Sir George Bowes, MP

Male 1527 - 1580  (~ 53 years)


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Generation: 1

  1. 1.  Sir George Bowes, MP was born ~1527, Streatlam, Durham, England (son of Richard Bowes, Esquire and Elizabeth Aske); died 20 Aug 1580, Shetland Islands, Scotland.

    George married Jane Talbot 1 Jul 1558. Jane (daughter of John Talbot and Frances Giffard) was born ~1537. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. Thomas Bowes

Generation: 2

  1. 2.  Richard Bowes, Esquire was born 1497 (son of Ralph Bowes and Margery Conyers); died 10 Nov 1558.

    Richard married Elizabeth Aske >8 Jul 1521. Elizabeth (daughter of Roger Aske and Margery Sedgwick) was born 1505, Aske, Yorkshire, England; died ~1572. [Group Sheet]


  2. 3.  Elizabeth Aske was born 1505, Aske, Yorkshire, England (daughter of Roger Aske and Margery Sedgwick); died ~1572.

    Other Events:

    • Baptism: 0Aug 1505

    Notes:

    Elizabeth Bowes (nâee Aske; 1505 - c. 1572) was an English Protestant exile, and a follower of John Knox, her son-in-law.


    Life

    Elizabeth Aske, baptized in August 1505,[1] was the granddaughter of William Aske (d. 23 August 1512) and Felice Strangeways, and the daughter of Roger Aske (d. before 1510/11), esquire, of Aske, North Yorkshire, by Margery Sedgwick, the daughter of Humphrey Sedgwick of Walbrun, Yorkshire.[2][3]

    While they were still children, she and her sister Anne were coheiresses to their father, mother and grandfather.[1] Their wardships were sold in 1510 to her future husband's father, Sir Ralph Bowes (d.1482) of Streatlam.[4] Anne Aske married Ralph Bulmer.,[1] and in 1521 Elizabeth Aske was betrothed to her guardian's youngest son, Richard Bowes (c.1497–1558), to whom the King granted special livery of half the lands of William Aske, to be received at his marriage. Richard Bowes, like the rest of his family, was engaged in border business, but seems to have lived chiefly at Aske.

    In 1548 Richard Bowes was made captain of Norham. His wife and family followed him northwards and lived in Berwick. Elizabeth, religious and much affected by the Protestant Reformation, met John Knox, who was living at Berwick in 1549. Knox wished to marry Elizabeth's daughter, Margery Bowes, but Richard Bowes' family pride was hurt by Knox's offer, and he refused his consent. Nonetheless Knox, who was about the same age as Elizabeth, contracted himself to Margery, and in July 1553 they were married in spite of opposition from Margery's family. At this time Knox's fortunes were at a low ebb, and Queen Mary had just ascended the throne. His letters to Elizabeth were intercepted by spies, and in January 1554 he left England.

    In June 1556 Elizabeth and Margery joined Knox at Geneva, where two sons were born to Margery and her husband. Knox left Geneva for Scotland in 1559, followed shortly afterwards by his wife. After a short stay in England, where Elizabeth I was now Queen, Elizabeth Bowes too made her way to her son-in-law, who wrote for the Queen's permission for her journey. In 1560 Margery died, but her mother still stayed near Knox, leaving her own family. She died about 1572,[1] and after her death Knox gave an account of the relationship in the Advertisement to his Answer to a Letter of a Jesuit named Tyrie (1572), published a letter to Elizabeth, dealing with her troubled conscience.

    Marriage and issue

    She married Richard Bowes (d. 10 November 1558), esquire, by whom she had five sons and seven daughters:[5]

    Ralph Bowes.[6]
    Francis Bowes.[6]
    Sir George Bowes (d. 20 August 1580).[5][7]
    Christopher Bowes.[6]
    Robert Bowes.[6][8]
    Bridget Bowes, who married Thomas Hussey, esquire.[6]
    Anne Bowes, who married Marmaduke Vincent, esquire.[6]
    Muriel Bowes, who married John Jackson.[6]
    Margery Bowes, who married the Scottish reformer John Knox.[6]
    Elizabeth Bowes, who married George Bainbrigge.[6]
    Margaret Bowes, who married firstly Thomas Middleton and secondly Ambrose Birkbeck.[6]
    Jane Bowes.[6]

    end of biography

    Children:
    1. 1. George Bowes, MP was born ~1527, Streatlam, Durham, England; died 20 Aug 1580, Shetland Islands, Scotland.


Generation: 3

  1. 4.  Ralph Bowes was born ~1450 (son of William Bowes and Maud FitzHugh); died 1482; was buried Barnard Castle, Durham, England.

    Notes:

    Buried:
    in Egglestone Abbey

    Ralph — Margery Conyers. Margery (daughter of Richard Conyers, Knight and Alice Wycliffe) was born ~1456, South Cowton, Yorkshire, England; died > 6 Aug 1524; was buried South Cowton, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 5.  Margery Conyers was born ~1456, South Cowton, Yorkshire, England (daughter of Richard Conyers, Knight and Alice Wycliffe); died > 6 Aug 1524; was buried South Cowton, Yorkshire, England.
    Children:
    1. 2. Richard Bowes, Esquire was born 1497; died 10 Nov 1558.

  3. 6.  Roger Aske was born ~1480, Aske, Yorkshire, England (son of William Aske and Felecia Strangeways); died >1511.

    Roger — Margery Sedgwick. Margery was born ~1482, Walbrun, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 7.  Margery Sedgwick was born ~1482, Walbrun, Yorkshire, England.
    Children:
    1. 3. Elizabeth Aske was born 1505, Aske, Yorkshire, England; died ~1572.


Generation: 4

  1. 8.  William Bowes was born ~1415, Streatlam Castle, Durham, England (son of William Bowes and Joan Greystoke); died 28 Jul 1466, Streatlam, Durham, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alt Birth: 1422, Streatlam, Durham, England

    Notes:

    William Bowes
    Born about 1415 in Streatlam Castle, Co. Durham

    Son of William Bowes and Joan (Greystoke) Bowes
    [sibling(s) unknown]
    Husband of Maud (FitzHugh) Bowes — married about 1445 [location unknown]
    DESCENDANTS descendants
    Father of Margaret (Bowes) Lisle, Joan Bowes, Ralph Bowes and Margery (Bowes) Hilton
    Died 1466 in Streatlam, Co. Durham, England
    Profile managers: Katherine Patterson private message [send private message] and Kevin Gerald Ryan private message [send private message]
    Bowes-46 created 21 Feb 2011 | Last modified 22 Jun 2016
    This page has been accessed 1,029 times.


    Sir William Bowes was born in 1422 at Streatlam, it says here.[1]

    Around 1445 he married Maud FitzHugh, daughter of the 4th Lord FitzHugh and Margaret Willoughby.

    They had 5 sons and 6 daughters, including

    Sir Ralph, 4th son and heir
    Katherine, wife of Sir Richard Conyers
    Anne, wife of Ralph Wycliffe.
    Sir William died on 28th July 1466.

    Sources

    Royal Ancestry by Douglas Richardson Vol. I page 493
    ? Marlyn Lewis

    end of profile.

    William married Maud FitzHugh 1445. Maud (daughter of William Fitzhugh, 4th Baron FitzHugh and Margery Willoughby, Baroness of Ravensworth) was born ~1428, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England; died >1466, Streatlam, Durham, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 9.  Maud FitzHugh was born ~1428, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England (daughter of William Fitzhugh, 4th Baron FitzHugh and Margery Willoughby, Baroness of Ravensworth); died >1466, Streatlam, Durham, England.

    Notes:

    Maud Bowes formerly FitzHugh
    Born about 1428 in Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England
    ANCESTORS ancestors
    Daughter of William FitzHugh and Margery (Willoughby) FitzHugh
    Sister of Margery (FitzHugh) Melton, Elizabeth (FitzHugh) Greystoke, Lora (FitzHugh) Constable, Henry FitzHugh, Eleanor FitzHugh, Lucy FitzHugh and Joan (FitzHugh) le Scrope
    Wife of William Bowes — married about 1445 [location unknown]
    DESCENDANTS descendants
    Mother of Margaret (Bowes) Lisle, Joan Bowes, Ralph Bowes and Margery (Bowes) Hilton
    Died after 1466 in Streatlam, Durham, England


    Maud FitzHugh was the daughter of Sir William FitzHugh of Ravensworth and his wife Margery Willoughby, daughter of the 5th Lord Willoughby de Eresby and Lucy le Strange.

    She married Sir William Bowes of Streatlam (sheriff of NBL), son and heir of Sir William Bowes and Joan Greystoke.[1]

    They had 5 sons and 6 daughters:

    William Esq
    Robert
    Thomas
    Sir Ralph
    Henry
    Margery, wife of Sir William Hilton
    Joan, wife of Sir Ralph Bulmer
    Katherine, wife of Sir Richard Conyers (see query below)
    Margaret, wife of Sir Humphrey Lisle.[2]
    Isabel, wife of John Swinnow
    Anne, wife of Ralph Wycliffe.
    Maud was living when her husband died on 28 July 1466.

    Query. Maud's son Sir Ralph married Margery Conyers, daughter and co-heiress of Sir Richard Conyers of South Cowton and his wife Alice Wycliffe. This Sir Richard reportedly built the church and "Castle" at South Cowton, ca. 1450-1470. He or another Sir Richard is said to have cleared and demolished the village there in 1489-90.

    So did Sir Ralph's sister Katherine become a late 2nd wife of Sir Ralph's father-in-law? (Many similar cases of a man marrying his son-in-law's sister have been noted.) Or did Katherine marry a man from a different branch of the clan?

    Effigies in the church are said to be those of Sir Richard and his two wives, but are described elsewhere as those of Sir Christopher Boynton (of Sedbury) and his two wives.

    Sources

    Marlyn Lewis.
    Royal Ancestry by Douglas Richardson Vol. I page 493
    http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=7384491&pid=819153895
    Acknowledgement

    This person was created through the import of Redmond_Chambers(3).ged on 28 January 2011.

    end of biography

    Children:
    1. 4. Ralph Bowes was born ~1450; died 1482; was buried Barnard Castle, Durham, England.

  3. 10.  Richard Conyers, Knight was born 1425-1444, South Cowton, Yorkshire, England (son of Christopher Conyers, Knight and Ellen Rolleston, of Hornby); died >1485, (South Cowton, Yorkshire, England).

    Notes:

    Richard Conyers, Knight
    Birthdate: between 1425 and 1444
    Birthplace: South Cowton, Gillington, Yorkshire, England
    Death: before 1485
    probably, South Cowton, North Yorkshire, England
    Place of Burial: South Cowton, North Yorkshire, England, UK
    Immediate Family:
    Son of Sir Christopher Conyers, of Hornby and Ellen Conyers, Lady of Hornby
    Husband of Alice Conyers
    Father of Margery Bowes; Sir Thomas Conyers; Richard Conyers; Margaret Danby and Eleanor Lassells
    Brother of Sir John Conyers, Sheriff of Yorkshire; Catherine Conyers; Roger Conyers; Sibilla Conyers; James (Jacob) Conyers and 9 others
    Half brother of Alice Conyers; Margaret Pudsey; Nicholas Conyers; Conan Conyers; Henry Conyers and 1 other
    Managed by: Carole (Erickson) Pomeroy,Vol. C...
    Last Updated: March 31, 2017
    View Complete Profile

    mmediate Family

    Alice Conyers
    wife

    Margery Bowes
    daughter

    Sir Thomas Conyers
    son

    Richard Conyers
    son

    Margaret Danby
    daughter

    Eleanor Lassells
    daughter

    Ellen Conyers, Lady of Hornby
    mother

    Sir Christopher Conyers, of Hornby
    father

    Sir John Conyers, Sheriff of Yor...
    brother

    Catherine Conyers
    sister

    Roger Conyers
    brother

    Sibilla Conyers
    sister
    About Sir Richard Conyers of South Cowton
    Richard Conyers

    Birth: about 1444 - of South Cowton, Gilling, Yorkshire, England
    Death: before 1485 (note 1)
    Parents: Christopher Conyers, Ellen Rolleston
    Married: Alice Wycliffe
    Children

    Richard Conyers, married Catherine Bowes (dau. of William Bowes and Maud Fitzhugh) d ABT 1483, South Cowton, Durham, England (note 3)
    Margaret, married Robert Danby
    Margery, married Robert Bowes (son of William Bowes and Maud Fitzhugh) ABT 1475 , Durham, England
    Eleanor, married Robert Lassells
    Sir Richard Conyers of South Cowton, knight, married Alice Wycliffe. He left three coheiresses: Margery, the wife of Sir Ralph Bowes of Streatlam; Margaret, the wife of Robert Danby, esq of Yafford, who died on Bosworth field, leaving behind him three daughters (note 2); and Eleanor, who married Robert Lassells of Sowerby near Thirsk, esq.

    Sir Richard is buried under an altar tomb at South Cowton where he founded a chantry, he having by will ordered himself to be buried there; the priest was to receive eight marks per annum. and to pray for the founder, and " Alice my now wife etc."

    His wife was to have the nomination for her life, and after her, "Sir Raufe Bowes, kt wcb hath marryed my daughter dame Marjory."

    From a copy of the original at Hornby Castle.

    Notes

    death date estimated as "before 1485" as his will names "Robert Danby, esq., husband of my daughter Margaret." Danby died 1485 in the Battle of Bosworth Field.
    the three daughters of Robert Danby & Margaret Conyers mentioned more likely belong to the next generation (their son Ralph)
    son Richard is not mentioned in his will so presumably died before its date
    __________________

    Sir Richard Conyers1,2,3
    M, #34844
    Father Sir Christopher Conyers, Sheriff of Yorkshire b. c 1393
    Mother Eleanor Rolleston b. c 1390, d. 6 Aug 1444
    Sir Richard Conyers was born at of South Cowton, Yorkshire, England. He married Alice Wycliffe, daughter of John Wycliffe, Esq. and Anne Rokeby.2,3
    Family Alice Wycliffe
    Child
    Margery Conyers+4,2,3 b. c 1456, d. 12 Aug 1532
    Citations
    [S10787] Unknown author, The Lineage and Ancestry of HRH Prince Charles, by Gerald Paget, Vol. II, p. 168.
    [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. I, p. 292.
    [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. I, p. 493.
    [S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 144.
    From: http://our-royal-titled-noble-and-commoner-ancestors.com/p1160.htm#i34844
    _____________________________

    Richard CONYERS
    Born: ABT 1444
    Father: Christopher CONYERS
    Mother: Ellen ROLLESTON
    Married: Alice WYCLIFFE (b. 1446)
    Children:
    1. Richard CONYERS
    2. Margaret CONYERS
    From: http://www.tudorplace.com.ar/CONYERS1.htm#Richard CONYERS1
    ___________________

    Name Sir Richard Conyers [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]
    Born Abt 1425 of, Cowton South, Yorkshire, England
    Father Sir Christopher Conyers, Knight, b. of, Hornby Castle, Yorkshire, England d. 6 Aug 1444, of, Hornby, Yorkshire, England
    Mother Eleanor Rolleston
    Family Alice Wycliffe
    Children
    1. Margery Conyers, b. Abt 1456, d. Aft 6 Aug 1524 (Age ~ 68 years)
    2. Elizabeth Conyers, b. Abt 1462
    3. Eleanor Conyers
    4. Margaret Conyers
    Sources
    [S495] #683 Ducatus Leodiensis, Or, the Topography of the Ancient and Populous Town and Parish of Leedes and Parts Adjacent, in the West-riding of the County of York: with the Pedigrees of Many of the Nobility and Gentry (1816), Thoresby, Ralph, (2nd edition. Leeds: Printed by B. Dewhirst for Robinson, Son and Holdsworth, 1816), FHL book Q 942.74 E5td; FHL microfilm 1,440,979 item 3., vol. 2 p. 202.
    [S304] #694 Dugdale's Visitation of Yorkshire, with Additions (1899-1917), Clay, J. W., (3 volumes. Exeter: William Pollard, 1899-1917), FHL book 942.74 D23c; FHL microfilm 823,741 items 1-3., vol. 2 p. 23.
    [S196] #3613 Yorkshire Pedigrees (1942-1944), Walker, John William, (Publications of the Harleian Society Visitations, volume 94. 3 volumes. London: [Harleian Society], 1942-1944), FHL book 942 B4h; FHL microfilm 162,083 items 1-3., Publications of the Harleian Society, vol. 94 p. 79.
    [S64] #3945 The Visitations of Yorkshire in the Years 1563 and 1564, Made by William Flower, Esquire, Norroy King of Arms (1881), Flower, William, (Publications of the Harleian Society: Visitations, volume 16. London: [Harleian Society], 1881), FHL book 942 B4h volume 16; FHL microfilm 162,050 item 2., vol. 16 p. 31.
    [S64] #3945 The Visitations of Yorkshire in the Years 1563 and 1564, Made by William Flower, Esquire, Norroy King of Arms (1881), Flower, William, (Publications of the Harleian Society: Visitations, volume 16. London: [Harleian Society], 1881), FHL book 942 B4h volume 16; FHL microfilm 162,050 item 2., p. 75.
    [S102] #667 The Extinct and Dormant Peerages of the Northern Counties of England (1913), Clay, John William, (London: James Nisbet, 1913), FHL microfilm 990,409 item 4., p. 32.
    [S63] #739 The Visitation of Yorkshire, Made in the Years 1584-85: to Which Is Added the Subsequent Visitation Made in 1612, by Richard St. George, Norry King of Arms: with Several Additional Pedigrees Edited by Joseph Foster (1875), Glover, Robert, (London: Robert Glover, 1875), FHL microfilm 990,320 item 1., p. 203.
    [S228] #247 [1816-1840] The History and Antiquities of the County Palatine of Durham (1816-1840), Surtees, Robert, of Mainsforth, Esq. F. S. A., (4 volumes. London: J.B. Nichols, Parliament-Street and G. Andrews, Durham 1816-1840), FHL book Folio 942.81 H2s; FHL microfilms 899,861-899,864., vol. 4 p. 107.
    From: https://histfam.familysearch.org//getperson.php?personID=I44644&tree=EuropeRoyalNobleHous
    ________________________

    Name Sir Richard Conyers, Knight [1]
    Born of, South Cowton, Gilling, Yorkshire, England [1]
    Family Alice Wycliffe
    Children
    1. Margery Conyers, b. Abt 1456, of, South Cowton, Gilling, Yorkshire, England d. Aft 6 Aug 1524 (Age ~ 68 years)
    Sources
    1. [S6] Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-century Colonists: the Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, Edward II, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies Before 1701 (2nd ed., 1999), Faris, David, (2nd edition. Boston: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), FHL book 973 D2fp., p. 46 BOWES:4 (Reliability: 3).
    From: https://histfam.familysearch.org//getperson.php?personID=I17086&tree=Nixon
    ______________________

    South Cowton Castle

    South Cowton Castle is a 15th-century fortified dwelling house in the Richmondshire district of North Yorkshire, England. It is situated on the land that was once the medieval village of South Cowton.
    The castle was built by Sir Richard Conyers in 1470 and it is the oldest surviving building in any of the Cowtons. The castle was built at the time of the Wars of the Roses, which gives an indication of why what is a country gentleman's house is so heavily fortified.
    The castle is a Grade I listed building; it situated near the 15th-century St Mary's Church, and overlooks the field markings from the abandoned village of South Cowton.
    The building is rectangular in plan, with two towers at the south western and north eastern corners. It is three storeyed with four-storey towers. The castle was altered in the 19th century and repaired in 1980.
    The castle is now used as a private farmhouse, it can be found just off the B1263 road near Atley Hill.
    From: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_Cowton_Castle
    ___________________

    South Cowton

    South Cowton is a village and Civil Parish located on the site of an abandoned medieval village in the Richmondshire district of North Yorkshire in England.
    The original village was founded some time after the Norman Conquest, The Domesday Book tells us that South Cowton was owned by Count Alan of Richmond, and was ruled by Godric the Steward. The archaeological remains of the village suggest that there were at least 20 houses during the Medieval era.
    The two major historic buildings in South Cowton are The Castle and St Mary's Church. Both buildings were erected in the 15th century. They were both built by Richard Conyers, one of the few lords of the many Cowton manors, ever to actually live there.
    Between 1489 and 1490 Richard Conyers demolished the village of South Cowton, evicting its tenants in order to convert the land into pastures.
    The current village consists of little more than a few widely dispersed farms, the Castle and the church. The former villages of Temple Cowton and Atley Cowton as well as the hamlets of Atley Hill and Pepper Arden have been incorporated into the parish of South Cowton.
    From: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_Cowton
    _______________

    St Mary's Church, South Cowton

    St Mary's Church is a redundant Anglican church standing in open countryside in the former village of South Cowton, near Scotch Corner in North Yorkshire, England. It is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade I listed building,[1] and is under the care of the Churches Conservation Trust.[2]
    The church was built between 1450 and 1470 by Sir Richard Conyers, who also built South Cowton Castle to the south of the church.[2] The village of South Cowton was destroyed by Sir Richard and its land cleared for agricultural use.[3] The church was restored in 1883.[4] St Mary's was vested in the Trust on 1 April 1988.[5]
    St Mary's is constructed in rubble and sandstone ashlar, with a lead roof. Its plan consists of a three-bay nave with a two-storey south porch, a three-bay chancel with a northeast vestry, and a west tower. The tower is in Perpendicular style. It has a two-light, ogee-arched bell opening on each side, an embattled parapet with pinnacles, and a stair turret on the southeast corner. On the south wall of the nave are three windows, two with three lights and the middle one with two lights. In the central bay of the south wall of the chancel is a doorway over which are two panels bearing the arms of the Conyers and the Boynton families. On each side of the doorway, at a higher level, is a two-light window.[1]
    Internally there is a low-pitched tie-beam roof. The font is octagonal and dates from the 15th century. On the chancel arch is a painting, also from the 15th century, and from the same period are the choirstalls, the rood screen and alabaster effigies of Sir Christopher Boynton and his two wives.[1] The porch has a barrel roof, over which is a room for the priest. On one of the choirstalls is a "two-faced" carving.[2] There is a ring of three bells, one dated 1700 cast by Samuel I Smith, one by Edward I Seller cast in 1712, and the third by John Warner & Sons, dating from 1883.[6]
    From: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Mary%27s_Church,_South_Cowton
    ______________________

    Sir John Conyers (died 1490), one of twenty-five children of Sir Christopher Conyers (died 1460),[1] was a pre-eminent member of the gentry of Yorkshire, northern England, during the fifteenth century Wars of the Roses.
    Based in Hornby Castle,[2] he was originally retained by his patron, the regional magnate Richard Neville, Earl of Salisbury at a fee of ¹8 6s. 8d.[3] By 1465, he was Steward of the Honour of Richmondshire and was being retained, along with his brothers William and Richard, by Salisbury's son and successor as regional magnate, the earl of Warwick,[4] for which he received ¹13 6s. 8d. He accompanied Salisbury on his journey from Middleham to Ludlow in September 1459, and took part in the Battle of Blore Heath on the 23rd of that month.[5] He later took part in Warwick's rebellion against Edward IV in 1469 and the Battle of Edgecote, raising his 'Wensleydale connection,[6] and possibly even being the ringleader, 'Robin of Redesdale.'[7] He submitted to the King in March 1469. After Edward's successful return to power in 1471 he was a Justice of the Peace for Yorkshire's North Riding.[8] A loyal retainer and probable ducal councillor of Edward's brother, Richard, Duke of Gloucester, later King Richard III, (who retained him for ¹20 annually)[9] he was made a knight of the body, at 200 marks per annum annuity, and substantial estates in Yorkshire, "where he was very active on local commissions." He was also elected to the Order of the Garter.[10] In August 1485 he appears to have fought in and survived the Battle of Bosworth in the army of Richard III, and was later granted offices in Richmondshire by the new king, Henry VII in February 1486, as a result of 'good and faithful service.'[11] He supported Henry during the first rebellion of his reign, in spring 1486, a position that has been called 'particularly significant' and, according to Michael Hicks, it 'was a momentous decision'.[12]
    From: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sir_John_Conyers
    ___________________________

    Name: Richard Conyers of South Cowton

    Surname: Conyers

    Given Name: Richard

    Suffix: of South Cowton

    Sex: M

    Birth: 1425 in Cowton, Yorkshire

    _UID: 277C3F582526CC45BFDB9F7BEC37AE06212E 1 2

    Change Date: 18 Aug 2009 at 01:00:00

    Father: Christopher Conyers b: 1383 in Hornby Castle, Yorkshire, England

    Mother: Ellen Rolleston b: ABT 1395 in Rolleston, Staffordshire, England

    Marriage 1 Alice Wycliffe

    Children

    Marjory Conyers
    Sources

    [S347] Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-century Colonists: the Descent from the Later Plantagenet Kings of England, Henry III, Edward I, Edward II, and Edward III, of Emigrants from England and Wales to the North American Colonies Before 1701 (2nd ed., 1999), Faris, David, (2nd edition. Boston: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999), FHL book 973 D2fp., p. 46 BOWES:4.
    The history and antiquities of the county palatine of Durham, William Fordyce, John Joicey, Publication: Vol. 2 - 1857
    Testamenta Eboracensia, Or Wills Registered at York: 1395-1491, James Raine, John William Clay, Publication: Vol. 3 - 1865
    _______________________

    Links
    http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/GEN-MEDIEVAL/2002-05/1022492556

    Richard — Alice Wycliffe. [Group Sheet]


  4. 11.  Alice Wycliffe
    Children:
    1. 5. Margery Conyers was born ~1456, South Cowton, Yorkshire, England; died > 6 Aug 1524; was buried South Cowton, Yorkshire, England.

  5. 12.  William Aske was born 1455, Aske, Yorkshire, England (son of Roger Aske, Esquire and unnamed spouse); died 24 Aug 1512.

