Eude Welles

Male 1387 - 1417  (~ 30 years)


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Generation: 1

  1. 1.  Eude Welles was born ~1387 (son of John de Welles and Eleanor de Mowbray); died >26 Jul 1417.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Eudo de Welles
    • Also Known As: Eudo Welles

    Eude married Maud Greystoke ~1405. Maud (daughter of Ralph de Greystoke, 3rd Baron Greystoke and Catherine Clifford, Baroness of Ravensworth) was born ~1390, Greystoke, Cumbria, England; died ~1416, Welles Lincolnshire, England. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. Lionel de Welles, 6th Baron Welles, Knight of the Garter was born ~1406, Lincolnshire, England; died 29 Mar 1461, Towton, Yorkshire, England.

Generation: 2

  1. 2.  John de Welles (son of John Welles, Knight, 4th Lord Welles and Maud de Ros, Lady Welles); died 8 Apr 1426.

    John married Eleanor de Mowbray Bef 1396. Eleanor (daughter of John de Mowbray, Knight, 4th Baron Mowbray and Elizabeth Segrave) was born Bef 1381; died 13 Aug 1417. [Group Sheet]


  2. 3.  Eleanor de Mowbray was born Bef 1381 (daughter of John de Mowbray, Knight, 4th Baron Mowbray and Elizabeth Segrave); died 13 Aug 1417.

    Notes:

    Eleanor de Mowbray (before 1361 – before 13 August 1417) was the daughter of John de Mowbray, 4th Baron Mowbray, and Elizabeth de Segrave, 5th Baroness Segrave (born 25 October 1338), daughter and heiress of John de Segrave, 4th Baron Segrave. She had two brothers and two sisters:[1]

    John de Mowbray, 1st Earl of Nottingham, who died unmarried shortly before 12 February 1383 and was buried at the Whitefriars, London.[2]
    Thomas de Mowbray, 1st Duke of Norfolk.[1]
    Margaret Mowbray (d. before 11 July 1401), who married, by licence dated 1 July 1369, Sir Reginald Lucy (d. 9 November 1437) of Woodcroft in Luton, Bedfordshire.[3]
    Joan Mowbray, who married firstly Sir Thomas Grey (1359 – 26 November or 3 December 1400) of Heaton near Norham, Northumberland, son of the chronicler Sir Thomas Grey, and secondly Sir Thomas Tunstall of Thurland in Tunstall, Lancashire.[4][2]
    Eleanor de Mowbray's father, the 4th Baron, was slain by the Turks at Thrace on 17 June 1368.[1][5]

    She died before 13 August 1417, when her husband, the 5th Baron, married a second wife named Margaret (d. 8 April 1426), whose surname is unknown.[6]

    Marriage and issue

    Before 1386 she married John de Welles, 5th Baron Welles (d. 8 April 1426), son of John de Welles, 4th Baron Welles (d. 11 October 1361), and Maud de Roos (d. 9 December 1388), daughter of William de Roos, 2nd Baron Roos of Helmsley, by Margery de Badlesmere, by whom she had a son and daughter:[5]

    Eude de Welles, who predeceased his father.[7]
    Eleanor.[7]

    end of biography

    Children:
    1. 1. Eude Welles was born ~1387; died >26 Jul 1417.


Generation: 3

  1. 4.  John Welles, Knight, 4th Lord Welles was born 23 Aug 1334, Bonthorpe, Lincolnshire, England; died 11 Oct 1361, Welles, Lincolnshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: 4th Baron Welles
    • Also Known As: John de Welles

    Notes:

    John de Welles, 4th Lord Welles1

    M, #189143, b. 23 August 1334, d. 11 October 1361
    Last Edited=16 Sep 2014
    John de Welles, 4th Lord Welles was born on 23 August 1334 at Bonthorpe, Lincolnshire, England.2 He was the son of Adam de Welle, 3rd Lord Welles and Margaret (?).2 He married Maud de Ros, daughter of William de Ros, 2nd Lord de Ros of Helmsley and Margery de Badlesmere, circa 1344/45. He died on 11 October 1361 at age 27.2
    He gained the title of 4th Lord Welles.
    Children of John de Welles, 4th Lord Welles and Maud de Ros

    Anne de Welles+1 d. a 1396
    Margery de Welles+3 d. 29 May 1422
    John de Welles, 5th Baron Welles+4 b. 20 Apr 1352, d. 26 Aug 1421
    Citations

    [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume X, page 122. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
    [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume XII/2, page 441.
    [S474] FamilySearch, online http://www.familysearch.com. Hereinafter cited as FamilySearch.
    [S22] Sir Bernard Burke, C.B. LL.D., A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire, new edition (1883; reprint, Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1978), page 572. Hereinafter cited as Burkes Extinct Peerage.

    John married Maud de Ros, Lady Welles 1344-1345. Maud (daughter of William de Ros, Knight, 2nd Baron de Ros and Margery de Badlesmere) was born (Helmsley, Yorkshire, England); died 9 Dec 1388. [Group Sheet]


  2. 5.  Maud de Ros, Lady Welles was born (Helmsley, Yorkshire, England) (daughter of William de Ros, Knight, 2nd Baron de Ros and Margery de Badlesmere); died 9 Dec 1388.
    Children:
    1. Margery Welles, Baroness of Masham died 29 May 1422.
    2. Anne Welles died 13 Nov 1397.
    3. 2. John de Welles died 8 Apr 1426.

  3. 6.  John de Mowbray, Knight, 4th Baron Mowbray was born 24 Jun 1340, Epworth, Lincolnshire, England (son of John de Mowbray, Knight, 3rd Baron Mowbray and Joan Plantagenet, Baroness Mowbray); died 19 Oct 1368, Thrace, Turkey.

    Other Events:

    • Probate: 17 May 1369, Lincoln, Lincolnshire, England

    Notes:

    John de Mowbray, 4th Baron Mowbray (24 June 1340 – 1368) was an English peer. He was slain near Constantinople while en route to the Holy Land.

    Family

    John de Mowbray, born 25 June 1340 at Epworth, Lincolnshire, was the son of John de Mowbray, 3rd Baron Mowbray, of Axholme, Lincolnshire, by his second wife, Joan of Lancaster, sixth and youngest daughter of Henry, 3rd Earl of Lancaster.[1][2][3] He had two sisters, Blanche and Eleanor (for details concerning his sisters see the article on his father, John de Mowbray, 3rd Baron Mowbray.[4]

    Career

    He and twenty-six others were knighted by Edward III in July 1355[3] while English forces were at the Downs before sailing to France. In 1356 he served in a campaign in Brittany.[2][3] He had livery of his lands on 14 November 1361; however his inheritance was subject to the dower which his father had settled on his stepmother, Elizabeth de Vere.[3] By 1369 she had married Sir William de Cossington, son and heir of Stephen de Cossington of Cossington in Aylesford, Kent; not long after the marriage she and her new husband surrendered themselves to the Fleet prison for debt.[2][4] According to Archer, the cause may have been Mowbray's prosecution of his stepmother for waste of his estates; he had been awarded damages against her of almost ą1000.[3]

    In about 1343 an agreement had been made for a double marriage between, on the one hand, Mowbray and Audrey Montagu, the granddaughter of Thomas of Brotherton, and on the other hand, Mowbray's sister, Blanche, and Audrey's brother, Edward Montagu. Neither marriage took place.[3] Instead, about 1349 a double marriage was solemnized between, on the one hand, Mowbray and Elizabeth Segrave, and on the other hand, Mowbray's sister Blanche, and Elizabeth Segrave's brother John, Pope Clement VI having granted dispensations for the marriages at the request of the Earl of Lancaster in order to prevent 'disputes between the parents', who were neighbours.[5][3] Mowbray had little financial benefit from his marriage during his lifetime as a result of the very large jointure which had been awarded to Elizabeth Segrave's mother, Margaret, Duchess of Norfolk, who lived until 1399.[6][3] However, when Elizabeth Segrave's father, John de Segrave, 4th Baron Segrave, died on 1 April 1353, Edward III allowed Mowbray to receive a small portion of his wife's eventual inheritance. Estate accounts for 1367 indicate that Mowbray enjoyed an annual income of almost ą800 at that time.[3]

    Mowbray was summoned to Parliament from 14 August 1362 to 20 January 1366.[2] On 10 October 1367 he appointed attorneys in preparation for travel beyond the seas; these appointments were confirmed in the following year.[7] He was slain by the Turks near Constantinople while en route to the Holy Land.[8] A letter from the priory of 'Peyn' written in 1396 suggests that he was initially buried at the convent at Pera opposite Constantinople;[9][10] according to the letter, 'at the instance of his son Thomas' his bones had now been gathered and were being sent to England for burial with his ancestors.[7]

    His will was proved at Lincoln on 17 May 1369.[11][5] His wife, Elizabeth, predeceased him in 1368 by only a few months.[5]

    Marriage and issue

    Mowbray married, by papal dispensation dated 25 March 1349,[5] Elizabeth de Segrave (born 25 October 1338 at Croxton Abbey),[5] suo jure Lady Segrave, daughter and heiress of John de Segrave, 4th Baron Segrave (d.1353),[3] by Margaret, daughter and heiress of Thomas of Brotherton, son of Edward I.[12]

    They had two sons and three daughters:[12]

    John de Mowbray, 1st Earl of Nottingham (1 August 1365 – before 12 February 1383), who died unmarried, and was buried at the Whitefriars, London.[13]
    Thomas de Mowbray, 1st Duke of Norfolk.[14]
    Eleanor Mowbray (born before 25 May 1364),[5] who married John de Welles, 5th Baron Welles.[13][15]
    Margaret Mowbray (d. before 11 July 1401), who married, by licence dated 1 July 1369, Sir Reginald Lucy (d. 9 November 1437) of Woodcroft in Luton, Bedfordshire.[16]
    Joan Mowbray, who married firstly Sir Thomas Grey (1359 – 26 November or 3 December 1400) of Heaton near Norham, Northumberland, son of the chronicler Sir Thomas Grey, and secondly Sir Thomas Tunstall of Thurland in Tunstall, Lancashire.[17][13]

    Died:
    while en route to the Holy Land...

    was slain by the Turks at Thrace on 17 June 1368.

    John married Elizabeth Segrave ~ 1343. Elizabeth (daughter of John Segrave, 4th Baron Segrave and Margaret Brotherton, Countess of Norfolk) was born 25 Oct 1338, Blaby, Leicestershire, England; died 24 May 1368, Leicestershire, England; was buried Croxton Abbey, Blaby, Leicestershire, England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 7.  Elizabeth SegraveElizabeth Segrave was born 25 Oct 1338, Blaby, Leicestershire, England (daughter of John Segrave, 4th Baron Segrave and Margaret Brotherton, Countess of Norfolk); died 24 May 1368, Leicestershire, England; was buried Croxton Abbey, Blaby, Leicestershire, England.

    Notes:

    Buried:
    Croxton Abbey, near Croxton Kerrial, Leicestershire, was a Premonstratensian monastery founded by William I, Count of Boulogne.

    images ... https://www.google.com/search?q=byland+abbey&espv=2&biw=1440&bih=815&site=webhp&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&sqi=2&ved=0ahUKEwj6svLG7MLKAhUEFh4KHfJ4BGgQsAQILg&dpr=1#tbm=isch&q=croxton+abbey

    Children:
    1. Joan Mowbray was born ~ 1361; died Aft 30 Nov 1402.
    2. Thomas de Mowbray, Knight, 1st Duke of Norfolk was born 22 Mar 1366, Epworth, Isle of Axholme, Lincolnshire, England; died 22 Sep 1399, Venice, Itlaly.
    3. 3. Eleanor de Mowbray was born Bef 1381; died 13 Aug 1417.


Generation: 4

  1. 10.  William de Ros, Knight, 2nd Baron de RosWilliam de Ros, Knight, 2nd Baron de Ros was born 0___ 1288, Helmsley, Yorkshire, England (son of William de Ros, Knight, 1st Baron de Ros of Hamlake and Maud de Vaux); died 3 Feb 1343, Kirkham, Yorkshire, England; was buried Kirkham Priory, Kirkham, North Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Member of Parliament
    • Also Known As: 3rd Baron de Ros of Hamlake, Werke, Trusbot & Belvoir
    • Also Known As: Lord Ross of Werke
    • Military: Lord High Admiral

    Notes:

    William de Ros, 2nd Baron de Ros of Helmsley (c.1288 - 3 February 1343) was the son of William de Ros, 1st Baron de Ros.

    Biography

    As 2nd Baron de Ros of Hamlake, Werke, Trusbut & Belvoir, he was summoned to Parliament during the reigns of Edward II and Edward III of England. In 1321 he completed the religious foundation which his father had begun at Blakeney. He was created Lord Ross of Werke. He was appointed Lord High Admiral and was one of the commissioners with the Archbishop of York, and others, to negotiate peace between the king and Robert de Bruce, who had assumed the title of king of Scotland.

    William de Ros was buried at Kirkham Priory, near the great altar.

    Family

    William de Ros married, before 25 November 1316, Margery De Badlesmere (c.1306 - 18 October 1363), eldest daughter of Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 1st Baron Badlesmere, with Margaret, daughter of Sir Thomas de Clare, with whom he had two sons and three daughters:[2]

    William, who succeeded his father as Baron.
    Thomas, who succeeded his brother as Baron.
    Margaret, who married Sir Edward de Bohun.
    Maud, who married John de Welles, 4th Baron Welles.
    Elizabeth, who married William la Zouche, 2nd Lord Zouche of Haryngworth, a descendant of Breton nobility.

    Maud survived her husband by many years and was one of the very few English people present at the Jubilee, at Rome, in 1350; the king had tried to prevent the attendance of his subjects at this ceremony on account of the large sums of money usually taken out of the kingdom on such occasions.

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    Biography

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    Residing in Wark Castle in August 1310. He was summoned for service in Scotland 1316-19, 1322, 1323, 1327, and 1335, and to Parliament 20 November 1317 to 21 Feb 1339/40. Received the surrender of Knaresborough, as a joint commander in January 1317/18, and remained loyal during the Earl of Lancaster's rebellion in 1321-22. Summoned for service in Gascony in December of 1324. He was appointed, by Prince Edward's government, Sheriff of Yorkshire (Nov 1326) and was a member of the Council of Regency in February 1326/27. In November 1327, he served as a commissioner to negotiate with the Scots for peace, as well as a similar role with France in February 1329/30. In 1334, he entertained the King at Helmsley, and during the King's absence in Flanders, he was one of the commissioners to preserve the peace in that country. He took part in the defense of Newcastle against the Scots. Buried at Kirkham in Lancashire.

    Children

    They had two sons, William, Knt. [3rd Lord Roos of Helmsley] and Thomas, Knt. [4th Lord Roos of Helmsley], and three daughters, Margaret, Maud, and Elizabeth. (Ref: Magna Carta Ancestry)

    William de Ros, 3rd Baron de Ros

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    William de Ros, 3rd Baron de Ros (died February 16, 1342) was the son of William de Ros, 2nd Baron de Ros.

    As 3rd Baron de Ros of Hamlake, Werke, Trusbut & Belvoir, he was summoned to Parliament during the reigns of Edward II and Edward III of England. In 1321 he completed the religious foundation which his father had begun at Blakeney. He was created Lord Ross of Werke. He was appointed Lord High Admiral and was one of the commissioners with the Archbishop of York, and others, to negotiate peace between the king and Robert de Bruce, who had assumed the title of king of Scotland.
    He married Margery De Badlesmere (1306-1363), the eldest sister and co-heir of Giles de Badlesmere, 2nd Baron Badlesmere of Leeds Castle, county of Kent. She survived her husband by many years and was one of the very few English people present at the Jubilee, at Rome, in 1350; the king had tried to prevent the attendance of his subjects at this ceremony on account of the large sums of money usually taken out of the kingdom on such occasions.

    Their children were:

    * William de Ros, 4th Baron de Ros
    * Thomas de Ros, 5th Baron de Ros
    * Sir John De Ros
    * Margaret de Ros
    * Matilda de Ros

    William de Ros was buried at Kirkham Priory, near the great altar.

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    Baron de Ros (pronounced "Roose") is one of the most ancient baronial titles in the Peerage of England . (The spelling of the title and of the surname of the original holders has been rendered differently in various texts. The word "Ros" is sometimes spelt "Roos", and the word "de" is sometimes dropped.)


    Barons de Ros of Helmsley (1264)[edit]
    William de Ros, 1st Baron de Ros (d. 1317)
    William de Ros, 2nd Baron de Ros (d. 1343)
    William de Ros, 3rd Baron de Ros (c. 1326–1352)
    Thomas de Ros, 4th Baron de Ros (1336–1384)
    John de Ros, 5th Baron de Ros (c. 1360–1394)
    William de Ros, 6th Baron de Ros (c. 1369–1414)
    John de Ros, 7th Baron de Ros (d. 1421)
    Thomas de Ros, 8th Baron de Ros (c. 1405–1431)
    Thomas de Ros, 9th Baron de Ros (c. 1427–1464) (forfeit 1464)
    Edmund de Ros, 10th Baron de Ros (d. 1508) (restored 1485, barony abeyant in 1508)
    George Manners, 11th Baron de Ros (d. 1513) (abeyance terminated about 1512)
    Thomas Manners, 1st Earl of Rutland, 12th Baron de Ros (d. 1543)
    Henry Manners, 2nd Earl of Rutland, 13th Baron de Ros (1526–1563)
    Edward Manners, 3rd Earl of Rutland, 14th Baron de Ros (1549–1587)
    Elizabeth Cecil, 16th Baroness de Ros (c. 1572–1591)
    William Cecil, 17th Baron de Ros (1590–1618)
    Francis Manners, 6th Earl of Rutland, 18th Baron de Ros (1578–1632)
    Katherine Villiers, Duchess of Buckingham, 19th Baroness de Ros (d. 1649)
    George Villiers, 2nd Duke of Buckingham, 20th Baron de Ros (1628–1687) (barony abeyant 1687)
    Charlotte FitzGerald-de Ros, 21st Baroness de Ros (1769–1831) (abeyance terminated 1806)
    Henry William FitzGerald-de Ros, 22nd Baron de Ros (1793–1839)
    William Lennox Lascelles FitzGerald-de Ros, 23rd Baron de Ros (1797–1874)
    Dudley Charles FitzGerald-de Ros, 24th Baron de Ros (1827–1907)
    Mary Dawson, Countess of Dartrey, 25th Baroness de Ros (1854–1939) (abeyant 1939)
    Una Mary Ross, 26th Baroness de Ros (1879–1956) (abeyance terminated 1943; abeyant 1956)
    Georgiana Angela Maxwell, 27th Baroness de Ros (1933–1983) (abeyance terminated 1958)
    Peter Trevor Maxwell, 28th Baron de Ros (b. 1958)
    The heir apparent is the present holder's son Hon. Finbar James Maxwell (b. 1988).

    Footnotes

    Jump up ^ Debrett's Peerage, 1968, p.347
    Jump up ^ The British herald; or, Cabinet of armorial bearings of the nobility & gentry of Great Britain & Ireland, from the earliest to the present time: with a complete glossary of heraldic terms: to which is prefixed a History of heraldry, collected and arranged ...
    Jump up ^ Cokayne 1949, p. 95; Richardson III 2011, p. 448.
    Jump up ^ Cokayne 1949, p. 95.
    Jump up ^ http://www.cracroftspeerage.co.uk/online/content/Ros1299.htm

    References

    Cokayne, George Edward (1949). The Complete Peerage, edited by Geoffrey H. White XI. London: St. Catherine Press.
    Richardson, Douglas (2011). Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, ed. Kimball G. Everingham III (2nd ed.). Salt Lake City. ISBN 144996639X

    Birth:
    (pronounced "Roose")

    Buried:
    The ruins of Kirkham Priory are situated on the banks of the River Derwent, at Kirkham, North Yorkshire, England. The Augustinian priory was founded in the 1120s by Walter l'Espec, lord of nearby Helmsley, who also built Rievaulx Abbey ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kirkham_Priory

    Images for Kirkham Priory ... https://www.google.com/search?q=Kirkham+Priory&rlz=1C1KMZB_enUS591US591&espv=2&biw=1440&bih=810&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjYj6LQuIzPAhXCJiYKHVRGC3wQsAQIMA

    William married Margery de Badlesmere Bef 25 Nov 1316. Margery (daughter of Bartholomew de Badlesmere, Knight, 1st Baron Badlesmere and Margaret de Clare, Baroness Badlesmere) was born 0___ 1306, Badlesmere Manor, Kent, England; died 18 Oct 1363. [Group Sheet]


  2. 11.  Margery de Badlesmere was born 0___ 1306, Badlesmere Manor, Kent, England (daughter of Bartholomew de Badlesmere, Knight, 1st Baron Badlesmere and Margaret de Clare, Baroness Badlesmere); died 18 Oct 1363.
    Children:
    1. Elizabeth de Ros was born 0___ 1325, Helmsley, Yorkshire, England; died 24 May 1380, Harringworth, Northamptonshire, , England.
    2. Thomas de Ros, Knight, 4th Baron de Ros was born 13 Jan 1335, Helmsley, Yorkshire, England; died 8 Jun 1383, Uffington, Lincolnshire, England; was buried Rievaulx Abbey, Helmsley, North Yorkshire, England.
    3. 5. Maud de Ros, Lady Welles was born (Helmsley, Yorkshire, England); died 9 Dec 1388.

  3. 12.  John de Mowbray, Knight, 3rd Baron Mowbray was born 29 Nov 1310, Hovingham, Yorkshire, England (son of John de Mowbray, I, 8th Baron Mowbray and Aline de Braose); died 4 Oct 1361, York, Yorkshire, England; was buried Bedford Greyfriars, Friars Minor, Bedford, Bedforshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Baron of Axholme
    • Also Known As: Baron of Bramber, Sussex
    • Also Known As: Keeper of Berwick-Upon-Tweed
    • Military: Battle of Neville's Cross

    Notes:

    Mowbray /'mo?bri/ is an Anglo-Norman baronial house, derived from Montbray in Normandy. From this village came Geoffrey de Montbray who came to be Bishop of Coutances and accompanied Duke William of Normandy at the Conquest of England in 1066.[1]

    For his support he was granted some 280 English manors (each about the size of a village). His nephew Robert de Montbrai became Earl of Northumberland in 1080, but he rebelled against William II (Rufus) and was captured and imprisoned in Windsor Castle for thirty years. His divorced wife, Matilda, married Nigel d'Aubigny (sometimes spelt d'Albini) whose family came from Saint-Martin-d'Aubigny, 16 km. west of Saint-Lăo and 15 km. north of Coutances. However, Robert was the maternal uncle of Nigel and although Nigel inherited Robert's vast landholdings, the marriage was annulled for consanguinity before any issue. By his second wife, Gundred, he had a son and heir Roger whose name was changed by royal command from d'Aubigny to de Montbray. The family flourished (Baronial Pedigree) and the name spelling evolved to Mowbray.[citation needed]

    The baronial line died out in England with a young heiress ca. 1475, although a son of an earlier generation had founded a dynasty in Scotland where issue has survived. The family was active up and down the east side of the country and settled predominantly in the counties of Durham, Lincolnshire and Leicestershire in historic times. Since then there has been the usual migration into other areas and overseas.[citation needed]

    As with any name, there are numerous spelling variations over time, but the major ones are Moubray, the Scottish version, and Mowberry which stemmed from a Leicestershire migration into Glinton, Northamptonshire, where the variant became established and eventually spread into a Lincolnshire branch. One of the many heraldic badges of the house was a mulberry tree.[citation needed]

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    John de Mowbray, 3rd Baron Mowbray (29 November 1310 - 4 October 1361) was the only son of John de Mowbray, 2nd Baron Mowbray, by his first wife, Aline de Brewes,[1] daughter of William de Braose, 2nd Baron Braose.

    He was born 29 November 1310 at Hovingham, Yorkshire.[1]

    Mowbray's father, the 2nd Baron, sided with Thomas, 2nd Earl of Lancaster, at the Battle of Boroughbridge on 16 March 1322 against Edward II, and was taken prisoner at the battle. He was hanged at York on 23 March 1322, and his estates forfeited.[1] His wife and son John were imprisoned in the Tower of London until Edward II was deposed by his wife, Queen Isabella, and Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March. The Mowbrays were released in 1327.

    The 3rd Baron de Mowbray was reportedly in Edward III's good graces, being present in France in the War of the Breton Succession for the sieges of Nantes and Aguillon. He was also on the English side at the Battle of Neville's Cross in the Second War of Scottish Independence.

    He died of the plague at York on 4 October 1361, and was buried at the Friars Minor in Bedford.[2]

    Marriages and issue

    He married firstly, before 26 February 1322, Maud de Holand, daughter of Robert de Holland, 1st Baron Holand, by Maud la Zouche, daughter and coheiress of Alan la Zouche, 1st Baron la Zouche of Ashby. The marriage was later declared void.[3]

    He married secondly, between 28 February 1327 and 4 June 1328, Joan of Lancaster, sixth and youngest daughter of Henry, 3rd Earl of Lancaster, by whom he had a son and two daughters:[3]

    Blanche Mowbray (d. 21 July 1409), who was contracted to marry Edward de Montagu (d. before February 1359), son and heir apparent of Edward de Montagu, 1st Baron Montagu (died 3 July 1461), by Alice of Norfolk, daughter and heiress of Thomas of Brotherton; however the marriage did not take place.

    She married firstly, by papal dispensation dated 21 March 1349, John de Segrave (d. before 1 April 1353), son and heir apparent of John Segrave, 4th Baron Segrave by Margaret, Duchess of Norfolk, daughter and heiress of Thomas of Brotherton;
    secondly, as his second wife, Sir Robert Bertam (d.1363);
    thirdly, before 5 June 1372, Thomas de Poynings, 2nd Baron Poynings (d. before 25 June 1375), son and heir of Michael de Poynings, 1st Baron Poynings;
    fourthly, before 21 March 1378, Sir John de Worth (d. before 1 June 1391); and
    fifthly, before 5 November 1394, Sir John Wiltshire. She had no issue by any of her husbands.[5]

    Eleanor Mowbray, who married firstly, as his second wife, Roger la Warr, 3rd Baron De La Warr (d. 27 August 1370),[6] by whom she had a daughter, Joan La Warr, who married Thomas West, 1st Baron West; and secondly Sir Lewis Clifford of Princes Risborough, Buckinghamshire, brother of Hugh de Clifford.[6][7][8][9]

    He married thirdly, by papal dispensation of 4 May 1351, Elizabeth de Vere (d. 14 or 16 August 1375), widow of Sir Hugh Courtenay (d. before 2 September 1349), and daughter of John de Vere, 7th Earl of Oxford, by Maud de Badlesmere, daughter of Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 1st Baron Badlesmere.[2]

    After Mowbray's death, his widow, Elizabeth de Vere, married, before 26 November 1368, Sir William de Cossington.[2]

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    3rd Lord Mowbray, Baron of Axholme, Lincolnshire, Baron of Bramber, Sussex, lord of Gower in Wales, Keeper of Berwick-Upon-Tweed.

    Only son and heir to Sir John de Mowbray and Aline de Brewes. grandson of Sir Roger de Mowbray and Rose de Clare, William de Brewse and Agnes.

    Husband of Joan of Lancaster Plantagenet, youngest daughter of Henry of Lancaster and Maud de Chaworth. They were married between 1327 and 1328 and had one son and two daughters:
    Sir John, 4th Lord Mowbray
    Blanche, who would marry John Seagrave, Sir Robert Bertram, Lord Thomas de Poynings, John de Worth and John Wiltshire.
    Eleanor, who married Roger de la Warre

    Secondly, husband of Elizabeth de Vere, daughter of John, Earl of Oxford and Maud Badlesmere, daughter of Lord Badlesmere. They married before 04 May 1351, the date of their papal dispensation as they were related in the 3rd and 4th degree. John and Elizabeth had no surviving children.

    John was baptized at Hoveringham, and betrothed to Maud de Holand, daughter of Sir Robert de Holand and Maud de la Zouche at an early age, but the marriage never took place. After his father's execution in 1322, John was twelve, he and his mother were imprisoned at the Tower of London by the Despensers. When Edward III became King, they were released, their lands and properties returned. John was summoned to Parliament 1327 to 160, and served in the Scottish and French wars.

    Sir John was one of the commanders of the English Army at the Battle of Neville's Cross, Durham in 1346, where Lanercost (one of the chroniclers of the times) loudly sang his praises: "He was full of grace and kindness - the conduct both of himself and his men was such as to resound to their perpetual honour." He was also present at the siege of Calais in 1347. In 1354 his title to Gower was contested by Thomas Beauchamp, the Earl of Warwick, and the Court of Common Pleas settled with Warwick. Sir John witnessed the surrender of Balliol of the Scottish crown in favor of Edward in 1356.

    John died of the pestilence at York, and was buried at the Church of Friars Minor at Bedford. Elizabeth would remarry to Sir William Cossington of Kent, and she died 16 August 1375.

    Military:
    The Battle of Neville's Cross took place to the west of Durham, England, on 17 October 1346. The culmination of a Scottish invasion of northern England, the battle ended with the rout of the Scots and the capture of their king, David II of Scotland.

    Died:
    He died of the plague at York...

    John married Joan Plantagenet, Baroness Mowbray 1326-1327, (Yorkshire, England). Joan (daughter of Henry Plantagenet, 3rd Earl of Lancaster and Leicester and Maud Chaworth) was born ~ 1312, Norfolk, England; died 7 Jul 1349, Yorkshire, England; was buried Byland Abbey, Coxwold, North Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 13.  Joan Plantagenet, Baroness Mowbray was born ~ 1312, Norfolk, England (daughter of Henry Plantagenet, 3rd Earl of Lancaster and Leicester and Maud Chaworth); died 7 Jul 1349, Yorkshire, England; was buried Byland Abbey, Coxwold, North Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Joan of Lancaster
    • Alt Birth: 0___ 1312, Monmouthshire, Wales

    Notes:

    Joan of Lancaster (c.1312-7 July 1349) sometimes called Joan Plantagenet after her dynasty's name, was the third daughter of Henry, 3rd Earl of Lancaster and Maud Chaworth.

    Marriage

    Joan of Lancaster was born circa 1312.[1] She married John de Mowbray, 3rd Baron Mowbray sometime between February and June 1327.[1][2] They had three children:[2]

    Blanche de Mowbray (died 1409), married firstly John Segrave, secondly Robert Bertram, thirdly Thomas Poynings, fourthly Sir John Worth, and fifthly Sir John Wiltshire.
    Eleanor de Mowbray, married firstly Roger La Warre, Lord La Warre and secondly Sir Lewis de Clifford.
    John de Mowbray, 4th Baron Mowbray (25 June 1340–1368), married Elizabeth de Segrave
    She died in Yorkshire, England of plague. Her husband remarried to Elizabeth de Vere, widow of Sir Hugh de Courtenay.

    *

    more...

    Joan was the fifth daughter of Henry Plantagenet, Earl of Lancaster and Maud de Chaworth, granddaughter of Edmund of England, the son of King Henry III, and Blanche of Artois, Sir Patrick de Chaworth and Isabel de Beauchamp.

    Joan was the wife of Sir John de Mowbray, the son of Sir John de Mowbray and Aline de Brewes. They were married between 1327 and 1329 and had one son and two daughters:
    Sir John, 4th Lord Mowbray
    Blanche, who would marry John Seagrave, Sir Robert Bertram, Lord Thomas de Poynings, John de Worth and John Wiltshire.
    Eleanor, who married Roger de la Warre.

    Buried:
    Byland Abbey is a ruined abbey and a small village in the Ryedale district of North Yorkshire, England, in the North York Moors National Park.

    Images ... https://www.google.com/search?q=byland+abbey&espv=2&biw=1440&bih=815&site=webhp&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&sqi=2&ved=0ahUKEwj6svLG7MLKAhUEFh4KHfJ4BGgQsAQILg&dpr=1

    Died:
    She died in Yorkshire, England of plague...

    Notes:

    Married:
    sometime between February and June 1327 and his 2nd marriage...

    Children:
    1. Blanche Mowbray died 21 Jul 1409.
    2. 6. John de Mowbray, Knight, 4th Baron Mowbray was born 24 Jun 1340, Epworth, Lincolnshire, England; died 19 Oct 1368, Thrace, Turkey.

  5. 14.  John Segrave, 4th Baron Segrave was born 4 May 1315 (son of Stephen Segrave, 3rd Baron Segrave and Alice FitzAlan); died 1 Apr 1353, Repton, Derbyshire, England; was buried Grey Friars, London, Middlesex, England.

    Notes:

    John Segrave, 4th Baron Segrave (4 May 1315 – 1 April 1353) was an English peer and landowner in Leicestershire and Yorkshire. His family title of Baron Segrave is drawn from a village now spelled Seagrave, which uses a coat of arms similar to that of the barons.

    Segrave was the son of Stephen Segrave, 3rd Baron Segrave, and Alice Fitzalan. Little is known of his early life.

    About 1335 Segrave married Margaret, daughter and eventual sole heir of Thomas of Brotherton, son of Edward I by his second marriage,[2] by whom he had two sons and two daughters:[3]

    John de Segrave, who died young.[4]
    John de Segrave (d. before 1 April 1353), second of that name, who was contracted to marry Blanche of Lancaster, younger daughter and coheiress of Henry of Grosmont, 1st Duke of Lancaster. However the contract was later declared void.[4]

    About 1349 a double marriage was solemnized in which John Segrave married Blanche Mowbray, while John's sister, Elizabeth Segrave, married Blanche Mowbray's brother, John de Mowbray, 4th Baron Mowbray, Pope Clement VI having granted dispensations for the marriages at the request of Lancaster, in order to prevent 'disputes between the parents', who were neighbours.[5][6][4]

    Elizabeth de Segrave, 5th Baroness Segrave, who married John de Mowbray, 4th Baron Mowbray.[4]

    Margaret de Segrave, who died young, before 1353.[4]

    A year after the marriage his wife inherited her father's title and estates, becoming in her own right Countess of Norfolk and Earl Marshal of England.

    In 1350, Segrave and his wife sought a divorce, arguing that they had been contracted in marriage before Margaret was of age, and that she had never consented. The impetus for this was that Margaret wished to marry Walter Manny, 1st Baron Manny, with whom she was implicated.[7] However, Segrave died at Bretby in Repton, Derbyshire on 1 April 1353,[8] before the divorce had been granted. He was succeeded in the barony by his daughter Elizabeth.

    *

    John married Margaret Brotherton, Countess of Norfolk ~ 1335, (Norfolkshire, England). Margaret (daughter of Thomas of Brotherton, Knight, 1st Earl of Norfolk and Alice Hales, Countess of Norfolk) was born ~ 1320, Norfolk, Norfolkshire, England; died 24 Mar 1399, Tower of London, London, Middlesex, England; was buried Grey Friars, London, Middlesex, England. [Group Sheet]


  6. 15.  Margaret Brotherton, Countess of Norfolk was born ~ 1320, Norfolk, Norfolkshire, England (daughter of Thomas of Brotherton, Knight, 1st Earl of Norfolk and Alice Hales, Countess of Norfolk); died 24 Mar 1399, Tower of London, London, Middlesex, England; was buried Grey Friars, London, Middlesex, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Duchess of Norfolk
    • Also Known As: Earl Marshal
    • Also Known As: Margaret Marshal
    • Also Known As: Margaret Plantagenet

    Notes:

    Margaret, in her own right Countess of Norfolk (sometimes surnamed Brotherton or Marshal;[1] c.?1320–24 March 1399), was the daughter and eventual sole heir of Thomas of Brotherton, eldest son of Edward I, by his second marriage. In 1338 she succeeded to the earldom of Norfolk and the office of Earl Marshal.

    Family

    Born about 1320, Margaret was the daughter of Thomas of Brotherton, eldest son of Edward I by his second marriage to Margaret (1279?–1318), the daughter of Philippe III of France (d.1285).[2] Her mother was Alice de Hales (d. in or before 1330), daughter of Sir Roger de Hales of Hales Hall in Loddon in Roughton, Norfolk, by his wife, Alice.[3][4] She had a brother and sister:

    Edward of Norfolk, who married Beatrice de Mortimer, daughter of Roger de Mortimer, 1st Earl of March, but died without issue before 9 August 1334.[5]
    Alice of Norfolk, who married Sir Edward de Montagu.[6]
    Life[edit]
    In 1335 aged 15 (the typical age of marriage for maidens of that era), she was married to John Segrave, 4th Baron Segrave, and proceeded to have four children - two sons and two daughters - by him. In 1350, she sought a divorce on the ground that they had been contracted in marriage (in other words betrothed) before she was of marriageable age, and that she had never consented to cohabit with him. She made known her intention of traveling to the continent in order to plead personally with the Pope for a divorce. King Edward III prohibited her from leaving England, but she set off incognito anyway, having taken care to obtain a safe conduct from the King of France.

    The following year (1351) Edward III charged her with having crossed the English Channel in contravention of his prohibition.[7] The inquisition, regarding this incident, shows that Margaret unlawfully crossed the Channel and met with a servant of her future husband, Sir Walter de Mauny, who broke his lantern with his foot so she could pass unnoticed and acted as her guardian during her sojourn in France. This incident and the involvement of her future husband's retainer may indicate the real motivation for Margaret seeking a divorce.

    The divorce case was ultimately heard by the Pope's auditor, the Dean of St. Hilary's at Poitiers. However, Margaret's first husband died in 1353, before the divorce could be finalized. Shortly thereafter, and just before 30 May 1354, she married Sir Walter de Mauny without the King's licence. They were married 18 years, and had three children before he died at London on 8 or 13 January 1372.[8]

    On 29 September 1397, Margaret she was created Duchess of Norfolk for life.[8] She died 24 March 1399, and was buried in the choir of Grey Friars in the City of London.[8]

    The executors of her will are reported to be John Sileby & Walter fitz Piers, who in 1399 were reported to be attempting to recover money due to her estate. [9]

    Marriages and issue[edit]
    Margaret married firstly, about 1335,[4] John Segrave, 4th Baron Segrave, by whom she had two sons and two daughters:[10]

    John de Segrave, who died young.[10]
    John de Segrave (d. before 1 April 1353), second of that name, who was contracted to marry Blanche of Lancaster, younger daughter and coheiress of Henry of Grosmont, 1st Duke of Lancaster. However the contract was later declared void[11] and Blanche later married John of Gaunt. About 1349, a double marriage was solemnized in which John Segrave married Blanche Mowbray, while John's sister, Elizabeth Segrave, married Blanche Mowbray's brother, John de Mowbray, 4th Baron Mowbray, Pope Clement VI having granted dispensations for the marriages at the request of Lancaster, in order to prevent 'disputes between the parents', who were neighbours.[12][13][11]
    Elizabeth de Segrave, 5th Baroness Segrave, who married John de Mowbray, 4th Baron Mowbray.[11]
    Margaret de Segrave, who died young, before 1353.[11]
    Shortly before 30 May 1354, Margaret married secondly, and without the King's licence, Sir Walter Mauny,[14] by whom she had a son and two daughters:[11]

    Thomas Mauny, who was drowned in a well at Deptford at the age of ten.[11]
    Anne Mauny, who married John Hastings, 2nd Earl of Pembroke.[11]
    Isabel Mauny, who was living in 1358, but died without issue before 30 November 1371.[11]
    Distinction[edit]
    As her brother had died without issue, she succeeded to the earldom of Norfolk and the office of Earl Marshal at her father's death in 1338. To date, she is the only woman to have held the latter office.

    Buried:
    "One substantial gift was to the Greyfriars, London, where she donated 350 marks for the new choir stalls, and where she chose to be buried, next to her grandson John Hastings, earl of Pembroke." ...
    http://www.royaldescent.net/margaret-of-brotherton-duchess-of-norfolk/

    Children:
    1. 7. Elizabeth Segrave was born 25 Oct 1338, Blaby, Leicestershire, England; died 24 May 1368, Leicestershire, England; was buried Croxton Abbey, Blaby, Leicestershire, England.


