Sir William de Greystoke, 2nd Baron Greystoke

Male 1321 - 1359  (38 years)


Generations:      Standard    |    Vertical    |    Compact    |    Box    |    Text    |    Ahnentafel    |    Media    |   Map

Generation: 1

  1. 1.  Sir William de Greystoke, 2nd Baron Greystoke was born 6 Jan 1321, Grimthorpe, Cumbria, England (son of Ralph de Greystoke, 1st Baron Audley and Alice de Audley); died 10 Jul 1359, Brancepeth Castle, Durham, England; was buried St. Andrews Church, Greystoke, Cumbria, England.

    Notes:

    William de Greystoke, 2nd Baron Greystoke, (6 January 1321 Ė 10 July 1359) of Greystoke in Cumbria, was an English peer and landowner.

    Origins

    Greystoke was the son of Ralph de Greystoke, 1st Baron Greystoke, and his wife Alice, daughter of Hugh, Lord Audley.[1]

    Career

    He was born at the family home in Grimthorpe, on 6 January 1321.[1] Greystoke's father died while he was still a child and he became a ward of his mother's second husband, Ralph Neville, 2nd Baron Neville de Raby,[2] until he reached his majority in 1342.[1] During the next ten years he was involved, on the English side, in the Hundred Years' War between the Kingdom of England and the Kingdom of France and was present at the Siege of Calais in 1346.[1] He served under Edward, the Black Prince, in France.[3] He participated in the Northern Crusades of Henry of Grosmont, 1st Duke of Lancaster to Prussia in 1351Ė2.[1] In the early 1350s he was involved in the negotiations to secure the release of King David II of Scotland, who had been taken prisoner at the Battle of Neville's Cross on 17 October 1346.[1] Greystoke was made a captain of Berwick-upon-Tweed, but due to his service in France, he was not present when the town fell to the Scots in August 1355.[1] In October 1353 Greystoke received a royal licence to crenellate "his dwelling place", later known as Greystoke Castle.[4] He was also responsible for renovations on Morpeth Castle which he also owned.[4]

    Marriages and children

    He married twice and had children by his second wife only:

    Firstly to Lucy de Lucie,[3] daughter of Thomas de Lucy, 2nd Baron Lucy (died 1365),[5] but the marriage was childless,[2] and they divorced.[3] During this time, his stepfather, Ralph Neville, unsuccessfully proposed that Greystoke should name his half-brothers, Ralph, Robert, and William Neville, as his heirs.[2]
    Secondly he married Joane FitzHugh, daughter of Baron Fitzhugh, by whom he had four children:
    Ralph de Greystoke, 3rd Baron Greystoke, eldest son and heir.
    Robert de Greystoke;
    William de Greystoke;
    Alice de Greystoke,[3] the first wife of Robert Harington, 3rd Baron Harington (1356Ė1406)[6] of Gleaston Castle in the manor of Aldingham in Furness, Lancashire.
    Death and burial[edit]
    Greystoke died on 10 July 1359, at Brancepeth Castle, the seat of his step-father Ralph Neville, 2nd Baron Neville de Raby,[5] and was buried in the parish church of St. Andrew's in Greystoke, Cumbria,[1] with a mass conducted by Gilbert de Welton, Bishop of Carlisle.[5] His funeral took place with "great pomp and solemnity", and was attended by great personages including: Roger de Clifford, 5th Baron de Clifford,[7] Henry Scrope, 1st Baron Scrope of Masham, Thomas, Baron Musgrave, the Abbot of Holmcultram Abbey and the Abbot of Shap Abbey.[5]

    end of biography

    William — Joane FitzHugh. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. Ralph de Greystoke, 3rd Baron Greystoke was born 18 Oct 1353, Ravensworth Castle, Yorkshire, England; was christened 18 Oct 1353, Kirkby Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England; died 6 Apr 1418, Kirkby Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England.

Generation: 2

  1. 2.  Ralph de Greystoke, 1st Baron Audley was born 15 Aug 1299; died 14 Jul 1323, Gateshead, Durham, England; was buried Newminster Abbey, Northumberland, England.

    Ralph — Alice de Audley. Alice (daughter of Hugh de Audley, 1st Baron Audley of Stratton and Isolde (Isabella) de Mortimer) was born 1302-1304, Hadley, Lambourne, Berkshire, England; died 12 Jan 1374, Greystoke Manor, Northumberland, England; was buried Durham Cathedral, Durham, Durhamshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 3.  Alice de Audley was born 1302-1304, Hadley, Lambourne, Berkshire, England (daughter of Hugh de Audley, 1st Baron Audley of Stratton and Isolde (Isabella) de Mortimer); died 12 Jan 1374, Greystoke Manor, Northumberland, England; was buried Durham Cathedral, Durham, Durhamshire, England.
    Children:
    1. 1. William de Greystoke, 2nd Baron Greystoke was born 6 Jan 1321, Grimthorpe, Cumbria, England; died 10 Jul 1359, Brancepeth Castle, Durham, England; was buried St. Andrews Church, Greystoke, Cumbria, England.


Generation: 3

  1. 6.  Hugh de Audley, 1st Baron Audley of StrattonHugh de Audley, 1st Baron Audley of Stratton was born 0___ 1267, Stratton Audley, Oxfordshire, England (son of James de Audley, Knight and Ela Longespee); died Bef 1326; was buried Much Marcle, Saint Bartholomew's Churchyard, Much Marcle, Herefordshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Member of Parliament
    • Residence: London, Middlesex, England
    • Also Known As: Sir Hugh de Audley, 1st Earl of Gloucester

    Notes:

    Hugh de Audley, 1st Baron Audley of Stratton, was the son of James de Aldithley and Ela Longesp‚ee, the daughter of William II Longesp‚ee and Idoina de Camville.

    He married Isolde de Mortimer about 1290.

    They were the parents of at least three children

    Sir Hugh de Audley, 1st Earl of Gloucester, who married Margaret de Clare, the daughter of Gilbert de Clare and Joan of Acre.
    Alice de Audley, who married Ralph de Neville, 2nd Baron Neville of Raby, the son of Ralph de Neville and Euphemia de Clavering
    James de Audley.

    Hugh de Alditheley or Audley, brother of Nicholas, Lord Audley of Heleigh, was summoned to parliament as "Hugh de Audley, Seniori" on 15 May, 1321, 14th Edward II. His lordship had been engaged during the reign of Edward I in the king's service and was called "Senior" to distinguish him from his son. Being concerned in the insurrection of Thomas, Earl of Lancaster, 15th Edward II [1322], the baron was committed a close prisoner to Wallingford Castle but making his peace with the king he obtained his release and suffered nothing further. He sat in the parliament on the 11th [1318] and 14th [1321] of Edward II.

    Buried:
    Plot: Inside Church

    Died:
    As a prisoner in Wallingford Castle, Berkshire, England...