    William — Felecia Strangeways. Felecia was born ~1469, Harlsey & Whorlton, Yorkshire, England; died <1511. [Group Sheet]


  6. 13.  Felecia Strangeways was born ~1469, Harlsey & Whorlton, Yorkshire, England; died <1511.
    Children:
    1. 6. Roger Aske was born ~1480, Aske, Yorkshire, England; died >1511.


Generation: 5

  1. 16.  William Bowes was born 1389-1394, Streatlam, Durham, England; died 1460-1465, Streatlam, Durham, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Soldier
    • Residence: France

    Notes:

    Sir William Bowes (1389–1460?) was a military commander.

    Bowes was the founder of the political importance of his family. He was the son of Sir Robert Bowes, and of Maude, lady of Dalden. He married Jane, daughter of Ralph, Lord Greystoke. His wife died in the first year of her marriage, whereon 'he toke much thoght and passed into France' about the year 1415. He showed much gallantry in the French war, and so commended himself to John, Duke of Bedford, whom he served as chamberlain. He fought at the battle of Verneuil, where he was knighted. While in France he was impressed with the architecture of the country, and sent home plans for rebuilding his manor house at Streatlam, near Barnard Castle. He returned from France after seventeen years' service and superintended his buildings at Streatlam, which unfortunately have been entirely destroyed. After his return he took part in the government of the borders, as warden of the middle marches and governor of Berwick.

    He died at a good old age, and is known in the family records as 'Old Sir William.'

    References

    This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: "Bowes, William". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900.

    William married Joan Greystoke 1414, Owesley, Yorkshire, England. Joan (daughter of Ralph de Greystoke, 3rd Baron Greystoke and Catherine Clifford, Baroness of Ravensworth) was born ~1394, Cumbria, England; died ~1415, Durham, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 17.  Joan Greystoke was born ~1394, Cumbria, England (daughter of Ralph de Greystoke, 3rd Baron Greystoke and Catherine Clifford, Baroness of Ravensworth); died ~1415, Durham, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Jane Greystoke

    Children:
    1. 8. William Bowes was born ~1415, Streatlam Castle, Durham, England; died 28 Jul 1466, Streatlam, Durham, England.

  3. 18.  William Fitzhugh, 4th Baron FitzHugh was born ~ 1399, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England (son of Henry FitzHugh, IV, Knight, 3rd Baron FitzHugh and Elizabeth Grey); died 22 Oct 1452, (Ravensworth) Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Member of Parliament

    Notes:

    William FitzHugh, 4th Baron FitzHugh (c. 1399 - 22 October 1452) was an English nobleman and Member of Parliament.

    Born at Ravensworth, North Riding of Yorkshire, England. He was the son of Henry FitzHugh, 3rd Baron FitzHugh and Elizabeth Grey. He served as a Member of Parliament from 1429-1450.

    FitzHugh married, before 18 November 1406, at Ravensworth, Margery Willoughby, daughter of William Willoughby, 5th Baron Willoughby de Eresby, and Lucy le Strange, by whom he had a son and seven daughters:[1]

    Henry FitzHugh, 5th Baron FitzHugh, who married Lady Alice Neville, daughter of Richard Neville, 5th Earl of Salisbury and Alice Montacute, 5th Countess of Salisbury, daughter and heiress of Thomas de Montacute, 4th Earl of Salisbury and Lady Eleanor Holland.[2] They were great-grandparents to queen consort Catherine Parr.

    Elizabeth FitzHugh, whom married Ralph Greystoke, 5th Baron Greystoke.[2]
    Eleanor FitzHugh, who married Ranulph Dacre, 1st Baron Dacre of Gilsland.[2]
    Maud FitzHugh, whom married Sir William Bowes (d. 28 July 1466) of Streatlam, Durham, by whom she was the grandmother of Sir Robert Bowes.[3][2]
    Lora FitzHugh, who married Sir John Constable of Halsham, Yorkshire.[2]
    Lucy, who became a nun.[2]
    Margery FitzHugh, who married John Melton.[2]
    Joan FitzHugh, who married John Scrope, 5th Baron Scrope of Bolton.[2]

    end of biography

    Sir William's 5-generation pedigree... http://www.ourfamilyhistories.org/ahnentafel.php?personID=I20341&tree=00&parentset=0&generations=5

    Photo, map & history of Ravensworth Castle, home of the Fitzhugh family... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ravensworth_Castle_(North_Yorkshire)

    end

    William married Margery Willoughby, Baroness of Ravensworth Bef 18 Nov 1406, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England. Margery (daughter of William Willoughby, 4th Baron Willoughby de Eresby and Lucy le Strange) was born ~ 1398, Willoughby Manor, Eresby, Spilsby, Lincoln, England; died Bef 1453, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 19.  Margery Willoughby, Baroness of Ravensworth was born ~ 1398, Willoughby Manor, Eresby, Spilsby, Lincoln, England (daughter of William Willoughby, 4th Baron Willoughby de Eresby and Lucy le Strange); died Bef 1453, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Margaret Willoughby
    • Probate: 22 Oct 1452, Yorkshire, England

    Notes:

    Her lineage to William the Conqueror (1024-1087) ... http://www.ourfamilyhistories.org/ahnentafel.php?personID=I20303&tree=00&parentset=0&generations=12

    Birth:
    Map & history of Spilsby... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spilsby

    Children:
    1. Elizabeth Fitzhugh was born ~ 1419, Ravensworth, Kirby, North Riding, Yorkshire, England; died 20 Mar 1468, Greystoke Manor, Northumberland, England.
    2. Margery Fitzhugh was born Ravensworth, Kirby, North Riding, Yorkshire, England; died Aft 1510, Kirkby, North Yorkshire, England.
    3. Henry FitzHugh, 5th Baron FitzHugh was born 1429-1435, Ravensworth, Kirby, Yorkshire, England; died 8 Jun 1472, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England.
    4. Lora FitzHugh was born (Ravensworth, Kirby, Yorkshire, England).
    5. Joan FitzHugh was born (Ravensworth, Kirby, Yorkshire, England).
    6. 9. Maud FitzHugh was born ~1428, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England; died >1466, Streatlam, Durham, England.

  5. 20.  Christopher Conyers, Knight was born ~ 1393, Hornby Castle, Hornby, Bedale, DL8 1NQ (son of John Conyers and Margaret St. Quintin); died 0___ 1462, Hornby Castle, Hornby, Bedale, DL8 1NQ.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Sheriff of Yorkshire
    • Also Known As: Lord of Hornby
    • Also Known As: Sir Christopher Conyers of Knayth

    Notes:

    About Sir Christopher Conyers, of Hornby
    Sir Christopher Conyers, Sheriff of Yorkshire1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8
    M, #15074, b. circa 1393
    Father Sir John Conyers d. bt Jun 1438 - Jul 1438
    Mother Margaret St. Quinton d. c 1426

    Sir Christopher Conyers, Sheriff of Yorkshire was born circa 1393 at of Hornby Castle, Yorkshire, England. He married Eleanor Rolleston, daughter of Thomas Rolleston, Esq. and Beatrice Haulay, before September 1415.2,6
    Sir Christopher Conyers, Sheriff of Yorkshire married Margaret Waddeley, daughter of Robert Waddeley, circa 1447.3,7

    Family 1 Eleanor Rolleston b. c 1390, d. 6 Aug 1444

    Children

    Sir John Conyers, Sheriff of Yorkshire, Constable of Middleham, Bailiff & Steward of Richmond Liberty, Steward of the lordship of Middleham+9,2,6 d. 14 Mar 1490
    Sir Richard Conyers+
    Elizabeth Conyers+10 b. c 1413
    Roger Conyers, Esq.+ b. c 1419
    Joan Conyers+ b. c 1423
    Isabel Conyers+11,4,8 b. c 1433
    Margaret Conyers+ b. c 1435

    Family 2 Margaret Waddeley
    Child
    Margaret Conyers+12,13,3,5,7 b. c 1451, d. 1500

    Citations
    [S3949] Unknown author, Lineage and Ancestry of HRH Prince Charles by Paget, Vol. II, p. 407; Plantagenet Ancestry of 17th Century Colonists, by David Faris, p. 70.
    [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. I, p. 530-531.
    [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. III, p. 400.
    [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. IV, p. 128.
    [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. II, p. 248.
    [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. II, p. 288.
    [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. IV, p. 431-432.
    [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. V, p. 69.
    [S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 227.
    [S40] RootsWeb's WorldConnect Project.
    [S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 695.
    [S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 218.
    [S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 597-598.
    From: http://our-royal-titled-noble-and-commoner-ancestors.com/p502.htm#i15074
    ___________________

    Christopher Conyers1
    M, #220984
    Last Edited=9 Apr 2007
    Christopher Conyers lived at Hornby, Yorkshire, England.1
    Child of Christopher Conyers
    Margaret Conyers+1
    Citations
    [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume III, page 294. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
    From: http://www.thepeerage.com/p22099.htm#i220984
    ________________________

    Christopher CONYERS
    Born: ABT 1380
    Died: AFT 1462
    Father: John CONYERS
    Mother: Margaret St. QUINTIN
    Married 1: Ellen ROLLESTON (b. ABT 1399 - d. 6 Aug 1444)
    Children:
    1. John CONYERS (Sir)
    2. Joan CONYERS
    3. Richard CONYERS
    4. Isabel CONYERS
    5. Margery CONYERS
    6. Eleanor CONYERS
    7. Elizabeth CONYERS
    Married 2: Margaret WADELEY AFT 1444
    Children:
    7. Margaret CONYERS
    From: http://www.tudorplace.com.ar/CONYERS1.htm#Christopher CONYERS2
    ____________________

    Name Sir Christopher Conyers, Knight [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
    Born of, Hornby Castle, Yorkshire, England
    Died 6 Aug 1444 of, Hornby, Yorkshire, England [1, 9, 10]
    Father Sir John Conyers, Lord Conyers, b. Abt 1360, Hornby Castle, Yorkshire, England
    Mother Margaret St. Quintin, b. Abt 1362, Brandesburton, Yorkshire, England
    Family 1 Eleanor Rolleston
    Children
    1. Sir John Conyers, d. 14 Mar 1489-1490
    2. Sir Richard Conyers, b. of, Marske, Yorkshire, England
    3. Sir Richard Conyers, b. Abt 1425, of, Cowton South, Yorkshire, England
    4. Thomas Conyers, d. 1449
    5. Isabel Conyers, b. Abt 1428
    6. Christopher Conyers, Rector of Rudby, d. Bef 1 Sep 1483
    7. Elizabeth Conyers, b. Abt 1433
    8. Ralph Conyers
    9. Jacob Conyers
    10. Sir Roger Conyers, Knight, b. of, Winyard, Durham, England
    11. Catherine Conyers
    12. Joan Conyers
    13. George Conyers
    14. Margaret Conyers
    15. Sibilla Conyers
    16. Margery Conyers
    17. James Conyers
    18. Hawise Conyers
    Family 2 Margaret Waddeley
    Children
    1. Brian Conyers, d. Bef 16 Oct 1478, of, Pinchingthorpe, Yorkshire, England
    2. Margaret Conyers, b. of, Hornby Castle, Yorkshire, England d. 1500, Bolton, Yorkshire, England
    3. Nicholas Conyers, Gentleman, d. Bef 6 Feb 1497-1498
    4. Henry Conyers
    5. Conan Conyers
    6. Alice Conyers
    Sources
    [S29] #798 The Wallop Family and Their Ancestry, Watney, Vernon James, (4 volumes. Oxford: John Johnson, 1928), FHL book Q 929.242 W159w; FHL microfilm 1696491 items 6-9., vol. 2 p. 225.
    [S452] #892 Record Series: The Yorkshire Archaeological and Topographical Association (1885-), ([S.I.]: Yorkshire Archaeological and Topographical Association, 1885-), FHL book 942.74 B4a., vol. 56 pedigree chart: Pudsay of Bolton.
    [S22] The royal descents of 600 immigrants to the American Colonies or the United States : who were themselves notable or left descendants notable in American history, Roberts, Gary Boyd, (Baltimore [Maryland] : Genealogical Pub. Co., c2004), 973 D2rrd., p. 431.
    [S767] Ancestors of American presidents, Roberts, Gary Boyd,, (Boston, Massachusetts : New England Historic Genealogical Society, c2009), 973 D2r 2009., p. 392.
    [S23] Magna Carta Ancestry: A study in Colonial and Medieval Families, Richardson, Douglas, (Kimball G. Everingham, editor. 2nd edition, 2011), vol. 4 p. 128.
    [S64] #3945 The Visitations of Yorkshire in the Years 1563 and 1564, Made by William Flower, Esquire, Norroy King of Arms (1881), Flower, William, (Publications of the Harleian Society: Visitations, volume 16. London: [Harleian Society], 1881), FHL book 942 B4h volume 16; FHL microfilm 162,050 item 2., p. 9, 74.
    [S66] Magna Carta Ancestry, Richardson, Douglas, (Baltimore, Maryland : Genealogical Pub. Co., c2005), 942 D5rdm., p. 343.
    [S143] #696 Visitations of the north, or, some early heraldic visitations of, and collections of pedigrees relating to, the north of England, Blair, Charles Henry Hunter, (Durham [England] : Andrews, 1912-1932. Part of the Publications of the Surtees Society.), 942 B4s., vol. 147 p. 92.
    [S102] #667 The Extinct and Dormant Peerages of the Northern Counties of England (1913), Clay, John William, (London: James Nisbet, 1913), FHL microfilm 990,409 item 4., p. 32.
    [S64] #3945 The Visitations of Yorkshire in the Years 1563 and 1564, Made by William Flower, Esquire, Norroy King of Arms (1881), Flower, William, (Publications of the Harleian Society: Visitations, volume 16. London: [Harleian Society], 1881), FHL book 942 B4h volume 16; FHL microfilm 162,050 item 2., p. 74.
    From: https://histfam.familysearch.org//getperson.php?personID=I44795&tree=EuropeRoyalNobleHous
    _________________________

    Sir John Conyers (died 1490), one of twenty-five children of Sir Christopher Conyers (died 1460),[1] was a pre-eminent member of the gentry of Yorkshire, northern England, during the fifteenth century Wars of the Roses.
    Based in Hornby Castle,[2] he was originally retained by his patron, the regional magnate Richard Neville, Earl of Salisbury at a fee of ¹8 6s. 8d.[3] By 1465, he was Steward of the Honour of Richmondshire and was being retained, along with his brothers William and Richard, by Salisbury's son and successor as regional magnate, the earl of Warwick,[4] for which he received ¹13 6s. 8d. He accompanied Salisbury on his journey from Middleham to Ludlow in September 1459, and took part in the Battle of Blore Heath on the 23rd of that month.[5] He later took part in Warwick's rebellion against Edward IV in 1469 and the Battle of Edgecote, raising his 'Wensleydale connection,[6] and possibly even being the ringleader, 'Robin of Redesdale.'[7] He submitted to the King in March 1469. After Edward's successful return to power in 1471 he was a Justice of the Peace for Yorkshire's North Riding.[8] A loyal retainer and probable ducal councillor of Edward's brother, Richard, Duke of Gloucester, later King Richard III, (who retained him for ¹20 annually)[9] he was made a knight of the body, at 200 marks per annum annuity, and substantial estates in Yorkshire, "where he was very active on local commissions." He was also elected to the Order of the Garter.[10] In August 1485 he appears to have fought in and survived the Battle of Bosworth in the army of Richard III, and was later granted offices in Richmondshire by the new king, Henry VII in February 1486, as a result of 'good and faithful service.'[11] He supported Henry during the first rebellion of his reign, in spring 1486, a position that has been called 'particularly significant' and, according to Michael Hicks, it 'was a momentous decision'.[12]
    From: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sir_John_Conyers
    ___________________________

    The Yorkshire Background of the Boyntons of Rowley", from "The Colonial Genealogist", by Robert Joseph Cuffman, MA, FAS/he, FSO, Associate Editor, reprinted by the Augustan Society 1988.
    "Sir Robert Conyers - Lord of Ormsby, holding also Coatham in Durham - b.1325 d. 1392 (Vist. of Yorks 1563-4 70 ft.; VCH Durham 3:301); married (1) Joan de Melton, niece of William de Melton, Archbishop of York 1317-40. (Vist. of Yorks 1563-4 70 ft.; Walker, Yorks. Peds. 2:285), thus d/o Henry de Melton. He married (2) Juliana Percy, d/o and heiress of John Percy, Lord of Ormsby, of the line of Percy of Kildale, who died without male issue and was sometimes given "William" (VCH Yorks NR 2:278; VCH Durham 3:301; Visit. of Yorks 1563-4 70 ft.) . He married (3) Aline de la Ley d. 1408, Lady of Dalden, d. 1408, by whom he had an only child, heiress to her mother, the Joan Conyers who married Sir Robert Bowes, Knight Banneret."
    |
    John Conyers (son of Sir Robert Conyers and 1st. wife Joan de Melton) married Margaret St. Quinton, living Oct 1426 d/o Sir Anthony St. Quinton (Vist. of Yorks. 1563-4 70 ft., 74 & ft.). "He was no doubt the 'John Conyers' who, with Sir Robert Conyers (his son) and Sir Thomas Boynton, settled Tanton Manor on William Percy of Castle Leavington in 1397 (VCH Yorks NR 2:307)"
    |
    Christopher Conyers (son of John Conyers and Margaret St. Quinton) Lord of Hornsby 1427, living 1459 (VCH Yorks NR 1:401) m. 1st. Ellen Roleston, d. 6 Aug 1444. Married 2nd. Margaret Wadeley (d/o Robert) (Vist. of Yorks. 1563-4 74 & ft.). "He was doubtless the 'Christopher Conyers' who with John Conyers of Ormsby and Christopher Boynton, was a trustee of Tanton Manor in 1434 (VCH Yorks NR 2:307) and who with those trustees settled Castle Leavington on Sir William Bowes, along with other trustees that year. (VCH Yorks NR 2:360)." Two of his sons were, Sir John Conyers of Hornby d. 1490, Sheriff of Yorkshire who m. Margery, dau. and coheir of Philip, Lord Darcy and Meynell and Robert Conyers, heir of Hornby, married Margaret, dau. and coheir of Rowland Darcy of Hinton, Leicestershire.
    ____________

    "Britannia" by William Camden (1607)

    YORKSHIRE

    62. [The river] Swale driveth on with a long course, not without some lets [obstructions] heere and there in his streame, not farre from Hornby Castle, belonging to the family of Saint Quintin, which afterwards came to the Cogniers [Conyers], and seeth nothing besides fresh pastures, country houses, and villages,

    ________________________

    Name: Christopher Conyers

    Surname: Conyers
    Given Name: Christopher
    Prefix: Sir
    Sex: M
    Birth: 1383 in Hornby Castle, Yorkshire, England
    Death: 1456 in Hornby Castle, Yorkshire, England
    _UID: 53FBD77679A94C4180F1D7DAEB0C31E377CD

    Note:
    He administered the will of his cousin John Conyers of Ormsby in 1438. His will was dated 1426. In it, he asks to be buried in the kirk of Hornby beside his father. He leaves Ellen, his wife one third of his goods. To son Thomas he left lands in Hornby, Brokeholme, North Ottrington and half his lands in Erythorne, Hunton, Hesilton, Little Crakehall and Whitby. Also mentioned were son John and daughter Joan. His mother dame Margaret Conyers was named one of the executors.

    CHRISTOPHER CONYERS, of Hornby; m Ellene, dau and coheir of - Rylestone (d 1443), and had, with a yr s (Sir William, of Marske, Yorks, identified by some historians (others prefer his er bro Sir John) with 'Robin of Redesdale', leader 1469 of an insurrection fomented by the 1st and last Earl of Warwick ('Warwick the Kingmaker') of the March 1449/50 cr (see ABERGAVENNY, M) against EDWARD IV, in particular his favourites and in-laws the Woodvilles, d 1495): Sir JOHN CONYERS 1 2 3

    Change Date: 18 Aug 2009 at 01:00:00
    Father: John Conyers b: 1371 in Hornby Castle, Yorkshire, England
    Mother: Margaret St Quintin b: ABT 1380 in Brandsburton, Yorkshire, England
    Marriage 1 Ellen Rolleston b: ABT 1395 in Rolleston, Staffordshire, England
    Married: BEF 1415
    Children
    John Conyers Sheriff of Yorkshire b: ABT 1414 in Hornby, North Riding, Yorkshire
    Joan Conyers b: 1428 in Hornby Castle, Yorkshire, England
    Roger Conyers b: 1419
    Catherine Conyers b: 1417
    Margaret Conyers b: 1421
    Sibyl Conyers b: 1423
    Richard Conyers of South Cowton b: 1425 in Cowton, Yorkshire
    Thomas Conyers b: 1426
    James Jacob Conyers b: 1429
    Isabel Conyers b: 1430
    Ralph Conyers b: 1432
    Christopher Conyers b: 1435
    Robert Conyers b: 1437
    Elizabeth Conyers b: 1439
    Margery Conyers b: 1440
    George Conyers b: 1442
    Sources:
    Repository:
    Title: Magna Charta Sureties 1215
    Author: Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Ed
    Publication: 1999
    Page: 164
    Title: Visitations of the North c 1480-1500, Publications of the Surtee's Society
    Page: #144:92, 116
    Title: Burke's Peerage and Gentry
    Publication: http://www.burkes-peerage.net/Welcome.aspx
    Page: Yarborough Family Page
    _______________________

    Hornby Castle, Yorkshire (North Riding), was a fourteenth and fifteenth-century courtyard castle, with a late fourteenth-century corner tower known as St Quintin's Tower, after the medieval family which occupied the castle (demolished in 1927) and fifteenth-century work done for William, Lord Conyers.[1]

    Hornby was largely rebuilt in the 1760s by John Carr of York, who was responsible for the surviving south range and the east range (demolished in the 1930s) and outbuildings, for Robert Darcy, 4th Earl of Holderness. The eventual heir was the Duke of Leeds, who assembled there rich early eighteenth-century furniture from several houses, illustrated in the books of Percy Macquoid.

    ___________________________

    Stirnet.com
    'Pudsey1'
    (A) Henry Pudsey o'f Barforth or Berforth'
    m. Margaret Conyers (dau of Christopher (not Sir John) Conyers of Hornby)
    ________________________

    *

    Re: Conyers of Sockburn, Coatham, Ormesby and Hornby
    On Oct 31, 7:35 am, John Watson wrote:
    Hi all,

    Something which has puzzled me and I am sure many other genealogists over the years, how do the families of Conyers of Sockburn, Conyers of Coatham, Conyers of Ormesby and Conyers of Hornby fit together. Here is my suggestion, which is full of holes but at least has the merit of fitting the available facts. The main differences to the perceived pedigrees being the identification of Scolastica de Cotum's husband as Roger Conyers, and the subsequent descent of lands in Coatham, Durham and Northumberland. Any corrections or additions would be gratefully received.

