Eleanor Copley

Female 1476 - 1536  (~ 59 years)


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Generation: 1

  1. 1.  Eleanor Copley was born ~1476 (daughter of Roger Copley, Esquire and Anne Hoo); died 1536.

    Eleanor — Thomas West, 8th Baron de la Warr. Thomas (son of Richard West, 7th Baron De La Warr and Katherine Hungerford) was born ~1457; died 11 Oct 1525. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. George West died 1538.

Generation: 2

  1. 2.  Roger Copley, Esquire

    Roger — Anne Hoo. Anne (daughter of Thomas Hoo, 1st Baron Hoo and Hastings and Eleanor Welles) was born Luton Hoo, Bedfordshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 3.  Anne Hoo was born Luton Hoo, Bedfordshire, England (daughter of Thomas Hoo, 1st Baron Hoo and Hastings and Eleanor Welles).
    Children:
    1. 1. Eleanor Copley was born ~1476; died 1536.


Generation: 3

  1. 6.  Thomas Hoo, 1st Baron Hoo and Hastings was born ~1396, Luton Hoo, Bedfordshire, England; died 13 Feb 1455.

    Notes:

    Thomas Hoo, 1st Baron Hoo and Hastings KG (c. 1396–1455) was a Knight of the Garter and English courtier.

    Life

    Thomas was the son of Sir Thomas Hoo (ca. 1370 – Luton Hoo, Bedfordshire, 23 August 1420) and his first wife (m. 1395) Eleanor de Felton (Litcham, Norfolk, 1378 – 8 August 1400). After his mother's death his father remarried to Elizabeth Etchyngham, daughter of William Etchingham and Alice Batisford, of Etchingham, Sussex. Thomas succeeded his father in 1420, inheriting the family's ancestral home of Luton Hoo in Bedfordshire as well as Mulbarton, Norfolk and other estates. His stepmother remarried to Sir Thomas Lewknor of Horsted Keynes (c.1392-1452) as his second wife and the mother of his younger children.[1]

    Thomas fought for Henry VI of England in France, and for his services was made, first Keeper of the Seals, then Chancellor of France. In 1439, he was granted the castle, lordship and honour of Hastings, and in 1445 elected Knight of the Garter. Two years later he was created Baron of Hoo and Hastings.

    The Barony of Hoo and Hastings became extinct at his death. Lord Hoo died on 13 February 1454/5. He dated his will 12 February 33 Henry VI, making provision for a chantry for himself and his ancestors at the altar of St Benignus at Battle Abbey. He refers to his manors of Wartling, Cukstede and Brokesmayle, which, being held by his stepmother Lady Lewkenor for life, are then to pass to his widow Eleanor for life: the Rape of Hastings is to be sold, if possible to his half-brother (Sir) Thomas (born 1416), and the proceeds to make his daughters' marriage portions: Anne,[2] Elizabeth and Alianor are to share 1000 marks for their portions, and their marriages to be governed by his widow and brother Thomas. Joan however receives only ¹20 to her marriage. He mentions also the manors of Offley (Hertfordshire), Mulberton and Hoo.[3]

    The brothers Thomas and Thomas are believed to be represented by the two recumbent effigies now on the Dacre Tomb at All Saints Church, Herstmonceux, Sussex.[4] It is supposed that the tomb was set up for Thomas Fiennes, 8th Baron Dacre (d. 1534) and his son Sir Thomas Fiennes (d. 1528), but that the figures themselves (perhaps brought from Battle Abbey following its sale in 1539) were those of the brothers Hoo (as shown by the arms revealed on their tabards during restoration), re-used for the Dacres.[5]

    Marriages and issue

    Thomas Hoo married (1st) before 1 July 1428, Elizabeth Wychingham, daughter of Nicholas Wychingham, esquire, of Wichingham, Norfolk, by whom he had a daughter:

    Anne Hoo (born c.1424), who married Sir Geoffrey Boleyn, mercer and Lord Mayor of London.[6][7]
    He married (2nd) before 1445 Eleanor Welles, daughter of Lionel de Welles, 6th Baron Welles, and his first wife, Joan Waterton, by whom he had three daughters:[6]

    Anne Hoo (born c.1447), who married (1st) Roger Copley, Esquire (d. before 1488), Citizen and mercer of London, of Roughey (Roffey) in Horsham, Sussex,[8] by whom she had three sons and six daughters; (2nd) William Greystoke, Gentleman (living 1498), of London and St. Olave, Southwark, Surrey, and (3rd) Sir Thomas Fiennes.[9]
    Eleanor Hoo, who married Sir James Carew of Beddington, Surrey.[10]
    Elizabeth Hoo, who married firstly Thomas Masingbeard, and secondly Sir John Devenish.[11]
    After the death of Lord Hoo his widow Eleanor remarried to Sir James Laurence[12] (son and heir of Sir Robert Laurence of Lancashire and Agnes Croft), by whom she had two further daughters and three sons. After his death in 1490 she is reputed to have made a third marriage to Hugh Hastings. She died before 1504.[13]

    In popular culture

    Hoo makes a cameo appearance in the first few chapters of Harry Turtledove's alternate history novel Opening Atlantis. His purpose in the story is so that settlers in a fictitious continent, halfway between Europe and America, can found a city named Hooville after him. As the book was released around the Holiday season, this may be a humorous literary allusion to How the Grinch Stole Christmas!.

    end of biograpghy

    Thomas married Eleanor Welles >1445. [Group Sheet]


  2. 7.  Eleanor Welles (daughter of Lionel de Welles, 6th Baron Welles, Knight of the Garter and Joan Waterton).
    Children:
    1. 3. Anne Hoo was born Luton Hoo, Bedfordshire, England.


Generation: 4

  1. 14.  Lionel de Welles, 6th Baron Welles, Knight of the Garter was born ~1406, Lincolnshire, England (son of Eude Welles and Maud Greystoke); died 29 Mar 1461, Towton, Yorkshire, England.

    Notes:

    Lionel de Welles, 6th Baron Welles, KG (c.1406 – 29 March 1461) was an English peer who served as Lord Lieutenant of Ireland and Joint Deputy of Calais. He was slain fighting on the Lancastrian side at the Battle of Towton, and was attainted on 21 December 1461. As a result of the attainder, his son, Richard Welles, 7th Baron Welles, did not succeed him in the barony of Welles until the attainder was reversed by Parliament in June 1467.

    Family

    Born about 1406, Lionel Welles was the son of Eudes Welles and Maud Greystoke. On his father's side, he was the grandson of John de Welles, 5th Baron Welles (d. 26 August 1421), and Eleanor Mowbray, and on his mother's side, the grandson of Ralph de Greystoke, 3rd Baron Greystoke and Katherine Clifford, daughter of Roger de Clifford, 5th Baron de Clifford. He had one brother, Sir William Welles, Lord Chancellor of Ireland.[1]

    Career

    Lionel Welles' father, Eudes Welles, died sometime before 26 July 1417, predeceasing his own father, the 5th Baron. At the death of the 5th Baron in 1421, Lionel Welles thus inherited the Welles barony and lands, but as he was underage, his wardship was granted to his future father-in-law, Robert Waterton (d.1425), a 'trusted retainer of John of Gaunt and the Lancastrian Kings'.[2][3]

    He was knighted at the Parliament at Leicester by the infant Henry VI on 19 May 1426, and had control of his lands on 5 December 1427. He accompanied Henry VI to France in 1430, was summoned to Parliament from 25 February 1432 to 30 July 1460 by writs directed Leoni de Welles, and was a privy councillor before 12 November 1434. In 1435 he was with Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester, in the expedition sent to relieve the siege of Calais. He was a member of Henry VI's household before February 1438. From 12 February 1438 he resided in Ireland as Lord Lieutenant; according to Hicks, he 'failed to control the contending factions and resigned prematurely in 1442'.

    His dealings, together with his kinsmen Robert Willoughby, 6th Baron Willoughby de Eresby and Ralph, Lord Cromwell, towards a servant of William Tailboys at Boston, Lincolnshire are complained of in a letter earlier than 1450 to the Viscount Beaumont among the Paston Letters.[4] Together with Richard Woodville, 1st Earl Rivers, he served as Joint Deputy of Calais for his brother-in-law, Edmund Beaufort, 2nd Duke of Somerset, who was Lieutenant of Calais from 1451 to 1455, and apparently remained at Calais until 20 April 1456, when Richard Neville, 16th Earl of Warwick, took over as Lieutenant. Despite these appointments, according to Hicks, Welles was 'essentially a Lincolnshire landowner'; he was a Justice of the Peace and served on other commissions in that county.[5][2]

    He was installed, together with John Talbot, 2nd Earl of Shrewsbury, as a Knight of the Garter on 14 May 1457, and in October of that year was sent with English reinforcements to Calais.[5]

    He was taken prisoner by Yorkist forces at the Battle of Blore Heath on 23 September 1459. In 1461 he was with the army of Queen Margaret, which advanced on London, and won the Second Battle of St Albans on 17 February 1461. He was slain a month later at the Battle of Towton on 29 March 1461, though rumours of his survival ran about.[6] After his death he was attained by Act of Parliament on 21 December 1461, whereby all his honours were forfeited. He was buried with his first wife, Joan Waterton, in the Waterton Chapel in St Oswald's parish church at Methley, Yorkshire,[7][2][8] where they have a fine table-tomb monument with recumbent effigies.[9] Welles is shown in full armour with a lion at his feet.

    Marriages and issue

    Welles married firstly Joan (in some accounts, Cecily) Waterton, daughter of Robert Waterton, esquire, of Methley, Yorkshire,[2] and his second wife, Cecily Fleming, daughter of Sir Robert Fleming, by whom he had one son and four daughters:[10]

    Richard Welles, 7th Baron Welles.[11]
    Cecily Welles, who married Sir Robert Willoughby of Parham, Suffolk and was the mother of Christopher Willoughby, 10th Baron Willoughby de Eresby.[12]
    Margaret Welles (d. 13 July 1480), who married firstly Sir Thomas Dymoke (executed 12 March 1470), and secondly Robert Radcliffe, esquire.[13][12]
    Eleanor Welles, who married Thomas Hoo, Baron Hoo and Hastings (d. 13 February 1455).[14]
    Katherine Welles, who married firstly Sir Thomas de la Launde (executed 15 March 1469), and secondly Robert Tempest (d. 23 April 1509), esquire.[12]
    He married secondly, by licence dated 14 April 1447, he married Margaret Beauchamp, widow successively of Sir Oliver St John (d.1437) and John Beaufort, 1st Duke of Somerset (d. 27 May 1444), and daughter of Sir John Beauchamp of Bletsoe, Bedfordshire, by his second wife, Edith Stourton, daughter of Sir John Stourton, by whom he had one son:[10]

    John Welles, 1st Viscount Welles, who married Cecily of York, the daughter of Edward IV of England.[10]
    By his second marriage Welles became the stepfather of Margaret Beaufort, mother of Henry VII.

    end of biography

    Died:
    during the Battle of Towton...

    Lionel married Joan Waterton 15 Aug 1417, St. Oswald's, Methley, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 15.  Joan Waterton (daughter of Robert Waterton and Cecily Fleming).

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Cecily Waterton

    Children:
    1. 7. Eleanor Welles
    2. Margaret Welles was born ~1430, Grimsby, Lincolnshire, England; died 13 Jul 1480.