    Hugh married Isolde (Isabella) de Mortimer ~ 1290. Isolde was born 0___ 1270, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England; died 0___ 1338, Stratton Audley, Oxfordshire, England; was buried Much Marcle, Saint Bartholomew's Churchyard, Much Marcle, Herefordshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 7.  Isolde (Isabella) de MortimerIsolde (Isabella) de Mortimer was born 0___ 1270, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England; died 0___ 1338, Stratton Audley, Oxfordshire, England; was buried Much Marcle, Saint Bartholomew's Churchyard, Much Marcle, Herefordshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Isoldt de Mortimer
    • Also Known As: Lady of the Manor of Eastingdon, Gloucestershire, Thornbury, and Herefordshire

    Notes:

    Isolde married Walter de Balun, (it is said that he died after an accident at a tournament on his wedding day while at Southampton waiting to go to the Holy Land with Henry lll). No children from this marriage.

    Isolde also married Hugh I de Audley, 1st Baron Audley of Stratton, about 1290.

    They had at least three children

    Hugh II de Audley, 1st and last Earl of Gloucester, who married Margaret de Clare, daughter of Gilbert de Clare and Joan of Acre
    Alice de Audley, who married Ralph de Neville, 2nd Baron Neville of Raby, the son of Ralph de Neville and Euphemia de Clavering
    Sir James de Audley

    Isolde's parentage is in conflict at this time. Some genealogies have her as the daughter of Hugh de Mortimer and Agatha de FerriŠeres or Edmund de Mortimer and Margaret de Fiennes. I have also seen her as the daughter of Hugh de Mortimer and unknown mistress.

    Buried:
    Note: According to Effigies and Brasses her effigy is in the Church...

    Children:
    1. Hugh de Audley, 1st Baron Audley was born ~ 1289, Stratton Audley, Oxfordshire, England; died 10 Nov 1347, Kent, England; was buried Tonbridge Priory, Kent, England.
    2. 3. Alice de Audley was born 1302-1304, Hadley, Lambourne, Berkshire, England; died 12 Jan 1374, Greystoke Manor, Northumberland, England; was buried Durham Cathedral, Durham, Durhamshire, England.


Generation: 4

  1. 12.  James de Audley, Knight was born 0___ 1220, Heleighley Castle, Staffordshire, England; died 11 Jun 1272, Ireland.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Justiciar of Ireland
    • Also Known As: James Aiditheley
    • Also Known As: James de Aldithel
    • Also Known As: James de Aldthley, Justice of Chester

    Notes:

    James de Audley (1220 - 1272), or James de Aldithel and Alditheley, was an English baron.[1]

    Biography

    Audley was born in 1220 to Henry de Audley, and was, like him, a lord-marcher. In 1257 he accompanied Richard, king of the Romans, to his coronation at Aachen (Matt. Paris), sailing on 29 April (Rymer) and returning to England in the autumn to take part in the Welsh campaign (1257-1260).

    In the following year (1258) he was one of the royalist members of the council of fifteen nominated by the Provisions of Oxford, and witnessed, as 'James of Aldithel,' their confirmation by the king (18 Oct.).

    He also, with his brother-in-law, Peter de Montfort, was appointed commissioner to treat with Llewelyn (18 Aug.), and two years later he acted as an itinerant justice.

    On Llewelyn of Wales attacking Mortimer, a royalist marcher, Audley joined Prince Edward at Hereford, 9 January 1263 to resist the invasion. But the barons, coming to Llewelyn's assistance, dispersed the royalist forces, and seized on his castles and estates.

    He is wrongly said by Dugdale and Foss to have been made 'justice of Ireland' in this year, but in December he was one of the royalist sureties in the appeal to Louis of France.

    At the time of the battle of Lewes (May 1264) he was in arms for the king on the Welsh marches (Matthew Paris), and he was one of the first to rise against the government of Simon de Montfort.

    On Gloucester embracing the royal cause, early in 1265, Audley joined him with the other marchers, and took part in the campaign of Evesham and the overthrow of the baronial party.

    He appears to have gone on a pilgrimage to Galicia in 1268, and also, it is stated, to Palestine in 1270; but though his name occurs among the 'Crucesignati' of 21 May 1270, it is clear that he never went, for he was appointed justiciary of Ireland a few months later, his name first occurring in connection with that office 5 September 1270.

    He also served as High Sheriff of Staffordshire and Shropshire in 1261 and 1270.[2] During his tenure as Justiciar of Ireland he led several expeditions against 'the Irish rebels,' but died by 'breaking his neck' about 11 June 1272 (when he is last mentioned as justiciary), and was succeeded by his son James, who did homage 29 July 1272.

    References

    Jump up ^ "(Sir) James DE AUDLEY Knight, Justiciar of Ireland". washington.ancestryregister.com. Archived from the original on March 20, 2015. Retrieved March 20, 2015.
    Jump up ^ Collections for a history of Staffordshire. Staffordshire Record Society. 1912. p. 276.

    end of biography

    Birth:
    Heighley Castle (or Heleigh Castle) is a ruined medieval castle near Madeley, Staffordshire. The castle was completed by the Audley family in 1233 and for over 300 years was one of their ancestral homes. It was held for Charles I during the English Civil War and was destroyed by Parliamentary forces in the 1640s. The ruinous remains comprise masonry fragments, mostly overgrown by vegetation. The site is protected by Grade II listed building status and is a Scheduled Ancient Monument. The castle is privately owned and is not open to visitors.

    Heleigh Castle was built by Henry de Aldithley (c.1175-1246) (later "de Audley"), Sheriff of Shropshire 1227-1232. He also built the nearby Red Castle, Shropshire. He endowed the nearby Cistercian Abbey of St. Mary at Hulton in 1223, and donated to it a large amount of land, some of which was an inheritance from his mother and some of which was purchased.

    ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heighley_Castle

    James married Ela Longespee 0___ 1244. Ela (daughter of William Longespee, II, Knight, Earl of Salisbury, Crusader and Odoine de Camville) was born ~ 1228, (Salisbury, Wiltshire) England; died 22 Nov 1299. [Group Sheet]


  2. 13.  Ela Longespee was born ~ 1228, (Salisbury, Wiltshire) England (daughter of William Longespee, II, Knight, Earl of Salisbury, Crusader and Odoine de Camville); died 22 Nov 1299.
    Children:
    1. Nicholas de Audley was born Bef 1258, Heleighley Castle, Staffordshire, England; died 28 Aug 1299, Brimsfield,,Gloucestershire,Englan.
    2. Maud Audley was born ~ 1260, Stratton Audley, Oxfordshire, England.
    3. 6. Hugh de Audley, 1st Baron Audley of Stratton was born 0___ 1267, Stratton Audley, Oxfordshire, England; died Bef 1326; was buried Much Marcle, Saint Bartholomew's Churchyard, Much Marcle, Herefordshire, England.


Generation: 5

  1. 26.  William Longespee, II, Knight, Earl of Salisbury, CrusaderWilliam Longespee, II, Knight, Earl of Salisbury, Crusader was born 0___ 1212, (Salisbury, Wiltshire) England (son of William (Plantagenet) Longespee, 3rd Earl of Salisbury and Ela FitzPatrick, 3rd Countess of Salisbury); died 8 Feb 1250, Al-Mansurah, Egypt.

    Notes:

    Sir William Longesp‚ee (c. 1212 - 8 February 1250) was an English knight, the son of William Longesp‚ee and Ela, Countess of Salisbury. His death became of significant importance to the English psyche, having died as a martyr due to the purported mistakes of the French at the Battle of Mansurah, near Al-Mansurah in Egypt.