Generation: 5

  1. 20.  William de Ros, Knight, 1st Baron de Ros of Hamlake was born ~ 1255, Helmsley Castle, Yorkshire, England (son of Robert de Ros, Knight and Isabel d'Aubigny); died 8 Aug 1316, Youlton, Yorkshire, England; was buried Kirkham, Yorkshire, England.

    Notes:

    William de Ros or Roos, 1st Baron de Ros of Helmsley (c.1255 – 6 or 8 August 1316), was one of the claimants of the crown of Scotland in 1292 during the reign of Edward I.[2]

    Family

    William de Ros was the eldest son of Robert de Ros (d. 17 May 1285) of Helmsley, Yorkshire, and Isabel d'Aubigny (c.1233 – 15 June 1301), daughter and heiress of William D'Aubigny of Belvoir, Leicestershire, and granddaughter of William d'Aubigny.[3] He had four brothers and three sisters:[4]

    Sir Robert de Ros of Gedney, Lincolnshire.
    John de Ros.
    Nicholas de Ros, a cleric.
    Peter de Ros, a cleric.
    Isabel de Ros, who married Walter de Fauconberg, 2nd Baron Fauconberg.
    Joan de Ros, who married John Lovell, 1st Baron Lovell.
    Mary de Ros, who married William de Braose, 1st Baron Braose.

    Career

    On 24 December 1264 William's father, Robert de Ros (d.1285), was summoned to Simon de Montfort's Parliament in London as Robert de Ros,[5] and for some time it was considered that the barony was created by writ in that year, and that Robert de Ros was the 1st Baron Ros. According to The Complete Peerage:

    In 1616 the barony of De Ros was allowed precedence from this writ [of 24 December 1264], a decision adopted by the Lords in 1806 (Round, Peerage and Pedigree, vol. i, pp. 249-50); but these writs, issued by Simon in the King's name, are no longer regarded as valid for the creation of peerages.[6]

    Accordingly, the barony is now considered to have been created when William de Ros was summoned to Parliament from 6 February 1299 to 16 October 1315 by writs directed Willelmo de Ros de Hamelak.[7]

    William de Ros succeeded to the family honours and estates on the death of his mother. He was an unsuccessful competitor for the crown of Scotland, founding his claim on his descent from his great grandmother, Isabel, a bastard daughter of William I of Scotland. He was buried at Kirkham Priory. He was involved in the wars of Gascony and Scotland.[8] He discovered that Robert De Ros, Lord of Werke, intended to give up his castle to the Scots. William notified the king of this, who sent him with a thousand men to defend that place. The place was then forfeited because of the treason of Robert De Ros. William De Ros then took possession of it. William was appointed warden of the west Marches of Scotland.[8]

    Through his marriage to Maud de Vaux the patronage of Penteney and Blakeney Priories in Norfolk and of Frestun in Lincolnshire came into the De Ros family. A video relating to relics found belonging to William de Ros and the Battle of Falkirk can be seen on YouTube under the title "braveheart battle camp metal detecting uk".

    Marriage and issue

    William de Ros married, before 1287, Maud de Vaux (born c.1261), younger daughter and coheiress of John De Vaux, by whom he had four sons and three daughters.[9]

    William de Ros, 2nd Baron de Ros.
    Sir John de Ros (d. before 16 November 1338), who married Margaret de Goushill (d. 29 July 1349).
    Thomas de Ros.
    George de Ros.
    Agnes de Ros, who married firstly Sir Pain de Tibetot, and secondly Sir Thomas de Vere.
    Alice de Ros, who married Sir Nicholas de Meinill. Their daughter, Elizabeth de Meinill, married Sir John Darcy, 2nd Lord Darcy of Knayth.
    Margaret de Ros.

    Footnotes:

    Jump up ^ Debrett's Peerage, 1968, p.347
    Jump up ^ http://www.celtic-casimir.com/webtree/13/24725.htm
    Jump up ^ Cokayne 1949, p. 96; Richardson I 2011, pp. 69–73; Richardson III 2011, pp. 447–8.
    Jump up ^ Richardson III 2011, pp. 447–8.
    Jump up ^ Cokayne 1949, p. 95; Richardson III 2011, p. 448.
    Jump up ^ Cokayne 1949, p. 95.
    Jump up ^ Cokayne 1949, p. 97; Richardson III 2011, p. 448.
    ^ Jump up to: a b Burke, John (1831). A general and heraldic dictionary of the peerages of England, Ireland, and Scotland, extinct, dormant, and in abeyance. England. Oxford University
    Jump up ^ Richardson III 2011, pp. 448–51.

    References:

    Cokayne, George Edward (1949). The Complete Peerage, edited by Geoffrey H. White. XI. London: St. Catherine Press.
    Richardson, Douglas (2011). Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, ed. Kimball G. Everingham. I (2nd ed.). Salt Lake City. ISBN 1449966373
    Richardson, Douglas (2011). Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, ed. Kimball G. Everingham. III (2nd ed.). Salt Lake City. ISBN 144996639X

    Birth:
    Map & History ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helmsley_Castle

    William — Maud de Vaux. [Group Sheet]


  2. 21.  Maud de Vaux
    Children:
    1. 10. William de Ros, Knight, 2nd Baron de Ros was born 0___ 1288, Helmsley, Yorkshire, England; died 3 Feb 1343, Kirkham, Yorkshire, England; was buried Kirkham Priory, Kirkham, North Yorkshire, England.
    2. Alice de Ros was born Abt 1310, Helmsley Castle, Yorkshire, England; died Bef 4 Jul 1344, Stokesley, Yorkshire, England.

  3. 22.  Bartholomew de Badlesmere, Knight, 1st Baron BadlesmereBartholomew de Badlesmere, Knight, 1st Baron Badlesmere was born 18 Aug 1275, Blean, Canterbury, Kent, England (son of Gunselm de Badlesmere and Joan LNU); died 14 Apr 1322, Blean, Canterbury, Kent, England.

    Notes:

    Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 1st Baron Badlesmere (circa 1275 - 14 April 1322), English soldier, diplomat, Member of Parliament, landowner and nobleman, was the son and heir of Gunselm de Badlesmere (died circa 1301). He fought in the English army both in France and Scotland during the later years of the reign of Edward I of England[2] and the earlier part of the reign of Edward II of England. He was executed after participating in an unsuccessful rebellion led by the Earl of Lancaster.

    Career

    The earliest records of Bartholomew's life relate to his service in royal armies, which included campaigns in Gascony (1294), Flanders (about 1297) and Scotland (1298, 1300, 1301-4, 1306, 1307, 1308, 1310–11, 1314, 1315 and 1319).[3] However, even at a relatively young age his activities were not limited to soldiering. In October 1300, was one of the household of Henry de Lacy, Earl of Lincoln who were permitted by the King to accompany the Earl when he set out for Rome during the following month in order to complain to Pope Boniface VIII of injury done by the Scots.[4][5]

    A writ issued on 13 April 1301, presumably soon after the death of Jocelin (Guncelinis, Goscelinus) de Badlesmere, initiated inquests into the identity of the next heir of lands that he held direct from the King. This led to a hearing on 30 April of that year in relation to property in Kent at Badlesmere and Donewelleshethe, where it was confirmed that the heir was his son Bartholomew, then aged 26.[6]

    Bartholomew de Badlesmere and Fulk Payfrer were the knights who represented the county of Kent at the Parliament that sat at Carlisle from January 1306/7 until 27 March 1307.[7] Also in 1307 Bartholomew was appointed governor of Bristol Castle.[2] In that role he took charge of the subjugation of the city when it defied royal authority in 1316.[8]

    In 1310, Bartholomew acted as deputy Constable of England on behalf of the Earl of Hereford.[9] Bartholomew served as his lieutenant when Hereford refused to perform his duties in the Scottish campaign of 1310-11.[10] He was one of the retinue of the Earl of Gloucester at the Battle of Bannockburn on 24 June 1314, Bartholomew's own sub-retinue consisting of at least 50 men.[10] He was criticised for not coming to his aid when Gloucester lost his life in an impetuous attack on the Scottish sheltron on that occasion.[11]

    In the following January, Bartholomew was one of the many notables who attended the funeral of Piers Gaveston.[12]

    On 28 April 1316, Bartholomew was one of four men who were authorised to grant safe conducts in the King's name to Robert Bruce and other Scots so that they could come to England to negotiate a truce. In December of that year, he was commissioned, along with the Bishop of Ely and the Bishop of Norwich to go on an embassy to Pope John XXII at Avignon to seek his help against the Scots and request a Bull to release the King from his oath to the Ordinances.[13] In June of the same year, Bartholomew's daughter Elizabeth married Edward, the son and heir of Roger Mortimer. Elizabeth's father was sufficiently wealthy to pay ą2,000 for the marriage, in exchange for which extensive property was settled on the bride.[14]

    On 1 November 1317, the King appointed Bartholomew as custodian of Leeds Castle in Kent [15] This was followed by a transaction on 20 March 1317/18 by which the King granted the castle and manor of Leeds along with the advowson of the priory of Leeds to Bartholomew and his heirs in exchange for the manor and advowson of Adderley, Shropshire, which Bartholomew surrendered to the King [16]

    By late November 1317, Bartholomew made a compact with a number of noblemen and prelates, including the Earl of Pembroke, the Earl of Hereford and the Archbishop of Canterbury with the aim of reducing the influence on the King of advisors of whom they disapproved.[17] Bartholomew and his associates formed a loose grouping which has been referred to by modern historians as the "Middle Party", who detested alike Edward's minions, like the Despensers, and his violent enemies like Lancaster. However, although he was very hostile to Thomas, Earl of Lancaster, Bartholomew helped to make peace between the king and the earl in 1318.[2]

    On 1 October 1318, Bartholomew was with the King at York, setting out to repel an invasion by the Scots.[18] Nineteen days later, he was appointed as the King's household steward in place of William Montagu. This position was of major importance, as it provided continual access to the King's presence and considerable influence over who else could obtain access to him.[19] Bartholomew was still holding this appointment in June 1321. Financial grants that he received during this period included ą500 on appointment as steward and over ą1,300 in October 1319.[20]

    In 1319, Bartholomew obtained the king's licence to found a priory on his manor of Badlesmere, but the proposed priory was never established.[21] In June of the following year, he hosted a splendid reception at Chilham Castle for Edward II and his entourage when they were travelling to Dover en route for France.[22] Also in 1320, he was granted control of Dover Castle and Wardenship of the Cinque Ports and in 1321 was appointed governor of Tunbridge Castle.

    During the earlier part of 1321, Bartholomew, along with the Bishop of Worcester and the Bishop of Carlisle and others represented the King in unsuccessful negotiations with the Scots for either a permanent peace or an extended truce.[23]

    Rebellion

    By the summer of 1321, Bartholomew defied the King by associating with their mutual enemy the Earl of Lancaster and his allies in their active opposition to Edward's "evil councillors" such as the Despensers. The Lancastrian forces moved from the North to London, reaching the capital by the end of July.

    In the autumn, the King started to apply pressure targeted on Bartholomew, probably partly because many of his manors were closer to London than those of magnates such as Lancaster and partly because of anger at the disloyalty of his own household steward. Edward took control of Dover Castle and forbade Bartholomew entrance to the county of Kent, an injunction that he promptly breached. Bartholomew then returned to Witney, Oxfordshire, where a tournament attended by many of his new allies was being held. When returning to London from a pilgrimage to Canterbury, the Queen did not take the most direct route but detoured to Leeds Castle, where she demanded access, precipitating the siege and its aftermath that is described in detail in the article about Bartholomew's wife. Although Bartholomew assembled an armed force and marched from Witney towards Kent, by the time he reached Kingston upon Thames it was clear that he would not receive help from Lancaster and his followers and so he was not able to take effective action to relieve the siege.[24] During the following months, civil war broke out.

    On 26 December 1321, the King ordered the sheriff of Gloucester to arrest Bartholomew.[25] Shortly afterwards, the King offered safe conducts to the rebels who would come over to him, with the specific exception of Bartholomew de Badlesmere.[26]

    Details contained in arrest warrants signpost the progress of Bartholomew and his companions across England. By 15 January 1321/2, they had occupied and burned the town of Bridgnorth and sacked the castles at Elmley and Hanley.[27] By 23 February, the rebels had been sighted in Northamptonshire.[28] On 1 March, Bartholomew was reported as one of a number of prominent rebels who had reached Pontefract.[29] On 11 March the sheriff of Nottingham and Derby was ordered to arrest the same group, who had taken Burton upon Trent but they departed from that town when the royal army approached.[30]

    On 16 March 1321/2, the Earl of Lancaster and his allies were defeated at the Battle of Boroughbridge.

    Death

    Bartholomew fled south from Boroughbridge and, according to the "Livere de Reis", was captured in a small wood near Brickden and taken by the Earl of Mar to Canterbury.[31] Alternative details appear in John Leland's "Collectanea", which states that "Syr Barptolemew Badelesmere was taken at Stow Parke yn the Manoyr of the Bishop of Lincoln that was his nephew."[32] Stow Park is about 10 miles north-west of the centre of Lincoln, where the current bishop was Henry Burghersh. Stow Park was one of the principal residences of the Bishop in that era but none of the medieval buildings still survive above ground.[33] The identity of "Brickden" is uncertain but may well refer to Buckden, Huntingdonshire, another place where the Bishop of Lincoln had a manor house (Buckden Towers). If so, that may be the reason for the differing accounts of the place that Bartholomew had reached when he was arrested, as they both featured residences of his nephew.

    Bartholomew was tried at Canterbury on 14 April 1322 and sentenced to death. On the same day he was drawn for three miles behind a horse to Blean, where he held property.[34] There he was hanged and beheaded. His head was displayed on the Burgh Gate at Canterbury and the rest of his body left hanging at Blean. There is probably remained for quite some time, as it was not until the Lent Parliament of 1324 that the prelates successfully petitioned for the bodies of the nobles still hanging on the gallows to be given ecclesiastical burial.[35] In a book that was first published in 1631, the antiquary John Weever stated that Bartholomew was buried at White Friars, Canterbury;[36] this was a community of the Order of St Augustine.[37]

    Property

    By the latter part of his life, Bartholomew possessed a vast portfolio of properties, either in his own right or jointly with his wife Margaret. These assets were forfeited because of Bartholomew’s rebellion. During the first four years of reign of Edward III, a series of inquisitions post mortem established the properties to which Margaret was entitled and also those of which her son Giles would be the right heir. Much of the property was restored to Bartholomew’s widow or assigned to Giles, who at that juncture was still a minor in the King’s wardship.[38]

    Some of the properties that Bartholomew held are listed below; the list is not exhaustive and he did not necessarily hold all of them at the same time.

    Bedfordshire: The manor of Sondyington (i.e. Sundon).
    Buckinghamshire: The manor of Hambleden. Also the manors of Cowley and Preston, both of which were in the parish of Preston Bissett.
    Essex: The manors of Chingford, Latchley (i.e. Dagworth Manor at Pebmarsh), Little Stambridge and Thaxted.
    Gloucestershire: The manor of Oxenton.
    Herefordshire: The manor of Lenhales and Lenhales Castle at Lyonshall.
    Hertfordshire: The manors of Buckland, Mardleybury (at Welwyn) and Plashes (at Standon).
    Kent: The manors of Badlesmere, Bockingfold (north of Goudhurst), Chilham, Hothfield, Kingsdown, Lesnes, Rydelyngwelde (i.e. Ringwould), Tonge and Whitstable. Bartholomew’s possessions in this county included Chilham Castle and Leeds Castle.
    Oxfordshire: The manor of Finmere.
    Shropshire: The manors of Adderley and Ideshale (at Shifnal).
    Suffolk: The manors of Barrow and Brendebradefeld (i.e. Bradfield Combust).
    Sussex: The manors of Eastbourne and Laughton. Also reversions of the manors of Drayton, Etchingham and West Dean.
    Wiltshire: The manors of Castle Combe, Knook, Orcheston and West Heytesbury
    The relevant inquisitions post mortem also contain details of numerous advowsons and other property rights that Bartholomew owned.

    Family

    Bartholomew married Margaret, the widow of Gilbert de Umfraville. The marriage had taken place by 30 June 1308, when the couple were jointly granted the manor of Bourne, Sussex.[39] Margaret was a daughter of Thomas de Clare and his wife Juliana FitzGerald.[40] A comprehensive overview of their children can be seen in the records of numerous inquisitions post mortem that were held after the death of their son Giles on 7 June 1338.[41] The evidence given at each hearing rested on local knowledge and there were some inconsistencies about the names of Giles' sisters and their precise ages. However, taken as a whole, it is clear from the inquisition records that the names of Bartholomew's children were as follows, listed in descending order of age:

    Margery de Badlesmere, married William de Ros, 2nd Baron de Ros, then Thomas de Arundel
    Maud de Badlesmere, married Robert FitzPayn, then John de Vere, 7th Earl of Oxford
    Elizabeth de Badlesmere, married Sir Edmund Mortimer, then William de Bohun, 1st Earl of Northampton
    Giles de Badlesmere, 2nd Baron Badlesmere, married Elizabeth Montagu, and died without issue[42]
    Margaret de Badlesmere, married John Tiptoft, 2nd Baron Tibetot

    Birth:
    More about Badlesmere ... http://bit.ly/1OpzcUw

    Died:
    near Blean...

    was hanged, drawn and quartered by orders of King Edward II, following his participation in the Earl of Lancaster's rebellion and his subsequent capture after the Battle of Boroughbridge

    Bartholomew married Margaret de Clare, Baroness Badlesmere Bef 30 Jun 1308. Margaret (daughter of Thomas de Clare, Knight, Lord of Thomond and Juliana Fitzgerald, Lady of Thomond) was born ~ 1 Apr 1287, Ireland; died 22 Oct 1333, Aldgate, London, Middlesex, England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 23.  Margaret de Clare, Baroness Badlesmere was born ~ 1 Apr 1287, Ireland (daughter of Thomas de Clare, Knight, Lord of Thomond and Juliana Fitzgerald, Lady of Thomond); died 22 Oct 1333, Aldgate, London, Middlesex, England.

    Notes:

    Margaret de Clare, Baroness Badlesmere (ca. 1 April 1287 – 22 October 1333/3 January 1334, disputed) was a Norman-Irish noblewoman, suo jure heiress, and the wife of Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 1st Baron Badlesmere.[1]

    She was arrested and subsequently imprisoned in the Tower of London for the duration of a year from November 1321 to November 1322, making her the first recorded female prisoner in the Tower's history.[2][3] She was jailed on account of having ordered an armed assault on Isabella of France, Queen consort of King Edward II of England. Before Margaret had instructed her archers to fire upon Isabella and her escort, she had refused the Queen admittance to Leeds Castle where her husband, Baron Badlesmere held the post of governor, but which was legally the property of Queen Isabella as part of the latter's dowry. Margaret surrendered the castle on 31 October 1321 after it was besieged by the King's forces using ballistas. Edward's capture of Leeds Castle was the catalyst which led to the Despenser War in the Welsh Marches and the north of England.

    Upon her release from the Tower, Margaret entered a religious life at the convent house of the Minorite Sisters outside Aldgate. King Edward granted her a stipend to pay for her maintenance.

    Background

    Margaret was born at an unrecorded place in either Ireland or England on or about 1 April 1287, the youngest child of Thomas de Clare, Lord of Thomond and Juliana FitzGerald of Offaly, and granddaughter of Richard de Clare, Earl of Hertford and Gloucester. She had two brothers, Gilbert de Clare, Lord of Thomond, and Richard de Clare, 1st Lord Clare, Lord of Thomond, who was killed at the Battle of Dysert O'Dea in 1318;[4] and an elder sister, Maud, whose first husband was Robert de Clifford, 1st Baron de Clifford. Margaret had an illegitimate half-brother, Richard.[5] Her parents resided in both Ireland and England throughout their marriage;[6] it has never been established where Juliana was residing at the time of Margaret's birth although the date is known.

    *

    A foremother of 24 times to David A. Hennessee (1942) ... http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=I3&secondpersonID=&maxrels=24&disallowspouses=1&generations=24&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I43875

    Her father died on 29 August 1287, when she was almost five months of age. His cause of death has never been ascertained by historians. Her mother married her second husband, Nicholas Avenel sometime afterwards, but the exact date of this marriage is not known. Between 11 December 1291 and 16 February 1292, Margaret acquired another stepfather when her mother married her third husband, Adam de Cretynges.

    Inheritance

    A series of inquisitions post mortem held in response to writs issued on 10 April 1321 established that Margaret, the wife of Bartholomew de Badlesmere and Maud, wife of Sir Robert de Welle (sisters of Richard de Clare and both aged 30 years and above) were the next heirs of Richard's son Thomas.[7] Thomas' estate included the stewardship of the Forest of Essex, the town and castle at Thomond and numerous other properties in Ireland that are listed in the reference.

    First Marriage

    She married firstly before the year 1303, Gilbert de Umfraville, son of Gilbert de Umfraville, Earl of Angus, and Elizabeth Comyn. Upon their marriage, the Earl of Angus granted Gilbert and Margaret the manors of Hambleton and Market Overton; however, when Gilbert died childless prior to 1307, the manors passed to Margaret.

    Second Marriage

    On an unrecorded date earlier than 30 June 1308, when the couple were jointly granted the manor of Bourne, Sussex,[8] Margaret married Bartholomew de Badlesmere, an English soldier and court official who was afterwards created 1st Baron Badlesmere by writ of summons. He had held the post of Governor of Bristol Castle since 1307, and during his life accumulated many renumerative grants and offices. It is feasible that Margaret's marriage to Badlesmere had been arranged by her brother-in-law, Baron Clifford; Badlesmere having been one of Clifford's retainers during the Scottish Wars. Clifford was later killed at the Battle of Bannockburn, where Badlesmere also fought.

    Margaret was styled as Baroness Badlesmere on 26 October 1309 (the date her husband was by writ summoned to Parliament by the title of Baron Badlesmere) and henceforth known by that title.[9]

    When Margaret was visiting Cheshunt Manor in Hertfordshire in 1319, she was taken hostage by a group of sixty people, both men and women.[10] Her captors demanded a ransom of ą100 for her release. She was held prisoner for one night before being rescued on the following day by the King's favourite, Hugh Despenser the Younger.[10] Hugh was married to Margaret's first cousin, Eleanor de Clare, eldest daughter of Gilbert de Clare, 7th Earl of Gloucester and Joan of Acre and also Eleanor was Edward II's niece. The King ordered the arrest and imprisonment of twenty of Margaret's kidnappers; they all, however, were eventually pardoned.

    Issue

    The five children of Margaret and Baron Badlesmere were:

    Margery de Badlesmere (1308/1309- 18 October 1363), married before 25 November 1316 William de Ros, 2nd Baron de Ros of Hamlake, by whom she had six children.
    Maud de Badlesmere (1310- 24 May 1366), married firstly, Robert FitzPayn; secondly, John de Vere, 7th Earl of Oxford, by whom she had seven children.
    Elizabeth de Badlesmere (1313- 8 June 1356), married firstly in 1316 Sir Edmund Mortimer, eldest son of Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March and Joan de Geneville, 2nd Baroness Geneville; she married secondly in 1335, William de Bohun, 1st Earl of Northampton. Both marriages produced children.
    Giles de Badlesmere, 2nd Baron Badlesmere (18 October 1314- 7 June 1338), married Elizabeth Montagu, but did not have any children by her.
    Margaret de Badlesmere (born 1315), married Sir John Tiptoft, 2nd Lord Tiptoft, by whom she had one son, Robert Tiptoft.
    The siege of Leeds Castle[edit]

    Queen consort Isabella, whom Margaret offended by refusing her admittance to Leeds Castle
    Margaret's husband, Baron Badlesmere was appointed Governor of the Royal Castle of Leeds in Kent in the fifth year of Edward II's reign (1312).[11] In October 1321, nine years after his assumption of the office, the queen consort Isabella went on a pilgrimage to the shrine of St. Thomas at Canterbury. She decided to interrupt her journey by stopping at Leeds Castle which legally belonged to her as the fortress and its demesne were Crown property and part of her dowry to be retained in widowhood.[12] Badlesmere, who by then had become disaffected with King Edward and had joined the swelling ranks of his opponents, was away at a meeting of the Contrariants[n 1] in Oxford at the time and had left Margaret in charge of the castle.

    Shortly before, Baron Badlesmere had deposited all of his treasure and goods inside Leeds Castle for safe-keeping.[13]

    Due to her strong dislike of Isabella as well as her own belligerent and quarrelsome character,[14][n 2] Margaret refused the Queen admittance.[15] It was suggested by Francis Lancellott that Margaret's antipathy towards Queen Isabella had its origins in about 1317 when she had asked Isabella to use her influence on behalf of a friend who was seeking an appointment in the Exchequer Office. When Isabella refused her request, for reasons unknown, a quarrel ensued and henceforth Margaret became the Queen's enemy.[16] Margaret allegedly told Isabella's marshal, whom she met on the lowered drawbridge, that "the Queen must seek some other lodging, for I would not admit anyone within the castle without an order from my lord [Baron Badlesmere]".[17] After issuing her message, she subsequently ordered her archers to loose their arrows upon Isabella from the battlements when the Queen (having apparently ignored Margaret's communication) approached the outer barbican,[18][19] in an attempt to enter the castle by force.[20] The unexpected, lethal volley of arrows, which killed six of the royal escort, compelled Isabella to make a hasty retreat from the castle and to seek alternative accommodation for the night.[21] Historian Paul C. Doherty suggests that the pilgrimage was a ruse on the part of the King and Queen in order to create a casus belli. Edward would have known beforehand that Baron Badlesmere was with the Contrariants in Oxford and had left Leeds Castle in the hands of the belligerently hostile Baroness Badlesmere; therefore he had given instructions for Isabella to deliberately stop at Leeds aware she would likely be refused admittance. Using the insult against the Queen as a banner, he would then be able to gather the moderate nobles and outraged populace to his side as a means of crushing the Contrariants.[22]

    When King Edward heard of the violent reception his consort was given by Margaret, he was predictably outraged and personally mustered a sizeable force of men "aged between sixteen and sixty", including at least six earls,[23] to join him in a military expedition which he promptly led against Margaret and her garrison at Leeds Castle to avenge the grievous insult delivered to the Queen by one of his subjects. Following a relentless assault of the fortress, which persisted for more than five days[n 3] and with the King's troops using ballistas, Margaret surrendered at curfew on 31 October having received a "promise of mercy" from Edward.[24] Throughout the siege, she had expected the Earl of Lancaster to arrive with his soldiery to relieve her, but this he had refused to do;[23][n 4] nor had any of the other Contrariants or the Marcher Lords[n 5] come to her assistance, which left her to defend the castle with merely her husband's nephew, Bartholomew de Burghersh, and the garrison troops.[23] Baron Badlesmere, although supportive of Margaret's conduct, had during that crucial time, sought refuge at Stoke Park, seat of the Bishop of Lincoln; however he did manage to despatch some knights from Witney to augment the garrison troops in the defence of Leeds.[15] Once King Edward had gained possession of the castle and the Badlesmere treasure within, the seneschal, Walter Colepepper and 12 of the garrison were hanged from the battlements.[23][25][n 6] Margaret was arrested and sent as a prisoner, along with her five children and Bartholomew de Burghersh, to the Tower of London;[14][26] she therefore became the first recorded woman imprisoned in the Tower.[2][3] On her journey to the fortress, she was insulted and jeered at by the citizens of London who, out of loyalty to Isabella, had followed her progression through the streets to vent their fury against the person who had dared maltreat their queen.[27]

    Aftermath

    Main article: Despenser War

    The King's military victory at Leeds, accomplished with the help of six influential earls including the Earls of Pembroke and Richmond, encouraged him to reclaim and assert the prerogative powers that Lancaster and the Lords Ordainers had so long denied him.[28][n 7] The dominant baronial oligarchy broke up into factions. Many of the nobles who had previously been hostile to Edward rushed to his side to quell the insurrection of the Marcher Lords, known as the Despenser War, which had erupted in full force after the King defiantly recalled to England the two Despensers (father and son,) whom the Ordainers had compelled him to banish in August 1321.[29] The first sparks to the uprising had been ignited when, prior to his expulsion, the rapacious Hugh le Despenser the Younger had persuaded the infatuated King to grant him lands in the Welsh Marches which rightfully belonged to entrenched Marcher barons such as Roger Mortimer,[30] his uncle Roger Mortimer de Chirk, and Humphrey de Bohun, 4th Earl of Hereford, a staunch Ordainer albeit the King's brother-in-law.[n 8] They had formed a confederation and made devastating raids against Despenser holdings in Wales; and Mortimer led his men in an unsuccessful march on London. These mutinous events, in addition to other incidents which created a tense situation and called for a mobilisation of forces throughout the realm, eventually led to the Ordainers constraining the King to exile the favourites. However, subsequent to his capture of Leeds Castle and the harsh sentences he had meted out to the insubordinate Margaret de Clare and her garrison, King Edward defied the Contrariants by persuading the bishops to declare the Despensers' banishment illegal at a convocation of the clergy, and he summoned them home.[28] This act had dire consequences in addition to the Despenser War: it paved the way for the complete domination of the grasping Despensers over Edward and his kingdom, leading to Roger Mortimer and Queen Isabella's 1326 Invasion of England, their assumption of power, the execution of the two Despensers, and finally, Edward's deposition.

    Imprisonment

    Margaret was the first recorded woman imprisoned in the Tower of London[2][3]

    Baron Badlesmere excused his wife's bellicose actions at Leeds with his declaration that when he had left Margaret in charge of Leeds, he had given her strict instructions not to admit anyone inside the castle without his specific orders.[18] This, he had insisted, included the Queen, with the words that "the royal prerogative of the King in the case of refusal of entry should not be assumed to provide a legal right for the Queen, who was merely his wife".[25] As a result of Margaret's imprisonment, Badlesmere remained firmly aligned with the King's opponents; shortly afterwards he participated in the Earl of Lancaster's rebellion. Badlesmere was captured after taking part in the Battle of Boroughbridge on 16 March 1322 which had ended with a royalist victory. Following trial at Canterbury, he was executed at Blean on 14 April 1322.[20]

    Margaret remained imprisoned in the Tower until 3 November 1322, when she was released on the strength of a bond from her son-in-law William de Ros and five others.[31] Presumably her children were released with her, but a record of the exact dates of their liberation has not been found.

    Later life

    Margaret retired to the convent house of the Minorite Sisters, outside Aldgate,[32] where the abbess Alice de Sherstede was personally acquainted with Queen Isabella, who took an interest in the convent's business affairs.[33] On 13 February 1322/3, the King granted Margaret a stipend of two shillings a day for her maintenance, which was paid to her by the Sheriff of Essex.[34] She also received a considerable proportion of her late husband's manors for her dowry.[35]

    Edward demonstrated his good will toward Margaret again on 1 July 1324, by giving her "permission to go to her friends within the realm whither she will, provided that she be always ready to come to the king when summoned".[36] It appears that after then she lived at Hambleton, Rutland as it was from there that on 27 May 1325 she submitted a petition in connection with property at Chilham.[37]

    Her son Giles obtained a reversal of his father's attainder in 1328, and succeeded by writ to the barony as the 2nd Baron Badlesmere. By this time Edward III had ascended the throne; however, the de facto rulers of England were Queen Isabella and her lover, Marcher Lord Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March (father-in-law of Margaret's daughter Elizabeth), who jointly held the Office of Regent for the new king. Edward II had been deposed in January 1327 and allegedly murdered in September by Mortimer's hired assassins.[38] The regency of Queen Isabella and Lord Mortimer ended in October 1330 when Edward III now nearly 18 had Mortimer hanged as a traitor and Queen Isabella exiled for the remaining 28 years of her life at Castle Rising in Norfolk.

    Margaret died between 22 October 1333 [39] and 3 January 1333/4.[40]

    Died:
    in the Convent house of the Minorite Sisters...

    Children:
    1. 11. Margery de Badlesmere was born 0___ 1306, Badlesmere Manor, Kent, England; died 18 Oct 1363.
    2. Maude de Badlesmere, Countess of Oxford was born 0___ 1310, Badlesmere Manor, Kent, England; died 24 May 1366, Hall Place, Earl's Colne, Essex, England; was buried Colne Priory, Essex, England.
    3. Elizabeth Badlesmere, Countess of Northampton was born 0___ 1313, Badlesmere Manor, Kent, England; died 8 Jun 1356, (Lancashire) England; was buried Black Friars, Blackburn, Lancashire, England.

  5. 24.  John de Mowbray, I, 8th Baron Mowbray was born 4 Sep 1286, Thirsk, Yorkshire, England (son of Roger de Mowbray, III, Knight, 1st Baron of Mowbray and Rose de Clare); died 23 Mar 1322, York, Yorkshire, England.

    Notes:

    John de Mowbray, 2nd Baron Mowbray (4 September 1286 – 23 March 1322) was the son of Roger de Mowbray, 1st Baron Mowbray. Lord of the manors of Tanfield and Well, Yorkshire.

    De Mowbray served in the Scottish wars of Edward I. The baron held such offices as sheriff of Yorkshire, governor of the city of York, a warden of the Scottish marches, governor of Malton and Scarborough Castles.

    He took part in the rebellion of Thomas, Earl of Lancaster. He was captured at the battle of Boroughbridge and subsequently hanged at York.

    John de Mowbray married Aline de Braose, (b. 1291 d. ca 1331), daughter of William de Braose, 2nd Baron Braose and Lord of Gower.[1] They had at least two sons:

    John,(b. 29 November 1310, Yorkshire, England d.1361 who succeeded his father to the barony.
    Alexander, (c. 1314 – c. 1391.)

    References

    Jump up ^ Davies, John; Jenkins, Nigel; Baines, Menna; Lynch, Peredur, eds. (2008). The Welsh Academy Encyclopaedia of Wales. Cardiff: University of Wales Press. p. 577. ISBN 978-0-7083-1953-6.

    Bibliography

    Burke, Sir Bernard. "Mowbray-Earls of Nottingham, Dukes of Norfolk, Earls-Marshal, Earls of Warren and Surrey." A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages, of the British Empire. London: Wm Clowes and Sons, Ltd, 1962. p. 387.
    G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, "The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant" (1910–1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume 9, page 379.

    Died:
    He took part in the rebellion of Thomas, Earl of Lancaster. He was captured at the battle of Boroughbridge and subsequently hanged at York.

    John — Aline de Braose. Aline (daughter of William de Braose, VII, Knight, 2nd Baron de Braose and Agnes LNU) was born 0___ 1291; died ~ 1331. [Group Sheet]


  6. 25.  Aline de Braose was born 0___ 1291 (daughter of William de Braose, VII, Knight, 2nd Baron de Braose and Agnes LNU); died ~ 1331.
    Children:
    1. Christiana Mowbray was born ~ 1305, Kirklington, North Yorkshire, England; died 25 Dec 1362.
    2. 12. John de Mowbray, Knight, 3rd Baron Mowbray was born 29 Nov 1310, Hovingham, Yorkshire, England; died 4 Oct 1361, York, Yorkshire, England; was buried Bedford Greyfriars, Friars Minor, Bedford, Bedforshire, England.
    3. Alexander de Mowbray, Chief Justice of England was born ~ 1314, Kirklington, North Yorkshire, England; died ~ 1368, (Yorkshire) England; was buried Kirklington, North Yorkshire, England.

  7. 26.  Henry Plantagenet, 3rd Earl of Lancaster and LeicesterHenry Plantagenet, 3rd Earl of Lancaster and Leicester was born 0___ 1281, Grosmont Castle, Monmouth, England (son of Edmund "Crouchback" Plantagenet, Prince of England and Blanche de Capet d'Artois, Queen of Navarre, Princess of France); died 22 Sep 1345, Leicester, Leicestershire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Military: Appointed Captain-General of all The King's Forces in The Marches of Scotland.
    • Death: 25 Mar 1345

    Notes:

    Henry, 3rd Earl of Leicester and Lancaster (c. 1281 – 22 September 1345) was an English nobleman, one of the principals behind the deposition of Edward II of England.

    Origins

    He was the younger son of Edmund Crouchback, 1st Earl of Lancaster, Earl of Leicester,[1] who was a son of King Henry III by his wife Eleanor of Provence. Henry's mother was Blanche of Artois, Queen Dowager of Navarre.

    Henry's elder brother Thomas, 2nd Earl of Lancaster, succeeded their father in 1296, but Henry was summoned to Parliament on 6 February 1298/99 by writ directed to Henrico de Lancastre nepoti Regis ("Henry of Lancaster, nephew of the king", Edward I), by which he is held to have become Baron Lancaster. He took part in the Siege of Caerlaverock in July 1300.

    Petition for succession and inheritance

    After a period of longstanding opposition to King Edward II and his advisors, including joining two open rebellions, Henry's brother Thomas was convicted of treason, executed and had his lands and titles forfeited in 1322. Henry did not participate in his brother's rebellions; he later petitioned for his brother's lands and titles, and on 29 March 1324 he was invested as Earl of Leicester. A few years later, shortly after his accession in 1327, the young Edward III of England returned the earldom of Lancaster to him, along with other lordships such as that of Bowland.

    Revenge

    On the Queen's return to England in September 1326 with Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March, Henry joined her party against King Edward II, which led to a general desertion of the king's cause and overturned the power of Hugh le Despenser, 1st Earl of Winchester, and his namesake son Hugh the younger Despenser.

    He was sent in pursuit and captured the king at Neath in South Wales. He was appointed to take charge of the king and was responsible for his custody at Kenilworth Castle.

    Full restoration and reward[edit]
    Henry was appointed "chief advisor" for the new king Edward III of England,[2] and was also appointed captain-general of all the king's forces in the Scottish Marches.[3] He was appointed High Sheriff of Lancashire in 1327. He also helped the young king to put an end to Mortimer's regency and tyranny, also had him declared a traitor and executed in 1330.

    Loss of sight

    In about the year 1330, he became blind.

    Nickname

    According to Froissart, he was nicknamed Wryneck, or Tort-col in French, possibly due to a medical condition.[citation needed]

    Succession

    He was succeeded as Earl of Lancaster and Leicester by his eldest son, Henry of Grosmont, who subsequently became Duke of Lancaster.

    Issue[edit]


    He married Maud Chaworth, before 2 March 1296/1297.[4]

    Henry and Maud had seven children:

    Henry, Earl of Derby, (about 1300–1360/61)
    Blanche of Lancaster, (about 1305–1380) married Thomas Wake, 2nd Baron Wake of Liddell
    Matilda of Lancaster, (about 1310–1377); married William de Burgh, 3rd Earl of Ulster and had descendants.
    Joan of Lancaster, (about 1312–1345); married John de Mowbray, 3rd Baron Mowbray and had descendants
    Isabel of Lancaster, Abbess of Amesbury, (about 1317-after 1347)
    Eleanor of Lancaster, (about 1318–1371/72) married (1) John De Beaumont and (2) 5 Feb. 1344/5, Richard FitzAlan, 10th Earl of Arundel and had descendants
    Mary of Lancaster, (about 1320–1362), who married Henry de Percy, 3rd Baron Percy, and was the mother of Henry Percy, 1st Earl of Northumberland.

    In about the year 1330, he became blind.

    Buried:
    at the Monastery of Canons...

    Henry married Maud Chaworth Bef 2 Mar 1297. Maud (daughter of Patrick Chaworth, Knight, Lord of Kidwelly and Isabella Beauchamp) was born 2 Feb 1282, Kidwelly, Carmarthenshire, Wales; died 3 Dec 1322, Montisfort, Hampshire, England; was buried Montisfort, Hampshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  8. 27.  Maud Chaworth was born 2 Feb 1282, Kidwelly, Carmarthenshire, Wales (daughter of Patrick Chaworth, Knight, Lord of Kidwelly and Isabella Beauchamp); died 3 Dec 1322, Montisfort, Hampshire, England; was buried Montisfort, Hampshire, England.

    Notes:

    Maud de Chaworth (2 February 1282-3 Dec 1322) was an English noblewoman and wealthy heiress. She was the only child of Patrick de Chaworth. Sometime before 2 March 1297, she married Henry, 3rd Earl of Lancaster, by whom she had seven children.

