomat. He negotiated two treaties with France, one in 1343 and one in 1350. He was also charged with negotiating in Scotland for the freedom of King David Bruce, King of Scots, who was held prisoner by the English.

    Issue

    1. Humphrey de Bohun, 7th Earl of Hereford (1341-1373)

    Mary de Bohun (1368-1394); mother of Henry V of England
    2. Elizabeth de Bohun (c. 1350-1385); married Richard FitzAlan, 11th Earl of Arundel

    Military:
    The Battle of Morlaix was a battle fought in Morlaix on 30 September 1342 between England and France. The English besieged the town, but a French relief force arrived. The English constructed a strong defensive position. After repeated attacks, the French forced the English to retreat into the woods. The French force then withdrew. Notably it was the first use of a tactical withdrawal by the English in medieval warfare.

    Outcome of the battle

    Whatever the details of the fighting, the final result was that 50 French knights were killed and 150 French captured including Geoffrey de Charny and a number of ‘populari’ which seems to indicate that at least some of the infantry were involved in the melee. The English force now made apprehensive by the remaining French forces withdrew into the wood at their back where they were safe from a full blooded cavalry charge. What was left of de Blois’ force then evidently relieved Morlaix and the besieging English, now trapped in the wood, themselves became the object of a siege for several days.

    William married Elizabeth Badlesmere, Countess of Northampton 0___ 1335, Badlesmere Castle, Badlesmere, Kent, England. Elizabeth (daughter of Bartholomew de Badlesmere, Knight, 1st Baron Badlesmere and Margaret de Clare, Baroness Badlesmere) was born 0___ 1313, Badlesmere Manor, Kent, England; died 8 Jun 1356, (Lancashire) England; was buried Black Friars, Blackburn, Lancashire, England. [Group Sheet]


  18. 159.  Elizabeth Badlesmere, Countess of Northampton was born 0___ 1313, Badlesmere Manor, Kent, England (daughter of Bartholomew de Badlesmere, Knight, 1st Baron Badlesmere and Margaret de Clare, Baroness Badlesmere); died 8 Jun 1356, (Lancashire) England; was buried Black Friars, Blackburn, Lancashire, England.

    Notes:

    Elizabeth de Badlesmere, Countess of Northampton (1313 – 8 June 1356) was the wife of two English noblemen, Sir Edmund Mortimer and William de Bohun, 1st Earl of Northampton. She was a co-heiress of her brother Giles de Badlesmere, 2nd Baron Badlesmere.

    At the age of eight she was sent to the Tower of London along with her mother, Margaret de Clare, Baroness Badlesmere and her four siblings after the former maltreated Queen consort Isabella by ordering an assault upon her and refusing her admittance to Leeds Castle.

    Family

    Elizabeth was born at Castle Badlesmere, Kent, England in 1313 to Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 1st Baron Badlesmere and Margaret de Clare. She was the third of four daughters. She had one younger brother, Giles de Badlesmere, 2nd Baron Badlesmere, who married Elizabeth Montagu, but did not have any children.

    Her paternal grandparents were Guncelin de Badlesmere and Joan FitzBernard, and her maternal grandparents were Thomas de Clare, Lord of Thomond and Juliana FitzGerald of Offaly.

    Elizabeth's father was hanged, drawn and quartered on 14 April 1322 for having participated in the Earl of Lancaster's rebellion against King Edward II of England; and her mother imprisoned in the Tower of London until 3 November 1322. She had been arrested the previous October for ordering an assault upon Queen consort Isabella after refusing her admittance to Leeds Castle, where Baron Badlesmere held the post of Governor.[1] Elizabeth and her siblings were also sent to the Tower along with their mother.[2] She was eight years old at the time and had been married for five years to her first husband; although the marriage had not yet been consummated due to her young age.

    In 1328, Elizabeth's brother Giles obtained a reversal of his father's attainder, and he succeeded to the barony as the 2nd Baron Badlesmere. Elizabeth, along with her three sisters, was a co-heiress of Giles, who had no children by his wife. Upon his death in 1338, the barony fell into abeyance. The Badlesmere estates were divided among the four sisters, and Elizabeth's share included the manors of Drayton in Sussex, Kingston and Erith in Kent, a portion of Finmere in Oxfordshire as well as property in London.[3]

    Marriages and issue

    On 27 June 1316, when she was just three years old, Elizabeth married her first husband Sir Edmund Mortimer (died 16 December 1331)[4] eldest son and heir of Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March and Joan de Geneville. The marriage contract was made on 9 May 1316, and the particulars of the arrangement between her father and prospective father-in-law are described in Welsh historian R. R. Davies' Lords and Lordship in the British Isles in the late Middle Ages. Lord Badlesmere paid Roger Mortimer the sum of ¹2000, and in return Mortimer endowed Elizabeth with five rich manors for life and the reversion of other lands.[5] The marriage, which was not consummated until many years afterward, produced two sons:

    Roger Mortimer, 2nd Earl of March (11 November 1328 Ludlow Castle- 26 February 1360), married Philippa Montacute, daughter of William Montacute, 1st Earl of Salisbury and Catherine Grandison, by whom he had issue, including Edmund Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March).
    John Mortimer (died young)
    By the order of King Edward III, Elizabeth's father-in-law, the Earl of Mortimer was hanged in November 1330 for having assumed royal power, along with other crimes. His estates were forfeited to the Crown, therefore Elizabeth's husband did not succeed to the earldom and died a year later. Elizabeth's dower included the estates of Maelienydd and Comot Deuddwr in the Welsh Marches.[6]

    In 1335, just over three years after the death of Edmund Mortimer, Elizabeth married secondly William de Bohun, 1st Earl of Northampton (1312–1360), fifth son of Humphrey de Bohun, 4th Earl of Hereford and Elizabeth of Rhuddlan. He was a renowned military commander and diplomat. Their marriage was arranged to end the mutual hostility which had existed between the Bohun and Mortimer families.[7] A papal dispensation was required for their marriage as de Bohun and her first husband, Sir Edmund Mortimer were related in the third and fourth degrees of consanguinity by dint of their common descent from Enguerrand de Fiennes, Seigneur de Fiennes. Elizabeth and de Bohun received some Mortimer estates upon their marriage.[8]

    By her second marriage, Elizabeth had two more children:[9]

    Humphrey de Bohun, 7th Earl of Hereford 6th Earl of Essex, 2nd Earl of Northampton (24 March 1342 - 16 January 1373), after 9 September 1359, married Joan Fitzalan, by whom he had two daughters, Eleanor de Bohun, Duchess of Gloucester, and Mary de Bohun, wife of Henry of Bolingbroke (who later reigned as King Henry IV).
    Elizabeth de Bohun (c.1350- 3 April 1385), on 28 September 1359, married Richard Fitzalan, 11th Earl of Arundel, by whom she had seven children including Thomas Fitzalan, 12th Earl of Arundel, Elizabeth FitzAlan, and Joan FitzAlan, Baroness Bergavenny.
    In 1348, the earldom of March was restored to her eldest son Roger who succeeded as the 2nd Earl.

    Death

    Elizabeth de Badlesmere died on 8 June 1356, aged about forty-three years old. She was buried in Black Friars Priory, London. She left a will dated 31 May 1356, requesting burial at the priory. Mention of Elizabeth's burial is found in the records (written in Latin) of Walden Abbey which confirm that she was buried in Black Friars:

    Anno Domini MCCCIxx.obiit Willielmus de Boun, Comes Northamptoniae, cujus corpus sepelitur in paret boreali presbyterii nostri. Et Elizabetha uxor ejus sepelitur Lundoniae in ecclesia fratrum praedictorum ante major altare.[10]

    Children:
    1. Humphrey de Bohun, Knight was born 25 Mar 1341, Hereford, Herefordshire, England; died 16 Jan 1373; was buried Walden Abbey, Essex, England.
    2. 79. Elizabeth de Bohun, Countess of Arundel, Countess of Surrey was born ~ 1350, Derbyshire, England; died 3 Apr 1385, Arundel, West Sussex, England.

  19. 160.  Ralph de Greystoke, 1st Baron Audley was born 15 Aug 1299; died 14 Jul 1323, Gateshead, Durham, England; was buried Newminster Abbey, Northumberland, England.

    Ralph — Alice de Audley. Alice (daughter of Hugh de Audley, 1st Baron Audley of Stratton and Isolde (Isabella) de Mortimer) was born 1302-1304, Hadley, Lambourne, Berkshire, England; died 12 Jan 1374, Greystoke Manor, Northumberland, England; was buried Durham Cathedral, Durham, Durhamshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  20. 161.  Alice de Audley was born 1302-1304, Hadley, Lambourne, Berkshire, England (daughter of Hugh de Audley, 1st Baron Audley of Stratton and Isolde (Isabella) de Mortimer); died 12 Jan 1374, Greystoke Manor, Northumberland, England; was buried Durham Cathedral, Durham, Durhamshire, England.
    Children:
    1. 80. William de Greystoke, 2nd Baron Greystoke was born 6 Jan 1321, Grimthorpe, Cumbria, England; died 10 Jul 1359, Brancepeth Castle, Durham, England; was buried St. Andrews Church, Greystoke, Cumbria, England.

  21. 164.  Robert de Clifford, Knight, 3rd Baron de Clifford was born 5 Nov 1305, (Skipton, North Yorkshire, England) (son of Robert de Clifford, Knight, 1st Baron de Clifford and Maude de Clare); died 20 May 1344.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: 3rd Lord of Skipton

    Notes:

    Robert de Clifford, 3rd Baron de Clifford, also 3rd Lord of Skipton (5 November 1305–20 May 1344) was a member of the Clifford family which held the seat of Skipton from 1310 to 1676.

    He was the second son of Robert de Clifford, 1st Baron de Clifford and Maud de Clare, eldest daughter of Thomas de Clare, Lord of Thomond and Juliana FitzGerald.

    His title was restored to him in 1327 after being forfeited by his elder brother Roger de Clifford, 2nd Baron de Clifford who was hanged for treason.

    He married Isabel de Berkeley, daughter of Maurice de Berkeley, 2nd Baron Berkeley at Berkeley Castle in 1328. They had 7 children. He was succeeded as Baron De Clifford by the eldest, Robert de Clifford, 4th Baron de Clifford

    Robert married Isabel de Berkeley 0Jun 1328. Isabel (daughter of Maurice de Berkeley, III, Knight, 2nd Baron Berkeley and Eva la Zouche) was born 0___ 1307; died 25 Jul 1362, Berkeley Castle, Berkeley, Gloucestershire, England. [Group Sheet]


  22. 165.  Isabel de Berkeley was born 0___ 1307 (daughter of Maurice de Berkeley, III, Knight, 2nd Baron Berkeley and Eva la Zouche); died 25 Jul 1362, Berkeley Castle, Berkeley, Gloucestershire, England.
    Children:
    1. Robert Clifford, Lord of Northumberland was born 0___ 1328, England; died Bef 1354, England.
    2. 82. Roger de Clifford, Knight, 5th Baron de Clifford was born 10 Jul 1333, Brougham Castle, Westmorland, England; died 13 Jul 1389, Brougham Castle, Westmorland, England.
    3. Eleanor Clifford was born ~ 1343.