    1. Humphrey Conyers
    --------------------
    Birth: abt. 1215
    Death: bef. 1283 [1]
    Father: Geoffrey (Galfrid) Conyers

    succeeded his brother John as lord of Sockburn, and Girsby[1]

    Spouse: Pernel [1]

    Children: John Conyers (- <1304)
    Sir Roger Conyers (- <1298)

    1.1 John Conyers
    --------------------
    Birth: abt. 1240
    Death: bef. 1304[1]

    proved his right to free warren in Girsby in 1293[1]

    Spouse: Unknown

    Children: John Conyers (c.1270-<1342)
    Roger Conyers (-) >>> Conyers of Sockburn

    1.2 Roger Conyers
    -------------------
    Birth: abt. 1250
    Death: bef. 1298
    Father: Humphrey Conyers
    Mother: Pernel

    Sir Roger de Conyers, knight [2]
    protection for 4 years going to Holy Land, 10 Feb 1271 [2]
    Holding 1 knight's fee in Northumberland [2]
    Distrained to receive knighthood 1278 [2]
    Quittance of eyre, Northumberland 27 Dec 1278 [2]
    Safe conduct for him, sent by King to Rothelan, 28 Apr 1279 [2]
    Protection till Michaelmas 31 Mar 1282 [2]

    He and his wife dead at the date of his father-in-law, Ralph de Cotum's ipm, when Ralph's heirs were his daughter Alice and John Conyers, son of his daughter Scolastica [4]

    Spouse: Scolastica de Cotum
    Death: bef. 14 Sep 1298 (date of writ for father's ipm) [3]
    Father: Sir Ralph de Cotum
    Mother: Christian

    Children: John Conyers (1284-1310)

    1.2.1 John Conyers
    --------------------
    Birth: abt. 1270
    Death: bef. Apr 1310 [5]
    Father: Roger Conyers
    Mother: Scolastica de Cotum

    Of Coatham Conyers, in the parish of Long Newton, Durham, also know as Coatham Stub and Stubhouse [7]

    21 July 1300, had pourparty of the lands late of Ralph de Cotun, his grandfather [6] included manors of Cronkley & Benrig, Northumberland [9]

    John Conyers 'of Stubhouse' made a grant of land in Cronkley (Northumberland) in 1306 [7]

    29 April 1310, Debtor: Thomas de Aynill, of Deighton, Creditor: John de Coyners of Stib Ho (Stubhous), recently deceased [5]

    Spouse: Unknown

    Children: Robert Conyers (c. 1305->1338)

    1.2.1.1 Robert Conyers
    ------------------------
    Birth: abt. 1305
    Death: aft. 1338 [10]
    Father: John Conyers

    de Banco Rolls relating to Northumberland for 1321: Robert, son of John de Conyers of Stubhous, plaintiff, William de Herle, defendant. Manor of Benrigge [8]

    de Banco Rolls for Northumberland for 1338, Robert de Conyers of Hubhouse, plaintiff, William Hunter and others, defendant. Trespass at Crumclyf [Cronkley] for 20s. [10]

    Spouse: Unknown

    Children: Robert Conyers (c.1325->Nov 1390)

    1.2.1.1.1 Robert Conyers
    -------------------------
    Birth: abt. 1325
    Death: bef 18 Nov 1390 (date of ipm) [11]
    Father: Robert Conyers

    Of Coatham Stub and and through first wife, Juliana de Percy, lord of Ormesby in Cleveland, Yorkshire

    ipm for Durham of Robert Coniers taken 18 November 1390. Robert Conyers, aged 34 is his son and next heir. He had been enfeoffed of his manor jointly with Alina his wife, to hold to them and their heirs of Robert and his first wife Juliana. He held the manor of Cotom next Longnewton of Thomas, son and heir of Alexander Surtees [11]

    Spouse 1: Juliana de Percy (c.1330-1370) [12]
    Father: John de Percy of Ormesby (->1325)

    Children: Sir Robert Conyers (c.1356-1432)
    John Conyers(c.1360-1412)
    William Conyers ( -<1412)
    Margaret Conyers ( -1408)

    Spouse 2: Aline de la Legh (c.1340-1408)
    Widow of William de Dalden (d. 1369) [13]

    Children: Joan Conyers (c.1380-1438)

    Note: Robert Conyers of Coatham Stub, Durham did not marry Joan, niece of William de Melton, as suggested by N. Harris Nicholas. Robert Conyers who married Joan was of Norton Conyers, Yorkshire - see Feet of Fines for the county of York, 1327 to 1347, Yorkshire Archaeological Society Record Series, vol. 42; 1910, p. 52

    1.2.1.1.1.1 Robert Conyers
    ---------------------------
    Birth: abt. 1356 [11]
    Death: bef. 18 Jul 1432 [15]
    Father: Robert Conyers
    Mother: Juliana de Percy

    Sir Robert Conyers of Ormesby

    de Banco Rolls for 1369 for Northumberland. Robert Conyers, chivaler, executor of Goscelin Surtays, plaintiff. Robert Conyers de Stubhouse and Elizabeth his wife, defendants [14]

    Robert Conyers, knight, brother of John Conyers of Horneby, mentioned in a royal pardon, dated 22 Apr 1423 [16]

    John Conyers of Ormesby administered to his father Sir Robert Conyers's effects on 18 Jul 1432 [15]

    Spouse: Elizabeth

    Children: John Conyers (c.1385-1438)

    1.2.1.1.1.2 John Conyers
    -------------------------
    Birth: abt.1360
    Death: bef. Jul 1412 [18]
    Father: Robert Conyers
    Mother: Juliana de Percy

    John Conyers of Hornby

    17 Aug 1403, Robert and John Conyers, brothers, were appointed custodians of the castle of Skelton, the manors of Skelton and Marske, and all the other lands of Thomas Faucomberge knight in cos. York and Northumberland [17]

    dead before 24 April 1412, when Richard de Norton and Laurence de Middleton, vicar of the church of Grimston granted to Richard son of John Conyers of Hornby, deceased, the manor of Solberge (Solbergh Super Wysk') [18]

    Spouse: Margaret St. Quintin
    Birth: abt. 1385
    Death: aft. May 1435
    Father: Anthony St. Quintin
    Mother: Elizabeth Gascoigne?

    Children: Christopher Conyers (c.1400-1460)
    Richard Conyers [18]
    Thomas Conyers [18]

    Regards,

    John

    References:
    1. 'Parishes: Sockburn', A History of the County of York North Riding:Volume 1 (1914), pp. 449-454
    2. Harleian Society, Vol 80, Knights of Edward I , Vol I (London:1929) p 234
    3. Calendar of Fine Rolls, Vol 1, p 403
    4. Calendar of Fine Rolls, Vol 1, p 424
    5. Chancery: Certificates of Statute Merchant and Statute Staple, C241/68/74
    6. Calendar of Fine Rolls, Vol 1, p 432
    7. 'Parishes: Long Newton', A History of the County of Durham: Volume3 (1928), pp. 299-304
    8. Archaeologica Aeliana, Third Series, Vol 6 (Newcastle: 1910) p 45
    9. John Hodgson, A History of Northumberland, Vol V (Vol 3, Part 1) (London: 1820) p 53 & 104
    10. Archaeologica Aeliana, Third Series, Vol 6 (Newcastle: 1910) p 48
    11. 45th Annual Report of the Deputy Keeper of the Public Records(London: 1885) p 175
    12. 'Parishes: Ormesby', A History of the County of York North Riding:Volume 2 (1923), pp. 276-283
    13. 45th Annual Report of the Deputy Keeper of the Public Records(London: 1885) p 183
    14. Archaeologica Aeliana, Third Series, Vol 7 (Newcastle: 1910) p 59
    15. Surtees Society, Vol 30, Testamenta Eboracensia, Part II (Durham:1855) p 64n
    16. Calendar of Patent Rolls, Henry 6, Vol 1, p 28
    17. Complete Peerage, Vol 5, p 277
    18. Lincolnshire Archives, Yarborough [YARB 16/1/1]

    Hi all,

    I spotted a small error in my previous post.

    John Conyers, son of Sir Roger Conyers must have been born before
    1279, since the king gave him his share of Ralph de Cotum's lands âin
    1300 when he must have been 21 or more.

    Regards,

    Birth:
    Hornby Castle, Yorkshire is a grade I listed fortified manor house on the edge of Wensleydale between Bedale and Leyburn.

    Originally 14th century, it has been remodelled in the 15th, 18th and 20th centuries. It is constructed of coursed sandstone rubble with lead and stone slate roofs.[1] The present building is the south range of a larger complex, the rest of which has been demolished.

    Images & History ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hornby_Castle,_Yorkshire

    More images ... https://www.google.com/search?q=hornby+castle+yorkshire&rlz=1C1KMZB_enUS591US591&tbm=isch&imgil=L17fJ7zgL9tiQM%253A%253BYOgSjyDjMuVhYM%253Bhttps%25253A%25252F%25252Fen.wikipedia.org%25252Fwiki%25252FHornby_Castle%25252C_Yorkshire&source=iu&pf=m&fir=L17fJ7zgL9tiQM%253A%252CYOgSjyDjMuVhYM%252C_&usg=__cshmFIN46k_oBFIrYWJnyvm3JAw%3D&biw=1440&bih=810&ved=0ahUKEwi4z-bTuozWAhVG0WMKHRESDlcQyjcIOA&ei=YMOtWbifKMaijwORpLi4BQ#imgrc=XkWlJVgO35F9_M:

    Christopher — Ellen Rolleston, of Hornby. Ellen was born ~1395; died 6 Aug 1444, Hornby, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  6. 21.  Ellen Rolleston, of Hornby was born ~1395; died 6 Aug 1444, Hornby, Yorkshire, England.

    Notes:

    About Sir Christopher Conyers, of Hornby
    Sir Christopher Conyers, Sheriff of Yorkshire1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8
    M, #15074, b. circa 1393
    Father Sir John Conyers d. bt Jun 1438 - Jul 1438
    Mother Margaret St. Quinton d. c 1426

    Sir Christopher Conyers, Sheriff of Yorkshire was born circa 1393 at of Hornby Castle, Yorkshire, England. He married Eleanor Rolleston, daughter of Thomas Rolleston, Esq. and Beatrice Haulay, before September 1415.2,6
    Sir Christopher Conyers, Sheriff of Yorkshire married Margaret Waddeley, daughter of Robert Waddeley, circa 1447.3,7

    Family 1 Eleanor Rolleston b. c 1390, d. 6 Aug 1444

    Children

    Sir John Conyers, Sheriff of Yorkshire, Constable of Middleham, Bailiff & Steward of Richmond Liberty, Steward of the lordship of Middleham+9,2,6 d. 14 Mar 1490
    Sir Richard Conyers+
    Elizabeth Conyers+10 b. c 1413
    Roger Conyers, Esq.+ b. c 1419
    Joan Conyers+ b. c 1423
    Isabel Conyers+11,4,8 b. c 1433
    Margaret Conyers+ b. c 1435

    Family 2 Margaret Waddeley
    Child
    Margaret Conyers+12,13,3,5,7 b. c 1451, d. 1500

    Citations
    [S3949] Unknown author, Lineage and Ancestry of HRH Prince Charles by Paget, Vol. II, p. 407; Plantagenet Ancestry of 17th Century Colonists, by David Faris, p. 70.
    [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. I, p. 530-531.
    [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. III, p. 400.
    [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. IV, p. 128.
    [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. II, p. 248.
    [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. II, p. 288.
    [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. IV, p. 431-432.
    [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. V, p. 69.
    [S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 227.
    [S40] RootsWeb's WorldConnect Project.
    [S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 695.
    [S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 218.
    [S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 597-598.
    From: http://our-royal-titled-noble-and-commoner-ancestors.com/p502.htm#i15074
    ___________________

    Christopher Conyers1
    M, #220984
    Last Edited=9 Apr 2007
    Christopher Conyers lived at Hornby, Yorkshire, England.1
    Child of Christopher Conyers
    Margaret Conyers+1
    Citations
    [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume III, page 294. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
    From: http://www.thepeerage.com/p22099.htm#i220984
    ________________________

    Christopher CONYERS
    Born: ABT 1380
    Died: AFT 1462
    Father: John CONYERS
    Mother: Margaret St. QUINTIN
    Married 1: Ellen ROLLESTON (b. ABT 1399 - d. 6 Aug 1444)
    Children:
    1. John CONYERS (Sir)
    2. Joan CONYERS
    3. Richard CONYERS
    4. Isabel CONYERS
    5. Margery CONYERS
    6. Eleanor CONYERS
    7. Elizabeth CONYERS
    Married 2: Margaret WADELEY AFT 1444
    Children:
    7. Margaret CONYERS
    From: http://www.tudorplace.com.ar/CONYERS1.htm#Christopher CONYERS2
    ____________________

    Name Sir Christopher Conyers, Knight [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
    Born of, Hornby Castle, Yorkshire, England
    Died 6 Aug 1444 of, Hornby, Yorkshire, England [1, 9, 10]
    Father Sir John Conyers, Lord Conyers, b. Abt 1360, Hornby Castle, Yorkshire, England
    Mother Margaret St. Quintin, b. Abt 1362, Brandesburton, Yorkshire, England
    Family 1 Eleanor Rolleston
    Children
    1. Sir John Conyers, d. 14 Mar 1489-1490
    2. Sir Richard Conyers, b. of, Marske, Yorkshire, England
    3. Sir Richard Conyers, b. Abt 1425, of, Cowton South, Yorkshire, England
    4. Thomas Conyers, d. 1449
    5. Isabel Conyers, b. Abt 1428
    6. Christopher Conyers, Rector of Rudby, d. Bef 1 Sep 1483
    7. Elizabeth Conyers, b. Abt 1433
    8. Ralph Conyers
    9. Jacob Conyers
    10. Sir Roger Conyers, Knight, b. of, Winyard, Durham, England
    11. Catherine Conyers
    12. Joan Conyers
    13. George Conyers
    14. Margaret Conyers
    15. Sibilla Conyers
    16. Margery Conyers
    17. James Conyers
    18. Hawise Conyers
    Family 2 Margaret Waddeley
    Children
    1. Brian Conyers, d. Bef 16 Oct 1478, of, Pinchingthorpe, Yorkshire, England
    2. Margaret Conyers, b. of, Hornby Castle, Yorkshire, England d. 1500, Bolton, Yorkshire, England
    3. Nicholas Conyers, Gentleman, d. Bef 6 Feb 1497-1498
    4. Henry Conyers
    5. Conan Conyers
    6. Alice Conyers
    Sources
    [S29] #798 The Wallop Family and Their Ancestry, Watney, Vernon James, (4 volumes. Oxford: John Johnson, 1928), FHL book Q 929.242 W159w; FHL microfilm 1696491 items 6-9., vol. 2 p. 225.
    [S452] #892 Record Series: The Yorkshire Archaeological and Topographical Association (1885-), ([S.I.]: Yorkshire Archaeological and Topographical Association, 1885-), FHL book 942.74 B4a., vol. 56 pedigree chart: Pudsay of Bolton.
    [S22] The royal descents of 600 immigrants to the American Colonies or the United States : who were themselves notable or left descendants notable in American history, Roberts, Gary Boyd, (Baltimore [Maryland] : Genealogical Pub. Co., c2004), 973 D2rrd., p. 431.
    [S767] Ancestors of American presidents, Roberts, Gary Boyd,, (Boston, Massachusetts : New England Historic Genealogical Society, c2009), 973 D2r 2009., p. 392.
    [S23] Magna Carta Ancestry: A study in Colonial and Medieval Families, Richardson, Douglas, (Kimball G. Everingham, editor. 2nd edition, 2011), vol. 4 p. 128.
    [S64] #3945 The Visitations of Yorkshire in the Years 1563 and 1564, Made by William Flower, Esquire, Norroy King of Arms (1881), Flower, William, (Publications of the Harleian Society: Visitations, volume 16. London: [Harleian Society], 1881), FHL book 942 B4h volume 16; FHL microfilm 162,050 item 2., p. 9, 74.
    [S66] Magna Carta Ancestry, Richardson, Douglas, (Baltimore, Maryland : Genealogical Pub. Co., c2005), 942 D5rdm., p. 343.
    [S143] #696 Visitations of the north, or, some early heraldic visitations of, and collections of pedigrees relating to, the north of England, Blair, Charles Henry Hunter, (Durham [England] : Andrews, 1912-1932. Part of the Publications of the Surtees Society.), 942 B4s., vol. 147 p. 92.
    [S102] #667 The Extinct and Dormant Peerages of the Northern Counties of England (1913), Clay, John William, (London: James Nisbet, 1913), FHL microfilm 990,409 item 4., p. 32.
    [S64] #3945 The Visitations of Yorkshire in the Years 1563 and 1564, Made by William Flower, Esquire, Norroy King of Arms (1881), Flower, William, (Publications of the Harleian Society: Visitations, volume 16. London: [Harleian Society], 1881), FHL book 942 B4h volume 16; FHL microfilm 162,050 item 2., p. 74.
    From: https://histfam.familysearch.org//getperson.php?personID=I44795&tree=EuropeRoyalNobleHous
    _________________________

    Sir John Conyers (died 1490), one of twenty-five children of Sir Christopher Conyers (died 1460),[1] was a pre-eminent member of the gentry of Yorkshire, northern England, during the fifteenth century Wars of the Roses.
    Based in Hornby Castle,[2] he was originally retained by his patron, the regional magnate Richard Neville, Earl of Salisbury at a fee of ¹8 6s. 8d.[3] By 1465, he was Steward of the Honour of Richmondshire and was being retained, along with his brothers William and Richard, by Salisbury's son and successor as regional magnate, the earl of Warwick,[4] for which he received ¹13 6s. 8d. He accompanied Salisbury on his journey from Middleham to Ludlow in September 1459, and took part in the Battle of Blore Heath on the 23rd of that month.[5] He later took part in Warwick's rebellion against Edward IV in 1469 and the Battle of Edgecote, raising his 'Wensleydale connection,[6] and possibly even being the ringleader, 'Robin of Redesdale.'[7] He submitted to the King in March 1469. After Edward's successful return to power in 1471 he was a Justice of the Peace for Yorkshire's North Riding.[8] A loyal retainer and probable ducal councillor of Edward's brother, Richard, Duke of Gloucester, later King Richard III, (who retained him for ¹20 annually)[9] he was made a knight of the body, at 200 marks per annum annuity, and substantial estates in Yorkshire, "where he was very active on local commissions." He was also elected to the Order of the Garter.[10] In August 1485 he appears to have fought in and survived the Battle of Bosworth in the army of Richard III, and was later granted offices in Richmondshire by the new king, Henry VII in February 1486, as a result of 'good and faithful service.'[11] He supported Henry during the first rebellion of his reign, in spring 1486, a position that has been called 'particularly significant' and, according to Michael Hicks, it 'was a momentous decision'.[12]
    From: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sir_John_Conyers
    ___________________________

    The Yorkshire Background of the Boyntons of Rowley", from "The Colonial Genealogist", by Robert Joseph Cuffman, MA, FAS/he, FSO, Associate Editor, reprinted by the Augustan Society 1988.
    "Sir Robert Conyers - Lord of Ormsby, holding also Coatham in Durham - b.1325 d. 1392 (Vist. of Yorks 1563-4 70 ft.; VCH Durham 3:301); married (1) Joan de Melton, niece of William de Melton, Archbishop of York 1317-40. (Vist. of Yorks 1563-4 70 ft.; Walker, Yorks. Peds. 2:285), thus d/o Henry de Melton. He married (2) Juliana Percy, d/o and heiress of John Percy, Lord of Ormsby, of the line of Percy of Kildale, who died without male issue and was sometimes given "William" (VCH Yorks NR 2:278; VCH Durham 3:301; Visit. of Yorks 1563-4 70 ft.) . He married (3) Aline de la Ley d. 1408, Lady of Dalden, d. 1408, by whom he had an only child, heiress to her mother, the Joan Conyers who married Sir Robert Bowes, Knight Banneret."
    |
    John Conyers (son of Sir Robert Conyers and 1st. wife Joan de Melton) married Margaret St. Quinton, living Oct 1426 d/o Sir Anthony St. Quinton (Vist. of Yorks. 1563-4 70 ft., 74 & ft.). "He was no doubt the 'John Conyers' who, with Sir Robert Conyers (his son) and Sir Thomas Boynton, settled Tanton Manor on William Percy of Castle Leavington in 1397 (VCH Yorks NR 2:307)"
    |
    Christopher Conyers (son of John Conyers and Margaret St. Quinton) Lord of Hornsby 1427, living 1459 (VCH Yorks NR 1:401) m. 1st. Ellen Roleston, d. 6 Aug 1444. Married 2nd. Margaret Wadeley (d/o Robert) (Vist. of Yorks. 1563-4 74 & ft.). "He was doubtless the 'Christopher Conyers' who with John Conyers of Ormsby and Christopher Boynton, was a trustee of Tanton Manor in 1434 (VCH Yorks NR 2:307) and who with those trustees settled Castle Leavington on Sir William Bowes, along with other trustees that year. (VCH Yorks NR 2:360)." Two of his sons were, Sir John Conyers of Hornby d. 1490, Sheriff of Yorkshire who m. Margery, dau. and coheir of Philip, Lord Darcy and Meynell and Robert Conyers, heir of Hornby, married Margaret, dau. and coheir of Rowland Darcy of Hinton, Leicestershire.
    ____________

    "Britannia" by William Camden (1607)

    YORKSHIRE

    62. [The river] Swale driveth on with a long course, not without some lets [obstructions] heere and there in his streame, not farre from Hornby Castle, belonging to the family of Saint Quintin, which afterwards came to the Cogniers [Conyers], and seeth nothing besides fresh pastures, country houses, and villages,

    ________________________

    Name: Christopher Conyers

    Surname: Conyers
    Given Name: Christopher
    Prefix: Sir
    Sex: M
    Birth: 1383 in Hornby Castle, Yorkshire, England
    Death: 1456 in Hornby Castle, Yorkshire, England
    _UID: 53FBD77679A94C4180F1D7DAEB0C31E377CD

    Note:
    He administered the will of his cousin John Conyers of Ormsby in 1438. His will was dated 1426. In it, he asks to be buried in the kirk of Hornby beside his father. He leaves Ellen, his wife one third of his goods. To son Thomas he left lands in Hornby, Brokeholme, North Ottrington and half his lands in Erythorne, Hunton, Hesilton, Little Crakehall and Whitby. Also mentioned were son John and daughter Joan. His mother dame Margaret Conyers was named one of the executors.

    CHRISTOPHER CONYERS, of Hornby; m Ellene, dau and coheir of - Rylestone (d 1443), and had, with a yr s (Sir William, of Marske, Yorks, identified by some historians (others prefer his er bro Sir John) with 'Robin of Redesdale', leader 1469 of an insurrection fomented by the 1st and last Earl of Warwick ('Warwick the Kingmaker') of the March 1449/50 cr (see ABERGAVENNY, M) against EDWARD IV, in particular his favourites and in-laws the Woodvilles, d 1495): Sir JOHN CONYERS 1 2 3

    Change Date: 18 Aug 2009 at 01:00:00
    Father: John Conyers b: 1371 in Hornby Castle, Yorkshire, England
    Mother: Margaret St Quintin b: ABT 1380 in Brandsburton, Yorkshire, England
    Marriage 1 Ellen Rolleston b: ABT 1395 in Rolleston, Staffordshire, England
    Married: BEF 1415
    Children
    John Conyers Sheriff of Yorkshire b: ABT 1414 in Hornby, North Riding, Yorkshire
    Joan Conyers b: 1428 in Hornby Castle, Yorkshire, England
    Roger Conyers b: 1419
    Catherine Conyers b: 1417
    Margaret Conyers b: 1421
    Sibyl Conyers b: 1423
    Richard Conyers of South Cowton b: 1425 in Cowton, Yorkshire
    Thomas Conyers b: 1426
    James Jacob Conyers b: 1429
    Isabel Conyers b: 1430
    Ralph Conyers b: 1432
    Christopher Conyers b: 1435
    Robert Conyers b: 1437
    Elizabeth Conyers b: 1439
    Margery Conyers b: 1440
    George Conyers b: 1442
    Sources:
    Repository:
    Title: Magna Charta Sureties 1215
    Author: Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Ed
    Publication: 1999
    Page: 164
    Title: Visitations of the North c 1480-1500, Publications of the Surtee's Society
    Page: #144:92, 116
    Title: Burke's Peerage and Gentry
    Publication: http://www.burkes-peerage.net/Welcome.aspx
    Page: Yarborough Family Page
    _______________________

    Hornby Castle, Yorkshire (North Riding), was a fourteenth and fifteenth-century courtyard castle, with a late fourteenth-century corner tower known as St Quintin's Tower, after the medieval family which occupied the castle (demolished in 1927) and fifteenth-century work done for William, Lord Conyers.[1]

    Hornby was largely rebuilt in the 1760s by John Carr of York, who was responsible for the surviving south range and the east range (demolished in the 1930s) and outbuildings, for Robert Darcy, 4th Earl of Holderness. The eventual heir was the Duke of Leeds, who assembled there rich early eighteenth-century furniture from several houses, illustrated in the books of Percy Macquoid.

    ___________________________

    Stirnet.com
    'Pudsey1'
    (A) Henry Pudsey o'f Barforth or Berforth'
    m. Margaret Conyers (dau of Christopher (not Sir John) Conyers of Hornby)
    ________________________

    *

    Re: Conyers of Sockburn, Coatham, Ormesby and Hornby
    On Oct 31, 7:35 am, John Watson wrote:
    Hi all,

    Something which has puzzled me and I am sure many other genealogists over the years, how do the families of Conyers of Sockburn, Conyers of Coatham, Conyers of Ormesby and Conyers of Hornby fit together. Here is my suggestion, which is full of holes but at least has the merit of fitting the available facts. The main differences to the perceived pedigrees being the identification of Scolastica de Cotum's husband as Roger Conyers, and the subsequent descent of lands in Coatham, Durham and Northumberland. Any corrections or additions would be gratefully received.