Generation: 5

  1. 28.  Eude Welles was born ~1387 (son of John de Welles and Eleanor de Mowbray); died >26 Jul 1417.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Eudo de Welles
    • Also Known As: Eudo Welles

    Eude married Maud Greystoke ~1405. Maud (daughter of Ralph de Greystoke, 3rd Baron Greystoke and Catherine Clifford, Baroness of Ravensworth) was born ~1390, Greystoke, Cumbria, England; died ~1416, Welles Lincolnshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 29.  Maud Greystoke was born ~1390, Greystoke, Cumbria, England (daughter of Ralph de Greystoke, 3rd Baron Greystoke and Catherine Clifford, Baroness of Ravensworth); died ~1416, Welles Lincolnshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Matilda Greystoke

    Notes:

    Maud "Matilda" de Welles formerly Greystoke
    Born about 1390 in Greystoke, Northumberland, England
    ANCESTORS ancestors
    Daughter of Ralph Greystoke and Katherine (Clifford) Greystoke
    Sister of Ralph Greystoke, William Greystoke, Thomas Greystoke, John Greystoke and Joan (Greystoke) Bowes
    Wife of Eudes (Welles) de Welles — married [date unknown] [location unknown]
    DESCENDANTS descendants
    Mother of Lionel (Welles) de Welles KG and William Welles
    Died about 1416 in Welles, Lincolnshire, England
    Profile managers: Tim Perry private message [send private message] and Katherine Patterson private message [send private message]
    Greystoke-35 created 4 Jul 2011 | Last modified 1 Apr 2016
    This page has been accessed 2,021 times.

    European Aristocracy
    Maud (Greystoke) de Welles is a member of royalty, nobility or aristocracy in the British Isles.
    Join: British Isles Royals and Aristocrats 742-1499 Project
    Discuss: EUROARISTO
    Note: Citations needs for datafield information: birth 1390, Greystoke, Northumberland, England; death 1416, Welles, Lincolnshire, England

    Biography

    Maud Greystoke[1] married Eudo de Welles, son of Sir John Welles, 5th Baron Welles and Alianore Mowbray, circa 1405; They had 2 sons (Sir Lionel, 6th Lord Welles; & Sir William, Lord Chancellor of Ireland).[2]

    Father Sir Ralph Greystoke, 3rd Lord Greystoke & FitzWilliam, Constable of Lochmaben Castle, Justice, Steward, & Keeper of the lordship of Annandale[3] b. 18 Oct 1353, d. 6 Apr 1418[4]
    Mother Katherine Clifford (b. c 1369, d. 23 Apr 1413)[4]
    Husband Eudo de Welles b. c 1387, d. b 26 Jul 1417[4]

    Children

    Sir Lionel Welles, 6th Baron Welles, Lt. of Ireland[5] b. c 1406, d. 29 Mar 1461[4]
    Sir William de Welles b. c 1410[4]
    Sources

    ? Plantagenet Ancestry, pp. 362-363 (#PA)
    ? Magna Carta Ancestry, Vol IV, p 304 (#MCA)
    ? Magna Carta Ancestry, p. 875 (#MCA)
    ? 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 #Lewis
    ? Magna Carta Ancestry, Vol. IV, p. 221-222. (#MCA)
    Maud Greystoke, "Our Royal, Titled, Noble, and Commoner Ancestors and Cousins" (website, compiled by Mr. Marlyn Lewis, Portland, OR; accessed October 11, 2015), citing "Unknown author, Magna Charta Sureties, 1215, 4th Ed., by F. L. Weis, p. 86; Plantagenet Ancestry of 17th Century Colonists, by David Faris, p. 277." and Richardson's Magna Carta Ancestry, Plantagenet Ancestry, and Royal Ancestry (#MCA: p. 875; Vol. II, p. 282; Vol. III, p. 475; Vol. IV, pp 221-222 & 304; #PA: pp 362-363, 758; #RA: Vol. III, pp 137-138; Vol. IV, pp 199-201, 331, 526-527)
    MCA: Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, Royal Ancestry series, 2nd edition, 4 vols., ed. Kimball G. Everingham, (Salt Lake City, Utah: the author, 2011)
    PA: Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, Royal Ancestry series, 2nd edition, 3 vols., ed. Kimball G. Everingham, (Salt Lake City, Utah: the author, 2011)
    RA: Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 5 vols., ed. Kimball G. Everingham, (Salt Lake City, Utah: the author, 2013)
    Mary Hillard Hinton, Genealogist, Raleigh, NC
    •Extinct and Dormant Peerages, 1831 •Magna Carta Barons and their Descendants, pgs. 159, 241, 269, 270, 292 •Virginia Heraldica, pgs. 66, 69, 87, 88 •Ancestral Papers #119, of the National Society of Runnymeade •Wurt's Magna Carta •The Carter Family
    Note: The following profiles had been attached as daughters:

    Anne (detached Oct. 17, 2015)
    Mary (detached Oct. 19, 2015)

    end of biography

    Children:
    1. 14. Lionel de Welles, 6th Baron Welles, Knight of the Garter was born ~1406, Lincolnshire, England; died 29 Mar 1461, Towton, Yorkshire, England.

  3. 30.  Robert Waterton died 1425.

    Robert — Cecily Fleming. Cecily (daughter of Robert Fleming and unnamed spouse) was born Methley, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 31.  Cecily Fleming was born Methley, Yorkshire, England (daughter of Robert Fleming and unnamed spouse).
    Children:
    1. 15. Joan Waterton


Generation: 6

  1. 56.  John de Welles (son of John Welles, Knight, 4th Lord Welles and Maud de Ros, Lady Welles); died 8 Apr 1426.

    John married Eleanor de Mowbray Bef 1396. Eleanor (daughter of John de Mowbray, Knight, 4th Baron Mowbray and Elizabeth Segrave) was born Bef 1381; died 13 Aug 1417. [Group Sheet]


  2. 57.  Eleanor de Mowbray was born Bef 1381 (daughter of John de Mowbray, Knight, 4th Baron Mowbray and Elizabeth Segrave); died 13 Aug 1417.

    Notes:

    Eleanor de Mowbray (before 1361 – before 13 August 1417) was the daughter of John de Mowbray, 4th Baron Mowbray, and Elizabeth de Segrave, 5th Baroness Segrave (born 25 October 1338), daughter and heiress of John de Segrave, 4th Baron Segrave. She had two brothers and two sisters:[1]

    John de Mowbray, 1st Earl of Nottingham, who died unmarried shortly before 12 February 1383 and was buried at the Whitefriars, London.[2]
    Thomas de Mowbray, 1st Duke of Norfolk.[1]
    Margaret Mowbray (d. before 11 July 1401), who married, by licence dated 1 July 1369, Sir Reginald Lucy (d. 9 November 1437) of Woodcroft in Luton, Bedfordshire.[3]
    Joan Mowbray, who married firstly Sir Thomas Grey (1359 – 26 November or 3 December 1400) of Heaton near Norham, Northumberland, son of the chronicler Sir Thomas Grey, and secondly Sir Thomas Tunstall of Thurland in Tunstall, Lancashire.[4][2]
    Eleanor de Mowbray's father, the 4th Baron, was slain by the Turks at Thrace on 17 June 1368.[1][5]

    She died before 13 August 1417, when her husband, the 5th Baron, married a second wife named Margaret (d. 8 April 1426), whose surname is unknown.[6]

    Marriage and issue

    Before 1386 she married John de Welles, 5th Baron Welles (d. 8 April 1426), son of John de Welles, 4th Baron Welles (d. 11 October 1361), and Maud de Roos (d. 9 December 1388), daughter of William de Roos, 2nd Baron Roos of Helmsley, by Margery de Badlesmere, by whom she had a son and daughter:[5]

    Eude de Welles, who predeceased his father.[7]
    Eleanor.[7]

    end of biography

    Children:
    1. 28. Eude Welles was born ~1387; died >26 Jul 1417.

  3. 58.  Ralph de Greystoke, 3rd Baron GreystokeRalph de Greystoke, 3rd Baron Greystoke was born 18 Oct 1353, Ravensworth Castle, Yorkshire, England; was christened 18 Oct 1353, Kirkby Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England (son of William de Greystoke, 2nd Baron Greystoke and Joane FitzHugh); died 6 Apr 1418, Kirkby Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England.

    Notes:

    Ralph de Greystoke, 3rd Baron Greystoke, (18 October 1353 – 6 April 1418) was an English peer and landowner.

    Life

    Greystoke was the son of William de Greystoke, 2nd Baron Greystoke, and Joane, daughter of Lord Fitzhugh, his second wife.[3][1] He was born on 18 October 1353 at Ravensworth Castle, North Yorkshire, the home of his maternal uncle Henry.[1] As he was still a child when his father died, his estates were placed under the guardianship of Roger de Clifford, 5th Baron de Clifford.[4]

    He was summoned to Parliament between 28 November 1375 and 5 October 1417,[5] and, in the 1370s and 1380s, served as a warden of the Scottish Marches.[1]

    In 1384, he led an English force that was defeated by the Scots, under the command of George I, Earl of March, while they were travelling to Roxburgh.[2] Greystoke was captured and taken to Dunbar Castle, where he was provided with a meal in the great hall, served upon his own dining-ware, which had been seized from his baggage train along with hangings that now decorated the walls of the great hall.[2] Greystoke's ransom was 3,000 marks,[5] and his younger brother William was his hostage in the exchange.[6] While at Dunbar, William took ill with fever and died.[6] William was buried at the castle, but two years later his remains were moved to Newminster Abbey in Northumberland, where his grandfather Ralph de Greystoke, 1st Baron Greystoke, was buried.[6] Greystoke returned to fight the Scots in 1402 at the Battle of Humbleton Hill in Northumberland.[7]

    In the 1390s, "disillusioned" with the reign of Richard II, Greystoke backed the return of the exiled Henry of Bolingbroke, son of John of Gaunt and grandson of Edward III.[1] Greystoke brought his own men to join those of the exile at Doncaster in 1399 and, after Richard II was deposed, with other northern English lords he remained loyal to Bolingbroke, who succeeded to the crown as Henry IV.[8]

    Personal

    Greystoke married Katherine, the daughter of his former guardian Roger de Clifford, 5th Baron de Clifford.[4] They had two children: John, his heir,[1] and Maude, who married Eudo de Welles, son of John de Welles, 5th Baron Welles.[6]

    Greystoke died on 6 April 1418.[1] At inquisitions following his death, his estate was assessed to include messuages, or "dwelling-houses", and land holdings in Westmorland, Northumberland, and Yorkshire, as well as the manors and castles of Greystoke and Morpeth.[9]