  23. 76.  Thomas de Beauchamp, Knight, 11th Earl of WarwickThomas de Beauchamp, Knight, 11th Earl of Warwick was born 14 Feb 1313, Warwick Castle, Warwick, Warwickshire, England (son of Guy de Beauchamp, Knight, 10th Earl of Warwick and Alice de Toeni, Countess of Warwick); died 13 Nov 1369, (Warwickshire) England; was buried St. Mary's Church, Warwick, Warwickshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Thomas de Beauchamp

    Notes:

    Thomas de Beauchamp, 11th Earl of Warwick, KG (c. 14 February 1313 – 13 November 1369) was an English nobleman and military commander during the Hundred Years' War. In 1348 he became one of the founders and the third Knight of the Order of the Garter.

    Early life

    Thomas de Beauchamp, 11th Earl of Warwick depicted in 1347 as one of the 8 mourners attached to the monumental brass of Sir Hugh Hastings (d. 1347) at St Mary's Church, Elsing, Norfolk. He displays the arms of Beauchamp on his tunic
    Thomas de Beauchamp was born at Warwick Castle, Warwickshire, England to Guy de Beauchamp, 10th Earl of Warwick and Alice de Toeni. He served in Scotland frequently during the 1330s, being captain of the army against the Scots in 1337. He was hereditary High Sheriff of Worcestershire from 1333 until his death (in 1369). In 1344 he was also made High Sheriff of Warwickshire and Leicestershire for life.[citation needed]

    Victor at Crâecy and Poitiers


    Left:Seal (obverse) of Thomas de Beauchamp, 11th Earl of Warwick, dated 1344: S(IGILLUM) THO(M)E COMITIS WARRWYCHIE ANNO REGNI REGIS E(DWARDII) TE(RT)II...(continued on counter-seal) ("Seal of Thomas, Count (Earl) of Warwick in the year of the reign of King Edward the Third..."). He displays on his surcoat, shield and horse's caparison the arms of Beauchamp, and carries on his helm as crest a swan's head and neck; right: Counter-seal/reverse: (legend continued from face of seal) ...POST CO(N)QUESTU(M) ANGLIE SEPTI(M)O DECIM(0) ET REGNI SUI FRANCIE QUARTO ("...after the Conquest of England the seventeenth and of his reign of the Kingdom of France the fourth"). This dates the seal to 1344. The arms are those of de Newburgh, the family of the Beaumont Earls of Warwick: Checky azure and or, a chevron ermine. This same display of double arms was used on the seal of his father Guy de Beauchamp, 10th Earl of Warwick on his seal affixed to the Barons' Letter, 1301
    Warwick was Marshall of England from 1343/4 until 1369, and was one of the commanders at the great English victories at Crâecy and Poitiers.

    Thomas de Beauchamp fought in all the French wars of King Edward III; he commanded the center at the Battle of Crecy (where many of his relatives were killed including his younger half-brother Alan la Zouche de Mortimer). He was trusted to be guardian of the sixteen-year-old Black Prince. Beauchamp fought at Poitiers in 1356 and at the Siege of Calais (1346).

    He began the rebuilding of the Collegiate Church of Saint Mary in Warwick using money received from the ransom of a French Archbishop. He died of plague in Calais on 13 November 1369 and was entombed in the Beauchamp Chapel. The chapel contains the finest example of the use of brisures for cadency in medieval heraldry -- seven different Beauchamp coats of arms.

    Marriage and children

    He married Katherine Mortimer, daughter of Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March. They had five sons and ten daughters:[1]

    Thomas b. 16 Mar 1338 d. 8 Aug 1401, who married Margaret Ferrers and had descendants. His son Richard succeeded him as Earl and inherited most of his property.
    Guy (d. 28 April 1360). He had two daughters who by entail were excluded from their grandfather's inheritance: Elizabeth (d. c.1369), and Katherine, who became a nun.
    Reinbrun, (d. 1361); he was named for a character in Guy of Warwick.
    William (c. 1343–1411), who inherited the honour of Abergavenny. Married Joan FitzAlan.
    Roger (d. 1361)
    Maud (d. 1403), who married Roger de Clifford, 5th Baron de Clifford.
    Philippa de Beauchamp who married Hugh de Stafford, 2nd Earl of Stafford.
    Alice (d. 1383), who married first John Beauchamp, 3rd Baron Beauchamp and then Sir Matthew Gournay.
    Joan, who married Ralph Basset, 4th Baron Basset de Drayton.
    Isabell (d. 1416) who married first John le Strange, 5th Baron Strange, and then to William de Ufford, 2nd Earl of Suffolk. After the latter's death she became a nun.
    Margaret, who married Guy de Montfort and after his death became a nun.
    Elizabeth, married Thomas de Ufford, KG
    Anne, married Walter de Cokesey
    Juliana
    Katherine, became a nun at Shouldham

    Catherine Montacute, Countess of Salisbury was not his daughter, although she is presented as such in William Painter's Palace of Pleasure and in the Elizabethan play, Edward III that may be by William Shakespeare.

    Thomas married Katherine de Mortimer, Countess of Warwick 19 Apr 1319, (Warwickshire) England. Katherine (daughter of Roger de Mortimer, 1st Earl of March and Joan de Geneville, 2nd Baroness Geneville) was born 0___ 1314, Wigmore Castle, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England; died 4 Aug 1369, (Warwickshire) England; was buried St. Mary's Church, Warwick, Warwickshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  24. 77.  Katherine de Mortimer, Countess of Warwick was born 0___ 1314, Wigmore Castle, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England (daughter of Roger de Mortimer, 1st Earl of March and Joan de Geneville, 2nd Baroness Geneville); died 4 Aug 1369, (Warwickshire) England; was buried St. Mary's Church, Warwick, Warwickshire, England.

    Notes:

    Katherine Mortimer, Countess of Warwick (1314 - 4 August 1369) was the wife of Thomas de Beauchamp, 11th Earl of Warwick KG, an English peer, and military commander during the Hundred Years War. She was a daughter and co-heiress of Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March and Joan de Geneville, Baroness Geneville.

    Sometime before 1355, she became an important figure at the royal court of King Edward III.

    Family and lineage

    Katherine Mortimer was born at Ludlow Castle, Shropshire, England, in 1314, one of the twelve children and a co-heiress of Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March and Joan de Geneville, Baroness Geneville. Her paternal grandparents were Edmund Mortimer, 2nd Baron Mortimer and Margaret de Fiennes, and her maternal grandparents were Sir Piers de Geneville, of Trim Castle and Ludlow, and Jeanne of Lusignan.

    Her father was de facto ruler of England together with his mistress Isabella of France, Queen consort of King Edward II, until his eventual capture and execution by the orders of King Edward III, eldest son of Isabella and King Edward II. The latter had been deposed in November 1326, and afterwards cruelly murdered by assassins acting under the orders of Mortimer and Queen Isabella. Katherine was sixteen years old when her father was hanged, Tyburn, London on 29 November 1330. Roger Mortimer was NOT Hanged drawn and quartered as stated but only hanged and his body was left until monks from Greyfriars in London took it down.

    Marriage

    On 19 April 1319, when she was about five years old, Katherine married Thomas de Beauchamp, 11th Earl of Warwick, eldest son of Guy de Beauchamp, 10th Earl of Warwick and Alice de Toeni.[1] Their marriage required a Papal dispensation as they were related within the prohibited third and fourth degrees. Beauchamp had succeeded to the earldom at the age of two, therefore Katherine was styled Countess of Warwick from the time of her marriage until her death. The marriage had been arranged in July 1318 in order to settle a quarrel between the two families over the lordship of Elfael, which was thus given to Katherine as her marriage portion.[2] For the term of his minority, Beauchamp's custody had been granted to Katherine's father, Roger Mortimer.[3]

    Katherine later became an important personage at the court of King Edward III. As a sign of royal favour she was chosen to stand as one of the godmothers, along with Queen Philippa of Hainault, to the latter's granddaughter, Philippa, Countess of Ulster in 1355. This honour bestowed on Katherine is described by 19th century author Agnes Strickland according to the Friar's Genealogy: "Her [Philippa, Countess of Ulster] godmother also was of Warwick Countess, a lady likewise of great worthiness".[4]

    Issue

    Katherine and Beauchamp together had fifteen children:[5]

    Guy de Beauchamp (died 28 April 1360), married Philippa de Ferrers, daughter of Henry de Ferrers, 2nd Lord Ferrers of Groby and Isabel de Verdun, by whom he had two daughters.[6]
    Thomas de Beauchamp, 12th Earl of Warwick (16 March 1339- 1401), married Margaret Ferrers, daughter of William Ferrers, 3rd Lord of Groby and Margaret de Ufford, by whom he had issue, including Richard de Beauchamp, 13th Earl of Warwick.
    Reinbrun de Beauchamp
    William de Beauchamp, 1st Baron Bergavenny (c. 1343- 8 May 1411), on 23 July 1392, married Lady Joan FitzAlan, daughter of Richard Fitzalan, 11th Earl of Arundel and Elizabeth de Bohun, by whom he had a son Richard de Beauchamp, 1st Earl of Worcester, and a daughter, Joan de Beauchamp, 4th Countess of Ormond. Queen consort Anne Boleyn was a notable descendant of the latter.
    Roger de Beauchamp (died 1361)
    Maud de Beauchamp (died 1403), married Roger de Clifford, 5th Baron Clifford, by whom she had issue, including Thomas de Clifford, 6th Baron Clifford.
    Philippa de Beauchamp, married Hugh de Stafford, 2nd Earl of Stafford, by whom she had nine children.
    Alice Beauchamp (died 1383), married firstly John Beauchamp, 3rd Baron Beauchamp of Somerset, and secondly Sir William Gournay.[7] She died childless.
    Joan de Beauchamp, married Ralph Basset, 3rd Baron Basset of Drayton. She died childless.
    Isabella de Beauchamp (died 29 September 1416), married firstly John le Strange, 5th Baron Strange, and secondly, William de Ufford, 2nd Earl of Suffolk. Upon the latter's death, she became a nun. She died childless.
    Margaret de Beauchamp, married Guy de Montfort, and after his death, she became a nun. She died childless.
    Elizabeth de Beauchamp, married Thomas de Ufford KG,
    Anne de Beauchamp, married Walter de Cokesey.
    Juliana de Beauchamp
    Katherine de Beauchamp, became a nun at Shouldham Priory.