    Parents

    Maud was the daughter of Sir Patrick de Chaworth, Baron of Kidwelly, in Carmarthenshire, South Wales, and Isabella de Beauchamp. Her maternal grandfather was William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick. Her father, Patrick de Chaworth died on 7 July 1283. He was thought to be 30 years old. Three years later, in 1286, Isabella de Beauchamp married Hugh Despenser the Elder and had two sons and four daughters by him. This made Maud the half-sister of Hugh the younger Despenser. Her mother, Isabella de Beauchamp, died in 1306.

    Childhood

    Maud was only a year old when her father died, and his death left her a wealthy heiress. However, because she was an infant, she became a ward of Eleanor of Castile, Queen consort of King Edward I of England. Upon Queen Eleanor's death in 1290, her husband, King Edward I, granted Maud's marriage to his brother Edmund, Earl of Lancaster on 30 December 1292.
    Edmund Crouchback, 1st Earl of Lancaster, Earl of Leicester was the son of Eleanor of Provence and Henry III of England. He first married Aveline de Forz, Countess of Albemarle, in 1269. Later, in Paris on 3 February 1276, he married Blanche of Artois, who was a niece of Louis IX of France and Queen of Navarre by her first marriage. Blanche and Edmund had four children together, one of whom was Henry, who would later become 3rd Earl of Leicester and Maud Chaworth’s husband.

    Marriage and issue


    Edmund Crouchback betrothed Maud to his son Henry, 3rd Earl of Lancaster.[1] Henry and Maud were married sometime before 2 March 1297. Henry was probably born between the years 1280 and 1281, making him somewhat older than Maud, but not by much since they were either fourteen or fifteen-years-old.

    Since Maud inherited her father’s property, Henry also acquired this property through the rights of marriage. Some of that property was of the following: Hampshire, Glamorgan, Wiltshire, and Carmarthenshire. Henry was the nephew of the King of England, as well as being closely related to the French royal family line. Henry's half-sister Jeanne (or Juana) was Queen of Navarre in her own right and married Philip IV of France. Henry was the uncle of King Edward II's Queen Isabella and of three Kings of France. He was also the younger brother of Thomas (Earl of Lancaster) and first cousin of Edward II.

    Maud is often described as the "Countess of Leicester" or "Countess of Lancaster", but she never bore the titles as she died in 1322, before her husband received them. Henry was named "Earl of Leicester" in 1324 and "Earl of Lancaster" in 1327. Henry never remarried and died on 22 September 1345, when he would have been in his mid-sixties. All but one of his seven children with Maud outlived him.

    Maud and Henry had seven children:

    Blanche of Lancaster, (about 1302/05–1380); Maud’s eldest daughter was probably born between 1302 and 1305, and was named after her father’s mother Blanche of Artois. Around 9 October 1316, she married Thomas Wake, 2nd Baron Wake of Liddell. Blanch was about forty-five when Thomas died, and she lived as a widow for more than thirty years. She was one of the executers of her brother Henry’s will when he died in 1361. Blanche outlived all her siblings, dying shortly before 12 July 1380 in her seventies. Born in the reign of Edward I, she survived all the way into the reign of his great grandson Richard II.

    Henry of Grosmont, 1st Duke of Lancaster, (about 1310–1361); Maud’s only son Henry was usually called Henry of Grosmont to distinguish him from his father. He was one of the great magnates of the fourteenth century, well known and highly respected. He took after his father and was well-educated, literate, and pious; he was a soldier and a diplomat. Henry produced his own memoir "Le Livre de Seyntz Medicines", which was completed in 1354. At one point, Henry of Grosmont was considered to be the richest man in England aside from the Prince of Wales. He emerged as a political figure in his own right within England: he was knighted and represented his father in Parliament. He married Isabella, daughter of Henry, Lord Beaumont. His daughter Blanche was betrothed and eventually married to the son of Edward III, John of Gaunt. In 1361, Henry was killed by a new outbreak of the Black Death, leaving John of Gaunt his inheritance and eventually his title through his daughter Blanche.[2]

    Maud of Lancaster, Countess of Ulster, (c. 1310 – 5 May 1377). There is some discrepancy as to when Maud died.[3][4] She married William de Burgh, 3rd Earl of Ulster in 1327. They had one child, Elizabeth de Burgh, who was born 6 July 1332. Eleven months after the birth of their child, Earl William was murdered at “Le Ford” in Belfast, apparently by some of his own men. The countess Maud fled to England with her baby and stayed with the royal family. In 1337, Maud of Lancaster managed to ensure that the Justiciar of Ireland was forbidden to pardon her husband’s killers. She fought for her dower rights and exerted some influence there. She remarried in 1344 to Ralph Ufford and returned to Ireland, where she had another daughter, Maud. After her second husband fell ill in 1346, she again returned to England. Maud of Lancaster died on 5 May 1377.
    Joan of Lancaster, (about 1312–1345); married between 28 February and 4 June 1327 to John de Mowbray, 3rd Baron Mowbray. John’s father was executed for reasons unknown, and young John was imprisoned in the Tower of London along with his mother Alice de Braose until late 1326. A large part of his inheritance was granted to Hugh Despenser the Younger, who was his future wife’s uncle; however, he was set free in 1327 before the marriage. Joan of Lancaster probably died 7July 1349. Joan and John, 3rd Lord Mowbray had six children.

    Isabel of Lancaster, Prioress of Amesbury, (about 1317–after 1347); One of the youngest daughters of Maud and Henry, she lived quietly, going on pilgrimages and spending a lot of time alone. She also spent a great deal of time outside the cloister on non-spiritual matters. Her father had given her quite a bit of property, which she administered herself. She owned hunting dogs and had personal servants. She used her family connections to secure privileges and concessions.[5]

    Eleanor of Lancaster, (1318- Sept. 1372); married John Beaumont between September and November 1330. Eleanor bore John a son, Henry, who married Margaret de Vere, a sister of Elizabeth and Thomas de Vere, Earl of Oxford. John Beaumont was killed in a jousting tournament in Northampton on 14 April 1342. Eleanor then became the mistress of Richard FitzAlan, 10th Earl of Arundel, who was married to her first cousin Isabel, daughter of Hugh Despenser the Younger. Richard obtained a divorce from the Pope and married Eleanor on 5 February 1345 in the presence of Edward III. They had five children together, three sons and two daughters. Eleanor died on 11 January 1372.

    Mary of Lancaster, (about 1320–1362); married Henry, Lord Percy before 4 September 1334; he fought at the battle of Crecy in 1346, and served in Gascony under the command of his brother-in-law Henry of Grosmont. Their son was Henry Percy, 1st Earl of Northumberland. Mary of Lancaster died on 1 September 1362, the year after her brother Henry.

    Birth:
    Photo, map & history of Kidwelly ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kidwelly

    Children:
    1. Henry of Grosmont, Knight, 1st Duke of Lancaster was born ~ 1310, Grosmont Castle, Grosmont, Monmouthshire, Wales; died 23 Mar 1361, Leicester Castle, Leicester, Leicestershire, England.
    2. 13. Joan Plantagenet, Baroness Mowbray was born ~ 1312, Norfolk, England; died 7 Jul 1349, Yorkshire, England; was buried Byland Abbey, Coxwold, North Yorkshire, England.
    3. Eleanor Plantagenet, Countess of Arundel was born 11 Sep 1318, Castle, Grosmont, Monmouth, Wales; died 11 Jan 1372, Arundel, West Sussex, England; was buried Lewes Priory, Sussex, England.
    4. Mary Plantagenet, Baroness of Percy was born 1319-1320, Tutbury Castle, Staffordshire, England; died 1 Sep 1362, Alnwick, Northumberland, England; was buried Alnwick, Northumberland, England.

  9. 28.  Stephen Segrave, 3rd Baron Segrave was born 0___ 1285; died 0Dec 1353.

    Stephen — Alice FitzAlan. Alice (daughter of Richard FitzAlan, Knight, 8th Earl of Arundel and Alice of Saluzzo, Countess of Arundel) was born 0___ 1291, Arundel, Sussex, England; died 7 Feb 1340, Northamptonshire, England; was buried Chacombe Priory, Chacombe, Northamptonshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  10. 29.  Alice FitzAlan was born 0___ 1291, Arundel, Sussex, England (daughter of Richard FitzAlan, Knight, 8th Earl of Arundel and Alice of Saluzzo, Countess of Arundel); died 7 Feb 1340, Northamptonshire, England; was buried Chacombe Priory, Chacombe, Northamptonshire, England.

    Notes:

    Buried:
    Inscription:
    Nothing remains of the original priory building and tombs. Present building is 16th century.

    Children:
    1. 14. John Segrave, 4th Baron Segrave was born 4 May 1315; died 1 Apr 1353, Repton, Derbyshire, England; was buried Grey Friars, London, Middlesex, England.

  11. 30.  Thomas of Brotherton, Knight, 1st Earl of Norfolk was born 1 Jun 1300, Brotherton, Yorkshire, England (son of Edward I, King of England and Margaret of France, Queen Consort of England); died 23 Aug 1338, Framlington Castle, Suffolk, England; was buried Bury St Edmunds Abbey, Suffolk, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Thomas Plantagenet of Brotherton

    Notes:

    Thomas of Brotherton, 1st Earl of Norfolk (1 June 1300 – August 1338), was a younger son of King Edward I (1272-1307) by his wife Margaret of France and was a younger half-brother of King Edward II (1307-1327). He occupied the office of Earl Marshal of England.

    Early life

    Thomas of Brotherton, born 1 June 1300, was the fifth son of Edward I, and the eldest son of his second marriage to Margaret (1279?–1318), the daughter of Philippe III of France (d.1285).[1] He was born at the manor house[2] at Brotherton, Yorkshire, while his mother was on her way to Cawood, where her confinement was scheduled to take place. According to Hilton, Margaret was staying at Pontefract Castle and was following a hunt when she went into labour.[3] The chronicler William Rishanger records that during the difficult delivery his mother prayed, as was the custom at the time, to Thomas Becket, and Thomas of Brotherton was thus named after the saint and his place of birth.[1]

    Edward I quickly rushed to the queen and the newborn baby and had him presented with two cradles. His brother Edmund was born in the year after that. They were overseen by wet nurses until they were six years old. Like their parents, they learned to play chess and to ride horses. They were visited by nobles and their half-sister Mary of Woodstock, who was a nun. Their mother often accompanied Edward on his campaigns to Scotland, but kept herself well-informed on their well-being.[3]

    His father died when he was 7 years old. Thomas's half-brother, Edward, became king of England and Thomas was heir presumptive until his nephew Edward was born in 1312. The Earldom of Cornwall had been intended for Thomas, but Edward instead bestowed it upon his favourite, Piers Gaveston, in 1306. When Thomas was 10 years old, Edward assigned to him and his brother Edmund, the estates of Roger Bigod, 5th Earl of Norfolk who had died without heirs in 1306.

    Career

    Ruins of the Abbey of Bury St Edmunds where Thomas of Brotherton was buried
    In 1312, he was titled "Earl of Norfolk" and on 10 February 1316 he was created Earl Marshal. While his brother was away fighting in Scotland, he was left Keeper of England. He was known for his hot and violent temper. He was one of the many victims of the unchecked greed of the king's new favourite, Hugh Despenser the Younger and his father Hugh Despenser the Elder, who stole some of the young earl's lands. He allied himself with Queen Isabella and Roger Mortimer when they invaded England in 1326, and stood as one of the judges in the trials against both Despensers. When his nephew Edward III reached his majority and took the government into his own hands Thomas became one of his principal advisors. It was in the capacity of Lord Marshal that he commanded the right wing of the English army at the Battle of Halidon Hill on 19 July 1333.

    He died about 20 September 1338, and was buried in the choir of the Abbey of Bury St Edmunds.[1][4][5]

    He was succeeded by his daughter, Margaret, as Countess of Norfolk.[1] She was later created Duchess of Norfolk for life in 1397.[5]

    As a son of Edward I of England, he was entitled to bear the coat of arms of the Kingdom of England, differenced by a label argent of three points.[6]

    Marriages and issue
    He married firstly, before 8 January 1326, Alice de Hales (d. before 12 October 1330), daughter of Sir Roger de Hales of Hales Hall in Loddon in Roughton, Norfolk, by his wife, Alice, by whom he had a son and two daughters:[7][1]

    Edward of Norfolk, who married Beatrice de Mortimer, daughter of Roger de Mortimer, 1st Earl of March, but died without issue before 9 August 1334.[8]
    Margaret, Duchess of Norfolk, who married firstly John Segrave, 4th Baron Segrave, and secondly Sir Walter Manny.
    Alice of Norfolk, who married Sir Edward de Montagu.[9]
    Alice Hales died by October 1330, when a chantry was founded for her soul in Bosham, Sussex.[10]

    He married secondly, before 4 April 1336, Mary de Brewes (died 11 June 1362), widow of Sir Ralph de Cobham, (d. 5 February 1326), and daughter of Sir Peter de Brewes[1] (d. before 7 February 1312) of Tetbury, Gloucestershire, by Agnes de Clifford (d. before 1332), by whom he had no surviving issue.[11][12]

    Buried:
    The Abbey of Bury St Edmunds was once among the richest Benedictine monasteries in England, until the Dissolution of the monasteries in 1539. It is in the town that grew up around it, Bury St Edmunds in the county of Suffolk, England. It was a centre of pilgrimage as the burial place of the Anglo-Saxon martyr-king Saint Edmund, killed by the Great Heathen Army of Danes in 869. The ruins of the abbey church and most other buildings are merely rubble cores, but two very large medieval gatehouses survive, as well as two secondary medieval churches built within the abbey complex.

    images ... https://www.google.com/search?q=Bury+St+Edmunds+Abbey&rlz=1C1KMZB_enUS591US591&espv=2&biw=1440&bih=815&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwilxIr28sLKAhUC_R4KHekVA9MQsAQILg&dpr=1

    Thomas married Alice Hales, Countess of Norfolk ~ 1321. Alice (daughter of Roger Hayles and Alice Skogan) was born ~ 1305, Harwich, Essex , England; died ~ 1330; was buried Bury St Edmunds Abbey, Suffolk, England. [Group Sheet]


  12. 31.  Alice Hales, Countess of Norfolk was born ~ 1305, Harwich, Essex , England (daughter of Roger Hayles and Alice Skogan); died ~ 1330; was buried Bury St Edmunds Abbey, Suffolk, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Alice de Hayles
    • Alt Death: 8 May 1326, Bosham, Sussex, England

    Notes:

    First wife of Prince Thomas (of Brotherton)Plantagenet. Her great beauty captured the heart of this son of King Edward I. She was the daughter of Roger de Hayles and Alice Skogan.

    *

    Marriage: abt 1321

    “Technically, Thomas’s marriage belonged to the king until Thomas came of age. There is no record of the young earl of Norfolk being granted his own marriage, as there is for the young earl of Gloucester (CPR 1307-1313, p. 50). Nor is there any record of Thomas having to pay a fine for marrying without licence of the king. So his marriage to Alice Hales must have occurred after he came of age in June 1321, and from the chronology of their children, probably very shortly after.”1

    Children:

    Margaret of Brotherton (~1322-1399)

    Edward of Brotherton (~1323-1334)

    Alice of Brotherton (1324-1352)

    *



    Sources

    1. Brad Verity, “Love Matches and Contracted Misery: Thomas of Brotherton and His Daughters (Part 1),” Foundations, Volume 2 Number 2, July 2006.

    He married first, probably in 1319, Alice Hayles, daughter of Sir Roger Hayles and Alice Skogan. She was supposed to have been a great beauty.

    Her father was the coroner of Norfolk, a title that held a different meaning in the 14th century than it does today; his post demanded that he collect and protect revenues for the king.

    Buried:
    The Abbey of Bury St Edmunds was once among the richest Benedictine monasteries in England, until the Dissolution of the monasteries in 1539. It is in the town that grew up around it, Bury St Edmunds in the county of Suffolk, England. It was a centre of pilgrimage as the burial place of the Anglo-Saxon martyr-king Saint Edmund, killed by the Great Heathen Army of Danes in 869. The ruins of the abbey church and most other buildings are merely rubble cores, but two very large medieval gatehouses survive, as well as two secondary medieval churches built within the abbey complex.

    images ... https://www.google.com/search?q=Bury+St+Edmunds+Abbey&rlz=1C1KMZB_enUS591US591&espv=2&biw=1440&bih=815&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwilxIr28sLKAhUC_R4KHekVA9MQsAQILg&dpr=1

    Children:
    1. 15. Margaret Brotherton, Countess of Norfolk was born ~ 1320, Norfolk, Norfolkshire, England; died 24 Mar 1399, Tower of London, London, Middlesex, England; was buried Grey Friars, London, Middlesex, England.


Generation: 6

  1. 40.  Robert de Ros, Knight was born ~ 1223, Helmsley Castle, Yorkshire, England (son of William de Ros, Knight and Lucy FitzPeter, Baroness de Ros); died 17 May 1285; was buried Kirkham Priory, Kirkham, North Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Member of Parliament
    • Also Known As: Sir Robert de Ros, Lord of Belvoir
    • Alt Birth: Bef 1237, Helmsley, Yorkshire, England

    Notes:

    Sir Robert de Ros (before 1237 – 17 May 1285) was an English nobleman.

    Family

    Robert de Ros of Helmsley, Yorkshire, born before 1237, was the grandson of Sir Robert de Ros, one of the twenty-five barons who guaranteed the observance of Magna Carta, and Isabel of Scotland, an illegitimate daughter of William the Lion, King of the Scots, by a daughter of Robert Avenel.[1]

    He was the son of Sir William de Ros (died c.1264/5) and Lucy FitzPeter, the daughter of Peter FitzHerbert and Alice FitzRoger. He had five brothers, Sir Peter, Sir William, Sir Alexander, Sir Herbert, and John, and two sisters, Lucy and Alice.[2]

    Career

    On 24 December 1264 he was summoned to Simon de Montfort's Parliament in London as Robert de Ros,[3][4] and for some time it was considered that the barony was created by writ in that year, and that Robert de Ros was the 1st Baron Ros. According to The Complete Peerage:

    In 1616 the barony of De Ros was allowed precedence from this writ [of 24 December 1264], a decision adopted by the Lords in 1806 (Round, Peerage and Pedigree, vol. i, pp. 249-50); but these writs, issued by Simon in the King's name, are no longer regarded as valid for the creation of peerages.[3]

    Accordingly, the barony is now considered to have been created when Robert's eldest son, William de Ros was summoned to Parliament from 6 February 1299 to 16 October 1315 by writs directed Willelmo de Ros de Hamelak.[5]<[4]

    On 3 July 1257, Ros obtained from Henry III a grant of the free warren, in the lordship of Belvoir, by which the boundary was determined. In 1258, he was actively employed in Scotland, in delivering King Alexander III of Scotland out of the hands of his rebellious subjects; and at Chester, in resisting the hostile invasions of Llewelyn the Last. In the same year, he and his lady Isabel had a controversy with the Prior and Convent of Belvoir, relative to the right of presentation to the Church of Redmile (near Bottesford), which was amicably compromised by their relinquishing the patronage to the convent, for a certain compensation. In 1261 he obtained from the king the grant of a weekly market, to be held at Belvoir, on Tuesday; and of an annual fair on the feast of St John the Baptist, to continue for three days. In 1264, he was one of the insurgent barons who defeated Henry III at the battle of Lewes, and took him and the prince prisoner, confining them in Farleigh Hungerford Castle. In 1264, de Ros was summoned to the parliament, which was called by the barons in the king's name. He died in 1285, and was buried at Kirkham Priory.[6]

    Marriage and issue

    Robert de Ros married, about 1243, Isabel d'Aubigny (c.1233 – 15 June 1301), granddaughter (her father, William, died in 1247) and heiress of William d'Aubigny (died 1236) of Belvoir, Leicestershire, by his second wife, Isabel, by whom he had five sons and three daughters:[7]

    William de Ros, 1st Baron de Ros.
    Sir Robert de Ros of Gedney, Lincolnshire, who married a wife named Erneburge.
    John de Ros.
    Nicholas de Ros, a cleric.
    Peter de Ros, a cleric.
    Isabel de Ros, who married Walter de Fauconberg, 2nd Baron Fauconberg.
    Joan de Ros, who married John Lovell, 1st Baron Lovell.
    Mary de Ros, who married William de Braose, 1st Baron Braose.

    Footnotes

    Jump up ^ Richardson III 2011, pp. 444–7.
    Jump up ^ Richardson III 2011, pp. 444–6.
    ^ Jump up to: a b Cokayne 1949, p. 95
    ^ Jump up to: a b Richardson III 2011, p. 448
    Jump up ^ Cokayne 1949, p. 97
    Jump up ^ Pedigrees of some Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants Vol II, Aileen Lewers Langston & J. Orton Buck, Jr 1974.
    Jump up ^ Richardson III 2011, pp. 447–8.

    References

    Cokayne, George Edward (1949). The Complete Peerage, edited by Geoffrey H. White. XI. London: St. Catherine Press.
    Richardson, Douglas (2011). Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, ed. Kimball G. Everingham. III (2nd ed.). Salt Lake City. ISBN 144996639X

    *

    Robert De ROS (Sir)

    Born: ABT 1223, Hamlake, Holderness, Yorkshire, England

    Died: 17 May 1285

    Buried: 16 Jun 1285, Kirkham, Yorkshire, England

    Notes: M.P. 1261, 1265, summoned to Parliament in 1264 as Baron Ros of Belvoir Castle. In 1258 he was apointed chief commissioner of Herfordshire to inquire into excesses there. In that same year he was summoned for service against the Welsh and the Scots. He sided with Simon de Montfort in 1264/4 and was holding Northampton under the younger Simon when the King took it. He was summoned to Monfort's parliament; but these writs, issued by Simon in the King's name, are no longer regarded as valid for the creation of peerages. In May 1265 Prince Edward (TKing Edward I) escaped from his custody at Hereford to Wigmore Castle, with help of Roger de Mortimer. Robert later surrendered Gloucester Castle to the Prince. After Montfort was slain and his rebellion quashed at the Battle of Eversham Robert received a full pardon at the insistance of Prince Edward. In 1276 he was one of the magnates, who, in council at Westminster, gave judgement against Llewelyn, and was summoned for servive in the consequent campaign. By his marriage he became Lord of Belvoir.

    Father: William De ROS (Sir)

    Mother: Lucy FITZPIERS

    Married: Isabel D'ALBINI 17 May 1246

    Children:

    1. William De ROS (1ş B. Ros of Hamlake)

    2. Isabel De ROS

    3. Joan De ROS

    4. Mary De ROS

    5. Avelina De ROS

    6. Robert De ROS

    7. John De ROS (Bishop of Carlisle)

    8. Nicholas De ROS

    Buried:
    The ruins of Kirkham Priory are situated on the banks of the River Derwent, at Kirkham, North Yorkshire, England. The Augustinian priory was founded in the 1120s by Walter l'Espec, lord of nearby Helmsley, who also built Rievaulx Abbey ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kirkham_Priory

    Images for Kirkham Priory ... https://www.google.com/search?q=Kirkham+Priory&rlz=1C1KMZB_enUS591US591&espv=2&biw=1440&bih=810&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjYj6LQuIzPAhXCJiYKHVRGC3wQsAQIMA

    Robert married Isabel d'Aubigny 17 May 1246. Isabel (daughter of William d'Aubigny and unnamed spouse) was born ~ 1233; died 15 Jun 1301. [Group Sheet]


  2. 41.  Isabel d'Aubigny was born ~ 1233 (daughter of William d'Aubigny and unnamed spouse); died 15 Jun 1301.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Isabel D'Albini

    Children:
    1. 20. William de Ros, Knight, 1st Baron de Ros of Hamlake was born ~ 1255, Helmsley Castle, Yorkshire, England; died 8 Aug 1316, Youlton, Yorkshire, England; was buried Kirkham, Yorkshire, England.
    2. Avelina de Ros

  3. 44.  Gunselm de Badlesmere was born ~ 1232; died ~ 1301.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Guncelin de Badlesmere

    Notes:

    Guncelin de Badlesmere (c.1232–c.1301), son of Bartholomew de Badlesmere (died 1248), was Justice of Chester and Cheshire in England.[1]

    Guncelin de Badlesmere was appointed to the office of Justice of Chester and Cheshire on 16 October 1274.[2] He held this position until 1281, when Reynold de Grey was appointed to this role and Gunselm was instructed to deliver the associated premises to him with effect from 29 September of that year.[3]

    An example of his close connection with the Crown appears in the account of the delivery of the royal seal of King Edward I by his son Edward to the Lord Chancellor, John de Langeton, which took place at Tonbridge Castle, Kent on 27 August 1297, with Sir Guncelin de Badlesmere being one of the witnesses.[4]

    Gunselin was evidently still alive on 22 March 1299/1300, when Walter de Gloucester, as "escheator this side the Trent", was instructed to investigate allegations that Guncelm had damaged property belonging to the estate of Edward, son and heir of Philip Burnel, a minor whom the King had committed into Guncelin's custody.[5]

    On 13 April 1301, a writ was issued to initiate enquiries into the identity of the next heir of lands that had been held directly from the King by Guncelin de Badlesmere. Presumably, he had died shortly before that date. An inquisition post mortem held on 30 April of that year in respect of land he held in Kent at Badlesmere and Donewelleshethe confirmed that the next heir was his son Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 1st Baron Badlesmere (c.1275–1322).[6]

    By 4 October 1302, it was established that the damage to Edward Burnel's inheritance had taken place before Gunselin became involved. Therefore, the lands concerned were to be delivered to the executors of Gunselin's will.[7]

    He died in the 29th year of the reign of Edward I (in 1301), and was buried in Badlesmere church, where in 1800 it was reported that his wooden cross-legged effigy could still be found.[1]

    Gunselm — Joan LNU. [Group Sheet]


  4. 45.  Joan LNU
    Children:
    1. 22. Bartholomew de Badlesmere, Knight, 1st Baron Badlesmere was born 18 Aug 1275, Blean, Canterbury, Kent, England; died 14 Apr 1322, Blean, Canterbury, Kent, England.
    2. Maud de Badlesmere was born ~ 1282, Kent, England.

  5. 46.  Thomas de Clare, Knight, Lord of Thomond was born ~ 1245, Tonbridge, Kent, England (son of Richard de Clare, Knight, 6th Earl of Gloucester and Maud de Lacy); died 29 Aug 1287, Ireland.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Lord of Inchiquin and Youghal

    Notes:

    Thomas de Clare, Lord of Inchiquin and Youghal (c. 1245 - 29 August 1287) was a Hiberno-Norman peer and soldier. He was the second son of Richard de Clare, 6th Earl of Gloucester and his wife Maud de Lacy, Countess of Gloucester. On 26 January 1276 he was granted the lordship of Thomond by Edward I of England; he spent the next eight years attempting to conquer it from the O'Brien dynasty, kings of Thomond.

    Career

    Thomas was born in about 1245 in Tonbridge, Kent, England, the second eldest son of Richard de Clare and Maud de Lacy.[1] He and his brother Bogo received gifts from King Henry III when they were studying at Oxford from 1257–59.[2]

    Thomas was a close friend and intimate advisor of Prince Edward of England, who would in 1272 accede to the throne as King Edward I. Together they took part in the Ninth Crusade. He held many important posts such as Governor of Colchester Castle (1266) and Governor of The City of London (1273). He was made Commander of the English forces in Munster, Ireland and created Lord of Inchiquin and Youghal. On 26 January 1276, he was granted the entire lordship of Thomond by King Edward.

    That same year, he jointly commanded a Norman army along with Sir Geoffrey de Geneville, Justiciar of Ireland against the Irish clans of County Wicklow. They were joined by a contingent of men from Connacht led by his father-in-law Maurice FitzGerald, 3rd Lord of Offaly. Thomas and Justiciar de Geneville's forces attacked the Irish at Glenmalure, but they were soundly defeated and suffered severe losses.[3]

    Civil war raged in Thomond between the rival factions of the O'Brien dynasty. In 1276, Brian Ruad, the deposed King of Thomond appealed to Thomas for support to help him regain his kingdom from his great-nephew Toirrdelbach MacTaidg O' Brien, who had usurped the throne. In return for his aid, Brian Ruad promised that Thomas would be allowed to colonise all the land between Athsollus in Quin and Limerick.[4] Together, Thomas and Brian Ruad expelled Toirrdelbach MacTaidg O'Brien and recaptured Clonroad which the latter had taken from Brian Ruad. O'Brien escaped to Galway where he elicited the help of his cousin William de Burgh, and in 1277 together with the assistance from clans, MacNamara and O'Dea they defeated the combined forces of Thomas and Brian Ruad. The latter fled to Bunratty Castle, but Thomas had his former ally hanged and drawn for treason.[5] The civil war continued for the next seven years, with Thomas supporting Brian Ruad's son Donnchad against Toirrdelbach; however, following the drowning death of Donnchad in 1284, Toirrdelbach emerged the victor. Thereafter until his death in 1306, Toirrdelbach MacTaidg O'Brien ruled as undisputed King of Thomond and Thomas had no choice but to accommodate him. O'Brien rented part of Bunratty Manor at ą121 per annum.[5]

    In 1280, Thomas embarked on a castle-building project at Quin, but was disrupted in his efforts by the O'Briens and MacNamaras. Thomas also reconstructed Bunratty Castle in stone, replacing the earlier wooden building.

    Marriage and children

    In February 1275, he married Juliana FitzGerald, the 12-year-old daughter of Maurice FitzGerald, 3rd Lord of Offaly and Maud de Prendergast.[6]

    Thomas and Juliana had four children:

    Maud de Clare (c. 1276–1326/27), married firstly, Robert de Clifford, 1st Baron de Clifford, by whom she had issue; and secondly Robert de Welles.
    Gilbert de Clare, Lord of Thomond, (3 February 1281–1308)
    Richard de Clare, Steward of Forest of Essex, 1st Lord Clare, Lord of Thomond (after 1281 – 10 May 1318), married a woman by the name of Joan, by whom he had one son, Thomas. He was killed at the Battle of Dysert O'Dea.
    Margaret de Clare (c. 1 April 1287 – 22 October 1333/3 January 1334), married firstly, Gilbert de Umfraville; and secondly Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 1st Baron Badlesmere, by whom she had issue.
    During their marriage, Thomas and Juliana lived in Ireland and in England. For instance, on 5 May 1284 the King notified his bailiffs and lieges in Ireland of the attorneys who were to act in Ireland on behalf of the couple as they were then in England. This arrangement was to continue for three years, except when Thomas and Juliana went to Ireland.[7]

    Death

    When evidence was taken in 1302 to prove the age of his son Gilbert, it was established that Thomas had died on 29 August 1287.[8] A mid-18th century compilation known as the Dublin Annals of Inisfallen states that Thomas was killed in battle against Turlough son of Teige and others. However, none of the earlier records of his death indicate that Thomas met a violent end. Some of the witnesses to Gilbert's age in 1302 referred to the date of Thomas' death in their calculations but all were silent as to its circumstances. This and much other evidence on the subject has been set out and evaluated by Goddard Henry Orpen of Trinity College, Dublin.[9]

    Thomas was succeeded as Lord of Thomond by his eldest son, Gilbert who was six years old. His widow Juliana, aged 24 years, would go on to marry two more times.

    Thomas married Juliana Fitzgerald, Lady of Thomond 0Feb 1275, (Ireland). Juliana (daughter of Maurice FitzGerald, II, 3rd Lord Offally and Emmeline Longespee) was born 12 Apr 1266, Dublin, Ireland; died 24 Sep 1300. [Group Sheet]


  6. 47.  Juliana Fitzgerald, Lady of Thomond was born 12 Apr 1266, Dublin, Ireland (daughter of Maurice FitzGerald, II, 3rd Lord Offally and Emmeline Longespee); died 24 Sep 1300.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Juliana FitzMaurice
    • Also Known As: Lady of Inchiquin and Youghal
    • Alt Birth: 0___ 1263, Dublin, Ireland

    Notes:

    Juliana FitzMaurice, Lady of Thomond (12 Apr 1266 - 29 Sep 1300) was a Norman-Irish noblewoman, the daughter of Maurice FitzGerald, 3rd Lord of Offaly, and the wife of Thomas de Clare, Lord of Thomond, a powerful Anglo-Norman baron in Ireland, who was a younger brother of Gilbert de Clare, 6th Earl of Hertford. Juliana was married three times; Thomas being her first. She is sometimes referred to as Juliane FitzMaurice.

    Early life and family

    Juliana FitzMaurice was born 12 Apr 1266 in Dublin, Ireland, the eldest daughter of Maurice FitzGerald II, 3rd Lord of Offaly, Justiciar of Ireland and Emeline Longspee.[1] She had a sister Amabel who married but was childless. Her first cousin was John FitzGerald, 1st Earl of Kildare. Her paternal grandparents were Maurice FitzGerald I, 2nd Lord of Offaly and Juliana, and her maternal grandparents were Sir Gerald de Prendergast of Beauvoir and the unnamed daughter of Richard Mor de Burgh, Lord of Connacht and Egidia de Lacy. Juliana's maternal ancestors included Brian Boru, Dermot McMurrough, and Maud de Braose.

    Juliana's father, Maurice FitzGerald, was married twice, first to Maud de Prendergast and secondly to Emmeline Longespee. It has been some source of contention as to which of his two wives had issue Juliana. However, at her death, Emmeline Longespee did not mention Juliana as her daughter and heir; rather, Emmeline's heir was her neice, Maud la Zouche, wife of Robert la Zouche, 1st Lord Holland. It has been concluded by several reputable researchers that Juliana's mother was Maurice FitzGerald's first wife, Maud de Prendergast. Supporters for Emmeline Longespee being the mother have yet to produce any counter-evidence beyond hearsay.

    Marriages and issue

    In 1278, at the age of 12, Juliana married her first husband, Thomas de Clare, Lord of Inchiquin and Youghal. He was the second eldest son of Richard de Clare, 5th Earl of Hertford, 2nd Earl of Gloucester and Maud de Lacy. Thomas was a friend of King Edward I of England, with whom he went on a Crusade. He held many important posts including the Office of Governor of Colchester Castle (1266), Governor of the City of London (1273). He was also the commander of the English forces in Munster, Ireland, and on 26 January 1276, he was granted the lordship of Thomond. He was born in 1245, which made him about eighteen years older than Juliana. Throughout their marriage, the couple lived in both Ireland and England. It is recorded that on 5 May 1284, King Edward notified his lieges and bailiffs in Ireland of the attorneys who were to act on behalf of Thomas and Juliana as they were in England at the time. This arrangement continued for another three years except while they were residing in Ireland.[2]

    Thomas and Juliana had four children:[3]

    Maud de Clare (c. 1276–1326/27), married firstly on 3 November 1295 Robert de Clifford, 1st Baron de Clifford, by whom she had issue; she married secondly after 1314 Robert de Welle.
    Gilbert de Clare, Lord of Thomond (3 February 1281–1308)
    Richard de Clare, Steward of Forest of Essex, 1st Lord Clare, Lord of Thomond (after 1281 – 10 May 1318 at the Battle of Dysert O'Dea), married a woman by the name of Joan by whom he fathered one son, Thomas.
    Margaret de Clare (c. 1 April 1287 – 22 October 1333), married firstly in 1303 Gilbert de Umfraville; she married secondly before 30 June 1308 Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 1st Lord Badlesmere, by whom she had four daughters and one son.

    The era was marked by unrest and strife as civil war was waged between rival factions of the powerful O'Brien clan. In 1277, Juliana's husband had his former ally Brian Ruad, the deposed King of Thomond, hanged for treason at Bunratty.[4]

    Thomas died on 29 August 1287, leaving Juliana a widow at the age of twenty-four with four small children; the youngest, Margaret was not quite five months old. On an unknown date she married her second husband, Nicholas Avenel. He presumably died before 11 December 1291/16 February 1292, as this is when she married her third husband, Adam de Cretynges.[5][6]

    Death and legacy

    Juliana died on 24 September 1300. Her numerous descendants included Ralph Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland who married Lady Joan Beaufort and thus their descendant, the English king Edward IV. By Edward IV's daughter, Elizabeth of York, consort of Henry VII, she was an ancestress to all subsequent monarchs of England and the current British Royal Family. Henry VIII's queens consort Anne Boleyn, Jane Seymour, Catherine Howard, and Catherine Parr also descended from her.

    Ancestors of Juliana FitzMaurice[show)

    Notes

    Jump up ^ The Complete Peerage
    Jump up ^ Calendar of Documents relating to Ireland 1252-1284, No. 2210
    Jump up ^ Cawley, Charles, Earls of Gloucester (Clare), Medieval Lands database, Foundation for Medieval Genealogy,[better source needed]
    Jump up ^ Joe Power, The Normans in Thomond, retrieved on 28 May 2009
    Jump up ^ Calendar of Patent Rolls, 1281–1292, pp.463, 476
    Jump up ^ "Adam de Cretinge et Juliana uxor ejus (filia Mauritii filii Mauritii defuncti) quondam uxor Thomµ de Clare defuncti." Calendarium Genealogicum Henry III and Edward I, ed. Charles Roberts, 1:431, 448.

    References

    The Complete Peerage, Vol. VII, p. 200
    Cawley, Charles, Medieval Lands, Ireland, Earls of Kildare, Medieval Lands database, Foundation for Medieval Genealogy,[better source needed]
    Cawley, Charles, Medieval Lands, Earls of Gloucester (Clare), Medieval Lands database, Foundation for Medieval Genealogy,[better source needed]
    Power, Joe. "The Normans in Thomond". Retrieved 28 May 2009.

    Children:
    1. Maude de Clare was born 0___ 1276; died 0___ 1327.
    2. 23. Margaret de Clare, Baroness Badlesmere was born ~ 1 Apr 1287, Ireland; died 22 Oct 1333, Aldgate, London, Middlesex, England.

  7. 48.  Roger de Mowbray, III, Knight, 1st Baron of MowbrayRoger de Mowbray, III, Knight, 1st Baron of Mowbray was born 0___ 1245, Lincolnshire, England (son of Roger de Mowbray, II, 6th Baron of Mowbray and Maud de Beauchamp); died 21 Nov 1297, Ghent, Belgium.

    Other Events:

    • Alt Birth: 1254-1266, (Lincolnshire, England)

    Notes:

    Roger de Mowbray, 1st Baron Mowbray (1254–21 November 1297), was an English peer and soldier.

    The son of another Roger de Mowbray, and grandson of William de Mowbray,[1] he served in the Welsh and Gascon Wars. He was summoned to the Parliament of Simon de Montfort in 1265, but such summonses have later been declared void. However, in 1283 he was summoned to Parliament by King Edward I as Lord Mowbray.[2]

    De Mowbray married Rose, a daughter of Richard de Clare, 6th Earl of Gloucester. They had at least two children:

    John, who would succeed his father to the barony
    Alexander, who apparently took up residence in Scotland.[2]

    References

    Jump up ^ Tait, James (1894). "Mowbray, William de". In Lee, Sidney. Dictionary of National Biography. 39. London: Smith, Elder & Co. p. 238.
    ^ Jump up to: a b Burke, Sir Bernard (1866). "Mowbray-Earls of Nottingham, Dukes of Norfolk, Earls-Marshal, Earls of Warren and Surrey". A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages, of the British Empire. London: Wm Clowes and Sons. p. 387. ISBN 9780806307893. Reprinted: 1985.

    end of biography

    About Roger de Mowbray, 1st Baron Mowbray
    Roger de Mowbray

    1st Lord Mowbray

    +1297 Ghent

    (DRGD) Considered to be the most senior Baron by Writ. Interred at Fountains Abbey.

    10995

    Roger de Mowbray, 1st Baron Mowbray (died 21 November 1297), was an English peer and soldier.

    The son of another Roger de Mowbray, served in the Welsh and Gascon Wars. He was summoned to the Parliament of Simon de Montfort in 1265, but such summons have later been declared void. However, in 1283 he was summoned to Parliament by the King as Lord Mowbray.