    Biography

    Longesp‚ee made a pilgrimage to the Holy Land in 1240, and again in 1247. The second time, he proceeded to Rome and made a plea to Pope Innocent IV for support:

    "Sir, you see that I am signed with the cross and am on my journey with the King of France to fight in this pilgrimage. My name is great and of note, viz., William Longesp‚ee, but my estate is slender, for the King of England, my kinsman and liege lord, hath bereft me of the title of earl and of that estate, but this he did judiciously, and not in displeasure, and by the impulse of his will; therefore I do not blame him for it. Howbeit, I am necessitated to have recourse to your holiness for favour, desiring your assistance in this distress. We see here (quoth he) that Earl Richard (of Cornwall) who, though he is not signed with the cross, yet, through the especial grace of your holiness, he hath got very much money from those who are signed, and therefore, I, who am signed and in want, do intreat the like favour."[1]

    Having succeeded in gaining the favour of the Pope, Longesp‚ee raised a company of 200 English horse to join with King Louis on his crusade. To raise funds for his expedition, he sold a charter of liberties to the burgesses of the town of Poole in 1248 for 70 marks.[2] During the Seventh Crusade, Longesp‚ee commanded the English forces. He became widely known for his feats of chivalry and his subsequent martyrdom. The circumstances of his death served to fuel growing English animosity toward the French; it is reported that the French Count d'Artois lured Longesp‚ee into attacking the Mameluks before the forces of King Louis arrived in support. D'Artois, Longesp‚ee and his men, along with 280 Knights Templar, were killed at this time.

    It is said that his mother, Countess Ela, had a vision of the martyr being received into heaven by angels on the day of his death. In 1252, the Sultan delivered Longesp‚ee's remains to a messenger who conveyed them to Acre for burial at the church of St Cross. However, his effigy is found amongst family members at Salisbury Cathedral, in England.

    Marriage and issue

    Longesp‚ee married Idoine de Camville, daughter of Richard de Camville and Eustacia Basset. They had three sons and a daughter:

    Edmund Longesp‚ee, The Book of Lacock names ďGuill Lungespee tertium, Ricīum, Elam et EdmundumĒ as the children of ďGuill Lungespee secundusĒ & his wife.
    Ela Longesp‚ee, married James De Audley (1220Ė1272), of Heleigh Castle, Staffordshire, son of Henry De Audley and Bertred Mainwaring
    William III Longesp‚ee, married Maud de Clifford, granddaughter of Llewelyn ap Iorwerth, Prince of North Wales. Their daughter Margaret married Henry de Lacy, 3rd Earl of Lincoln.[3]
    Richard Longesp‚ee, married Alice le Rus, daughter of William le Rus of Suffolk and died shortly before 27 December 1261.[4]

    *

    William — Odoine de Camville. Odoine (daughter of Richard de Camville and Eustacia Basset) was born ~ 1210, Brattleby, Lincolnshire, England; died 0___ 1252. [Group Sheet]


  2. 27.  Odoine de Camville was born ~ 1210, Brattleby, Lincolnshire, England (daughter of Richard de Camville and Eustacia Basset); died 0___ 1252.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Idonea de Camville

    Children:
    1. 13. Ela Longespee was born ~ 1228, (Salisbury, Wiltshire) England; died 22 Nov 1299.
    2. William Longespee, III was born ~ 1230, Amesbury, Wiltshire, England; died 1256-1257, Blyth, Nottinghamshire, England.
    3. Richard Longespee was born ~ 1240, (Salisbury, Wiltshire) England; died Bef 1265; was buried Woodbridge Priory, Suffolk, England.
    4. Edmund Longespee was born (Salisbury, Wiltshire) England.


Generation: 6

  1. 52.  William (Plantagenet) Longespee, 3rd Earl of SalisburyWilliam (Plantagenet) Longespee, 3rd Earl of Salisbury was born ~ 1176, (Salisbury, Wiltshire) England (son of Henry II, King of England and Ida de Tosny, Countess of Norfolk); died 7 Mar 1226, Salisbury Castle, Salisbury, Wiltshire, England; was buried Salisbury Cathedral, Salisbury, Wiltshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: William Longsword

    Notes:

    William Longesp‚ee, 3rd Earl of Salisbury (c. 1176 Ė 7 March 1226) ("Long Sword", Latinised to de Longa Spatha) was an English noble, primarily remembered for his command of the English forces at the Battle of Damme and for remaining loyal to his half-brother, King John. His nickname "Longesp‚ee" is generally taken as a reference to his great size and the outsize weapons he wielded.

    Early life

    He was an illegitimate son of Henry II, King of England. His mother was unknown for many years until the discovery of a charter William made that mentions "Comitissa Ida, mater mea" (Countess Ida, my mother).[1][2] This referred to Ida de Tosny, a member of the prominent Tosny (or Toesny) family, who had married Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk[3] in 1181.

    Prior to the discovery of the charter mentioning Countes Ida, speculation and folklore gave Rosamond Clifford, another misress of Henry II, as William's mother. URL https://www.genealogieonline.nl/en/family-tree-fountaine-fontaine-fountain-lafontaine/P2800.php

    King Henry acknowledged William as his son and gave him the honour of Appleby, Lincolnshire, in 1188. Eight years later, his half brother King Richard I married him to a great heiress, Ela of Salisbury, 3rd Countess of Salisbury.

    During the reign of King John, Salisbury was at court on several important ceremonial occasions and held various offices: sheriff of Wiltshire; lieutenant of Gascony; constable of Dover; and Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports; and later warden of the Welsh Marches. He was appointed sheriff of Cambridgeshire and Huntingdonshire about 1213.

    Military career

    He was a commander in the king's Welsh and Irish expeditions of 1210Ė1212 and was appointed Viceroy of Ireland, jointly with John de Gray, Bishop of Norwich, when the king left for England in 1210.[4] The king also granted him the honour of Eye in Suffolk.

    In 1213, Salisbury led a large fleet to Flanders, where he seized or destroyed a good part of a French invasion fleet anchored at or near Damme. This ended the invasion threat but not the conflicts between England and France. In 1214, Salisbury was sent to help Otto IV of Germany, an English ally, who was invading France. Salisbury commanded the right wing of the army at their disastrous defeat in that year at the Battle of Bouvines, where he was captured.

    By the time he returned to England, revolt was brewing amongst the barons. Salisbury was one of the few who remained loyal to John. In the civil war that took place the year after the signing of the Magna Carta, Salisbury was one of the leaders of the king's army in the south. He was made High Sheriff of Wiltshire again, this time for life. After raising the siege of Lincoln with William Marshall he was also appointed High Sheriff of Lincolnshire (in addition to his current post as High Sheriff of Somerset) and governor of Lincoln castle. However, after the French prince Louis (later Louis VIII) landed as an ally of the rebels, Salisbury went over to his side. Presumably, he thought John's cause was lost.


    Tomb of William Longesp‚ee in Salisbury Cathedral
    After John's death and the departure of Louis, Salisbury, along with many other barons, joined the cause of John's young son, now Henry III of England. He held an influential place in the government during the king's minority and fought in Gascony to help secure the remaining part of the English continental possessions. He was appointed High Sheriff of Devon in 1217 and High Sheriff of Staffordshire and Shropshire in 1224. Salisbury's ship was nearly lost in a storm while returning to England in 1225, and he spent some months in refuge at a monastery on the French island of R‚e.