    Death and effigy

    Katherine Mortimer died on 4 August 1369 at the age of about fifty-five. Two years before her death, in 1367, Katherine was a legatee in the will of her sister Agnes de Hastings, Countess of Pembroke.[8] Katherine was buried in St. Mary's Church, Warwick, Warwickshire. She lies alongside her husband, who died three months after her of the Black Death. Their tomb with well-preserved, alabaster effigies can be seen in the centre of the quire. Katherine is depicted wearing a frilled veil with a honeycomb pattern and she is holding hands with Beauchamp. The sides of the tomb chest are decorated with figures of mourners, both male and female.

    Children:
    1. 83. Maud Beauchamp was born 0___ 1335, Warwickshire, England; died 0Feb 1403, Brougham Castle, Westmorland, England.
    2. Thomas de Beauchamp, Knight, 12th Earl of Warwick was born 16 Mar 1338, Warwick Castle, Warwick, Warwickshire, England; died 10 Apr 1401, (Warwickshire) England.
    3. Philippa Beauchamp was born 1334-1344, Elmley, Gloucestershire, England; died 6 Apr 1386.
    4. William de Beauchamp, 1st Baron Bergavenny was born 1343-1345, Warwick, Warwickshire, England; died 8 May 1411, Warwick, Warwickshire, England; was buried Black Friars Churchyard, Hereford, Herefordshire, England.
    5. Guy de Beauchamp

  25. 168.  Robert de Ferrers, 3rd Baron Ferrers of Chartley was born 25 Mar 1309, Chartley, Staffordshire, England (son of John de Ferrers, 1st Baron Ferrers of Chartley and Hawise de Muscegros); died 28 Aug 1350.

    Notes:

    Robert de Ferrers, 2nd Baron Ferrers of Chartley (Chartley, Staffordshire, 25 March 1309 – 28 August 1350), was the son of John de Ferrers, 1st Baron Ferrers of Chartley and Hawise de Muscegros, a daughter of Robert de Muscegros.[1]

    He inherited the title Baron Ferrers of Chartley upon his father's death from poisoning in Gascony in 1324 and was summoned to parliament on 25 February 1342.

    Robert served frequently in the Scottish and French wars of Edward III as well as participating the victory at Cressy.

    Before 20 October 1333, he married a woman named Margaret. They had one son, John who succeeded his father as John de Ferrers, 3rd Baron Ferrers of Chartley.[1]

    After the death of Margaret, Robert remarried to Joan de la Mote before 1350. They had one son, Sir Robert Ferrers, summoned to parliament as the 4th Baron Boteler of Wem Jure uxoris through his marriage to Elizabeth Boteler, 4th Baroness Boteler of Wem, by whom he had Robert Ferrers, 5th Baron Boteler of Wem.[1]

    Robert de Ferrers, 2nd Baron Ferrers of Chartley, died on the 28 August 1350.

    *

    Robert De FERRERS (3° B. Ferrers of Chartley)

    Born: 25 Mar 1309

    Died: 28 Aug 1350

    Notes: The Complete Peerage vol.V,pp.310-315.

    Father: John De FERRERS (1º B. Ferrers of Chartley)

    Mother: Hawise De MUSCEGROS

    Married 1: Agnes (Margaret) BOHUN (B. Ferrers of Chartley) 21 Nov 1324, Caldecot, Northamptonshire, England

    Children:

    1. John De FERRERS (4° B. Ferrers of Chartley)

    Married 2: Joan De La MOTE (Lady of Willisham)

    Children:

    2. Robert De FERRERS (Sir)

    *

    Robert — Joan de la Note, Lady of Willisham. [Group Sheet]


  26. 169.  Joan de la Note, Lady of Willisham
    Children:
    1. 84. Robert de Ferrers, 4th Baron Ferrers of Wem was born 1341-1350, Chartley, Stafford, England; died 31 Dec 1380.

  27. 170.  William Boteler, 3rd Baron Boteler of Wem was born ~1322, Wem, Shropshire, England (son of William Boteler, 2nd Baron Boteler of Wem and Margaret FitzAlan); died 14 Aug 1369.

    William — Elizabeth de Handsacre, Baroness Boteler of Wemme. Elizabeth was born ~1324, Melbourn, Royston, Cambridgeshire, England; died Aft May 1361. [Group Sheet]


  28. 171.  Elizabeth de Handsacre, Baroness Boteler of Wemme was born ~1324, Melbourn, Royston, Cambridgeshire, England; died Aft May 1361.
    Children:
    1. 85. Elizabeth Boteler, 4th Baroness Boteler of Wem was born 1345-1350, Wem, Shropshire, England; died 19 Jun 1411, London, Middlesex, England; was buried Brothers of the Holy Cross, London, Middlesex, England.

  29. 172.  Edward III, King of EnglandEdward III, King of England was born 13 Nov 1312, Windsor Castle, Windsor, Berkshire, England; was christened 20 Nov 1312 (son of Edward II, King of England and Isabella of France, Queen of England); died 21 Jun 1377, Richmond Palace, London, England; was buried Westminster Abbey, 20 Deans Yd, London SW1P 3PA, United Kingdom.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Edward of Windsor

    Notes:

    Edward III (13 November 1312 – 21 June 1377) was King of England from 25 January 1327 until his death; he is noted for his military success and for restoring royal authority after the disastrous reign of his father, Edward II. Edward III transformed the Kingdom of England into one of the most formidable military powers in Europe. His long reign of fifty years also saw vital developments in legislation and government—in particular the evolution of the English parliament—as well as the ravages of the Black Death.

    Edward was crowned at age fourteen after his father was deposed by his mother and her lover Roger Mortimer. At age seventeen he led a successful coup against Mortimer, the de facto ruler of the country, and began his personal reign. After a successful campaign in Scotland he declared himself rightful heir to the French throne in 1337 but his claim was denied due to the Salic law. This started what would become known as the Hundred Years' War.[1] Following some initial setbacks the war went exceptionally well for England; victories at Crâecy and Poitiers led to the highly favourable Treaty of Brâetigny. Edward's later years, however, were marked by international failure and domestic strife, largely as a result of his inactivity and poor health.

    Edward III was a temperamental man but capable of unusual clemency. He was in many ways a conventional king whose main interest was warfare. Admired in his own time and for centuries after, Edward was denounced as an irresponsible adventurer by later Whig historians such as William Stubbs. This view has been challenged recently and modern historians credit him with some significant achievements.[2][3]

    Early life

    Edward was born at Windsor Castle on 13 November 1312, and was often referred to as Edward of Windsor in his early years.[4] The reign of his father, Edward II, was a particularly problematic period of English history.[5] One source of contention was the king's inactivity, and repeated failure, in the ongoing war with Scotland.[6] Another controversial issue was the king's exclusive patronage of a small group of royal favourites.[7] The birth of a male heir in 1312 temporarily improved Edward II's position in relation to the baronial opposition.[8] To bolster further the independent prestige of the young prince, the king had him created Earl of Chester at only twelve days of age.[9]

    In 1325, Edward II was faced with a demand from the French king, Charles IV, to perform homage for the English Duchy of Aquitaine.[10] Edward was reluctant to leave the country, as discontent was once again brewing domestically, particularly over his relationship with the favourite Hugh Despenser the Younger.[11] Instead, he had his son Edward created Duke of Aquitaine in his place and sent him to France to perform the homage.[12] The young Edward was accompanied by his mother Isabella, who was the sister of King Charles, and was meant to negotiate a peace treaty with the French.[13] While in France, however, Isabella conspired with the exiled Roger Mortimer to have the king Edward deposed.[14] To build up diplomatic and military support for the venture, Isabella had Prince Edward engaged to the twelve-year-old Philippa of Hainault.[15] An invasion of England was launched and Edward II's forces deserted him completely. The king was forced to relinquish the throne to his son on 25 January 1327. The new king was crowned as Edward III on 1 February 1327.[16]

    It was not long before the new reign also met with other problems caused by the central position at court of Roger Mortimer, who was now the de facto ruler of England. Mortimer used his power to acquire noble estates and titles, and his unpopularity grew with the humiliating defeat by the Scots at the Battle of Stanhope Park and the ensuing Treaty of Edinburgh–Northampton, signed with the Scots in 1328.[17] Also the young king came into conflict with his guardian. Mortimer knew his position in relation to the king was precarious and subjected Edward to disrespect. The tension increased after Edward and Philippa, who had married on 24 January 1328, had a son on 15 June 1330.[18] Eventually, Edward decided to take direct action against Mortimer. Aided by his close companion William Montagu and a small number of other trusted men, Edward took Mortimer by surprise at Nottingham Castle on 19 October 1330. Mortimer was executed and Edward III's personal reign began.[19]

    Early reign

    Edward III was not content with the peace agreement made in his name, but the renewal of the war with Scotland originated in private, rather than royal initiative. A group of English magnates known as The Disinherited, who had lost land in Scotland by the peace accord, staged an invasion of Scotland and won a great victory at the Battle of Dupplin Moor in 1332.[20] They attempted to install Edward Balliol as king of Scotland in David II's place, but Balliol was soon expelled and was forced to seek the help of Edward III. The English king responded by laying siege to the important border town of Berwick and defeated a large relieving army at the Battle of Halidon Hill.[21] Edward reinstated Balliol on the throne and received a substantial amount of land in southern Scotland.[22] These victories proved hard to sustain, however, as forces loyal to David II gradually regained control of the country. In 1338, Edward was forced to agree to a truce with the Scots.[23]

    To mark his claim to the French crown, Edward's coat of arms showed the three lions of England quartered with the fleurs-de-lys of France. English stained glass, c. 1350–1377[24]
    One reason for the change of strategy towards Scotland was a growing concern for the relationship between England and France. As long as Scotland and France were in an alliance, the English were faced with the prospect of fighting a war on two fronts.[25] The French carried out raids on English coastal towns, leading to rumours in England of a full-scale French invasion.[23] In 1337, Philip VI confiscated the English king's duchy of Aquitaine and the county of Ponthieu. Instead of seeking a peaceful resolution to the conflict by paying homage to the French king, the way his father had done, Edward responded by laying claim to the French crown as the grandson of Philip IV.[26] The French, however, invoked the Salic law of succession and rejected his claim. Instead, they upheld the rights of Philip IV's nephew, King Philip VI (an agnatic descendant of the House of France), thereby setting the stage for the Hundred Years' War (see family tree below).[27] In the early stages of the war, Edward's strategy was to build alliances with other Continental princes. In 1338, Louis IV named Edward vicar-general of the Holy Roman Empire and promised his support.[28] These measures, however, produced few results; the only major military victory in this phase of the war was the English naval victory at Sluys on 24 June 1340, which secured English control of the Channel.[29]