    1. Humphrey Conyers
    --------------------
    Birth: abt. 1215
    Death: bef. 1283 [1]
    Father: Geoffrey (Galfrid) Conyers

    succeeded his brother John as lord of Sockburn, and Girsby[1]

    Spouse: Pernel [1]

    Children: John Conyers (- <1304)
    Sir Roger Conyers (- <1298)

    1.1 John Conyers
    --------------------
    Birth: abt. 1240
    Death: bef. 1304[1]

    proved his right to free warren in Girsby in 1293[1]

    Spouse: Unknown

    Children: John Conyers (c.1270-<1342)
    Roger Conyers (-) >>> Conyers of Sockburn

    1.2 Roger Conyers
    -------------------
    Birth: abt. 1250
    Death: bef. 1298
    Father: Humphrey Conyers
    Mother: Pernel

    Sir Roger de Conyers, knight [2]
    protection for 4 years going to Holy Land, 10 Feb 1271 [2]
    Holding 1 knight's fee in Northumberland [2]
    Distrained to receive knighthood 1278 [2]
    Quittance of eyre, Northumberland 27 Dec 1278 [2]
    Safe conduct for him, sent by King to Rothelan, 28 Apr 1279 [2]
    Protection till Michaelmas 31 Mar 1282 [2]

    He and his wife dead at the date of his father-in-law, Ralph de Cotum's ipm, when Ralph's heirs were his daughter Alice and John Conyers, son of his daughter Scolastica [4]

    Spouse: Scolastica de Cotum
    Death: bef. 14 Sep 1298 (date of writ for father's ipm) [3]
    Father: Sir Ralph de Cotum
    Mother: Christian

    Children: John Conyers (1284-1310)

    1.2.1 John Conyers
    --------------------
    Birth: abt. 1270
    Death: bef. Apr 1310 [5]
    Father: Roger Conyers
    Mother: Scolastica de Cotum

    Of Coatham Conyers, in the parish of Long Newton, Durham, also know as Coatham Stub and Stubhouse [7]

    21 July 1300, had pourparty of the lands late of Ralph de Cotun, his grandfather [6] included manors of Cronkley & Benrig, Northumberland [9]

    John Conyers 'of Stubhouse' made a grant of land in Cronkley (Northumberland) in 1306 [7]

    29 April 1310, Debtor: Thomas de Aynill, of Deighton, Creditor: John de Coyners of Stib Ho (Stubhous), recently deceased [5]

    Spouse: Unknown

    Children: Robert Conyers (c. 1305->1338)

    1.2.1.1 Robert Conyers
    ------------------------
    Birth: abt. 1305
    Death: aft. 1338 [10]
    Father: John Conyers

    de Banco Rolls relating to Northumberland for 1321: Robert, son of John de Conyers of Stubhous, plaintiff, William de Herle, defendant. Manor of Benrigge [8]

    de Banco Rolls for Northumberland for 1338, Robert de Conyers of Hubhouse, plaintiff, William Hunter and others, defendant. Trespass at Crumclyf [Cronkley] for 20s. [10]

    Spouse: Unknown

    Children: Robert Conyers (c.1325->Nov 1390)

    1.2.1.1.1 Robert Conyers
    -------------------------
    Birth: abt. 1325
    Death: bef 18 Nov 1390 (date of ipm) [11]
    Father: Robert Conyers

    Of Coatham Stub and and through first wife, Juliana de Percy, lord of Ormesby in Cleveland, Yorkshire

    ipm for Durham of Robert Coniers taken 18 November 1390. Robert Conyers, aged 34 is his son and next heir. He had been enfeoffed of his manor jointly with Alina his wife, to hold to them and their heirs of Robert and his first wife Juliana. He held the manor of Cotom next Longnewton of Thomas, son and heir of Alexander Surtees [11]

    Spouse 1: Juliana de Percy (c.1330-1370) [12]
    Father: John de Percy of Ormesby (->1325)

    Children: Sir Robert Conyers (c.1356-1432)
    John Conyers(c.1360-1412)
    William Conyers ( -<1412)
    Margaret Conyers ( -1408)

    Spouse 2: Aline de la Legh (c.1340-1408)
    Widow of William de Dalden (d. 1369) [13]

    Children: Joan Conyers (c.1380-1438)

    Note: Robert Conyers of Coatham Stub, Durham did not marry Joan, niece of William de Melton, as suggested by N. Harris Nicholas. Robert Conyers who married Joan was of Norton Conyers, Yorkshire - see Feet of Fines for the county of York, 1327 to 1347, Yorkshire Archaeological Society Record Series, vol. 42; 1910, p. 52

    1.2.1.1.1.1 Robert Conyers
    ---------------------------
    Birth: abt. 1356 [11]
    Death: bef. 18 Jul 1432 [15]
    Father: Robert Conyers
    Mother: Juliana de Percy

    Sir Robert Conyers of Ormesby

    de Banco Rolls for 1369 for Northumberland. Robert Conyers, chivaler, executor of Goscelin Surtays, plaintiff. Robert Conyers de Stubhouse and Elizabeth his wife, defendants [14]

    Robert Conyers, knight, brother of John Conyers of Horneby, mentioned in a royal pardon, dated 22 Apr 1423 [16]

    John Conyers of Ormesby administered to his father Sir Robert Conyers's effects on 18 Jul 1432 [15]

    Spouse: Elizabeth

    Children: John Conyers (c.1385-1438)

    1.2.1.1.1.2 John Conyers
    -------------------------
    Birth: abt.1360
    Death: bef. Jul 1412 [18]
    Father: Robert Conyers
    Mother: Juliana de Percy

    John Conyers of Hornby

    17 Aug 1403, Robert and John Conyers, brothers, were appointed custodians of the castle of Skelton, the manors of Skelton and Marske, and all the other lands of Thomas Faucomberge knight in cos. York and Northumberland [17]

    dead before 24 April 1412, when Richard de Norton and Laurence de Middleton, vicar of the church of Grimston granted to Richard son of John Conyers of Hornby, deceased, the manor of Solberge (Solbergh Super Wysk') [18]

    Spouse: Margaret St. Quintin
    Birth: abt. 1385
    Death: aft. May 1435
    Father: Anthony St. Quintin
    Mother: Elizabeth Gascoigne?

    Children: Christopher Conyers (c.1400-1460)
    Richard Conyers [18]
    Thomas Conyers [18]

    Regards,

    John

    References:
    1. 'Parishes: Sockburn', A History of the County of York North Riding:Volume 1 (1914), pp. 449-454
    2. Harleian Society, Vol 80, Knights of Edward I , Vol I (London:1929) p 234
    3. Calendar of Fine Rolls, Vol 1, p 403
    4. Calendar of Fine Rolls, Vol 1, p 424
    5. Chancery: Certificates of Statute Merchant and Statute Staple, C241/68/74
    6. Calendar of Fine Rolls, Vol 1, p 432
    7. 'Parishes: Long Newton', A History of the County of Durham: Volume3 (1928), pp. 299-304
    8. Archaeologica Aeliana, Third Series, Vol 6 (Newcastle: 1910) p 45
    9. John Hodgson, A History of Northumberland, Vol V (Vol 3, Part 1) (London: 1820) p 53 & 104
    10. Archaeologica Aeliana, Third Series, Vol 6 (Newcastle: 1910) p 48
    11. 45th Annual Report of the Deputy Keeper of the Public Records(London: 1885) p 175
    12. 'Parishes: Ormesby', A History of the County of York North Riding:Volume 2 (1923), pp. 276-283
    13. 45th Annual Report of the Deputy Keeper of the Public Records(London: 1885) p 183
    14. Archaeologica Aeliana, Third Series, Vol 7 (Newcastle: 1910) p 59
    15. Surtees Society, Vol 30, Testamenta Eboracensia, Part II (Durham:1855) p 64n
    16. Calendar of Patent Rolls, Henry 6, Vol 1, p 28
    17. Complete Peerage, Vol 5, p 277
    18. Lincolnshire Archives, Yarborough [YARB 16/1/1]

    Hi all,

    I spotted a small error in my previous post.

    John Conyers, son of Sir Roger Conyers must have been born before
    1279, since the king gave him his share of Ralph de Cotum's lands âin
    1300 when he must have been 21 or more.

    Regards,

    Children:
    1. 10. Richard Conyers, Knight was born 1425-1444, South Cowton, Yorkshire, England; died >1485, (South Cowton, Yorkshire, England).

  7. 24.  Roger Aske, Esquire was born ~1430, Aske, Yorkshire, England (son of Conan Aske and Alice Savile); died 1 Feb 1505.

    Roger — unnamed spouse. unnamed was born (Yorkshire, England). [Group Sheet]


  8. 25.  unnamed spouse was born (Yorkshire, England).
    Children:
    1. 12. William Aske was born 1455, Aske, Yorkshire, England; died 24 Aug 1512.


Generation: 6

  1. 34.  Ralph de Greystoke, 3rd Baron GreystokeRalph de Greystoke, 3rd Baron Greystoke was born 18 Oct 1353, Ravensworth Castle, Yorkshire, England; was christened 18 Oct 1353, Kirkby Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England (son of William de Greystoke, 2nd Baron Greystoke and Joane FitzHugh); died 6 Apr 1418, Kirkby Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England.

    Notes:

    Ralph de Greystoke, 3rd Baron Greystoke, (18 October 1353 – 6 April 1418) was an English peer and landowner.

    Life

    Greystoke was the son of William de Greystoke, 2nd Baron Greystoke, and Joane, daughter of Lord Fitzhugh, his second wife.[3][1] He was born on 18 October 1353 at Ravensworth Castle, North Yorkshire, the home of his maternal uncle Henry.[1] As he was still a child when his father died, his estates were placed under the guardianship of Roger de Clifford, 5th Baron de Clifford.[4]

    He was summoned to Parliament between 28 November 1375 and 5 October 1417,[5] and, in the 1370s and 1380s, served as a warden of the Scottish Marches.[1]

    In 1384, he led an English force that was defeated by the Scots, under the command of George I, Earl of March, while they were travelling to Roxburgh.[2] Greystoke was captured and taken to Dunbar Castle, where he was provided with a meal in the great hall, served upon his own dining-ware, which had been seized from his baggage train along with hangings that now decorated the walls of the great hall.[2] Greystoke's ransom was 3,000 marks,[5] and his younger brother William was his hostage in the exchange.[6] While at Dunbar, William took ill with fever and died.[6] William was buried at the castle, but two years later his remains were moved to Newminster Abbey in Northumberland, where his grandfather Ralph de Greystoke, 1st Baron Greystoke, was buried.[6] Greystoke returned to fight the Scots in 1402 at the Battle of Humbleton Hill in Northumberland.[7]

    In the 1390s, "disillusioned" with the reign of Richard II, Greystoke backed the return of the exiled Henry of Bolingbroke, son of John of Gaunt and grandson of Edward III.[1] Greystoke brought his own men to join those of the exile at Doncaster in 1399 and, after Richard II was deposed, with other northern English lords he remained loyal to Bolingbroke, who succeeded to the crown as Henry IV.[8]

    Personal

    Greystoke married Katherine, the daughter of his former guardian Roger de Clifford, 5th Baron de Clifford.[4] They had two children: John, his heir,[1] and Maude, who married Eudo de Welles, son of John de Welles, 5th Baron Welles.[6]

    Greystoke died on 6 April 1418.[1] At inquisitions following his death, his estate was assessed to include messuages, or "dwelling-houses", and land holdings in Westmorland, Northumberland, and Yorkshire, as well as the manors and castles of Greystoke and Morpeth.[9]

    References

    ^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h Dockray, Keith (2004). "Greystoke family (per. 1321–1487)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/54524. Retrieved 19 December 2013.
    ^ Jump up to: a b c David R. Perry; Mark A. S. Blackburn (2000). Castle Park, Dunbar: Two Thousand Years on a Fortified Headland. Society Antiquaries Scotland. p. 12. ISBN 978-0-903903-16-5.
    Jump up ^ John Burke (1831). A general and heraldic dictionary of the peerages of England, Ireland, and Scotland, extinct, dormant, and in abeyance. England. p. 244.
    ^ Jump up to: a b Summerson, Henry (2004). "Clifford, Roger, fifth Baron Clifford (1333–1389)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/5660. Retrieved 19 December 2013.
    ^ Jump up to: a b John Burke (1831). A general and heraldic dictionary of the peerages of England, Ireland, and Scotland, extinct, dormant, and in abeyance. England. p. 245.
    ^ Jump up to: a b c d Samuel Jefferson (1840). The history and antiquities of Leath Ward: in the county of Cumberland: with biographical notices and memoirs. S. Jefferson. pp. 342–343.
    Jump up ^ Wm. E. Baumgaertner (January 2010). Squires, Knights, Barons, Kings: War and Politics in Fifteenth Century England. Trafford Publishing. p. 25. ISBN 978-1-4269-0769-2.
    Jump up ^ Gwilym Dodd; Douglas Biggs (1 January 2003). Henry IV: The Establishment of the Regime, 1399–1406. Boydell & Brewer Ltd. p. 130. ISBN 978-1-903153-12-3.
    Jump up ^ Great Britain. Public Record Office (2002). Calendar of Inquisitions Post Mortem and Other Analogous Documents Preserved in the Public Record Office: Henry V. Boydell & Brewer Ltd. pp. 28–31. ISBN 978-0-85115-899-0.

    endo of biography

    Baron Ralph de Greystoke (1353-1418) is the 21st great-grandfather of the grand-children of Ma Byars (1894-1985)

    Baron Ralph de Greystoke (1353-1418) is the 12th great-grandson of William the Conqueror (1024-1087) ... http://www.ourfamilyhistories.org/ahnentafel.php?personID=I14874&tree=00&parentset=0&generations=12

    History and development of Brougham Castle... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brougham_Castle

    Do you remember the 1984 Bristish film, "Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan, Lord of the Apes"... go to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greystoke:_The_Legend_of_Tarzan,_Lord_of_the_Apes

    General Notes:

    on and heir, by 2nd wife, born and baptized at Kirkby Ravensworth, co. York, 18 October 1353. He was appointed Warden of the West Marches, 12 February 1373 /4. The King took his homage and fealty and he had livery of his father's lands, 19 May 1374, and of those which Alice, his grandmother, had held in dower, 20 May 1375. He was summoned, for Military Service, 13 June 1385, and to Parliament from 28 December 1375 to 5 October 1417, by writs directed Radulpho haroni de Graystok'. He was appointed Warden of the West Marches, 16 July 1376; Constable of the castle of Lochmaben, and Justice, Steward, and Keeper of the lordship of Annandale, for three years, 1 December 1376; Warden of the West Marches, 16 July 1377; Warden of the East and West Marches, 12 December 1377; Warden of the West Marches, 4 June and 4 November 1379; Warden of the East Marches, 10 March 1379/80, 29 May 1380, and 16 June 1382; and of the West Marches, 27 March 1386. He was taken prisoner by George, Earl of Dunbar [SCT], in a skirmish at Horseridge in Glendale ward, Northumberland, 25 June 1380. He was one of the Lords who gave his assent in Parliament, 23 October 1399, to the secret imprisonment of Richard II. On 8 November 1403 the King took his homage and fealty and he had livery of the lands which Joan, his mother, had held in dower. He married Katherine, daughter of Roger (DE CLIFFORD), LORD CLIFFORD, by Maud, daughter of Thomas (DE BEAUCHAMP), EARL OF WARWICK. She died 23 April 1413. He died 6 April 1418, aged 64. [Complete Peerage VI:195-6, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)] ... http://www.celtic-casimir.com/webtree/18/53249.htm

    Ancestral File Number: 8J5R-02.

    end of profile

    Birth:
    Image, map & history ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ravensworth_Castle_(North_Yorkshire)

    Ralph married Catherine Clifford, Baroness of Ravensworth 0___ 1377, Brougham Castle, Westmorland, England. Catherine (daughter of Roger de Clifford, Knight, 5th Baron de Clifford and Maud Beauchamp) was born ~1367, Brougham Castle, Westmorland, England; was christened Ravensworth, Kirby, North Riding, Yorkshire, England; died 23 Apr 1413, (North Riding, Yorkshire) England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 35.  Catherine Clifford, Baroness of Ravensworth was born ~1367, Brougham Castle, Westmorland, England; was christened Ravensworth, Kirby, North Riding, Yorkshire, England (daughter of Roger de Clifford, Knight, 5th Baron de Clifford and Maud Beauchamp); died 23 Apr 1413, (North Riding, Yorkshire) England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Katherine de Clifford

    Children:
    1. John de Greystoke, 4th Baron of Greystock was born 0___ 1389, Penrith, Cumbria, England; died 8 Aug 1436, Northamptonshire, England; was buried Collegiate Church, Greystoke, Penrith, England.
    2. Maud Greystoke was born ~1390, Greystoke, Cumbria, England; died ~1416, Welles Lincolnshire, England.
    3. 17. Joan Greystoke was born ~1394, Cumbria, England; died ~1415, Durham, England.
    4. Ralph de Greystoke, 5th Baron Greystoke was born 9 Sep 1406, Greystoke Manor, Penrith, England; died 1 Jun 1487, Kirkham, Yorkshire, England; was buried Monastery, Kirkham, Northumberland, England.

  3. 36.  Henry FitzHugh, IV, Knight, 3rd Baron FitzHughHenry FitzHugh, IV, Knight, 3rd Baron FitzHugh was born 1359-1363, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England (son of Henry FitzHugh, KG, 2nd Baron FitzHugh of Ravensworth and Joan Scrope); died 14 Jan 1425, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England; was buried Jervaulx Abbey, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Chamberlain of the Household for King Henry VI, 1413-1425
    • Occupation: Diplomat, 1420
    • Occupation: Member of Parliament, 1388
    • Occupation: Treasurer of England, 1416-1421
    • Residence: Vadstena Abbey, Vadstena, Sweden
    • Also Known As: Henry Scrope
    • Military: Battle of Agincourt (October 25, 1415)
    • Military: Battle of Homildon Hill, Wooler, Northumberland, England

    Notes:

    Henry FitzHugh, 3rd Baron FitzHugh KG (c.?1363 - 11 January 1425) was an English administrator and diplomat who served under Henry IV and Henry V.

    Royal service

    Summoned to parliament in 1388, FitzHugh became active in public affairs following Henry IV's succession. He was engaged in Anglo-Scottish diplomacy, taking part in the Battle of Humbleton Hill in 1402 and negotiating the surrender of his uncle, Archbishop of York Richard le Scrope, in 1405. The next year he travelled to Denmark as part of the escort of Philippa, Henry's daughter, for her marriage to Eric of Pomerania, king of Denmark, Norway and Sweden.[1]

    At the coronation of Henry V in 1413, FitzHugh was Constable.[2] During Henry's reign, he served as Chamberlain of the Household (1413–1425, into the reign of Henry VI), and Treasurer of England (1416–1421). He participated in the Battle of Agincourt in 1415 and subsequent diplomacy with the French, which led to the Treaty of Troyes in 1420. He travelled with the king to France, and he escorted the king's remains back to England following his death in 1422. He was an executor of Henry's will and was a feoffee of lands in the will.[1]

    He became a Knight of the Garter about 1409.[3]

    After his death on 11 January 1425, FitzHugh was buried at Jervaulx Abbey in Yorkshire at his request.[1]

    Religion

    During his travels to the Scandinavian Peninsula in 1406, he visited the Bridgettine Vadstena Abbey in Sweden, where he volunteered to help establish a Bridgettine community in England, including the promise of a manor at Cherry Hinton in Cambridgeshire. An English order was established in 1415 at Twickenham with the assistance of Henry V.[1][4] He also attended the Council of Constance in 1415.[1]

    Family

    A descendant of Akarius Fitz Bardolph,[2] FitzHugh was the first son of Hugh FitzHugh, 2nd Baron FitzHugh, and Joan, daughter of Henry Scrope, 1st Baron Scrope of Masham. He married Elizabeth Grey (born c. 1363), daughter of Sir Robert de Grey and his wife, Lora St Quentin. Robert was a son of John de Grey, 1st Baron Grey de Rotherfield and Avice Marmion (a descendant of John, King of England).[5] They had eight sons and six daughters, including:[5]

    William FitzHugh, 4th Baron FitzHugh, married to Margery Willoughby, daughter of William Willoughby, 5th Baron Willoughby de Eresby.[5] They were parents to Henry FitzHugh, 5th Baron FitzHugh who became a brother-in-law to "Warwick, the Kingmaker" by his marriage to Lady Alice Neville; they were great-grandparents to queen consort Catherine Parr.[5]

    Hon. Robert FitzHugh, Bishop of London[5]

    Eleanor FitzHugh, who married firstly to Philip Darcy, 6th Lord Darcy of Knayth; they were parents to Elizabeth Darcy, wife of Sir James Strangeways. Eleanor married secondly to Thomas Tunstall and thirdly to Henry Bromflete, 1st Baron Vesci.[5][6]

    Elizabeth FitzHugh, married firstly on 10 December 1427 to Sir Ralph Gray of Chillingham (d.17 March 1442/3) and secondly, in 1445, Sir Edmund Montfort.[5] Her only issue was by her first husband.[5] Elizabeth was a lady-in-waiting to queen consort Margaret of Anjou.[5]

    Maud FitzHugh, wife of Sir William Eure of Witton.[5]

    References

    ^ Jump up to: a b c d e Reeves, A. C. (January 2008). "Fitzhugh, Henry, third Baron Fitzhugh (1363?–1425)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/50151. Retrieved 5 June 2011. (subscription or UK public library membership required)
    ^ Jump up to: a b Burke, John (1831). A general and heraldic dictionary of the peerages of England, Ireland, and Scotland, extinct, dormant, and in abeyance. London: Henry Colburn and Richard Bentley. p. 202. Retrieved 30 May 2011.
    Jump up ^ "Knights of the Garter". leighrayment.com. 30 April 2011. Retrieved 5 June 2011.
    Jump up ^ "History of the Bridgettine Order in the UK". Bridgettine Order in the UK. Retrieved 5 June 2011.
    ^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h i j editor, Douglas Richardson ; Kimball G. Everingham,. Plantagenet ancestry : a study in colonial and medieval families (2nd ed.). Salt Lake City, UT.: Douglas Richardson. p. 83. ISBN 9781449966348.
    Jump up ^ Richardson, Douglas (2011). Magna Carta ancestry : a study in colonial and medieval families, Vol II (2nd ed.). Salt Lake City, UT.: Douglas Richardson. p. 27. ISBN 9781449966386.

    Occupation:
    The Lord Chamberlain or Lord Chamberlain of the Household is the senior officer of the Royal Household of the United Kingdom, overseeing the departments which support and provide advice to the Sovereign of the United Kingdom.

    The Lord Chamberlain is always sworn of the Privy Council, is usually a peer and before 1782 the post was of Cabinet rank. Until 1924 the position was a political one. The office dates from the Middle Ages, when the King's Chamberlain often acted as the King's spokesman in Council and Parliament.[1]

    Occupation:
    The post of Lord High Treasurer or Lord Treasurer was an English government position and has been a British government position since the Acts of Union of 1707. A holder of the post would be the third highest ranked Great Officer of State, below the Lord High Chancellor and above the Lord President of the Council.

    Occupation:
    led to the Treaty of Troyes in 1420...

    The Treaty of Troyes was an agreement that King Henry V of England and his heirs would inherit the throne of France upon the death of King Charles VI of France. It was signed in the French city of Troyes on 21 May 1420 in the aftermath of Henry's successful military campaign in France. It forms a part of the backdrop of the latter phase of the Hundred Years' War finally won by the French at the Battle of Castillon in 1453, and in which various English kings tried to establish their claims to the French throne.

    Residence:
    The Abbey of Our Lady and of St. Bridget (Latin: Monasterium sanctarum Mariµ Virgáinis et Brigidµ in Vatzstena), more commonly referred to as Vadstena Abbey, situated on Lake Vèattern, in the Diocese of Linkèoping, Sweden, was the motherhouse of the Bridgettine Order. The abbey started on one of the farms donated to it by the king, but the town of Vadstena grew up around it. It was active from 1346 until 1595.

    Military:
    The Battle of Agincourt (Azincourt in French) was a major English victory in the Hundred Years' War.[a] The battle took place on Friday, 25 October 1415 (Saint Crispin's Day), near Azincourt, in northern France.[5][b] Henry V's victory at Agincourt, against a numerically superior French army, crippled France and started a new period in the war during which Henry V married the French king's daughter, and their son, later Henry VI of England and Henry II of France, was made heir to the throne of France as well as of England. English speakers found it easier to pronounce "Agincourt" with a "g" instead of the original "z". For all historians in the non-English speaking world, the battle is referred to with the toponymy of Azincourt, whereas English-only speaking historians kept the modified spelling of Agincourt.

    Henry V led his troops into battle and participated in hand-to-hand fighting. The French king of the time, Charles VI, did not command the French army himself as he suffered from severe psychotic illnesses with moderate mental incapacitation. Instead, the French were commanded by Constable Charles d'Albret and various prominent French noblemen of the Armagnac party.

    This battle is notable for the use of the English longbow in very large numbers, with English and Welsh archers forming most of Henry's army. The battle is the centrepiece of the play Henry V by William Shakespeare.

    more ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Agincourt

    Military:
    The Battle of Homildon Hill was a conflict between English and Scottish armies on 14 September 1402 in Northumberland, England. The battle was recounted in Shakespeare’s Henry IV, part 1. Although Humbleton Hill is the modern name of the site, over the centuries it has been variously named Homildon, Hameldun, Holmedon, and Homilheugh.

    more ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Homildon_Hill

    Henry married Elizabeth Grey ~ 1380, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England. Elizabeth (daughter of Robert de Grey and Lora St. Quintin) was born ~ 1363, Wilcote, Oxfordshire, England; died 12 Dec 1427, (Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England); was buried Jervaulx Abbey, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 37.  Elizabeth Grey was born ~ 1363, Wilcote, Oxfordshire, England (daughter of Robert de Grey and Lora St. Quintin); died 12 Dec 1427, (Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England); was buried Jervaulx Abbey, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Will: 24 Sep 1427
    • Probate: 29 Dec 1427

    Notes:

    Elizabeth Grey1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17
    F, #12937, b. between 1363 and 1366, d. 12 December 1427
    Father Sir Robert de Grey2,3,4,5,6,7,18,9,10,19,12,13,14,15,16,20 d. 19 Aug 1367
    Mother Lora de St. Quentin2,6,18,19,15,20 b. c 1342, d. 1369
    Elizabeth Grey was born between 1363 and 1366 at of Wilcote, Oxfordshire, England; Age 21 or 24 in 1387.2,6,15 She married Sir Henry FitzHugh, 3rd Lord FitzHugh, Lord High Treasurer, Chamberlain to King Henry V, son of Henry FitzHugh, 2nd Lord FitzHugh and Joan le Scrope, before 1391; They had 8 sons (Henry; John; Sir William, 4th Lord FitzHugh; Sir Geoffrey; Robert, Bishop of London; Ralph; Herbert; & Richard) & 6 daughters (Elizabeth; Joan, wife of Sir Robert, 6th Lord Willoughby; Eleanor, wife of Sir Philip, 6th Lord Darcy of Knaith, of Sir Thomas Tunstall, & of Sir Henry Bromflete, Lord Vescy; Maud, wife of Sir William Eure; Elizabeth, wife of Sir Ralph Gray, & of Sir Edmund Montfort; & Lora, wife of Sir Maurice Berkeley).2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17 Elizabeth Grey left a will on 24 September 1427.6,15 She wrote a codicil on 10 December 1427.6,15 She died on 12 December 1427; Buried at Jervaulx Abbey, Yorkshire.2,6,15 Her estate was probated on 29 December 1427.15
    Family
    Sir Henry FitzHugh, 3rd Lord FitzHugh, Lord High Treasurer, Chamberlain to King Henry V b. c 1358, d. 11 Jan 1425

    Children

    Matilda (Maud) FitzHugh+21,22,4,6,13,15 d. 17 Mar 1467
    Henry FitzHugh23
    John FitzHugh23
    Ralph FitzHugh23
    Herbert FitzHugh23
    Richard FitzHugh23
    Joan FitzHugh23
    Lora FitzHugh+23,24,22,5,6,14,15 d. a 12 Mar 1461
    Robert FitzHugh, Bishop of London23 d. 15 Jan 1436
    Eleanor FitzHugh+25,26,22,27,3,6,9,28,10,29,12,15,30 b. c 1391, d. 30 Sep 1457
    Sir William FitzHugh, 4th Lord FitzHugh+6,15 b. c 1399, d. 22 Oct 1452
    Geoffrey FitzHugh+ b. c 1405
    Elizabeth FitzHugh+23,22,31,6,7,15,16 b. c 1410, d. a 1453

    Citations

    [S3657] Unknown author, The Complete Peerage, by Cokayne, Vol. V, p. 422-425; Lineage and Ancestry of HRH Prince Charles by Paget, Vol. II, p. 405.
    [S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 324.
    [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. II, p. 27-28.
    [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. II, p. 126.
    [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. II, p. 172-173.
    [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. II, p. 198-199.
    [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. II, p. 258.
    [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. III, p. 272.
    [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. IV, p. 97-98.
    [S6] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: 2nd Edition, Vol. I, p. 407-408.
    [S6] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: 2nd Edition, Vol. II, p. 83-84.
    [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. II, p. 391.
    [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. II, p. 526.
    [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. II, p. 591.
    [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. II, p. 630-631.
    [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. III, p. 109-110.
    [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. IV, p. 275.
    [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. III, p. 271-272.
    [S6] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: 2nd Edition, Vol. II, p. 83.
    [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. IV, p. 274-275.
    [S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 295-296.
    [S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 325.
    [S11568] The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain, and the United Kingdom, by George Edward Cokayne, Vol. V, p. 434, chart.
    [S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 312.
    [S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 158-159.
    [S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 256.
    [S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 731.
    [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. IV, p. 237.
    [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. I, p. 571-572.
    [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. V, p. 217.
    [S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 354-355.