    References

    ^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h Dockray, Keith (2004). "Greystoke family (per. 1321–1487)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/54524. Retrieved 19 December 2013.
    ^ Jump up to: a b c David R. Perry; Mark A. S. Blackburn (2000). Castle Park, Dunbar: Two Thousand Years on a Fortified Headland. Society Antiquaries Scotland. p. 12. ISBN 978-0-903903-16-5.
    Jump up ^ John Burke (1831). A general and heraldic dictionary of the peerages of England, Ireland, and Scotland, extinct, dormant, and in abeyance. England. p. 244.
    ^ Jump up to: a b Summerson, Henry (2004). "Clifford, Roger, fifth Baron Clifford (1333–1389)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/5660. Retrieved 19 December 2013.
    ^ Jump up to: a b John Burke (1831). A general and heraldic dictionary of the peerages of England, Ireland, and Scotland, extinct, dormant, and in abeyance. England. p. 245.
    ^ Jump up to: a b c d Samuel Jefferson (1840). The history and antiquities of Leath Ward: in the county of Cumberland: with biographical notices and memoirs. S. Jefferson. pp. 342–343.
    Jump up ^ Wm. E. Baumgaertner (January 2010). Squires, Knights, Barons, Kings: War and Politics in Fifteenth Century England. Trafford Publishing. p. 25. ISBN 978-1-4269-0769-2.
    Jump up ^ Gwilym Dodd; Douglas Biggs (1 January 2003). Henry IV: The Establishment of the Regime, 1399–1406. Boydell & Brewer Ltd. p. 130. ISBN 978-1-903153-12-3.
    Jump up ^ Great Britain. Public Record Office (2002). Calendar of Inquisitions Post Mortem and Other Analogous Documents Preserved in the Public Record Office: Henry V. Boydell & Brewer Ltd. pp. 28–31. ISBN 978-0-85115-899-0.

    endo of biography

    Baron Ralph de Greystoke (1353-1418) is the 21st great-grandfather of the grand-children of Ma Byars (1894-1985)

    Baron Ralph de Greystoke (1353-1418) is the 12th great-grandson of William the Conqueror (1024-1087) ... http://www.ourfamilyhistories.org/ahnentafel.php?personID=I14874&tree=00&parentset=0&generations=12

    History and development of Brougham Castle... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brougham_Castle

    Do you remember the 1984 Bristish film, "Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan, Lord of the Apes"... go to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greystoke:_The_Legend_of_Tarzan,_Lord_of_the_Apes

    General Notes:

    on and heir, by 2nd wife, born and baptized at Kirkby Ravensworth, co. York, 18 October 1353. He was appointed Warden of the West Marches, 12 February 1373 /4. The King took his homage and fealty and he had livery of his father's lands, 19 May 1374, and of those which Alice, his grandmother, had held in dower, 20 May 1375. He was summoned, for Military Service, 13 June 1385, and to Parliament from 28 December 1375 to 5 October 1417, by writs directed Radulpho haroni de Graystok'. He was appointed Warden of the West Marches, 16 July 1376; Constable of the castle of Lochmaben, and Justice, Steward, and Keeper of the lordship of Annandale, for three years, 1 December 1376; Warden of the West Marches, 16 July 1377; Warden of the East and West Marches, 12 December 1377; Warden of the West Marches, 4 June and 4 November 1379; Warden of the East Marches, 10 March 1379/80, 29 May 1380, and 16 June 1382; and of the West Marches, 27 March 1386. He was taken prisoner by George, Earl of Dunbar [SCT], in a skirmish at Horseridge in Glendale ward, Northumberland, 25 June 1380. He was one of the Lords who gave his assent in Parliament, 23 October 1399, to the secret imprisonment of Richard II. On 8 November 1403 the King took his homage and fealty and he had livery of the lands which Joan, his mother, had held in dower. He married Katherine, daughter of Roger (DE CLIFFORD), LORD CLIFFORD, by Maud, daughter of Thomas (DE BEAUCHAMP), EARL OF WARWICK. She died 23 April 1413. He died 6 April 1418, aged 64. [Complete Peerage VI:195-6, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)] ... http://www.celtic-casimir.com/webtree/18/53249.htm

    Ancestral File Number: 8J5R-02.

    end of profile

    Birth:
    Image, map & history ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ravensworth_Castle_(North_Yorkshire)

    Ralph married Catherine Clifford, Baroness of Ravensworth 0___ 1377, Brougham Castle, Westmorland, England. Catherine (daughter of Roger de Clifford, Knight, 5th Baron de Clifford and Maud Beauchamp) was born ~1367, Brougham Castle, Westmorland, England; was christened Ravensworth, Kirby, North Riding, Yorkshire, England; died 23 Apr 1413, (North Riding, Yorkshire) England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 59.  Catherine Clifford, Baroness of Ravensworth was born ~1367, Brougham Castle, Westmorland, England; was christened Ravensworth, Kirby, North Riding, Yorkshire, England (daughter of Roger de Clifford, Knight, 5th Baron de Clifford and Maud Beauchamp); died 23 Apr 1413, (North Riding, Yorkshire) England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Katherine de Clifford

    Children:
    1. John de Greystoke, 4th Baron of Greystock was born 0___ 1389, Penrith, Cumbria, England; died 8 Aug 1436, Northamptonshire, England; was buried Collegiate Church, Greystoke, Penrith, England.
    2. 29. Maud Greystoke was born ~1390, Greystoke, Cumbria, England; died ~1416, Welles Lincolnshire, England.
    3. Joan Greystoke was born ~1394, Cumbria, England; died ~1415, Durham, England.
    4. Ralph de Greystoke, 5th Baron Greystoke was born 9 Sep 1406, Greystoke Manor, Penrith, England; died 1 Jun 1487, Kirkham, Yorkshire, England; was buried Monastery, Kirkham, Northumberland, England.

  5. 62.  Robert Fleming was born Methley, Yorkshire, England.

    Robert — unnamed spouse. [Group Sheet]


  6. 63.  unnamed spouse
    Children:
    1. 31. Cecily Fleming was born Methley, Yorkshire, England.


Generation: 7

  1. 112.  John Welles, Knight, 4th Lord Welles was born 23 Aug 1334, Bonthorpe, Lincolnshire, England; died 11 Oct 1361, Welles, Lincolnshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: 4th Baron Welles
    • Also Known As: John de Welles

    Notes:

    John de Welles, 4th Lord Welles1

    M, #189143, b. 23 August 1334, d. 11 October 1361
    Last Edited=16 Sep 2014
    John de Welles, 4th Lord Welles was born on 23 August 1334 at Bonthorpe, Lincolnshire, England.2 He was the son of Adam de Welle, 3rd Lord Welles and Margaret (?).2 He married Maud de Ros, daughter of William de Ros, 2nd Lord de Ros of Helmsley and Margery de Badlesmere, circa 1344/45. He died on 11 October 1361 at age 27.2
    He gained the title of 4th Lord Welles.
    Children of John de Welles, 4th Lord Welles and Maud de Ros

    Anne de Welles+1 d. a 1396
    Margery de Welles+3 d. 29 May 1422
    John de Welles, 5th Baron Welles+4 b. 20 Apr 1352, d. 26 Aug 1421
    Citations

    [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume X, page 122. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
    [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume XII/2, page 441.
    [S474] FamilySearch, online http://www.familysearch.com. Hereinafter cited as FamilySearch.
    [S22] Sir Bernard Burke, C.B. LL.D., A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire, new edition (1883; reprint, Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1978), page 572. Hereinafter cited as Burkes Extinct Peerage.

    John married Maud de Ros, Lady Welles 1344-1345. Maud (daughter of William de Ros, Knight, 2nd Baron de Ros and Margery de Badlesmere) was born (Helmsley, Yorkshire, England); died 9 Dec 1388. [Group Sheet]


  2. 113.  Maud de Ros, Lady Welles was born (Helmsley, Yorkshire, England) (daughter of William de Ros, Knight, 2nd Baron de Ros and Margery de Badlesmere); died 9 Dec 1388.
    Children:
    1. Margery Welles, Baroness of Masham died 29 May 1422.
    2. Anne Welles died 13 Nov 1397.
    3. 56. John de Welles died 8 Apr 1426.

  3. 114.  John de Mowbray, Knight, 4th Baron Mowbray was born 24 Jun 1340, Epworth, Lincolnshire, England (son of John de Mowbray, Knight, 3rd Baron Mowbray and Joan Plantagenet, Baroness Mowbray); died 19 Oct 1368, Thrace, Turkey.

    Other Events:

    • Probate: 17 May 1369, Lincoln, Lincolnshire, England

    Notes:

    John de Mowbray, 4th Baron Mowbray (24 June 1340 – 1368) was an English peer. He was slain near Constantinople while en route to the Holy Land.

    Family

    John de Mowbray, born 25 June 1340 at Epworth, Lincolnshire, was the son of John de Mowbray, 3rd Baron Mowbray, of Axholme, Lincolnshire, by his second wife, Joan of Lancaster, sixth and youngest daughter of Henry, 3rd Earl of Lancaster.[1][2][3] He had two sisters, Blanche and Eleanor (for details concerning his sisters see the article on his father, John de Mowbray, 3rd Baron Mowbray.[4]

    Career

    He and twenty-six others were knighted by Edward III in July 1355[3] while English forces were at the Downs before sailing to France. In 1356 he served in a campaign in Brittany.[2][3] He had livery of his lands on 14 November 1361; however his inheritance was subject to the dower which his father had settled on his stepmother, Elizabeth de Vere.[3] By 1369 she had married Sir William de Cossington, son and heir of Stephen de Cossington of Cossington in Aylesford, Kent; not long after the marriage she and her new husband surrendered themselves to the Fleet prison for debt.[2][4] According to Archer, the cause may have been Mowbray's prosecution of his stepmother for waste of his estates; he had been awarded damages against her of almost ¹1000.[3]

    In about 1343 an agreement had been made for a double marriage between, on the one hand, Mowbray and Audrey Montagu, the granddaughter of Thomas of Brotherton, and on the other hand, Mowbray's sister, Blanche, and Audrey's brother, Edward Montagu. Neither marriage took place.[3] Instead, about 1349 a double marriage was solemnized between, on the one hand, Mowbray and Elizabeth Segrave, and on the other hand, Mowbray's sister Blanche, and Elizabeth Segrave's brother John, Pope Clement VI having granted dispensations for the marriages at the request of the Earl of Lancaster in order to prevent 'disputes between the parents', who were neighbours.[5][3] Mowbray had little financial benefit from his marriage during his lifetime as a result of the very large jointure which had been awarded to Elizabeth Segrave's mother, Margaret, Duchess of Norfolk, who lived until 1399.[6][3] However, when Elizabeth Segrave's father, John de Segrave, 4th Baron Segrave, died on 1 April 1353, Edward III allowed Mowbray to receive a small portion of his wife's eventual inheritance. Estate accounts for 1367 indicate that Mowbray enjoyed an annual income of almost ¹800 at that time.[3]

    Mowbray was summoned to Parliament from 14 August 1362 to 20 January 1366.[2] On 10 October 1367 he appointed attorneys in preparation for travel beyond the seas; these appointments were confirmed in the following year.[7] He was slain by the Turks near Constantinople while en route to the Holy Land.[8] A letter from the priory of 'Peyn' written in 1396 suggests that he was initially buried at the convent at Pera opposite Constantinople;[9][10] according to the letter, 'at the instance of his son Thomas' his bones had now been gathered and were being sent to England for burial with his ancestors.[7]

    His will was proved at Lincoln on 17 May 1369.[11][5] His wife, Elizabeth, predeceased him in 1368 by only a few months.[5]

    Marriage and issue

    Mowbray married, by papal dispensation dated 25 March 1349,[5] Elizabeth de Segrave (born 25 October 1338 at Croxton Abbey),[5] suo jure Lady Segrave, daughter and heiress of John de Segrave, 4th Baron Segrave (d.1353),[3] by Margaret, daughter and heiress of Thomas of Brotherton, son of Edward I.[12]

    They had two sons and three daughters:[12]

    John de Mowbray, 1st Earl of Nottingham (1 August 1365 – before 12 February 1383), who died unmarried, and was buried at the Whitefriars, London.[13]
    Thomas de Mowbray, 1st Duke of Norfolk.[14]
    Eleanor Mowbray (born before 25 May 1364),[5] who married John de Welles, 5th Baron Welles.[13][15]
    Margaret Mowbray (d. before 11 July 1401), who married, by licence dated 1 July 1369, Sir Reginald Lucy (d. 9 November 1437) of Woodcroft in Luton, Bedfordshire.[16]
    Joan Mowbray, who married firstly Sir Thomas Grey (1359 – 26 November or 3 December 1400) of Heaton near Norham, Northumberland, son of the chronicler Sir Thomas Grey, and secondly Sir Thomas Tunstall of Thurland in Tunstall, Lancashire.[17][13]

    Died:
    while en route to the Holy Land...

    was slain by the Turks at Thrace on 17 June 1368.