    Meanwhile, the fiscal pressure on the kingdom caused by Edward's expensive alliances led to discontent at home. The regency council at home was frustrated by the mounting national debt, while the king and his commanders on the Continent were angered by the failure of the government in England to provide sufficient funds.[30] To deal with the situation, Edward himself returned to England, arriving in London unannounced on 30 November 1340.[31] Finding the affairs of the realm in disorder, he purged the royal administration of a great number of ministers and judges.[32] These measures did not bring domestic stability, however, and a stand-off ensued between the king and John de Stratford, Archbishop of Canterbury, during which Stratford's relatives Robert Stratford Bishop of Chichester and Henry de Stratford were temporarily stripped of title and imprisoned respectively.[33] Stratford claimed that Edward had violated the laws of the land by arresting royal officers.[34] A certain level of conciliation was reached at the parliament of April 1341. Here Edward was forced to accept severe limitations to his financial and administrative freedom, in return for a grant of taxation.[35] Yet in October the same year, the king repudiated this statute and Archbishop Stratford was politically ostracised. The extraordinary circumstances of the April parliament had forced the king into submission, but under normal circumstances the powers of the king in medieval England were virtually unlimited, a fact that Edward was able to exploit.[36]


    Historian Nicholas Rodger called Edward III's claim to be the "Sovereign of the Seas" into question, arguing there was hardly any Royal Navy before the reign of Henry V (1413–22). Although Rodger may have made this claim, the reality was that King John had already developed a royal fleet of galleys and had attempted to establish an administration for these ships and ones which were arrested (privately owned ships pulled into royal/national service). Henry III, his successor, continued this work. Notwithstanding the fact that he, along with his predecessor, had hoped to develop a strong and efficient naval administration, their endeavours produced one that was informal and mostly ad hoc. A formal naval administration emerged during Edward's reign which was composed of lay administrators and headed by William de Clewre, Matthew de Torksey, and John de Haytfield successively with them being titled, Clerk of the King's Ships. Sir Robert de Crull was the last to fill this position during Edward III's reign[37] and would have the longest tenure in this position.[38] It was during his tenure that Edward's naval administration would become a base for what evolved during the reigns of successors such as Henry VIII of England's Council of Marine and Navy Board and Charles I of England's Board of Admiralty. Rodger also argues that for much of the fourteenth century, the French had the upper hand, apart from Sluys in 1340 and, perhaps, off Winchelsea in 1350.[39] Yet, the French never invaded England and France's King John II died in captivity in England. There was a need for an English navy to play a role in this and to handle other matters, such as the insurrection of the Anglo-Irish lords and acts of piracy.[40]

    Fortunes of war

    Map showing 14th-century France in green, with the southwest and parts of the north in pink.
    Map showing the area (in pink) gained by England through the Treaty of Brâetigny.
    By the early 1340s, it was clear that Edward's policy of alliances was too costly, and yielded too few results. The following years saw more direct involvement by English armies, including in the Breton War of Succession, but these interventions also proved fruitless at first.[41] A major change came in July 1346, when Edward staged a major offensive, sailing for Normandy with a force of 15,000 men.[42] His army sacked the city of Caen, and marched across northern France, to meet up with English forces in Flanders. It was not Edward's initial intention to engage the French army, but at Crâecy, just north of the Somme, he found favourable terrain and decided to fight an army led by Philip VI.[43] On 26 August, the English army defeated a far larger French army in the Battle of Crâecy.[44] Shortly after this, on 17 October, an English army defeated and captured King David II of Scotland at the Battle of Neville's Cross.[45] With his northern borders secured, Edward felt free to continue his major offensive against France, laying siege to the town of Calais. The operation was the greatest English venture of the Hundred Years' War, involving an army of 35,000 men.[46] The siege started on 4 September 1346, and lasted until the town surrendered on 3 August 1347.[47]


    Edward III counting the dead on the battlefield of Crâecy
    After the fall of Calais, factors outside of Edward's control forced him to wind down the war effort. In 1348, the Black Death struck England with full force, killing a third or more of the country's population.[48] This loss of manpower led to a shortage of farm labour, and a corresponding rise in wages. The great landowners struggled with the shortage of manpower and the resulting inflation in labour cost.[49] To curb the rise in wages, the king and parliament responded with the Ordinance of Labourers in 1349, followed by the Statute of Labourers in 1351. These attempts to regulate wages could not succeed in the long run, but in the short term they were enforced with great vigour.[50] All in all, the plague did not lead to a full-scale breakdown of government and society, and recovery was remarkably swift.[51] This was to a large extent thanks to the competent leadership of royal administrators such as Treasurer William de Shareshull and Chief Justice William Edington.[52]

    It was not until the mid-1350s that military operations on the Continent were resumed on a large scale.[53] In 1356, Edward's eldest son, Edward, the Black Prince, won an important victory in the Battle of Poitiers. The greatly outnumbered English forces not only routed the French, but captured the French king, John II and his youngest son, Philip.[54] After a succession of victories, the English held great possessions in France, the French king was in English custody, and the French central government had almost totally collapsed.[55] There has been a historical debate as to whether Edward's claim to the French crown originally was genuine, or if it was simply a political ploy meant to put pressure on the French government.[56] Regardless of the original intent, the stated claim now seemed to be within reach. Yet a campaign in 1359, meant to complete the undertaking, was inconclusive.[57] In 1360, therefore, Edward accepted the Treaty of Brâetigny, whereby he renounced his claims to the French throne, but secured his extended French possessions in full sovereignty.[58]

    Later reign

    While Edward's early reign had been energetic and successful, his later years were marked by inertia, military failure and political strife. The day-to-day affairs of the state had less appeal to Edward than military campaigning, so during the 1360s Edward increasingly relied on the help of his subordinates, in particular William Wykeham.[59] A relative upstart, Wykeham was made Keeper of the Privy Seal in 1363 and Chancellor in 1367, though due to political difficulties connected with his inexperience, the Parliament forced him to resign the chancellorship in 1371.[60] Compounding Edward's difficulties were the deaths of his most trusted men, some from the 1361–62 recurrence of the plague. William Montague, Earl of Salisbury, Edward's companion in the 1330 coup, died as early as 1344. William de Clinton, who had also been with the king at Nottingham, died in 1354. One of the earls created in 1337, William de Bohun, Earl of Northampton, died in 1360, and the next year Henry of Grosmont, perhaps the greatest of Edward's captains, succumbed to what was probably plague.[61] Their deaths left the majority of the magnates younger and more naturally aligned to the princes than to the king himself.[62]


    King Edward III grants Aquitaine to his son Edward, the Black Prince. Initial letter "E" of miniature, 1390; British Library, shelfmark: Cotton MS Nero D VI, f.31
    Increasingly, Edward began to rely on his sons for the leadership of military operations. The king's second son, Lionel of Antwerp, attempted to subdue by force the largely autonomous Anglo-Irish lords in Ireland. The venture failed, and the only lasting mark he left were the suppressive Statutes of Kilkenny in 1366.[63] In France, meanwhile, the decade following the Treaty of Brâetigny was one of relative tranquillity, but on 8 April 1364 John II died in captivity in England, after unsuccessfully trying to raise his own ransom at home.[64] He was followed by the vigorous Charles V, who enlisted the help of the capable Constable Bertrand du Guesclin.[65] In 1369, the French war started anew, and Edward's younger son John of Gaunt was given the responsibility of a military campaign. The effort failed, and with the Treaty of Bruges in 1375, the great English possessions in France were reduced to only the coastal towns of Calais, Bordeaux, and Bayonne.[66]

    Military failure abroad, and the associated fiscal pressure of constant campaigns, led to political discontent at home. The problems came to a head in the parliament of 1376, the so-called Good Parliament. The parliament was called to grant taxation, but the House of Commons took the opportunity to address specific grievances. In particular, criticism was directed at some of the king's closest advisors. Chamberlain William Latimer and Steward of the Household John Neville were dismissed from their positions.[67] Edward's mistress, Alice Perrers, who was seen to hold far too much power over the ageing king, was banished from court.[68][69] Yet the real adversary of the Commons, supported by powerful men such as Wykeham and Edmund de Mortimer, Earl of March, was John of Gaunt. Both the king and the Black Prince were by this time incapacitated by illness, leaving Gaunt in virtual control of government.[70] Gaunt was forced to give in to the demands of parliament, but at its next convocation, in 1377, most of the achievements of the Good Parliament were reversed.[71]

    Edward himself, however, did not have much to do with any of this; after around 1375 he played a limited role in the government of the realm. Around 29 September 1376 he fell ill with a large abscess. After a brief period of recovery in February 1377, the king died of a stroke at Sheen on 21 June.[72] He was succeeded by his ten-year-old grandson, King Richard II, son of the Black Prince, since the Black Prince himself had died on 8 June 1376.[73]

    Achievements of the reign

    Legislation

    The middle years of Edward's reign were a period of significant legislative activity. Perhaps the best-known piece of legislation was the Statute of Labourers of 1351, which addressed the labour shortage problem caused by the Black Death. The statute fixed wages at their pre-plague level and checked peasant mobility by asserting that lords had first claim on their men's services. In spite of concerted efforts to uphold the statute, it eventually failed due to competition among landowners for labour.[74] The law has been described as an attempt "to legislate against the law of supply and demand", which made it doomed to fail.[75] Nevertheless, the labour shortage had created a community of interest between the smaller landowners of the House of Commons and the greater landowners of the House of Lords. The resulting measures angered the peasants, leading to the Peasants' Revolt of 1381.[76]

    The reign of Edward III coincided with the so-called Babylonian Captivity of the papacy at Avignon. During the wars with France, opposition emerged in England against perceived injustices by a papacy largely controlled by the French crown.[77] Papal taxation of the English Church was suspected to be financing the nation's enemies, while the practice of provisions – the Pope providing benefices for clerics – caused resentment in the English population. The statutes of Provisors and Praemunire, of 1350 and 1353 respectively, aimed to amend this by banning papal benefices, as well as limiting the power of the papal court over English subjects.[78] The statutes did not, however, sever the ties between the king and the Pope, who were equally dependent upon each other.[79]

    Other legislation of importance includes the Treason Act of 1351. It was precisely the harmony of the reign that allowed a consensus on the definition of this controversial crime.[80] Yet the most significant legal reform was probably that concerning the Justices of the Peace. This institution began before the reign of Edward III but, by 1350, the justices had been given the power not only to investigate crimes and make arrests, but also to try cases, including those of felony.[81] With this, an enduring fixture in the administration of local English justice had been created.[82]

    Parliament and taxation

    Half groat with portrait of King Edward III, York mint.
    Parliament as a representative institution was already well established by the time of Edward III, but the reign was nevertheless central to its development.[83] During this period, membership in the English baronage, formerly a somewhat indistinct group, became restricted to those who received a personal summons to parliament.[84] This happened as parliament gradually developed into a bicameral institution, composed of a House of Lords and a House of Commons.[85] Yet it was not in the upper, but in the lower house that the greatest changes took place, with the expanding political role of the Commons. Informative is the Good Parliament, where the Commons for the first time – albeit with noble support – were responsible for precipitating a political crisis.[86] In the process, both the procedure of impeachment and the office of the Speaker were created.[87] Even though the political gains were of only temporary duration, this parliament represented a watershed in English political history.