    Children:
    1. Eleanor Fitzhugh was born ~ 1391; died 30 Sep 1457, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England.
    2. 18. William Fitzhugh, 4th Baron FitzHugh was born ~ 1399, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England; died 22 Oct 1452, (Ravensworth) Yorkshire, England.
    3. Lora Fitzhugh was born ~ 1400, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England.

  5. 38.  William Willoughby, 4th Baron Willoughby de EresbyWilliam Willoughby, 4th Baron Willoughby de Eresby was born 1370-1375, Eresby, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England (son of Robert Willoughby, 4th Baron Willoughby de Eresby and Margery la Zouche, Baroness of Willoughby); died 4 Dec 1409, Edgefield, Linconshire, England; was buried St. James Church, Willoughby Chapel, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Ordained: 0Jan 1400

    Notes:

    William Willoughby, 5th Baron Willoughby de Eresby KG (c.1370 - 4 December 1409) was an English baron.

    Origins

    William Willoughby was the son of Robert Willoughby, 4th Baron Willoughby de Eresby, by his first wife,[1] Margery la Zouche, the daughter of William la Zouche, 2nd Baron Zouche of Harringworth, by Elizabeth de Roos, daughter of William de Roos, 2nd Baron de Roos of Hemsley, and Margery de Badlesmere (130-–1363), eldest sister and co-heir of Giles de Badlesmere, 2nd Baron Badlesmere. He had four brothers: Robert, Sir Thomas (died c. 20 August 1417), John and Brian.[2]

    After the death of Margery la Zouche, his father the 4th Baron married, before 9 October 1381, Elizabeth le Latimer (d. 5 November 1395), suo jure 5th Baroness Latimer, daughter of William Latimer, 4th Baron Latimer, and widow of John Neville, 3rd Baron Neville de Raby, by whom the 4th Baron had a daughter, Margaret Willoughby, who died unmarried. By her first marriage Elizabeth Latimer had a son, John Neville, 6th Baron Latimer (c.1382 – 10 December 1430), and a daughter, Elizabeth Neville, who married her step-brother, Sir Thomas Willoughby (died c. 20 August 1417).[3]

    Career

    The 4th Baron died on 9 August 1396, and Willoughby inherited the title as 5th Baron, and was given seisin of his lands on 27 September.[4]

    Hicks notes that the Willoughby family had a tradition of military service, but that the 5th Baron 'lived during an intermission in foreign war and served principally against the Welsh and northern rebels of Henry IV'.[5] Willoughby joined Bolingbroke, the future King Henry IV, soon after his landing at Ravenspur, was present at the abdication of Richard II in the Tower on 29 September 1399, and was one of the peers who consented to King Richard's imprisonment. In the following year he is said to taken part in Henry IV's expedition to Scotland.[6]

    In 1401 he was admitted to the Order of the Garter, and on 13 October 1402 was among those appointed to negotiate with the Welsh rebel, Owain Glyndwr. When Henry IV's former allies, the Percys, rebelled in 1403, Willoughby remained loyal to the King, and in July of that year was granted lands that had been in the custody of Henry Percy (Hotspur), who was killed at the Battle of Shrewsbury on 21 July 1403. Willoughby was appointed to the King's council in March 1404. On 21 February 1404 he was among the commissioners appointed to expel aliens from England.[7]

    In 1405 Hotspur's father, Henry Percy, 1st Earl of Northumberland, again took up arms against the King, joined by Lord Bardolf, and on 27 May Archbishop Scrope, perhaps in conjunction with Northumberland's rebellion, assembled a force of some 8000 men on Shipton Moor. Scrope was tricked into disbanding his army on 29 May, and he and his allies were arrested. Henry IV denied them trial by their peers, and Willoughby was among the commissioners[8] who sat in judgment on Scrope in his own hall at his manor of Bishopthorpe, some three miles south of York. The Chief Justice, Sir William Gascoigne, refused to participate in such irregular proceedings and to pronounce judgment on a prelate, and it was thus left to the lawyer Sir William Fulthorpe to condemn Scrope to death for treason. Scrope was beheaded under the walls of York before a great crowd on 8 June 1405, 'the first English prelate to suffer judicial execution'.[9] On 12 July 1405 Willoughby was granted lands forfeited by the rebel Earl of Northumberland.[10]

    In 1406 Willoughby was again appointed to the Council. On 7 June and 22 December of that year he was among the lords who sealed the settlement of the crown.[11]

    Marriages and issue

    Willoughby married twice:

    Firstly, soon after 3 January 1383, Lucy le Strange, daughter of Roger le Strange, 5th Baron Strange of Knockin, by Aline, daughter of Edmund FitzAlan, 9th Earl of Arundel, by whom he had two sons and three daughters:[12]

    Robert Willoughby, 6th Baron Willoughby de Eresby, who married firstly, Elizabeth Montagu, and secondly, Maud Stanhope.

    Sir Thomas Willoughby, who married Joan Arundel, daughter and co-heiress of Sir Richard Arundel by his wife, Alice. Their descendants, who include Catherine Willoughby, Duchess of Suffolk, inherited the Barony. Catherine became the 12th Baroness and the title descended through her children by her second husband, Richard Bertie.

    Elizabeth Willoughby, who married Henry Beaumont, 5th Baron Beaumont (d.1413).

    Margery Willoughby, who married William FitzHugh, 4th Baron FitzHugh. Their son, the 5th Baron, would marry Lady Alice Neville, sister of Warwick, the Kingmaker. Alice was a grandniece of Willoughby's second wife, Lady Joan Holland. The 5th Baron and his wife Alice were great-grandparents to queen consort Catherine Parr.

    Margaret Willoughby, who married Sir Thomas Skipwith.

    Secondly to Lady Joan Holland (d. 12 April 1434), widow of Edmund of Langley, 1st Duke of York, and daughter of Thomas Holland, 2nd Earl of Kent, by Lady Alice FitzAlan, daughter of Richard FitzAlan, 10th Earl of Arundel, by whom he had no issue.[13] After Willoughby's death his widow married thirdly Henry Scrope, 3rd Baron Scrope of Masham, who was beheaded on 5 August 1415 after the discovery of the Southampton Plot on the eve of King Henry V's invasion of France. She married fourthly, Henry Bromflete, Lord Vescy (d. 16 January 1469).[14]

    Death & burial

    Church of St. James, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, burial place of William Willoughby, 5th Baron
    Willoughby died at Edgefield, Norfolk on 4 December 1409 and was buried in the Church of St James in Spilsby, Lincolnshire, with his first wife.[15] A chapel in the church at Spilsby still contains the monuments and brasses of several early members of the Willoughby family, including the 5th Baron and his first wife.[16]

    Sources

    Cokayne, George Edward (1936). The Complete Peerage, edited by H.A Doubleday and Lord Howard de Walden IX. London: St. Catherine Press.
    Cokayne, G.E. (1959). The Complete Peerage, edited by Geoffrey H. White. XII (Part II). London: St. Catherine Press.
    Harriss, G.L. (2004). Willoughby, Robert (III), sixth Baron Willoughby (1385–1452). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Retrieved 5 December 2012. (subscription required)
    Hicks, Michael (2004). Willoughby family (per. c.1300–1523). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Retrieved 6 December 2012. (subscription required)
    Holmes, George (2004). Latimer, William, fourth Baron Latimer (1330–1381). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Retrieved 6 December 2012. (subscription required)
    McNiven, Peter (2004). Scrope, Richard (c.1350–1405). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Retrieved 7 December 2012. (subscription required)
    Richardson, Douglas (2011). Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, ed. Kimball G. Everingham I (2nd ed.). Salt Lake City. ISBN 1449966373
    Richardson, Douglas (2011). Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, ed. Kimball G. Everingham III (2nd ed.). Salt Lake City. ISBN 144996639X
    Richardson, Douglas (2011). Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, ed. Kimball G. Everingham IV (2nd ed.). Salt Lake City. ISBN 1460992709

    References

    Jump up ^ Cokayne and Hicks state that Margery was the 4th Baron's second wife; however Richardson states that recent research establishes that Margery was his first wife.
    Jump up ^ Cokayne 1959, pp. 661–2; Richardson III 2011, pp. 450–2; Richardson IV 2011, pp. 332–3, 422–5; Hicks 2004.
    Jump up ^ Cokayne 1936, p. 503; Cokayne 1959, pp. 661–2; Richardson I 2011, p. 333; Richardson III 2011, pp. 242–6; Richardson IV 2011, pp. 332–3; Holmes 2004.

    *

    Biography of Sir William... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Willoughby,_5th_Baron_Willoughby_de_Eresby

    The Most Noble Order of the Garter... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Order_of_the_Garter

    A listing of the "Knights of the Garter"... http://www.tudorplace.com.ar/Documents/Knights%20of%20the%20Garter.htm

    A panorama of St. James Church... http://www.panoramio.com/photo/53324562

    Willoughby Chapel in St. James Church... http://homepage.ntlworld.com/peter.fairweather/docs/spilsby.htm

    19th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Jesse D Hennessee (1880-1952)

    *

    Birth:
    Map & history of Spilsby... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spilsby

    Ordained:
    as a "Knight of the Garter"...

    Buried:
    William the fifth Lord ( Died 1410 ) and his wife are portrayed as 3’ 10" brasses and each has a canopy engraved

    William married Lucy le Strange Aft 3 Jan 1383, Dudley, Worcester, England. Lucy (daughter of Roger le Strange, 5th Baron Strange of Knockin and Aline FitzAlan) was born ~ 1365, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England; died 28 Apr 1398, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England; was buried St. James Church, Willoughby Chapel, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  6. 39.  Lucy le Strange was born ~ 1365, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England (daughter of Roger le Strange, 5th Baron Strange of Knockin and Aline FitzAlan); died 28 Apr 1398, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England; was buried St. James Church, Willoughby Chapel, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alt Birth: Abt 1367, Knockyn, Shropshire, England
    • Alt Death: 28 Apr 1405, Lincolnshire, England

    Notes:

    Baroness Lucy's 5-generation pedigree... http://www.ourfamilyhistories.org/ahnentafel.php?personID=I20302&tree=00&parentset=0&generations=5

    Notes

    Some details of Lucy Strange were provided by Adrian Hill in hisHill-Dickson-Lamotte genealogy.

    Lucy Le Strange
    ?Birth about 1367 - Knockyn, Shropshire, England
    ?Died 28 April 1398 - Eresby, Lincolnshire, England; age at death:possibly 31 years old

    Parents

    ?Roger Strange Jr. ca 1327-1381
    ?Aline FitzAlan ca 1309-1385

    Spouse

    ?Married to William Willoughby ca 1370-1410
    (Parents: Robert Willoughby 1349-1396 & Alice Skipwith ca 1355-ca1412)

    Children

    ?Robert Willoughby 1385-1452
    ?Thomas Willoughby 1387-1432
    ?Elizabeth Willoughby 1388-1428
    ?Margaret Willoughby 1388
    ?Marjory Willoughby 1397-1452
    -- Alan Hill,http://gw0.geneanet.org/index.php3?b=aahill&lang=en;p=lucy;n=le+strange

    Sources

    1. GeneaNet
    Alan Hill,
    2. Angel Streur, GeneaNet genealogy
    http://gw.geneanet.org/index.php3?b=dragonladys&lang=en&n=N&v=Le%20Str
    3. Le Strange Website
    Descent, http://www.ls.u-net.com/le_Strange/Seat-H2.htm

    *

    Birth: 1367
    Shropshire, England
    Death: Apr. 28, 1405
    Lincolnshire, England

    Daughter of Roger Le Strange and Aline (Fitzalan) Le Strange,( the daughter of Edmund Fitzalan (Earl of Arundel). Married Lord William Willoughby Apr. 23, 1383. Mother of Margaret Willoughby (Skipwith).


    Family links:
    Spouse:
    William 5th Lord Willoughby (1370 - 1409)

    Children:
    Margaret Willoughby Oldhall*
    Thomas Willoughby*
    Margaret Willoughby Oldhall (____ - 1455)*
    Robert Willoughby (1385 - 1452)*

    *Calculated relationship

    Burial:
    Saint James Churchyard
    Spilsby
    East Lindsey District
    Lincolnshire, England

    Created by: Kaaren Crail Vining
    Record added: Mar 05, 2010
    Find A Grave Memorial# 49143946

    Birth:
    Map & history of Spilsby... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spilsby

    Children:
    1. 19. Margery Willoughby, Baroness of Ravensworth was born ~ 1398, Willoughby Manor, Eresby, Spilsby, Lincoln, England; died Bef 1453, Yorkshire, England.

  7. 40.  John Conyers was born ~ 1360, Coatham Stob, Long Newton, Durham, England; died ~ 1438.

    John — Margaret St. Quintin. Margaret (daughter of John de St. Quintin and Elizabeth Gascoigne) was born Aft 1377, Hornby Castle, Hornby, Bedale, DL8 1NQ; died Aft May 1435. [Group Sheet]


  8. 41.  Margaret St. Quintin was born Aft 1377, Hornby Castle, Hornby, Bedale, DL8 1NQ (daughter of John de St. Quintin and Elizabeth Gascoigne); died Aft May 1435.

    Notes:

    Birth:
    Hornby Castle, Yorkshire is a grade I listed fortified manor house on the edge of Wensleydale between Bedale and Leyburn.

    Originally 14th century, it has been remodelled in the 15th, 18th and 20th centuries. It is constructed of coursed sandstone rubble with lead and stone slate roofs.[1] The present building is the south range of a larger complex, the rest of which has been demolished.

    Images & History ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hornby_Castle,_Yorkshire

    More images ... https://www.google.com/search?q=hornby+castle+yorkshire&rlz=1C1KMZB_enUS591US591&tbm=isch&imgil=L17fJ7zgL9tiQM%253A%253BYOgSjyDjMuVhYM%253Bhttps%25253A%25252F%25252Fen.wikipedia.org%25252Fwiki%25252FHornby_Castle%25252C_Yorkshire&source=iu&pf=m&fir=L17fJ7zgL9tiQM%253A%252CYOgSjyDjMuVhYM%252C_&usg=__cshmFIN46k_oBFIrYWJnyvm3JAw%3D&biw=1440&bih=810&ved=0ahUKEwi4z-bTuozWAhVG0WMKHRESDlcQyjcIOA&ei=YMOtWbifKMaijwORpLi4BQ#imgrc=XkWlJVgO35F9_M:

    Children:
    1. 20. Christopher Conyers, Knight was born ~ 1393, Hornby Castle, Hornby, Bedale, DL8 1NQ; died 0___ 1462, Hornby Castle, Hornby, Bedale, DL8 1NQ.

  9. 48.  Conan Aske was born 1403 (son of Roger Aske and Elizabeth Pert); died 1440.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Conant Aske

    Conan — Alice Savile. Alice (daughter of Thomas Savile, (V) Knight and Margaret Pilkington) was born ~1397, Thornhill, West Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  10. 49.  Alice Savile was born ~1397, Thornhill, West Yorkshire, England (daughter of Thomas Savile, (V) Knight and Margaret Pilkington).
    Children:
    1. 24. Roger Aske, Esquire was born ~1430, Aske, Yorkshire, England; died 1 Feb 1505.


Generation: 7

  1. 68.  William de Greystoke, 2nd Baron Greystoke was born 6 Jan 1321, Grimthorpe, Cumbria, England (son of Ralph de Greystoke, 1st Baron Audley and Alice de Audley); died 10 Jul 1359, Brancepeth Castle, Durham, England; was buried St. Andrews Church, Greystoke, Cumbria, England.

    Notes:

    William de Greystoke, 2nd Baron Greystoke, (6 January 1321 – 10 July 1359) of Greystoke in Cumbria, was an English peer and landowner.

    Origins

    Greystoke was the son of Ralph de Greystoke, 1st Baron Greystoke, and his wife Alice, daughter of Hugh, Lord Audley.[1]

    Career

    He was born at the family home in Grimthorpe, on 6 January 1321.[1] Greystoke's father died while he was still a child and he became a ward of his mother's second husband, Ralph Neville, 2nd Baron Neville de Raby,[2] until he reached his majority in 1342.[1] During the next ten years he was involved, on the English side, in the Hundred Years' War between the Kingdom of England and the Kingdom of France and was present at the Siege of Calais in 1346.[1] He served under Edward, the Black Prince, in France.[3] He participated in the Northern Crusades of Henry of Grosmont, 1st Duke of Lancaster to Prussia in 1351–2.[1] In the early 1350s he was involved in the negotiations to secure the release of King David II of Scotland, who had been taken prisoner at the Battle of Neville's Cross on 17 October 1346.[1] Greystoke was made a captain of Berwick-upon-Tweed, but due to his service in France, he was not present when the town fell to the Scots in August 1355.[1] In October 1353 Greystoke received a royal licence to crenellate "his dwelling place", later known as Greystoke Castle.[4] He was also responsible for renovations on Morpeth Castle which he also owned.[4]

    Marriages and children

    He married twice and had children by his second wife only:

    Firstly to Lucy de Lucie,[3] daughter of Thomas de Lucy, 2nd Baron Lucy (died 1365),[5] but the marriage was childless,[2] and they divorced.[3] During this time, his stepfather, Ralph Neville, unsuccessfully proposed that Greystoke should name his half-brothers, Ralph, Robert, and William Neville, as his heirs.[2]
    Secondly he married Joane FitzHugh, daughter of Baron Fitzhugh, by whom he had four children:
    Ralph de Greystoke, 3rd Baron Greystoke, eldest son and heir.
    Robert de Greystoke;
    William de Greystoke;
    Alice de Greystoke,[3] the first wife of Robert Harington, 3rd Baron Harington (1356–1406)[6] of Gleaston Castle in the manor of Aldingham in Furness, Lancashire.
    Death and burial[edit]
    Greystoke died on 10 July 1359, at Brancepeth Castle, the seat of his step-father Ralph Neville, 2nd Baron Neville de Raby,[5] and was buried in the parish church of St. Andrew's in Greystoke, Cumbria,[1] with a mass conducted by Gilbert de Welton, Bishop of Carlisle.[5] His funeral took place with "great pomp and solemnity", and was attended by great personages including: Roger de Clifford, 5th Baron de Clifford,[7] Henry Scrope, 1st Baron Scrope of Masham, Thomas, Baron Musgrave, the Abbot of Holmcultram Abbey and the Abbot of Shap Abbey.[5]

    end of biography

    William — Joane FitzHugh. [Group Sheet]


  2. 69.  Joane FitzHugh
    Children:
    1. 34. Ralph de Greystoke, 3rd Baron Greystoke was born 18 Oct 1353, Ravensworth Castle, Yorkshire, England; was christened 18 Oct 1353, Kirkby Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England; died 6 Apr 1418, Kirkby Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England.

  3. 70.  Roger de Clifford, Knight, 5th Baron de Clifford was born 10 Jul 1333, Brougham Castle, Westmorland, England (son of Robert de Clifford, Knight, 3rd Baron de Clifford and Isabel de Berkeley); died 13 Jul 1389, Brougham Castle, Westmorland, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: 5th Baron of Westmorland

    Notes:

    Roger de Clifford, 5th Baron de Clifford, ninth Lord Clifford, fifth Baron of Westmoreland (10 July 1333[1] - 13 July 1389), was the son of Robert de Clifford, 3rd Baron de Clifford (d. 20 May 1344), second son of Robert de Clifford, 1st Baron de Clifford (1273–1314), the founder of the northern branch of the family. His mother was Isabella (d. 25 July 1362), daughter of Maurice, 2nd Lord Berkeley. He succeeded his elder brother, Robert de Clifford, 4th Baron de Clifford in 1350, on which day he made proof of his age.[2]

    Military career

    Clifford entered on his military career when hardly more than twelve, being armed at the time of Jacob van Artevelde's death on 17 July 1345.[3]

    In August 1350 he was engaged in the seafight with the Spaniards near Winchelsea; and in 1355 he accompanied his father-in-law, Thomas de Beauchamp, 11th Earl of Warwick, on the expedition to Gascony.[4] He again served in Gascony in 1359, 1360, and in the French expedition of the Duke of Lancaster in 1373.

    A document dated at Brougham 10 July 1369 shows him engaging the services of Richard le Fleming and his company for a year. In the same way he retained Sir Roger de Mowbray; and was himself retained, with his company of nearly eighty men, by Edmund Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March, on 25 September 1379.[5]

    On 15 March 1361 he was called upon to assist Lionel, duke of Clarence, in his great Irish expedition on pain of forfeiting his Irish estates. A similar summons to defend his lands in Ireland was issued on 28 July 1368.[6]

    His chief services, however, were rendered on the Scotch borders. In July 1370 he was appointed one of the wardens of the west marches; but according to Sir H. Nicolas he is found defending the northern borders fourteen years earlier.[7] Resigned the truce with Scotland on 24 August 1369, and was warden of both east and west marches on five occasions between 1380 and 1385.

    In August 1385 he accompanied Richard II's expedition against Scotland with sixty men-at-arms and forty archers. His last border sendee seems to have been in October 1388, when he was ordered to adopt measures of defence for the Scotch Marches.[8] In May 1388 he accompanied Richard FitzAlan, 11th Earl of Arundel, in his naval expedition to Brittany.[9]

    Political Offices

    He was hereditary High Sheriff of Westmorland from 1350? until his death in 1389. In 1377 he was made High Sheriff of Cumberland and governor of Carlisle, a city whose walls he appears to have inspected and found weak in the preceding year. To the last two offices he was reappointed on Richard II's accession.

    He was made a commissioner of array against the Scots (26 February 1372), and one of a body of commissioners to correct truce-breakers and decide border disputes 26 May 1373, having sat on a similar commission in September 1367.

    Parliament

    Clifford was summoned to all parliaments from 15 December 1356 to 28 July 1388.[10] He was trier of petitions in many parliaments from November 1373 to September 1377. In August 1374 he was appointed one of the commissioners to settle the dispute between Henry de Percy and William, Earl of Douglas, relative to the possession of Jedworth Forest. In the parliament of November 1381 he was member of a committee to confer with the House of Commons. On 12 October 1386 he gave evidence in the great Scrope and Grosvenor case at St. Margaret's Church, Westminster.

    Death and Succession

    Roger de Clifford died 13 July 1389, being then possessed of enormous estates, chiefly situated in Yorkshire, Northumberland, Cumberland, and Westmoreland, but spread over several other counties.[11] He was succeeded by his son Thomas de Clifford, 6th Baron de Clifford.

    Marriage and Issue

    He married Maud (d. 1403), daughter of Thomas de Beauchamp, 11th Earl of Warwick.[12]

    Thomas de Clifford, 6th Baron de Clifford (d. 1391 ?)
    William Clifford, the Governor of Berwick (d. 1419)
    Margaret, married Sir John Melton, knight
    Katherine, married Ralph, lord Greystock
    Philippa, married William Ferrers, 5th Baron Ferrers of Groby (Lewis, Ancestral Roots, 8th ed. (2006), line 11, no. 34)
    Dugdale gives him a third son, the Lollard, Sir Lewis Clifford (d. 1404), whom, however, Sir H. Nicolas shows to have been probably his brother, but certainly not his son[13]

    Magna Carta Ancestry by Douglas Richardson lists three sons, including a Roger, no additional information.

    Genealogy

    The genealogical table in Whitaker gives Clifford two brothers, John de Clifford and Thomas de Clifford, said to have been the ancestor of Richard de Clifford, Bishop of London, and three sisters.