    John married Elizabeth Segrave ~ 1343. Elizabeth (daughter of John Segrave, 4th Baron Segrave and Margaret Brotherton, Countess of Norfolk) was born 25 Oct 1338, Blaby, Leicestershire, England; died 24 May 1368, Leicestershire, England; was buried Croxton Abbey, Blaby, Leicestershire, England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 115.  Elizabeth SegraveElizabeth Segrave was born 25 Oct 1338, Blaby, Leicestershire, England (daughter of John Segrave, 4th Baron Segrave and Margaret Brotherton, Countess of Norfolk); died 24 May 1368, Leicestershire, England; was buried Croxton Abbey, Blaby, Leicestershire, England.

    Notes:

    Buried:
    Croxton Abbey, near Croxton Kerrial, Leicestershire, was a Premonstratensian monastery founded by William I, Count of Boulogne.

    images ... https://www.google.com/search?q=byland+abbey&espv=2&biw=1440&bih=815&site=webhp&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&sqi=2&ved=0ahUKEwj6svLG7MLKAhUEFh4KHfJ4BGgQsAQILg&dpr=1#tbm=isch&q=croxton+abbey

    Children:
    1. Joan Mowbray was born ~ 1361; died Aft 30 Nov 1402.
    2. Thomas de Mowbray, Knight, 1st Duke of Norfolk was born 22 Mar 1366, Epworth, Isle of Axholme, Lincolnshire, England; died 22 Sep 1399, Venice, Itlaly.
    3. 57. Eleanor de Mowbray was born Bef 1381; died 13 Aug 1417.

  5. 116.  William de Greystoke, 2nd Baron Greystoke was born 6 Jan 1321, Grimthorpe, Cumbria, England (son of Ralph de Greystoke, 1st Baron Audley and Alice de Audley); died 10 Jul 1359, Brancepeth Castle, Durham, England; was buried St. Andrews Church, Greystoke, Cumbria, England.

    Notes:

    William de Greystoke, 2nd Baron Greystoke, (6 January 1321 – 10 July 1359) of Greystoke in Cumbria, was an English peer and landowner.

    Origins

    Greystoke was the son of Ralph de Greystoke, 1st Baron Greystoke, and his wife Alice, daughter of Hugh, Lord Audley.[1]

    Career

    He was born at the family home in Grimthorpe, on 6 January 1321.[1] Greystoke's father died while he was still a child and he became a ward of his mother's second husband, Ralph Neville, 2nd Baron Neville de Raby,[2] until he reached his majority in 1342.[1] During the next ten years he was involved, on the English side, in the Hundred Years' War between the Kingdom of England and the Kingdom of France and was present at the Siege of Calais in 1346.[1] He served under Edward, the Black Prince, in France.[3] He participated in the Northern Crusades of Henry of Grosmont, 1st Duke of Lancaster to Prussia in 1351–2.[1] In the early 1350s he was involved in the negotiations to secure the release of King David II of Scotland, who had been taken prisoner at the Battle of Neville's Cross on 17 October 1346.[1] Greystoke was made a captain of Berwick-upon-Tweed, but due to his service in France, he was not present when the town fell to the Scots in August 1355.[1] In October 1353 Greystoke received a royal licence to crenellate "his dwelling place", later known as Greystoke Castle.[4] He was also responsible for renovations on Morpeth Castle which he also owned.[4]

    Marriages and children

    He married twice and had children by his second wife only:

    Firstly to Lucy de Lucie,[3] daughter of Thomas de Lucy, 2nd Baron Lucy (died 1365),[5] but the marriage was childless,[2] and they divorced.[3] During this time, his stepfather, Ralph Neville, unsuccessfully proposed that Greystoke should name his half-brothers, Ralph, Robert, and William Neville, as his heirs.[2]
    Secondly he married Joane FitzHugh, daughter of Baron Fitzhugh, by whom he had four children:
    Ralph de Greystoke, 3rd Baron Greystoke, eldest son and heir.
    Robert de Greystoke;
    William de Greystoke;
    Alice de Greystoke,[3] the first wife of Robert Harington, 3rd Baron Harington (1356–1406)[6] of Gleaston Castle in the manor of Aldingham in Furness, Lancashire.
    Death and burial[edit]
    Greystoke died on 10 July 1359, at Brancepeth Castle, the seat of his step-father Ralph Neville, 2nd Baron Neville de Raby,[5] and was buried in the parish church of St. Andrew's in Greystoke, Cumbria,[1] with a mass conducted by Gilbert de Welton, Bishop of Carlisle.[5] His funeral took place with "great pomp and solemnity", and was attended by great personages including: Roger de Clifford, 5th Baron de Clifford,[7] Henry Scrope, 1st Baron Scrope of Masham, Thomas, Baron Musgrave, the Abbot of Holmcultram Abbey and the Abbot of Shap Abbey.[5]

    end of biography

    William — Joane FitzHugh. [Group Sheet]


  6. 117.  Joane FitzHugh
    Children:
    1. 58. Ralph de Greystoke, 3rd Baron Greystoke was born 18 Oct 1353, Ravensworth Castle, Yorkshire, England; was christened 18 Oct 1353, Kirkby Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England; died 6 Apr 1418, Kirkby Ravensworth, Yorkshire, England.

  7. 118.  Roger de Clifford, Knight, 5th Baron de Clifford was born 10 Jul 1333, Brougham Castle, Westmorland, England (son of Robert de Clifford, Knight, 3rd Baron de Clifford and Isabel de Berkeley); died 13 Jul 1389, Brougham Castle, Westmorland, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: 5th Baron of Westmorland

    Notes:

    Roger de Clifford, 5th Baron de Clifford, ninth Lord Clifford, fifth Baron of Westmoreland (10 July 1333[1] - 13 July 1389), was the son of Robert de Clifford, 3rd Baron de Clifford (d. 20 May 1344), second son of Robert de Clifford, 1st Baron de Clifford (1273–1314), the founder of the northern branch of the family. His mother was Isabella (d. 25 July 1362), daughter of Maurice, 2nd Lord Berkeley. He succeeded his elder brother, Robert de Clifford, 4th Baron de Clifford in 1350, on which day he made proof of his age.[2]

    Military career

    Clifford entered on his military career when hardly more than twelve, being armed at the time of Jacob van Artevelde's death on 17 July 1345.[3]

    In August 1350 he was engaged in the seafight with the Spaniards near Winchelsea; and in 1355 he accompanied his father-in-law, Thomas de Beauchamp, 11th Earl of Warwick, on the expedition to Gascony.[4] He again served in Gascony in 1359, 1360, and in the French expedition of the Duke of Lancaster in 1373.

    A document dated at Brougham 10 July 1369 shows him engaging the services of Richard le Fleming and his company for a year. In the same way he retained Sir Roger de Mowbray; and was himself retained, with his company of nearly eighty men, by Edmund Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March, on 25 September 1379.[5]

    On 15 March 1361 he was called upon to assist Lionel, duke of Clarence, in his great Irish expedition on pain of forfeiting his Irish estates. A similar summons to defend his lands in Ireland was issued on 28 July 1368.[6]

    His chief services, however, were rendered on the Scotch borders. In July 1370 he was appointed one of the wardens of the west marches; but according to Sir H. Nicolas he is found defending the northern borders fourteen years earlier.[7] Resigned the truce with Scotland on 24 August 1369, and was warden of both east and west marches on five occasions between 1380 and 1385.

    In August 1385 he accompanied Richard II's expedition against Scotland with sixty men-at-arms and forty archers. His last border sendee seems to have been in October 1388, when he was ordered to adopt measures of defence for the Scotch Marches.[8] In May 1388 he accompanied Richard FitzAlan, 11th Earl of Arundel, in his naval expedition to Brittany.[9]

    Political Offices

    He was hereditary High Sheriff of Westmorland from 1350? until his death in 1389. In 1377 he was made High Sheriff of Cumberland and governor of Carlisle, a city whose walls he appears to have inspected and found weak in the preceding year. To the last two offices he was reappointed on Richard II's accession.

    He was made a commissioner of array against the Scots (26 February 1372), and one of a body of commissioners to correct truce-breakers and decide border disputes 26 May 1373, having sat on a similar commission in September 1367.

    Parliament

    Clifford was summoned to all parliaments from 15 December 1356 to 28 July 1388.[10] He was trier of petitions in many parliaments from November 1373 to September 1377. In August 1374 he was appointed one of the commissioners to settle the dispute between Henry de Percy and William, Earl of Douglas, relative to the possession of Jedworth Forest. In the parliament of November 1381 he was member of a committee to confer with the House of Commons. On 12 October 1386 he gave evidence in the great Scrope and Grosvenor case at St. Margaret's Church, Westminster.

    Death and Succession

    Roger de Clifford died 13 July 1389, being then possessed of enormous estates, chiefly situated in Yorkshire, Northumberland, Cumberland, and Westmoreland, but spread over several other counties.[11] He was succeeded by his son Thomas de Clifford, 6th Baron de Clifford.

    Marriage and Issue

    He married Maud (d. 1403), daughter of Thomas de Beauchamp, 11th Earl of Warwick.[12]

    Thomas de Clifford, 6th Baron de Clifford (d. 1391 ?)
    William Clifford, the Governor of Berwick (d. 1419)
    Margaret, married Sir John Melton, knight
    Katherine, married Ralph, lord Greystock
    Philippa, married William Ferrers, 5th Baron Ferrers of Groby (Lewis, Ancestral Roots, 8th ed. (2006), line 11, no. 34)
    Dugdale gives him a third son, the Lollard, Sir Lewis Clifford (d. 1404), whom, however, Sir H. Nicolas shows to have been probably his brother, but certainly not his son[13]

    Magna Carta Ancestry by Douglas Richardson lists three sons, including a Roger, no additional information.

    Genealogy

    The genealogical table in Whitaker gives Clifford two brothers, John de Clifford and Thomas de Clifford, said to have been the ancestor of Richard de Clifford, Bishop of London, and three sisters.

    References

    Jump up ^ (Scr. and Gros. Roll, text, i. 197)
    Jump up ^ (Dugdale, i. 240; Whitaker, pp. 310-11; Hist. Peerage, 117; Hist. of Westmoreland, i. 279; Escheat Rolls, ii. 118, 248)
    Jump up ^ (Scr. and Gros. Roll, i. 197)
    Jump up ^ (Whitaker, 314- 315; Dugdale, i. 340)
    Jump up ^ (Dugdale, i. 340; Whitaker, 317)
    Jump up ^ (Rymer, vi. 319, 595)
    Jump up ^ (Rymer, vi. 657; Dugdale, i. 340; Scrope Roll, ii. 469, &c.)
    Jump up ^ (Rymer, vi. 570, 637, 714, vii. 9, 475; Nicolas, Scr. and Gros. Roll, ii. 469, &c.)
    Jump up ^ (Scr. and Gros. Roll, i. 197, ii. 469, &c.; Rymer, vii. 45)
    Jump up ^ (Dugdale, i. 340; Hist. Peerage, 117)
    Jump up ^ (Dugdale, i. 341; Escheat Rolls, iii. 113)
    Jump up ^ (cf. Escheat Rolls, iii. 286)
    Jump up ^ (Dugdale, i. 340-2; Whitaker, 314-16; Nicolas, Scr. and Gros. Roll, ii. 427, &c.)
    This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: "Clifford, Roger de (1333-1389)". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900.