    The political influence of the Commons originally lay in their right to grant taxes.[88] The financial demands of the Hundred Years' War were enormous, and the king and his ministers tried different methods of covering the expenses. The king had a steady income from crown lands, and could also take up substantial loans from Italian and domestic financiers.[89] To finance warfare on Edward III's scale, however, the king had to resort to taxation of his subjects. Taxation took two primary forms: levy and customs. The levy was a grant of a proportion of all moveable property, normally a tenth for towns and a fifteenth for farmland. This could produce large sums of money, but each such levy had to be approved by parliament, and the king had to prove the necessity.[90] The customs therefore provided a welcome supplement, as a steady and reliable source of income. An "ancient duty" on the export of wool had existed since 1275. Edward I had tried to introduce an additional duty on wool, but this unpopular maltolt, or "unjust exaction", was soon abandoned.[91] Then, from 1336 onwards, a series of schemes aimed at increasing royal revenues from wool export were introduced. After some initial problems and discontent, it was agreed through the Ordinance of the Staple of 1353 that the new customs should be approved by parliament, though in reality they became permanent.[92]

    Through the steady taxation of Edward III's reign, parliament – and in particular the Commons – gained political influence. A consensus emerged that in order for a tax to be just, the king had to prove its necessity, it had to be granted by the community of the realm, and it had to be to the benefit of that community.[93] In addition to imposing taxes, parliament would also present petitions for redress of grievances to the king, most often concerning misgovernment by royal officials.[94] This way the system was beneficial for both parties. Through this process the commons, and the community they represented, became increasingly politically aware, and the foundation was laid for the particular English brand of constitutional monarchy.[95]

    Chivalry and national identity

    Edward III as head of the Order of the Garter, drawing c. 1430–40 in the Bruges Garter Book
    Partly ruined black seal, showing Edward III on horseback, in armour and sword raised.
    The Great Seal of Edward III.
    Central to Edward III's policy was reliance on the higher nobility for purposes of war and administration. While his father had regularly been in conflict with a great portion of his peerage, Edward III successfully created a spirit of camaraderie between himself and his greatest subjects.[96] Both Edward I and Edward II had been limited in their policy towards the nobility, allowing the creation of few new peerages during the sixty years preceding Edward III's reign.[97] The young king reversed this trend when, in 1337, as a preparation for the imminent war, he created six new earls on the same day.[98] At the same time, Edward expanded the ranks of the peerage upwards, by introducing the new title of duke for close relatives of the king.[99] Furthermore, Edward bolstered the sense of community within this group by the creation of the Order of the Garter, probably in 1348. A plan from 1344 to revive the Round Table of King Arthur never came to fruition, but the new order carried connotations from this legend by the circular shape of the garter.[100] Polydore Vergil tells of how the young Joan of Kent, Countess of Salisbury – allegedly the king's favourite at the time – accidentally dropped her garter at a ball at Calais. King Edward responded to the ensuing ridicule of the crowd by tying the garter around his own knee with the words honi soit qui mal y pense – shame on him who thinks ill of it.[101]

    This reinforcement of the aristocracy must be seen in conjunction with the war in France, as must the emerging sense of national identity.[96] Just as the war with Scotland had done, the fear of a French invasion helped strengthen a sense of national unity, and nationalise the aristocracy that had been largely Anglo-French since the Norman conquest. Since the time of Edward I, popular myth suggested that the French planned to extinguish the English language, and as his grandfather had done, Edward III made the most of this scare.[102] As a result, the English language experienced a strong revival; in 1362, a Statute of Pleading ordered the English language to be used in law courts,[103] and the year after, Parliament was for the first time opened in English.[104] At the same time, the vernacular saw a revival as a literary language, through the works of William Langland, John Gower and especially The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer.[105] Yet the extent of this Anglicisation must not be exaggerated. The statute of 1362 was in fact written in the French language and had little immediate effect, and parliament was opened in that language as late as 1377.[106] The Order of the Garter, though a distinctly English institution, included also foreign members such as John V, Duke of Brittany and Sir Robert of Namur.[107][108] Edward III – himself bilingual – viewed himself as legitimate king of both England and France, and could not show preferential treatment for one part of his domains over another.

    Assessment and character

    See also: Cultural depictions of Edward III of England
    Early modern half-figure portrait of Edward III in his royal garb.
    Edward III as he was portrayed in the late 16th century.
    Edward III enjoyed unprecedented popularity in his own lifetime, and even the troubles of his later reign were never blamed directly on the king himself.[109] Edward's contemporary Jean Froissart wrote in his Chronicles that "His like had not been seen since the days of King Arthur".[72] This view persisted for a while but, with time, the image of the king changed. The Whig historians of a later age preferred constitutional reform to foreign conquest and discredited Edward for ignoring his responsibilities to his own nation. In the words of Bishop Stubbs:

    Edward III was not a statesman, though he possessed some qualifications which might have made him a successful one. He was a warrior; ambitious, unscrupulous, selfish, extravagant and ostentatious. His obligations as a king sat very lightly on him. He felt himself bound by no special duty, either to maintain the theory of royal supremacy or to follow a policy which would benefit his people. Like Richard I, he valued England primarily as a source of supplies.
    — William Stubbs, The Constitutional History of England[110]

    Influential as Stubbs was, it was long before this view was challenged. In a 1960 article, titled "Edward III and the Historians", May McKisack pointed out the teleological nature of Stubbs' judgement. A medieval king could not be expected to work towards the future ideal of a parliamentary monarchy; rather his role was a pragmatic one—to maintain order and solve problems as they arose. At this, Edward III excelled.[111] Edward had also been accused of endowing his younger sons too liberally and thereby promoting dynastic strife culminating in the Wars of the Roses. This claim was rejected by K.B. McFarlane, who argued that this was not only the common policy of the age, but also the best.[112] Later biographers of the king such as Mark Ormrod and Ian Mortimer have followed this historiographical trend. However, the older negative view has not completely disappeared; as recently as 2001, Norman Cantor described Edward III as an "avaricious and sadistic thug" and a "destructive and merciless force."[113]

    From what is known of Edward's character, he could be impulsive and temperamental, as was seen by his actions against Stratford and the ministers in 1340/41.[114] At the same time, he was well known for his clemency; Mortimer's grandson was not only absolved, but came to play an important part in the French wars, and was eventually made a Knight of the Garter.[115] Both in his religious views and his interests, Edward was a conventional man. His favourite pursuit was the art of war and, in this, he conformed to the medieval notion of good kingship.[116][117] As a warrior he was so successful that one modern military historian has described him as the greatest general in English history.[118] He seems to have been unusually devoted to his wife, Queen Philippa. Much has been made of Edward's sexual licentiousness, but there is no evidence of any infidelity on the king's part before Alice Perrers became his lover, and by that time the queen was already terminally ill.[119][120] This devotion extended to the rest of the family as well; in contrast to so many of his predecessors, Edward never experienced opposition from any of his five adult sons.[121]

    Birth:
    Windsor Castle is a royal residence at Windsor in the English county of Berkshire. It is notable for its long association with the English and later British royal family and for its architecture. The original castle was built in the 11th century after the Norman invasion of England by William the Conqueror. Since the time of Henry I, it has been used by all monarchs, and is the longest-occupied palace in Europe. The castle's lavish early 19th-century State Apartments were described by the art historian Hugh Roberts as "a superb and unrivalled sequence of rooms widely regarded as the finest and most complete expression of later Georgian taste".[1] Inside the castle walls is the 15th-century St George's Chapel, considered by the historian John Martin Robinson to be "one of the supreme achievements of English Perpendicular Gothic" design.

    View map & image ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windsor_Castle (Sheila & I traversed "the Long Walk" by horse & carriage...DAH)

    Buried:
    Westminster Abbey, formally titled the Collegiate Church of St Peter at Westminster, is a large, mainly Gothic abbey church in the City of Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. It is one of the United Kingdom's most notable religious buildings and the traditional place of coronation and burial site for English and, later, British monarchs. Between 1540 and 1556 the abbey had the status of a cathedral. Since 1560, however, the building is no longer an abbey nor a cathedral, having instead the status of a Church of England "Royal Peculiar"—a church responsible directly to the sovereign. The building itself is the original abbey church.

    According to a tradition first reported by Sulcard in about 1080, a church was founded at the site (then known as Thorn Ey (Thorn Island)) in the 7th century, at the time of Mellitus, a Bishop of London. Construction of the present church began in 1245, on the orders of King Henry III.

    Photo & maps ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Westminster_Abbey

    Died:
    Formerly known as "Sheen Palace" until partially destroyed by fire and rebuilt and renamed by Henry VII...

    Edward married Phillipa d'Avesnes, Queen of England 24 Jan 1327, York Minster, York, East Riding, Yorkshire, England. Phillipa was born 1312-1314, Mons, Hainaut, Belgium, Netherlands; died 15 Aug 1369, Windsor Castle, Windsor, Berkshire, England; was buried 15 Aug 1368, Westminster Abbey, 20 Deans Yd, London SW1P 3PA, United Kingdom. [Group Sheet]


  30. 173.  Phillipa d'Avesnes, Queen of England was born 1312-1314, Mons, Hainaut, Belgium, Netherlands; died 15 Aug 1369, Windsor Castle, Windsor, Berkshire, England; was buried 15 Aug 1368, Westminster Abbey, 20 Deans Yd, London SW1P 3PA, United Kingdom.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Philippa of Hainault

    Children:
    1. Edward of Woodstock, The Black Prince was born 15 Jun 1330, Woodstock Palace, Oxfordshire, England; died 8 Jun 1376, Westminster Palace, Westminster, London, Middlesex, England; was buried Canterbury Cathedral, Canterbury, Kent, England.
    2. Lionel of Antwerp, Knight, 1st Duke of Clarence was born 29 Nov 1338, Antwerp, Belgium; died 17 Oct 1368, Alba, Italy; was buried Clare Priory, Suffolk, England.
    3. 86. John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster was born 6 Mar 1340, St. Bavo's Abbey, Ghent, Belgium; died 3 Feb 1399, Leicester Castle, Leicester, Leicestershire, England; was buried 15 Mar 1399, St. Paul's Cathedral, London, Middlesex, England..
    4. Edmund of Langley, 1st Duke of York, 1st Earl of Cambridge was born 5 Jun 1341, King's Langley, Hertford, England; was christened King's Langley, Hertford, England; died 1 Aug 1402, Abbot's Langley, Hertford, England; was buried Dominicans Church, King's Langley, Hertford, England.
    5. Thomas of Woodstock was born 7 Jan 1355, Woodstock Palace, Oxfordshire, England; died 8 Sep 1397, Calais, France.