    References

    Jump up ^ (Scr. and Gros. Roll, text, i. 197)
    Jump up ^ (Dugdale, i. 240; Whitaker, pp. 310-11; Hist. Peerage, 117; Hist. of Westmoreland, i. 279; Escheat Rolls, ii. 118, 248)
    Jump up ^ (Scr. and Gros. Roll, i. 197)
    Jump up ^ (Whitaker, 314- 315; Dugdale, i. 340)
    Jump up ^ (Dugdale, i. 340; Whitaker, 317)
    Jump up ^ (Rymer, vi. 319, 595)
    Jump up ^ (Rymer, vi. 657; Dugdale, i. 340; Scrope Roll, ii. 469, &c.)
    Jump up ^ (Rymer, vi. 570, 637, 714, vii. 9, 475; Nicolas, Scr. and Gros. Roll, ii. 469, &c.)
    Jump up ^ (Scr. and Gros. Roll, i. 197, ii. 469, &c.; Rymer, vii. 45)
    Jump up ^ (Dugdale, i. 340; Hist. Peerage, 117)
    Jump up ^ (Dugdale, i. 341; Escheat Rolls, iii. 113)
    Jump up ^ (cf. Escheat Rolls, iii. 286)
    Jump up ^ (Dugdale, i. 340-2; Whitaker, 314-16; Nicolas, Scr. and Gros. Roll, ii. 427, &c.)
    This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: "Clifford, Roger de (1333-1389)". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900.

    *

    Roger — Maud Beauchamp. Maud (daughter of Thomas de Beauchamp, Knight, 11th Earl of Warwick and Katherine de Mortimer, Countess of Warwick) was born 0___ 1335, Warwickshire, England; died 0Feb 1403, Brougham Castle, Westmorland, England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 71.  Maud Beauchamp was born 0___ 1335, Warwickshire, England (daughter of Thomas de Beauchamp, Knight, 11th Earl of Warwick and Katherine de Mortimer, Countess of Warwick); died 0Feb 1403, Brougham Castle, Westmorland, England.
    Children:
    1. Margaret Clifford was born Brougham Castle, Westmorland, England.
    2. Thomas Clifford, Knight, 6th Baron de Clifford was born 1363-1364, Cumbria, England; died 18 Aug 1391.
    3. 35. Catherine Clifford, Baroness of Ravensworth was born ~1367, Brougham Castle, Westmorland, England; was christened Ravensworth, Kirby, North Riding, Yorkshire, England; died 23 Apr 1413, (North Riding, Yorkshire) England.
    4. Phillippa Clifford, Baroness Ferrers of Groby was born 0___ 1371, Brougham Castle, Westmorland, England; died Bef 9 Aug 1416.

  5. 72.  Henry FitzHugh, KG, 2nd Baron FitzHugh of Ravensworth was born 0___ 1338, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England (son of Henry FitzHugh, 1st Baron FitzHugh of Ravensworth and Joan Fourneux); died 29 Aug 1368, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England.

    Henry married Joan Scrope Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England. Joan (daughter of Henry le Scrope, Knight, 1st Baron Scrope of Masham and Joan LNU) was born 0___ 1336, Masham, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1386, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  6. 73.  Joan Scrope was born 0___ 1336, Masham, Yorkshire, England (daughter of Henry le Scrope, Knight, 1st Baron Scrope of Masham and Joan LNU); died 0___ 1386, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England.
    Children:
    1. 36. Henry FitzHugh, IV, Knight, 3rd Baron FitzHugh was born 1359-1363, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England; died 14 Jan 1425, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England; was buried Jervaulx Abbey, Yorkshire, England.
    2. Eleanor FitzHugh was born Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England.

  7. 74.  Robert de Grey was born ~ 1333 (son of John de Grey, KG, 2nd Baron Grey of Rotherfield and Avice Marmion); died Bef 30 Nov 1367, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Marmion

    Robert — Lora St. Quintin. Lora was born ~ 1342; died 0___ 1369, Brandesburton in Holderness, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  8. 75.  Lora St. Quintin was born ~ 1342; died 0___ 1369, Brandesburton in Holderness, Yorkshire, England.
    Children:
    1. 37. Elizabeth Grey was born ~ 1363, Wilcote, Oxfordshire, England; died 12 Dec 1427, (Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England); was buried Jervaulx Abbey, Yorkshire, England.

  9. 76.  Robert Willoughby, 4th Baron Willoughby de Eresby was born 1343-1350, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England (son of John Willoughby and Cecily Ufford); died 9 Aug 1396, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England; was buried Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England.

    Notes:

    Alice Skipworth is also cited as a spouse...

    Robert married Margery la Zouche, Baroness of Willoughby Abt 1369. Margery (daughter of William la Zouche, 2nd Baron Zouche of Haryngworth and Elizabeth de Ros) was born Abt 1355, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England; died 18 Oct 1391. [Group Sheet]


  10. 77.  Margery la Zouche, Baroness of Willoughby was born Abt 1355, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England (daughter of William la Zouche, 2nd Baron Zouche of Haryngworth and Elizabeth de Ros); died 18 Oct 1391.

    Other Events:

    • Alt Death: Bef 1412, (Lincolnshire) England

    Notes:

    Married:
    He [Robert de Willoughby] married, 3rdly, Elizabeth, de jure suo jure (according to modern doctrine) BARONESS LATIMER, widow of John (DE NEVILLE), 3rd LORD NEVILLE (of Raby), daughter and heir of William (LE LATIMER), 4th LORD LATIMER, by his wife Elizabeth.

    Children:
    1. 38. William Willoughby, 4th Baron Willoughby de Eresby was born 1370-1375, Eresby, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England; died 4 Dec 1409, Edgefield, Linconshire, England; was buried St. James Church, Willoughby Chapel, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England.
    2. Thomas Willoughby was born Bef 1378, Eresby, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England; died Bef 20 Aug 1417.

  11. 78.  Roger le Strange, 5th Baron Strange of Knockin was born ~ 1327, Knockyn, Shropshire, England (son of Roger le Strange, 4th Baron Strange of Knockin and Joan de Ingham, Baroness Ingham); died 26 Aug 1382, Monmouthshire, Wales.

    Roger married Aline FitzAlan ~ 1350, Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England. Aline (daughter of Edmund FitzAlan, Knight, 9th Earl of Arundel and Alice de Warenne, Countess of Arundel) was born 0___ 1314, Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England; died 20 Jan 1386. [Group Sheet]


  12. 79.  Aline FitzAlan was born 0___ 1314, Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England (daughter of Edmund FitzAlan, Knight, 9th Earl of Arundel and Alice de Warenne, Countess of Arundel); died 20 Jan 1386.
    Children:
    1. 39. Lucy le Strange was born ~ 1365, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England; died 28 Apr 1398, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England; was buried St. James Church, Willoughby Chapel, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England.

  13. 82.  John de St. Quintin was born ~ 1341, Hornby Castle, Hornby, Bedale, DL8 1NQ; died Aft 2 May 1378, Estbrompton Manor, Northallerton, Yorkshire, England.

    Notes:

    Birth:
    Hornby Castle, Yorkshire is a grade I listed fortified manor house on the edge of Wensleydale between Bedale and Leyburn.

    Originally 14th century, it has been remodelled in the 15th, 18th and 20th centuries. It is constructed of coursed sandstone rubble with lead and stone slate roofs.[1] The present building is the south range of a larger complex, the rest of which has been demolished.

    Images & History ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hornby_Castle,_Yorkshire

    More images ... https://www.google.com/search?q=hornby+castle+yorkshire&rlz=1C1KMZB_enUS591US591&tbm=isch&imgil=L17fJ7zgL9tiQM%253A%253BYOgSjyDjMuVhYM%253Bhttps%25253A%25252F%25252Fen.wikipedia.org%25252Fwiki%25252FHornby_Castle%25252C_Yorkshire&source=iu&pf=m&fir=L17fJ7zgL9tiQM%253A%252CYOgSjyDjMuVhYM%252C_&usg=__cshmFIN46k_oBFIrYWJnyvm3JAw%3D&biw=1440&bih=810&ved=0ahUKEwi4z-bTuozWAhVG0WMKHRESDlcQyjcIOA&ei=YMOtWbifKMaijwORpLi4BQ#imgrc=XkWlJVgO35F9_M:

    John — Elizabeth Gascoigne. Elizabeth (daughter of William Gascoigne, VII, Knight and Margaret Agnes Franke) was born ~ 1352, Harewood, Yorkshire, England; died ~ 1378. [Group Sheet]


  14. 83.  Elizabeth Gascoigne was born ~ 1352, Harewood, Yorkshire, England (daughter of William Gascoigne, VII, Knight and Margaret Agnes Franke); died ~ 1378.
    Children:
    1. 41. Margaret St. Quintin was born Aft 1377, Hornby Castle, Hornby, Bedale, DL8 1NQ; died Aft May 1435.

  15. 96.  Roger Aske was born 0___ 1380, Aske, Yorkshire, England; died 0Dec 1440.

    Roger — Elizabeth Pert. Elizabeth (daughter of William Pert and Joan Scrope) was born 0___ 1380; died 14 Apr 1429, Leyburne, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  16. 97.  Elizabeth Pert was born 0___ 1380 (daughter of William Pert and Joan Scrope); died 14 Apr 1429, Leyburne, Yorkshire, England.
    Children:
    1. Euphemia Marie Aske was born ~ 1399, Aske, Yorkshire, England.
    2. 48. Conan Aske was born 1403; died 1440.

  17. 98.  Thomas Savile, (V) Knight was born Thornhill, West Yorkshire, England (son of Henry Savile, (IV) Esquire and Elizabeth Thornhill).

    Thomas married Margaret Pilkington Aft 1436. Margaret (daughter of John Pilkington, Knight and Margaret de Verdun, 2nd Baroness de Verdon) was born Pilkington, Lancashire, England; died ~ 1445, Thornhill, West Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  18. 99.  Margaret Pilkington was born Pilkington, Lancashire, England (daughter of John Pilkington, Knight and Margaret de Verdun, 2nd Baroness de Verdon); died ~ 1445, Thornhill, West Yorkshire, England.
    Children:
    1. John Savile, (VI) Knight was born ~ 1411, Harewood, Yorkshire, England; died 15 Jun 1482; was buried Thornhill, England.
    2. Margaret Savile
    3. 49. Alice Savile was born ~1397, Thornhill, West Yorkshire, England.
    4. Elizabeth Savile was born Thornhill, West Yorkshire, England.


Generation: 8

  1. 136.  Ralph de Greystoke, 1st Baron Audley was born 15 Aug 1299; died 14 Jul 1323, Gateshead, Durham, England; was buried Newminster Abbey, Northumberland, England.

    Ralph — Alice de Audley. Alice (daughter of Hugh de Audley, 1st Baron Audley of Stratton and Isolde (Isabella) de Mortimer) was born 1302-1304, Hadley, Lambourne, Berkshire, England; died 12 Jan 1374, Greystoke Manor, Northumberland, England; was buried Durham Cathedral, Durham, Durhamshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 137.  Alice de Audley was born 1302-1304, Hadley, Lambourne, Berkshire, England (daughter of Hugh de Audley, 1st Baron Audley of Stratton and Isolde (Isabella) de Mortimer); died 12 Jan 1374, Greystoke Manor, Northumberland, England; was buried Durham Cathedral, Durham, Durhamshire, England.
    Children:
    1. 68. William de Greystoke, 2nd Baron Greystoke was born 6 Jan 1321, Grimthorpe, Cumbria, England; died 10 Jul 1359, Brancepeth Castle, Durham, England; was buried St. Andrews Church, Greystoke, Cumbria, England.

  3. 140.  Robert de Clifford, Knight, 3rd Baron de Clifford was born 5 Nov 1305, (Skipton, North Yorkshire, England) (son of Robert de Clifford, Knight, 1st Baron de Clifford and Maude de Clare); died 20 May 1344.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: 3rd Lord of Skipton

    Notes:

    Robert de Clifford, 3rd Baron de Clifford, also 3rd Lord of Skipton (5 November 1305–20 May 1344) was a member of the Clifford family which held the seat of Skipton from 1310 to 1676.

    He was the second son of Robert de Clifford, 1st Baron de Clifford and Maud de Clare, eldest daughter of Thomas de Clare, Lord of Thomond and Juliana FitzGerald.

    His title was restored to him in 1327 after being forfeited by his elder brother Roger de Clifford, 2nd Baron de Clifford who was hanged for treason.

    He married Isabel de Berkeley, daughter of Maurice de Berkeley, 2nd Baron Berkeley at Berkeley Castle in 1328. They had 7 children. He was succeeded as Baron De Clifford by the eldest, Robert de Clifford, 4th Baron de Clifford

    Robert married Isabel de Berkeley 0Jun 1328. Isabel (daughter of Maurice de Berkeley, III, Knight, 2nd Baron Berkeley and Eva la Zouche) was born 0___ 1307; died 25 Jul 1362, Berkeley Castle, Berkeley, Gloucestershire, England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 141.  Isabel de Berkeley was born 0___ 1307 (daughter of Maurice de Berkeley, III, Knight, 2nd Baron Berkeley and Eva la Zouche); died 25 Jul 1362, Berkeley Castle, Berkeley, Gloucestershire, England.
    Children:
    1. Robert Clifford, Lord of Northumberland was born 0___ 1328, England; died Bef 1354, England.
    2. 70. Roger de Clifford, Knight, 5th Baron de Clifford was born 10 Jul 1333, Brougham Castle, Westmorland, England; died 13 Jul 1389, Brougham Castle, Westmorland, England.
    3. Eleanor Clifford was born ~ 1343.

  5. 142.  Thomas de Beauchamp, Knight, 11th Earl of WarwickThomas de Beauchamp, Knight, 11th Earl of Warwick was born 14 Feb 1313, Warwick Castle, Warwick, Warwickshire, England (son of Guy de Beauchamp, Knight, 10th Earl of Warwick and Alice de Toeni, Countess of Warwick); died 13 Nov 1369, (Warwickshire) England; was buried St. Mary's Church, Warwick, Warwickshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Thomas de Beauchamp

    Notes:

    Thomas de Beauchamp, 11th Earl of Warwick, KG (c. 14 February 1313 – 13 November 1369) was an English nobleman and military commander during the Hundred Years' War. In 1348 he became one of the founders and the third Knight of the Order of the Garter.

    Early life

    Thomas de Beauchamp, 11th Earl of Warwick depicted in 1347 as one of the 8 mourners attached to the monumental brass of Sir Hugh Hastings (d. 1347) at St Mary's Church, Elsing, Norfolk. He displays the arms of Beauchamp on his tunic
    Thomas de Beauchamp was born at Warwick Castle, Warwickshire, England to Guy de Beauchamp, 10th Earl of Warwick and Alice de Toeni. He served in Scotland frequently during the 1330s, being captain of the army against the Scots in 1337. He was hereditary High Sheriff of Worcestershire from 1333 until his death (in 1369). In 1344 he was also made High Sheriff of Warwickshire and Leicestershire for life.[citation needed]

    Victor at Crâecy and Poitiers


    Left:Seal (obverse) of Thomas de Beauchamp, 11th Earl of Warwick, dated 1344: S(IGILLUM) THO(M)E COMITIS WARRWYCHIE ANNO REGNI REGIS E(DWARDII) TE(RT)II...(continued on counter-seal) ("Seal of Thomas, Count (Earl) of Warwick in the year of the reign of King Edward the Third..."). He displays on his surcoat, shield and horse's caparison the arms of Beauchamp, and carries on his helm as crest a swan's head and neck; right: Counter-seal/reverse: (legend continued from face of seal) ...POST CO(N)QUESTU(M) ANGLIE SEPTI(M)O DECIM(0) ET REGNI SUI FRANCIE QUARTO ("...after the Conquest of England the seventeenth and of his reign of the Kingdom of France the fourth"). This dates the seal to 1344. The arms are those of de Newburgh, the family of the Beaumont Earls of Warwick: Checky azure and or, a chevron ermine. This same display of double arms was used on the seal of his father Guy de Beauchamp, 10th Earl of Warwick on his seal affixed to the Barons' Letter, 1301
    Warwick was Marshall of England from 1343/4 until 1369, and was one of the commanders at the great English victories at Crâecy and Poitiers.

    Thomas de Beauchamp fought in all the French wars of King Edward III; he commanded the center at the Battle of Crecy (where many of his relatives were killed including his younger half-brother Alan la Zouche de Mortimer). He was trusted to be guardian of the sixteen-year-old Black Prince. Beauchamp fought at Poitiers in 1356 and at the Siege of Calais (1346).

    He began the rebuilding of the Collegiate Church of Saint Mary in Warwick using money received from the ransom of a French Archbishop. He died of plague in Calais on 13 November 1369 and was entombed in the Beauchamp Chapel. The chapel contains the finest example of the use of brisures for cadency in medieval heraldry -- seven different Beauchamp coats of arms.

    Marriage and children

    He married Katherine Mortimer, daughter of Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March. They had five sons and ten daughters:[1]

    Thomas b. 16 Mar 1338 d. 8 Aug 1401, who married Margaret Ferrers and had descendants. His son Richard succeeded him as Earl and inherited most of his property.
    Guy (d. 28 April 1360). He had two daughters who by entail were excluded from their grandfather's inheritance: Elizabeth (d. c.1369), and Katherine, who became a nun.
    Reinbrun, (d. 1361); he was named for a character in Guy of Warwick.
    William (c. 1343–1411), who inherited the honour of Abergavenny. Married Joan FitzAlan.
    Roger (d. 1361)
    Maud (d. 1403), who married Roger de Clifford, 5th Baron de Clifford.
    Philippa de Beauchamp who married Hugh de Stafford, 2nd Earl of Stafford.
    Alice (d. 1383), who married first John Beauchamp, 3rd Baron Beauchamp and then Sir Matthew Gournay.
    Joan, who married Ralph Basset, 4th Baron Basset de Drayton.
    Isabell (d. 1416) who married first John le Strange, 5th Baron Strange, and then to William de Ufford, 2nd Earl of Suffolk. After the latter's death she became a nun.
    Margaret, who married Guy de Montfort and after his death became a nun.
    Elizabeth, married Thomas de Ufford, KG
    Anne, married Walter de Cokesey
    Juliana
    Katherine, became a nun at Shouldham

    Catherine Montacute, Countess of Salisbury was not his daughter, although she is presented as such in William Painter's Palace of Pleasure and in the Elizabethan play, Edward III that may be by William Shakespeare.

    Thomas married Katherine de Mortimer, Countess of Warwick 19 Apr 1319, (Warwickshire) England. Katherine (daughter of Roger de Mortimer, 1st Earl of March and Joan de Geneville, 2nd Baroness Geneville) was born 0___ 1314, Wigmore Castle, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England; died 4 Aug 1369, (Warwickshire) England; was buried St. Mary's Church, Warwick, Warwickshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  6. 143.  Katherine de Mortimer, Countess of Warwick was born 0___ 1314, Wigmore Castle, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England (daughter of Roger de Mortimer, 1st Earl of March and Joan de Geneville, 2nd Baroness Geneville); died 4 Aug 1369, (Warwickshire) England; was buried St. Mary's Church, Warwick, Warwickshire, England.

    Notes:

    Katherine Mortimer, Countess of Warwick (1314 - 4 August 1369) was the wife of Thomas de Beauchamp, 11th Earl of Warwick KG, an English peer, and military commander during the Hundred Years War. She was a daughter and co-heiress of Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March and Joan de Geneville, Baroness Geneville.

    Sometime before 1355, she became an important figure at the royal court of King Edward III.

    Family and lineage

    Katherine Mortimer was born at Ludlow Castle, Shropshire, England, in 1314, one of the twelve children and a co-heiress of Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March and Joan de Geneville, Baroness Geneville. Her paternal grandparents were Edmund Mortimer, 2nd Baron Mortimer and Margaret de Fiennes, and her maternal grandparents were Sir Piers de Geneville, of Trim Castle and Ludlow, and Jeanne of Lusignan.

    Her father was de facto ruler of England together with his mistress Isabella of France, Queen consort of King Edward II, until his eventual capture and execution by the orders of King Edward III, eldest son of Isabella and King Edward II. The latter had been deposed in November 1326, and afterwards cruelly murdered by assassins acting under the orders of Mortimer and Queen Isabella. Katherine was sixteen years old when her father was hanged, Tyburn, London on 29 November 1330. Roger Mortimer was NOT Hanged drawn and quartered as stated but only hanged and his body was left until monks from Greyfriars in London took it down.

    Marriage

    On 19 April 1319, when she was about five years old, Katherine married Thomas de Beauchamp, 11th Earl of Warwick, eldest son of Guy de Beauchamp, 10th Earl of Warwick and Alice de Toeni.[1] Their marriage required a Papal dispensation as they were related within the prohibited third and fourth degrees. Beauchamp had succeeded to the earldom at the age of two, therefore Katherine was styled Countess of Warwick from the time of her marriage until her death. The marriage had been arranged in July 1318 in order to settle a quarrel between the two families over the lordship of Elfael, which was thus given to Katherine as her marriage portion.[2] For the term of his minority, Beauchamp's custody had been granted to Katherine's father, Roger Mortimer.[3]

    Katherine later became an important personage at the court of King Edward III. As a sign of royal favour she was chosen to stand as one of the godmothers, along with Queen Philippa of Hainault, to the latter's granddaughter, Philippa, Countess of Ulster in 1355. This honour bestowed on Katherine is described by 19th century author Agnes Strickland according to the Friar's Genealogy: "Her [Philippa, Countess of Ulster] godmother also was of Warwick Countess, a lady likewise of great worthiness".[4]

    Issue

    Katherine and Beauchamp together had fifteen children:[5]

    Guy de Beauchamp (died 28 April 1360), married Philippa de Ferrers, daughter of Henry de Ferrers, 2nd Lord Ferrers of Groby and Isabel de Verdun, by whom he had two daughters.[6]
    Thomas de Beauchamp, 12th Earl of Warwick (16 March 1339- 1401), married Margaret Ferrers, daughter of William Ferrers, 3rd Lord of Groby and Margaret de Ufford, by whom he had issue, including Richard de Beauchamp, 13th Earl of Warwick.
    Reinbrun de Beauchamp
    William de Beauchamp, 1st Baron Bergavenny (c. 1343- 8 May 1411), on 23 July 1392, married Lady Joan FitzAlan, daughter of Richard Fitzalan, 11th Earl of Arundel and Elizabeth de Bohun, by whom he had a son Richard de Beauchamp, 1st Earl of Worcester, and a daughter, Joan de Beauchamp, 4th Countess of Ormond. Queen consort Anne Boleyn was a notable descendant of the latter.
    Roger de Beauchamp (died 1361)
    Maud de Beauchamp (died 1403), married Roger de Clifford, 5th Baron Clifford, by whom she had issue, including Thomas de Clifford, 6th Baron Clifford.
    Philippa de Beauchamp, married Hugh de Stafford, 2nd Earl of Stafford, by whom she had nine children.
    Alice Beauchamp (died 1383), married firstly John Beauchamp, 3rd Baron Beauchamp of Somerset, and secondly Sir William Gournay.[7] She died childless.
    Joan de Beauchamp, married Ralph Basset, 3rd Baron Basset of Drayton. She died childless.
    Isabella de Beauchamp (died 29 September 1416), married firstly John le Strange, 5th Baron Strange, and secondly, William de Ufford, 2nd Earl of Suffolk. Upon the latter's death, she became a nun. She died childless.
    Margaret de Beauchamp, married Guy de Montfort, and after his death, she became a nun. She died childless.
    Elizabeth de Beauchamp, married Thomas de Ufford KG,
    Anne de Beauchamp, married Walter de Cokesey.
    Juliana de Beauchamp
    Katherine de Beauchamp, became a nun at Shouldham Priory.

    Death and effigy

    Katherine Mortimer died on 4 August 1369 at the age of about fifty-five. Two years before her death, in 1367, Katherine was a legatee in the will of her sister Agnes de Hastings, Countess of Pembroke.[8] Katherine was buried in St. Mary's Church, Warwick, Warwickshire. She lies alongside her husband, who died three months after her of the Black Death. Their tomb with well-preserved, alabaster effigies can be seen in the centre of the quire. Katherine is depicted wearing a frilled veil with a honeycomb pattern and she is holding hands with Beauchamp. The sides of the tomb chest are decorated with figures of mourners, both male and female.

    Children:
    1. 71. Maud Beauchamp was born 0___ 1335, Warwickshire, England; died 0Feb 1403, Brougham Castle, Westmorland, England.
    2. Thomas de Beauchamp, Knight, 12th Earl of Warwick was born 16 Mar 1338, Warwick Castle, Warwick, Warwickshire, England; died 10 Apr 1401, (Warwickshire) England.
    3. Philippa Beauchamp was born 1334-1344, Elmley, Gloucestershire, England; died 6 Apr 1386.
    4. William de Beauchamp, 1st Baron Bergavenny was born 1343-1345, Warwick, Warwickshire, England; died 8 May 1411, Warwick, Warwickshire, England; was buried Black Friars Churchyard, Hereford, Herefordshire, England.
    5. Guy de Beauchamp

  7. 144.  Henry FitzHugh, 1st Baron FitzHugh of Ravensworth was born 1296-1297, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England; died 24 Sep 1352, (Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England).

    Notes:

    Henry FITZHUGH FITZHENRY (2° B. Fitzhugh of Ravensworth)

    Born: ABT 1338

    Died: 29 Aug 1386

    Father: Henry FITZHUGH (1° B. Fitzhugh of Ravensworth)

    Mother: Joan FOURNEUX

    Married: Joan SCROPE (B. Fitzhugh of Ravensworth) Sep 1350, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England

    Children:

    1. Henry FITZHUGH (3° B. Fitzhugh of Ravensworth)

    2. John FITZHENRY FITZHUGH

    3. Eleanor FITZHUGH

    end of biography

    Photos, history of "Baron FitzHugh" ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baron_FitzHugh

    ... Baron FitzHugh, of Ravensworth in North Yorkshire, is an abeyant title in the Peerage of England. It was created in 1321 for Sir Henry FitzHugh. The title passed through the male line until the death in 1513 of George FitzHugh, 7th Baron FitzHugh, when it became abeyant between his great-aunts Alice, Lady Fiennes and Elizabeth, Lady Parr, and to their descendants living today, listed below. The family seat was Ravensworth Castle in North Yorkshire.