    *

    Roger — Maud Beauchamp. Maud (daughter of Thomas de Beauchamp, Knight, 11th Earl of Warwick and Katherine de Mortimer, Countess of Warwick) was born 0___ 1335, Warwickshire, England; died 0Feb 1403, Brougham Castle, Westmorland, England. [Group Sheet]


  8. 119.  Maud Beauchamp was born 0___ 1335, Warwickshire, England (daughter of Thomas de Beauchamp, Knight, 11th Earl of Warwick and Katherine de Mortimer, Countess of Warwick); died 0Feb 1403, Brougham Castle, Westmorland, England.
    Children:
    1. Margaret Clifford was born Brougham Castle, Westmorland, England.
    2. Thomas Clifford, Knight, 6th Baron de Clifford was born 1363-1364, Cumbria, England; died 18 Aug 1391.
    3. 59. Catherine Clifford, Baroness of Ravensworth was born ~1367, Brougham Castle, Westmorland, England; was christened Ravensworth, Kirby, North Riding, Yorkshire, England; died 23 Apr 1413, (North Riding, Yorkshire) England.
    4. Phillippa Clifford, Baroness Ferrers of Groby was born 0___ 1371, Brougham Castle, Westmorland, England; died Bef 9 Aug 1416.


Generation: 8

  1. 226.  William de Ros, Knight, 2nd Baron de RosWilliam de Ros, Knight, 2nd Baron de Ros was born 0___ 1288, Helmsley, Yorkshire, England (son of William de Ros, Knight, 1st Baron de Ros of Hamlake and Maud de Vaux); died 3 Feb 1343, Kirkham, Yorkshire, England; was buried Kirkham Priory, Kirkham, North Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Member of Parliament
    • Also Known As: 3rd Baron de Ros of Hamlake, Werke, Trusbot & Belvoir
    • Also Known As: Lord Ross of Werke
    • Military: Lord High Admiral

    Notes:

    William de Ros, 2nd Baron de Ros of Helmsley (c.1288 - 3 February 1343) was the son of William de Ros, 1st Baron de Ros.

    Biography

    As 2nd Baron de Ros of Hamlake, Werke, Trusbut & Belvoir, he was summoned to Parliament during the reigns of Edward II and Edward III of England. In 1321 he completed the religious foundation which his father had begun at Blakeney. He was created Lord Ross of Werke. He was appointed Lord High Admiral and was one of the commissioners with the Archbishop of York, and others, to negotiate peace between the king and Robert de Bruce, who had assumed the title of king of Scotland.

    William de Ros was buried at Kirkham Priory, near the great altar.

    Family

    William de Ros married, before 25 November 1316, Margery De Badlesmere (c.1306 - 18 October 1363), eldest daughter of Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 1st Baron Badlesmere, with Margaret, daughter of Sir Thomas de Clare, with whom he had two sons and three daughters:[2]

    William, who succeeded his father as Baron.
    Thomas, who succeeded his brother as Baron.
    Margaret, who married Sir Edward de Bohun.
    Maud, who married John de Welles, 4th Baron Welles.
    Elizabeth, who married William la Zouche, 2nd Lord Zouche of Haryngworth, a descendant of Breton nobility.

    Maud survived her husband by many years and was one of the very few English people present at the Jubilee, at Rome, in 1350; the king had tried to prevent the attendance of his subjects at this ceremony on account of the large sums of money usually taken out of the kingdom on such occasions.

    *

    Biography

    more...

    Residing in Wark Castle in August 1310. He was summoned for service in Scotland 1316-19, 1322, 1323, 1327, and 1335, and to Parliament 20 November 1317 to 21 Feb 1339/40. Received the surrender of Knaresborough, as a joint commander in January 1317/18, and remained loyal during the Earl of Lancaster's rebellion in 1321-22. Summoned for service in Gascony in December of 1324. He was appointed, by Prince Edward's government, Sheriff of Yorkshire (Nov 1326) and was a member of the Council of Regency in February 1326/27. In November 1327, he served as a commissioner to negotiate with the Scots for peace, as well as a similar role with France in February 1329/30. In 1334, he entertained the King at Helmsley, and during the King's absence in Flanders, he was one of the commissioners to preserve the peace in that country. He took part in the defense of Newcastle against the Scots. Buried at Kirkham in Lancashire.

    Children

    They had two sons, William, Knt. [3rd Lord Roos of Helmsley] and Thomas, Knt. [4th Lord Roos of Helmsley], and three daughters, Margaret, Maud, and Elizabeth. (Ref: Magna Carta Ancestry)

    William de Ros, 3rd Baron de Ros

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    William de Ros, 3rd Baron de Ros (died February 16, 1342) was the son of William de Ros, 2nd Baron de Ros.

    As 3rd Baron de Ros of Hamlake, Werke, Trusbut & Belvoir, he was summoned to Parliament during the reigns of Edward II and Edward III of England. In 1321 he completed the religious foundation which his father had begun at Blakeney. He was created Lord Ross of Werke. He was appointed Lord High Admiral and was one of the commissioners with the Archbishop of York, and others, to negotiate peace between the king and Robert de Bruce, who had assumed the title of king of Scotland.
    He married Margery De Badlesmere (1306-1363), the eldest sister and co-heir of Giles de Badlesmere, 2nd Baron Badlesmere of Leeds Castle, county of Kent. She survived her husband by many years and was one of the very few English people present at the Jubilee, at Rome, in 1350; the king had tried to prevent the attendance of his subjects at this ceremony on account of the large sums of money usually taken out of the kingdom on such occasions.

    Their children were:

    * William de Ros, 4th Baron de Ros
    * Thomas de Ros, 5th Baron de Ros
    * Sir John De Ros
    * Margaret de Ros
    * Matilda de Ros

    William de Ros was buried at Kirkham Priory, near the great altar.

    *

    more...

    Baron de Ros (pronounced "Roose") is one of the most ancient baronial titles in the Peerage of England . (The spelling of the title and of the surname of the original holders has been rendered differently in various texts. The word "Ros" is sometimes spelt "Roos", and the word "de" is sometimes dropped.)


    Barons de Ros of Helmsley (1264)[edit]
    William de Ros, 1st Baron de Ros (d. 1317)
    William de Ros, 2nd Baron de Ros (d. 1343)
    William de Ros, 3rd Baron de Ros (c. 1326–1352)
    Thomas de Ros, 4th Baron de Ros (1336–1384)
    John de Ros, 5th Baron de Ros (c. 1360–1394)
    William de Ros, 6th Baron de Ros (c. 1369–1414)
    John de Ros, 7th Baron de Ros (d. 1421)
    Thomas de Ros, 8th Baron de Ros (c. 1405–1431)
    Thomas de Ros, 9th Baron de Ros (c. 1427–1464) (forfeit 1464)
    Edmund de Ros, 10th Baron de Ros (d. 1508) (restored 1485, barony abeyant in 1508)
    George Manners, 11th Baron de Ros (d. 1513) (abeyance terminated about 1512)
    Thomas Manners, 1st Earl of Rutland, 12th Baron de Ros (d. 1543)
    Henry Manners, 2nd Earl of Rutland, 13th Baron de Ros (1526–1563)
    Edward Manners, 3rd Earl of Rutland, 14th Baron de Ros (1549–1587)
    Elizabeth Cecil, 16th Baroness de Ros (c. 1572–1591)
    William Cecil, 17th Baron de Ros (1590–1618)
    Francis Manners, 6th Earl of Rutland, 18th Baron de Ros (1578–1632)
    Katherine Villiers, Duchess of Buckingham, 19th Baroness de Ros (d. 1649)
    George Villiers, 2nd Duke of Buckingham, 20th Baron de Ros (1628–1687) (barony abeyant 1687)
    Charlotte FitzGerald-de Ros, 21st Baroness de Ros (1769–1831) (abeyance terminated 1806)
    Henry William FitzGerald-de Ros, 22nd Baron de Ros (1793–1839)
    William Lennox Lascelles FitzGerald-de Ros, 23rd Baron de Ros (1797–1874)
    Dudley Charles FitzGerald-de Ros, 24th Baron de Ros (1827–1907)
    Mary Dawson, Countess of Dartrey, 25th Baroness de Ros (1854–1939) (abeyant 1939)
    Una Mary Ross, 26th Baroness de Ros (1879–1956) (abeyance terminated 1943; abeyant 1956)
    Georgiana Angela Maxwell, 27th Baroness de Ros (1933–1983) (abeyance terminated 1958)
    Peter Trevor Maxwell, 28th Baron de Ros (b. 1958)
    The heir apparent is the present holder's son Hon. Finbar James Maxwell (b. 1988).

    Footnotes

    Jump up ^ Debrett's Peerage, 1968, p.347
    Jump up ^ The British herald; or, Cabinet of armorial bearings of the nobility & gentry of Great Britain & Ireland, from the earliest to the present time: with a complete glossary of heraldic terms: to which is prefixed a History of heraldry, collected and arranged ...
    Jump up ^ Cokayne 1949, p. 95; Richardson III 2011, p. 448.
    Jump up ^ Cokayne 1949, p. 95.
    Jump up ^ http://www.cracroftspeerage.co.uk/online/content/Ros1299.htm

    References

    Cokayne, George Edward (1949). The Complete Peerage, edited by Geoffrey H. White XI. London: St. Catherine Press.
    Richardson, Douglas (2011). Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, ed. Kimball G. Everingham III (2nd ed.). Salt Lake City. ISBN 144996639X

    Birth:
    (pronounced "Roose")

    Buried:
    The ruins of Kirkham Priory are situated on the banks of the River Derwent, at Kirkham, North Yorkshire, England. The Augustinian priory was founded in the 1120s by Walter l'Espec, lord of nearby Helmsley, who also built Rievaulx Abbey ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kirkham_Priory

    Images for Kirkham Priory ... https://www.google.com/search?q=Kirkham+Priory&rlz=1C1KMZB_enUS591US591&espv=2&biw=1440&bih=810&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjYj6LQuIzPAhXCJiYKHVRGC3wQsAQIMA

    William married Margery de Badlesmere Bef 25 Nov 1316. Margery (daughter of Bartholomew de Badlesmere, Knight, 1st Baron Badlesmere and Margaret de Clare, Baroness Badlesmere) was born 0___ 1306, Badlesmere Manor, Kent, England; died 18 Oct 1363. [Group Sheet]


  2. 227.  Margery de Badlesmere was born 0___ 1306, Badlesmere Manor, Kent, England (daughter of Bartholomew de Badlesmere, Knight, 1st Baron Badlesmere and Margaret de Clare, Baroness Badlesmere); died 18 Oct 1363.
    Children:
    1. Elizabeth de Ros was born 0___ 1325, Helmsley, Yorkshire, England; died 24 May 1380, Harringworth, Northamptonshire, , England.
    2. Thomas de Ros, Knight, 4th Baron de Ros was born 13 Jan 1335, Helmsley, Yorkshire, England; died 8 Jun 1383, Uffington, Lincolnshire, England; was buried Rievaulx Abbey, Helmsley, North Yorkshire, England.
    3. 113. Maud de Ros, Lady Welles was born (Helmsley, Yorkshire, England); died 9 Dec 1388.