    Death

    He died not long after his return to England at Salisbury Castle. Roger of Wendover alleged that he was poisoned by Hubert de Burgh. He was buried at Salisbury Cathedral in Salisbury, Wiltshire, England.

    William Longesp‚ee's tomb was opened in 1791. Bizarrely, the well-preserved corpse of a rat which carried traces of arsenic, was found inside his skull.[5] The rat is now on display in a case at the Salisbury and South Wiltshire Museum.[5]

    Likeness

    A terracotta statue of Longesp‚ee, dating from 1756, is located in the Great Hall of Lacock Abbey in Lacock, Wiltshire, England. A likeness of his wife Ela is also on display, while several other statues are believed to show their children.

    Family

    By his wife Ela, Countess of Salisbury, he had four sons and six daughters:[6]

    William II Longesp‚ee (1212?Ė1250), who was sometimes called Earl of Salisbury but never legally bore the title because he died before his mother, Countess Ela, who held the earldom until her death in 1261.
    Richard, a canon of Salisbury.
    Stephen (d. 1260), who was seneschal of Gascony and married Emeline de Ridelsford, widow of Hugh de Lacy, 1st Earl of Ulster. Their two daughters were Eleanor Longspee, who married Sir Roger La Zouche and Emeline Longspee, who married Sir Maurice FitzMaurice, Justiciar of Ireland.
    Nicholas (d. 1297), bishop of Salisbury.
    Isabella Longesp‚ee, who married Sir William de Vesci.
    Ela Longesp‚ee, who first married Thomas de Beaumont, 6th Earl of Warwick, and then married Philip Basset. No issue.[7]
    Ida Longesp‚ee, married firstly Ralph who was son of Ralph de Somery, Baron of Dudley, and Margaret, daughter of John Marshal;[7] she married secondly William de Beauchamp, Baron of Bedford, by whom she had six children, including Maud de Beauchamp, wife of Roger de Mowbray.[8]
    Ida II de Longesp‚ee (she is alternatively listed as William and Ela's granddaughter: see notes below), married Sir Walter FitzRobert, son of Robert Fitzwalter, by whom she had issue including Ela FitzWalter, wife of William de Odyngsells. Ela's and Williams's grandsons include William de Clinton and John de Grey.[7]
    Mary Longesp‚ee, married. No issue.[7]
    Pernel Longesp‚ee.

    *

    William Longesp‚ee was the illegitimate son of the first Plantagenet king, Henry II and Ida de Tosny, a member of the Tosny (or Toesny) family. The epithet "Longesp‚ee" ,or Longsword is a reference to his great size and the huge weapons he wielded.

    Ida de Tosny was a royal ward who became the mistress of King Henry II. The first evidence of contemporary information about Ida came to light in 1979 with the publication in the of two charters found in the Bradenstoke Priory Cartulary where he mentions "Comitissa Ida, mater mea" (Countess Ida, my mother), until then, it was assumed that Rosamund Clifford, a previous and more famous mistress of King Henry II's, was William's mother. Four years after William's birth, in 1181, Ida de Tosny was married to Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk, by whom she had a number of children.

    King Henry II readily acknowledged William as his son and in 1188 granted him the honour of Appleby in Lincolnshire. Following the death of his father in 1189, his half brother King Richard I 'the Lionheart' succeeded to the throne, William began his successful military career by fighting alongside his half brother in Normandy.

    King Richard arranged for the marriage of his half brother to the young heiress, Ela FitzPatrick, who was Countess of Salisbury in her own right, the daughter of William FitzPatrick, 2nd Earl of Salisbury and El‚eonore de Vitr‚e.

    Richard died of a crossbow wound at Chalus, near Limoges in 1199 to be succeeded by his younger brother, King John, William held various offices during John's reign, sheriff of Wiltshire; lieutenant of Gascony; constable of Dover; and Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports; and later warden of the Welsh Marches. He was appointed sheriff of Cambridgeshire and Huntingdonshire about 1213.

    William LongswordWilliam took part in John's Welsh and Irish expeditions of 1210-1212. In 1213, Salisbury led a large fleet to Flanders, where he seized or destroyed a good part of a French invasion fleet anchored at or near Damme, then the port of Bruges, thus temporarily ending the French invasion threat.

    In 1214, Salisbury was dispatched to aid John's nephew and ally, Otto IV of Germany, in his invasion of France. Salisbury commanded the right wing of Otto's army at their disastrous and decisive defeat in that year at the Battle of Bouvines, where he was taken prisoner by the French.

    William returned to England to find the barons in revolt against John, he was one of the few who remained loyal to his unpopular half brother. In the civil war that broke out the year after the signing of the Magna Carta, William served as one of the leaders of the king's army in the south. Along with William Marshall he raised the siege of Lincoln, but after Prince Louis of France, son and heir of the John's arch enemy French King Philip II 'Augustus' landed in England in alliance with the rebels, Salisbury, assuming John's cause now lost, deserted him and went over to the rebels.

    William LongswordWhile retreating before this incursion, King John died of dysentry at Newark on the wild stormy night of 18th October, 1216, leaving England in a state of anarchy and civil war. His nine year old son Henry was crowned King Henry III of England at the Abbey Church of Gloucester with a circlet belonging to his mother Isabella of Angouleme, since his father had previously lost the royal treasure in the Wash.

    After the defeat of Louis, Salisbury joined the cause of John's young son Henry. By 1218, the English and French signed the Treaty of Lambeth, which agreed that the French prince Louis would surrender his claims to the English throne.

    William held an influential place in the government during the young king's minority and fought in Gascony to help secure the remaining remnant of the once great Angevin Empire in France. He fell sick after campaigning in Gascony in 1226. Salisbury's ship was nearly lost in a storm while returning to England, and he spent some months in refuge at a monastery on the French island of R‚e.

    William Longesp‚ee died on 7 March 1226 at Salisbury Castle soon after his return to England. Roger of Wendover alleged that he had been poisoned by Hubert de Burgh. He was buried at Salisbury Cathedral of which he had been a benefactor. His eldest son William succeeded to the title Earl of Salisbury, His widow, Ela, Countess of Salisbury lived on until 1261 and was buried in Lacock Abbey.

    The tomb of William Longesp‚ee was opened in 1791, inside his skull was found the remains of a rat which carried traces of arsenic. The rat is now on display at the Salisbury and South Wiltshire Museum.

    *

    Sir William is the 24th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Jesse D Hennessee (1880-1952)

    Click on this link to view their lineage ... http://bit.ly/1AJ6pEc

    More history and images for Sir William ... http://bit.ly/1FlUhIj

    More history and images for Salisbury Cathedral ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salisbury_Cathedral

    *

    Buried:
    The cathedral has the tallest church spire in the United Kingdom (123m/404 ft).

    The tomb of William Longesp‚ee was opened in 1791, inside his skull was found the remains of a rat which carried traces of arsenic. The rat is now on display at the Salisbury and South Wiltshire Museum.

    More history and images for Salisbury Cathedral ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salisbury_Cathedral

    Died:
    Roger of Wendover alleged that he had been poisoned by Hubert de Burgh.