    De Mowbray married Rose, a descendant of Richard de Clare, Earl of Hertford. They had at least two children:

    John, who would succeed his father to the barony

    Alexander, who apparently took up residence in Scotland.

    References

    Burke, Sir Bernard. "Mowbray-Earls of Nottingham, Dukes of Norfolk, Earls-Marshal, Earls of WArren and Surrey." A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages, of the British Empire. London: Wm Clowes and Sons, Ltd., 1962. p. 387.

    source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_de_Mowbray,_1st_Baron_Mowbray

    Name: *Roger III De Mowbray

    Given Name: *Roger III

    Surname: De Mowbray

    Sex: M

    Birth: ABT 1250 in ,Axholme,Lincolnshire,England

    Death: in ,Ghent,Holland

    Ancestral File #: 8503-8D

    Reference Number: 6240

    Marriage 1 *Roese (Rohesia) De Clare b: 17 OCT 1252 in ,Tonbridge,Kent,England

    Married: 1270 in 14 Aug 1991 Ogden

    Children

    Alexander De Mowbray b: 1288 in Epworth,Lincolnshire,England
    *John , 2Nd Lord Mowbray De Mowbray b: 4 SEP 1286 in Thirsk,Chamb,Norfolk,England
    http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=afesmire&id=I19066

    Roger de Mowbray, 1st Baron Mowbray

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Jump to: navigation, search

    Roger de Mowbray, 1st Baron Mowbray (died 21 November 1297), was an English peer and soldier.

    The son of another Roger de Mowbray, served in the Welsh and Gascon Wars. He was summoned to the Parliament of Simon de Montfort in 1265, but such summons have later been declared void. However, in 1283 he was summoned to Parliament by the King as Lord Mowbray.

    De Mowbray married Rose, a descendant of Richard de Clare, Earl of Hertford. They had at least two children:

    * John, who would succeed his father to the barony
    * Alexander, who apparently took up residence in Scotland.
    [edit] References

    * Burke, Sir Bernard. "Mowbray-Earls of Nottingham, Dukes of Norfolk, Earls-Marshal, Earls of WArren and Surrey." A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages, of the British Empire. London: Wm Clowes and Sons, Ltd., 1962. p. 387.
    Roger de Mowbray, 1st Baron Mowbray (died 21 November 1297), was an English peer and soldier.

    The son of another Roger de Mowbray, served in the Welsh and Gascon Wars. He was summoned to the Parliament of Simon de Montfort in 1265, but such summons have later been declared void. However, in 1283 he was summoned to Parliament by the King as Lord Mowbray.

    De Mowbray married Rose, a descendant of Richard de Clare, Earl of Hertford. They had at least two children:

    * John, who would succeed his father to the barony
    * Alexander, who apparently took up residence in Scotland.
    [edit] References

    * Burke, Sir Bernard. "Mowbray-Earls of Nottingham, Dukes of Norfolk, Earls-Marshal, Earls of WArren and Surrey." A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages, of the British Empire. London: Wm Clowes and Sons, Ltd., 1962. p. 387.
    Peerage of England

    Preceded by

    New Creation Baron Mowbray

    1295–1298 Succeeded by

    John de Mowbray

    Knight, 1st Lord of Mowbray of Thirek and Hovingham, MP 1295-7

    Roger de Mowbray, 1st Baron Mowbray

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Roger de Mowbray, 1st Baron Mowbray (died 21 November 1297), was an English peer and soldier.

    The son of another Roger de Mowbray, served in the Welsh and Gascon Wars. He was summoned to the Parliament of Simon de Montfort in 1265, but such summons have later been declared void. However, in 1283 he was summoned to Parliament by the King as Lord Mowbray.

    De Mowbray married Rose, a descendant of Richard de Clare, Earl of Hertford. They had at least two children:

    John, who would succeed his father to the barony

    Alexander, who apparently took up residence in Scotland.

    [edit]References

    Burke, Sir Bernard. "Mowbray-Earls of Nottingham, Dukes of Norfolk, Earls-Marshal, Earls of WArren and Surrey." A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages, of the British Empire. London: Wm Clowes and Sons, Ltd., 1962. p. 387.

    the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia
    Roger de Mowbray, 1st Baron Mowbray (died 21 November 1297), was an English peer and soldier.

    The son of another Roger de Mowbray, served in the Welsh and Gascon Wars. He was summoned to the Parliament of Simon de Montfort in 1265, but such summons have later been declared void. However, in 1283 he was summoned to Parliament by the King as Lord Mowbray.

    De Mowbray married Rose, a descendant of Richard de Clare, 6th Earl of Gloucester. They had at least two children:

    John, who would succeed his father to the barony Alexander, who apparently took up residence in Scotland. Roger was born about 1257 and in 1278 (6EdwardI) he had livery of his lands. In1282 and 1283 he was summoned for military service against the Welsh. They had revolted against the Marcher Lords, who killed their leader, Llewellyn, at Ironbridge, Shropshire. In June 1283 Roger was at the Parliament at Shrewsbury and again in 1287 the King required his presence at a military council at Gloucester.

    In 1291 he was called into military service against the Scots, and again in 1296. There had been a Parliament with the Scots at Norham in the former year, and in the latter there was a savage sacking of Berwick with Earl Warrenne being made ruler of Scotland and the Stone of Scone removed to London.

    From 1278 to 1294 there were quo warrento enquiries challenging the jurisdictional rights of the magnates. Perhaps it was as an outcome of these that in 1295 Roger was created Lord Mowbray, Baron by Writ. As no previous barony had been created by writ, he became premier baron of England.

    In 1294 there was an outbreak of war with France when Philip IV confiscated Gascony. In September 1294 Roger was going there on the King's services. In 1297 Roger again attended Parliament, this time at Salisbury. A record from 1295 shows 53 magnates summoned to Parliament

    There is a record of Walter de Burnham agreeing to serve in Flanders under Roger de Mowbray in 1297. In that year and Edward I left for Flanders, and England was on the verge of civil war. Roger died at Ghent in 1297 and his body was brought back to be re-interred in Fountains Abbey where there is effigy in stone.

    His marriage to Rose de Clare, daughter of the Duke of Gloucester, had been arranged as early as his 13th. birthday by his and Rose's mothers. It took place in 1270 and produced a son and heir, John and perhaps a second son Geoffrey.

    The entry in Burke's Extinct Peerage makes reference to a son Alexander who went to Scotland, but in the Mowbray Journal, Stephen Goslin claims that Alexander was in fact one of the seven sons of Geoffrey de Mowbray of Scotland, descended from Philip de Mowbray.

    Inquisition Post Mortem This lists Roger's land in the following counties:

    Essex: at Doddinghurst and Easthorpe.

    Leicestershire: at Melton Mowbray, Kirkby on the Wreak, Frithby, Welby, Kettleby, Stathern, Eastwell, Goadby, Burton Lazars,

    Wyfordby, Little Dalby, Sysonby, Queeniborough, Cold Newton, Hoby, Pickwell, Leesthorpe, Bitteswell, Ullesthorpe, Ashton Flamville, Thrussington, Radcliffe.

    Lincolnshire: at Gainsborough, Scawby, Garthorpe, Blyborough, Burton by Lincoln, and the whole of the Isle of Axholme (including Haxey, Butterwick, Ouston, Beltoft and Belton)

    Northamptonshire: at Crich and Welford.

    Nottinghamshire: at Egmanton, Averham, Serlby in Harworth, Auckley (partially in Yorkshire), and Finningley.

    Rutland: at Empingham.

    Warwickshire: at Monks Kirkby, Little Harborough, Wappenbury, Brinklow, Hampton in Arden, Nuthurst, Over, Chadwick, Newham, Baddesley Clinton, Shustoke, Bentley, Hesilholt and Smyte.

    Yorkshire: too many places to list!

    end of biography

    Roger married Rose de Clare 0Jul 1270, Thirsk, Yorkshire, England. Rose (daughter of Richard de Clare, Knight, 6th Earl of Gloucester and Maud de Lacy) was born 17 Oct 1252, Tonbridge, Kent, England; died 0Jan 1316. [Group Sheet]


  8. 49.  Rose de Clare was born 17 Oct 1252, Tonbridge, Kent, England (daughter of Richard de Clare, Knight, 6th Earl of Gloucester and Maud de Lacy); died 0Jan 1316.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Roese de Clare
    • Also Known As: Rohese de Clare
    • Also Known As: Rohesia de Clare

    Children:
    1. 24. John de Mowbray, I, 8th Baron Mowbray was born 4 Sep 1286, Thirsk, Yorkshire, England; died 23 Mar 1322, York, Yorkshire, England.
    2. Alexander de Mowbray was born 0___ 1288, Epworth, Lincolnshire, England.

  9. 50.  William de Braose, VII, Knight, 2nd Baron de Braose was born ~ 1260, (Wales) (son of William de Braose, VI, Knight, 1st Baron Braose and Aline de Multon); died 0___ 1326.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Lord of Bramber
    • Also Known As: Lord of Gower

    Notes:

    William de Braose, (sometimes William de Briouze, William de Breuse, William de Brewes or William de Brewose; c. 1260–1326) was the second Baron Braose, as well as Lord of Gower and Lord of Bramber. He was held as a hostage after being captured in 1264 during the Second Barons' War and records of some of his childhood expenses survive from his time as a hostage. He first entered royal service in 1286 and, in 1291, he succeeded his father as baron. He continued in royal military service, serving in Scotland as well as in Wales. Protracted disputes over his lands embroiled him throughout his life and at the end of his life helped spark a revolt against King Edward II of England's favourites, the Despensers. He married twice, and his heirs were his daughter Aline and his grandson John de Bohun.

    Family and early life

    Braose was the son of William de Braose, 1st Baron Braose and his first wife, Aline, daughter of Thomas de Multon.[1] He was likely born around 1260, as his age was given as about 46 in 1307. Other events prove that he was born prior to 1264, as he was captured in that year. This came about during the Second Barons' War (1264–1267) during the reign of King Henry III of England, as the elder Braose had sided with the king during Simon de Montfort's rebellion. The younger Braose was a hostage in the custody of Montfort's wife, Eleanor. Her household accounts include expenses related to the younger William's care.[2]

    Sometime around 1285, Braose confirmed grants of land by his ancestors to the religious house of Sele Priory.[3][a] In 1286 Braose was in the king's service, for unspecified duties overseas. It is possible that these included accompanying the king, Edward I, to Paris where Edward performed homage to the new French king, Philip IV, for Edward's French lands.[2] Braose played a significant role in King Edward's Welsh wars. In the winter of 1287–8 he commanded the force blockading Emlyn castle. His men also provided the escort for the transport of a huge siege engine from Dryslwyn to Emlyn. The arrival of the engine, with 480 great stones as ammunition, persuaded the defenders of the castle to surrender peaceably.[5]

    Marcher Baron

    The younger Braose succeeded his father before 1 March 1291, when he did homage for his father's lands.[1] He received custody of his father's lands on 2 March 1291, which had been placed into the custody of Robert de Tibetot on 12 January 1291.[6] He was summoned a number of times to Parliament from 1291 until 1322 as Baron Braose. He was the second Baron Braose, as well as Lord of Gower and Lord of Bramber.[1]

    After his father's death, Braose continued to serve Edward. He contributed both money and personal military service in Edward's wars in Wales, Scotland, and France.[2] He saw service in Gascony in 1294.[3] In 1297 he took part in a military campaign in Flanders. As a reward for his service in Flanders, he received the wardship of John de Mowbray, who Braose eventually married to his daughter Aline.[2] From 1298 to 1306 he was involved in the Scottish wars, and was at the Battle of Falkirk on 22 July 1298.[3] Besides the military service, he served the king in 1301 by signing a letter from the leading barons of England to Pope Boniface VIII in which the barons decried papal interference in the royal rights of England.[2]

    Braose captured the Welsh rebel William Cragh in 1290, whose miraculous resurrection after being hanged was attributed to Thomas de Cantilupe.[7] This led in 1307 to Braose giving testimony to papal commissioners inquiring into the events surrounding Cragh's hanging and whether or not it would support the canonisation of Cantilupe.[8]

    It was most likely Braose who commissioned a condensed copy of Domesday Book, now Public Record Office manuscript E164/1. This copy has a marginal notation of "Br" next to the estates owned by Braose's ancestor, the first William de Braose.[9]

    Braose was embroiled in a dispute over his lordship of Gower in 1299 when the Bishop of Llandaff, John de Monmouth, brought a case against Braose to the king. Although the case was adjudicated in 1302, the resulting decision was overturned. In 1304 Braose secured King Edward's confirmation of earlier grants and charters granting Braose special rights and liberties in Gower. He managed this because he was serving the king in Scotland at the time, and thus had easy access to the king. In 1305, however, Braose miscalculated and insulted a royal judge,[10] using "gross and contumelious words" to describe the royal official.[11] This episode caused the case of Gower to be reopened in 1306, and Braose was only able to settle the issue again by the grant of rights to his men in Swansea and Gower.[10]

    In 1320 King Edward II of England confiscated the lordship of Gower on the grounds that Braose had given it to his son-in-law Mowbray without royal permission. Over the preceding years Braose had promised Gower to a number of persons,[12] including Humphrey de Bohun, the Earl of Hereford, Hugh Despenser the Younger, and Roger Mortimer of Wigmore. Mowbray then in late 1319 took custody of Gower to protect his rights. Despenser persuaded the king in 1320 to take Gower into royal hands in October, and was appointed keeper of the honour in November.[13] The other lords in the Welsh Marches resented this seizure, feeling that the king's excuse for it was not applicable. The seizure was one of the precipitating causes of the baronial rebellion that led to the exile of the Despensers in 1321.[12] In 1322 Gower was given to the younger Despenser again, who then traded it for the honours of Usk and Caerleon. Braose was then induced to sue the new holder of Gower for the return of the barony in April 1324, which action succeeded in June 1324. Braose then promptly gave Gower to the elder Despenser, returning the property to the Despenser family once more.[14] The lordship of Gower eventually ended up in the hands of the Beauchamp family, but it was not until the 1350s that the issue was decided.[15]

    Marriage, death, and legacy

    The name of Braose's first wife was Agnes,[16] but her family is not known. His second wife was Elizabeth, the daughter and heiress of Raymund de Sully. He had two daughters with his first wife, but no children with his second wife, who outlived him.[1] It appears that there was a son named William, who was the subject of a military summons from King Edward in 1311, but nothing further is mentioned of him after 1315. In 1316 a settlement of William the father's estates made no mention of this son making it likely that the son died before this date.[17]

    Braose died not long before 1 May 1326[1] and his heirs were his daughter Aline and his grandson John de Bohun.[18] Aline, the elder daughter,[13] married John de Mowbray and Richard de Peschale. The second daughter, Joan, married James de Bohun and Richard Foliot, son of Jordan Foliot. Mowbray received the lands of Gower and Bramber before Braose's death.[1]

    Braose was known as a man often in debt and as being unable to manage his cash flow well.[17] Thomas Walsingham stated in his chronicle that Braose was "very rich by descent but a dissipater of the property left to him".[19]

    William — Agnes LNU. [Group Sheet]


  10. 51.  Agnes LNU
    Children:
    1. Joan de Braose was born ~ 1283, Bramber, West Sussex, England; died 1321-1324, Gressenhall, Norfolk, England.
    2. 25. Aline de Braose was born 0___ 1291; died ~ 1331.

  11. 52.  Edmund "Crouchback" Plantagenet, Prince of England was born 16 Jan 1245, London, Middlesex, England (son of Henry III, King of England and Eleanor of Provence, Queen of England, Princess of Castile); died 5 Jun 1296, Bayonne, Pyrennes-Atlantiques, France; was buried 15 Jul 1296, Westminster Abbey, 20 Deans Yd, London SW1P 3PA, United Kingdom.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Earl of Lancaster
    • Also Known As: Earl of Leicester

    Notes:

    More on Sir Edmund ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edmund_Crouchback

    Edmund married Blanche de Capet d'Artois, Queen of Navarre, Princess of France Bef 29 Oct 1275-6, Paris, France. Blanche was born 0___ 1245, Arras, Pas-de-Calais, France; died 2 May 1302, Paris, France. [Group Sheet]


  12. 53.  Blanche de Capet d'Artois, Queen of Navarre, Princess of France was born 0___ 1245, Arras, Pas-de-Calais, France; died 2 May 1302, Paris, France.
    Children:
    1. 26. Henry Plantagenet, 3rd Earl of Lancaster and Leicester was born 0___ 1281, Grosmont Castle, Monmouth, England; died 22 Sep 1345, Leicester, Leicestershire, England.

  13. 54.  Patrick Chaworth, Knight, Lord of Kidwelly was born ~ 1250, Kempsford, Gloucestershire, England (son of Patrick de Chaworth and Hawise de Londres); died 0___ 1283.

    Patrick married Isabella Beauchamp ~ 1281, Carmarthenshire, Wales. Isabella (daughter of William de Beauchamp, Knight, 9th Earl of Warwick and Maud FitzGeoffrey) was born ~ 1263, Warwickshire, England; died Bef 30 May 1306. [Group Sheet]


  14. 55.  Isabella Beauchamp was born ~ 1263, Warwickshire, England (daughter of William de Beauchamp, Knight, 9th Earl of Warwick and Maud FitzGeoffrey); died Bef 30 May 1306.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Isabel de Beauchamp
    • Also Known As: Lady Despencer
    • Also Known As: Lady Kidwelly

    Notes:

    Isabella de Beauchamp, Lady Kidwelly, Lady Despenser (born c. 1263 - died before 30 May 1306), was an English noblewoman and wealthy heiress.

    Family

    Isabella was born in about 1263 in Warwickshire, England. She was the only daughter of William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick and Maud FitzJohn who appears to have married; two sisters who were nuns at Shouldham are mentioned in her father's will.[1] She had a brother, Guy de Beauchamp, 10th Earl of Warwick who married Alice de Toeni, by whom he had seven children. Her paternal grandparents were William de Beauchamp of Elmley Castle and Isabel Maudit, and her maternal grandparents were Sir John FitzGeoffrey, Lord of Shere, and Isabel Bigod.

    Marriages and issue

    Sometime before 1281, she married firstly Sir Patrick de Chaworth, Lord of Kidwelly in Carmarthenshire, South Wales. The marriage produced one daughter:

    Maud Chaworth (2 February 1282- 1322), married Henry, 3rd Earl of Lancaster, by whom she had seven children.
    Following Patrick's death in 1286, Isabella had in her possession four manors in Wiltshire and two manors in Berkshire, assigned to her until her dowry should be set forth along with the livery of Chedworth in Gloucestershire and the Hampshire manor of Hartley Mauditt which had been granted to her and Sir Patrick in frankmarriage by her father.[2]

    That same year 1286, she married secondly Sir Hugh le Despenser without the King's licence for which Hugh had to pay a fine of 2000 marks.[2] He was created Lord Despenser by writ of summons to Parliament in 1295, thereby making Isabella Lady Despenser.

    Together Hugh and Isabella had four children:

    Hugh le Depenser, Lord Despenser the Younger (1286- executed 24 November 1326), married Eleanor de Clare, by whom he had issue.
    Aline le Despenser (died before 28 November 1353), married Edward Burnell, Lord Burnell
    Isabella le Despenser (died 4/5 December 1334), married firstly as his second wife, John Hastings, 1st Baron Hastings, by whom she had three children. Their descendants became the Lords Hastings; she married secondly as his second wife, Sir Ralph de Monthermer, 1st Baron Monthermer.[4]
    Phillip le Despenser (died 1313), married as his first wife Margaret de Goushill, by whom he had issue.
    Isabella died sometime before 30 May 1306. Twenty years later, her husband and eldest son, favourites of King Edward II, were both executed by the orders of Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March and Queen Isabella. The couple were by that time the de facto rulers of England, and along with most of the people in the kingdom, they had resented the power both Despensers wielded over the King.

    As her husband had been made Earl of Winchester in 1322, Isabella was never styled as the Countess of Winchester.

    References

    Jump up ^ Testamenta Vestusta by Nicholas Harris Nicolas.
    ^ Jump up to: a b http://www.powernet.co.uk/barfield/chap1.htm.[dead link]
    Jump up ^ Charles Cawley, Medieval Lands, Earls of Winchester
    Jump up ^ Richardson, D. (2011) Magna Carta Ancestry 2nd Edition, pg 325 (via Google)
    Charles Cawley, Medieval Lands, Earls of Warwick
    Charles Cawley, Medieval Lands, Earls of Winchester

    Children:
    1. 27. Maud Chaworth was born 2 Feb 1282, Kidwelly, Carmarthenshire, Wales; died 3 Dec 1322, Montisfort, Hampshire, England; was buried Montisfort, Hampshire, England.

  15. 58.  Richard FitzAlan, Knight, 8th Earl of ArundelRichard FitzAlan, Knight, 8th Earl of Arundel was born 2 Mar 1266, Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England (son of John FitzAlan, Knight, 7th Earl of Arundel and Isabella Mortimer); died 9 Mar 1302, Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England; was buried Haughmond Abbey, Shropshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Baron Arundel

    Notes:

    Richard FitzAlan, 8th Earl of Arundel (7th Earl of Arundel per Ancestral Roots) (3 February 1266/7 – 9 March 1301/2) was an English Norman medieval nobleman.

    Lineage

    He was the son of John FitzAlan, 7th Earl of Arundel (6th Earl of Arundel per Ancestral Roots) and Isabella Mortimer, daughter of Roger Mortimer, 1st Baron Wigmore and Maud de Braose. His paternal grandparents were John Fitzalan, 6th Earl of Arundel and Maud le Botiller.

    Richard was feudal Lord of Clun and Oswestry in the Welsh Marches. After attaining his majority in 1289 he became the 8th Earl of Arundel, by being summoned to Parliament by a writ directed to the Earl of Arundel.

    He was knighted by King Edward I of England in 1289.

    Fought in Wales, Gascony & Scotland

    He fought in the Welsh wars, 1288 to 1294, when the Welsh castle of Castell y Bere (near modern-day Towyn) was besieged by Madog ap Llywelyn. He commanded the force sent to relieve the siege and he also took part in many other campaigns in Wales ; also in Gascony 1295-97; and furthermore in the Scottish wars, 1298-1300.

    Marriage & Issue

    He married sometime before 1285, Alice of Saluzzo (also known as Alesia di Saluzzo), daughter of Thomas I of Saluzzo in Italy. Their issue:

    Edmund FitzAlan, 9th Earl of Arundel.
    John, a priest.
    Alice FitzAlan, married Stephen de Segrave, 3rd Lord Segrave.
    Margaret FitzAlan, married William le Botiller (or Butler).
    Eleanor FitzAlan, married Henry de Percy, 1st Baron Percy.[a]

    Burial

    Richard and his mother are buried together in the sanctuary of Haughmond Abbey, long closely associated with the FitzAlan family.

    Ancestry

    [show]Ancestors of Richard FitzAlan, 8th Earl of Arundel

    Notes

    Jump up ^ Standard accounts of the Percy family identify Eleanor as the daughter of the "Earl of Arundel". Arrangements for Eleanor's marriage to Lord Percy are found in the recognizance made in 1300 by Eleanor's father, Richard, Earl of Arundel, for a debt of 2,000 marks which he owed Sir Henry Percy. Eleanor was styled as a "kinswoman" of Edward II on two separate occasions; once in 1318 and again in 1322 presumably by her descent from Amadeus IV, Count of Savoy who was the brother of Edward II's great-grandmother, Beatrice of Savoy. Eleanor's brothers, Edmund and John were also styled as "kinsmen" of the king. Eleanor's identity is further indicated by the presence of the old and new arms of FitzAlan (or Arundel) at her tomb.

    References

    Jump up ^ www.briantimms.net, Charles's Roll
    Jump up ^ Debrett's Peerage, 1968, p.833
    Wikisource link to Fitzalan, Richard (1267-1302) (DNB00). Wikisource.
    Weis, Frederick Lewis. Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700.
    External links[edit]
    Medieval Lands Project on Richard FitzAlan

    Richard married Alice of Saluzzo, Countess of Arundel Bef 1285. Alice (daughter of Thomas of Saluzzo, Marquis of Saluzzo and Luigia de Ceva) was born 0___ 1269, Saluzzo, Italy; died 25 Sep 1292, Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England; was buried Haughmond Abbey, Shropshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  16. 59.  Alice of Saluzzo, Countess of Arundel was born 0___ 1269, Saluzzo, Italy (daughter of Thomas of Saluzzo, Marquis of Saluzzo and Luigia de Ceva); died 25 Sep 1292, Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England; was buried Haughmond Abbey, Shropshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Alesia di Saluzzo
    • Also Known As: Alisona de Saluzzo

    Notes:

    Alice of Saluzzo, Countess of Arundel (died 25 September 1292),[1] also known as Alesia di Saluzzo, was an Italian-born noblewoman and an English countess. She was a daughter of Thomas I of Saluzzo, and the wife of Richard Fitzalan, 8th Earl of Arundel. Alice was one of the first Italian women to marry into an English noble family. She assumed the title of Countess of Arundel in 1289.

    Family

    Alesia was born on an unknown date in Saluzzo (present-day Province of Cuneo, Piedmont); the second eldest daughter of Thomas I, 4th Margrave of Saluzzo, and Luigia di Ceva (died 22 August 1291/1293), daughter of Giorgio, Marquis of Ceva[2] and Menzia d'Este.[1] Alesia had fifteen siblings. Her father was a very wealthy and cultured nobleman under whose rule Saluzzo achieved a prosperity, freedom, and greatness it had never known previously.[citation needed]

    Marriage and issue

    Sometime before 1285, Alice married Richard Fitzalan, feudal Lord of Clun and Oswestry in the Welsh Marches, the son of John Fitzalan, 7th Earl of Arundel and Isabella Mortimer. Richard would succeed to the title of Earl of Arundel in 1289, thus making Alice the 8th Countess of Arundel. Along with her aunt, Alasia of Saluzzo who married Edmund de Lacy, 2nd Earl of Lincoln in 1247, Alice was one of the first Italian women to marry into an English noble family. Her marriage had been arranged by the late King Henry III's widowed Queen consort Eleanor of Provence.

    Richard and Alice's principal residence was Marlborough Castle in Wiltshire, but Richard also held Arundel Castle in Sussex and the castles of Clun and Oswestry in Shropshire. Her husband was knighted by King Edward I in 1289, and fought in the Welsh Wars (1288–1294), and later in the Scottish Wars. The marriage produced four children:[3]

    Edmund Fitzalan, 9th Earl of Arundel (1 May 1285- 17 November 1326 by execution), married Alice de Warenne, by whom he had issue.
    John Fitzalan, a priest
    Alice Fitzalan (died 7 September 1340), married Stephen de Segrave, 3rd Lord Segrave, by whom she had issue.
    Margaret Fitzalan, married William le Botiller, by whom she had issue.
    Eleanor Fitzalan, married Henry de Percy, 1st Baron Percy, by whom she had issue.
    Alice died on 25 September 1292 and was buried in Haughmond Abbey, Shropshire. Her husband Richard died on 09/03/1301 and was buried alongside Alice. In 1341, provision was made for twelve candles to be burned beside their tombs.[2] The Abbey is now a ruin as the result of a fire during the English Civil War. Her many descendants included the Dukes of Norfolk, the English queen consorts of Henry VIII, Sir Winston Churchill, Diana, Princess of Wales, and the current British Royal Family.

    References

    ^ Jump up to: a b Cawley, Charles, Saluzzo, Medieval Lands database, Foundation for Medieval Genealogy,[better source needed]
    ^ Jump up to: a b The Complete Peerage, vol.1, page 241.[full citation needed]
    Jump up ^ Cawley, Charles, Earls of Arundel, Medieval Lands database, Foundation for Medieval Genealogy,[better source needed]

    Categories: 13th-century births1292 deathsPeople from SaluzzoWomen of medieval Italy

    end of biography

    Children of Alisona di Saluzzo and Richard FitzAlan Baron of Arundel are:

    i. Edmund FitzAlan 9th Earl of Arundel was born 1 MAY 1285 in Marlborough Castle, Marlborough, Wiltshire, England, and died 17 NOV 1326 in Hereford, Herefordshire, England. He married Alice Warenne 1305 in Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England, daughter of William de Warenne Earl of Surrey and Joan de Vere. She was born ABT 1286 in Warren, Sussex, England, and died BEF 23 MAY 1338.
    21. ii. Margaret FitzAlan was born 1302 in Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England. She married William 2nd Baron le Boteler Sir of Wemme in Shropshire, England, son of William 1st Baron le Boteler Sir of Wemme and Beatrice de Herdeburgh. He was born 8 SEP 1296 in Wem, Shropshire, England, and died DEC 1361 in Oversley, Alcester, Warwickshire, England.
    iii. Alice FitzAlan. She married Stephen 3rd Lord de Seagrave, son of John 2nd Baron de Segrave & Penn Sir and Christian de Plessis Heir of Stottesdon. He was born 1285 in Seagrave, Leicestershire, England, and died 1326.
    iv. Thomas FitzAlan Baron of Arundel.

    Children:
    1. Eleanor FitzAlan was born 0___ 1282; died 0___ 1328; was buried Beverley Minster, Yorkshire, England.
    2. Edmund FitzAlan, Knight, 9th Earl of Arundel was born 1 May 1285, Marlborough Castle, Marlborough, Wiltshire, England; died 17 Nov 1326, Hereford, Herefordshire, England; was buried Haughmond Abbey, Shropshire, England.
    3. 29. Alice FitzAlan was born 0___ 1291, Arundel, Sussex, England; died 7 Feb 1340, Northamptonshire, England; was buried Chacombe Priory, Chacombe, Northamptonshire, England.
    4. Margaret FitzAlan was born 1302, Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England.

  17. 60.  Edward I, King of EnglandEdward I, King of England was born 17 Jun 1239, Westminster, London, Middlesex, England; was christened 22 Jun 1239, Westminster Abbey, 20 Deans Yd, London SW1P 3PA, United Kingdom (son of Henry III, King of England and Eleanor of Provence, Queen of England, Princess of Castile); died 7 Jul 1307, Burgh by Sands, Carlisle, Cumbria, England; was buried 28 Oct 1307, Westminster Abbey, 20 Deans Yd, London SW1P 3PA, United Kingdom.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Edward Longshanks

    Notes:

    More on King Edward I ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_I_of_England

    Remember Mel Gibson's role as William Wallace in his 1995 movie, "Braveheart", about the 13th c. Scottish Rebellion? Here is the fellow he battled, brilliantly portrayed by Patrick McGoohan... Here's a clip of that movie... http://www.cinemagia.ro/trailer/braveheart-braveheart-inima-neinfricata-1054/

    Edward I, called Longshanks (1239-1307), king of England (1272-1307), Lord of Gascony, of the house of Plantagenet. He was born in Westminster on June 17, 1239, the eldest son of King Henry III, and at 15 married Eleanor of Castile. In the struggles of the barons against the crown for constitutional and ecclesiastical reforms, Edward took a vacillating course. When warfare broke out between the crown and the nobility, Edward fought on the side of the king, winning the decisive battle of Evesham in 1265. Five years later he left England to join the Seventh Crusade.

    Following his father's death in 1272, and while he was still abroad, Edward was recognized as king by the English barons; in 1273, on his return to England, he was crowned.

    The first years of Edward's reign were a period of the consolidation of his power. He suppressed corruption in the administration of justice, restricted the jurisdiction of the ecclesiastical courts to church affairs, and eliminated the papacy's overlordship over England. On the refusal of Llewelyn ab Gruffydd (died 1282), ruler of Wales, to submit to the English crown, Edward began the military conflict that resulted, in 1284, in the annexation of Llewelyn's principality to the English crown. In 1290 Edward expelled all Jews from England. War between England and France broke out in 1293 as a result of the efforts of France to curb Edward's power in Gascony. Edward lost Gascony in 1293 and did not again come into possession of the duchy until 1303. About the same year in which he lost Gascony, the Welsh rose in rebellion.
    Greater than either of these problems was the disaffection of the people of Scotland. In agreeing to arbitrate among the claimants to the Scottish throne, Edward, in 1291, had exacted as a prior condition the recognition by all concerned of his overlordship of Scotland. The Scots later repudiated him and made an alliance with France against England. To meet the critical situations in Wales and Scotland, Edward summoned a parliament, called the Model Parliament by historians because it was a representative body and in that respect was the forerunner of all future parliaments. Assured by Parliament of support at home, Edward took the field and suppressed the Welsh insurrection. In 1296, after invading and conquering Scotland, he declared himself king of that realm. In 1298 he again invaded Scotland to suppress the revolt led by Sir William Wallace. In winning the Battle of Falkirk in 1298, Edward achieved the greatest military triumph of his career, but he failed to crush Scottish opposition.

    The conquest of Scotland became the ruling passion of his life. He was, however, compelled by the nobles, clergy, and commons to desist in his attempts to raise by arbitrary taxes the funds he needed for campaigns. In 1299 Edward made peace with France and married Margaret, sister of King Philip III of France. Thus freed of war, he again undertook the conquest of Scotland in 1303. Wallace was captured and executed in 1305. No sooner had Edward established his government in Scotland, however, than a new revolt broke out and culminated in the coronation of Robert Bruce as king of Scotland. In 1307 Edward set out for the third time to subdue the Scots, but he died en route near Carlisle on July 7, 1307. He also had a daughter with Eleanor of Castile that died young.

    Edward I, while on his way to war against the Scots, died on the marshes near Burgh, and his corpse lay at the village's 12th-century church until its eventual removal to Westminster Abbey.

    There is an impressive monument on the marshes erected in 1685 to mark the place where he died. It is 11/4 miles NNW of the village, is signposted and can be reached on foot.

    Edward I [37370] Burgh by Sands, Cumbria, England

    is the 22nd great-grandfather of David Hennessee:

    http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=I3&secondpersonID=&maxrels=1&disallowspouses=0&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I37370

    and also of Sheila Ann Mynatt Hennessee (1945-2016):

    http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=I3&secondpersonID=I27517&maxrels=1&disallowspouses=0&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I37370

    Died:
    Edward I, while on his way to war against the Scots, died on the marshes near Burgh, and his corpse lay at the village's 12th-century church, St. Michael's, until its eventual removal to Westminster Abbey.

    There is an impressive monument on the marshes erected in 1685 to mark the place where he died. It is 11/4 miles NNW of the village, is signposted and can be reached on foot.

    Photos, maps & source ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burgh_by_Sands

    Edward married Margaret of France, Queen Consort of England 10 Sep 1299, Canterbury Cathedral, Canterbury, Kent, England. Margaret (daughter of Phillip III, King of France and Maria of Brabant, Queen of France) was born ~ 1279, Paris, France; died 14 Feb 1318, Marlborough Castle, Marlborough, Wiltshire, England; was buried Christ Church Greyfriars, Newgate, London, England. [Group Sheet]


  18. 61.  Margaret of France, Queen Consort of England was born ~ 1279, Paris, France (daughter of Phillip III, King of France and Maria of Brabant, Queen of France); died 14 Feb 1318, Marlborough Castle, Marlborough, Wiltshire, England; was buried Christ Church Greyfriars, Newgate, London, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Princess Marguerite of France

    Notes:

    Margaret of France (c. 1279[1] - 14 February 1318[1]), a daughter of Philip III of France and Maria of Brabant, was Queen of England as the second wife of King Edward I.

    Early life

    Her father died when she was three years old and she grew up under guidance of her mother and Joan I of Navarre, her half-brother King Philip IV's wife.[2]

    Marriage

    The death of Edward's beloved first wife, Eleanor of Castile, at the age of 49 in 1290, left him reeling in grief. However, it was much to Edward's benefit to make peace with France to free him to pursue his wars in Scotland. Additionally, with only one surviving son, Edward was anxious to protect the English throne with additional heirs. In summer of 1291, the English king had betrothed his son and heir, Edward, to Blanche of France in order to achieve peace with France. However, hearing of her renowned beauty, Edward decided to have his son's bride for his own and sent emissaries to France. Philip agreed to give Blanche to Edward on the following conditions: that a truce would be concluded between the two countries and that Edward would give up the province of Gascony. Edward agreed to the conditions and sent his brother Edmund Crouchback, Earl of Lancaster, to fetch the new bride. Edward had been deceived, for Blanche was to be married to Rudolph III of Habsburg, the eldest son of King Albert I of Germany. Instead, Philip offered her younger sister Margaret to marry Edward (then 55). Upon hearing this, Edward declared war on France, refusing to marry Margaret. After five years, a truce was agreed upon under the influence of Pope Boniface VIII. A series of treaties in the first half of 1299 provided terms for a double marriage: Edward I would marry Margaret and his son would marry Isabella of France, Philip's youngest surviving child. Additionally, the English monarchy would regain the key city of Guienne and receive ą15,000 owed to Margaret as well as the return of Eleanor of Castile's lands in Ponthieu and Montreuil as a dower first for Margaret, and then Isabella of France.[3]

    Edward was then 60 years old, at least 40 years older than his bride. The wedding took place at Canterbury on 8 September 1299. Margaret was never crowned, being the first uncrowned queen since the Conquest. This in no way lessened her dignity as the king's wife, however, for she used the royal title in her letters and documents, and appeared publicly wearing a crown even though she had not received one during a formal rite of investiture.[5]

    French Monarchy
    Direct Capetians
    Arms of the Kingdom of France (Ancien).svg
    Philip III
    Louis of France
    Philip IV
    Charles, Count of Valois
    Louis, Count of âEvreux
    Blanche, Duchess of Austria
    Margaret of France, Queen of England
    v t e
    Edward soon returned to the Scottish border to continue his campaigns and left Margaret in London, but she had become pregnant quickly after the wedding. After several months, bored and lonely, the young queen decided to join her husband. Nothing could have pleased the king more, for Margaret's actions reminded him of his first wife Eleanor, who had had two of her sixteen children abroad.

    In less than a year Margaret gave birth to a son, Thomas of Brotherton who was named after Thomas Becket, since she had prayed to him during her pregnancy. That Margaret was physically fit was demonstrated by the fact that she was still hunting when her labour pains started.[6]

    The next year she gave birth to another son, Edmund.

    It is said[who?] that many who fell under the king's wrath were saved from too stern a punishment by the queen's influence over her husband, and the statement, Pardoned solely on the intercession of our dearest consort, queen Margaret of England, appears. In 1305, the young queen acted as a mediator between her step-son and husband, reconciling the heir to his aging father, and calming her husband's wrath.[7]

    She favored the Franciscan order and was a benefactress of a new foundation at Newgate. Margaret employed the minstrel Guy de Psaltery and both she and her husband liked to play chess.[8] She and her stepson, Edward, Prince of Wales, the future king Edward II (who was two years younger than she), also became fond of each other: he once made her a gift of an expensive ruby and gold ring, and she on one occasion rescued many of the Prince's friends from the wrath of the King.

    The mismatched couple were blissfully happy. When Blanche died in 1305 (her husband never became Emperor), Edward ordered all the court to go into mourning to please his queen. He had realised the wife he had gained was "a pearl of great price" as Margaret was respected for her beauty, virtue, and piety. The same year Margaret gave birth to a girl, Eleanor, named in honour of Edward's first wife, a choice which surprised many, and showed Margaret's unjealous nature.

    When Edward went on summer campaign to Scotland in 1307, Margaret accompanied him, but he died in Burgh by Sands.

    Widowhood

    Arms of Margaret of France as Queen of England.
    Margaret never remarried after Edward's death in 1307, despite being only 26 when widowed. She was alleged to have stated that "when Edward died, all men died for me".

    Margaret was not pleased when Edward II elevated Piers Gaveston to become Earl of Cornwall upon his father's death, since the title had been meant for one of her own sons.[9] She attended the new king's wedding to her half-niece, Isabella of France, and a silver casket was made with both their arms. After Isabella's coronation, Margaret retired to Marlborough Castle (which was by this time a dower house), but she stayed in touch with the new Queen and with her half-brother Philip IV by letter during the confusing times leading up to Gaveston's death in 1312. Margaret, too, was a victim of Gaveston's influence over her step-son. Edward II gave several of her dower lands to the favourite, including Berkhamsted Castle. In May 1308, an anonymous informer reported that Margaret had provided ą40,000 along with her brother, Philip IV, to support the English barons against Gaveston.[10] Due to this action, Gaveston was briefly exiled and Margaret remained fairly unmolested by the upstart until his death in June 1312.