    Henry — Joan Fourneux. Joan (daughter of Richard Fourneux and Sybil LNU) was born ~ 1297, Carlton in Lindrick, Nottinghamshire , England; died 15 Sep 1349, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England; was buried Jervaulx Abbey, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  8. 145.  Joan Fourneux was born ~ 1297, Carlton in Lindrick, Nottinghamshire , England (daughter of Richard Fourneux and Sybil LNU); died 15 Sep 1349, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England; was buried Jervaulx Abbey, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Joan de Fourneaux

    Notes:

    Joan de Fourneaux
    Also Known As: "Orreby FitzHenry"
    Birthdate: circa 1297 (52)
    Birthplace: Carlton in Lindrick, Nottinghamshire , England
    Death: September 15, 1349 (48-56)
    Ravensworth, North Riding, Yorkshire , England
    Place of Burial: Jervaulx Abbey, York, England, United Kingdom
    Immediate Family:
    Daughter of Richard de Fourneux, Sir and Sibil (Unk MN) de Fourneux
    Wife of John de Orreby and Sir Henry FitzHenry, of Ravensworth
    Mother of Hugh FitzHugh; Joane FitzHenry, Baroness Greystroke and Henry Fitzhugh, 2nd Baron Ravensworth
    Sister of William Fourneys
    Managed by: Private User
    Last Updated: September 20, 2016

    About Joan de Fourneaux
    Joan de Forneaux

    Birth: 1297 in Carlton in Lindrick, Nottinghamshire, England 3
    Death: SEP 1349 in Ravensworth, Yorkshire, North Riding, England 4 3
    Father: Richard DE FOURNEUX b: 1256 in Carlton in Lindrick, Nottinghamshire, England
    Mother: Sibil OF NOTTINGHAM b: ABT 1270 in Botharnsall, Nottinghamshire, England
    Marriage

    John DE ORREBY b: 1258 in Hatherton, Cheshire, England Married: 1316
    Henry FITZHENRY of Ravensworth b: 1297 in Ravensworth, Yorlshire, North Riding, England Married: MAR 1330
    Children with 2nd husband

    Hugh FITZHENRY b: 1331 in Ravensworth, Yorkshire, North Riding, England
    Joan FITZHUGH b: 1333 in Ravensworth, Yorlshire, North Riding, England
    Henry FitzHugh LORD FITZHUGH b: 1337 in Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England
    http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=REG&db=tmebl&id=I09536
    http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00140240&tree=LEO
    http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=labron00&id=I64611

    Buried:
    Jervaulx Abbey in East Witton near the city of Ripon, was one of the great Cistercian abbeys of Yorkshire, England, dedicated to St. Mary in 1156.

    The place-name Jervaulx is first attested in 1145, where it appears as Jorvalle. The name means 'the Ure valley', in French, and is perhaps a translation of the English 'Ure-dale',[2] aka Yoredale. The valley is now called Wensleydale.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jervaulx_Abbey

    Children:
    1. 72. Henry FitzHugh, KG, 2nd Baron FitzHugh of Ravensworth was born 0___ 1338, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England; died 29 Aug 1368, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England.

  9. 146.  Henry le Scrope, Knight, 1st Baron Scrope of Masham was born 29 Sep 1312, Masham, Yorkshire, England (son of Geoffrey le Scrope, Knight and Ivette de Ros); died 31 Jul 1391, Ghent, Belgium; was buried Coverham Abbey, Coverham, Yorkshire, England.

    Notes:

    Henry SCROPE (1° B. Scrope of Masham)

    Born: 29 Sep 1312, Masham, Yorkshire, England

    Died: 31 Jul 1391, Ghent

    Buried: Coverham Abbey, Coverham, Yorkshire, England

    Father: Geoffrey SCROPE of Masham (Sir Knight)

    Mother: Ivetta De ROS

    Married 1: Blanche De NORWICH ABT 1336, Masham, Yorkshire, England

    Children:

    1. Geoffrey SCROPE

    2. Stephen SCROPE (2° B. Scrope of Masham)

    Married 2: Joan (Agnes) ?

    Children:

    3. Joan SCROPE (B. Fitzhugh of Ravensworth)

    4. Isabella SCROPE

    5. Henry SCROPE

    6. John SCROPE (Sir)

    7. William SCROPE

    8. Richard SCROPE (Archbishop of York)

    Henry — Joan LNU. [Group Sheet]


  10. 147.  Joan LNU

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Agnes

    Children:
    1. 73. Joan Scrope was born 0___ 1336, Masham, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1386, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England.
    2. Isabella Scrope was born Masham, Yorkshire, England.
    3. Henry le Scrope was born Masham, Yorkshire, England.
    4. John Scrope was born Masham, Yorkshire, England.
    5. Geoffrey, Knight was born 1330-1336, Alnwick, Northumberland, England; died 0___ 1362, Lithuania; was buried Konigsberg, Germany.
    6. William Scrope was born ~ 1349, Masham, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1399.
    7. Richard Scrope, Knight was born ~ 1350, Masham, Yorkshire, England; died 8 Jun 1405.

  11. 148.  John de Grey, KG, 2nd Baron Grey of Rotherfield was born 9 Oct 1300, Rotherfield, Oxfordshire, England (son of John de Grey, 1st Baron Grey de Rotherfield and Margaret de Odingsells); died 1 Sep 1359, Rotherfield, Oxfordshire, England.

    Notes:

    John de Grey, 2nd Baron Grey de Rotherfield, KG (9 October 1300[1] – September 1359[1]) was an English soldier and courtier. John was the son and heir of Sir John de Grey, 1st Baron Grey de Rotherfield,[2] by Margaret who was daughter William de Odingsells and the granddaughter of Ida II Longespee.[3]

    John de Grey of Rotherfield was a founding member of the Most Noble Order of the Garter. He is often confused with John Grey of Codnor, who bore the same coat of arms (Barry argent and azure).

    By December 1349,[1] John was Lord Steward of the Royal Household of King Edward III. He distinguished himself well in the Scotch and French wars. He was summoned to parliament often from 1338 to 1357, and is regarded as having become Baron Grey of Rotherfield.[1]

    Family

    He married firstly, shortly before 1313,[1] Katherine Fitzalan, daughter and coheir of Bryan FitzAlan, Lord FitzAlan of Bedale, Yorkshire and had a single son and heir:

    Sir John de Grey, 3rd Baron Grey de Rotherfield.[2]

    He married secondly Avice, daughter of John Marmion, Baron of Winteringham, a descendant of John of England.[1][4] by whom he had the following issue:

    John de Grey aka Marmion, (d.s.p. 1385)[4] m. Elizabeth St. Quintin (b.1341)[5]
    Sir Robert de Grey aka Marmion, m. Lora St. Quintin (b.1343)[5] and whose granddaughter Elizabeth m. Henry FitzHugh, 3rd Baron FitzHugh[4]

    References

    ^ Jump up to: a b c d e f Henry Summerson, ‘Grey, John, first Lord Grey of Rotherfield (1300–1359)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, September 2004; online edn, January 2008. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/11544
    ^ Jump up to: a b Burke, Sir Bernard. A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire.
    Jump up ^ Richardson, D. (2011) Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study ... pg 642 (via Google)
    ^ Jump up to: a b c Nicolas, Nicholas Harris (1857). Historic Peerage of England. London: John Murray.
    ^ Jump up to: a b Calendar of Inquisitions Post Mortem, XI, London: HMSO, 1935
    Peerage of England
    Preceded by
    John de Grey, 1st Baron Grey de Rotherfield Baron Grey of Rotherfield
    1338–1359 Succeeded by
    John de Grey

    *

    About John de Grey, 2nd Baron Grey of Rotherfield
    In 1300 a lavish banquet was held to celebrate the birth and baptism (at Rotherfield Greys) of John de Grey, 'which feast is still notorious in these parts because abbots, priors and almost all other good men of those parts were present'. 374. Cal. Inq. p.m. VI, pp. 204–5. https://www.british-history.ac.uk/vch/oxon/vol16/pp266-302#anchorn374
    Knight of the Garter. Received livery of his lands in the fifteenth year of the reign of Edward II. In 1336 he was fighting for the King in Scotland; in 1342 he took part in the expedition to Flanders. He was in France in 1343, 1345-6, 1348 and again in 1356. He took part in the Battle of Crecy in 1346 with Edward III and his son Edward, the Black Prince, and it was after his return (after the fall of Calais in 1347) that he was given licence to crenellate Rotherfield. In the 6th of the reign of Edward III, upon some differences between his lordship and William la Zouche of Haryngworth, another great baron, which was heard before the King, Lord Grey, under the irritation of the moment, drew his knife upon Lord Zouche in the royal presence, whereupon both lords were committed to prison; but the Lord Zouche was soon afterwards released, while Lord Grey was remanded and his lands seized upon by the crown. He was, however, within a short time, upon making submission, restored to favour. In 1353 he was commissioner of array for the counties of Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire, and in 1356 was one of the witnesses to the charters by which Edward Baliol granted all his rights in Scotland to Edward III. He was steward of the king's household and had summons to parliament from the 1st to the 29th Edward III, inclusive. Was one of the Original Knights of the Garter instituted at its foundation in 1344 and confirmed in 1348, where he occupied the eighth stall on the sovereign's side at Windsor Castle. [Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, England, 1883, p. 247, Grey, Barons Grey, of Rotherfield, co. Oxford]

    src: tudorplace.com.ar/Grey1.htm

    ----------------------------------------------

    Summoned to 1338 Parliament

    Knight of the Garter - 1348

    John Gray/de Gray in 1348 was the founder of the Order of the garter

    John was married 1st to Katherine Fitz Alan who died before 7,Aug,1328.

    He was married 2nd to Avice Marmion, dughter of Sir Hohn marmion and maud de furnival,dau of Thomas de Furnival and Joan le Despenser,daughter of Hugh le Despenser.

    John Grey/de Grey had an argument with William la Zouche Mortimer,1st Lord Zoucje in January 1331/1332 and he drew his knife in the presence of the King. He was commandered to prison and was pardoned on 27 March 1332.

    He was summoned to Parliment from 15 November 1338 to 15 December 1357.

    He died 1 September 1359.

    Pedigreees of Some of Emperor Charlemage's Descendants page 255

    http://www.tudorplace.com.ar/GREY1.htm#John De GREY (2° B. Grey of Rotherfield)

    John De GREY (2° B. Grey of Rotherfield)

    Born: 9 Oct 1300, Rotherfield, Oxfordshire, England

    Christened: 1 Nov 1300, Rotherfield, Oxfordshire, England

    Died: 1 Sep 1359, Rotherfield, Oxfordshire, England

    Notes: Knight of the Garter. Received livery of his lands in the fifteenth year of the reign of Edward II. In 1336 he was fighting for the King in Scotland; in 1342 he took part in the expedition to Flanders. He was in France in 1343, 1345-6, 1348 and again in 1356. He took part in the Battle of Crecy in 1346 with Edward III and his son Edward, the Black Prince, and it was after his return (after the fall of Calais in 1347) that he was given licence to crenellate Rotherfield. In the 6th of the reign of Edward III, upon some differences between his lordship and William la Zouche of Haryngworth, another great baron, which was heard before the King, Lord Grey, under the irritation of the moment, drew his knife upon Lord Zouche in the royal presence, whereupon both lords were committed to prison; but the Lord Zouche was soon afterwards released, while Lord Grey was remanded and his lands seized upon by the crown. He was, however, within a short time, upon making submission, restored to favour. In 1353 he was commissioner of array for the counties of Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire, and in 1356 was one of the witnesses to the charters by which Edward Baliol granted all his rights in Scotland to Edward III. He was steward of the king's household and had summons to parliament from the 1st to the 29th Edward III, inclusive. Was one of the Original Knights of the Garter instituted at its foundation in 1344 and confirmed in 1348, where he occupied the eighth stall on the sovereign's side at Windsor Castle. [Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, England, 1883, p. 247, Grey, Barons Grey, of Rotherfield, co. Oxford]

    Father: John De GREY (1° B. Grey of Rotherfield)

    Mother: Margaret De ODDINGESELLS

    Married 1: Catherine FITZBRIAN (Dau. of Brian Fitzalan, B. Bedale and Agnes Baliol) BEF 27 Dec 1317, Rotherfield, Oxfordshire, England

    Children:

    1. John De GREY (3° B. Grey of Rotherfield)

    2. Maud De GREY

    Married 2: Avice MARMION (b. ABT 1302/9 - d. AFT 20 Mar 1378) (dau. of John De Marmion and Maud Furnival) ABT 1342

    Children:

    3. Joan De GREY

    4. Robert De GREY (Sir Knight)

    5. John De GREY (B. Marmion)

    http://our-royal-titled-noble-and-commoner-ancestors.com/p431.htm#i12940

    Sir John de Grey, 1st Lord Grey of Rotherfield1,2

    M, b. 9 October 1300, d. 1 September 1359

    Father Sir John de Grey3 b. c 1272, d. 17 Oct 1311

    Mother Margaret de Odingsells3 b. c 1277, d. c 1330

    Sir John de Grey, 1st Lord Grey of Rotherfield was born on 9 October 1300 at Rotherfield, Oxfordshire, England. He married Katherine FitzAlan, daughter of Sir Bryan FitzAlan, Baron Bedale and Maud (Agnes), before 1 March 1312; They had 1 son, John.2 Sir John de Grey, 1st Lord Grey of Rotherfield married Avice Marmion, daughter of Sir John de Marmion 2nd Baron Marmion and Maud Furnival, before 1343; They had 2 sons (John Marmion & Robert de Grey) and 1 daughter (Maud).4,2 Sir John de Grey, 1st Lord Grey of Rotherfield died on 1 September 1359 at Rotherfield, Oxfordshire, England, at age 58.2

    Family 1 Avice Marmion d. a 20 Mar 1379

    Children ?Sir Robert de Grey+5,2 d. 19 Aug 1367

    ?Maud Grey+6,2 d. 29 Jan 1394

    Family 2 Katherine FitzAlan b. c 1300, d. b 7 Aug 1328

    Children

    ?Joane Grey+

    ?Sir John de Grey, 2nd Lord Grey of Rotherfield+2 b. bt 1319 - 1329, d. 4 Jun 1375

    Citations

    1.[S3660] Unknown author, The Complete Peerage, by Cokayne, Vol. V, p. 397/8, Vol. VI, p. 145-147; Magna Charta Sureties, 1215, by F. L. Weis, 4th Ed., p. 60; The Ancestry of Dorothea Poyntz, by Ronny O. Bodine, p. 57.

    2.[S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 554-555.

    3.[S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 553-555.

    4.[S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 493-494.

    5.[S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 324.

    6.[S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 376.

    John de Grey, 1st Baron Grey de Rotherfield, KG (29 October 1300[1] - September 1359 He was an English soldier and courtier. John Grey of Rotherfield was one of the founder members of the Most Noble Order of the Garter. He is often confused with John Grey of Codnor, who bore the same coat of arms (Barry argent and azure). By December 1349, John was Lord Steward of the Royal Household of King Edward III. He distinguished himself well in the Scotch and French wars. He was summoned to parliament many times from 1338 to 1357, and is thus regarded as having become Lord Grey of Rotherfield. John was the son and heir of Sir John Grey, by Margaret only daughter and coheir of William de Odingbells. He married firstly, shortly before 1313, Katherine Fitzalan, daughter and coheir of Bryan FitzAlan, Lord FitzAlan of Bedale, Yorkshire. He married secondly Avice, daughter of John, 2nd Lord Marmion.

    Sir John de Grey, First Lord Grey of Rotherfield
    John de Grey, Knight of the Garter, 1st Lord Grey of Rotherfield was a Founder Knight of the Order of the Garter in 1348. John Grey had an argument with William la Zouche Mortimer, 1st Lord Zouche in January 1331/32 and he drew his knife in the presence of the King. He was committed to prison and was pardoned on March 27, 1332. John was summoned to Parliament from November 15, 1338 to December 15, 1357.

    John married first to before 1311/12 to Katherine, daughter and heir of Sir Bryan Fitz Alan. They had one son, John de Grey, 2nd Lord Grey of Rotherfield. Katherine died before August 7, 1328. John married secondly before 1343 to Avice Marmion, daughter of Sir John Marmion, 2nd Lord Marmion.

    John and Avice had the following children:

    John Marmion, Knight, died in 1387

    Robert de Grey, Knight, of Wilcote, Oxfordshire who married Lora de Saint Quintin.

    Maud Grey

    *

    John — Avice Marmion. Avice (daughter of John Marmion, Knight, 4th Baron of Winteringham and unnamed spouse) was born 0___ 1309; died Aft 20 Mar 1347. [Group Sheet]


  12. 149.  Avice Marmion was born 0___ 1309 (daughter of John Marmion, Knight, 4th Baron of Winteringham and unnamed spouse); died Aft 20 Mar 1347.
    Children:
    1. 74. Robert de Grey was born ~ 1333; died Bef 30 Nov 1367, Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England.

  13. 152.  John Willoughby was born ~1320, Eresby, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England; died 29 Mar 1372, Eresby, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England.

    John — Cecily Ufford. Cecily (daughter of Robert de Ufford, (II), Knight, 1st Earl of Suffolk and Margaret Norwich) was born 29 Mar 1372, Eresby, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  14. 153.  Cecily Ufford was born 29 Mar 1372, Eresby, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England (daughter of Robert de Ufford, (II), Knight, 1st Earl of Suffolk and Margaret Norwich).
    Children:
    1. 76. Robert Willoughby, 4th Baron Willoughby de Eresby was born 1343-1350, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England; died 9 Aug 1396, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England; was buried Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England.
    2. Joan Willoughby was born 0___ 1345, Eresby, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England; died Bef 1413, (Astley, Warwickshire, England).

  15. 154.  William la Zouche, 2nd Baron Zouche of Haryngworth was born 25 Dec 1321, Harringworth, Northampton, England; died 23 Apr 1382; was buried Biddlesdon Abbey, Biddlesdon, Buckingham, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Constable of Wark Castle
    • Occupation: Sheriff of Yorkshire

    William married Elizabeth de Ros Bef 16 Jul 1334, England. Elizabeth (daughter of William de Ros, Knight, 2nd Baron de Ros and Margery de Badlesmere) was born 0___ 1325, Helmsley, Yorkshire, England; died 24 May 1380, Harringworth, Northamptonshire, , England. [Group Sheet]


  16. 155.  Elizabeth de Ros was born 0___ 1325, Helmsley, Yorkshire, England (daughter of William de Ros, Knight, 2nd Baron de Ros and Margery de Badlesmere); died 24 May 1380, Harringworth, Northamptonshire, , England.

    Other Events:

    • Will: 16 May 1380

    Notes:

    Biography

    Father Sir William de Roos, 2nd Lord Roos, Sheriff of Yorkshire, Constable of Wark Castle b. c 1288, d. 3 Feb 1343

    Mother Margery de Badlesmere b. c 1306, d. 18 Oct 1363

    Elizabeth de Roos[1] was born circa 1325 at of Helmsley, Yorkshire, England. She married Sir William la Zouche, 2nd Lord Zouche of Haryngworth, son of Sir Eudes la Zouche and Joan Inge, before 16 July 1334;

    They had 3 sons (

    Sir William, 3rd Lord Zouche of Harringworth;

    Sir Thomas; &

    Eudes, Chancellor of Cambridge University)

    and 2 daughters

    (Elizabeth, wife of Sir John Basing; &
    Margery, wife of Sir Robert, 4th Lord Willoughby of Eresby).[2]

    Elizabeth de Roos left a will on 16 May 1380.4,6 She died on 24 May 1380.[3]

    Family

    Sir William la Zouche, 2nd Lord Zouche of Haryngworth b. c 25 Dec 1321, d. 23 Apr 1382

    Children

    Margery la Zouche d. 18 Oct 1391
    Sir William la Zouche, 3rd Lord Zouche of Harringworth b. c 1342, d. 13 May 1396
    Sir Thomas la Zouche4,6 b. c 1345, d. 30 Oct 1404

    Children:
    1. 77. Margery la Zouche, Baroness of Willoughby was born Abt 1355, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England; died 18 Oct 1391.

  17. 156.  Roger le Strange, 4th Baron Strange of Knockin was born 15 Aug 1301, Ellesmere, Shropshire, England; died 29 Jul 1349, Sedgrebrook, Lincolnshire, England.

    Notes:

    Roger Le STRANGE (5º B. Strange of Knockin)

    Born: 15 Aug 1301, Ellesmere, Shropshire, England

    Died: 29 Jul 1349

    Notes: brother and heir. On 20 Jan 1326/7 he was made a Banneret. In 1335 he was found to be heir to his uncle, Eubolo Lestrange (q.v.), whose widow, Alice, Countess of Lincoln, granted him in 1336/7 a life-estate in the manor of Ellesmere;

    in Jun 1337 he was sum. to come to the King;

    in 1341/2 to a Council at Westminster;

    and on 20 Nov 1348 (22 Edw. III) to Parl. as Roger Lestrange.

    In 1340 and 1345 he was in commissions for Salop. In Aug 1347 he was staying at the war overseas.

    He married 1stly, Maud; and 2ndly, before 25 Mar. 1344, Joan, dau. and coheir (and eventually heir) of Oliver De Ingham, Lord Ingham.

    He died 29 Jul 1349 in the Manor of Sedgebrook, Lincs.

    Joan, married 2ndly, Sir Miles De Stapleton, K.G. She died before 12 Dec 1365 and was Buried at Ingham. Miles died 4 Oct 1364 and was Buried at Ingham.

    Father: John Le STRANGE (3º B. Strange of Knockin)

    Mother: Isolda De WALTON

    Married 1: Maud ? (b. 1305 - d. 1344)

    Married 2: Joan De INGHAM (b. 1299 / 1337) (dau. of Sir Oliver De Ingham and Elizabeth La Zouche) (m.2 of Miles De Stapelton)

    Children:

    1. Roger Le STRANGE (6º B. Strange of Knockin)

    2. Maud Le STRANGE

    3. Alianor Le STRANGE (B. Grey of Ruthin)

    *

    Died:
    at the manor...

    Roger married Joan de Ingham, Baroness Ingham Bef 25 Mar 1344. Joan (daughter of Oliver de Ingham, Knight, Lord Ingham and Elizabeth la Zouche) was born ~ 1320, Ellesmere, Shropshire, England; died 12 Dec 1365, Ingham, Norfolkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  18. 157.  Joan de Ingham, Baroness Ingham was born ~ 1320, Ellesmere, Shropshire, England (daughter of Oliver de Ingham, Knight, Lord Ingham and Elizabeth la Zouche); died 12 Dec 1365, Ingham, Norfolkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Jane de Ingham

    Notes:

    Joan was the daughter and coheiress of Oliver de Ingham in Norfolk, and widow of Roger Le Strange of Nockin.

    Joan married Sir Roger Le Strange 4th Baron Strange of Knockyn, son of Sir John Le Strange 2nd Baron le Strange of Knockyn and Iseult (Isolda), before March 25, 1344.He was her 1st husband and his 2nd wife. (Sir Roger Le Strange 4th Baron Strange of Knockyn was born on 15 Aug 1301 in Knockin, Oswestry, Shropshire, England and died on 29 Jul 1349 in Sedgebrook, Lincolnshire, England

    Joan also married Sir Miles II Staplton K.G., of Bedale, son of Sir Gilbert de Stapleton of Bedale and Agnes FitzAlan Heiress of Bedale, on 30 Nov 1350. her 2nd husband and his 2nd wife. (Sir Miles II Staplton K.G., of Bedale was born in 1320 in Bedale, North Riding Yorkshire, England, died on 4 Oct 1364 in Battle of Auray, France and was buried in Ingham, Smallburgh, Norfolk, England.)

    Henceforward Stapleton is often described as 'of Ingham' as of 'Bedale', and became a considerable proprietor in Norfolk. Stapleton's eldest son John died before him, and he was succeeded at Ingham as well as Bedale by Miles, his son by the heiress of Ingham.

    *

    Died:
    at Ingham Manor...

    Children:
    1. Maude le Strange was born Abt 1321, Knockin, Shropshire, England.
    2. 78. Roger le Strange, 5th Baron Strange of Knockin was born ~ 1327, Knockyn, Shropshire, England; died 26 Aug 1382, Monmouthshire, Wales.

  19. 158.  Edmund FitzAlan, Knight, 9th Earl of Arundel was born 1 May 1285, Marlborough Castle, Marlborough, Wiltshire, England (son of Richard FitzAlan, Knight, 8th Earl of Arundel and Alice of Saluzzo, Countess of Arundel); died 17 Nov 1326, Hereford, Herefordshire, England; was buried Haughmond Abbey, Shropshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Residence: Paris, France
    • Also Known As: 3rd Earl of Arundel

    Notes:

    Edmund FitzAlan, 9th Earl of Arundel[a] (1 May 1285 – 17 November 1326) was an English nobleman prominent in the conflict between Edward II and his barons. His father, Richard FitzAlan, 2nd Earl of Arundel, died on 9 March 1301, while Edmund was still a minor. He therefore became a ward of John de Warenne, Earl of Surrey, and married Warenne's granddaughter Alice. In 1306 he was styled Earl of Arundel, and served under Edward I in the Scottish Wars, for which he was richly rewarded.

    After Edward I's death, Arundel became part of the opposition to the new king Edward II, and his favourite Piers Gaveston. In 1311 he was one of the so-called Lords Ordainers who assumed control of government from the king. Together with Thomas, Earl of Lancaster, he was responsible for the death of Gaveston in 1312. From this point on, however, his relationship to the king became more friendly. This was to a large extent due to his association with the king's new favourite Hugh Despenser the Younger, whose daughter was married to Arundel's son. Arundel supported the king in suppressing rebellions by Roger Mortimer and other Marcher Lords, and eventually also Thomas of Lancaster. For this he was awarded with land and offices.