    William married Ela FitzPatrick, 3rd Countess of Salisbury 0___ 1196, Salisbury, Wiltshire, England. Ela (daughter of William of Salisbury, Knight, 2nd Earl of Salisbury and Eleonore de Vitre, Countess of Salisbury) was born 0___ 1187, Amesbury, Wiltshire, England; died 24 Aug 1261, Lacock Abbey, Wiltshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 53.  Ela FitzPatrick, 3rd Countess of Salisbury was born 0___ 1187, Amesbury, Wiltshire, England (daughter of William of Salisbury, Knight, 2nd Earl of Salisbury and Eleonore de Vitre, Countess of Salisbury); died 24 Aug 1261, Lacock Abbey, Wiltshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Ela d'Evreux
    • Also Known As: Ela of Salisbury

    Notes:

    Ela of Salisbury, 3rd Countess of Salisbury (1187 - 24 August 1261) was a wealthy English heiress and the suo jure Countess of Salisbury, having succeeded to the title in 1196 upon the death of her father, William FitzPatrick, 2nd Earl of Salisbury.[1] Her husband William Longesp‚ee, an illegitimate half-brother of kings Richard I of England and John of England assumed the title of 3rd Earl of Salisbury by right of his marriage to Ela, which took place in 1196 when she was nine years old.

    Ela held the post of High Sheriff of Wiltshire for two years after William's death, then became a nun, and eventually Abbess of Lacock Abbey in Wiltshire, which she had founded in 1229.

    Family

    Ela was born in Amesbury, Wiltshire in 1187, the only child and heiress of William FitzPatrick, 2nd Earl of Salisbury, Sheriff of Wiltshire and El‚eonore de Vitr‚e (c.1164- 1232/1233).[2] In 1196, she succeeded her father as suo jure 3rd Countess of Salisbury. There is a story that immediately following her father's death she was imprisoned in a castle in Normandy by one of her paternal uncles who wished to take her title and enormous wealth for himself. According to the legend, Ela was eventually rescued by William Talbot, a knight who had gone to France where he sang ballads under windows in all the castles of Normandy until he received a response from Ela.[3]

    In 1198, Ela's mother married her fourth husband, Gilbert de Malesmains.

    Marriage and issue

    In 1196, the same year she became countess and inherited her father's numerous estates, Ela married William Longesp‚ee, an illegitimate son of King Henry II of England, by his mistress Ida de Tosny, who later married Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk. Longespee became 3rd Earl of Salisbury by right of his wife. The Continuator of Florence recorded that their marriage had been arranged by King Richard I of England, who was William's legitimate half-brother.[1]

    Together William and Ela had at least eight or possibly nine children:

    William II Longesp‚ee, titular Earl of Salisbury (c.1209- 7 February 1250), married in 1216 Idoine de Camville, daughter of Richard de Camville and Eustache Basset, by whom he had four children. William was killed while on crusade at the Battle of Mansurah.

    Richard Longesp‚ee, clerk and canon of Salisbury.

    Stephen Longesp‚ee, Seneschal of Gascony and Justiciar of Ireland (1216Ė1260), married as her second husband 1243/1244 Emmeline de Ridelsford, daughter of Walter de Ridelsford and Annora Vitr‚e, by whom he had two daughters: Ela, wife of Sir Roger La Zouche, and Emmeline (1252Ė1291), the second wife of Maurice FitzGerald, 3rd Lord of Offaly.

    Nicholas Longesp‚ee, Bishop of Salisbury (died 28 May 1297)

    Isabella Longesp‚ee (died before 1244), married as his first wife shortly after 16 May 1226, William de Vescy, Lord of Alnwick, by whom she had issue.

    Petronilla Longesp‚ee, died unmarried

    Ela Longesp‚ee, who first married Thomas de Beaumont, 6th Earl of Warwick, and then married Philip Basset. No issue.[4]

    Ida Longesp‚ee, married firstly Ralph who was son of Ralph de Somery, Baron of Dudley, and Margaret, daughter of John Marshal;[4] she married secondly William de Beauchamp, Baron of Bedford, by whom she had six children, including Maud de Beauchamp, wife of Roger de Mowbray.[5]

    Ida II de Longesp‚ee (she is alternatively listed as William and Ela's granddaughter: see notes below), married Sir Walter FitzRobert, son of Robert Fitzwalter, by whom she had issue including Ela FitzWalter, wife of William de Odyngsells. Ela's and Williams's grandsons include William de Clinton and John de Grey.[4]

    Mary Longesp‚ee, married. No issue.[4]

    Pernel Longesp‚ee.

    Lacock Abbey, founded in 1229 by Ela, Countess of Salisbury

    Later life

    In 1225, Ela's husband William was shipwrecked off the coast of Brittany, upon returning from Gascony. He spent months recovering at a monastery on the Island of R‚e in France. He died at Salisbury Castle on 7 March 1226 just several days after arriving in England. Ela held the post of Sheriff of Wiltshire for two years following her husband's death.

    Three years later in 1229, Ela founded Lacock Abbey in Wiltshire as a nunnery of the Augustinian order. In 1238, she entered the abbey as a nun; she was made Abbess of Lacock in 1240, and held the post until 1257. The Book of Lacock recorded that Ela founded the monasteries at Lacock and Henton.[1] During her tenure as abbess, Ela obtained many rights for the abbey and village of Lacock.

    Ela, Countess of Salisbury died on 24 August 1261 and was buried in Lacock Abbey. The inscription on her tombstone, originally written in Latin, reads:

    Below lie buried the bones of the venerable Ela, who gave this sacred house as a home for the nuns. She also had lived here as holy abbess and Countess of Salisbury, full of good works[6]

    Her numerous descendants included English kings Edward IV and Richard III, Mary, Queen of Scots, Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex, Sir Winston Churchill, Diana, Princess of Wales, the Dukes of Norfolk, and the English queen consorts of King Henry VIII: Anne Boleyn, Jane Seymour, Catherine Howard, and Catherine Parr.

    Ela has been described as having been "one of the two towering female figures of the mid-13th century", the other one being Margaret de Quincy, Countess of Lincoln.[7]

    Died:
    Lacock Abbey in the village of Lacock, Wiltshire, England, was founded in the early 13th century by Ela, Countess of Salisbury, as a nunnery of the Augustinian order. The Abbey remained a nunnery until the suppression of Catholic institutions in England in the 16th century.

    Some interior sequences in Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets were filmed at Lacock, including the cloister walk (illustrated, left) where Harry comes out from Professor Lockhart's room after serving detention and hears the basilisk. During four days in October 2007 Lacock was also used to film some scenes for the sixth Harry Potter film, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince.

    The Abbey was one of two major locations for the 2008 film version of the historical novel The Other Boleyn Girl.

    Lacock appears in the "Robin Hood and the Sorcerer", "Cromm Cruac" and "The Pretender" episodes of Robin of Sherwood. It was also used in the 1995 BBC/A&E production of Pride and Prejudice.

    In the Spring of 2012, it was a filming location of the fantasy adventure movie Mariah Mundi and the Midas Box, which is scheduled for release in 2013.

    Scenes for the BBC's historical TV serial Wolf Hall were filmed there in 2014.

    Photos, history & source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lacock_Abbey

    Notes:

    Married:
    King Richard arranged for the marriage of his half brother to the young heiress, Ela FitzPatrick, who was Countess of Salisbury in her own right, the daughter of William FitzPatrick, 2nd Earl of Salisbury and El‚eonore de Vitr‚e.