  3. 228.  John de Mowbray, Knight, 3rd Baron Mowbray was born 29 Nov 1310, Hovingham, Yorkshire, England (son of John de Mowbray, I, 8th Baron Mowbray and Aline de Braose); died 4 Oct 1361, York, Yorkshire, England; was buried Bedford Greyfriars, Friars Minor, Bedford, Bedforshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Baron of Axholme
    • Also Known As: Baron of Bramber, Sussex
    • Also Known As: Keeper of Berwick-Upon-Tweed
    • Military: Battle of Neville's Cross

    Notes:

    Mowbray /'mo?bri/ is an Anglo-Norman baronial house, derived from Montbray in Normandy. From this village came Geoffrey de Montbray who came to be Bishop of Coutances and accompanied Duke William of Normandy at the Conquest of England in 1066.[1]

    For his support he was granted some 280 English manors (each about the size of a village). His nephew Robert de Montbrai became Earl of Northumberland in 1080, but he rebelled against William II (Rufus) and was captured and imprisoned in Windsor Castle for thirty years. His divorced wife, Matilda, married Nigel d'Aubigny (sometimes spelt d'Albini) whose family came from Saint-Martin-d'Aubigny, 16 km. west of Saint-Lão and 15 km. north of Coutances. However, Robert was the maternal uncle of Nigel and although Nigel inherited Robert's vast landholdings, the marriage was annulled for consanguinity before any issue. By his second wife, Gundred, he had a son and heir Roger whose name was changed by royal command from d'Aubigny to de Montbray. The family flourished (Baronial Pedigree) and the name spelling evolved to Mowbray.[citation needed]

    The baronial line died out in England with a young heiress ca. 1475, although a son of an earlier generation had founded a dynasty in Scotland where issue has survived. The family was active up and down the east side of the country and settled predominantly in the counties of Durham, Lincolnshire and Leicestershire in historic times. Since then there has been the usual migration into other areas and overseas.[citation needed]

    As with any name, there are numerous spelling variations over time, but the major ones are Moubray, the Scottish version, and Mowberry which stemmed from a Leicestershire migration into Glinton, Northamptonshire, where the variant became established and eventually spread into a Lincolnshire branch. One of the many heraldic badges of the house was a mulberry tree.[citation needed]

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    John de Mowbray, 3rd Baron Mowbray (29 November 1310 - 4 October 1361) was the only son of John de Mowbray, 2nd Baron Mowbray, by his first wife, Aline de Brewes,[1] daughter of William de Braose, 2nd Baron Braose.

    He was born 29 November 1310 at Hovingham, Yorkshire.[1]

    Mowbray's father, the 2nd Baron, sided with Thomas, 2nd Earl of Lancaster, at the Battle of Boroughbridge on 16 March 1322 against Edward II, and was taken prisoner at the battle. He was hanged at York on 23 March 1322, and his estates forfeited.[1] His wife and son John were imprisoned in the Tower of London until Edward II was deposed by his wife, Queen Isabella, and Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March. The Mowbrays were released in 1327.

    The 3rd Baron de Mowbray was reportedly in Edward III's good graces, being present in France in the War of the Breton Succession for the sieges of Nantes and Aguillon. He was also on the English side at the Battle of Neville's Cross in the Second War of Scottish Independence.

    He died of the plague at York on 4 October 1361, and was buried at the Friars Minor in Bedford.[2]

    Marriages and issue

    He married firstly, before 26 February 1322, Maud de Holand, daughter of Robert de Holland, 1st Baron Holand, by Maud la Zouche, daughter and coheiress of Alan la Zouche, 1st Baron la Zouche of Ashby. The marriage was later declared void.[3]

    He married secondly, between 28 February 1327 and 4 June 1328, Joan of Lancaster, sixth and youngest daughter of Henry, 3rd Earl of Lancaster, by whom he had a son and two daughters:[3]

    Blanche Mowbray (d. 21 July 1409), who was contracted to marry Edward de Montagu (d. before February 1359), son and heir apparent of Edward de Montagu, 1st Baron Montagu (died 3 July 1461), by Alice of Norfolk, daughter and heiress of Thomas of Brotherton; however the marriage did not take place.

    She married firstly, by papal dispensation dated 21 March 1349, John de Segrave (d. before 1 April 1353), son and heir apparent of John Segrave, 4th Baron Segrave by Margaret, Duchess of Norfolk, daughter and heiress of Thomas of Brotherton;
    secondly, as his second wife, Sir Robert Bertam (d.1363);
    thirdly, before 5 June 1372, Thomas de Poynings, 2nd Baron Poynings (d. before 25 June 1375), son and heir of Michael de Poynings, 1st Baron Poynings;
    fourthly, before 21 March 1378, Sir John de Worth (d. before 1 June 1391); and
    fifthly, before 5 November 1394, Sir John Wiltshire. She had no issue by any of her husbands.[5]

    Eleanor Mowbray, who married firstly, as his second wife, Roger la Warr, 3rd Baron De La Warr (d. 27 August 1370),[6] by whom she had a daughter, Joan La Warr, who married Thomas West, 1st Baron West; and secondly Sir Lewis Clifford of Princes Risborough, Buckinghamshire, brother of Hugh de Clifford.[6][7][8][9]

    He married thirdly, by papal dispensation of 4 May 1351, Elizabeth de Vere (d. 14 or 16 August 1375), widow of Sir Hugh Courtenay (d. before 2 September 1349), and daughter of John de Vere, 7th Earl of Oxford, by Maud de Badlesmere, daughter of Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 1st Baron Badlesmere.[2]

    After Mowbray's death, his widow, Elizabeth de Vere, married, before 26 November 1368, Sir William de Cossington.[2]

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    3rd Lord Mowbray, Baron of Axholme, Lincolnshire, Baron of Bramber, Sussex, lord of Gower in Wales, Keeper of Berwick-Upon-Tweed.

    Only son and heir to Sir John de Mowbray and Aline de Brewes. grandson of Sir Roger de Mowbray and Rose de Clare, William de Brewse and Agnes.

    Husband of Joan of Lancaster Plantagenet, youngest daughter of Henry of Lancaster and Maud de Chaworth. They were married between 1327 and 1328 and had one son and two daughters:
    Sir John, 4th Lord Mowbray
    Blanche, who would marry John Seagrave, Sir Robert Bertram, Lord Thomas de Poynings, John de Worth and John Wiltshire.
    Eleanor, who married Roger de la Warre

    Secondly, husband of Elizabeth de Vere, daughter of John, Earl of Oxford and Maud Badlesmere, daughter of Lord Badlesmere. They married before 04 May 1351, the date of their papal dispensation as they were related in the 3rd and 4th degree. John and Elizabeth had no surviving children.

    John was baptized at Hoveringham, and betrothed to Maud de Holand, daughter of Sir Robert de Holand and Maud de la Zouche at an early age, but the marriage never took place. After his father's execution in 1322, John was twelve, he and his mother were imprisoned at the Tower of London by the Despensers. When Edward III became King, they were released, their lands and properties returned. John was summoned to Parliament 1327 to 160, and served in the Scottish and French wars.

    Sir John was one of the commanders of the English Army at the Battle of Neville's Cross, Durham in 1346, where Lanercost (one of the chroniclers of the times) loudly sang his praises: "He was full of grace and kindness - the conduct both of himself and his men was such as to resound to their perpetual honour." He was also present at the siege of Calais in 1347. In 1354 his title to Gower was contested by Thomas Beauchamp, the Earl of Warwick, and the Court of Common Pleas settled with Warwick. Sir John witnessed the surrender of Balliol of the Scottish crown in favor of Edward in 1356.

    John died of the pestilence at York, and was buried at the Church of Friars Minor at Bedford. Elizabeth would remarry to Sir William Cossington of Kent, and she died 16 August 1375.

    Military:
    The Battle of Neville's Cross took place to the west of Durham, England, on 17 October 1346. The culmination of a Scottish invasion of northern England, the battle ended with the rout of the Scots and the capture of their king, David II of Scotland.

    Died:
    He died of the plague at York...

    John married Joan Plantagenet, Baroness Mowbray 1326-1327, (Yorkshire, England). Joan (daughter of Henry Plantagenet, 3rd Earl of Lancaster and Leicester and Maud Chaworth) was born ~ 1312, Norfolk, England; died 7 Jul 1349, Yorkshire, England; was buried Byland Abbey, Coxwold, North Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 229.  Joan Plantagenet, Baroness Mowbray was born ~ 1312, Norfolk, England (daughter of Henry Plantagenet, 3rd Earl of Lancaster and Leicester and Maud Chaworth); died 7 Jul 1349, Yorkshire, England; was buried Byland Abbey, Coxwold, North Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Joan of Lancaster
    • Alt Birth: 0___ 1312, Monmouthshire, Wales

    Notes:

    Joan of Lancaster (c.1312-7 July 1349) sometimes called Joan Plantagenet after her dynasty's name, was the third daughter of Henry, 3rd Earl of Lancaster and Maud Chaworth.

    Marriage

    Joan of Lancaster was born circa 1312.[1] She married John de Mowbray, 3rd Baron Mowbray sometime between February and June 1327.[1][2] They had three children:[2]

    Blanche de Mowbray (died 1409), married firstly John Segrave, secondly Robert Bertram, thirdly Thomas Poynings, fourthly Sir John Worth, and fifthly Sir John Wiltshire.
    Eleanor de Mowbray, married firstly Roger La Warre, Lord La Warre and secondly Sir Lewis de Clifford.
    John de Mowbray, 4th Baron Mowbray (25 June 1340–1368), married Elizabeth de Segrave
    She died in Yorkshire, England of plague. Her husband remarried to Elizabeth de Vere, widow of Sir Hugh de Courtenay.

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    Joan was the fifth daughter of Henry Plantagenet, Earl of Lancaster and Maud de Chaworth, granddaughter of Edmund of England, the son of King Henry III, and Blanche of Artois, Sir Patrick de Chaworth and Isabel de Beauchamp.

    Joan was the wife of Sir John de Mowbray, the son of Sir John de Mowbray and Aline de Brewes. They were married between 1327 and 1329 and had one son and two daughters:
    Sir John, 4th Lord Mowbray
    Blanche, who would marry John Seagrave, Sir Robert Bertram, Lord Thomas de Poynings, John de Worth and John Wiltshire.
    Eleanor, who married Roger de la Warre.

    Buried:
    Byland Abbey is a ruined abbey and a small village in the Ryedale district of North Yorkshire, England, in the North York Moors National Park.

    Images ... https://www.google.com/search?q=byland+abbey&espv=2&biw=1440&bih=815&site=webhp&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&sqi=2&ved=0ahUKEwj6svLG7MLKAhUEFh4KHfJ4BGgQsAQILg&dpr=1

    Died:
    She died in Yorkshire, England of plague...

    Notes:

    Married:
    sometime between February and June 1327 and his 2nd marriage...

    Children:
    1. Blanche Mowbray died 21 Jul 1409.
    2. 114. John de Mowbray, Knight, 4th Baron Mowbray was born 24 Jun 1340, Epworth, Lincolnshire, England; died 19 Oct 1368, Thrace, Turkey.