    She was present at the birth of the future Edward III in November 1312.

    On 14 February 1318 she died in her castle at Marlborough. Dressed in a Franciscan habit, she was buried at Christ Church Greyfriars in London, a church she had generously endowed. Her tomb, beautifully carved, was destroyed during the Reformation.[11]

    Issue

    In all, Margaret gave birth to three children:[12]

    Thomas of Brotherton, 1st Earl of Norfolk (1 June 1300 – 4 August 1338)
    Edmund of Woodstock, 1st Earl of Kent (5 August 1301 – 19 March 1330)
    Eleanor of England (1306-1311)[12]

    Notes:

    Married:
    “An interlude in the political wrangling occurred on 10 September 1299, when Edward married Margaret of France at Canterbury, in a ceremony conducted by Archbishop Winchelsey, who was, at least briefly, on relatively good terms with the king.

    The bishops of Durham, Winchester and Chester were present, as were the earls of Lincoln, Warenne, Warwick, Lancaster, Hereford and Norfolk, along with a host of other magnates. After the ceremony, there was a splendid feast, with entertainment provided by a host of minstrels. The festivities took three days in all".

    Children:
    1. 30. Thomas of Brotherton, Knight, 1st Earl of Norfolk was born 1 Jun 1300, Brotherton, Yorkshire, England; died 23 Aug 1338, Framlington Castle, Suffolk, England; was buried Bury St Edmunds Abbey, Suffolk, England.
    2. Edmund of Woodstock, 1st Earl of Kent was born 5 Aug 1301, Woodstock, Oxfordshire, England; died 19 Mar 1330, Winchester Castle, England; was buried Westminster Abbey, 20 Deans Yd, London SW1P 3PA, United Kingdom.

  19. 62.  Roger Hayles was born 0___ 1274, Harwich, Essex , England; died 0___ 1313, Harwich, Essex , England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Coroner of Harwich
    • Also Known As: Sir Roger de Hales of Lodden-Hales

    Notes:

    936. *Roger de Hales and Alice his wife and Johanna and Matilda, daughters of the said Roger, v. William fil’ Roger de Hales, in Lodnes, Whetacre, Elingham juxta Kyrkeby, and Brom juxta Thweyt’ (Rye, 1885).

    From the lack of mention of his daughter Alice and his son and heir John de Hales, it may be presumed they were not yet born in 1303.

    *

    About Roger de Hales, Sir
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------

    ID: I21812

    Name: Roger HAYLES

    Sex: M

    Occupation: Coroner of Norfolk 1

    Note:

    Coroner of Norfolk, his post demanded that he collect and protect revenues for the king.

    (Wikipedia)

    Marriage 1 Alice SKOGAN

    Children

    Alice HAYLES
    Sources:

    Title: From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Name: (Sir)Roger Hayles

    Sex: M

    Death: 1313

    Residence: Harwich, Essex

    Occupation: Coroner of Norfolk

    Father: Ralph De Hayles

    Marriage 1 Alice Skogan b: in Woodchurch, Kent

    Children

    Alice Hayles
    http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=flugar15136&id=I07847

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Sir Roger of Harwich Hayles (Ralph De Hales1) was born 1274 in Woodchurch, Kent, ENG, and died 1313. He married Alice Skogan. She was born 1277 in Woodchurch, Kent, ENG.

    Children of Sir Roger of Harwich Hayles and Alice Skogan are:
    2 i. Nicholas Hayles was born 1300.
    + 3 ii. Alice Hayles was born 1302, and died AFT 8 MAY 1326.
    4 iii. Joan Hayles was born 1304.
    5 iv. John Hayles was born 1304.
    6 v. Edmund Hayles was born 1307.
    7 vi. Jane Hayles was born ABT 1310.
    http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=REG&db=jed&id=I4679
    He married first, probably in 1319, Alice Hayles, daughter of Sir Roger Hayles and Alice Skogan. She was supposed to have been a great beauty. Her father was the coroner of Norfolk, a title that held a different meaning in the 14th century than it does today; his post demanded that he collect and protect revenues for the king.

    From Wiki article about his son in law Thomas of Brotherton

    Roger — Alice Skogan. Alice was born 0___ 1280, Woodchurch, Kent, England. [Group Sheet]


  20. 63.  Alice Skogan was born 0___ 1280, Woodchurch, Kent, England.
    Children:
    1. 31. Alice Hales, Countess of Norfolk was born ~ 1305, Harwich, Essex , England; died ~ 1330; was buried Bury St Edmunds Abbey, Suffolk, England.


Generation: 7

  1. 80.  William de Ros, Knight was born 0___ 1192, Helmsley, Yorkshire, England (son of Robert de Ros, Knight and Isabella Mac William); died 1264-1265, England; was buried Kirkham Priory, Kirkham, North Yorkshire, England.

    Notes:

    Birth: 1192
    Helmsley
    North Yorkshire, England
    Death: 1264, England

    Knight of Helmsley and Hunsingore, Yorkshire

    Son and heir to Robert de Ros and Isabel of Scotland, grandson of Everard de Ros and Roese Trussebut, William the Lion, King of Scotland and a mistress Avenel. Sir Robert was born before 1200.

    Husband of Lucy FitzPeter, daughter of Peter FitzHerbert of Blaen Llyfni, Breconshire, Wales and Alice FitzRobert, daughter of Robert FitzRoger of Warkworth, Northumbria. They were married before 24 Jan 1234 and had six sons and two daughters;

    * Sir Robert
    * Sir Peter
    * Sir William
    * Sir Alexander
    * Herbert
    * John
    * Lucy
    * Alice

    William was excommunicated with his father by Pope Innocent III on 16th of December 1215. He was taken as prisoner at the Battle of Lincoln on 20 May 1217, released on sureties 26 Oct 1217. He took no part in the Baron's war and was apparently faithful to the king. Sir William was the benefactor of the monasteries of Kirkham, Rievaulx, Meaux and of the Templars.

    Sir William died 1258 or 1264, buried at Kirkham. His widow, Lucy, was alive Michaelmas 1266.

    Sir William's name is spelled both Ros and Roos.

    Family links:
    Parents:
    Robert De Ros (1170 - 1226)
    Isabella nic William de Ros (1175 - 1240)

    Spouse:
    Lucy FitzPiers de Ros (1207 - 1267)*

    Children:
    Alice de Ros (____ - 1286)*
    William de Ros (____ - 1310)*
    Robert de Ros (1223 - 1285)*
    Lucy de Ros de Kyme (1230 - ____)*

    Sibling:
    William de Ros (1192 - 1264)
    Robert de Ros (1195 - 1269)*

    *Calculated relationship

    Burial:
    Kirkham Priory
    Kirkham
    Ryedale District
    North Yorkshire, England

    Maintained by: Anne Shurtleff Stevens
    Originally Created by: Jerry Ferren
    Record added: May 25, 2011
    Find A Grave Memorial# 70352904

    William — Lucy FitzPeter, Baroness de Ros. Lucy (daughter of Peter FitzHerbert, Lord of Brecknock and Alice FitzRoger) was born 1207-1210, Forest Dean, Gloucestershire, England; died 0___ 1267, North Yorkshire, England; was buried Kirkham Priory, Kirkham, North Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 81.  Lucy FitzPeter, Baroness de Ros was born 1207-1210, Forest Dean, Gloucestershire, England (daughter of Peter FitzHerbert, Lord of Brecknock and Alice FitzRoger); died 0___ 1267, North Yorkshire, England; was buried Kirkham Priory, Kirkham, North Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Lucia of Brecknock FitzPiers
    • Also Known As: Lucy FitzPiers

    Notes:

    Lucy FitzPiers
    Also Known As: "Lucia", "Lucy;de;ros; Lucy", "FITZ", "PETER", "ros"
    Birthdate: circa 1210
    Birthplace: Forest Dean, Gloucestershire, England, (Present UK)
    Death: Died 1247 in Yorkshire, England, (Present UK)
    Immediate Family:
    Daughter of Piers FitzHerbert, Lord of Brecknock and Alice Fitzpiers
    Wife of Thomas de Newsom and Sir William de Ros
    Mother of Constance Scrope (de Newsom); Sir Alexander de Braose; Sir Herbert de Braose; Alicia de Ros, of Helmsley; Robert de Ros and 10 others
    Sister of Beatrix Fitzpiers; Reginald FitzPiers, Lord of Blaen Llyfni and Herbert Fitzpiers, Sheriff Hampshire
    Half sister of Joan de Verdun

    The de Ros family, from Scottish Kings to English Gentry

    Lucy FitzPiers
    Also Known As: "Lucia", "Lucy;de;ros; Lucy", "FITZ", "PETER", "ros"
    Birthdate: circa 1210
    Birthplace: Forest Dean, Gloucestershire, England, (Present UK)
    Death: Died 1247 in Yorkshire, England, (Present UK)
    Immediate Family:
    Daughter of Piers FitzHerbert, Lord of Brecknock and Alice Fitzpiers
    Wife of Thomas de Newsom and Sir William de Ros
    Mother of Constance Scrope (de Newsom); Sir Alexander de Braose; Sir Herbert de Braose; Alicia de Ros, of Helmsley; Robert de Ros and 10 others
    Sister of Beatrix Fitzpiers; Reginald FitzPiers, Lord of Blaen Llyfni and Herbert Fitzpiers, Sheriff Hampshire
    Half sister of Joan de Verdun
    Managed by: James Fred Patin, Jr.
    Last Updated: April 1, 2016
    View Complete Profile
    Matching family tree profiles for Lucy FitzPiers, Baroness de Ros view all matches ›

    Lucy De Ros (born Fitzpiers) in MyHeritage family trees (Maynard, Jr. Web Site)

    Lucy (Lucia) De Ross (born Fitzpiers) in MyHeritage family trees (Keefe Web Site)

    Lucy De Ros (born Fitzpiers) in MyHeritage family trees (Carter Family Website)

    Lucy Ross (born Fitzpiers) in MyHeritage family trees (Martens Web Site)
    view all 31
    Immediate Family

    Thomas de Newsom
    husband

    Constance Scrope (de Newsom)
    daughter

    Sir Alexander de Braose
    son

    Sir Herbert de Braose
    son

    Sir William de Ros
    husband

    Alicia de Ros, of Helmsley
    daughter

    Robert de Ros
    son

    Lucy de Ros
    daughter

    Robert de Ros, Lord of Belvoir
    son

    Alexander de Ros
    son

    Peter de Ros
    son

    Mary de Ros
    daughter
    About Lucy FitzPiers, Baroness de Ros
    Individual Record FamilySearch™ Pedigree Resource File

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    Lucia of Brecknock FitzPiers Compact Disc #41 Pin #277411 Pedigree

    Sex: F
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Event(s)

    Birth: abt 1196
    Helmsley,Yorkshire,England
    Death: aft 1266
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Parents

    Father: Piers FitzHerbert Disc #41 Pin #283090
    Mother: Alice de Warkworth FitzRobert Disc #41 Pin #283089
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Marriage(s)

    Spouse: Sir William I of Hamlake de Ros Disc #41 Pin #277410
    Marriage:
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Notes and Sources

    Notes: None
    Sources: Available on CD-ROM Disc# 41
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Submitter

    Kathy LONGHURST
    1175 S. 180 W. Hurricane Utah

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    Submission Search: 1606834-0220102210938

    URL:
    CD-ROM: Pedigree Resource File - Compact Disc #41
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    Order Pedigree Resource File CD-ROMS
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    About FamilySearch Pedigree Resource File

    The Pedigree Resource File is a new lineage linked database of records available on compact disc containing family history records submitted by individuals through FamilySearch Internet Genealogy Service. Family information is organized in family groups and pedigrees and includes submitted notes and sources. Many charts and reports can be printed from this data. Each disc contains about 1.1 million names. With the publication of every five discs, a master index for those discs will be published and packaged with that set of discs. With the publication of every 25 discs, a master index for those discs will also be published and packaged with that volume of discs. Discs may be purchased as sets or volumes.
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    Lucia FITZPIERS Pedigree

    Female Family
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Event(s):

    Birth: 1195
    Christening:
    Death:
    Burial:
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Parents:

    Father: Herbert FITZHERBERT Family
    Mother: Alice FITZ ROGER
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Marriages:

    Spouse: William De ROSS Family
    Marriage: About 1259 Of Igmanthorpe, , Yorkshire, England
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Messages:

    Record submitted after 1991 by a member of the LDS Church. No additional information is available. Ancestral File may list the same family and the submitter.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Source Information:

    No source information is available.
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    Lucy FITZPIERS (-1266) [Pedigree]

    Daughter of Piers FITZHERBERT (-1235) and Alice de WARKWORTH (-1225)

    b. of Brecknock, Wales
    d. AFT 1266
    Married Sir William de ROS (1193-1264)

    Children: [listed under entry for William de ROS]

    References:

    1. "Magna Charta Sureties, 1215",

    F. L. Weis,
    4th Ed..
    2. "Burke's Peerage, 1938".

    3. "Presidents GEDCOM File",

    Otto-G. Richter, Brian Tompsett.
    4. "Ancestral roots of certain American colonists who came

    to America before 1700",
    Frederick Lewis Weis, 1992, seventh edition.
    The earlier editions were called: "Ancestral roots of
    sixty colonists who came to New England 1623-1650"
    Lucy FitzPiers

    (say 1195 - )

    Lucy FitzPiers|b. s 1195|p317.htm#i18533|Reginald or Piers FitzPeirs or FitzHerbert||p317.htm#i14306||||||||||||||||

    Lucy FitzPiers married Sir William de Ros, son of Sir Robert de Ros Fursan and Isabel Avenal of Scotland. Rosie Bevan wrote: That William de Ros of Helmsley was married to Lucy fitz Piers identified, ( CP (XI : 94) as you say, citing Dugdale), as daughter of Piers fitz Herbert, lord of Brecknock, would appeare to be borne out by the names of their children - Robert, William, Alexander, Herbert, John, Piers, Lucy and Alice, as listed in CP XI p. 94 note (l) and supported by about ten references. Lucy FitzPiers was born say 1195 at Wales. Dugdale citing Glover, Somerset Herald, stated that she was the daughter of Reginald FitzPiers of Blewlebeny in Wales. If she belonged to this family, she was presumably sister of Herbert Fitzpiers and of his brother and heir Reynold FitzPiers, and daughter of Piers FitzHerbert, lords of the Honour of Brecknock, whose castle was built at Blaenllyfni. She was the daughter of Reginald or Piers FitzPeirs or FitzHerbert.
    She was living at Michaelmas 1266, when there is a record of her claim for dower in Ulceby, Lincs, against Alice de Ros, and in a manor in Yorks against Piers de Ros.
    Children of Lucy FitzPiers and Sir William de Ros

    * Sir William de Ros (of Ingmanthorpe)+ d. b 28 May 1310
    * Sir Alexander de Ros
    * Sir Herbert de Ros
    * Sir John de Ros
    * Piers de Ros
    * Sir Robert de Ros 1st Baron+ b. bt 1220 - 1223, d. 17 May 1285
    * Lucy de Ros+ b. s 1230, d. a 1279
    * Alice de Ros d. 29 Apr 1286
    Lucy FitzPiers1

    F, #176196

    Lucy FitzPiers||p17620.htm#i176196|Piers FitzHerbert||p36888.htm#i368871||||||||||||||||

    Last Edited=13 Jun 2009

    Lucy FitzPiers is the daughter of Piers FitzHerbert.2 She married Sir William de Ros, son of Robert de Ros, 1st Lord Ros of Helmsley and Isabella (?).1
    Children of Lucy FitzPiers and Sir William de Ros

    * Sir Robert de Ros+ d. 17 Mar 12852
    * Sir William de Ros+ d. 28 May 13101
    * Piers Ros 2
    Citations

    1. [S1545] Mitchell Adams, "re: West Ancestors," e-mail message from (Australia) to Darryl Roger Lundy, 6 December 2005 - 19 June 2009. Hereinafter cited as "re: West Ancestors".
    2. [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke's Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke's Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 1, page 1107. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
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    William De ROSS Pedigree

    Male Family
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Event(s):

    Birth:
    Christening:
    Death:
    Burial:
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Marriages:

    Spouse: Lucia FITZPIERS Family
    Marriage: About 1259 Of Igmanthorpe, , Yorkshire, England
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Messages:

    Record submitted after 1991 by a member of the LDS Church. No additional information is available. Ancestral File may list the same family and the submitter.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Source Information:

    No source information is available.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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    Lucy[1,2,3]

    - 1266
    Sex Female

    Lived In Scotland

    Complete *

    Died Aft 1265

    Person ID I00113893 Leo

    Last Modified 22 Aug 1997

    Father Piers FitzHerbert

    Mother Alice

    Family ID F00119593 Group Sheet

    Family Sir William de Ros, of Helmsley

    Children

    1. Sir Robert de Ros, of Helmsley, b. est 1235

    2. Sir William de Ros, of Ingmanthorpe, b. est 1240

    3. Alexander de Ros
    4. Herbert de Ros
    5. John de Ros
    6. Piers de Ros
    7. Lucy de Ros
    8. Alice de Ros
    Last Modified 22 Aug 1997

    Family ID F00049669 Group Sheet

    Sources 1. [S00058] The Complete Peerage, 1936 , Doubleday, H.A. & Lord Howard de Walden, Reference: XI Ros 94n

    2. [S01336] Descendants of Leofric of Mercia 2002 , Ravilious, John & Rosie Bevan

    3. [S00123] ~Living descendants of Blood Royal in America , Angerville, Count d', Reference: 54

    "Of Brecknock, Wales"

    Children:
    1. 40. Robert de Ros, Knight was born ~ 1223, Helmsley Castle, Yorkshire, England; died 17 May 1285; was buried Kirkham Priory, Kirkham, North Yorkshire, England.
    2. Peter de Ros was born (Yorkshire, England).
    3. Alexander de Ros was born (Yorkshire, England).
    4. Herbert de Ros was born (Yorkshire, England).
    5. William de Ros, Knight was born ~ 1244, (Yorkshire) England; died 0May 1310, (Yorkshire) England; was buried Greyfriars Abbey Church, King's Straith, York, Yorkshire, England.
    6. Anne de Ros was born ~ 1246, Helmsley, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1290.

  3. 82.  William d'Aubigny was born (Leicestershire, England) (son of William d'Aubigny, Lord of Belvoir and unnamed spouse); died 0___ 1247.

    William — unnamed spouse. [Group Sheet]


  4. 83.  unnamed spouse
    Children:
    1. 41. Isabel d'Aubigny was born ~ 1233; died 15 Jun 1301.

  5. 92.  Richard de Clare, Knight, 6th Earl of GloucesterRichard de Clare, Knight, 6th Earl of Gloucester was born 4 Aug 1222, Clare Castle, Clare, Suffolk, England (son of Gilbert de Clare, Knight, 4th Earl of Hertford and Isabel Marshal, Countess Marshall); died 14 Jul 1262, Waltham, Canterbury, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Earl of Hertford

    Notes:

    Richard de Clare, 5th Earl of Hertford, 6th Earl of Gloucester (4 August 1222 – 14 July 1262) was son of Gilbert de Clare, 4th Earl of Hertford and Isabel Marshal.[1][2] On his father's death, when he became Earl of Gloucester (October 1230), he was entrusted first to the guardianship of Hubert de Burgh. On Hubert's fall, his guardianship was given to Peter des Roches (c. October 1232); and in 1235 to Gilbert, Earl Marshall.

    Marriage

    Richard's first marriage to Margaret or Megotta, as she was also called, ended with either an annulment or with her death in November 1237. They were both approximately fourteen or fifteen. The marriage of Hubert de Burgh's daughter Margaret to Richard de Clare, the young Earl of Gloucester, brought de Burgh into some trouble in 1236, for the earl was as yet a minor and in the wardship of King Henry III, and the marriage had been celebrated without the royal license. Hubert, however, protested that the match was not of his making, and promised to pay the king some money, so the matter passed by for the time.[4][5] Even before Margaret died, the Earl of Lincoln offered 5,000 marks to King Henry to secure Richard for his own daughter. This offer was accepted, and Richard was married secondly, on 2 February 1238 to Maud de Lacy, daughter of John de Lacy, 1st Earl of Lincoln [6]

    Military career

    He joined in the Barons' letter to the Pope in 1246 against the exactions of the Curia in England. He was among those in opposition to the King's half-brothers, who in 1247 visited England, where they were very unpopular, but afterwards he was reconciled to them.[7]

    In August 1252/3 the King crossed over to Gascony with his army, and to his great indignation the Earl refused to accompany him and went to Ireland instead. In August 1255 he and John Maunsel were sent to Edinburgh by the King to find out the truth regarding reports which had reached the King that his son-in-law, Alexander III, King of Scotland, was being coerced by Robert de Roos and John Balliol. If possible, they were to bring the young King and Queen to him. The Earl and his companion, pretending to be the two of Roos's knights, obtained entry to Edinburgh Castle, and gradually introduced their attendants, so that they had a force sufficient for their defense. They gained access to the Scottish Queen, who made her complaints to them that she and her husband had been kept apart. They threatened Roos with dire punishments, so that he promised to go to the King.[1][4][8]

    Meanwhile, the Scottish magnates, indignant at their Castle of Edinburgh's being in English hands, proposed to besiege it, but they desisted when they found they would be besieging their King and Queen. The King of Scotland apparently traveled South with the Earl, for on 24 September they were with King Henry III at Newminster, Northumberland. In July 1258 he fell ill, being poisoned with his brother William, as it was supposed, by his steward, Walter de Scotenay. He recovered but his brother died.[2]

    Death and legacy

    Richard died at John de Griol's Manor of Asbenfield in Waltham, near Canterbury, 14 July 1262 at the age of 39, it being rumored that he had been poisoned at the table of Piers of Savoy. On the following Monday he was carried to Canterbury where a mass for the dead was sung, after which his body was taken to the canon's church at Tonbridge and interred in the choir. Thence it was taken to Tewkesbury Abbey and buried 28 July 1262, with great solemnity in the presence of two bishops and eight abbots in the presbytery at his father's right hand. Richard's own arms were: Or, three chevronels gules.[9]

    Richard left extensive property, distributed across numerous counties. Details of these holdings were reported at a series of inquisitions post mortem that took place after his death.[10]

    Family

    Richard had no children by his first wife, Margaret (or "Megotta") de Burgh. By his second wife, Maud de Lacy, daughter of the Surety John de Lacy and Margaret de Quincy, he had:

    Isabel de Clare (c. 1240-1270); m. William VII of Montferrat.
    Gilbert de Clare, 6th Earl of Hertford, 7th Earl of Gloucester (2 September 1243 - 7 December 1295)
    Thomas de Clare (c. 1245-1287); seized control of Thomond in 1277; m. Juliana FitzGerald
    Bogo de Clare (c. 1248-1294)
    Margaret de Clare (c. 1250-1312); m. Edmund, 2nd Earl of Cornwall
    Rohese de Clare (c. 1252); m. Roger de Mowbray
    Eglentina de Clare (d. 1257); died in infancy.

    His widow Maud, who had the Manor of Clare and the Manor and Castle of Usk and other lands for her dower, erected a splendid tomb for her late husband at Tewkesbury. She arranged for the marriages of her children. She died before 10 March 1288/9.[11]

    Richard married Maud de Lacy 0___ 1238. Maud (daughter of John de Lacy, Knight, 2nd Earl of Lincoln and Margaret de Quincy, 2nd Countess of Lincoln) was born 25 Jan 1223; died 1287-1289. [Group Sheet]


  6. 93.  Maud de Lacy was born 25 Jan 1223 (daughter of John de Lacy, Knight, 2nd Earl of Lincoln and Margaret de Quincy, 2nd Countess of Lincoln); died 1287-1289.
    Children:
    1. Gilbert de Clare, Knight, Earl of Hertford was born 2 Sep 1243, Christchurch, Hampshire, England; died 7 Dec 1295, Monmouth Castle, Monmouth, Monmouthshire, Wales; was buried Tewkesbury Abbey, Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England GL20 5RZ.
    2. 46. Thomas de Clare, Knight, Lord of Thomond was born ~ 1245, Tonbridge, Kent, England; died 29 Aug 1287, Ireland.
    3. 49. Rose de Clare was born 17 Oct 1252, Tonbridge, Kent, England; died 0Jan 1316.

  7. 94.  Maurice FitzGerald, II, 3rd Lord Offally was born 0___ 1238, Wexford, Ireland (son of Maurice FitzGerald, 2nd Lord of Offaly and Juliana de Cogan); died Bef 10 Nov 1286, Ross, County Wexford, Ireland.

    Notes:

    Maurice fitz Maurice FitzGerald (1238 – before 10 November 1286)[1] was an Irish magnate born in Ireland; a soldier, and Justiciar of Ireland from 1272 to 1273. His family would come to epitomize the ideal of cultural synthesis in Ireland, becoming More Irish than the Irish themselves, fusing Gaelic & Norman customs in Irish identity.

    Career

    He was born in 1238 in Wexford, Ireland, one of the sons of Maurice FitzGerald, 2nd Lord of Offaly and Juliana, whose surname is unknown. He had three brothers, Gerald fitz Maurice II (died 1243), Thomas fitz Maurice (died 1271), David fitz Maurice (died without issue). Maurice was known by the nickname of Maurice Mael (an old word meaning "devotee" in Irish). He was granted his father's lands in Connacht in exchange for quitclaiming the barony of Offaly before 20 May 1257,[2] when his father Maurice fitz Gerald II died at Youghal Monastery. Before his father died, Maurice was custos of Offaly, but after Maurice fitz Gerald II died, the countess of Lincoln, Margaret de Quincy, sued him for custody of Offaly.[3] The next lord of Offaly was Maurice's nephew Maurice fitz Gerald III, son of his elder brother, Gerald fitz Maurice II who had died in 1243. Maurice fitz Gerald III must have been born within nine months of his father's death.[4] Once his nephew was 'full-age', Maurice fitz Maurice and Maurice fitz Gerald III captured the justiciar, Richard de la Rochelle, Theobald Butler IV, and John de Cogan I (whose son was married to Maurice fitz Gerald III's sister, Juliana). The capture of the three magnates led to a private war in Ireland, with the Geraldines on one side and Walter de Burgh and Geoffrey de Geneville on the other. However, the Second Barons' War in England forced them to come to a temporary peace while they battled Montfortians in the English Midlands in 1266.[5] Maurice III, drowned in the Irish Channel in July 1268, was the 3rd Lord of Offaly, and was succeeded by his own son, Gerald fitz Maurice III (born in 1263). Gerald's marriage was sold to Geoffrey de Geneville, who matched Gerald with his own daughter, Joan, but he died childless on 29 August 1287.

    In May 1265, Maurice fitz Maurice was among the chief magnates in Ireland summoned to inform King Henry III of England and his son Prince Edward about conditions in the country, and again in June 1265. These were the result of the private war between the Geraldines (Maurice and his nephew, Maurice fitz Gerald III) and Walter de Burgh, lord of Connacht (who was later made the 1st earl of Ulster). Maurice was appointed Justiciar of Ireland on 23 June 1272 following the accidental death of his predecessor, James de Audley on 11 June of that year; his father had served in the same capacity from 1232 to 1245. Maurice himself held the post until September 1273, when he was succeeded by Sir Geoffrey de Geneville, Seigneur de Vaucouleurs.

    He held four knight's fees in both Lea and Geashill from Roger Mortimer, 1st Baron Mortimer who had inherited them from his wife, Maud de Braose.[6]

    In 1276, he led a force of men from Connacht against the Irish of County Wicklow. Maurice's contingent joined the main army of English settlers jointly commanded by his son-in-law, Thomas de Clare, Lord of Inchiquin and Youghal who had been made Lord of Thomond earlier that same year, and Sir Geoffrey de Geneville, Maurice's successor as Justiciar of Ireland. The English under Thomas de Clare and Geoffrey de Geneville attacked the Irish at Glenmalure, but were defeated and suffered heavy losses.[7]

    Marriages and issue

    Sometime between May 1258 and 28 October 1259, he married his first wife, Maud de Prendergast, daughter of Sir Gerald de Prendergast of Beauvoir and an unnamed daughter of Richard Mor de Burgh. Together he and Maud had one daughters:[8]

    Amabel FitzGerald, married but died childless.

    Maurice was Maud's third husband. She died on an unknown date. In 1273, Maurice married his second wife, Emmeline Longespee (1252–1291), daughter of Stephen Longespee and Emmeline de Ridelsford. He and Emeline had one daughter.[9]

    Juliana FitzGerald (d. 24 September 1300), married firstly, Thomas de Clare, Lord of Thomond, by whom she had four children; she married secondly Nicholas Avenel, and thirdly, Adam de Cretynges.
    Maurice died sometime before 10 November 1286 at Ross, County Wexford. Emmeline Longespee then fought until her death to claim her dower against her daughter, Juliana, her step-daughter, Amabilia, and John FitzGerald, who would be created 1st Earl of Kildare on 14 May 1316. John was the son of his brother Thomas by Rohesia de St. Michael. John sued or physically took lands from the bailiffs of Emmeline, Juliana, and Amabilia.[10]

    *

    Maurice — Emmeline Longespee. Emmeline (daughter of Stephen Longespee and Emmeline de Riddelford) was born 0___ 1252; died 0___ 1291. [Group Sheet]


  8. 95.  Emmeline Longespee was born 0___ 1252 (daughter of Stephen Longespee and Emmeline de Riddelford); died 0___ 1291.
    Children:
    1. 47. Juliana Fitzgerald, Lady of Thomond was born 12 Apr 1266, Dublin, Ireland; died 24 Sep 1300.

  9. 96.  Roger de Mowbray, II, 6th Baron of Mowbray was born 0___ 1218, Thirsk, Yorkshire, England (son of William de Mowbray, Knight, 6th Baron of Thirsk and Avice d'Aubigny); died 18 Oct 1263, Pontefract Castle, Wakefield, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alt Birth: 0___ 1240, (Thirsk Castle, Thirsk, Yorkshire, England)
    • Alt Death: 0___ 1266

    Notes:

    About Roger de Mowbray
    Roger DE MOWBRAY

    * Father: William DE MOWBRAY
    * Mother: Agnes of ARUNDEL
    * Birth: 1210, Lincoln, England
    * Death: 1266, Epworth, England
    * Partnership with: Maud DE BEAUCHAMP
    o Child: Elizabeth DE MOWBRAY Birth: 1230, Lincolnshire, England
    o Child: Roger DE MOWBRAY Birth: 1245, Axholme, Lincolnshire, England
    o Child: John DE MOWBRAY
    o Child: Edmund DE MOWBRAY
    o Child: William DE MOWBRAY Birth: 1250
    o Child: Andrew DE MOWBRY
    o Child: Robert DE MOWBRY
    Roger de MOWBRAY (1230-1266) [Pedigree]

    Son of William de MOWBRAY Baron of Axholme (-1223) and Avice (Agnes)

    b. BEF 1230
    r. Thirsk and Slingsby
    d. ABT Nov 1266, Isle of Axholme, Eng.
    d. 1266
    Married Maud de BEAUCHAMP (-1273)

    Children:

    Roger de MOWBRAY 1st Lord Mowbray (-1296) m. Roese de CLARE (-1316)

    Roger married Maud de Beauchamp ~ 1247. Maud (daughter of William de Beauchamp, Knight, Baron of Bedford and Ida Longespee) was born ~ 1234; died Bef April 1273. [Group Sheet]


  10. 97.  Maud de Beauchamp was born ~ 1234 (daughter of William de Beauchamp, Knight, Baron of Bedford and Ida Longespee); died Bef April 1273.
    Children:
    1. 48. Roger de Mowbray, III, Knight, 1st Baron of Mowbray was born 0___ 1245, Lincolnshire, England; died 21 Nov 1297, Ghent, Belgium.

  11. 100.  William de Braose, VI, Knight, 1st Baron Braose was born ~ 1224, (Wales) (son of John de Braose and Marared ferch Llywelyn); died 0___ 1291, Findon, Sussex, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Lord of Bramber
    • Also Known As: Lord of Gower
    • Also Known As: William Bruce
    • Also Known As: William de Breuse
    • Also Known As: William de Brewes
    • Also Known As: William de Brewose
    • Also Known As: William de Briouze

    Notes:

    William de Braose, (alias Breuse, Brewes, Brehuse,[1] Briouze, Brewose etc.; c. 1224–1291) was the first Baron Braose, as well as Lord of Gower and Lord of Bramber.[2]

    Family and early life

    Braose was the son of John de Braose, the Lord of Bramber and Gower and John's wife Margaret, the daughter of Llywelyn the Great, prince of Gwynedd.[2] These members of the Braose family were all descendants of William de Braose, who died around 1093 and was the Domesday tenant of Bramber.[3] His family had its origins at Briouze in Normandy.[4]

    Braose's father was dead in 1232, before 18 July, when William became lord of his father's properties. William came of age before 15 July 1245,[2] making his birth around 1224.[1]

    Lord and baron

    He served King Henry III of England and Henry's son Edward I as a councilor and in various councils.[2] He sided with King Henry against Simon de Montfort during the civil war in England in the later part of Henry's reign.[1] In April and May 1292, he was summoned to Parliament, as Lord Braose.[2]

    Braose was a benefactor of Sele Priory, with surviving charters recording the grant of a large estate in Crockhurst, Sussex to the priory in 1254.[5] The charter was dated 4 January 1254, and was in exchange for 10 marks as an annual rent from the priory.[6] Another charter records the gift of land near the road from Chichester to Bramber that was made at the urging of his mother Margaret.[5] Other benefactions included gifs of rents[7] and two small gifts of land.[8] Around 1280, Braose released the priory from performing certain customary services and rents that it had previously paid to him and his ancestors.[9][Notes 1]

    Marriages, death, and legacy

    Braose married three times. His first wife was Aline, daughter of Thomas de Multon. His second was Agnes, daughter of Nicholas de Moeles. His third wife was Mary, daughter of Robert de Ros.[10] He died at Findon in Sussex shortly before 6 January 1291.[2] He was buried at Sele Priory in Sussex on 15 January.[1]

    Braose's son, William de Braose, 2nd Baron Braose, by his first wife, succeeded him.[2] By his second wife, he had a son Giles, who was knighted and fought in Scotland in 1300.[11] By his third wife, William had at least three children – Richard, Peter, and Margaret (wife of Ralph de Camoys, 1st Baron Camoys) – and possibly a fourth – William.[1] Richard was dead before 9 February 1296, and Peter died before 7 February 1312.[12]

    See also

    House of Braose

    William — Aline de Multon. [Group Sheet]


  12. 101.  Aline de Multon (daughter of Thomas de Multon and unnamed spouse).
    Children:
    1. 50. William de Braose, VII, Knight, 2nd Baron de Braose was born ~ 1260, (Wales); died 0___ 1326.

  13. 104.  Henry III, King of EnglandHenry III, King of England was born 1 Oct 1207, Winchester Castle, Hampshire, United Kingdom; was christened 0___ 1207, Bermondsey, London, Middlesex, England (son of John I, King of England and Isabelle of Angouleme, Queen of England); died 16 Nov 1272, Westminster Palace, Westminster, London, Middlesex, England; was buried 20 Nov 1272, Westminster Abbey, 20 Deans Yd, London SW1P 3PA, United Kingdom.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Duke of Aquitaine
    • Also Known As: Henry III, King of England
    • Also Known As: Henry of Winchester
    • Also Known As: Lord of Ireland

    Notes:

    King Henry III biography... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_III_of_England

    Henry married Eleanor of Provence, Queen of England, Princess of Castile 14 Jan 1236, Canterbury Cathedral, Canterbury, Kent, England. Eleanor was born 0___ 1222, Aix-En-Provence, Bouches-Du-Rhone, France; died 24 Jun 1291, Amesbury, Wiltshire, England; was buried 11 Sep 1291, Amesbury Abbey, Wiltshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  14. 105.  Eleanor of Provence, Queen of England, Princess of Castile was born 0___ 1222, Aix-En-Provence, Bouches-Du-Rhone, France; died 24 Jun 1291, Amesbury, Wiltshire, England; was buried 11 Sep 1291, Amesbury Abbey, Wiltshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Eleonore Berenger

    Notes:

    Eleanor of Provence (c. 1223 - 24/25 June 1291[1]) was Queen consort of England, as the spouse of King Henry III of England, from 1236 until his death in 1272.

    Although she was completely devoted to her husband, and staunchly defended him against the rebel Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester, she was very much hated by the Londoners. This was because she had brought a large number of relatives with her to England in her retinue; these were known as "the Savoyards", and they were given influential positions in the government and realm. On one occasion, Eleanor's barge was attacked by angry citizens who pelted her with stones, mud, pieces of paving, rotten eggs and vegetables.

    Eleanor was the mother of five children including the future King Edward I of England. She also was renowned for her cleverness, skill at writing poetry, and as a leader of fashion.

    Family[edit]
    Born in Aix-en-Provence, she was the second daughter of Ramon Berenguer IV, Count of Provence (1198–1245) and Beatrice of Savoy (1205–1267), the daughter of Thomas I of Savoy and his second wife Margaret of Geneva. She was well educated as a child, and developed a strong love of reading. Her three sisters also married kings.[2] After her elder sister Margaret married Louis IX of France, their uncle William corresponded with Henry III of England to persuade him to marry Eleanor. Henry sought a dowry of up to twenty thousand silver marks to help offset the dowry he had just paid for his sister Isabella, but Eleanor's father was able to negotiate this down to no dowry, just a promise to leave her ten thousand when he died.

    Like her mother, grandmother, and sisters, Eleanor was renowned for her beauty. She was a dark-haired brunette with fine eyes.[3] Piers Langtoft speaks of her as "The erle's daughter, the fairest may of life".[4] On 22 June 1235, Eleanor was betrothed to King Henry III (1207–1272).[1] Eleanor was probably born in 1223; Matthew Paris describes her as being "jamque duodennem" (already twelve) when she arrived in the Kingdom of England for her marriage.

    Marriage and issue

    13th century costume depicting Eleanor of Provence, Queen of Henry III of England - illustration by Percy Anderson for Costume Fanciful, Historical and Theatrical, 1906
    Eleanor was married to King Henry III of England on 14 January 1236.[5] She had never seen him prior to the wedding at Canterbury Cathedral and had never set foot in his kingdom.[6] Edmund Rich, Archbishop of Canterbury, officiated. She was dressed in a shimmering golden gown which was tightly-fitted to the waist, and then flared out in wide pleats to her feet. The sleeves were long and lined with ermine.[7] After riding to London the same day where a procession of citizens greeted the bridal pair, Eleanor was crowned queen consort of England in a ceremony at Westminster Abbey which was followed by a magnificent banquet with the entire nobility in full attendance.[8]

    Eleanor and Henry together had five children:

    Edward I (1239–1307), married Eleanor of Castile (1241–1290) in 1254, by whom he had issue, including his heir Edward II. His second wife was Margaret of France, by whom he had issue.
    Margaret (1240–1275), married King Alexander III of Scotland, by whom she had issue.
    Beatrice (1242–1275), married John II, Duke of Brittany, by whom she had issue.
    Edmund Crouchback, 1st Earl of Lancaster (1245–1296), married Aveline de Forz in 1269, who died four years later without issue; married Blanche of Artois in 1276, by whom he had issue.
    Katherine (25 November 1253 – 3 May 1257)
    Four others are listed, but their existence is in doubt as there is no contemporary record of them. These are:

    Richard (1247–1256)
    John (1250–1256)
    William (1251–1256)
    Henry (1256–1257)
    Eleanor seems to have been especially devoted to her eldest son, Edward; when he was deathly ill in 1246, she stayed with him at the abbey at Beaulieu in Hampshire for three weeks, long past the time allowed by monastic rules.[9] It was because of her influence that King Henry granted the duchy of Gascony to Edward in 1249.[citation needed] Her youngest child, Katherine, seems to have had a degenerative disease that rendered her deaf. When the little girl died at the age of three, both her royal parents suffered overwhelming grief.[10]

    Unpopularity

    Eleanor was a loyal and faithful consort to Henry, but she brought in her retinue a large number of uncles and cousins, "the Savoyards," and her influence with the King and her unpopularity with the English barons created friction during Henry's reign.[11] Her uncle William of Savoy became a close advisor of her husband, displacing and displeasing English barons.[12] Though Eleanor and Henry supported different factions at times, she was made regent of England when her husband left for Normandy in 1253. Eleanor was devoted to her husband's cause, stoutly contested Simon de Montfort, raising troops in France for Henry's cause. On 13 July 1263, she was sailing down the Thames when her barge was attacked by citizens of London.[13] Eleanor stoutly hated the Londoners who returned her hatred; in revenge for their dislike Eleanor had demanded from the city all the back payments due on the monetary tribute known as queen-gold, by which she received a tenth of all fines which came to the Crown. In addition to the queen-gold other such fines were levied on the citizens by the Queen on the thinnest of pretexts.[14] In fear for her life as she was pelted with stones, loose pieces of paving, dried mud, rotten eggs and vegetables, Eleanor was rescued by Thomas Fitzthomas, the Mayor of London, and took refuge at the bishop of London's home.