    Children:
    1. 26. William Longespee, II, Knight, Earl of Salisbury, Crusader was born 0___ 1212, (Salisbury, Wiltshire) England; died 8 Feb 1250, Al-Mansurah, Egypt.
    2. Richard Longespee was born (Salisbury, Wiltshire) England.
    3. Ida Longespee, II was born (Salisbury, Wiltshire) England.
    4. Stephen Longespee was born ~ 1216, (Salisbury, Wiltshire) England; died ~ 1260.
    5. Ida Longespee was born 1205-1210, Salisbury, Wiltshire, England; died 0___ 1269, England.

  3. 54.  Richard de Camville was born ~ 1178, Brattleby, Lincolnshire, England; died 0___ 1226, Brattleby, Lincolnshire, England.

    Notes:

    Richard de Camville (died 1191) (Richard's grandfather) was an English crusader knight, and one of Richard the Lionheart's senior commanders during the Third Crusade. In June 1190, at Chinon, he was, with 3 others, put in charge of King Richard's fleet sailing for the Holy Land.

    In 1191 he was appointed governor of Cyprus, jointly with Robert of Thornham. He died later in the same year at the Siege of Acre.

    He was the son of another Richard de Camville (died 1176), an Anglo-Norman landowner, and Millicent de Rethel, a kinswoman (second cousin) of Adeliza of Louvain, the second wife of King Henry I.

    The family probably originated from Canville-les-Deux-‚Eglises (Canvilla 1149, Camvilla 1153) in Normandy. He had at least one son, Gerard de Camville, and one daughter, Matilda, wife of William de Ros.

    In England, his holdings included land at Stanton Harcourt, Oxfordshire, Blackland, Wiltshire, and Speen (possibly posthumously and Avington, both in Berkshire.

    Richard married Eustacia Basset ~ 1205. Eustacia was born ~ 1185, Bicester, Oxfordshire, England; died ~ 1215, Brattleby, Lincolnshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 55.  Eustacia Basset was born ~ 1185, Bicester, Oxfordshire, England; died ~ 1215, Brattleby, Lincolnshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Eustache Basset, Heriess of Bicester

    Children:
    1. 27. Odoine de Camville was born ~ 1210, Brattleby, Lincolnshire, England; died 0___ 1252.


Generation: 7

  1. 104.  Henry II, King of EnglandHenry II, King of England was born 5 Mar 1133, Le Mans, France; was christened 25 Mar 1133, Le Mans, France (son of Geoffrey "Le Bon" Plantagenet, Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy and Matilda of England, Queen of England); died 6 Jul 1189, Chinon Castle, France; was buried 7 Jul 1189, Fontevraud Abbey, France.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Count of Anjou
    • Also Known As: Count of Nantes
    • Also Known As: Curt Mantel
    • Also Known As: Duke of Aquitaine
    • Also Known As: Duke of Normandy
    • Also Known As: Henry Curtmantle
    • Also Known As: Henry FitzEmpress
    • Also Known As: Henry II, King of England

    Notes:

    Henry founded the Plantagenet Dynasty... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_II_of_England

    Henry II is the 27th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Jesse D Hennessee (1880-1952) through his 12th great granddaughter,

    Catherine Mountfort Booth (1450-1483) ...

    http://www.thehennesseefamily.com/getperson.php?personID=I32450&tree=hennessee

    Henry II (1133-1189) is the great-grandson of William the Conqueror (1024-1087) ergo

    William the Conqueror (1024-1087) is the 30th great-grandfather of all the grandchildren of Jesse D Hennessee (1880-1952)

    Who could forget Peter O'Toole's magnificient protrayal of Henry II in the 1968 movie production of "The Lion in Winter" and Katherine Hepburn's Eleanor of Aquitaine? ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Lion_in_Winter_(1968_film)

    History of Henry II and his reign... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_II_of_England

    Source: 'The World Book Encyclopedia', 1968, p H178. 'Royalty for Commoners', Roderick W. Stuart, 1993, p 37-38. Reigned 1154-1189.

    He ruled an empire that stretched from the Tweed to the Pyrenees. In spite of frequent hostitilties with the French King his own family and rebellious Barons (culminating in the great revolt of 1173-74) and his quarrel with Thomas Becket, Henry maintained control over his possessions until shortly before his death. His judicial and administrative reforms which increased Royal control and influence at the expense of the Barons were of great constitutional importance. Introduced trial by Jury. Duke of Normandy. Henry II 'Curt Mantel,' Duke of Normandy, Count of Maine and Anjou, King Of England became king in 1154.

    At the height of his power, Henry ruled England and almost all western France. His marriage to Eleanor of Aquitaine, the most famous woman of the age, brought the duchy of Aquitaine under his control. Henry also claimed to rule Scotland, Wales, and eastern Ireland. Henry II carried on his grandfather's policy of limiting the power of the nobles. He also tried to make the Roman Catholic Church in England submit to his authority. This policy brought him into conflict with Thomas a Becket, Achbishop of Canterbury. Four of the king's knights murdered Becket while he was at vespers in his cathedral. Henry made Anglo-Saxon common law, rather than the revised Roman law, the supreme law of the land. He introduced trial by jury and circuit courts. In his later years, Henry's sons often rebelled against him. Two of them, Richard the Lion-Hearted and John, became the next two kings of England.

    REF: "Falls the Shadow" Sharon Kay Penman: William the Conqueror requested a large number of Jews to move to England after his conquest. They spoke Norman & did well under his reign. They continued to thrive under William's grandson Henry II.

    REF: British Monarchy Official Website: Henry II (reigned 1154-89)

    ruled over an empire which stretched from the Scottish border to the Pyrenees. Married to Eleanor, the heiress of Aquitaine, the king spent only 13 years of his reign in England; the other 21 years were spent on the continent in his territories in what is now France. By 1158, Henry had restored to the crown some of the lands and royal power lost by Stephen. For example, locally chosen sheriffs were changed into royally appointed agents charged with enforcing the law and collecting taxes in the counties. Personally interested in government and law, Henry strengthened royal justice, making use of juries and re-introduced the sending of justices (judges) on regular tours of the country to try cases for the Crown. His legal reforms have led him to be seen as the founder of English Common Law. Henry's disagreements with his Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Becket, over Church/State relations ended in Becket's murder in 1170. Family disputes almost wrecked the king's achievements and he died in 1189 at war with his sons.

    Reigned 25 Oct 1154-1189. Invested As Duke Of Nomandy By His Parents In 1150.

    Ruled An Empire That Stretched From The Tweed To The Pyrenees.

    Numerous Quarrels With French King, & His Own Family.

    Quarreled With Thomas Becket.

    Beat Rebellious Barons (Culminating In The Great Revolt Of 1173-74).

    Retained Control Of His Possessions Until Shortly Before His Death.

    Important Judicial & Admin. Reforms Incr. Power Of King At The Expense Of Barons

    Introduced Trial By Jury.

    Count Of Anjou & Aquitaine.