  5. 230.  John Segrave, 4th Baron Segrave was born 4 May 1315 (son of Stephen Segrave, 3rd Baron Segrave and Alice FitzAlan); died 1 Apr 1353, Repton, Derbyshire, England; was buried Grey Friars, London, Middlesex, England.

    Notes:

    John Segrave, 4th Baron Segrave (4 May 1315 – 1 April 1353) was an English peer and landowner in Leicestershire and Yorkshire. His family title of Baron Segrave is drawn from a village now spelled Seagrave, which uses a coat of arms similar to that of the barons.

    Segrave was the son of Stephen Segrave, 3rd Baron Segrave, and Alice Fitzalan. Little is known of his early life.

    About 1335 Segrave married Margaret, daughter and eventual sole heir of Thomas of Brotherton, son of Edward I by his second marriage,[2] by whom he had two sons and two daughters:[3]

    John de Segrave, who died young.[4]
    John de Segrave (d. before 1 April 1353), second of that name, who was contracted to marry Blanche of Lancaster, younger daughter and coheiress of Henry of Grosmont, 1st Duke of Lancaster. However the contract was later declared void.[4]

    About 1349 a double marriage was solemnized in which John Segrave married Blanche Mowbray, while John's sister, Elizabeth Segrave, married Blanche Mowbray's brother, John de Mowbray, 4th Baron Mowbray, Pope Clement VI having granted dispensations for the marriages at the request of Lancaster, in order to prevent 'disputes between the parents', who were neighbours.[5][6][4]

    Elizabeth de Segrave, 5th Baroness Segrave, who married John de Mowbray, 4th Baron Mowbray.[4]

    Margaret de Segrave, who died young, before 1353.[4]

    A year after the marriage his wife inherited her father's title and estates, becoming in her own right Countess of Norfolk and Earl Marshal of England.

    In 1350, Segrave and his wife sought a divorce, arguing that they had been contracted in marriage before Margaret was of age, and that she had never consented. The impetus for this was that Margaret wished to marry Walter Manny, 1st Baron Manny, with whom she was implicated.[7] However, Segrave died at Bretby in Repton, Derbyshire on 1 April 1353,[8] before the divorce had been granted. He was succeeded in the barony by his daughter Elizabeth.

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    John married Margaret Brotherton, Countess of Norfolk ~ 1335, (Norfolkshire, England). Margaret (daughter of Thomas of Brotherton, Knight, 1st Earl of Norfolk and Alice Hales, Countess of Norfolk) was born ~ 1320, Norfolk, Norfolkshire, England; died 24 Mar 1399, Tower of London, London, Middlesex, England; was buried Grey Friars, London, Middlesex, England. [Group Sheet]


  6. 231.  Margaret Brotherton, Countess of Norfolk was born ~ 1320, Norfolk, Norfolkshire, England (daughter of Thomas of Brotherton, Knight, 1st Earl of Norfolk and Alice Hales, Countess of Norfolk); died 24 Mar 1399, Tower of London, London, Middlesex, England; was buried Grey Friars, London, Middlesex, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Duchess of Norfolk
    • Also Known As: Earl Marshal
    • Also Known As: Margaret Marshal
    • Also Known As: Margaret Plantagenet

    Notes:

    Margaret, in her own right Countess of Norfolk (sometimes surnamed Brotherton or Marshal;[1] c.?1320–24 March 1399), was the daughter and eventual sole heir of Thomas of Brotherton, eldest son of Edward I, by his second marriage. In 1338 she succeeded to the earldom of Norfolk and the office of Earl Marshal.

    Family

    Born about 1320, Margaret was the daughter of Thomas of Brotherton, eldest son of Edward I by his second marriage to Margaret (1279?–1318), the daughter of Philippe III of France (d.1285).[2] Her mother was Alice de Hales (d. in or before 1330), daughter of Sir Roger de Hales of Hales Hall in Loddon in Roughton, Norfolk, by his wife, Alice.[3][4] She had a brother and sister:

    Edward of Norfolk, who married Beatrice de Mortimer, daughter of Roger de Mortimer, 1st Earl of March, but died without issue before 9 August 1334.[5]
    Alice of Norfolk, who married Sir Edward de Montagu.[6]
    Life[edit]
    In 1335 aged 15 (the typical age of marriage for maidens of that era), she was married to John Segrave, 4th Baron Segrave, and proceeded to have four children - two sons and two daughters - by him. In 1350, she sought a divorce on the ground that they had been contracted in marriage (in other words betrothed) before she was of marriageable age, and that she had never consented to cohabit with him. She made known her intention of traveling to the continent in order to plead personally with the Pope for a divorce. King Edward III prohibited her from leaving England, but she set off incognito anyway, having taken care to obtain a safe conduct from the King of France.

    The following year (1351) Edward III charged her with having crossed the English Channel in contravention of his prohibition.[7] The inquisition, regarding this incident, shows that Margaret unlawfully crossed the Channel and met with a servant of her future husband, Sir Walter de Mauny, who broke his lantern with his foot so she could pass unnoticed and acted as her guardian during her sojourn in France. This incident and the involvement of her future husband's retainer may indicate the real motivation for Margaret seeking a divorce.

    The divorce case was ultimately heard by the Pope's auditor, the Dean of St. Hilary's at Poitiers. However, Margaret's first husband died in 1353, before the divorce could be finalized. Shortly thereafter, and just before 30 May 1354, she married Sir Walter de Mauny without the King's licence. They were married 18 years, and had three children before he died at London on 8 or 13 January 1372.[8]

    On 29 September 1397, Margaret she was created Duchess of Norfolk for life.[8] She died 24 March 1399, and was buried in the choir of Grey Friars in the City of London.[8]

    The executors of her will are reported to be John Sileby & Walter fitz Piers, who in 1399 were reported to be attempting to recover money due to her estate. [9]

    Marriages and issue[edit]
    Margaret married firstly, about 1335,[4] John Segrave, 4th Baron Segrave, by whom she had two sons and two daughters:[10]

    John de Segrave, who died young.[10]
    John de Segrave (d. before 1 April 1353), second of that name, who was contracted to marry Blanche of Lancaster, younger daughter and coheiress of Henry of Grosmont, 1st Duke of Lancaster. However the contract was later declared void[11] and Blanche later married John of Gaunt. About 1349, a double marriage was solemnized in which John Segrave married Blanche Mowbray, while John's sister, Elizabeth Segrave, married Blanche Mowbray's brother, John de Mowbray, 4th Baron Mowbray, Pope Clement VI having granted dispensations for the marriages at the request of Lancaster, in order to prevent 'disputes between the parents', who were neighbours.[12][13][11]
    Elizabeth de Segrave, 5th Baroness Segrave, who married John de Mowbray, 4th Baron Mowbray.[11]
    Margaret de Segrave, who died young, before 1353.[11]
    Shortly before 30 May 1354, Margaret married secondly, and without the King's licence, Sir Walter Mauny,[14] by whom she had a son and two daughters:[11]

    Thomas Mauny, who was drowned in a well at Deptford at the age of ten.[11]
    Anne Mauny, who married John Hastings, 2nd Earl of Pembroke.[11]
    Isabel Mauny, who was living in 1358, but died without issue before 30 November 1371.[11]
    Distinction[edit]
    As her brother had died without issue, she succeeded to the earldom of Norfolk and the office of Earl Marshal at her father's death in 1338. To date, she is the only woman to have held the latter office.

    Buried:
    "One substantial gift was to the Greyfriars, London, where she donated 350 marks for the new choir stalls, and where she chose to be buried, next to her grandson John Hastings, earl of Pembroke." ...
    http://www.royaldescent.net/margaret-of-brotherton-duchess-of-norfolk/

    Children:
    1. 115. Elizabeth Segrave was born 25 Oct 1338, Blaby, Leicestershire, England; died 24 May 1368, Leicestershire, England; was buried Croxton Abbey, Blaby, Leicestershire, England.

  7. 232.  Ralph de Greystoke, 1st Baron Audley was born 15 Aug 1299; died 14 Jul 1323, Gateshead, Durham, England; was buried Newminster Abbey, Northumberland, England.

    Ralph — Alice de Audley. Alice (daughter of Hugh de Audley, 1st Baron Audley of Stratton and Isolde (Isabella) de Mortimer) was born 1302-1304, Hadley, Lambourne, Berkshire, England; died 12 Jan 1374, Greystoke Manor, Northumberland, England; was buried Durham Cathedral, Durham, Durhamshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  8. 233.  Alice de Audley was born 1302-1304, Hadley, Lambourne, Berkshire, England (daughter of Hugh de Audley, 1st Baron Audley of Stratton and Isolde (Isabella) de Mortimer); died 12 Jan 1374, Greystoke Manor, Northumberland, England; was buried Durham Cathedral, Durham, Durhamshire, England.
    Children:
    1. 116. William de Greystoke, 2nd Baron Greystoke was born 6 Jan 1321, Grimthorpe, Cumbria, England; died 10 Jul 1359, Brancepeth Castle, Durham, England; was buried St. Andrews Church, Greystoke, Cumbria, England.

  9. 236.  Robert de Clifford, Knight, 3rd Baron de Clifford was born 5 Nov 1305, (Skipton, North Yorkshire, England) (son of Robert de Clifford, Knight, 1st Baron de Clifford and Maude de Clare); died 20 May 1344.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: 3rd Lord of Skipton

    Notes:

    Robert de Clifford, 3rd Baron de Clifford, also 3rd Lord of Skipton (5 November 1305–20 May 1344) was a member of the Clifford family which held the seat of Skipton from 1310 to 1676.

    He was the second son of Robert de Clifford, 1st Baron de Clifford and Maud de Clare, eldest daughter of Thomas de Clare, Lord of Thomond and Juliana FitzGerald.

    His title was restored to him in 1327 after being forfeited by his elder brother Roger de Clifford, 2nd Baron de Clifford who was hanged for treason.

    He married Isabel de Berkeley, daughter of Maurice de Berkeley, 2nd Baron Berkeley at Berkeley Castle in 1328. They had 7 children. He was succeeded as Baron De Clifford by the eldest, Robert de Clifford, 4th Baron de Clifford

    Robert married Isabel de Berkeley 0Jun 1328. Isabel (daughter of Maurice de Berkeley, III, Knight, 2nd Baron Berkeley and Eva la Zouche) was born 0___ 1307; died 25 Jul 1362, Berkeley Castle, Berkeley, Gloucestershire, England. [Group Sheet]


  10. 237.  Isabel de Berkeley was born 0___ 1307 (daughter of Maurice de Berkeley, III, Knight, 2nd Baron Berkeley and Eva la Zouche); died 25 Jul 1362, Berkeley Castle, Berkeley, Gloucestershire, England.
    Children:
    1. Robert Clifford, Lord of Northumberland was born 0___ 1328, England; died Bef 1354, England.
    2. 118. Roger de Clifford, Knight, 5th Baron de Clifford was born 10 Jul 1333, Brougham Castle, Westmorland, England; died 13 Jul 1389, Brougham Castle, Westmorland, England.
    3. Eleanor Clifford was born ~ 1343.