  31. 174.  Paon de Roet, Knight was born ~ 1310, Roeulx, France; died 0___ 1380, Ghent, Belgium; was buried Old St. Paul's Cathedral, London, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Paganus de Rodio
    • Also Known As: Sir Gilles de Roet

    Notes:

    Paon de Roet sometimes Payne Roet of Guienne (c.1310-1380), and also referred to as Sir Gilles de Roet, was a herald and knight from Hainaut who was involved in the early stages of the Hundred Years War. He became attached to the court of King Edward III of England through the king's marriage to Philippa of Hainaut.

    He is most notable for the fact that he became the ancestor of the monarchs of England because his daughter Katherine married John of Gaunt. Her children, given the surname "Beaufort", became the forebears of the Tudor dynasty through Margaret Beaufort. Another of his daughters also made a notable marriage, to the poet Geoffrey Chaucer.

    Early life

    Paon de Roet was "probably christened as Gilles",[1] but seems to have been known as "Paon" or "Payne", Latinised as "Paganus". He is named in a legal document in the form Paganus de Rodio — referring to Rodium, the mediaeval Latin form corresponding to the Roeulx, or Le Rœulx, a town of 3000 inhabitants, 8 miles north-east of Mons, on the highway leading from Mons to Nivelle located in the County of Hainaut.

    Paon de Roet may have been impelled to seek his fortune in England by the recital of the exploits of Fastre de Roet, who accompanied John of Beaumont in 1326, when, with three hundred followers, he went to assist the English against the Scots. Fastre was the younger brother of the last lord of Roeulx, descended from the Counts of Hainault. He and his brother Eustace fell into pecuniary straits, and were obliged to alienate their landed possessions. Fastre died in 1331, and was buried in the abbey church of Roeulx, while his brother Eustace survived till 1336. Paon was, like Fastre, a younger brother — possibly of a collateral line.

    In England

    Paon de Roet may have come to England as part of the retinue of Philippa of Hainaut, accompanying the young queen in her departure from Valenciennes to join her youthful husband Edward III in England at the close of 1327. His name does not appear in the official list of knights who accompanied the queen from Hainaut. However, Froissart says he was one of a number of additional young knights and squires who added to the queen's retinue, referred to as 'pluissier jone esquier', i.e. "plusiers jeunes escuyers" ('other young squires'); Speght (1598)[2]

    Froissart's account of the history of English monarchs includes a genealogical tree, the relevant part of which begins with Paon's name. He is described as "Paganus de Rouet Hannoniensis, aliter dictus Guien Rex Armorum" ("Paon de Rouet of Hainaut, also called Guyenne King of Arms"). The latter part refers to the title of King of Arms granted by Edward III to Roet for the territory of Guyenne (Aquitaine) which was controlled by Edward.

    France and Hainaut

    In 1347, Roet was sent to the Siege of Calais, and was one of two knights deputed by Queen Philippa to conduct out of town the citizens whom she had saved (the so-called Burghers of Calais).[3]

    He had returned to the lands of Hainaut, probably by 1349. He went to serve the queen’s sister, Marguerite, who was the empress of Germany, and his three younger children—Walter, Philippa and Katherine—were left in the care of Queen Philippa.[4] He died in Ghent in 1380.

    Family

    Paon had three daughters, Katherine, Philippa and Isabel (also called Elizabeth) de Roet, and a son, Walter. Isabel was to become Canoness of the convent of St. Waudru at Mons in Hainaut, c. 1366. Philippa married the poet Geoffrey Chaucer in 1366. They met while still children when they were attached to the household of Elizabeth de Burgh, 4th Countess of Ulster.[5]

    Katherine became governess to the daughters of John of Gaunt. After the death of John's wife Blanche in 1369, Katherine and John began a love affair which would bring forth four children born out of wedlock and would endure as a lifelong relationship. However, John made a dynastic marriage to Constance of Castille, a claimant to the throne of Castile, after which he called himself "King of Castille". When Constance died he married Katherine and legitimised their children.

    Tomb

    Roet's name listed amongst early graves lost noted on the memorial in St Paul's Cathedral
    Paon de Roet's tomb was in Old St Paul's Cathedral, near Sir John Beauchamp's tomb (commonly called "Duke Humphrey's"). The antiquary John Weever had previously recorded that "Once a fair marble stone inlaid all over with brass, nothing but the heads of a few brazen nails are at this day visible, previously engraven with the representation and coat of arms of the party defunct, thus much of a mangled funeral inscription was of late times perspicuous to be read".[6]

    By 1658, viewed without its brass plate and effigies, this tomb was described by William Dugdale. The tomb, along with the tombs of many others, including John of Gaunt and Blanche of Lancaster's, were completely destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666. A modern monument in the crypt lists De Roet amongst the important graves lost.

    The former inscription was as follows:

    " Hic Jacet Paganus Roet Miles Guyenne Rex
    Armorum Pater Catherine Ducisse Lancastrie."
    (Here lies Paon de Roet, knight, Guyenne King of Arms, father of Katherine Duchess of Lancaster)

    Birth:
    Roeulx is a French commune located in the department of North , in region Nord-Pas-de-Calais and Picardy .

    Buried:
    Old St Paul's Cathedral was the medieval cathedral of the City of London that, until 1666, stood on the site of the present St Paul's Cathedral. Built from 1087 to 1314 and dedicated to Saint Paul, the cathedral was the fourth church on the site at Ludgate Hill.

    Paon de Roet's tomb was in Old St Paul's Cathedral, near Sir John Beauchamp's tomb (commonly called "Duke Humphrey's"). The antiquary John Weever had previously recorded that "Once a fair marble stone inlaid all over with brass, nothing but the heads of a few brazen nails are at this day visible, previously engraven with the representation and coat of arms of the party defunct, thus much of a mangled funeral inscription was of late times perspicuous to be read".[6]

    By 1658, viewed without its brass plate and effigies, this tomb was described by William Dugdale. The tomb, along with the tombs of many others, including John of Gaunt and Blanche of Lancaster's, were completely destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666. A modern monument in the crypt lists De Roet amongst the important graves lost.

    The former inscription was as follows:

    " Hic Jacet Paganus Roet Miles Guyenne Rex
    Armorum Pater Catherine Ducisse Lancastrie."
    (Here lies Paon de Roet, knight, Guyenne King of Arms, father of Katherine Duchess of Lancaster)

    Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paon_de_Roet

    Paon — unnamed spouse. [Group Sheet]


  32. 175.  unnamed spouse
    Children:
    1. 87. Katherine de Roet, Duchess of Lancaster was born 25 Nov 1350, Picardie, France; died 10 May 1403, Lincoln, Lincolnshire, England; was buried Lincoln Cathedral, Lincoln, Lincolnshire, England.
    2. Phillipa de Roet was born ~ 1346, (Roeulx) France; died ~ 1387, (London, Middlesex, England).

  33. 176.  Henry FitzHugh, 1st Baron FitzHugh of Ravensworth was born 1296-1297, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England; died 24 Sep 1352, (Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England).

    Notes:

    Henry FITZHUGH FITZHENRY (2° B. Fitzhugh of Ravensworth)

    Born: ABT 1338

    Died: 29 Aug 1386

    Father: Henry FITZHUGH (1° B. Fitzhugh of Ravensworth)

    Mother: Joan FOURNEUX

    Married: Joan SCROPE (B. Fitzhugh of Ravensworth) Sep 1350, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England

    Children:

    1. Henry FITZHUGH (3° B. Fitzhugh of Ravensworth)

    2. John FITZHENRY FITZHUGH

    3. Eleanor FITZHUGH

    end of biography

    Photos, history of "Baron FitzHugh" ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baron_FitzHugh

    ... Baron FitzHugh, of Ravensworth in North Yorkshire, is an abeyant title in the Peerage of England. It was created in 1321 for Sir Henry FitzHugh. The title passed through the male line until the death in 1513 of George FitzHugh, 7th Baron FitzHugh, when it became abeyant between his great-aunts Alice, Lady Fiennes and Elizabeth, Lady Parr, and to their descendants living today, listed below. The family seat was Ravensworth Castle in North Yorkshire.

    Henry — Joan Fourneux. Joan (daughter of Richard Fourneux and Sybil LNU) was born ~ 1297, Carlton in Lindrick, Nottinghamshire , England; died 15 Sep 1349, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England; was buried Jervaulx Abbey, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  34. 177.  Joan Fourneux was born ~ 1297, Carlton in Lindrick, Nottinghamshire , England (daughter of Richard Fourneux and Sybil LNU); died 15 Sep 1349, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England; was buried Jervaulx Abbey, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Joan de Fourneaux

    Notes:

    Joan de Fourneaux
    Also Known As: "Orreby FitzHenry"
    Birthdate: circa 1297 (52)
    Birthplace: Carlton in Lindrick, Nottinghamshire , England
    Death: September 15, 1349 (48-56)
    Ravensworth, North Riding, Yorkshire , England
    Place of Burial: Jervaulx Abbey, York, England, United Kingdom
    Immediate Family:
    Daughter of Richard de Fourneux, Sir and Sibil (Unk MN) de Fourneux
    Wife of John de Orreby and Sir Henry FitzHenry, of Ravensworth
    Mother of Hugh FitzHugh; Joane FitzHenry, Baroness Greystroke and Henry Fitzhugh, 2nd Baron Ravensworth
    Sister of William Fourneys
    Managed by: Private User
    Last Updated: September 20, 2016

    About Joan de Fourneaux
    Joan de Forneaux

    Birth: 1297 in Carlton in Lindrick, Nottinghamshire, England 3
    Death: SEP 1349 in Ravensworth, Yorkshire, North Riding, England 4 3
    Father: Richard DE FOURNEUX b: 1256 in Carlton in Lindrick, Nottinghamshire, England
    Mother: Sibil OF NOTTINGHAM b: ABT 1270 in Botharnsall, Nottinghamshire, England
    Marriage

    John DE ORREBY b: 1258 in Hatherton, Cheshire, England Married: 1316
    Henry FITZHENRY of Ravensworth b: 1297 in Ravensworth, Yorlshire, North Riding, England Married: MAR 1330
    Children with 2nd husband

    Hugh FITZHENRY b: 1331 in Ravensworth, Yorkshire, North Riding, England
    Joan FITZHUGH b: 1333 in Ravensworth, Yorlshire, North Riding, England
    Henry FitzHugh LORD FITZHUGH b: 1337 in Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England
    http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=REG&db=tmebl&id=I09536
    http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00140240&tree=LEO
    http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=labron00&id=I64611

    Buried:
    Jervaulx Abbey in East Witton near the city of Ripon, was one of the great Cistercian abbeys of Yorkshire, England, dedicated to St. Mary in 1156.

    The place-name Jervaulx is first attested in 1145, where it appears as Jorvalle. The name means 'the Ure valley', in French, and is perhaps a translation of the English 'Ure-dale',[2] aka Yoredale. The valley is now called Wensleydale.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jervaulx_Abbey

    Children:
    1. 88. Henry FitzHugh, KG, 2nd Baron FitzHugh of Ravensworth was born 0___ 1338, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England; died 29 Aug 1368, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England.