    Later life

    In 1272 Henry died, and her son Edward, who was 33 years old, became Edward I, King of England. She remained in England as queen dowager, and raised several of her grandchildren—Edward's son Henry and daughter Eleanor, and Beatrice's son John. When her grandson Henry died in her care in 1274, Eleanor went into mourning and gave orders for his heart to be buried at the priory at Guildford which she founded in his memory. In 1275 Eleanor's two remaining daughters died Margaret 26 February and Beatrice 24 March.

    She retired to a convent; however, she remained in contact with her son, King Edward, and her sister, Queen Margaret of France.

    Eleanor died on 24/25 June 1291 in Amesbury, eight miles north of Salisbury, England. She was buried on 11 September 1291 in the Abbey of St Mary and St Melor, Amesbury on 9 December. The exact site of her grave at the abbey is unknown making her the only English queen without a marked grave. Her heart was taken to London where it was buried at the Franciscan priory.[15]

    Cultural legacy

    Eleanor was renowned for her learning, cleverness, and skill at writing poetry,[6] as well as her beauty; she was also known as a leader of fashion, continually importing clothes from France.[4] She often wore parti-coloured cottes (a type of tunic), gold or silver girdles into which a dagger was casually thrust, she favoured red silk damask, and decorations of gilt quatrefoil, and to cover her dark hair she wore jaunty pillbox caps. Eleanor introduced a new type of wimple to England, which was high, "into which the head receded until the face seemed like a flower in an enveloping spathe".[4]

    She had developed a love for the songs of the troubadors as a child, and continued this interest. She bought many romantic and historical books, covering stories from ancient times to modern romances.

    Eleanor is the protagonist of The Queen From Provence, a historical romance by British novelist Jean Plaidy which was published in 1979. Eleanor is a main character in the novel Four Sisters, All Queens by author Sherry Jones, as well as in the novel The Sister Queens by Sophie Perinot. She is also the subject of Norwegian Symphonic metal band Leave's Eyes in their song "Eleonore De Provence" from their album Symphonies of the Night.

    Children:
    1. 60. Edward I, King of England was born 17 Jun 1239, Westminster, London, Middlesex, England; was christened 22 Jun 1239, Westminster Abbey, 20 Deans Yd, London SW1P 3PA, United Kingdom; died 7 Jul 1307, Burgh by Sands, Carlisle, Cumbria, England; was buried 28 Oct 1307, Westminster Abbey, 20 Deans Yd, London SW1P 3PA, United Kingdom.
    2. 52. Edmund "Crouchback" Plantagenet, Prince of England was born 16 Jan 1245, London, Middlesex, England; died 5 Jun 1296, Bayonne, Pyrennes-Atlantiques, France; was buried 15 Jul 1296, Westminster Abbey, 20 Deans Yd, London SW1P 3PA, United Kingdom.
    3. Margaret of England, Queen of Scots was born 29 Sep 1251, Windsor Castle, Windsor, Berkshire, England; died 26 Feb 1275, Cupar Castle, Cupar, Fife, Scotland; was buried Dunfermline Abbey, Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland.
    4. Mary Elizabeth Plantagenet, Princess of England was born 1255, Elsenham Manor, Essex, England; died 16 Sep 1295, West Greenwich, London, England.

  15. 108.  Patrick de Chaworth

    Patrick — Hawise de Londres. [Group Sheet]


  16. 109.  Hawise de Londres
    Children:
    1. 54. Patrick Chaworth, Knight, Lord of Kidwelly was born ~ 1250, Kempsford, Gloucestershire, England; died 0___ 1283.

  17. 110.  William de Beauchamp, Knight, 9th Earl of WarwickWilliam de Beauchamp, Knight, 9th Earl of Warwick was born 0___ 1237, Elmley Castle, Worcestershire, England (son of William de Beauchamp and Isabel Mauduit); died 0___ 1298, (Elmley Castle, Worcestershire, England).

    Notes:

    William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick (1237-1298) was an English nobleman and soldier, described as a "vigorous and innovative military commander". He was active in the field against the Welsh for many years, and at the end of his life campaigned against the Scots.

    Career

    He became hereditary High Sheriff of Worcestershire for life on the death of his father in 1268.

    He was a close friend of Edward I of England, and was an important leader in Edward's invasion of Wales in 1277.[2][3] In 1294 he raised the siege of Conwy Castle, where the King had been penned in,[4] crossing the estuary.[5] He was victorious on 5 March 1295 at the battle of Maes Moydog, against the rebel prince of Wales, Madog ap Llywelyn.[6] In a night attack on the Welsh infantry he used cavalry to drive them into compact formations which were then shot up by his archers and charged.[7]R

    Family

    His father was William de Beauchamp (d.1268) of Elmley Castle and his mother Isabel Mauduit, sister and heiress of William Mauduit, 8th Earl of Warwick, from whom he inherited his title in 1268. He had a sister, Sarah, who married Richard Talbot.

    He married Maud FitzJohn. Their children included:

    Isabella de Beauchamp,[8] married firstly, Sir Patrick de Chaworth and, secondly, Hugh le Despenser, 1st Earl of Winchester
    Guy de Beauchamp, 10th Earl of Warwick, who married Alice de Toeni, widow of Thomas de Leyburne
    .

    Ancestry

    [show]Ancestors of William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick
    References[edit]
    Jump up ^ Barfield, Sebastian. "Chapter 1 - The Beauchamp family to 1369". The Beauchamp Earls of Warwick, 1298-1369. Retrieved 5 November 2011.
    Jump up ^ F. M. Powicke, The Thirteenth Century (1962 edition), p. 409.
    Jump up ^ Osprey Publishing - The Castles of Edward I in Wales 1277–1307
    Jump up ^ Welsh Castles - Conwy Castle
    Jump up ^ T. F. Tout, The History of England From the Accession of Henry III. to the Death of Edward III (1216-1377) ,online.
    Jump up ^ R. R. Davies, The Age of Conquest: Wales 1063-1415 (1991), p. 383.
    Jump up ^ Powicke, p. 442-3.
    Jump up ^ Lundy, Darryl. "p. 10687 § 106863 - Person Page 10687". The Peerage.[unreliable source]

    External links

    Lundy, Darryl. "p. 2648 § 26478 page". The Peerage.
    http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~mysouthernfamily/myff/d0041/g0000063.html

    Birth:
    The ruins of an important Norman and medieval castle, from which the village derives its name, are located in the deer park, just over half a mile south on Bredon Hill. The castle is supposed to have been built for Robert Despenser in the years following the Norman Conquest. After his death (post 1098) it descended to his heirs, the powerful Beauchamp family. It remained their chief seat until William de Beauchamp inherited the earldom and castle of Warwick from his maternal uncle, William Maudit, 8th Earl of Warwick, in 1268. Thereafter, Elmley Castle remained a secondary property of the Earls of Warwick until it was surrendered to the Crown in 1487. In 1528 the castle seems to have been still habitable, for Walter Walshe was then appointed constable and keeper, and ten years later Urian Brereton succeeded to the office. In 1544, however, prior to the grant to Christopher Savage (d.1545), who had been an Esquire of the Body of King Henry VIII, a survey was made of the manor and castle of Elmley, and it was found that the castle, strongly situated upon a hill surrounded by a ditch and wall, was completely uncovered and in decay.

    Map & Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elmley_Castle

    William married Maud FitzGeoffrey ~ 1261. Maud (daughter of John FitzGeoffrey, Justicar of Ireland and Isabelle Bigod, Countess of Essex) was born ~ 1238, Shere, Surrey, England; died 18 Apr 1301; was buried Friars Minor, Worcester, England. [Group Sheet]


  18. 111.  Maud FitzGeoffrey was born ~ 1238, Shere, Surrey, England (daughter of John FitzGeoffrey, Justicar of Ireland and Isabelle Bigod, Countess of Essex); died 18 Apr 1301; was buried Friars Minor, Worcester, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Maud FitzJohn

    Notes:

    Maud FitzJohn, Countess of Warwick (c. 1238 – 16/18 April 1301) was an English noblewoman and the eldest daughter of John FitzGeoffrey, Lord of Shere. Her second husband was William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick, a celebrated soldier. Through her daughter, Isabella, Maud was the maternal grandmother of Hugh the younger Despenser, the unpopular favourite of King Edward II of England, who was executed in 1326.

    Family

    Maud was born in Shere, Surrey, England in about 1238, the eldest daughter of John FitzGeoffrey, Lord of Shere, Justiciar of Ireland, and Isabel Bigod, a descendant of Strongbow and Aoife of Leinster. Maud had two brothers, Richard FitzJohn of Shere and John FitzJohn of Shere, and three younger sisters, Aveline FitzJohn, Joan FitzJohn, and Isabel FitzJohn. She also had a half-brother, Walter de Lacy, and two half-sisters, Margery de Lacy, and Maud de Lacy, Baroness Geneville, from her mother's first marriage to Gilbert de Lacy of Ewyas Lacy. The chronicle of Tintern Abbey in Monmouthshire names Matilda uxor Guidono comitis Warwici as the eldest daughter of Johanni Fitz-Geffrey and Isabella Bygod.[1] Her paternal grandparents were Geoffrey Fitzpeter, 1st Earl of Essex and Aveline de Clare, and her maternal grandparents were Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk and Maud Marshal.


    Guy de Beauchamp, 10th Earl of Warwick, the only son of Maud FitzJohn. Here he is shown with the decapitated body of Piers Gaveston

    Marriages and issue

    Maud married her first husband, Gerald de Furnivalle, Lord Hallamshire on an unknown date. Sometime after his death in 1261, Maud married her second husband, the celebrated soldier, William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick. Upon their marriage, Maud was styled as Countess of Warwick.

    Together William and Maud had at least two children:[2]

    Guy de Beauchamp, 10th Earl of Warwick (1270/1271- 28 July 1315), on 28 February 1310, he married as her second husband, heiress Alice de Toeni, by whom he had seven children.
    Isabella de Beauchamp (died before 30 May 1306), married firstly in 1281 Sir Patrick de Chaworth, Lord of Kidwelly, by whom she had a daughter, Maud Chaworth; she married secondly in 1286, Hugh le Despenser, Lord Despenser by whom she had four children including Hugh Despenser the younger, the unpopular favourite of King Edward II, who was executed in 1326, shortly after his father.
    Maud died between 16 and 18 April 1301. She was buried at the house of the Friars Minor in Worcester.

    end of biography

    Children of Maud FitzJohn and William de Beauchamp 9th Earl of Warwick are:

    i. Isabel Beauchamp was born ABT 1267 in Warwick Castle, Warwick, Warwickshire, England, and died BEF 30 MAY 1306 in Elmley Castle, Worcestershire, England. She married Patrick 5th Baron de Chaworth ABT 1281, son of Patrick de Chaworth of Kidwelly and Hawise de Londres. He was born ABT 1250 in Kidwelly, Carmarthenshire, Wales, and died BEF 7 JUL 1283. She married Hugh Baron le Despenser Earl of Winchester BEF 1286, son of Hugh 1st Baron le Despenser Sir and Aline Basset Countess of Norfolk. He was born 1 MAR 1260/61 in Loughborough, Leicestershire, England, and died 27 OCT 1326 in Bristol, Bristol, England.
    18. ii. Guy of Beauchamp 2nd Earl of Warwick was born 1271 in Warwick Castle, Warwick, Warwickshire, England, was christened 1257 in Elmley Castle, Worcestershire, England, and died 12 AUG 1315 in Warwick Castle, Warwick, Warwickshire, England. He married Alice de Toeni Countess of Warwick 1303 in Warwick Castle, Warwick, Warwickshire, England, daughter of Ralph VI de Toeni Lord of Flamstead and Mary Clarissa de Brus. She was born 8 JAN 1282/83 in Castle Maud, Flamstead, Hertfordshire, England, was christened 1264 in Flamstead, Hertfordshire, England, and died 1 JAN 1324/25 in Warwick Castle, Warwick, Warwickshire, England. He married Isabella de Clare Lady BEF 11 MAY 1297 in Worcester, Worcestershire, England, daughter of Gilbert de Clare 7th Earl of Hertford and Alice de Lusignan Countess of Surrey. She was born 10 MAR 1262/63 in Monmouth Castle, Monmourth, Monmouthshire, Wales, and died 1338 in Elmley Castle, Worcestershire, England.
    iii. Robert de Beauchamp was born ABT 1271 in Warwick, Warwickshire, England.
    iv. John de Beauchamp was born ABT 1273 in Warwick, Warwickshire, England.
    v. Anne Beauchamp was born ABT 1274 in Warwick, Warwickshire, England, and died AFT 1296.
    vi. Amy Beauchamp was born ABT 1276 in Warwick, Warwickshire, England, and died AFT 1296.
    vii. Margaret Beauchamp was born ABT 1278 in Warwick, Warwickshire, England. She married John Sudley.
    viii. Maud Beauchamp was born ABT 1282 in Warwick, Warwickshire, England, and died 1360. She married HusbandofMaudBeauchamp Rithco.

    Children:
    1. 55. Isabella Beauchamp was born ~ 1263, Warwickshire, England; died Bef 30 May 1306.

  19. 116.  John FitzAlan, Knight, 7th Earl of Arundel was born 14 Sep 1246, Clun, Shropshire, England (son of John FitzAlan, Knight, 6th Earl of Arundel and Maud de Verdon); died 18 Mar 1272, Arundel, Sussex, England; was buried Haughmond Abbey, Shropshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Baron of Clun and Oswestry

    Notes:

    Biography

    John FitzAlan was born on the day of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross, 30 Henry III (14 September, 1246),[1] or 1245,[2] in Arundel, Sussex.

    John was the oldest son and heir of his parents, John son of Alan[1] or Fitz Alan, feudal Lord of Clun and Oswestry, Salop, and his wife Maud, who was the daughter of Theobald le Botiller, 2nd Baron Butler, and his second wife, Rohese de Verndun; Rohese's children were known by their mother's surname, Verdun.[3]

    John married Isabel, the daughter of Roger de Mortimer of Wigmore and his wife, Maud, the daughter and coheir of William de Briouze of Brecknock,[3] before 14 May 1260.[2]

    John and Isabel had children:

    Richard, only son and heir.[3]
    His father died before 10 November, 52 Henry III, when a writ was issued, resulting in Inquisitions held in Sussex and Salop in the same year, which found that John, aged 22 on his last birthday, was his heir, and the properties his father held included Oswestry, Westhope, Clawne, La Hethe, and Halchameston, and he held of the king in chief the two whole baronies of Cloun and Blaunkmoster and 1/4 of the earldom of Arundel.[1]

    After his father's death, his mother was married to Richard d'Amundeville.[3]

    John son of Alan died on the Friday before the Annunciation in 56 Henry III, (18 Mar 1272), Inquisitions were taken in Sussex and Salop that year and found his son Richard, aged 5 on the day of St Blaise, was his heir to extensive properties including Arundel castle with the honour, held for 1/4 of a barony.[4]

    He was buried at Haughmond Abbey, Shropshire, England.[2]

    Neither John nor his father were known as earls of Arundel in their lifetimes.[3]

    Sources

    ? 1.0 1.1 1.2 The Deputy Keeper of the Records, Calendar of Inquisitions Post Mortem and other Analogous Documents preserved in the Public Record Office, Vol I Henry III, (London: His Majesty's Principal Secretary of State for the Home Department, 1904), accessed 6 September 2014, https://archive.org/stream/calendarinquisi00offigoog#page/n275/mode/2up pp.216. Abstract No 684 John son of Alan - very damaged.
    ? 2.0 2.1 2.2 Medieval Lands: John Fitzalan
    ? 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 George Edward Cockayne, The Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland and Great Britain and the United Kingdom Extant Extinct or Dormant, Ed. Hon Vicary Gibbs, Vol I AB-ADAM to Basing, (London: The St Catherine Press LTD, 1910), accessed 6 September 2014, http://www.archive.org/stream/completepeerageo01coka#page/238/mode/2up pp.239-40.
    ? The Deputy Keeper of the Records, Calendar of Inquisitions Post Mortem and other Analogous Documents preserved in the Public Record Office, Vol I Henry III, (London: His Majesty's Principal Secretary of State for the Home Department, 1904), accessed 6 September 2014, https://archive.org/stream/calendarinquisi00offigoog#page/n337/mode/2up pp.278-9. Abstract No 812 John son of Alan.

    See also:

    Wikipedia: John FitzAlan, 7th Earl of Arundel

    end of biography

    Children

    Has No Children Joan FitzAlan b: ABT 1262 in Winchester, Hampshire, England
    Has Children Maud FitzAlan b: ABT 1264 in Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England
    Has Children Richard FitzAlan Baron of Arundel b: 3 FEB 1267 in Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England
    Has No Children John FitzAlan b: ABT 1271 in Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England
    Has No Children Amy FitzAlan b: ABT 1273 in Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England
    Has Children Eleanor FitzAlan b: ABT 1275 in Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England

    Marriage 2 Robert de Hastings b: 1247
    Married: 3rd husband 2 SEP 1285 in Poling, Sussex, England 4

    John married Isabella Mortimer 0___ 1260. Isabella (daughter of Roger Mortimer, Knight, 1st Baron Mortimer and Maud de Braose, Lady Mortimer) was born 0___ 1248, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England; died 0___ 1292. [Group Sheet]


  20. 117.  Isabella Mortimer was born 0___ 1248, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England (daughter of Roger Mortimer, Knight, 1st Baron Mortimer and Maud de Braose, Lady Mortimer); died 0___ 1292.

    Other Events:

    • Alt Death: 0___ 1274

    Children:
    1. 58. Richard FitzAlan, Knight, 8th Earl of Arundel was born 2 Mar 1266, Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England; died 9 Mar 1302, Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England; was buried Haughmond Abbey, Shropshire, England.

  21. 118.  Thomas of Saluzzo, Marquis of Saluzzo was born Saluzzo, Italy; died (Saluzzo, Italy).

    Thomas married Luigia de Ceva (Saluzzo, Italy). Luigia was born (Saluzzo, Italy). [Group Sheet]


  22. 119.  Luigia de Ceva was born (Saluzzo, Italy).
    Children:
    1. 59. Alice of Saluzzo, Countess of Arundel was born 0___ 1269, Saluzzo, Italy; died 25 Sep 1292, Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England; was buried Haughmond Abbey, Shropshire, England.

  23. 122.  Phillip III, King of France

    Phillip — Maria of Brabant, Queen of France. [Group Sheet]


  24. 123.  Maria of Brabant, Queen of France
    Children:
    1. 61. Margaret of France, Queen Consort of England was born ~ 1279, Paris, France; died 14 Feb 1318, Marlborough Castle, Marlborough, Wiltshire, England; was buried Christ Church Greyfriars, Newgate, London, England.


Generation: 8

  1. 160.  Robert de Ros, KnightRobert de Ros, Knight was born 1170-1172, (Yorkshire) England; died 0___ 1227; was buried Temple Church, London, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Sheriff of Cumbria
    • Also Known As: Baron of Helmsley
    • Also Known As: Lord of Hamlake

    Notes:

    Sir Robert de Ros, or de Roos of Helmsley, (ca. 1170/1172 – 1227[1]), was the grandfather and ancestor of the Barons Ros of Helmsley that was created by writ in 1264. In 1215, Ros joined the confederation of the barons at Stamford. He was one of the twenty-five barons to guarantee the observance of Magna Carta, sealed by King John on 15 Jun 1215.[1]

    Life

    He was the son of Everard de Ros, Baron of Helmsley and Rohese Trusbut, daughter of William Trusbut of Wartre. In 1191, aged fourteen, he paid a thousand marks fine for livery of his lands to King Richard I of England. In 1197, while serving King Richard in Normandy, he was arrested for an unspecified offence, and was committed to the custody of Hugh de Chaumont, but Chaumont entrusted his prisoner to William de Spiney, who allowed him to escape from the castle of Bonville, England. King Richard thereupon hanged Spiney and collected a fine of twelve hundred marks from Ros' guardian as the price of his continued freedom.[2]

    When King John came to the throne, he gave Ros the barony of his great-grandmother's father, Walter d'Espec. Soon afterwards he was deputed one of those to escort William the Lion, his father-in-law, into England, to swear fealty to King John. Some years later, Robert de Ros assumed the habit of a monk, whereupon the custody of all his lands and Castle Werke (Wark), in Northumberland, were committed to Philip d'Ulcote, but he soon returned and about a year later he was High Sheriff of Cumberland.[2]

    When the struggle of the barons for a constitutional government began, de Ros at first sided with King John, and thus obtained some valuable grants from the crown, and was made governor of Carlisle; but he subsequently went over to the barons and became one of the celebrated twenty-five "Sureties" appointed to enforce the observance of Magna Carta, the county of Northumberland being placed under his supervision. He gave his allegiance to King Henry III and, in 1217–18, his manors were restored to him. Although he was witness to the second Great Charter and the Forest Charter, of 1224, he seems to have remained in royal favour.[2]

    Marriage and issue

    In early 1191, in Haddington, East Lothian, Scotland, Ros married Isabella Mac William (Isibâeal nic Uilliam), widow of Robert III de Brus. Isabella was the illegitimate daughter of William the Lion, King of Scots by the daughter of Richard Avenel.[1][3]

    Issue with Isabella:

    Sir William de Ros (b. before 1200 – d. ca. 1264/1265), father of Robert de Ros, 1st Baron de Ros.[1] and Sir William de Roos of Helmsley, Yorkshire (whose daughter, Ivette de Roos, married Sir Geoffrey le Scrope, K.B. of Masham, Yorkshire.[4]
    Sir Robert de Ros[1] (ca. 1223 – 13 May 1285), was Chief Justice of the Kings Bench. He married Christian Bertram; from which Elizabeth Ros (d.1395), wife of Sir William Parr of Kendal (1350 – c.1404) descended. The two were ancestors of Queen consort Catherine Parr.
    Sir Alexander de Ros (d. ca. 1306), he fathered one child with an unknown wife, William.[1]
    Peter de Ros[1]
    He erected Helmsley or Hamlake Castle in Yorkshire, and of Wark Castle in Northumberland. Sir Robert is buried at the Temple Church under a magnificent tomb.[1]

    Controversy

    While "Fursan" is given as a location for Robert de Ros (sometimes also Roos) most use the term "furfan" to designate a title within the Templars essentially equivalent to grandmaster or head priest. This title also further refers to the resulting aura resembling a "fan" / "Furry fan". Some would also use the term "Kingmaker".[citation needed]

    References

    ^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h Douglas Richardson, Kimball G. Everingham. Magna Carta ancestry: a study in colonial and medieval families, Genealogical Publishing Company, 2005. pg 699. Google eBook
    ^ Jump up to: a b c "Ros, Robert de (d.1227)". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900.
    Jump up ^ Chronicle of Melrose
    Jump up ^ Douglas Richardson, , Kimball G. Everingham, (2011). Magna Carta ancestry : a study in colonial and medieval families, Volume II (2nd ed.). Salt Lake City, UT.: Douglas Richardson. p. 198. ISBN 9781449966386.

    Buried:
    View a gallery of pictures, history & source for Temple Church ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Temple_Church

    Robert married Isabella Mac William 0___ 1191, Haddington, East Lothian, Scotland. Isabella (daughter of William, I, King of the Scots and Isabel d'Avenel) was born ~ 1165, (Scotland). [Group Sheet]


  2. 161.  Isabella Mac William was born ~ 1165, (Scotland) (daughter of William, I, King of the Scots and Isabel d'Avenel).

    Notes:

    Isabella mac William (ca. 1165 - ) (Gaelic:Isibâeal nic Uilliam) was the illegitimate daughter of William the Lion King of Scots by a daughter of Robert Avenel. She married Robert III de Brus in 1183. They had no children. After his death in 1191, Isabella was married to Robert de Ros, Baron Ros of Wark, (died 1227). They had the following children:

    Sir William de Ros (b. before 1200 – d. ca. 1264/1265), father of Robert de Ros, 1st Baron de Ros.[1] and Sir William de Roos of Helmsley, Yorkshire (whose daughter, Ivette de Roos, married Sir Geoffrey le Scrope, K.B. of Masham, Yorkshire.[2]
    Sir Robert de Ros[2] (ca. 1223 – 13 May 1285), was Chief Justice of the Kings Bench. He married Christian Bertram; from which Elizabeth Ros (d.1395), wife of Sir William Parr of Kendal (1350 – ca. 1404) descended. The two were ancestors of Queen consort Catherine Parr.
    Sir Alexander de Ros (d. ca. 1306), who fathered one child, William, with an unknown wife.[2]
    Peter de Ros.[2]

    References

    Jump up ^ Douglas Richardson, Kimball G. Everingham. Magna Carta ancestry: a study in colonial and medieval families, Genealogical Publishing Company, 2005. pg 699. Google eBook
    ^ Jump up to: a b c d Douglas Richardson, , Kimball G. Everingham, (2011). Magna Carta ancestry : a study in colonial and medieval families, Volume II (2nd ed.). Salt Lake City, UT.: Douglas Richardson. p. 198. ISBN 9781449966386.

    Birth:
    Isabella was the illegitimate daughter of William the Lion, King of Scots by the daughter of Richard Avenel...

    Notes:

    Residence (Family):
    View image, ready history & source for Helmsley Castle ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helmsley_Castle

    Children:
    1. 80. William de Ros, Knight was born 0___ 1192, Helmsley, Yorkshire, England; died 1264-1265, England; was buried Kirkham Priory, Kirkham, North Yorkshire, England.

  3. 162.  Peter FitzHerbert, Lord of Brecknock was born 0___ 1163, Wales; died 1 Jun 1235, Reading, Berkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Baron of Barnstable in Devonshire
    • Also Known As: Piers FitzHerbert
    • Also Known As: Piers FitzHerbert, Lord of Brecknock

    Notes:

    About Piers FitzHerbert, Lord of Brecknock


    Peter Fitz-Herbert, Baron of Barnstable in Devonshire, the honor of which he obtained from King John with fifteen knight's fees, part of the lands of William de Braose, and he was made Governor of Pickering Castle in Yorkshire, and Sheriff of that county by the same monarch.


    This Peter was one of the barons named in Magna Carta and, by his signature, fourth in rank amongst the barons. He m. first, Alice, dau. of Robert Fitz Roger, a great baron in Northumberland, Lord of Warkworth and Clavering, and sister of John, to whom Edward I gave the surname of Clavering, Lord of Callaly in Northumberland. By this lady he had a son and heir, Reginald Fitz Peter.


    He m. secondly, Isabel, dau. and coheir of William de Braose, and widow of David Llewellin, Prince of Wales, and by the alliance acquired the lordships and castle of Blenlevenny and Talgarth in the county of Brecknock, with other possessions in Wales. He fortified his castle of Blenlevenny, and, dying in 1235, was s. by his son, ReginaldFitzPeter, Lord of Blenlevenny, [John Burke, History of the Commoners of Great Britain and Ireland, Vol. IV, R. Bentley,London, 1834, p. 728, Jones, of Llanarth]

    Piers FITZHERBERT (-1235) [Pedigree]

    Son of Herbert FITZHERBERT (-1204) and Lucy of Hereford (-1220)

    r. Blaen Llyfni, Wales
    d. 1 Jun 1235
    d. BEF 6 Jun 1235
    bur. Reading, Eng.
    Married first Alice de WARKWORTH (-1225)

    Children:

    1. Lucy FITZPIERS (-1266) m. Sir William de ROS (1193-1264)
    2. Herbert FITZPETER Sheriff of Hampshire (-1248)
    3. Sir Reginald (Rynold) FitzPiers (-1286) m(1) Alice (-1264)

    Married second Isabel de FERRERS (1166-1252)

    Married third Sibyl de DINHAM

    References:

    1. "Ancestral roots of certain American colonists who came to America before 1700",
    Frederick Lewis Weis, 1992, seventh edition. The earlier editions were called: "Ancestral roots of sixty colonists who came to New England 1623-1650"

    2. "The Complete Peerage", Cokayne.

    3. "Ancestors of Deacon Edward Converse".

    4. "Plantagenet Ancestry", Turton.

    5. "Burke's Peerage, 1938".

    6. "Presidents GEDCOM File", Otto-G. Richter, Brian Tompsett.

    7. "Ancestral Roots of Sixty Colonists Who Came to New England 1623-1650", Weis, Editions 1-6. The latest edition (7) of this book is titled: "Ancestral roots of certain American colonists who came to America before 1700" by Weis, 1992, 7th edition. Information which has been checked in the latest edition usually has the reference key "AR7", while information from earlier editions (1-6) will have the reference key "Weis1".

    8. "Some Early English Pedigrees", Vernon M. Norr. Piers FitzHerbert1 M, #368871

    Last Edited=13 Jun 2009

    Piers FitzHerbert gained the title of Lord of the Honour of Brecknock [England by writ].1

    Child of Piers FitzHerbert

    * Lucy FitzPiers+ 1

    Citations

    1. [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke's Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke's Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 1, page 1107. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    Piers was also called Lord of Blaen Llynfi county Brecknock; and also called Peter.

    A settlement for the marriage Piers FitzHerbert, Lord Blaen Llynfi, and Alice de Warkworth was made on 28 November 1203.

    Piers was "seen" in 1204.

    He was was present in support of King John at the signing of the Magna Carta on 15 June 1215 at Runnymede, between Windsor and Staines, in Surrey.

    Piers inherited, through his mother, a 1/3 interest in the barony of Miles Fitz Walter of Gloucester in 1219.

    He married Isabel de Ferrers, daughter of William I, 3rd Earl of Derby, and Goda de Tosny, before 1225.

    Piers died before 6 June 1235.

    See "My Lines"

    ( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/p391.htm#i7189 )

    from Compiler: R. B. Stewart, Evans, GA

    ( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/index.htm )

    view all 18

    Piers FitzHerbert, Lord of Brecknock's Timeline
    1163
    1163
    Birth of Piers
    Blewleveny Castle, Blaen Llyfni, Brecknockshire, Wales
    1183
    1183
    Age 20
    Birth of Joan de Verdun
    Blaen Llyfni, , Brecknockshire, Wales
    1206
    1206
    Age 43
    Birth of Reginald FitzPiers, Lord of Blaen Llyfni
    Blaen, Llyfni, Brecknock, Wales
    1206
    Age 43
    Birth of Beatrix Fitzpiers
    1207
    1207
    Age 44
    Birth of Herbert Fitzpiers, Sheriff Hampshire
    1210
    1210
    Age 47
    Birth of Lucy FitzPiers, Baroness de Ros
    Forest Dean, Gloucestershire, England, (Present UK)
    1235
    June 1, 1235
    Age 72
    Death of Piers at Reading, Berkshire, England
    Reading, Berkshire, England

    Birth:
    Blaenllyfni Castle (Welsh: Castell Blaenllynfi) is a privately-owned ruinous stone castle near the village of Bwlch in southern Powys, Wales. It was probably built in the early thirteenth century. It was captured several times during the rest of the century and apparently was never fully repaired afterwards and fell into ruins. It is a Scheduled Ancient Monument.

    Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blaenllynfi_Castle

    Peter married Alice FitzRoger 28 Nov 1203, (Warkworth, Northumberland, England). Alice (daughter of Robert FitzRoger, Knight, 2nd Baron of Warkworth and Margaret de Cheney) was born 1184-1185, (Warkworth, Northumberland, England); died 0___ 1225, (Reading, Berkshire, England). [Group Sheet]


  4. 163.  Alice FitzRoger was born 1184-1185, (Warkworth, Northumberland, England) (daughter of Robert FitzRoger, Knight, 2nd Baron of Warkworth and Margaret de Cheney); died 0___ 1225, (Reading, Berkshire, England).

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Alice De Warkworth FitzRoger

    Notes:

    My Lines
    Person Page - 397

    Alice de Warkworth1
    b. circa 1184, d. before 1255

    Father Robert fitz Roger, 2nd Baron of Warkworth1,2 b. circa 1161, d. 1214
    Mother Margaret de Cheney1 b. circa 1162, d. after 1214
    Also called Alice FitzRoger.3 Alice de Warkworth was born circa 1184.1 She was the daughter of Robert fitz Roger, 2nd Baron of Warkworth and Margaret de Cheney.1,2 A settlement for the marriage Alice de Warkworth and Piers FitzHerbert, Lord Blaen Llynfi was made on 28 November 1203; His 1st.4,5 Alice de Warkworth died before 1255.

    Family

    Piers FitzHerbert, Lord Blaen Llynfi b. circa 1172, d. before 6 June 1235

    Children

    Lucy fitz Piers+ b. c 1207, d. a 1266
    Reynold fitz Piers, Lord of Blaen Llynfi+ b. c 1210?, d. c 5 May 12863

    Citations

    [S206] With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr. and assisted by David Faris Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis: AR 7th ed., 246D-28.
    [S206] With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr. and assisted by David Faris Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis: AR 7th ed., Line 262.29.
    [S206] With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr. and assisted by David Faris Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis: AR 7th ed., Line 261.32.
    [S206] With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr. and assisted by David Faris Frederick Lewis Weis, Weis: AR 7th ed., Line 261.32, 262.29.
    [S1191] Esq. John Burke B:C of GB&I, IV:728.

    Children:
    1. 81. Lucy FitzPeter, Baroness de Ros was born 1207-1210, Forest Dean, Gloucestershire, England; died 0___ 1267, North Yorkshire, England; was buried Kirkham Priory, Kirkham, North Yorkshire, England.

  5. 164.  William d'Aubigny, Lord of Belvoir died 1 May 1236, Offington, Leicestershire, England; was buried Newstead Abbey, Nottingham, England.

    Notes:

    William d'Aubigny or D'Aubeney or d'Albini, Lord of Belvoir (died 1 May 1236) was a prominent member of the baronial rebellions against King John of England.

    Family background

    D'Aubigny was the son of William d'Aubigny of Belvoir and grandson of William d'Aubigny, and was heir to Domesday Book landholder Robert de Todeni, who held many properties, possibly as many as eighty. Amongst them was one in Leicestershire, where he built Belvoir Castle, which was the family's home for many generations.[1] He was High Sheriff of Warwickshire and Leicester and High Sheriff of Bedfordshire and Buckinghamshire in 1199.

    Involvement in military actions

    D'Aubigny stayed neutral at the beginning of the troubles of King John's reign, only joining the rebels after the early success in taking London in 1215. He was one of the twenty-five sureties or guarantors of the Magna Carta. In the war that followed the sealing of the charter, he held Rochester Castle for the barons, and was imprisoned (and nearly hanged) after John captured it. He became a loyalist on the accession of Henry III in October 1216, and was a commander at the Second Battle of Lincoln on 20 May 1217.[2]

    Death

    He died on 1 May 1236, at Offington, Leicestershire, and was buried at Newstead Abbey and "his heart under the wall, opposite the altar at Belvoir Castle".[1] He was succeeded by his son, another William d'Aubigny, who died in 1247 and left only daughters. One of them was Isabel, a co-heiress, who married Robert de Ros.

    William — unnamed spouse. [Group Sheet]


  6. 165.  unnamed spouse
    Children:
    1. 82. William d'Aubigny was born (Leicestershire, England); died 0___ 1247.

  7. 184.  Gilbert de Clare, Knight, 4th Earl of HertfordGilbert de Clare, Knight, 4th Earl of Hertford was born 0___ 1180, Hertford, Hertfordshire, England (son of Richard de Clare, Knight, 3rd Earl of Hertford and Amice FitzWilliam, 4th Countess of Gloucester); died 25 Oct 1230, Brittany, France; was buried Tewkesbury Abbey, Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England GL20 5RZ.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: 5th Earl of Gloucester

    Notes:

    Gilbert de Clare, 4th Earl of Hertford, 5th Earl of Gloucester (1180 - 25 October 1230) was the son of Richard de Clare, 3rd Earl of Hertford (c.?1153–1217), from whom he inherited the Clare estates. He also inherited from his mother, Amice Fitz William, the estates of Gloucester and the honour of St. Hilary, and from Rohese, an ancestor, the moiety of the Giffard estates. In June 1202, he was entrusted with the lands of Harfleur and Montrevillers.[1]

    In 1215 Gilbert and his father were two of the barons made Magna Carta sureties and championed Louis "le Dauphin" of France in the First Barons' War, fighting at Lincoln under the baronial banner. He was taken prisoner in 1217 by William Marshal, whose daughter Isabel he later married on 9 October, her 17th birthday.

    In 1223 he accompanied his brother-in-law, Earl Marshal, in an expedition into Wales. In 1225 he was present at the confirmation of the Magna Carta by Henry III. In 1228 he led an army against the Welsh, capturing Morgan Gam, who was released the next year. He then joined in an expedition to Brittany, but died on his way back to Penrose in that duchy. His body was conveyed home by way of Plymouth and Cranborne to Tewkesbury. His widow Isabel later married Richard Plantagenet, Earl of Cornwall & King of the Romans. His own arms were: Or, three chevronels gules.

    Issue

    Gilbert de Clare had six children by his wife Isabel, nâee Marshal:[2]

    Agnes de Clare (b. 1218)
    Amice de Clare (1220–1287), who married Baldwin de Redvers, 6th Earl of Devon
    Richard de Clare, 6th Earl of Gloucester (1222–1262)
    Isabel de Clare (1226–1264), who married Robert de Brus, 5th Lord of Annandale
    William de Clare (1228–1258)
    Gilbert de Clare (b. 1229)

    Gilbert married Isabel Marshal, Countess Marshall 9 Oct 1217, Tewkesbury Abbey, Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England GL20 5RZ. Isabel (daughter of William Marshal, Templar Knight, 1st Earl Pembroke and Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke) was born 9 Oct 1200, Pembroke Castle, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales; died 17 Jan 1240, Berkhamsted Castle, Berkhamsted, Hertforshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  8. 185.  Isabel Marshal, Countess Marshall was born 9 Oct 1200, Pembroke Castle, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales (daughter of William Marshal, Templar Knight, 1st Earl Pembroke and Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke); died 17 Jan 1240, Berkhamsted Castle, Berkhamsted, Hertforshire, England.

    Notes:

    Isabel Marshal (9 October 1200 - 17 January 1240) was a medieval English countess. She was the wife of both Gilbert de Clare, 4th Earl of Hertford and 5th Earl of Gloucester and Richard, 1st Earl of Cornwall (son of King John of England). With the former, she was a great grandparent of King Robert the Bruce of Scotland.

    Family

    Born at Pembroke Castle, Isabel was the seventh child, and second daughter, of William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke and Isabel de Clare. She had 10 siblings, who included the 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th and 6th Earls of Pembroke; each of her brothers dying without a legitimate male heir, thus passing the title on to the next brother in line. Her last brother to hold the title of Earl of Pembroke died without legitimate issue, and the title was passed down through the family of Isabel's younger sister Joan. Her sisters married, respectively, the Earls of Norfolk, Surrey, and Derby; the Lord of Abergavenny and the Lord of Swanscombe.