  11. 238.  Thomas de Beauchamp, Knight, 11th Earl of WarwickThomas de Beauchamp, Knight, 11th Earl of Warwick was born 14 Feb 1313, Warwick Castle, Warwick, Warwickshire, England (son of Guy de Beauchamp, Knight, 10th Earl of Warwick and Alice de Toeni, Countess of Warwick); died 13 Nov 1369, (Warwickshire) England; was buried St. Mary's Church, Warwick, Warwickshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Thomas de Beauchamp

    Notes:

    Thomas de Beauchamp, 11th Earl of Warwick, KG (c. 14 February 1313 – 13 November 1369) was an English nobleman and military commander during the Hundred Years' War. In 1348 he became one of the founders and the third Knight of the Order of the Garter.

    Early life

    Thomas de Beauchamp, 11th Earl of Warwick depicted in 1347 as one of the 8 mourners attached to the monumental brass of Sir Hugh Hastings (d. 1347) at St Mary's Church, Elsing, Norfolk. He displays the arms of Beauchamp on his tunic
    Thomas de Beauchamp was born at Warwick Castle, Warwickshire, England to Guy de Beauchamp, 10th Earl of Warwick and Alice de Toeni. He served in Scotland frequently during the 1330s, being captain of the army against the Scots in 1337. He was hereditary High Sheriff of Worcestershire from 1333 until his death (in 1369). In 1344 he was also made High Sheriff of Warwickshire and Leicestershire for life.[citation needed]

    Victor at Crâecy and Poitiers


    Left:Seal (obverse) of Thomas de Beauchamp, 11th Earl of Warwick, dated 1344: S(IGILLUM) THO(M)E COMITIS WARRWYCHIE ANNO REGNI REGIS E(DWARDII) TE(RT)II...(continued on counter-seal) ("Seal of Thomas, Count (Earl) of Warwick in the year of the reign of King Edward the Third..."). He displays on his surcoat, shield and horse's caparison the arms of Beauchamp, and carries on his helm as crest a swan's head and neck; right: Counter-seal/reverse: (legend continued from face of seal) ...POST CO(N)QUESTU(M) ANGLIE SEPTI(M)O DECIM(0) ET REGNI SUI FRANCIE QUARTO ("...after the Conquest of England the seventeenth and of his reign of the Kingdom of France the fourth"). This dates the seal to 1344. The arms are those of de Newburgh, the family of the Beaumont Earls of Warwick: Checky azure and or, a chevron ermine. This same display of double arms was used on the seal of his father Guy de Beauchamp, 10th Earl of Warwick on his seal affixed to the Barons' Letter, 1301
    Warwick was Marshall of England from 1343/4 until 1369, and was one of the commanders at the great English victories at Crâecy and Poitiers.

    Thomas de Beauchamp fought in all the French wars of King Edward III; he commanded the center at the Battle of Crecy (where many of his relatives were killed including his younger half-brother Alan la Zouche de Mortimer). He was trusted to be guardian of the sixteen-year-old Black Prince. Beauchamp fought at Poitiers in 1356 and at the Siege of Calais (1346).

    He began the rebuilding of the Collegiate Church of Saint Mary in Warwick using money received from the ransom of a French Archbishop. He died of plague in Calais on 13 November 1369 and was entombed in the Beauchamp Chapel. The chapel contains the finest example of the use of brisures for cadency in medieval heraldry -- seven different Beauchamp coats of arms.

    Marriage and children

    He married Katherine Mortimer, daughter of Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March. They had five sons and ten daughters:[1]

    Thomas b. 16 Mar 1338 d. 8 Aug 1401, who married Margaret Ferrers and had descendants. His son Richard succeeded him as Earl and inherited most of his property.
    Guy (d. 28 April 1360). He had two daughters who by entail were excluded from their grandfather's inheritance: Elizabeth (d. c.1369), and Katherine, who became a nun.
    Reinbrun, (d. 1361); he was named for a character in Guy of Warwick.
    William (c. 1343–1411), who inherited the honour of Abergavenny. Married Joan FitzAlan.
    Roger (d. 1361)
    Maud (d. 1403), who married Roger de Clifford, 5th Baron de Clifford.
    Philippa de Beauchamp who married Hugh de Stafford, 2nd Earl of Stafford.
    Alice (d. 1383), who married first John Beauchamp, 3rd Baron Beauchamp and then Sir Matthew Gournay.
    Joan, who married Ralph Basset, 4th Baron Basset de Drayton.
    Isabell (d. 1416) who married first John le Strange, 5th Baron Strange, and then to William de Ufford, 2nd Earl of Suffolk. After the latter's death she became a nun.
    Margaret, who married Guy de Montfort and after his death became a nun.
    Elizabeth, married Thomas de Ufford, KG
    Anne, married Walter de Cokesey
    Juliana
    Katherine, became a nun at Shouldham

    Catherine Montacute, Countess of Salisbury was not his daughter, although she is presented as such in William Painter's Palace of Pleasure and in the Elizabethan play, Edward III that may be by William Shakespeare.

    Thomas married Katherine de Mortimer, Countess of Warwick 19 Apr 1319, (Warwickshire) England. Katherine (daughter of Roger de Mortimer, 1st Earl of March and Joan de Geneville, 2nd Baroness Geneville) was born 0___ 1314, Wigmore Castle, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England; died 4 Aug 1369, (Warwickshire) England; was buried St. Mary's Church, Warwick, Warwickshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  12. 239.  Katherine de Mortimer, Countess of Warwick was born 0___ 1314, Wigmore Castle, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England (daughter of Roger de Mortimer, 1st Earl of March and Joan de Geneville, 2nd Baroness Geneville); died 4 Aug 1369, (Warwickshire) England; was buried St. Mary's Church, Warwick, Warwickshire, England.

    Notes:

    Katherine Mortimer, Countess of Warwick (1314 - 4 August 1369) was the wife of Thomas de Beauchamp, 11th Earl of Warwick KG, an English peer, and military commander during the Hundred Years War. She was a daughter and co-heiress of Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March and Joan de Geneville, Baroness Geneville.

    Sometime before 1355, she became an important figure at the royal court of King Edward III.

    Family and lineage

    Katherine Mortimer was born at Ludlow Castle, Shropshire, England, in 1314, one of the twelve children and a co-heiress of Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March and Joan de Geneville, Baroness Geneville. Her paternal grandparents were Edmund Mortimer, 2nd Baron Mortimer and Margaret de Fiennes, and her maternal grandparents were Sir Piers de Geneville, of Trim Castle and Ludlow, and Jeanne of Lusignan.

    Her father was de facto ruler of England together with his mistress Isabella of France, Queen consort of King Edward II, until his eventual capture and execution by the orders of King Edward III, eldest son of Isabella and King Edward II. The latter had been deposed in November 1326, and afterwards cruelly murdered by assassins acting under the orders of Mortimer and Queen Isabella. Katherine was sixteen years old when her father was hanged, Tyburn, London on 29 November 1330. Roger Mortimer was NOT Hanged drawn and quartered as stated but only hanged and his body was left until monks from Greyfriars in London took it down.

    Marriage

    On 19 April 1319, when she was about five years old, Katherine married Thomas de Beauchamp, 11th Earl of Warwick, eldest son of Guy de Beauchamp, 10th Earl of Warwick and Alice de Toeni.[1] Their marriage required a Papal dispensation as they were related within the prohibited third and fourth degrees. Beauchamp had succeeded to the earldom at the age of two, therefore Katherine was styled Countess of Warwick from the time of her marriage until her death. The marriage had been arranged in July 1318 in order to settle a quarrel between the two families over the lordship of Elfael, which was thus given to Katherine as her marriage portion.[2] For the term of his minority, Beauchamp's custody had been granted to Katherine's father, Roger Mortimer.[3]

    Katherine later became an important personage at the court of King Edward III. As a sign of royal favour she was chosen to stand as one of the godmothers, along with Queen Philippa of Hainault, to the latter's granddaughter, Philippa, Countess of Ulster in 1355. This honour bestowed on Katherine is described by 19th century author Agnes Strickland according to the Friar's Genealogy: "Her [Philippa, Countess of Ulster] godmother also was of Warwick Countess, a lady likewise of great worthiness".[4]

    Issue

    Katherine and Beauchamp together had fifteen children:[5]

    Guy de Beauchamp (died 28 April 1360), married Philippa de Ferrers, daughter of Henry de Ferrers, 2nd Lord Ferrers of Groby and Isabel de Verdun, by whom he had two daughters.[6]
    Thomas de Beauchamp, 12th Earl of Warwick (16 March 1339- 1401), married Margaret Ferrers, daughter of William Ferrers, 3rd Lord of Groby and Margaret de Ufford, by whom he had issue, including Richard de Beauchamp, 13th Earl of Warwick.
    Reinbrun de Beauchamp
    William de Beauchamp, 1st Baron Bergavenny (c. 1343- 8 May 1411), on 23 July 1392, married Lady Joan FitzAlan, daughter of Richard Fitzalan, 11th Earl of Arundel and Elizabeth de Bohun, by whom he had a son Richard de Beauchamp, 1st Earl of Worcester, and a daughter, Joan de Beauchamp, 4th Countess of Ormond. Queen consort Anne Boleyn was a notable descendant of the latter.
    Roger de Beauchamp (died 1361)
    Maud de Beauchamp (died 1403), married Roger de Clifford, 5th Baron Clifford, by whom she had issue, including Thomas de Clifford, 6th Baron Clifford.
    Philippa de Beauchamp, married Hugh de Stafford, 2nd Earl of Stafford, by whom she had nine children.
    Alice Beauchamp (died 1383), married firstly John Beauchamp, 3rd Baron Beauchamp of Somerset, and secondly Sir William Gournay.[7] She died childless.
    Joan de Beauchamp, married Ralph Basset, 3rd Baron Basset of Drayton. She died childless.
    Isabella de Beauchamp (died 29 September 1416), married firstly John le Strange, 5th Baron Strange, and secondly, William de Ufford, 2nd Earl of Suffolk. Upon the latter's death, she became a nun. She died childless.
    Margaret de Beauchamp, married Guy de Montfort, and after his death, she became a nun. She died childless.
    Elizabeth de Beauchamp, married Thomas de Ufford KG,
    Anne de Beauchamp, married Walter de Cokesey.
    Juliana de Beauchamp
    Katherine de Beauchamp, became a nun at Shouldham Priory.

    Death and effigy

    Katherine Mortimer died on 4 August 1369 at the age of about fifty-five. Two years before her death, in 1367, Katherine was a legatee in the will of her sister Agnes de Hastings, Countess of Pembroke.[8] Katherine was buried in St. Mary's Church, Warwick, Warwickshire. She lies alongside her husband, who died three months after her of the Black Death. Their tomb with well-preserved, alabaster effigies can be seen in the centre of the quire. Katherine is depicted wearing a frilled veil with a honeycomb pattern and she is holding hands with Beauchamp. The sides of the tomb chest are decorated with figures of mourners, both male and female.

    Children:
    1. 119. Maud Beauchamp was born 0___ 1335, Warwickshire, England; died 0Feb 1403, Brougham Castle, Westmorland, England.
    2. Thomas de Beauchamp, Knight, 12th Earl of Warwick was born 16 Mar 1338, Warwick Castle, Warwick, Warwickshire, England; died 10 Apr 1401, (Warwickshire) England.
    3. Philippa Beauchamp was born 1334-1344, Elmley, Gloucestershire, England; died 6 Apr 1386.
    4. William de Beauchamp, 1st Baron Bergavenny was born 1343-1345, Warwick, Warwickshire, England; died 8 May 1411, Warwick, Warwickshire, England; was buried Black Friars Churchyard, Hereford, Herefordshire, England.
    5. Guy de Beauchamp