    His fortune changed, however, when the country was invaded in 1326 by Mortimer, who had made common cause with the king's wife, Queen Isabella. Immediately after the capture of Edward II, the queen, Edward III's regent, ordered Arundel executed, his title forfeit and his property confiscated. Arundel's son and heir Richard only recovered the title and lands in 1331, after Edward III had taken power from the regency of Isabella and Mortimer. In the 1390s, a cult emerged around the late earl. He was venerated as a martyr, though he was never canonised.

    Family and early life

    Edmund FitzAlan was born in the Castle of Marlborough, in Wiltshire, on 1 May 1285.[1] He was the son of Richard FitzAlan, 8th Earl of Arundel, and his wife, Alice of Saluzzo, daughter of Thomas I of Saluzzo in Italy. Richard had been in opposition to the king during the political crisis of 1295, and as a result he had incurred great debts and had parts of his land confiscated.[2] When Richard died in 09/03/1301, Edmund's wardship was given to John de Warenne, Earl of Surrey. Warenne's only son, William, had died in 1286, so his daughter Alice was now heir apparent to the Warenne earldom. Alice was offered in marriage to Edmund, who for unknown reasons initially refused her. By 1305 he had changed his mind, however, and the two were married.[3]

    In April 1306, shortly before turning twenty-one, Edmund was granted possession of his father's title and land. On 22 May 1306, he was knighted by Edward I, along with the young Prince Edward – the future Edward II.[1] The knighting was done in expectation of military service the Scottish Wars, and after the campaign was over, Arundel was richly rewarded. Edward I pardoned the young earl a debt of ¹4,234. This flow of patronage continued after the death of Edward I in 1307; in 1308 Edward II returned the hundred of Purslow to Arundel, an honour that Edward I had confiscated from Edmund's father.[4] There were also official honours in the early years of Edward II's reign. At the new king's coronation on 25 February 1308, Arundel officiated as chief butler (or pincerna), a hereditary office of the earls of Arundel.[3]

    Opposition to Edward II

    Though the reign of Edward II was initially harmonious, he soon met with opposition from several of his earls and prelates.[5] At the source of the discontent was the king's relationship with the young Gascon knight Piers Gaveston, who had been exiled by Edward I, but was recalled immediately upon Edward II's accession.[6] Edward's favouritism towards the upstart Gaveston was an offence to the established nobility, and his elevation to the earldom of Cornwall was particularly offensive to the established nobility.[7] A group of magnates led by Henry de Lacy, Earl of Lincoln, forced Gaveston into exile in 1308.[8] By 1309, however, Edward had reconciled himself with the opposition, and Gaveston was allowed to return.[9]

    Arundel joined the opposition at an early point, and did not attend the Stamford parliament in July 1309, where Gaveston's return was negotiated.[10] After Gaveston returned, his behaviour became even more offensive, and opposition towards him grew.[11] In addition to this, there was great discontent with Edward II's failure to follow up his father's Scottish campaigns.[12] On 16 March 1310, the king had to agree to the appointment of a committee known as the Lords Ordainers, who were to be in charge of the reform of the royal government. Arundel was one of eight earls among the twenty-one Ordainers.[13]

    The Ordainers once more sent Gaveston into exile in 1311, but by 1312 he was back.[14] Now the king's favourite was officially an outlaw, and Arundel was among the earls who swore to hunt him down. The leader of the opposition – after Lincoln's death the year before – was now Thomas, Earl of Lancaster.[15] In June 1312 Gaveston was captured, tried before Lancaster, Arundel and the earls of Warwick and Hereford, and executed.[16] A reconciliation was achieved between the king and the offending magnates, and Arundel and the others received pardons, but animosity prevailed. In 1314 Arundel was among the magnates who refused to assist Edward in a campaign against the Scottish, resulting in the disastrous English defeat at the Battle of Bannockburn.[10]

    Return to loyalty

    Around the time of Bannockburn, however, Arundel's loyalty began to shift back towards the king. Edward's rapprochement towards the earl had in fact started earlier, when on 2 November 1313, the king pardoned Arundel's royal debts.[17] The most significant factor in this process though, was the marriage alliance between Arundel and the king's new favourites, the Despensers. Hugh Despenser the Younger and his father Hugh Despenser the elder were gradually taking over control of the government, and using their power to enrich themselves.[18] While this alienated most of the nobility, Arundel's situation was different. At some point in 1314–1315, his son Richard was betrothed to Isabel, daughter of Hugh Despenser the Younger.[17] Now that he found himself back in royal favour, Arundel started receiving rewards in the form of official appointments. In 1317 he was appointed Warden of the Marches of Scotland, and in August 1318, he helped negotiate the Treaty of Leake, which temporarily reconciled the king with Thomas of Lancaster.[10]


    Clun Castle was the source of the personal animosity between Arundel and Roger Mortimer.
    With Arundel's change of allegiance came a conflict of interest. In August 1321, a demand was made to the king that Hugh Despenser and his father, Hugh Despenser the elder, be sent into exile.[19] The king, facing a rebellion in the Welsh Marches, had no choice but to assent.[20] Arundel voted for the expulsion, but later he claimed that he did so under compulsion, and also supported their recall in December.[10] Arundel had suffered personally from the rebellion, when Roger Mortimer seized his castle of Clun.[21][22] Early in 1322, Arundel joined King Edward in a campaign against the Mortimer family.[20] The opposition soon crumbled, and the king decided to move against Thomas of Lancaster, who had been supporting the marcher rebellion all along. Lancaster was defeated at the Battle of Boroughbridge in March, and executed.[23]

    In the aftermath of the rebellion, the Despensers enriched themselves on the forfeited estates of the rebels, and Hugh Despenser the elder was created Earl of Winchester in May 1322.[24] Also Arundel, who was now one of the king's principal supporters, was richly rewarded. After the capture of Roger Mortimer in 1322, he received the forfeited Mortimer lordship of Chirk in Wales.[10] He was also trusted with important offices: he became Chief Justiciar of North and South Wales in 1323, and in 1325 he was made Warden of the Welsh Marches, responsible for the array in Wales.[1] He also extended his influence through marriage alliances; in 1325 he secured marriages between two of his daughters and the sons and heirs of two of Lancaster's main allies: the deceased earls of Hereford and Warwick.[b]

    Final years and death

    In 1323, Roger Mortimer, who had been held in captivity in the Tower of London, escaped and fled to France.[22] Two years later, Queen Isabella travelled to Paris on an embassy to the French king. Here, Isabella and Mortimer developed a plan to invade England and replace Edward II on the throne with his son, the young Prince Edward, who was in the company of Isabella.[25] Isabella and Mortimer landed in England on 24 September 1326, and due to the virulent resentment against the Despenser regime, few came to the king's aid.[26] Arundel initially escaped the invading force in the company of the king, but was later dispatched to his estates in Shropshire to gather troops.[27] At Shrewsbury he was captured by his old enemy John Charlton of Powys, and brought to Queen Isabella at Hereford. On 17 November – the day after Edward II had been taken captive – Arundel was executed, allegedly on the instigation of Mortimer.[10] According to a chronicle account, the use of a blunt sword was ordered, and the executioner needed 22 strokes to sever the earl's head from his body.[28]


    The ruins of Haughmond Abbey, Arundel's final resting place.
    Arundel's body was initially interred at the Franciscan church in Hereford. It had been his wish, however, to be buried at the family's traditional resting place of Haughmond Abbey in Shropshire, and this is where he was finally buried.[29] Though he was never canonised, a cult emerged around the late earl in the 1390s, associating him with the 9th-century martyr king St Edmund. This veneration may have been inspired by a similar cult around his grandson, Richard FitzAlan, 11th Earl of Arundel, who was executed by Richard II in 1397.[30]

    Arundel was attainted at his execution; his estates were forfeited to the crown, and large parts of these were appropriated by Isabella and Mortimer.[31] The castle and honour of Arundel was briefly held by Edward II's half-brother Edmund, Earl of Kent, who was executed on 3 September 1330.[1] Edmund FitzAlan's son, Richard, failed in an attempted rebellion against the crown in June 1330, and had to flee to France. In October the same year, the guardianship of Isabella and Mortimer was supplanted by the personal rule of King Edward III. This allowed Richard to return and reclaim his inheritance, and on 8 February 1331, he was fully restored to his father's lands, and created Earl of Arundel.[32]

    Issue

    Edmund and Alice had at least seven children:[33]

    Name Birth date Death date Notes
    Richard FitzAlan, 10th Earl of Arundel c. 1313 24 January 1376 Married (1) Isabel le Despenser, (2) Eleanor of Lancaster
    Edmund — c. 1349
    Michael — —
    Mary — 29 August 1396 Married John le Strange, 4th Baron Strange of Blackmere[34]
    Aline — 20 January 1386 Married Roger le Strange, 5th Baron Strange of Knockin[35]
    Alice — 1326 Married John de Bohun, 5th Earl of Hereford
    Katherine — d. 1375/76 Married (1) Henry Hussey, 2nd Baron Hussey, (2) Andrew Peverell
    Eleanor — — Married Gerard de Lisle, 1st Baron Lisle
    Elizabeth - - Married William Latimer, 4th Baron Latimer
    Ancestry[edit]

    Residence:
    in exile...

    Died:
    executed...

    Edmund married Alice de Warenne, Countess of Arundel 0___ 1305. Alice (daughter of William de Warenne and Joan de Vere) was born 15 Jun 1287, Warren, Sussex, England; died 23 May 1338. [Group Sheet]


  20. 159.  Alice de Warenne, Countess of Arundel was born 15 Jun 1287, Warren, Sussex, England (daughter of William de Warenne and Joan de Vere); died 23 May 1338.

    Notes:

    Alice de Warenne, Countess of Arundel (15 June 1287 -23 May 1338) was an English noblewoman and heir apparent to the Earldom of Surrey. In 1305, she married Edmund FitzAlan, 9th Earl of Arundel.

    Family

    Alice, the only daughter of William de Warenne (1256-1286) and Joan de Vere, was born on 15 June 1287 in Warren, Sussex, six months after her father was accidentally killed in a tournament on 15 December 1286. On the death of her paternal grandfather, John de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey in 1304, her only sibling John de Warenne, 7th Earl of Surrey succeeded to the earldom. He became estranged from his childless wife and they never reconciled, leaving Alice as the heir presumptive to the Surrey estates and title.

    Marriage to the Earl of Arundel

    In 1305, Alice married Edmund Fitzalan, 9th Earl of Arundel,[1] the son of Richard Fitzalan, 8th Earl of Arundel and Alice of Saluzzo.[2] He had initially refused her, for reasons which were not recorded;[citation needed] however, by 1305, he had changed his mind and they were wed.[1] They had nine recorded children,[citation needed] and their chief residence was Arundel Castle in Sussex. Arundel inherited his title on 9 March 1302 upon his father's death.[2] He was summoned to Parliament as Lord Arundel in 1306, and was later one of the Lords Ordainers. He also took part in the Scottish wars.

    The Earl of Arundel and his brother-in-law John de Warenne were the only nobles who remained loyal to King Edward II, after Queen Isabella and her lover Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March returned to England in 1326. He had allied himself to the King's favourite Hugh le Despenser, and agreed to the marriage of his son to Despenser's granddaughter. Arundel had previously been granted many of the traitor Mortimer's forfeited estates, and was appointed Justice of Wales in 1322 and Warden of the Welsh Marches in 1325. He was also made Constable of Montgomery Castle which became his principal base.

    The Earl of Arundel was captured in Shropshire by the Queen's party.[3] On 17 November 1326 in Hereford, Arundel was beheaded by order of the Queen, leaving Alice de Warenne a widow. Her husband's estates and titles were forfeited to the Crown following Arundel's execution, but later restored to her eldest son, Richard.[citation needed]

    Alice died before 23 May 1338,[1] aged 50. Her brother died in 1347 without legitimate issue, thus the title of Surrey eventually passed to Alice's son, Richard.

    Issue

    Richard FitzAlan, 10th Earl of Arundel, known as Copped Hat, (1306 Arundel Castle, Sussex – 24 January 1376), also succeeded to the title of Earl of Surrey on 12 April 1361. He married firstly Isabel le Despenser, whom he later repudiated, and was granted an annulment by Pope Clement VI. He had a son Edmund who was bastardised by the annulment. His second wife, whom he married on 5 February 1345, by Papal dispensation, was Eleanor of Lancaster, the daughter of Henry, 3rd Earl of Lancaster and Maud Chaworth. She was the widow of John de Beaumont, 2nd Lord Beaumont. Richard and Eleanor had three sons and four daughters, including Richard FitzAlan, 11th Earl of Arundel and Joan de Bohun, Countess of Hereford.
    Edward FitzAlan (1308–1398)
    Alice FitzAlan (born 1310), married John de Bohun, 5th Earl of Hereford.
    Joan FitzAlan (born 1312), married Warin Gerard, Baron L'Isle.
    Aline FitzAlan (1314–1386), married Roger le Strange, 5th Baron Strange of Knockyn, by whom she had issue.
    John FitzAlan (born 1315)
    Catherine FitzAlan (died 1376), married firstly Andrew Peverell, and secondly Henry Hussey of Cockfield. Had issue by her second husband.
    Elizabeth FitzAlan (1320–1389), married William Latimer, 4th Baron Latimer, by whom she had one daughter, Elizabeth.
    Eleanor FitzAlan

    Notes:

    Residence (Family):
    Arundel Castle is a restored and remodeled medieval castle in Arundel, West Sussex, England. It was established by Roger de Montgomery on Christmas Day 1067. Roger became the first to hold the earldom of Arundel by the graces of William the Conqueror. The castle was damaged in the English Civil War and then restored in the 18th and 19th centuries.

    View image, history & source ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arundel_Castle

    Children:
    1. Richard FitzAlan, Knight, 10th Earl of Arundel was born 1306-1313, Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England; died 24 Jan 1376, Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England; was buried Lewes Priory, Southover, Sussex, England.
    2. Mary de Arundel was born Corfham Castle, Diddlebury, Shropshire, England; died 29 Aug 1396, Corfham, Shropshire, England.
    3. 79. Aline FitzAlan was born 0___ 1314, Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England; died 20 Jan 1386.
    4. Elizabeth FitzAlan was born 0___ 1320, (England); died 0___ 1389.

  21. 166.  William Gascoigne, VII, Knight was born Abt 1320, Gawthorpe, Yorkshire, England (son of William Gascoigne, VI and Marilda de Gawkethorpe); died 0___ 1383, Harewood, Yorkshire, England.

    Notes:

    About Sir William Gascoigne
    ID: I072469
    Name: William Gaskin , IX ;[SIR KNIGHT]
    Sex: M
    ALIA: William /Gascoigne/, IX ;[SIR KNIGHT]
    Birth: 1293 in Of, Gawthorpe, Yorkshire, England
    Death: 1383
    Father: William Gaskin , VIII ;[SIR KNIGHT] b: ABT 1250 in Harwood, Yorkshire, England

    Mother: Matilda de Gawkethorp b: ABT 1267 in Gawthorpe, Yorkshire, Eng

    Marriage 1 Margaret Agnes Franke b: ABT 1312 in Alwoodley, Yorkshire, England

    * Married: 1334 in Of, Alwoodley, Yorkshire, England
    Children

    1. Henry Gaskin b: in Mickelfield, Yorkshire, England
    2. William Gaskin , X ;[SIR KNIGHT] b: ABT 1333 in Cardington, Bedford, England
    3. Elizabeth Gaskin b: ABT 1334a

    Birth:
    Map of Kirkby Wharfe ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kirkby_Wharfe

    William married Margaret Agnes Franke Abt 1361, Alwoodley, Yorkshire, England. Margaret (daughter of William Franke and Alice Aldwaldley) was born Abt 1332, Alwoodley, Yorkshire, England; died Harewood, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  22. 167.  Margaret Agnes Franke was born Abt 1332, Alwoodley, Yorkshire, England (daughter of William Franke and Alice Aldwaldley); died Harewood, Yorkshire, England.

    Notes:

    Birth:
    Alwoodley is a civil parish and suburb of Leeds in West Yorkshire, England. It is 5 miles (8.0 km) north of central Leeds and is one of the most affluent areas of the city. The name Alwoodley is said to be a corruption of 'Aethelwaldley', as it was originally known in the Middle Ages, meaning the woodland clearing (ley), at Aethelwald's farm.[2] Alwoldelei in the 1086 Domesday Book. The route of the Roman road between Ilkley and Tadcaster passes through Alwoodley. Part of it was excavated along Lakeland Crescent in 1994. Alwoodley lies in Leeds 17 which was reported to contain the most expensive housing area in Yorkshire and the Humber by The Times.

    Map, images & source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alwoodley

    Died:
    at Gawthorpe Hall...

    Children:
    1. William Gascoigne, VIII, Knight was born ~ 1350, Gawthorpe, Wakefield, Yorkshire, England; died 17 Dec 1419, Harewood, Yorkshire, England; was buried Harewood, Yorkshire, England.
    2. 83. Elizabeth Gascoigne was born ~ 1352, Harewood, Yorkshire, England; died ~ 1378.
    3. Margaret Gascoigne was born Abt 1360, Harewood, Yorkshire, England.
    4. Nicholas Gascoigne, Sr. was born 0___ 1363, Harewood, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1428.

  23. 194.  William Pert was born ~ 1340; died Bef 1390, Leyburne, Yorkshire, England.

    William — Joan Scrope. [Group Sheet]


  24. 195.  Joan Scrope (daughter of Stephen Scrope, Knight and Isabel LNU).
    Children:
    1. 97. Elizabeth Pert was born 0___ 1380; died 14 Apr 1429, Leyburne, Yorkshire, England.

  25. 196.  Henry Savile, (IV) Esquire was born ~1335, Elland, West Yorkshire, England (son of John Savile, Knight and Isabel de Eland); died 0___ 1412, (Thornhill, West Yorkshire, England).

    Notes:

    IV. HENRY SAVILE, ESQ., of Elland and of Thornhill, by his marriage; died 1412 (Hunter); mar. Elizabeth, daughter and heiress of Simon, son and heir of Sir Brian Thornhill, Knt., of Thornhill. They had issue -

    Sir THOMAS (V).

    1 In the same Chantry Surveys, p. 292, Sir John Savile is said to have founded a chantry at Thornhill with rents of lands "in Brigehowse by will xmo Decembris, Edward iiij, xxmo." This is not in, nor agrees with, he above will.
    2 Mr. E. W. Crossley found this long Latin will at York, and copied it in Halifax Wills, ii, 216, but nothing further relating to the Savile family is in his extract.

    5
    Henry, mar. Eleanor, daughter of Thomas Copley, Esq., of Copley (A quo the Saviles of Copley, Hullinedge, Newhall, Methley, etc.).

    end

    Henry — Elizabeth Thornhill. Elizabeth (daughter of Simon Thornhill and unnamed spouse) was born Thornhill Hall, Thornhill, West Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  26. 197.  Elizabeth Thornhill was born Thornhill Hall, Thornhill, West Yorkshire, England (daughter of Simon Thornhill and unnamed spouse).

    Notes:

    Married:
    ...Elizabeth Thornhill, the only child of Simon Thornhill, married Sir Henry Savile...

    Children:
    1. 98. Thomas Savile, (V) Knight was born Thornhill, West Yorkshire, England.

  27. 198.  John Pilkington, Knight was born 0___ 1364, Brixworth, Northamptonshire, England; died 16 Feb 1421, Brixworth, Northamptonshire, England.

    Notes:

    About Sir John Pilkington, Knight

    Lord of, Pilkington, & Bury, fought at, Agincourt. Roger's son Sir John Pilkington (d. 1421) was granted custody of the manors of Prestwich and Alkrington.

    He married Margaret (d. 1436), heir of John Verdon of Brixworth, Northamptonshire, soon after the death of her first husband, Hugh Bradshaw of Leigh. Margaret's son from her first marriage, William Bradshaw, died in 1415, leaving a daughter, Elizabeth.

    In 1430 Margaret settled the manors of her inheritance which included Stagenhoe in Hertfordshire, Clipston, Northamptonshire and Brixworth in Northamptonshire, and Bressingham in Norfolk, on her Pilkington sons, John, Edmund (d. about 1451), and Robert (d. 1457).

    Links:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pilkington_of_Lancashire
    http://thepeerage.com/p51240.htm

    end

    John — Margaret de Verdun, 2nd Baroness de Verdon. Margaret was born 0___ 1362, Brixworth, Northamptonshire, Englan; died 24 Nov 1436, Pilkington, Lancashire, England. [Group Sheet]


  28. 199.  Margaret de Verdun, 2nd Baroness de Verdon was born 0___ 1362, Brixworth, Northamptonshire, Englan; died 24 Nov 1436, Pilkington, Lancashire, England.

    Notes:

    About Margaret Pinkington, 2nd Baroness de Verdon
    Margaret, 2nd Baroness de VERDON

    Birth: ABT 1362 in Brixworth, Northamptonshire, England
    Death: 24 NOV 1436
    Parents: Edmond Verdon, Joan
    Married: Hugh de Bradshagh, Sir John Pilkington, Knt.
    from gwenbj's Rootsweb database

    Sir John Pilkington, Knt., and his wife Margaret (Verdon) Bradshagh) (IPM 1439), daughter of Sir John Verdon, Knt. Sir John de Verdon (or Verdun) of Brisingham, Norfolk, and Brixworth, co. Northampton, son of Thomas de Verdon of the same, was b. ca. 1300 (age 16 years on 24 Jun 1316), and d. ca. 1346. By his first wife, Maud, he was father of Margaret (Verdon) (Bradshagh) Pilkington. Sir William Harington's sister Margaret married Sir Thomas Pilkington, slain 1437. [Ancestral Roots line 34-36]

    Note: The AR account above is wrong in several ways, see below.

    Her son by her 1st mariage was b. c1378, and in her 2nd marriage to John Pilkington, dated 1383 she had, according to Burke's Peerage, p. 1924, the following children:

    1) John (Sir), b. c 1394. (the eldest son, but daughters may have been born earlier)
    2) Edmund.
    3) Robert, b. c 1398.
    4) Henry, d. young.
    5) Roger, dsp.
    1) Katherine.
    2) Elizabeth.
    3) Margaret.
    4) Hannah.
    Sources

    Weis, Frederick Lewis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (7th ed., Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1992.), 34-35, 34-36, Los Angeles Public Library, Gen 974 W426 1992.
    Croston, James, County Families of Lancashire and Cheshire (Manchester: J. Heywood, 1887.), p. 259, Los Angeles Public Library, 929.725 C951.
    Pilkington, John, History of the Pilkington Family of Lancashire (Liverpool: J. Pilkington, 1912.), pp. 45, 296, Family History Library, 929.242 P646p.
    Cokayne, George Edward, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct, or Dormant (London: St. Catherine Press, 1910.), 12 (2): 245, Los Angeles Public Library, 929.721 C682.
    Richardson, Douglas, Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 2005.), p. 385, Family History Library, 942 D5rdm.
    Links

    http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=jweber&id=I04250
    (The) history of the Lancashire family of Pilkington and its branches from ... By John Pilkington Pg.17

    "Margaret, the wife of Sir John, died 28th April, 1436, as shown by the Inquisition post mortem for co. Suffolk, dated 21st February, 15 Henry VI ; and, as already stated, the date of Sir John's death was 8th March, 1421. They had issue nine children.

    1. Sir John, of whom we shall treat shortly as

    descent VIII, but who died without issue, and was

    succeeded by his nephew Sir Thomas, the eldest

    son of Sir John's brother Edmund.

    2. Edmund, to whom reference is made later as

    descent VIIIa, on page 23.

    3. A son, who is said to have died young. 20

    4. Roger, who had no issue.

    5. Robert, whose eldest son was Sir John, of

    Wakefield (treated of on page 29), from whom

    the Yorkshire branch trace their descent, though

    through a natural son of Sir John. Robert is named in fine levied 8 Henry VI (1430). He and his sons are referred to in Appendix K.

    6. Elizabeth, who married Sir William Atherton,

    her father's ward, and had issue.

    7. Margaret, who married, first, Nicholas Griffin,

    who died 15 Hen. VI (1437) leaving five sons ; and,

    secondly, Sir Thomas Savile [Savell] of Howley

    and Thornhill, knight of the shire for co. York, in

    1442, by whom there were four children. Her

    daughter, Anna Savile, married Sir John Butler,

    knight, of Bewsey, Baron of Warrington, who was murdered, it is said, out of revenge, at the instiga-

    tion of Thomas Stanley, first Earl of Derby.

    8. Hannah, who married Sir Francis Bernard,

    of Acorn Bank, Westmoreland, ancestor of the

    Earl of Bandon.

    9. Katherine, who married Sir Henry Scaris-

    brick, of Scarisbrick, near Ormskirk, who fought

    at Agincourt, along with his father-in-law and

    brother-in-law, [33rd Report of Deputy Keeper, p. 33].

    They had a son, Henry, and three daughters."

    -------------------------------

    Margaret (Verdun) Pilkington's Profile Family Tree & Genealogy Tools Margaret Pilkington formerly Verdun aka Bradshagh Born [date unknown] in Brixworth,,Northamptonshire,England Daughter of Edmund Verdun and [mother unknown] [sibling(s) unknown] Wife of Hugh Bradshagh — married 1377 in Westleigh,,Lancashire,England Wife of John Pilkington — married before August 26, 1383 [location unknown] Mother of William Bradshagh, Margaret (Pilkington) Saville, Edmund Pilkington Esq and Robert Pilkington Died November 24, 1436 in England

    http://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Verdun-10

    end

    Children:
    1. 99. Margaret Pilkington was born Pilkington, Lancashire, England; died ~ 1445, Thornhill, West Yorkshire, England.