    Buried:
    Click on this link to view images of Fontevraud Abbey ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fontevraud_Abbey

    Died:
    Images and commentary for Chinon Castle ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ch%C3%A2teau_de_Chinon

    Henry — Ida de Tosny, Countess of Norfolk. Ida (daughter of Ralph de Tosny, V, Knight, Earl and Margaret de Beaumont) died Aft 1185. [Group Sheet]


  2. 105.  Ida de Tosny, Countess of Norfolk (daughter of Ralph de Tosny, V, Knight, Earl and Margaret de Beaumont); died Aft 1185.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Ida de Toesny

    Notes:

    Ida de Tosny, Countess of Norfolk was very likely a daughter of Ralph V de Tosny (died 1162) and his wife Margaret (born circa 1125 and living in 1185), a daughter of Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester.[1]

    Relationship to Henry II

    Ida de Tosny was a royal ward and mistress of King Henry II, by whom she was mother of one of his illegitimate sons, William Longesp‚ee, 3rd Earl of Salisbury, (b c. 1176-March 7, 1226). For many years, until the discovery of a charter of William mentioning "Comitissa Ida, mater mea" (Countess Ida, my mother),[2] it was assumed that Rosamund Clifford, a previous mistress of Henry's, was the mother, but painstaking genealogical detective work [3] has since shown otherwise. Ida was not the first English royal ward to be taken as a royal mistress. Isabel de Beaumont (Elizabeth de Beaumont), daughter of Robert de Beaumont, who fought at the Battle of Hastings with the Conqueror, was the ward of King Henry I and the mistress of one of his sons.[4]

    Marriage

    Around Christmas 1181, Ida de Tosny was given in marriage to Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk by Henry II, together with the manors of Acle, Halvergate and South Walsham, which had been confiscated from his inheritance after his father's death (Hugh Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk).[5] Ida and Roger had a number of children including:

    Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk who married in 1206 or 1207, Maud Marshal, a daughter of William Marshal
    William Bigod
    Ralph Bigod
    Roger Bigod
    Margery Bigod, married William de Hastings
    Mary Bigod, married Ralph fitz Robert

    Many historians, including Marc Morris have speculated that the couple had a third daughter, Alice, who married Aubrey de Vere IV, 2nd Earl of Oxford as his second wife. If so, the marriage would have been well within the bounds of consanguinity, for the couple would have been quite closely related, a daughter of the second earl of Norfolk being first cousin once removed to the second earl of Oxford.

    Ida de Tosney in fiction

    Ida de Tosny and her husband Roger are the main characters in Elizabeth Chadwick's The Time of Singing (Sphere, 2008), published in the USA as For the King's Favor. They appear as minor characters in other of her books set at the same time, notably To Defy a King, which concerns the marriage of their son Hugh to Maud, a daughter of William Marshal

    *

    more ...

    Ida de Tosny was a royal ward who became the mistress of King Henry II. The first evidence of contemporary information about Ida came to light in 1979 with the publication in the of two charters found in the Bradenstoke Priory Cartulary where he mentions "Comitissa Ida, mater mea" (Countess Ida, my mother), until then, it was assumed that Rosamund Clifford, a previous and more famous mistress of King Henry II's, was William's mother.

    Notes:

    Not married:
    she was mother of one of his illegitimate sons, William Longesp‚ee, 3rd Earl of Salisbury, (b c. 1176-March 7, 1226)

    Children:
    1. 52. William (Plantagenet) Longespee, 3rd Earl of Salisbury was born ~ 1176, (Salisbury, Wiltshire) England; died 7 Mar 1226, Salisbury Castle, Salisbury, Wiltshire, England; was buried Salisbury Cathedral, Salisbury, Wiltshire, England.

  3. 106.  William of Salisbury, Knight, 2nd Earl of Salisbury was born ~ 1150, (Salisbury, Wiltshire, England) (son of Patrick of Salisbury, Knight, 1st Earl of Salisbury and Adelia de Talvaise, Countess of Montreuil); died 17 Apr 1196.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Sheriff of Wiltshire
    • Also Known As: Earl of Wiltshire
    • Also Known As: William D'Evereux
    • Also Known As: William FitzPatrick
    • Also Known As: William of Salisbury

    Notes:

    William of Salisbury, 2nd Earl of Salisbury (died 1196) was an Anglo-Norman peer. Though he is generally known as such, his proper title was Earl of Wiltshire, which title was conferred on his father by the Empress Maud around 1143. He was also called William FitzPatrick. (No relation to the Irish medieval dynasts who bore the surname "Fitzpatrick", which itself is a later anglicization of the Irish "Mac Giolla Ph‚adraig".)

    He was the son and heir of Patrick of Salisbury, Earl of Wiltshire, styled Earl of Salisbury, and of Ela Talvas.[1]

    Family

    He married El‚eonore, daughter of Robert III de Vitr‚e of Tilliers. He died without male issue in 1196. Their only daughter and heiress, was Ela of Salisbury, 3rd Countess of Salisbury who married William Longesp‚ee, 3rd Earl of Salisbury, who was half-brother to the king.

    Service to Richard

    William bore the golden sceptre at the coronation of King Richard I, but the next year when the king became a prisoner in Almaine, he was one of those who adhered to the then Count of Mortain, who later became King John of England. In 1194 he served as High Sheriff of Somerset and Dorset. In 1195, William was back with King Richard in the expedition into Normandy and upon his return to England was one of Richard's great council assembled at Nottingham. The Earl of Salisbury was one of the four earls who supported the canopy of state at the second coronation of Richard that same year [2]

    William — Eleonore de Vitre, Countess of Salisbury. Eleonore was born ~ 1158, Bretagne, France; died 0___ 1232, (Salisbury, Wiltshire, England). [Group Sheet]


  4. 107.  Eleonore de Vitre, Countess of Salisbury was born ~ 1158, Bretagne, France; died 0___ 1232, (Salisbury, Wiltshire, England).

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Alianore de Vitre

    Children:
    1. 53. Ela FitzPatrick, 3rd Countess of Salisbury was born 0___ 1187, Amesbury, Wiltshire, England; died 24 Aug 1261, Lacock Abbey, Wiltshire, England.


Generation: 8

  1. 208.  Geoffrey "Le Bon" Plantagenet, Count of Anjou, Duke of NormandyGeoffrey "Le Bon" Plantagenet, Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy was born 24 Sep 1113, Anjou, France; died 7 Sep 1151, Chateau-Du-Loir, Eure-Et-Loire, France; was buried Saint Julian Church, Le Mans, France.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Duke of Normandy

    Notes:

    More on Geoffrey's biography and history with photos ... http://bit.ly/1i49b9d

    Geoffrey married Matilda of England, Queen of England 3 Apr 1127, Le Massachusetts, Sarthe, France. Matilda (daughter of Henry I, King of England and Matilda of Scotland, Queen of England) was born 7 Feb 1102, London, Middlesex, England; was christened 7 Apr 1141; died 10 Sep 1167, Notre Dame, Rouen, Seine-Maritime, France; was buried 10 Sep 1169, Bec Abbey, Le Bec-Hellouin, Eure, France. [Group Sheet]


  2. 209.  Matilda of England, Queen of England was born 7 Feb 1102, London, Middlesex, England; was christened 7 Apr 1141 (daughter of Henry I, King of England and Matilda of Scotland, Queen of England); died 10 Sep 1167, Notre Dame, Rouen, Seine-Maritime, France; was buried 10 Sep 1169, Bec Abbey, Le Bec-Hellouin, Eure, France.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Empress Matilda
    • Also Known As: Empress Maude
    • Also Known As: Empress of Germany
    • Also Known As: Queen of Italy

    Notes:

    Empress Matilda (c. 7 February 1102 Ė 10 September 1167), also known as the Empress Maude,[nb 1] was the claimant to the English throne during the civil war known as the Anarchy. The daughter of King Henry I of England, she moved to Germany as a child when she married the future Holy Roman Emperor Henry V. She travelled with her husband into Italy in 1116, was controversially crowned in St. Peter's Basilica, and acted as the imperial regent in Italy. Matilda and Henry had no children, and when Henry died in 1125, the crown was claimed by Lothair II, one of his political enemies.