    First marriage

    On her 17th birthday, Isabel was married to Gilbert de Clare, 4th Earl of Hertford and 5th Earl of Gloucester, who was 20 years her senior, at Tewkesbury Abbey. The marriage was an extremely happy one, despite the age difference, and the couple had six children:

    Agnes de Clare (b. 1218)
    Amice de Clare (1220–1287), who married the 6th Earl of Devon
    Richard de Clare, 6th Earl of Hertford (1222–1262)
    Isabel de Clare (2 November 1226– 10 July 1264), who married the 5th Lord of Annandale; through this daughter, Isabel would be the great grandmother of Robert the Bruce
    William de Clare (1228–1258)
    Gilbert de Clare (b. 1229), a priest
    Isabel's husband Gilbert joined in an expedition to Brittany in 1229, but died 25 October 1230 on his way back to Penrose, in that duchy. His body was conveyed home by way of Plymouth and Cranborne, to Tewkesbury, where he was buried at the abbey.

    Second marriage

    Isabel was a young widow, only 30 years old. She had proven childbearing ability and the ability to bear healthy sons; as evidenced by her six young children, three of whom were sons. These were most likely the reasons for both the proposal of marriage from Richard, 1st Earl of Cornwall, and Isabel's acceptance of it, despite the fact that her husband had just died five months previously. The two were married on 30 March 1231 at Fawley Church, much to the displeasure of Richard's brother King Henry, who had been arranging a more advantageous match for Richard. Isabel and Richard got along well enough, though Richard had a reputation as a womanizer and is known to have had mistresses during the marriage. They were the parents of four children, three of whom died in the cradle.

    John of Cornwall (31 January 1232 – 22 September 1233), born and died at Marlow, Buckinghamshire, buried at Reading Abbey
    Isabella of Cornwall (9 September 1233 – 10 October 1234), born and died at Marlow, Buckinghamshire, buried at Reading Abbey
    Henry of Almain (2 November 1235 – 13 March 1271), murdered by his cousins Guy and Simon de Montfort, buried at Hailes Abbey.
    Nicholas of Cornwall (b. & d. 17 January 1240 Berkhamsted Castle), died shortly after birth, buried at Beaulieu Abbey with his mother
    Death and burial[edit]
    Isabel died of liver failure, contracted while in childbirth, on 17 January 1240, at Berkhamsted Castle. She was 39 years old.

    When Isabel was dying she asked to be buried next to her first husband at Tewkesbury Abbey, but Richard had her interred at Beaulieu Abbey, with her infant son, instead. As a pious gesture, however, he sent her heart, in a silver-gilt casket,[1] to Tewkesbury.

    Birth:
    Pembroke Castle (Welsh: Castell Penfro) is a medieval castle in Pembroke, West Wales. Standing beside the River Cleddau, it underwent major restoration work in the early 20th century. The castle was the original seat of the Earldom of Pembroke.

    In 1093 Roger of Montgomery built the first castle at the site when he fortified the promontory during the Norman invasion of Wales. A century later this castle was given to William Marshal by Richard I. Marshall, who would become one of the most powerful men in 12th-Century Britain, rebuilt Pembroke in stone creating most of the structure that remains today.

    Photos, history & source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pembroke_Castle

    Died:
    Berkhamsted Castle is a Norman motte-and-bailey castle in Berkhamsted, Hertfordshire. The castle was built to obtain control of a key route between London and the Midlands during the Norman conquest of England in the 11th century. Robert of Mortain, William the Conqueror's half brother, was probably responsible for managing its construction, after which he became the castle's owner. The castle was surrounded by protective earthworks and a deer park for hunting. The castle became a new administrative centre, and the former Anglo-Saxon settlement of Berkhamsted reorganised around it. Subsequent kings granted the castle to their chancellors. The castle was substantially expanded in the mid-12th century, probably by Thomas Becket.

    Photos, map, history & source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berkhamsted_Castle

    Children:
    1. 92. Richard de Clare, Knight, 6th Earl of Gloucester was born 4 Aug 1222, Clare Castle, Clare, Suffolk, England; died 14 Jul 1262, Waltham, Canterbury, England.
    2. Isabel de Clare was born 2 Nov 1226, Hertford, Hertfordshire, England; died 10 Jul 1264.

  9. 186.  John de Lacy, Knight, 2nd Earl of Lincoln was born ~ 1192 (son of Roger de Lacy, 6th Baron of Pontefrac and Maud de Clare); died 22 Jul 1240; was buried Cistercian Abbey of Stanlaw, in County Chester, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Constable of Cheshire
    • Also Known As: 5th Lord of Bowland
    • Also Known As: 7th Baron of Halton Castle
    • Also Known As: Baron of Pontefract

    Notes:

    He was the eldest son and heir of Roger de Lacy and his wife, Maud or Matilda de Clere (not of the de Clare family).[1]

    Public life

    He was hereditary constable of Chester and, in the 15th year of King John, undertook the payment of 7,000 marks to the crown, in the space of four years, for livery of the lands of his inheritance, and to be discharged of all his father's debts due to the exchequer, further obligating himself by oath, that in case he should ever swerve from his allegiance, and adhere to the king's enemies, all of his possessions should devolve upon the crown, promising also, that he would not marry without the king's licence. By this agreement it was arranged that the king should retain the castles of Pontefract and Dunnington, still in his own hands; and that he, the said John, should allow 40 pounds per year, for the custody of those fortresses. But the next year he had Dunnington restored to him, upon hostages.

    John de Lacy, 7th Baron of Halton Castle, 5th Lord of Bowland and hereditary constable of Chester, was one of the earliest who took up arms at the time of the Magna Charta, and was appointed to see that the new statutes were properly carried into effect and observed in the counties of York and Nottingham. He was one of twenty-five barons charged with overseeing the observance of Magna Carta in 1215.[2]

    He was excommunicated by the Pope. Upon the accession of King Henry III, he joined a party of noblemen and made a pilgrimage to the Holy Land, and did good service at the siege of Damietta. In 1232 he was made Earl of Lincoln and in 1240, governor of Chester and Beeston Castles. In 1237, his lordship was one of those appointed to prohibit Oto, the pope's prelate, from establishing anything derogatory to the king's crown and dignity, in the council of prelates then assembled; and the same year he was appointed High Sheriff of Cheshire, being likewise constituted Governor of the castle of Chester.

    Private life

    He married firstly Alice in 1214 in Pontefract, daughter of Gilbert de Aquila, who gave him one daughter Joan.[3] Alice died in 1216 in Pontefract and, after his marked gallantry at the siege of Damietta.

    He married secondly in 1221 Margaret de Quincy, only daughter and heiress of Robert de Quincy, son of Saer de Quincy, 1st Earl of Winchester, by Hawyse, 4th sister and co-heir of Ranulph de Mechines, Earl of Chester and Lincoln, which Ranulph, by a formal charter under his seal, granted the Earldom of Lincoln, that is, so much as he could grant thereof, to the said Hawyse, "to the end that she might be countess, and that her heirs might also enjoy the earldom;" which grant was confirmed by the king, and at the especial request of the countess, this John de Lacy, constable of Chester, through his marriage was allowed to succeed de Blondeville and was created by charter, dated Northampton, 23 November 1232, Earl of Lincoln, with remainder to the heirs of his body, by his wife, the above-mentioned Margaret.[1] In the contest which occurred during the same year, between the king and Richard Marshal, 3rd Earl of Pembroke, Earl Marshal, Matthew Paris states that the Earl of Lincoln was brought over to the king's party, with John of Scotland, 7th Earl of Chester, by Peter de Rupibus, Bishop of Winchester, for a bribe of 1,000 marks.
    By this marriage he had one son, Edmund de Lacy, Baron of Pontefract, and two daughters, of one, Maud, married Richard de Clare, 6th Earl of Gloucester.[4]

    Later life

    He died on 22 July 1240 and was buried at the Cisterian Abbey of Stanlaw, in County Chester. The monk Matthew Paris, records: "On the 22nd day of July, in the year 1240, which was St. Magdalen's Day, John, Earl of Lincoln, after suffering from a long illness went the way of all flesh". Margaret, his wife, survived him and remarried Walter Marshal, 5th Earl of Pembroke.

    John married Margaret de Quincy, 2nd Countess of Lincoln Bef 21 June 1221. Margaret (daughter of Robert de Quincy and Hawise of Chester, 1st Countess of Chester) was born ~ 1206, England; died 0Mar 1266, Hampstead, England; was buried Church of The Hospitallers, Clerkenwell, England. [Group Sheet]


  10. 187.  Margaret de Quincy, 2nd Countess of Lincoln was born ~ 1206, England (daughter of Robert de Quincy and Hawise of Chester, 1st Countess of Chester); died 0Mar 1266, Hampstead, England; was buried Church of The Hospitallers, Clerkenwell, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Countess of Pembroke

    Notes:

    Margaret de Quincy, 2nd Countess of Lincoln suo jure (c. 1206 – March 1266) was a wealthy English noblewoman and heiress having inherited in her own right the Earldom of Lincoln and honours of Bolingbroke from her mother Hawise of Chester, received a dower from the estates of her first husband, and acquired a dower third from the extensive earldom of Pembroke following the death of her second husband, Walter Marshal, 5th Earl of Pembroke. Her first husband was John de Lacy, 2nd Earl of Lincoln, by whom she had two children. He was created 2nd Earl of Lincoln by right of his marriage to Margaret. Margaret has been described as "one of the two towering female figures of the mid-13th century".[1]

    Family

    Margaret was born in about 1206, the daughter and only child of Robert de Quincy and Hawise of Chester, herself the co-heiress of her uncle Ranulf de Blondeville, 6th Earl of Chester. Hawise became suo jure Countess of Chester in April 1231 when her brother resigned the title in her favour.

    Her paternal grandfather, Saer de Quincy, 1st Earl of Winchester was one of the 25 sureties of the Magna Carta; as a result he was excommunicated by the Church in December 1215. Two years later her father died after having been accidentally poisoned through medicine prepared by a Cistercian monk.[2]

    Life

    On 23 November 1232, Margaret and her husband John de Lacy, Baron of Pontefract were formally invested by King Henry III as Countess and Earl of Lincoln. In April 1231 her maternal uncle Ranulf de Blondeville, 1st Earl of Lincoln had made an inter vivos gift, after receiving dispensation from the crown, of the Earldom of Lincoln to her mother Hawise. Her uncle granted her mother the title by a formal charter under his seal which was confirmed by King Henry III. Her mother was formally invested as suo jure 1st Countess of Lincoln on 27 October 1232 the day after her uncle's death. Likewise her mother Hawise of Chester received permission from King Henry III to grant the Earldom of Lincoln jointly to Margaret and her husband John, and less than a month later a second formal investiture took place, but this time for Margaret and her husband John de Lacy. Margaret became 2nd Countess of Lincoln suo jure (in her own right) and John de Lacy became 2nd Earl of Lincoln by right of his wife. (John de Lacy is mistakenly called the 1st Earl of Lincoln in many references.)

    In 1238, Margaret and her husband paid King Henry the large sum of 5,000 pounds to obtain his agreement to the marriage of their daughter Maud to Richard de Clare, 6th Earl of Hertford, 2nd Earl of Gloucester.

    On 22 July 1240 her first husband John de Lacy died. Although he was nominally succeeded by their only son Edmund de Lacy (c.1227-1258) for titles and lands that included Baron of Pontefract, Baron of Halton, and Constable of Chester, Margaret at first controlled the estates in lieu of her son who was still in his minority and being brought up at the court of Henry III and Eleanor of Provence. Edmund was allowed to succeed to his titles and estates at the age of 18. Edmund was also Margaret's heir to the Earldom of Lincoln and also her other extensive estates that included the third of the Earldom of Pembroke that she had inherited from her second husband in 1248. Edmund was never able to become Earl of Lincoln, however, as he predeceased his mother by eight years.

    As the widowed Countess of Lincoln suo jure, Margaret was brought into contact with some of the most important people in the county of Lincolnshire. Among these included Robert Grosseteste, Bishop of Lincoln, the most significant intellectual in England at the time who recognised Margaret's position as Countess of Lincoln to be legitimate and important, and he viewed Margaret as both patron and peer. He dedicated Les Reules Seynt Robert, his treatise on estate and household management, to her.[3]

    Marriages and issue

    Sometime before 21 June 1221, Margaret married as his second wife, her first husband John de Lacy of Pontefract. The purpose of the alliance was to bring the rich Lincoln and Bolingbroke inheritance of her mother to the de Lacy family.[4] John's first marriage to Alice de l'Aigle had not produced issue; although John and Margaret together had two children:

    Maud de Lacy (25 January 1223- 1287/10 March 1289), married in 1238 Richard de Clare, 6th Earl of Hertford, 2nd Earl of Gloucester, by whom she had seven children.
    Edmund de Lacy, Baron of Pontefract (died 2 June 1258), married in 1247 Alasia of Saluzzo, daughter of Manfredo III of Saluzzo, by whom he had three children, including Henry de Lacy, 3rd Earl of Lincoln.
    She married secondly on 6 January 1242, Walter Marshal, 5th Earl of Pembroke, Lord of Striguil, Lord of Leinster, Earl Marshal of England, one of the ten children of William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke and Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke. This marriage, like those of his four brothers, did not produce any children; therefore when he died at Goodrich Castle on 24 November 1245, Margaret inherited a third of the Earldom of Pembroke as well as the properties and lordship of Kildare. Her dower third outweighed any of the individual holdings of the 13 different co-heirs of the five Marshal sisters which meant she would end up controlling more of the earldom of Pembroke and lordship of Leinster than any of the other co-heirs; this brought her into direct conflict with her own daughter, Maud, whose husband was by virtue of his mother Isabel Marshal one of the co-heirs of the Pembroke earldom.[5] As a result of her quarrels with her daughter, Margaret preferred her grandson Henry de Lacy who would become the 3rd Earl of Lincoln on reaching majority (21) in 1272. She and her Italian daughter-in-law Alasia of Saluzzo shared in the wardship of Henry who was Margaret's heir, and the relationship between the two women appeared to have been cordial.[6]

    Death and legacy

    Margaret was a careful overseer of her property and tenants, and gracious in her dealings with her son's children, neighbours and tenants.[7] She received two papal dispensations in 1251, the first to erect a portable altar; the other so that she could hear mass in the Cistercian monastery.[8] Margaret died in March 1266[9][10] at Hampstead. Her death was recorded in the Annals of Worcester and in the Annals of Winchester.[9] She was buried in the Church of the Hospitallers in Clerkenwell.[9]

    Margaret was described as "one of the two towering female figures of the mid-13th century"; the other being Ela, Countess of Salisbury.[11]

    Peerage of England
    Preceded by
    Hawise of Chester
    Countess of Lincoln suo jure from 1232-1240 together with her spouse
    John de Lacy, 2nd Earl of Lincoln
    jure uxoris
    Countess of Lincoln suo jure
    1232–c.1266 Succeeded by
    Henry de Lacy
    3rd Earl of Lincoln

    Notes

    Jump up ^ Mitchell p.42
    Jump up ^ Cawley, Charles, Earls of Chester, Medieval Lands database, Foundation for Medieval Genealogy,[better source needed]
    Jump up ^ Mitchell, p.32
    Jump up ^ Carpenter, p.421
    Jump up ^ Mitchell, p.33
    Jump up ^ Mitchell, p.34-35
    Jump up ^ Mitchell, p.39
    Jump up ^ Mitchell, p.40
    ^ Jump up to: a b c Cawley, Charles, Earls of Lincoln, Medieval Lands database, Foundation for Medieval Genealogy,[better source needed]
    Jump up ^ Wilkinson, p. 65, at Google Books
    Jump up ^ Mitchell, p.42

    References

    Carpenter (2003), David A., The Struggle For Mastery: Britain 1066-1284, OUP Google Books accessed 28 September 2009
    Cawley. C, Earls of Chester and Earls of Lincoln Foundation for Medieval Genealogy
    Mitchell (2003), Linda Elizabeth, Portraits of Medieval Women: Family, Marriage, and Politics in England 1225-1350, Palgrave Macmillan Google Books accessed 28 September 2009.
    Wilkinson, Louise J. (2007): Women in Thirteenth-Century Lincolnshire. Boydell Press, Woodbridge. ISBN 978-0-86193-285-6 (Women in Thirteenth-Century Lincolnshire at Google Books)

    Notes:

    Married:
    The purpose of the alliance was to bring the rich Lincoln and Bolingbroke inheritance of her mother to the de Lacy family.[4] John's first marriage to Alice de l'Aigle had not produced issue; although John and Margaret together had two children:

    Children:
    1. 93. Maud de Lacy was born 25 Jan 1223; died 1287-1289.

  11. 188.  Maurice FitzGerald, 2nd Lord of Offaly was born 0___ 1194, Ireland (son of Gerald FitzMaurice, 1st Lord of Offaly and Eve de Bermingham); died 20 May 1257, Youghal Monastery, Ireland.

    Notes:

    Maurice FitzGerald I, 2nd Lord of Offaly (1194 – 20 May 1257) was a Norman-Irish peer, soldier, and Justiciar of Ireland from 1232 to 1245. He mustered many armies against the Irish, and due to his harsh methods as Justiciar, he received criticism from King Henry III of England. He was succeeded as Lord of Offaly by his son, Maurice FitzGerald, 3rd Lord of Offaly.

    Career

    He was born in Ireland in 1194, the son of Gerald FitzMaurice, 1st Lord of Offaly and Eve de Bermingham (died between June 1223/December 1226). He succeeded to the title of Lord of Offaly on 15 January 1204, and was invested as a knight in July 1217, at the age of 23. In 1224 he founded South Abbey, Youghal, the proto-friary of the Irish Province of the Observant Franciscans,[1] dedicated to St. Nicholas. Maurice was summoned to London to accompany King Henry III of England to Poitou and Gascony in October 1229. He was appointed Justiciar of Ireland in September 1232 and held the post until 1245. His reputation was marred by rumours that he had contrived the death of Richard Marshal, 3rd Earl of Pembroke in 1234.[2] FitzGerald met Marshal at the Battle of the Curragh on 1 April, where Marshal was wounded and died shortly after. It was rumoured that Marshal had been betrayed.[3] In February 1235, the King criticised him for his proceedings in office, and described him as "little pleasant, nay, beyond measure harsh in executing the King's mandates".[2] The same year, he took part in the subjugation of Connacht. In the years 1241 and 1242, and later in 1246, 1247, and 1248 he mustered armies against the Irish.

    In 1247, Maurice invaded Tâir Chonaill, and fought the combined forces of Cineâal Chonaill and Cineâal Eoghain at the Battle of Ballyshannon. According to various Irish annals, three eminent lords fell in battle against him: Maol Seachlainn Ó Domhnaill, King of Tâir Chonaill, An Giolla Muinealach Ó Baoighill, and Mac Somhairle, King of Argyll (a man seemingly identical to Ruaidhrâi mac Raghnaill).[4]

    In 1245, Maurice was dismissed from his post as Justiciar as a result of tardiness in sending the King assistance in the latter's military campaigns in Wales. His successor was John FitzGeoffrey. That same year he laid the foundations for Sligo Castle. In 1250, he held both the office of Member of the Council of Ireland, and Commissioner of the Treasury. He also founded the Franciscan Friary at Youghal and the Dominican Friary at Sligo; hence his nickname of an Brathair, which is Irish for The Friar.[5] He was at the English royal court in January 1252, and received an urgent summons from King Henry in January 1254.

    Marriage and issue

    He married Juliana de Cogan, daughter of Sir William de Cogan and by her, they had four sons:

    Gerald FitzMaurice FitzGerald (died 1243), married a woman whose name is not recorded by whom he had a son, Maurice (died July 1268), and a daughter, Juliana (died after 1309), wife of Sir John de Cogan, by whom she had issue.
    Maurice FitzGerald, 3rd Lord of Offaly (1238- before 10 November 1286), married firstly, Maud de Prendergast, by whom he had two daughters; he married secondly, Emmeline Longespee.
    David FitzMaurice FitzGerald, died childless
    Thomas FitzMaurice FitzGerald (died 1271 Lough Mask), married Rohesia de St. Michael, by whom he had issue including John FitzGerald, 1st Earl of Kildare, 4th Lord of Offaly
    Death[edit]
    In 1257, Maurice and his Norman army engaged the forces led by Gofraidh Ó Domhnaill, King of Tâir Chonaill at the Battle of Credan, in the north of what is now County Sligo. The two men fought each other in single combat and both were gravely wounded. Maurice died of his injuries at Youghal Monastery, wearing the habit of the Franciscans, on 20 May 1257, aged 63 years. In the Annals of the Four Masters, 1257 his death is described thus: "Maurice FitzGerald for some time Lord Justice of Ireland and the destroyer of the Irish, died." (In Irish this reads as: "Muiris macGerailt lustis Ereann re h-edh diosccaoilteach Gaoidheal d'âecc".)

    He was succeeded as Lord of Offaly by his son, Maurice FitzGerald, 3rd Lord of Offaly, rather than the rightful successor, his grandson, Maurice, son of his eldest son, Gerald.

    *

    Maurice — Juliana de Cogan. Juliana (daughter of William de Cogan and unnamed spouse) was born (Ireland). [Group Sheet]


  12. 189.  Juliana de Cogan was born (Ireland) (daughter of William de Cogan and unnamed spouse).
    Children:
    1. 94. Maurice FitzGerald, II, 3rd Lord Offally was born 0___ 1238, Wexford, Ireland; died Bef 10 Nov 1286, Ross, County Wexford, Ireland.

  13. 190.  Stephen Longespee was born ~ 1216, (Salisbury, Wiltshire) England (son of William (Plantagenet) Longespee, 3rd Earl of Salisbury and Ela FitzPatrick, 3rd Countess of Salisbury); died ~ 1260.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Justiciar of Ireland

    Notes:

    Occupation:
    Lord Chief Justice of Ireland
    The Court of King's Bench (or Court of Queen's Bench during the reign of a Queen) was one of the senior courts of common law in Ireland. It was a mirror of the Court of King's Bench in England. The Lord Chief Justice was the most senior judge in the court, and the second most senior Irish judge under English rule and later when Ireland became part of the United Kingdom. Additionally, for a brief period between 1922 and 1924, the Lord Chief Justice of Ireland was the most senior judge in the Irish Free State .

    Stephen — Emmeline de Riddelford. [Group Sheet]


  14. 191.  Emmeline de Riddelford (daughter of Walter de Riddlesford and Annabilis FitzHenry).

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Emmeline de Ridelsford

    Children:
    1. Ela Longespee was born 0___ 1244, Salisbury, Wiltshire, England; died 19 Jul 1276, (Northamptonshire) England.
    2. 95. Emmeline Longespee was born 0___ 1252; died 0___ 1291.

  15. 192.  William de Mowbray, Knight, 6th Baron of Thirsk was born 1172-1173, Thirsk Castle, Thirsk, Yorkshire, England (son of Nigel de Mowbray and Mabel de Braose); died 1223-1224, Epworth, Lincolnshire, England; was buried Furness Abbey, Cumbria, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: 4th Baron Mowbray

    Notes:

    William de Mowbray, 6th Baron of Thirsk, 4th Baron Mowbray (c.?1173–c.?1222) was an Norman Lord and English noble who was one of the twenty five executors of the Magna Carta. He was described as being as small as a dwarf but very generous and valiant.[1]

    Family and early life

    William was the eldest of the one daughter and three or four sons of Nigel de Mowbray, by Mabel, thought to be daughter of William de Patri, and grandson of Roger de Mowbray.[2]

    Career under Richard I

    William appears to have been in the company of Richard I in Speyer, Germany, on 20 November 1193 during Richard's period of captivity on his return from Palestine.[3] In 1194 he had livery of his lands. paying a relief of ą100. He was immediately called upon to pay a sum nearly as large as his share of the scutage levied towards Richard's ransom, for the payment of which he was one of the hostages.[4] William was later a witness to Richard's treaty with Baldwin of Flanders in 1197.[3]

    Career under John

    In 1215 Mowbray was prominent with other north-country barons in opposing King John. He was appointed one of the twenty-five executors of the Magna Carta, and as such was specially named among those excommunicated by Pope Innocent III. His youngest brother, Roger, has sometimes been reckoned as one of the twenty-five, apparently by confusion with, or as a substitute for, Roger de Mumbezon. Roger died without heirs about 1218, and William received his lands.[4][5]

    Career under Henry III

    In the First Barons' War, Mowbray supported Louis. Mowbray was taken prisoner in the Battle of Lincoln (1217), and his estates bestowed upon William Marshal the younger; but he redeemed them by the surrender of the lordship of Bensted in Surrey to Hubert de Burgh, before the general restoration in September of that year.[4]

    In January 1221, Mowbray assisted Hubert in driving his former co-executor, William of Aumăale, from his last stronghold at Bytham in Lincolnshire.[4]

    Benefactor, marriage and succession

    William de Mowbray founded the chapel of St. Nicholas, with a chantry, at Thirsk, and was a benefactor of his grandfather's foundations at Furness Abbey and Newburgh, where, on his death in Axholme about 1224, he was buried.[4][3]

    He married Avice, a daughter of William d'Aubigny, 3rd Earl of Arundel, of the elder branch of the d'Aubignys. By her he had two sons, Nigel and Roger. The ‘Progenies Moubraiorum’ makes Nigel predecease his father, and Nicolas and Courthope accept this date; but Dugdale adduces documentary evidence showing that he had livery of his lands in 1223, and did not die (at Nantes) until 1228. As Nigel left no issue by his wife Mathilda or Maud, daughter of Roger de Camvile, he was succeeded as sixth baron by his brother Roger II, who only came of age in 1240, and died in 1266. This Roger's son, Roger III, was seventh baron (1266-1298) and father of John I de Mowbray, eighth baron.[4]

    There has been some speculation that de Mowbray was the inspiration for the character of Tyrion Lannister in Game of Thrones.[citation needed]

    References

    Jump up ^ Michel, Francique, ed. (1840). Histoire des Ducs de Normandie et des Rois d'Angleterre (in French). Paris. p. 145. Guillaumes de Moubray, qui estoit autresi petis comme uns nains; mais moult estoit larges et vaillans.
    Jump up ^ Tait, James; Thomas, Hugh M. "William de Mowbray". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/19461. (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
    ^ Jump up to: a b c Richardson, Douglas. Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families (2 ed.). p. 198. ISBN 978-0806317595.
    ^ Jump up to: a b c d e f Tait 1894.
    Jump up ^ Browning, Charles H. (1898). The Magna Charta Barons and Their American Descendants. p. 114. ISBN 0806300558. LCCN 73077634. reprinted 1969

    Attribution

    This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Tait, James (1894). "Mowbray, William de". In Lee, Sidney. Dictionary of National Biography. 39. London: Smith, Elder & Co.

    View The House of Mowbray ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_of_Mowbray

    end

    Birth:
    View map, photo & history of Thirsk ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thirsk

    Thirsk Castle's description ... http://www.gatehouse-gazetteer.info/English%20sites/2180.html

    Buried:
    Photos, History, Map & Source of Furness Abbey: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Furness_Abbey

    Died:
    Isle of Axholme

    William — Avice d'Aubigny. Avice (daughter of William d'Aubigny, Knight, 3rd Earl of Arundel and Mabel of Chester) was born 0___ 1196; died 0___ 1214. [Group Sheet]


  16. 193.  Avice d'Aubigny was born 0___ 1196 (daughter of William d'Aubigny, Knight, 3rd Earl of Arundel and Mabel of Chester); died 0___ 1214.
    Children:
    1. Nigel de Mowbray
    2. 96. Roger de Mowbray, II, 6th Baron of Mowbray was born 0___ 1218, Thirsk, Yorkshire, England; died 18 Oct 1263, Pontefract Castle, Wakefield, Yorkshire, England.

  17. 194.  William de Beauchamp, Knight, Baron of Bedford was born ~ 1185, Essex, England; died 0___ 1260, Bedford, Bedfordshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: "Walcheline (Walter) De /Beauchamp/"

    Notes:

    About William de Beauchamp, Lord of Bedford

    William de Beauchamp (1185) From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia William de Beauchamp (c.1185–1260) was a British judge and High Sheriff. He took part in the 1210 expedition to Ireland and the 1214 expedition to Poitiers before joining the rebellious barons in 1215 at the beginning of the First Barons' War, entertaining them at his seat of Bedford Castle; as such Beauchamp was one of the rebels excommunicated by Pope Innocent III. He was captured at the Battle of Lincoln on 20 May 1217 but made his peace with the government; by this point he had already lost Bedford Castle to Falkes de Breautâe in 1215, leading to an odd situation; Breautâe was granted the castle, while Beauchamp held the barony. When Breatâe fell from power Bedford Castle was sieged and partially destroyed on royal orders, but Beauchamp was granted licence to build a residence within its Bailey. He was part of a royal expedition ambushed by Richard Marshal in 1233, and was appointed a Baron of the Exchequer in 1234 and 1237. Between 1234 and 1237 he also served as High Sheriff of Buckinghamshire and Bedfordshire, and when Eleanor of Provence was crowned queen in 1236 he served as an Almoner. He died in 1260, leaving a son, also called William. [1]

    Sir William de Beauchamp, Lord of Bedford, b abt 1189, Essex, England, d 1260. He md Ida Longespee abt 1232, daughter of Sir William I Longespee and Ela Fitz Patrick of Salisbury.

    Children of William de Beauchamp and Ida Longespee were: Maud de Beauchamp b abt 1234, d bef Apr 1273. She md Roger de Mowbray abt 1247, son of William de Mowbray and Avice. Ela de Beauchamp b abt 1240, Essex, England, d 1266. She md Baldwin Wake abt 1254, son of Hugh Wake and Joan de Stuteville. Beatrice de Beauchamp b abt 1245, prob Bedford, Bedfordshire, England, d 1280-1281. She md Sir Thomas Fitz Otho bef 1264. Their daughter, Maud/Matilda Fitz Thomas md Sir John de Botetourte abt 1284.

    William married Ida Longespee ~ 1232. Ida (daughter of William (Plantagenet) Longespee, 3rd Earl of Salisbury and Ela FitzPatrick, 3rd Countess of Salisbury) was born 1205-1210, Salisbury, Wiltshire, England; died 0___ 1269, England. [Group Sheet]


  18. 195.  Ida Longespee was born 1205-1210, Salisbury, Wiltshire, England (daughter of William (Plantagenet) Longespee, 3rd Earl of Salisbury and Ela FitzPatrick, 3rd Countess of Salisbury); died 0___ 1269, England.

    Notes:

    About Ida de Longespâee of Salisbury

    Ida de Longespee daughter of William de Longespee and Ela de Salisbury married Ralph de Somery and William de Beauchamp. NOT to be confused with Ida de Longespee who married Walter FitzRobert de Clare of Dunmow.

    Marriage to Ralph de Somery was arranged in her childhood and may never have been consummated.

    Children:
    1. 97. Maud de Beauchamp was born ~ 1234; died Bef April 1273.

  19. 200.  John de Braose was born 1197-1198, (Bramber, Sussex, England) (son of William de Braose, III, Knight, 4th Lord of Bramber and Maud de St. Valery, Lady of the Haie); died 18 Jul 1232, Bramber, Sussex, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Lord of Bramber and Gower

    Notes:

    John de Braose (born 1197 or 1198 – 18 July 1232), known as Tadody to the Welsh, was the Lord of Bramber and Gower.

    Re-establishment of the de Braose dynasty

    John re-established the senior branch of the de Braose dynasty.

    His father was William de Braose, eldest son of William de Braose, 4th Lord of Bramber and Maud de St. Valery, and his mother was Maud de Clare, (born ca. 1184) daughter of Richard de Clare, 3rd Earl of Hertford of Tonbridge Castle in Kent. John was their eldest son and one of four brothers, the others being Giles, Phillip and Walter de Braose.

    Royal threat

    His grandfather had had his lands seized and his grandmother Maud de St. Valery had been captured by forces of King John of England in 1210. She was imprisoned, along with John's father William, in Corfe Castle and walled alive inside the dungeon. Both mother and son starved to death on the King's orders. This was probably due to John's grandfather's conflict with the monarch, open rebellion and subsequent alliance with Llewelyn the Great. John's nickname Tadody means "fatherless" in the Welsh.

    Hiding and imprisonment

    At his family's fall from Royal favour John de Braose was initially hidden on Gower and spent some time in the care of his uncle Giles de Braose, Bishop of Hereford, but finally in 1214 John and his younger brother Philip were taken into custody. They were imprisoned until after King John had died (in 1216), the throne passing to Henry III. John was released from custody in 1218.

    Welsh intermarriage

    photograph taken in 1999
    Swansea castle, the centre of power for the honour of Gower
    In 1219 he married Margaret Ferch Llywelyn, (born about 1202 in the Kingdom of Gwynedd), daughter of the leader of Wales Llywelyn Fawr and his English wife Joan Plantagenet also known as Joan, Lady of Wales, and he received the Lordship of Gower as her dowry with Llywelyn's blessing.

    In 1226 another surviving uncle Reginald de Braose sold him the honour of Bramber, and he inherited more lands and titles when this uncle died a few years later in 1228. Sometime in the 1220s, he established the deer park, Parc le Breos in the Gower Peninsula.

    He and Margaret, his Welsh wife, had three sons, his heir, William de Braose the eldest son, John and Richard (born about 1225 in Stinton, Norfolk) the youngest, (buried in Woodbridge Priory, Suffolk) having died before June 1292.

    Death and legacy

    In 1232 John was killed in a fall from his horse on his land in Bramber, Sussex at 34 years of age. His widow soon remarried to Walter III de Clifford. William de Braose (born about 1224; died 1291 in Findon, Sussex), his eldest son, succeeded him in the title of Lord of Bramber. John the younger son became Lord of the manor of Corsham in Wiltshire and also later Lord of Glasbury on Wye.

    William de Braose (c.1224–1291) also had a son named William de Braose who died "shortly before 1st May 1326".[1]

    Another William de Braose who became Bishop of Llandaff cannot be placed with certainty in this branch of the family.

    The de Braose name modified to de Brewes in the Middle Ages 1200 to 1400.

    See also

    House of Braose

    Notes

    Jump up ^ Richardson & Everingham, Magna Carta Ancestry, p137.
    References[edit]
    Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, By Douglas Richardson & Kimball G. Everingham, Published 2005, Genealogical Publishing Com
    Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis, Lines: 29A-28, 246-30.

    end of biography

    John married Marared ferch Llywelyn 0___ 1219. Marared (daughter of Llywelyn The Great and Joan Plantagenet, Lady of Wales) was born 0___ 1202, Gwynedd, Wales; died Aft 1268. [Group Sheet]


  20. 201.  Marared ferch Llywelyn was born 0___ 1202, Gwynedd, Wales (daughter of Llywelyn The Great and Joan Plantagenet, Lady of Wales); died Aft 1268.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Margaret
    • Also Known As: Margaret of Wales

    Children:
    1. 100. William de Braose, VI, Knight, 1st Baron Braose was born ~ 1224, (Wales); died 0___ 1291, Findon, Sussex, England.
    2. Richard de Braose was born 0___ 1232; died 0___ 1292.

  21. 202.  Thomas de Multon

    Thomas — unnamed spouse. [Group Sheet]


  22. 203.  unnamed spouse
    Children:
    1. 101. Aline de Multon

  23. 208.  John I, King of EnglandJohn I, King of England was born 24 Dec 1166, Beaumont Palace, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England (son of Henry II, King of England and Eleanore de Aquitaine, Queen of England); died 19 Oct 1216, Newark Castle, Nottinghamshire, England; was buried 19 Oct 1216, Worcester Cathedral, Worcester, Warwickshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Johan sanz Terre
    • Also Known As: John de Normandie, King of England
    • Also Known As: John I, King of England
    • Also Known As: John Lackland
    • Also Known As: John Plantagenet, King of England

    Notes:

    John (24 December 1166 - 19 October 1216), also known as John Lackland (Norman French: Johan sanz Terre),[1] was King of England from 6 April 1199 until his death in 1216.

    Following the battle of Bouvines, John lost the duchy of Normandy to King Philip II of France, which resulted in the collapse of most of the Angevin Empire and contributed to the subsequent growth in power of the Capetian dynasty during the 13th century.

    The baronial revolt at the end of John's reign led to the sealing of the Magna Carta, a document sometimes considered to be an early step in the evolution of the constitution of the United Kingdom.

    more on King John ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John,_King_of_England

    More images of King John ...

    https://www.google.com/search?q=john+lackland+coat+of+arms&rlz=1C1KMZB_enUS591US591&espv=2&biw=1440&bih=810&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiNnKWp6aPPAhULXB4KHb1qCnQQsAQIKw&dpr=1#imgrc=F8SAOkDV1jsAEM%3A

    *

    Baronial Order of Magna Charta:

    The Baronial Order of Magna Charta ("BOMC") is a scholarly, charitable, and lineage society founded in 1898. The BOMC was originally named the Baronial Order of Runnemede, but the name was subsequently changed to better reflect the organization's purposes relating to the Magna Charta and the promulgation of "freedom of man under the rule of law." view its membership list: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baronial_Order_of_Magna_Charta

    These 25 barons were Sureties for the concessions made by John, King of England, d. 18 Oct 1216.

    1. William d'Albini, Lord of Belvoir Castle, d. 1236.
    ((26th, 27th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Vernia Swindell "Ma" Byars;
    24th, 25th & 26th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Jesse D Hennessee: http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=&secondpersonID=I3&maxrels=12&disallowspouses=0&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I46884

    2. Roger Bigod, (43132) Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk, d. 1220.
    (26th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Perry Green "Pop" Byars: http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=&secondpersonID=I3&maxrels=6&disallowspouses=1&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I43132

    3. Hugh Bigod, (43271) heir to the earldoms of Norfolk and Suffolk, d. 1225.
    (25th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Perry Green "Pop" Byars: http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=I3&secondpersonID=&maxrels=6&disallowspouses=1&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I43271

    4. Henry de Bohun, Earl of Hereford, (46127) d. 1220.
    (26th, 27th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Vernia Swindell "Ma" Byars;
    25th & 26th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Jesse D Hennessee: http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=&secondpersonID=I3&maxrels=6&disallowspouses=1&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I46127


    5. Richard de Clare, Earl of Hertford, (46129) d. 1217.
    (25th, 26th & 27th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Vernia Swindell "Ma" Byars: http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=I3&secondpersonID=&maxrels=6&disallowspouses=1&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I46129

    6. Gilbert de Clare, heir to the earldom of Hertford, (45550) d. 1230.
    (24th, 26th & 27th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Vernia Swindell "Ma" Byars;
    25th & 27th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Perry Green "Pop" Byars;
    24th & 25th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Jesse D Hennessee: http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=I3&secondpersonID=&maxrels=16&disallowspouses=1&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I45550

    John FitzRobert, Lord of Warkworth Castle, Northumberland, d. 1240.

    7. Robert FitzWalter, Lord of Dunmow Castle, Essex, d. 1234.
    (28th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Perry Green "Pop" Byars)

    William de Fortibus, Earl of Albemarle, d. 1241, no great-grandchildren.
    William Hardell, Mayor of the City of London, d. after 1216, no known issue.
    William de Huntingfield, Sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk, d. 1220.
    John de Lacie, Lord of Pontefract Castle, d. 1240.
    William de Lanvallei, Lord of Standway Castle, Essex, d. 1217.
    William Malet, Sheriff of Somerset and Dorset, d. about 1217.
    Geoffrey de Mandeville, Earl of Essex and Gloucester, d. 1216, d.s.p..

    William Marshall jr, heir to the earldom of Pembroke, d. 1231, (43947) d.s.p..
    A cousin to the grandchildren of Vernia Swindell "Ma" Byars & Perry Green "Pop" Byars: http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=I3&secondpersonID=&maxrels=6&disallowspouses=1&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I43947

    Roger de Montbegon, Lord of Hornby Castle, Lancashire, d. 1226, d.s.p..
    Richard de Montfichet, Baron, d. after 1258, d.s.p..