  35. 178.  Henry le Scrope, Knight, 1st Baron Scrope of Masham was born 29 Sep 1312, Masham, Yorkshire, England (son of Geoffrey le Scrope, Knight and Ivette de Ros); died 31 Jul 1391, Ghent, Belgium; was buried Coverham Abbey, Coverham, Yorkshire, England.

    Notes:

    Henry SCROPE (1° B. Scrope of Masham)

    Born: 29 Sep 1312, Masham, Yorkshire, England

    Died: 31 Jul 1391, Ghent

    Buried: Coverham Abbey, Coverham, Yorkshire, England

    Father: Geoffrey SCROPE of Masham (Sir Knight)

    Mother: Ivetta De ROS

    Married 1: Blanche De NORWICH ABT 1336, Masham, Yorkshire, England

    Children:

    1. Geoffrey SCROPE

    2. Stephen SCROPE (2° B. Scrope of Masham)

    Married 2: Joan (Agnes) ?

    Children:

    3. Joan SCROPE (B. Fitzhugh of Ravensworth)

    4. Isabella SCROPE

    5. Henry SCROPE

    6. John SCROPE (Sir)

    7. William SCROPE

    8. Richard SCROPE (Archbishop of York)

    Henry — Joan LNU. [Group Sheet]


  36. 179.  Joan LNU

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Agnes

    Children:
    1. 89. Joan Scrope was born 0___ 1336, Masham, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1386, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England.
    2. Isabella Scrope was born Masham, Yorkshire, England.
    3. Henry le Scrope was born Masham, Yorkshire, England.
    4. John Scrope was born Masham, Yorkshire, England.
    5. Geoffrey, Knight was born 1330-1336, Alnwick, Northumberland, England; died 0___ 1362, Lithuania; was buried Konigsberg, Germany.
    6. William Scrope was born ~ 1349, Masham, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1399.
    7. Richard Scrope, Knight was born ~ 1350, Masham, Yorkshire, England; died 8 Jun 1405.

  37. 180.  John de Grey, KG, 2nd Baron Grey of Rotherfield was born 9 Oct 1300, Rotherfield, Oxfordshire, England (son of John de Grey, 1st Baron Grey de Rotherfield and Margaret de Odingsells); died 1 Sep 1359, Rotherfield, Oxfordshire, England.

    Notes:

    John de Grey, 2nd Baron Grey de Rotherfield, KG (9 October 1300[1] – September 1359[1]) was an English soldier and courtier. John was the son and heir of Sir John de Grey, 1st Baron Grey de Rotherfield,[2] by Margaret who was daughter William de Odingsells and the granddaughter of Ida II Longespee.[3]

    John de Grey of Rotherfield was a founding member of the Most Noble Order of the Garter. He is often confused with John Grey of Codnor, who bore the same coat of arms (Barry argent and azure).

    By December 1349,[1] John was Lord Steward of the Royal Household of King Edward III. He distinguished himself well in the Scotch and French wars. He was summoned to parliament often from 1338 to 1357, and is regarded as having become Baron Grey of Rotherfield.[1]

    Family

    He married firstly, shortly before 1313,[1] Katherine Fitzalan, daughter and coheir of Bryan FitzAlan, Lord FitzAlan of Bedale, Yorkshire and had a single son and heir:

    Sir John de Grey, 3rd Baron Grey de Rotherfield.[2]

    He married secondly Avice, daughter of John Marmion, Baron of Winteringham, a descendant of John of England.[1][4] by whom he had the following issue:

    John de Grey aka Marmion, (d.s.p. 1385)[4] m. Elizabeth St. Quintin (b.1341)[5]
    Sir Robert de Grey aka Marmion, m. Lora St. Quintin (b.1343)[5] and whose granddaughter Elizabeth m. Henry FitzHugh, 3rd Baron FitzHugh[4]

    References

    ^ Jump up to: a b c d e f Henry Summerson, ‘Grey, John, first Lord Grey of Rotherfield (1300–1359)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, September 2004; online edn, January 2008. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/11544
    ^ Jump up to: a b Burke, Sir Bernard. A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire.
    Jump up ^ Richardson, D. (2011) Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study ... pg 642 (via Google)
    ^ Jump up to: a b c Nicolas, Nicholas Harris (1857). Historic Peerage of England. London: John Murray.
    ^ Jump up to: a b Calendar of Inquisitions Post Mortem, XI, London: HMSO, 1935
    Peerage of England
    Preceded by
    John de Grey, 1st Baron Grey de Rotherfield Baron Grey of Rotherfield
    1338–1359 Succeeded by
    John de Grey

    *

    About John de Grey, 2nd Baron Grey of Rotherfield
    In 1300 a lavish banquet was held to celebrate the birth and baptism (at Rotherfield Greys) of John de Grey, 'which feast is still notorious in these parts because abbots, priors and almost all other good men of those parts were present'. 374. Cal. Inq. p.m. VI, pp. 204–5. https://www.british-history.ac.uk/vch/oxon/vol16/pp266-302#anchorn374
    Knight of the Garter. Received livery of his lands in the fifteenth year of the reign of Edward II. In 1336 he was fighting for the King in Scotland; in 1342 he took part in the expedition to Flanders. He was in France in 1343, 1345-6, 1348 and again in 1356. He took part in the Battle of Crecy in 1346 with Edward III and his son Edward, the Black Prince, and it was after his return (after the fall of Calais in 1347) that he was given licence to crenellate Rotherfield. In the 6th of the reign of Edward III, upon some differences between his lordship and William la Zouche of Haryngworth, another great baron, which was heard before the King, Lord Grey, under the irritation of the moment, drew his knife upon Lord Zouche in the royal presence, whereupon both lords were committed to prison; but the Lord Zouche was soon afterwards released, while Lord Grey was remanded and his lands seized upon by the crown. He was, however, within a short time, upon making submission, restored to favour. In 1353 he was commissioner of array for the counties of Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire, and in 1356 was one of the witnesses to the charters by which Edward Baliol granted all his rights in Scotland to Edward III. He was steward of the king's household and had summons to parliament from the 1st to the 29th Edward III, inclusive. Was one of the Original Knights of the Garter instituted at its foundation in 1344 and confirmed in 1348, where he occupied the eighth stall on the sovereign's side at Windsor Castle. [Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, England, 1883, p. 247, Grey, Barons Grey, of Rotherfield, co. Oxford]

    src: tudorplace.com.ar/Grey1.htm

    ----------------------------------------------

    Summoned to 1338 Parliament

    Knight of the Garter - 1348

    John Gray/de Gray in 1348 was the founder of the Order of the garter

    John was married 1st to Katherine Fitz Alan who died before 7,Aug,1328.

    He was married 2nd to Avice Marmion, dughter of Sir Hohn marmion and maud de furnival,dau of Thomas de Furnival and Joan le Despenser,daughter of Hugh le Despenser.

    John Grey/de Grey had an argument with William la Zouche Mortimer,1st Lord Zoucje in January 1331/1332 and he drew his knife in the presence of the King. He was commandered to prison and was pardoned on 27 March 1332.

    He was summoned to Parliment from 15 November 1338 to 15 December 1357.

    He died 1 September 1359.

    Pedigreees of Some of Emperor Charlemage's Descendants page 255

    http://www.tudorplace.com.ar/GREY1.htm#John De GREY (2° B. Grey of Rotherfield)

    John De GREY (2° B. Grey of Rotherfield)

    Born: 9 Oct 1300, Rotherfield, Oxfordshire, England

    Christened: 1 Nov 1300, Rotherfield, Oxfordshire, England

    Died: 1 Sep 1359, Rotherfield, Oxfordshire, England

    Notes: Knight of the Garter. Received livery of his lands in the fifteenth year of the reign of Edward II. In 1336 he was fighting for the King in Scotland; in 1342 he took part in the expedition to Flanders. He was in France in 1343, 1345-6, 1348 and again in 1356. He took part in the Battle of Crecy in 1346 with Edward III and his son Edward, the Black Prince, and it was after his return (after the fall of Calais in 1347) that he was given licence to crenellate Rotherfield. In the 6th of the reign of Edward III, upon some differences between his lordship and William la Zouche of Haryngworth, another great baron, which was heard before the King, Lord Grey, under the irritation of the moment, drew his knife upon Lord Zouche in the royal presence, whereupon both lords were committed to prison; but the Lord Zouche was soon afterwards released, while Lord Grey was remanded and his lands seized upon by the crown. He was, however, within a short time, upon making submission, restored to favour. In 1353 he was commissioner of array for the counties of Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire, and in 1356 was one of the witnesses to the charters by which Edward Baliol granted all his rights in Scotland to Edward III. He was steward of the king's household and had summons to parliament from the 1st to the 29th Edward III, inclusive. Was one of the Original Knights of the Garter instituted at its foundation in 1344 and confirmed in 1348, where he occupied the eighth stall on the sovereign's side at Windsor Castle. [Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, England, 1883, p. 247, Grey, Barons Grey, of Rotherfield, co. Oxford]

    Father: John De GREY (1° B. Grey of Rotherfield)

    Mother: Margaret De ODDINGESELLS

    Married 1: Catherine FITZBRIAN (Dau. of Brian Fitzalan, B. Bedale and Agnes Baliol) BEF 27 Dec 1317, Rotherfield, Oxfordshire, England

    Children:

    1. John De GREY (3° B. Grey of Rotherfield)

    2. Maud De GREY

    Married 2: Avice MARMION (b. ABT 1302/9 - d. AFT 20 Mar 1378) (dau. of John De Marmion and Maud Furnival) ABT 1342

    Children:

    3. Joan De GREY

    4. Robert De GREY (Sir Knight)

    5. John De GREY (B. Marmion)

    http://our-royal-titled-noble-and-commoner-ancestors.com/p431.htm#i12940

    Sir John de Grey, 1st Lord Grey of Rotherfield1,2

    M, b. 9 October 1300, d. 1 September 1359

    Father Sir John de Grey3 b. c 1272, d. 17 Oct 1311

    Mother Margaret de Odingsells3 b. c 1277, d. c 1330

    Sir John de Grey, 1st Lord Grey of Rotherfield was born on 9 October 1300 at Rotherfield, Oxfordshire, England. He married Katherine FitzAlan, daughter of Sir Bryan FitzAlan, Baron Bedale and Maud (Agnes), before 1 March 1312; They had 1 son, John.2 Sir John de Grey, 1st Lord Grey of Rotherfield married Avice Marmion, daughter of Sir John de Marmion 2nd Baron Marmion and Maud Furnival, before 1343; They had 2 sons (John Marmion & Robert de Grey) and 1 daughter (Maud).4,2 Sir John de Grey, 1st Lord Grey of Rotherfield died on 1 September 1359 at Rotherfield, Oxfordshire, England, at age 58.2

    Family 1 Avice Marmion d. a 20 Mar 1379

    Children ?Sir Robert de Grey+5,2 d. 19 Aug 1367

    ?Maud Grey+6,2 d. 29 Jan 1394

    Family 2 Katherine FitzAlan b. c 1300, d. b 7 Aug 1328

    Children

    ?Joane Grey+

    ?Sir John de Grey, 2nd Lord Grey of Rotherfield+2 b. bt 1319 - 1329, d. 4 Jun 1375

    Citations

    1.[S3660] Unknown author, The Complete Peerage, by Cokayne, Vol. V, p. 397/8, Vol. VI, p. 145-147; Magna Charta Sureties, 1215, by F. L. Weis, 4th Ed., p. 60; The Ancestry of Dorothea Poyntz, by Ronny O. Bodine, p. 57.