    Meanwhile, Matilda's younger brother, William Adelin, died in the White Ship disaster of 1120, leaving England facing a potential succession crisis. On Henry V's death, Matilda was recalled to Normandy by her father, who arranged for her to marry Geoffrey of Anjou to form an alliance to protect his southern borders. Henry I had no further legitimate children and nominated Matilda as his heir, making his court swear an oath of loyalty to her and her successors, but the decision was not popular in the Anglo-Norman court. Henry died in 1135 but Matilda and Geoffrey faced opposition from the Norman barons and were unable to pursue their claims. The throne was instead taken by Matilda's cousin Stephen of Blois, who enjoyed the backing of the English Church. Stephen took steps to solidify his new regime, but faced threats both from neighbouring powers and from opponents within his kingdom.

    In 1139 Matilda crossed to England to take the kingdom by force, supported by her half-brother, Robert of Gloucester, and her uncle, King David I of Scotland, while Geoffrey focused on conquering Normandy. Matilda's forces captured Stephen at the Battle of Lincoln in 1141, but the Empress's attempt to be crowned at Westminster collapsed in the face of bitter opposition from the London crowds. As a result of this retreat, Matilda was never formally declared Queen of England, and was instead titled the Lady of the English. Robert was captured following the Rout of Winchester in 1141, and Matilda agreed to exchange him for Stephen. Matilda became trapped in Oxford Castle by Stephen's forces that winter, and was forced to escape across the frozen River Isis at night to avoid capture. The war degenerated into a stalemate, with Matilda controlling much of the south-west of England, and Stephen the south-east and the Midlands. Large parts of the rest of the country were in the hands of local, independent barons.

    Matilda returned to Normandy, now in the hands of her husband, in 1148, leaving her eldest son to continue the campaign in England; he eventually succeeded to the throne as Henry II in 1154. She settled her court near Rouen and for the rest of her life concerned herself with the administration of Normandy, acting on Henry's behalf when necessary. Particularly in the early years of her son's reign, she provided political advice and attempted to mediate during the Becket controversy. She worked extensively with the Church, founding Cistercian monasteries, and was known for her piety. She was buried under the high altar at Bec Abbey after her death in 1167.

    Notes:

    Married:
    The marriage was meant to seal a peace between England/Normandy and Anjou. She was eleven years older than Geoffrey, and very proud of her status as an Empress (as opposed to being a mere Countess). Their marriage was a stormy one with frequent long separations, but she bore him three sons and survived him.

    Children:
    1. 104. Henry II, King of England was born 5 Mar 1133, Le Mans, France; was christened 25 Mar 1133, Le Mans, France; died 6 Jul 1189, Chinon Castle, France; was buried 7 Jul 1189, Fontevraud Abbey, France.

  3. 210.  Ralph de Tosny, V, Knight, Earl was born (Normandy, France); died 0___ 1162.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Ralph V de Toeni
    • Also Known As: Raoul IV

    Notes:

    History of the House of Tosny: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_of_Tosny

    Ralph — Margaret de Beaumont. Margaret (daughter of Robert de Beaumont, Knight, 2nd Earl of Leicester and Amice de Montfort, Countess of Leicester) was born 0___ 1125, (Leicestershire, England); died Aft 1185. [Group Sheet]


  4. 211.  Margaret de Beaumont was born 0___ 1125, (Leicestershire, England) (daughter of Robert de Beaumont, Knight, 2nd Earl of Leicester and Amice de Montfort, Countess of Leicester); died Aft 1185.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Marguerite of Leicester

    Children:
    1. 105. Ida de Tosny, Countess of Norfolk died Aft 1185.

  5. 212.  Patrick of Salisbury, Knight, 1st Earl of Salisbury was born 1117-1122, Salisbury, Wiltshire, England (son of Walter of Salisbury and Sibilla de Chaworth); died 27 Mar 1168, Poitiers, France; was buried St. Hilaire Abbey, Poitiers, Vienne, France.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Constable of Salisbury
    • Also Known As: 1st Earl of Wiltshire
    • Also Known As: Earl of Salisbury
    • Also Known As: Patrick I de Fitzwalter

    Notes:

    Patrick of Salisbury, 1st Earl of Salisbury (c. 1122 - 1168) was an Anglo-Norman nobleman, and the uncle of the famous William Marshal.

    His parents were Walter of Salisbury and Sibilla de Chaworth.[1] Before 1141, Patrick was constable of Salisbury, a powerful local official but not a nobleman. That year, Patrick married his sister to John fitzGilbert the Marshal, who had been a local rival of his, and transferred his allegiance from King Stephen to the Empress Matilda. This political move gained him his earldom, and the friendship of John the Marshal. Patrick's nephew, William the Marshal would go on to become regent of England during the minority of Henry III. For a time William served as a household knight with Patrick during Patrick's time as governor of Poitou.

    The Earl of Salisbury also minted his own coins, struck in the county town of Salisbury during the so-called "baronial issues" of 1135Ė1153. Only four examples have survived, three of which are in the Conte collection.

    Patrick married twice,[2] his second wife being Ela, daughter of William III Talvas, Duke of Alenūcon and Ponthieu, whom he married in 1149. Ela was widow of William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey. Patrick and Ela had a son, William in about 1150[1] and three others, including Walter and Philip.[2]

    He was killed at Poitiers, France on 27 March 1168 in an ambush by forces of Guy of Lusignan.[1]

    Died:
    in an ambush by forces of Guy of Lusignan.

    Patrick married Adelia de Talvaise, Countess of Montreuil 0___ 1149. Adelia was born 1118-1119, Alencon, Orne, France; died 4 Dec 1174, Bradenstoke, Wiltshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  6. 213.  Adelia de Talvaise, Countess of Montreuil was born 1118-1119, Alencon, Orne, France; died 4 Dec 1174, Bradenstoke, Wiltshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Adela
    • Also Known As: Ela Talvas

    Notes:

    Died:
    Bradenstoke Priory is a medieval priory in the village of Bradenstoke, Wiltshire, England. It is noted today for some of its structures having been used by William Randolph Hearst for the renovation of St Donat's Castle, near Llantwit Major, Wales, in the 1930s. ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bradenstoke_Priory

    Children:
    1. 106. William of Salisbury, Knight, 2nd Earl of Salisbury was born ~ 1150, (Salisbury, Wiltshire, England); died 17 Apr 1196.
    2. Walter of Salisbury was born (Salisbury, Wiltshire, England).
    3. Philip of Salisbury was born (Salisbury, Wiltshire, England).