    8.. William de Mowbray, Lord of Axholme Castle, Lincolnshire, (46138) d. 1223
    (24th & 26th great grandfather to the grandchildren of Vernia Swindell "Ma" Byars: http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=&secondpersonID=I3&maxrels=6&disallowspouses=1&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I46138

    Richard de Percy, Baron, Yorkshire, d. 1244, d.s.p..

    9.Saire de Quincey, Earl of Winchester, (46162) d. 1219.
    (25th & 27th great grandfather to the grandchildren of Vernia Swindell "Ma" Byars;
    25th & 26th great grandfather to the grandchildren of Jesse D Hennessee;
    27th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Perry Green "Pop" Byars: http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=I3&secondpersonID=&maxrels=6&disallowspouses=1&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I46162

    10. Robert de Roos, Lord of Hamlake Castle, Yorkshire, (46148)d. 1226.
    (25th, 26th & 27th great grandfather to the grandchildren of Vernia Swindell "Ma" Byars: http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=&secondpersonID=I3&maxrels=12&disallowspouses=1&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I46148

    Geoffrey de Saye, Baron, d. 1230.

    11. Robert de Vere, heir to the earldom of Oxford, d. 1221.
    (25th, 27th great grandfather to the grandchildren of Vernia Swindell "Ma" Byars;
    25th, 26th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Jesse D Hennessee;
    27th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Perry Green "Pop" Byars; http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=&secondpersonID=I3&maxrels=12&disallowspouses=1&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I46155

    Eustace de Vesci, Lord of Alnwick Castle, Northumberland, d. 1216 d.s.p..

    Birth:
    Beaumont Palace, built outside the north gate of Oxford, was intended by Henry I about 1130 to serve as a royal palace conveniently close to the royal hunting-lodge at Woodstock (now part of the park of Blenheim Palace). Its former presence is recorded in Beaumont Street, Oxford. Set into a pillar on the north side of the street, near Walton Street, is a stone with the inscription: "Near to this site stood the King's Houses later known as Beaumont Palace. King Richard I was born here in 1157 and King John in 1167". The "King's House" was the range of the palace that contained the king's lodgings.

    Henry passed Easter 1133 in the nova aula, his "new hall" at Beaumont in great pomp, celebrating the birth of his grandson, the future Henry II.[1] Edward I was the last king to sojourn in Beaumont officially as a palace, and in 1275 he granted it to an Italian lawyer, Francesco Accorsi, who had undertaken diplomatic missions for him.[2] When Edward II was put to flight at the battle of Bannockburn in 1314, he is said to have invoked the Virgin Mary and vowed to found a monastery for the Carmelites (the White Friars) if he might escape safely. In fulfilment of his vow he remanded Beaumont Palace to the Carmelites in 1318.

    In 1318, the Palace was the scene for the beginnings of the John Deydras affair, in which a royal pretender, arguing that he was the rightful king of England, claimed the Palace for his own. John Deydras was ultimately executed for sedition.[3]


    When the White Friars were disbanded at the Reformation, most of the structure was dismantled and the building stone reused in Christ Church and St John's College.[4] An engraving of 1785[5] shows the remains of Beaumont Palace, the last of which were destroyed in the laying out of Beaumont Street in 1829.[6]

    Drawings, Sketches & Source ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beaumont_Palace

    Buried:
    Worcester Cathedral, before the English Reformation known as Worcester Priory, is an Anglican cathedral in Worcester, England; situated on a bank overlooking the River Severn. It is the seat of the Bishop of Worcester. Its official name is The Cathedral Church of Christ and the Blessed Mary the Virgin of Worcester. Built between 1084 and 1504, Worcester Cathedral represents every style of English architecture from Norman to Perpendicular Gothic.

    It is famous for its Norman crypt and unique chapter house, its unusual Transitional Gothic bays, its fine woodwork and its "exquisite" central tower,[1] which is of particularly fine proportions.

    Images, History & Source ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Worcester_Cathedral

    Died:
    Newark Castle, in Newark, in the English county of Nottinghamshire was founded in the mid 12th century by Alexander, Bishop of Lincoln. Originally a timber castle, it was rebuilt in stone towards the end of the century. Dismantled in the 17th century after the English Civil War, the castle was restored in the 19th century, first by Anthony Salvin in the 1840s and then by the corporation of Newark who bought the site in 1889. The Gilstrap Heritage Centre is a free-admission museum in the castle grounds about the history of the town of Newark.

    Images & Source ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newark_Castle,_Nottinghamshire

    John married Isabelle of Angouleme, Queen of England 26 Aug 1200, Cathedral of Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France. Isabelle was born 0___ 1188, Angouleme, France; died 31 May 1246, Fontevrault L'abbe, Maine-Ete-Loire, France; was buried 31 May 1246, Fontevrault L'abbe, Maine-Ete-Loire, France. [Group Sheet]


  24. 209.  Isabelle of Angouleme, Queen of EnglandIsabelle of Angouleme, Queen of England was born 0___ 1188, Angouleme, France; died 31 May 1246, Fontevrault L'abbe, Maine-Ete-Loire, France; was buried 31 May 1246, Fontevrault L'abbe, Maine-Ete-Loire, France.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Countess of Angouleme
    • Also Known As: Isabella de Taillefer, Queen of England
    • Alt Birth: Abt 1173
    • Alt Death: 14 Oct 1217
    • Alt Death: 4 Jun 1246

    Notes:

    Isabel of Gloucester (c. 1173 - 14 October 1217) was the first wife of John of England . She is known by an exceptionally large number of alternative names: Hadwisa, Hawisia, Hawise, Joan, Eleanor, Avise and Avisa.

    *

    Isabella of Angoulăeme (French: Isabelle d'Angoulăeme, IPA: [izab?l d?~gul?m]; c.1188 – 4 June 1246) was queen consort of England as the second wife of King John from 1200 until John's death in 1216. She was also reigning Countess of Angoulăeme from 1202 until 1246.

    She had five children by the king including his heir, later Henry III. In 1220, Isabella married Hugh X of Lusignan, Count of La Marche, by whom she had another nine children.

    Some of her contemporaries, as well as later writers, claim that Isabella formed a conspiracy against King Louis IX of France in 1241, after being publicly snubbed by his mother, Blanche of Castile for whom she had a deep-seated hatred.[1] In 1244, after the plot had failed, Isabella was accused of attempting to poison the king. To avoid arrest, she sought refuge in Fontevraud Abbey where she died two years later, but none of this can be confirmed.

    Queen of England

    She was the only daughter and heir of Aymer Taillefer, Count of Angoulăeme, by Alice of Courtenay, who was sister of Peter II of Courtenay, Latin Emperor of Constantinople and granddaughter of King Louis VI of France.

    Isabella became Countess of Angoulăeme in her own right on 16 June 1202, by which time she was already queen of England. Her marriage to King John took place on 24 August 1200, in Angoulăeme,[2] a year after he annulled his first marriage to Isabel of Gloucester. She was crowned queen in an elaborate ceremony on 8 October at Westminster Abbey in London. Isabella was originally betrothed to Hugh IX le Brun, Count of Lusignan,[3] son of the then Count of La Marche. As a result of John's temerity in taking her as his second wife, King Philip II of France confiscated all of their French lands, and armed conflict ensued.

    At the time of her marriage to John, the blonde and blue-eyed 12-year-old Isabella was already renowned by some for her beauty[4] and has sometimes been called the Helen of the Middle Ages by historians.[5] Isabella was much younger than her husband and possessed a volatile temper similar to his own. King John was infatuated with his young, beautiful wife; however, his acquisition of her had as much, if not more to do with spiting his enemies, than romantic love. She was already engaged to Hugh IX le Brun, when she was taken by John. It had been said that he neglected his state affairs to spend time with Isabella, often remaining in bed with her until noon. However, these were rumors, ignited by John's enemies to discredit him as being a weak and grossly irresponsible ruler. Given that at the time they were made John was engaging in a desperate war with King Phillip of France to hold on to the remaining Plantagenet dukedoms. The common people began to term her a "siren" or "Messalina", which spoke volumes as to common opinion .[6] Her mother-in-law, Eleanor of Aquitaine readily accepted her as John's wife.[7]

    On 1 October 1207 at Winchester Castle, Isabella gave birth to a son and heir who was named Henry after the King's father, Henry II. He was quickly followed by another son, Richard, and three daughters, Joan, Isabel, and Eleanor. All five children survived into adulthood, and would make illustrious marriages; all but Joan would produce offspring of their own.

    Second marriage

    When King John died in October 1216, Isabella's first act was to arrange the speedy coronation of her nine-year-old son at the city of Gloucester on 28 October. As the royal crown had recently been lost in The Wash, along with the rest of King John's treasure, she supplied her own golden circlet to be used in lieu of a crown.[8] The following July, less than a year after his crowning as King Henry III of England, she left him in the care of his regent, William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke and returned to France to assume control of her inheritance of Angoulăeme.

    In the spring of 1220, she married Hugh X of Lusignan, "le Brun", Seigneur de Luisignan, Count of La Marche, the son of her former fiancâe, Hugh IX, to whom she had been betrothed before her marriage to King John. It had been previously arranged that her eldest daughter Joan should marry Hugh, and the little girl was being brought up at the Lusignan court in preparation for her marriage. Hugh, however, upon seeing Isabella, whose beauty had not diminished,[9] preferred the girl's mother. Princess Joan was provided with another husband, King Alexander II of Scotland, whom she wed in 1221.

    Isabella had married Hugh without waiting to receive the consent of the King's council in England, which was the required procedure for a former Queen of England, as the Council had the power to not only choose the Queen Dowager's second husband, but to decide whether or not she should be allowed to marry at all. Isabella's flouting of this law caused the Council to confiscate her dower lands and stop the payment of her pension.[10] Isabella and her husband retaliated by threatening to keep Princess Joan, who had been promised in marriage to the King of Scotland, in France. The council first responded by sending furious letters, signed in the name of young King Henry, to the Pope, urging him to excommunicate Isabella and her husband, but then decided to come to terms with Isabella, as to avoid conflict with the Scottish king, who was eager to receive his bride. Isabella was granted, in compensation for her dower lands in Normandy, the stannaries in Devon and the revenue of Aylesbury for a period of four years. She also received ą3000 as payment for arrears in her pension.[11]

    By Hugh X, Isabella had nine more children. Their eldest son Hugh XI of Lusignan succeeded his father as Count of La Marche and Count of Angoulăeme in 1249.

    Isabella's children from her past marriage continued their lives in England.

    Rebellion and death[edit]
    Described by some contemporaries as "vain, capricious, and troublesome,"[12] Isabella could not reconcile herself with her less prominent position in France. Though Queen dowager of England, Isabella was now mostly regarded as a mere Countess of La Marche and had to give precedence to other women.[13] In 1241, when Isabella and Hugh were summoned to the French court to swear fealty to King Louis IX of France's brother, Alphonse, who had been invested as Count of Poitou, their mother, the Queen Dowager Blanche openly snubbed her. This so infuriated Isabella, who had a deep-seated hatred of Blanche due to the latter having fervently supported the French invasion of England during the First Barons' War in May 1216, that she began to actively conspire against King Louis. Isabella and her husband, along with other disgruntled nobles, including her son-in-law Raymond VII of Toulouse, sought to create an English-backed confederacy which united the provinces of the south and west against the French king.[14] She encouraged her son Henry in his invasion of Normandy in 1230, but then did not provide him the support she had promised.[15]

    In 1244, after the confederacy had failed and Hugh had made peace with King Louis, two royal cooks were arrested for attempting to poison the King; upon questioning they confessed to having been in Isabella's pay.[16] Before Isabella could be taken into custody, she fled to Fontevraud Abbey, where she died on 4 June 1246.[17]

    By her own prior arrangement, she was first buried in the Abbey's churchyard, as an act of repentance for her many misdeeds. On a visit to Fontevraud, her son King Henry III of England was shocked to find her buried outside the Abbey and ordered her immediately moved inside. She was finally placed beside Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine. Afterwards, most of her many Lusignan children, having few prospects in France, set sail for England and the court of Henry, their half-brother.

    Issue

    With King John of England: 5 children, all of whom survived into adulthood, including:
    King Henry III of England (1 October 1207 – 16 November 1272). Married Eleanor of Provence, by whom he had issue, including his heir, King Edward I of England.
    Richard, Earl of Cornwall and King of the Romans (5 January 1209 – 2 April 1272). Married firstly Isabel Marshal, secondly Sanchia of Provence, and thirdly Beatrice of Falkenburg. Had issue.
    Joan (22 July 1210 – 1238), the wife of King Alexander II of Scotland. Her marriage was childless.
    Isabella (1214–1241), the wife of Emperor Frederick II, by whom she had issue.
    Eleanor (1215–1275), who would marry firstly William Marshal, 2nd Earl of Pembroke; and secondly Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester, by whom she had issue.

    With Hugh X of Lusignan, Count of La Marche: nine children, all of whom survived into adulthood, including:

    Hugh XI of Lusignan (1221–1250), Count of La Marche and Count of Angoulăeme. Married Yolande de Dreux, Countess of Penthiáevre and of Porhoet, by whom he had issue.
    Aymer of Lusignan (1222–1260), Bishop of Winchester
    Agnáes de Lusignan (1223–1269). Married William II de Chauvigny (d. 1270), and had issue.
    Alice of Lusignan (1224 – 9 February 1256). Married John de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey, by whom she had issue.
    Guy of Lusignan (c. 1225 – 1264), killed at the Battle of Lewes. (Tufton Beamish maintains that he escaped to France after the Battle of Lewes and died there in 1269).
    Geoffrey of Lusignan (c. 1226 – 1274). Married in 1259 Jeanne, Viscountess of Chăatellerault, by whom he had issue.
    Isabella of Lusignan (c.1226/1227 14 January 1299). Married firstly before 1244 Maurice IV, seigneur de Craon (1224–1250),[18] by whom she had issue; she married secondly, Geoffrey de Rancon.[19]
    William of Lusignan (c. 1228 – 1296). 1st Earl of Pembroke. Married Joan de Munchensi, by whom he had issue.
    Marguerite de Lusignan (c. 1229 – 1288). Married firstly in 1243 Raymond VII of Toulouse; secondly c. 1246 Aimery IX de Thouars, Viscount of Thouars and had issue

    Birth:
    Aquitaine, Charente department...

    Notes:

    Married:
    Bordeaux Cathedral (Cathâedrale Saint-Andrâe de Bordeaux) is a Roman Catholic cathedral, seat of the Archbishop of Bordeaux-Bazas, located in Bordeaux.

    The cathedral was consecrated by Pope Urban II in 1096. Of the original Romanesque edifice, only a wall in the nave remains. The Royal Gate is from the early 13th century, while the rest of the construction is mostly from the 14th-15th centuries. The building is a national monument of France.

    In this church in 1137 the 13-year-old Eleanor of Aquitaine married the future Louis VII, a few months before she became Queen.


    Images, History & Source ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bordeaux_Cathedral

    Children:
    1. 104. Henry III, King of England was born 1 Oct 1207, Winchester Castle, Hampshire, United Kingdom; was christened 0___ 1207, Bermondsey, London, Middlesex, England; died 16 Nov 1272, Westminster Palace, Westminster, London, Middlesex, England; was buried 20 Nov 1272, Westminster Abbey, 20 Deans Yd, London SW1P 3PA, United Kingdom.
    2. Richard Plantagenet, Knight, 1st Earl of Cornwall was born 5 Jan 1209, Winchester Castle, Castle Ave, Winchester, Hampshire SO23 8PJ, United Kingdom; was christened 0___ 1214, Winchester Castle, Castle Ave, Winchester, Hampshire SO23 8PJ, United Kingdom; died 2 Apr 1272, Berkhamsted Castle, Hertfordshire, England; was buried 13 Apr 1272, Hailes Abbey, Winchcombe, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire - GL54 5PB, England.
    3. Isabella Plantagenet was born 0___ 1214; died 0___ 1241.
    4. Eleanor of Leicester was born 0___ 1215, Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England; died 13 Apr 1275, Montargis Abbey, France; was buried Montargis Abbey, France.

  25. 220.  William de Beauchamp was born ~ 1215, Elmley Castle, Worcestershire, England (son of Walter de Beauchamp and Joan Mortimer); died 0___ 1268, Elmley Castle, Worcestershire, England.

    Notes:

    William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick (1237-1298) was an English nobleman and soldier, described as a “vigorous and innovative military commander."[1] He was active in the field against the Welsh for many years, and at the end of his life campaigned against the Scots.

    Career

    He became hereditary High Sheriff of Worcestershire for life on the death of his father in 1268.

    He was a close friend of Edward I of England, and was an important leader in Edward's invasion of Wales in 1277.[2][3] In 1294 he raised the siege of Conwy Castle, where the King had been penned in,[4] crossing the estuary.[5] He was victorious on 5 March 1295 at the battle of Maes Moydog, against the rebel prince of Wales, Madog ap Llywelyn.[6] In a night attack on the Welsh infantry he used cavalry to drive them into compact formations which were then shot up by his archers and charged.[7]R

    Family

    His father was William de Beauchamp (d.1268) of Elmley Castle and his mother Isabel Mauduit, sister and heiress of William Mauduit, 8th Earl of Warwick, from whom he inherited his title in 1268. He had a sister, Sarah, who married Richard Talbot.

    He married Maud FitzJohn. Their children included:

    Isabella de Beauchamp,[8] married firstly, Sir Patrick de Chaworth and, secondly, Hugh le Despenser, 1st Earl of Winchester
    Guy de Beauchamp, 10th Earl of Warwick, who married Alice de Toeni, widow of Thomas de Leyburne

    *

    Birth:
    The ruins of an important Norman and medieval castle, from which the village derives its name, are located in the deer park, just over half a mile south on Bredon Hill. The castle is supposed to have been built for Robert Despenser in the years following the Norman Conquest. After his death (post 1098) it descended to his heirs, the powerful Beauchamp family. It remained their chief seat until William de Beauchamp inherited the earldom and castle of Warwick from his maternal uncle, William Maudit, 8th Earl of Warwick, in 1268. Thereafter, Elmley Castle remained a secondary property of the Earls of Warwick until it was surrendered to the Crown in 1487. In 1528 the castle seems to have been still habitable, for Walter Walshe was then appointed constable and keeper, and ten years later Urian Brereton succeeded to the office. In 1544, however, prior to the grant to Christopher Savage (d.1545), who had been an Esquire of the Body of King Henry VIII, a survey was made of the manor and castle of Elmley, and it was found that the castle, strongly situated upon a hill surrounded by a ditch and wall, was completely uncovered and in decay.

    Map & Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elmley_Castle

    William — Isabel Mauduit. Isabel (daughter of William de Maudit, IV, Knight, Baron of Hanslape & Hartley and Alice de Newburgh) was born ~ 1214, Hanslope, Buckinghamshire, England; died 7 Jan 1268, Elmley Castle, Worcestershire, England. [Group Sheet]


  26. 221.  Isabel Mauduit was born ~ 1214, Hanslope, Buckinghamshire, England (daughter of William de Maudit, IV, Knight, Baron of Hanslape & Hartley and Alice de Newburgh); died 7 Jan 1268, Elmley Castle, Worcestershire, England.
    Children:
    1. 110. William de Beauchamp, Knight, 9th Earl of Warwick was born 0___ 1237, Elmley Castle, Worcestershire, England; died 0___ 1298, (Elmley Castle, Worcestershire, England).
    2. Guy de Beauchamp, Knight, 10th Earl of Warwick was born 0___ 1262, Elmley Castle, Worcester, England; died 12 Aug 1315, Warwick Castle, Warwickshire, England; was buried Bordesley Abbey, Worcester, England.

  27. 222.  John FitzGeoffrey, Justicar of Ireland was born ~ 1213, Shere, Surrey, England (son of Geoffrey FitzPiers, Knight, Earl of Essex and Aveline de Clare); died 23 Nov 1253, (Surrey) England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Lord of Kirtling
    • Also Known As: Sheriff of Yorkshire
    • Alt Birth: ~ 1205, Shere, Surrey, England

    Notes:

    John FitzGeoffrey, Lord of Shere and Justiciar of Ireland (1205? in Shere, Surrey, England – 23 November 1258) was an English nobleman.

    John Fitz Geoffrey was the son of Geoffrey Fitz Peter, 1st Earl of Essex and Aveline de Clare, daughter of Roger de Clare, 2nd Earl of Hertford and his wife Maud de Saint-Hilaire.

    He was appointed Justiciar of Ireland, serving from 1245 to 1255.[1]

    He was not entitled to succeed his half-brother as Earl of Essex in 1227, the Earldom having devolved from his father's first wife. He was the second husband of Isabel Bigod, daughter of Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk and his wife Maud Marshal of Pembroke. They had six children, one being Maud who married William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick.

    Children

    Note: The males took the FitzJohn surname ("fitz" mean "son of").

    John FitzJohn of Shere (?–1275). Married Margary, daughter of Philip Basset of Wycombe (?–1271).
    Richard FitzJohn of Shere (?–1297). Lord FitzJohn 1290. Married as her first husband, Emma (?-1332).
    Maud FitzJohn (? – 16/18 April 1301). Married firstly to Gerard de Furnivalle, Lord of Hallamshire (?–1261). Married secondly to William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick, son of William de Beauchamp of Elmley, Worcestershire and his wife Isabel Mauduit. Had issue.
    Isabel. Married Robert de Vespont, Lord of Westmoreland (?–1264). Had issue.
    Aveline (1229–1274). Married Walter de Burgh, Earl of Ulster (1230–1271). Had issue, including Richard Óg de Burgh, 2nd Earl of Ulster who in turn married Margaret de Burgh, by whom he had ten children.
    Joan (? – 4 April 1303). Married Theobald le Botiller. Had issue, from whom descend the Butler Earls of Ormond.

    John FitzGeoffrey
    Spouse(s) Isabel Bigod
    Father Geoffrey Fitz Peter, 1st Earl of Essex
    Mother Aveline de Clare
    Born 1205?
    Shere, Surrey,
    Kingdom of England
    Died 23 November 1258

    *

    John — Isabelle Bigod, Countess of Essex. Isabelle (daughter of Hugh Bigod, Knight, 3rd Earl of Norfolk and Maud Marshal, Countess of Norfolk) was born ~ 1211, Thetford, Norfolk, England; died 0___ 1239. [Group Sheet]


  28. 223.  Isabelle Bigod, Countess of Essex was born ~ 1211, Thetford, Norfolk, England (daughter of Hugh Bigod, Knight, 3rd Earl of Norfolk and Maud Marshal, Countess of Norfolk); died 0___ 1239.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Isabel Bigod
    • Alt Birth: ~ 1212
    • Alt Death: 0___ 1250

    Children:
    1. Aveline FitzJohn was born 0___ 1236, Shere, Surrey, England; died 20 May 1274.
    2. Joan FitzJohn died 4 Apr 1303.
    3. 111. Maud FitzGeoffrey was born ~ 1238, Shere, Surrey, England; died 18 Apr 1301; was buried Friars Minor, Worcester, England.

  29. 232.  John FitzAlan, Knight, 6th Earl of Arundel was born 6 May 1223, Oswestry Castle, Shropshire, England (son of John FitzAlan, Knight, 3rd Lord of Oswestry and Isabel d'Aubigny); died 10 Nov 1267, Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Earl of Arundel
    • Also Known As: Lord of Clun and Oswestry

    Notes:

    John FitzAlan (1223–1267), Lord of Oswestry and Clun, and de jure matris Earl of Arundel, was a Breton-English nobleman and Marcher Lord with lands in the Welsh Marches.

    Family

    The son and heir of John Fitzalan, Lord of Oswestry and Clun, from Shropshire. His mother was Isabel, and she was the daughter of William d'Aubigny, 3rd Earl of Arundel by his wife, Mabel of Chester. John obtained possession of his paternal estates on 26 May 1244, aged 21 years.

    After the death of his mother's brother Hugh d'Aubigny, 5th Earl of Arundel, and without direct heirs, he inherited jure matris the castle and honour of Arundel in 1243, which, according to the admission of 1433, he was held to have become de jure Earl of Arundel.[1]

    Welsh Conflicts

    In 1257 the Welsh Lord Gruffydd ap Gwenwynwyn, in the southern realm of the Kingdom of Powys, sought the aid of the Lord of Oswestry against Llywelyn ap Gruffudd. John Fitzalan was a surviving member of the English force that was defeated at the hands of the Welsh at Cymerau in Carmarthenshire.

    In 1258 he was one of the key English military commanders in the Welsh Marches and was summoned yet again in 1260 for further conflict against the Welsh.

    As Earl of Arundel, John vacillated in the conflicts between Henry III and the Barons. He fought on the King's side at the Battle of Lewes in 1264, where he was taken prisoner.

    By 1278 to 1282 his sons were engaged in Welsh border hostilities, attacking the lands of Llywelyn.

    Marriage

    He married Maud de Verdon, daughter of Theobald le Botiller (Boteler) by his wife Rohesia de Verdon (alias Rohese), by whom he had progeny including:

    John FitzAlan, 7th Earl of Arundel, eldest son and heir.
    Joan FitzAlan (c.1267-after 6 October 1316), wife of Sir Richard of Cornwall (d.1296), an illegitimate son of Richard of England, 1st Earl of Cornwall and King of the Romans (1209-1272) (the second son of King John (1199-1216)) by his mistress Joan de Bath (alias de Valletort).
    References[edit]
    Jump up ^ "The complete peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain, and the United Kingdom : extant, extinct, or dormant". Archive.org. pp. Volume 1, 239–40, as corrected by Vol. 14, p. 38. Retrieved 2013-05-10.
    Weis, Frederick Lewis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700, Lines: 70A-29, 149-29.

    *

    Sir John FitzAlan 6th Earl of Arundel[1]
    Name: John III Fitz Alan[2][3][4][5][6]
    Name: John, 6th Earl Arundel Lord of Oswestry and Clun FitzAlan[7]
    Birth Date: May 1223, Arundel, Sussex, England[8][9]
    Title: Earl Arundel, Lord Clun
    John FitzAlan (1223-1267), Lord of Oswestry and Clun, and de jure Earl of Arundel, was a Breton-English nobleman and Marcher Lord with lands in the Welsh Marches.[10]
    Marriage: 1242, England
    Sir John married Maud le Botiller (Maud de Verdun), daughter of Theobald le Botiller (Boteler) and Rohese or Rohesia de Verdon. His son and successor was:
    John Fitzalan, 7th Earl of Arundel
    Death: bef. 10 Nov 1267, Arundel, Sussex, England[11][12][13]
    Burial: Before 10 Nov 1267[14]
    Citations
    Source: ^ Cockayne, G. E., edited by the Hon. Vicary Gibbs, & H. A. Doubleday,London, 1926, vol.v, p.392
    Source: Weis, Frederick Lewis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700, Lines: 70A-29, 149-29.
    Family

    The son and heir of John Fitzalan, Lord of Oswestry and Clun, in Shropshire, and Isabel, daughter of William d'Aubigny, 3rd Earl of Arundel by his wife, Mabel of Chester, he obtained possession of his paternal estates on May 26, 1244, aged 21 years.
    After the death without direct heirs of his mother's brother Hugh d'Aubigny, 5th Earl of Arundel, he inherited 'jure matris' the castle and honour of Arundel in 1243, which, according to the admission of 1433, he was held to have become 'de jure' Earl of Arundel.[1]
    Sir John was succeeded by right of his mother, the 27 Nov 1243, to the Castle and Honor of Arundel. In 26 May 1244 he obtained possession of his paternal estates in Shropshire. According to some early accounts he married Maud de Verdon[15], daughter of Rhys de Verdon, 6th Earl of Arundel; Lord of Oswestry and Clun. Burial BEF 10 Nov 1267
    Welsh Conflicts

    In 1257 the Welsh Lord of Gwenwynwyn, in the southern realm of the Welsh Kingdom of Powys, sought the aid of the Lord of Oswestry against Llywelyn ap Gruffydd and John FitzAlan was a member of the English Force that was defeated at the hands of the Welsh at Cymerau in Carmarthenshire, which he survived.
    In 1258 he was one of the key English military commanders in the Welsh Marches and was summoned yet again in 1260 for further conflict against the Welsh.
    Arundel vacillated in the conflicts between Henry III and the Barons, and fought on the King's side at the Battle of Lewes in 1264, where he was taken prisoner.
    By 1278 to 1282 his own sons were also engaged in Welsh border hostilities, attacking the lands of Llywelyn the son of Gruffydd ap Madog.
    Sources

    Source: Ancestral File Number: 8JDT-WP
    Source: http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=225892&pid=4891
    Source: http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=document&guid=5be12808-996e-45e5-beff-db793b00550a&tid=13078823&pid=332637204
    Source: The Magna Charta Sureties, 1215, Edition: 4th ed., Record Number: CS55 A31979 Abbreviation: Magna Charta, 4th ed. Author: Weis, Frederick Lewis Publication: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, MD, 1991
    Source: S2375940657 Repository: #R2375940656 Title: Ancestry Family Trees Publication: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry member. Page: Ancestry Family Trees; Text: http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=27624422&pid=970
    Source: S-2024265482 Royal and Noble Genealogical Data: Brian Tompsett: Copyright 1994-2001, Version March 25, 2001 http://www.dcs.hull.ac.uk/public/genealogy/GEDCOM.html, Department of Computer Science, University of Hull, Hull, UK, HU6 7RX, B.C.Tompsett@dcs.hull.ac.uk
    Source: S-1968866219 Repository #R-1969211483 Title: Ancestry Family Trees; Publication: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members.
    Source: Repository: R-1969211483 Name: Ancestry.com; Address: http://www.Ancestry.com
    Source: S96 Record ID Number: MH:S96 User ID: CCD7662F-AD30-47C8-B9BC-6B348174ACE3 Title: Eula Maria McKeaig II - 061204.FTW Note: Other
    Footnotes

    ? Source: #S-1968866219 Page: Ancestry Family Trees; Text: http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=2886322&pid=1757493331
    ? Source: #S004330 Birth date: May 1223 Birthplace: Clun/Oswestry, Salop, England Death date: 1267 Death place:
    ? Source: #S004444 Page: Ancestry Family Trees; Text: http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=13078823&pid=332637204
    ? Source: #S004444 Page: Ancestry Family Trees Data: Text: http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=13078823&pid=332637204
    ? Source: #S004444 Page: Ancestry Family Trees Data: Text: http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=13078823&pid=332637204
    ? Source: #S004444 Page: Ancestry Family Trees Data: Text: http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=13078823&pid=332637204
    ? Text: http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=6835128&pid=-1207650802
    ? Source: #S004330 Text: Birth Date: May 1223; Birth Place: Clun/Oswestry, Salop, England Death Date: 1267
    ? Source: #S27185
    ? Source: John FitzAlan. Wikipedia. Commons. Accessed: 30 March 2015
    ? Source: #S004330 Birth Date: May 1223; Birthplace: Clun/Oswestry, Salop, England; Death Date: 1267
    ? Source: #S37 Page: 134
    ? Source: #S27185
    ? Source: #S96 Date of Import: Jul 25, 2005; ID: 74386626-64E7-433B-91B6-677D4331906C; ID Number: MH:IF7037
    ? Richardson's Royal Ancestry, Vol. V, page 154 succinctly states John FitzAlan married Maud de Verdun
    See also:

    Note: Shropshire Map
    Note: Coronet for an Earl
    Note: Arundel Castle
    Note: Shropshire COA
    Note: England COA
    Note: Arundel Family Crest
    Note: FitzAlan Arms
    Note: Sussex COA
    Note: Clun Castle
    Note: England Flag
    Note: Map of England
    Note: Coronet for a Baron
    Note: Sussex Map
    Note: Oswestry Castle
    Note: FitzAlan COA
    Acknowledgments

    Created through the import of Rodney Timbrook Ancestors and Relatives_2010-09-10.ged on 10 September 2010.
    Fitz Alan-48 created through the import of WILLIAMS 2011.GED on Jun 22, 2011 by Ted Williams.
    Created through the import of Acrossthepond.ged on 21 February 2011.
    Created through the import of Bwiki.ged on 03 April 2011. Fitz-Alan-13 created through the import of wikitree.ged on Aug 1, 2011 by Abby Brown.
    Created through the import of LJ Pellman Consolidated Family_2011-03-21.ged on 21 March 2011.
    FitzAlan-35 created through the import of MOORMAN FAMILY.GED on May 31, 2011 by Mary Elizabeth Stewart.
    Fitzalan-341 created through the import of FISCUS Family Tree.ged on Jun 6, 2011 by Liisa Small.
    Created through the import of master 11_12.ged on 21 October 2010.
    Created through the import of GerwingLoueyFamilyTree2009_2011-04-27.ged on 28 April 2011.
    FitzAlan-415 created through the import of The BTM Tree.ged on Jun 26, 2011 by Carolyn Trenholm.
    FitzAlan-479 created through the import of Bierbrodt.GED on Jul 14, 2011 by Becky Bierbrodt.
    fitzrandtocharlemange.FTW. Fitz alan-61 created through the import of heinakuu2011-6.ged on Jul 5, 2011 by Johanna Amnelin.
    Thank you to Tracy Conrad for creating WikiTree profile Fitzalan-554 through the import of Pedersen Family Tree.ged on May 19, 2013. Click to the Changes page for the details of edits by Tracy and others.
    Thank you to Steve Woods for creating WikiTree profile Fitz Alan-120 through the import of Woods Beedle Wiki.GED on Mar 1, 2013.
    This person was created through the import of Hooker Family Tree.ged on 30 March 2011.
    Record ID Number

    ID Number: MH:I3935
    User ID

    ID: 11A6FA5B-8E15-40F3-8FF5-A43B6A0BB55B

    Notes

    [Eula Maria McKeaig II - 061204.FTW] Burke's Peerage, p. 2098, on Lineage of FitzAlan:

    The d'Aubigny male line died out by 1243, whereupon the huge family estates were parcelled out between the last d'Aubigny, Earl of Arundel's sisters. Isabel, the second eldest, was wife of John FitzAlan, who through her came into possession of Arundel Castle but, perhaps significantly, did not style himself Earl of Arundel and was not so referred to by third parties. A contributory factor here seems to have been the longevity of the last d'Aubigny Earl of Arundel's widow, who survived her husband almost forty years, and who may in some sense therefore have been regarded as Countess of Arundel in her own right.

    Note: I assume the d'Aubigny widow who survived her husband almost 40 years was wife of Hugh d'Aubigny, 5th Earl of Arundel, brother of Isabel. - Jim Weber
    Note NI4017!SOURCES: 1. A9C7 p. 234; 2. Eng 116, p. 107-08; 3. Bucks 1 Vol 1 p. 455

    John — Maud de Verdon. Maud (daughter of Theobald le Botiller, 2nd Chief Butler of Ireland and Rohesia de Verdon) died 27 Nov 1283. [Group Sheet]


  30. 233.  Maud de Verdon (daughter of Theobald le Botiller, 2nd Chief Butler of Ireland and Rohesia de Verdon); died 27 Nov 1283.
    Children:
    1. 116. John FitzAlan, Knight, 7th Earl of Arundel was born 14 Sep 1246, Clun, Shropshire, England; died 18 Mar 1272, Arundel, Sussex, England; was buried Haughmond Abbey, Shropshire, England.
    2. Joan FitzAlan was born ~ 1267; died Aft 6 October 1316.

  31. 234.  Roger Mortimer, Knight, 1st Baron Mortimer was born 0___ 1231, (Wigmore Castle, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England) (son of Ralph de Mortimer, Knight and Gwladus Ddu); died 30 Oct 1292; was buried Wigmore Abbey, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Roger de Mortimer

    Notes:

    Roger Mortimer, 1st Baron Mortimer, of Wigmore (1231 – 30 October 1282), was a famous and honoured knight from Wigmore Castle in Herefordshire. He was a loyal ally of King Henry III of England. He was at times an enemy, at times an ally, of Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, Prince of Wales.

    Early career

    Born in 1231, Roger was the son of Ralph de Mortimer and his Welsh wife, Princess Gwladys Ddu, daughter of Llywelyn ab Iorwerth and Joan Plantagenet, daughter of John "Lackland", King of England.

    In 1256 Roger went to war with Llywelyn ap Gruffudd when the latter invaded his lordship of Gwrtheyrnion or Rhayader. This war would continue intermittently until the deaths of both Roger and Llywelyn in 1282. They were both grandsons of Llywelyn ab Iorwerth.

    Mortimer fought for the King against the rebel Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester, and almost lost his life in 1264 at the Battle of Lewes fighting Montfort's men. In 1265 Mortimer's wife, Maud de Braose helped rescue Prince Edward; and Mortimer and the Prince made an alliance against de Montfort.

    Victor at Evesham

    In August 1265, de Montfort's army was surrounded by the River Avon on three sides, and Prince Edward's army on the fourth. Mortimer had sent his men to block the only possible escape route, at the Bengeworth bridge. The Battle of Evesham began in earnest. A storm roared above the battle field. Montfort's Welsh soldiers broke and ran for the bridge, where they were slaughtered by Mortimer's men. Mortimer himself killed Hugh Despencer and Montfort, and crushed Montfort's army. Mortimer was awarded Montfort's severed head and other parts of his anatomy, which he sent home to Wigmore Castle as a gift for his wife, Lady Mortimer.

    Welsh wars and death

    See also: Conquest of Wales by Edward I

    Mortimer took part in Edward I's 1282 campaign against Llewelyn the Last, and was put in charge of operations in mid-Wales.[1] It was a major setback for Edward when Mortimer died in October 1282.[1]

    Marriage and children

    Lady Mortimer was Maud de Braose, daughter of William de Braose, Lord of Abergavenny by Eva Marshal. Roger Mortimer had married her in 1247. She was, like him, a scion of a Welsh Marches family. Their six known children were:[2]

    Ralph Mortimer, died 10 August 1274, Sheriff of Shropshire and Staffordshire.
    Edmund Mortimer, 2nd Baron Mortimer (1251–1304), married Margaret de Fiennes, the daughter of William II de Fiennes and Blanche de Brienne. Had issue, including Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March
    Isabella Mortimer, died 1292. She married (1) John Fitzalan, 7th Earl of Arundel,[2] (2) Ralph d'Arderne and (3) Robert de Hastang;[3]
    Margaret Mortimer, died 1297. She married Robert de Vere, 6th Earl of Oxford
    Roger Mortimer, 1st Baron Mortimer of Chirk, died 1326.
    Geoffrey Mortimer, died 1273.
    William Mortimer, died before June 1297, a knight, married Hawise, daughter and heir of Robert de Mucegros. Died childless.
    Their eldest son, Ralph, was a famed knight but died in his youth. The second son, Edmund, was recalled from Oxford University and appointed his father's heir.

    Epitaph

    Roger Mortimer died on 30 October 1282, and was buried at Wigmore Abbey, where his tombstone read:

    Here lies buried, glittering with praise, Roger the pure, Roger Mortimer the second, called Lord of Wigmore by those who held him dear. While he lived all Wales feared his power, and given as a gift to him all Wales remained his. It knew his campaigns, he subjected it to torment.

    Buried:
    his tombstone read:

    Here lies buried, glittering with praise, Roger the pure, Roger Mortimer the second, called Lord of Wigmore by those who held him dear. While he lived all Wales feared his power, and given as a gift to him all Wales remained his. It knew his campaigns, he subjected it to torment.

    Roger married Maud de Braose, Lady Mortimer 0___ 1247, King's Stanley, Gloucestershire, England. Maud (daughter of William de Braose, Lord of Brycheiniog and Eva Marshal, Countess of Abergavenny) was born ~ 1224, (Wales); died 0___ 1301. [Group Sheet]


  32. 235.  Maud de Braose, Lady Mortimer was born ~ 1224, (Wales) (daughter of William de Braose, Lord of Brycheiniog and Eva Marshal, Countess of Abergavenny); died 0___ 1301.
    Children:
    1. 117. Isabella Mortimer was born 0___ 1248, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England; died 0___ 1292.
    2. Edmund Mortimer, Knight, 2nd Baron Mortimer was born 0___ 1251, (Wigmore Castle, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England); died 17 Jul 1304, Wigmore Castle, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England.