    2.[S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 554-555.

    3.[S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 553-555.

    4.[S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 493-494.

    5.[S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 324.

    6.[S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 376.

    John de Grey, 1st Baron Grey de Rotherfield, KG (29 October 1300[1] - September 1359 He was an English soldier and courtier. John Grey of Rotherfield was one of the founder members of the Most Noble Order of the Garter. He is often confused with John Grey of Codnor, who bore the same coat of arms (Barry argent and azure). By December 1349, John was Lord Steward of the Royal Household of King Edward III. He distinguished himself well in the Scotch and French wars. He was summoned to parliament many times from 1338 to 1357, and is thus regarded as having become Lord Grey of Rotherfield. John was the son and heir of Sir John Grey, by Margaret only daughter and coheir of William de Odingbells. He married firstly, shortly before 1313, Katherine Fitzalan, daughter and coheir of Bryan FitzAlan, Lord FitzAlan of Bedale, Yorkshire. He married secondly Avice, daughter of John, 2nd Lord Marmion.

    Sir John de Grey, First Lord Grey of Rotherfield
    John de Grey, Knight of the Garter, 1st Lord Grey of Rotherfield was a Founder Knight of the Order of the Garter in 1348. John Grey had an argument with William la Zouche Mortimer, 1st Lord Zouche in January 1331/32 and he drew his knife in the presence of the King. He was committed to prison and was pardoned on March 27, 1332. John was summoned to Parliament from November 15, 1338 to December 15, 1357.

    John married first to before 1311/12 to Katherine, daughter and heir of Sir Bryan Fitz Alan. They had one son, John de Grey, 2nd Lord Grey of Rotherfield. Katherine died before August 7, 1328. John married secondly before 1343 to Avice Marmion, daughter of Sir John Marmion, 2nd Lord Marmion.

    John and Avice had the following children:

    John Marmion, Knight, died in 1387

    Robert de Grey, Knight, of Wilcote, Oxfordshire who married Lora de Saint Quintin.

    Maud Grey

    *

    John — Avice Marmion. Avice (daughter of John Marmion, Knight, 4th Baron of Winteringham and unnamed spouse) was born 0___ 1309; died Aft 20 Mar 1347. [Group Sheet]


  38. 181.  Avice Marmion was born 0___ 1309 (daughter of John Marmion, Knight, 4th Baron of Winteringham and unnamed spouse); died Aft 20 Mar 1347.
    Children:
    1. 90. Robert de Grey was born ~ 1333; died Bef 30 Nov 1367, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England.

  39. 184.  John Willoughby was born ~1320, Eresby, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England; died 29 Mar 1372, Eresby, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England.

    John — Cecily Ufford. Cecily (daughter of Robert de Ufford, (II), Knight, 1st Earl of Suffolk and Margaret Norwich) was born 29 Mar 1372, Eresby, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  40. 185.  Cecily Ufford was born 29 Mar 1372, Eresby, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England (daughter of Robert de Ufford, (II), Knight, 1st Earl of Suffolk and Margaret Norwich).
    Children:
    1. 92. Robert Willoughby, 4th Baron Willoughby de Eresby was born 1343-1350, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England; died 9 Aug 1396, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England; was buried Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England.
    2. Joan Willoughby was born 0___ 1345, Eresby, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England; died Bef 1413, (Astley, Warwickshire, England).

  41. 186.  William la Zouche, 2nd Baron Zouche of Haryngworth was born 25 Dec 1321, Harringworth, Northampton, England; died 23 Apr 1382; was buried Biddlesdon Abbey, Biddlesdon, Buckingham, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Constable of Wark Castle
    • Occupation: Sheriff of Yorkshire

    William married Elizabeth de Ros Bef 16 Jul 1334, England. Elizabeth (daughter of William de Ros, Knight, 2nd Baron de Ros and Margery de Badlesmere) was born 0___ 1325, Helmsley, Yorkshire, England; died 24 May 1380, Harringworth, Northamptonshire, , England. [Group Sheet]


  42. 187.  Elizabeth de Ros was born 0___ 1325, Helmsley, Yorkshire, England (daughter of William de Ros, Knight, 2nd Baron de Ros and Margery de Badlesmere); died 24 May 1380, Harringworth, Northamptonshire, , England.

    Other Events:

    • Will: 16 May 1380

    Notes:

    Biography

    Father Sir William de Roos, 2nd Lord Roos, Sheriff of Yorkshire, Constable of Wark Castle b. c 1288, d. 3 Feb 1343

    Mother Margery de Badlesmere b. c 1306, d. 18 Oct 1363

    Elizabeth de Roos[1] was born circa 1325 at of Helmsley, Yorkshire, England. She married Sir William la Zouche, 2nd Lord Zouche of Haryngworth, son of Sir Eudes la Zouche and Joan Inge, before 16 July 1334;

    They had 3 sons (

    Sir William, 3rd Lord Zouche of Harringworth;

    Sir Thomas; &

    Eudes, Chancellor of Cambridge University)

    and 2 daughters

    (Elizabeth, wife of Sir John Basing; &
    Margery, wife of Sir Robert, 4th Lord Willoughby of Eresby).[2]

    Elizabeth de Roos left a will on 16 May 1380.4,6 She died on 24 May 1380.[3]

    Family

    Sir William la Zouche, 2nd Lord Zouche of Haryngworth b. c 25 Dec 1321, d. 23 Apr 1382

    Children

    Margery la Zouche d. 18 Oct 1391
    Sir William la Zouche, 3rd Lord Zouche of Harringworth b. c 1342, d. 13 May 1396
    Sir Thomas la Zouche4,6 b. c 1345, d. 30 Oct 1404

    Children:
    1. 93. Margery la Zouche, Baroness of Willoughby was born Abt 1355, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England; died 18 Oct 1391.

  43. 188.  Roger le Strange, 4th Baron Strange of Knockin was born 15 Aug 1301, Ellesmere, Shropshire, England; died 29 Jul 1349, Sedgrebrook, Lincolnshire, England.

    Notes:

    Roger Le STRANGE (5º B. Strange of Knockin)

    Born: 15 Aug 1301, Ellesmere, Shropshire, England

    Died: 29 Jul 1349

    Notes: brother and heir. On 20 Jan 1326/7 he was made a Banneret. In 1335 he was found to be heir to his uncle, Eubolo Lestrange (q.v.), whose widow, Alice, Countess of Lincoln, granted him in 1336/7 a life-estate in the manor of Ellesmere;

    in Jun 1337 he was sum. to come to the King;

    in 1341/2 to a Council at Westminster;

    and on 20 Nov 1348 (22 Edw. III) to Parl. as Roger Lestrange.

    In 1340 and 1345 he was in commissions for Salop. In Aug 1347 he was staying at the war overseas.

    He married 1stly, Maud; and 2ndly, before 25 Mar. 1344, Joan, dau. and coheir (and eventually heir) of Oliver De Ingham, Lord Ingham.

    He died 29 Jul 1349 in the Manor of Sedgebrook, Lincs.

    Joan, married 2ndly, Sir Miles De Stapleton, K.G. She died before 12 Dec 1365 and was Buried at Ingham. Miles died 4 Oct 1364 and was Buried at Ingham.

    Father: John Le STRANGE (3º B. Strange of Knockin)

    Mother: Isolda De WALTON

    Married 1: Maud ? (b. 1305 - d. 1344)

    Married 2: Joan De INGHAM (b. 1299 / 1337) (dau. of Sir Oliver De Ingham and Elizabeth La Zouche) (m.2 of Miles De Stapelton)

    Children:

    1. Roger Le STRANGE (6º B. Strange of Knockin)

    2. Maud Le STRANGE

    3. Alianor Le STRANGE (B. Grey of Ruthin)

    *

    Died:
    at the manor...

    Roger married Joan de Ingham, Baroness Ingham Bef 25 Mar 1344. Joan (daughter of Oliver de Ingham, Knight, Lord Ingham and Elizabeth la Zouche) was born ~ 1320, Ellesmere, Shropshire, England; died 12 Dec 1365, Ingham, Norfolkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  44. 189.  Joan de Ingham, Baroness Ingham was born ~ 1320, Ellesmere, Shropshire, England (daughter of Oliver de Ingham, Knight, Lord Ingham and Elizabeth la Zouche); died 12 Dec 1365, Ingham, Norfolkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Jane de Ingham

    Notes:

    Joan was the daughter and coheiress of Oliver de Ingham in Norfolk, and widow of Roger Le Strange of Nockin.

    Joan married Sir Roger Le Strange 4th Baron Strange of Knockyn, son of Sir John Le Strange 2nd Baron le Strange of Knockyn and Iseult (Isolda), before March 25, 1344.He was her 1st husband and his 2nd wife. (Sir Roger Le Strange 4th Baron Strange of Knockyn was born on 15 Aug 1301 in Knockin, Oswestry, Shropshire, England and died on 29 Jul 1349 in Sedgebrook, Lincolnshire, England

    Joan also married Sir Miles II Staplton K.G., of Bedale, son of Sir Gilbert de Stapleton of Bedale and Agnes FitzAlan Heiress of Bedale, on 30 Nov 1350. her 2nd husband and his 2nd wife. (Sir Miles II Staplton K.G., of Bedale was born in 1320 in Bedale, North Riding Yorkshire, England, died on 4 Oct 1364 in Battle of Auray, France and was buried in Ingham, Smallburgh, Norfolk, England.)

    Henceforward Stapleton is often described as 'of Ingham' as of 'Bedale', and became a considerable proprietor in Norfolk. Stapleton's eldest son John died before him, and he was succeeded at Ingham as well as Bedale by Miles, his son by the heiress of Ingham.

    *

    Died:
    at Ingham Manor...

    Children:
    1. Maude le Strange was born Abt 1321, Knockin, Shropshire, England.
    2. 94. Roger le Strange, 5th Baron Strange of Knockin was born ~ 1327, Knockyn, Shropshire, England; died 26 Aug 1382, Monmouthshire, Wales.