William Weston, Sir

Male 1470 - 1540  (~ 70 years)


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Generation: 1

  1. 1.  William Weston, Sir was born ~ 1470 (son of Edmund Weston, Sir and Catharine Camell); died 7 May 1540.

    Notes:

    Sir William Weston (c. 1470 – 7 May 1540) was the last English prior of the Order of St John (the Knights Hospitaller) in England.

    Biography

    William Weston was born in about 1470, the second son of Edmund Weston of Boston, Lincolnshire, by his wife Catherine, daughter and heir of John Camell of Skapwick, Dorset. Sir Richard Weston (1466?–1542) was his brother. His family had already been intimately connected with the order of the knights of St John; two of Sir William's uncles had held the post of "Turcopolier", or commander of the light cavalry, an office generally conferred on the most illustrious knights of the "English language", and a third had been lord prior of England (Sir John Weston, 31st Prior, from 1476 to 1489); the William Weston who defended Rhodes against the Turks in 1480 was probably his uncle.[1]

    In 1498, William Weston was granted the preceptory of Ansty, Wiltshire; and in 1507 that of Baddesley Preceptory, Hampshire.[2] On 27 October 1508 he arrived at Calais on some diplomatic mission.[3] In 1510 he was at Rhodes, and in 1522 he distinguished himself at its siege; he was one of the few English knights who survived, and was himself wounded. After evacuating Rhodes the knights made for Crete; here, early in 1523, Weston was appointed "Turcopolier" in place of Sir John Bouch, who had been slain during the siege. He was also placed in command of the Great Carack, "the first ironclad recorded in history. … She was sheathed with metal and perfectly cannon-proof. She had room for five hundred men, and provisions for six months. A picture of this famous ship is in the royal collections at Windsor".[4] In the same year Weston, with the universal consent of the English knights, was granted the right of succession to the priories of England and Ireland. In 1524 he was sent on an embassy to the court of Henry VIII on behalf of the order; on 27 June 1527 he was appointed, by a bull of the Grand Master, lord prior of England, on the death of Prior Thomas Docwra or Docrai. The lord prior had his headquarters at Clerkenwell, and ranked as premier baron in the roll of peers. There was some difficulty over the appointment, and a rumour was current that Henry intended, after conferring the office on a favourite of his own, to separate the English knights from the rest of the order, and to station them at Calais. The matter was settled by a personal visit of the Grand Master—Philippe Villiers de L'Isle-Adam, the heroic defender of Rhodes—to England, Henry assenting to the appointment of Sir William Weston and withdrawing his first claim for a yearly tribute of ¹4,000 from the new prior.[5]

    In 1535 Weston was present at a ball given by Morette, the French ambassador; he is characterised as one of the influential adherents of the papacy.[6]

    Death and commemoration[edit]
    By 1539 Weston was in failing health, and he died on 7 May 1540, the very day on which the order in England was dissolved: he reportedly collapsed on hearing the news.[7] A pension of ¹1,000 a year for life had been settled upon him at the dissolution. He was buried on the north side of the chancel of the nunnery of St Mary Clerkenwell (afterwards the parish church of St James), under "a faire marble tombe, with the portraiture of a dead man lying upon his shroud: the most artificially cut in stone that ever man beheld".[8][9] In 1788, prior to the complete rebuilding of the church, the monument was dismantled and its parts dispersed. However, its transi effigy was preserved in the new church until 1931. In that year it was removed to the crypt of the historic priory church of the Order of St John, now reacquired for use as a chapel by the modern Order, which is where it remains.[10][11]

    Weston is entitled to rank as the last prior of the English order, although an abortive attempt was made to revive the "English Langue" under Mary.[a]


Generation: 2

  1. 2.  Edmund Weston, Sir was born ~ 1464, Boston, Lincolnshire, England (son of John Weston, Sr., Esquire and Margaret Mitford).

    Edmund married Catharine Camell ~ 1486. Catharine (daughter of John Carmell and Isabelle Pavely) was born ~ 1466, Skapwick, Dorsetshire, England; died 1506. [Group Sheet]


  2. 3.  Catharine Camell was born ~ 1466, Skapwick, Dorsetshire, England (daughter of John Carmell and Isabelle Pavely); died 1506.
    Children:
    1. 1. William Weston, Sir was born ~ 1470; died 7 May 1540.
    2. Anne Weston was born ~ 1490, Boston, Lincolnshire, England; died 26 Jun 1519, Albury, Hertford, England; was buried Albury, Hertford, England.


Generation: 3

  1. 4.  John Weston, Sr., Esquire was born ~ 1435, Oakham, Rutland, England (son of William Weston, VI and Margaret Richking); died 14 Jun 1483, Kent, England.

    Notes:

    John Weston, Sr.
    Birthdate: circa 1424 (59)
    Birthplace: Ockham, Surrey, , England
    Death: June 14, 1483 (55-63)
    Kent, , England
    Immediate Family:
    Son of William Weston, VI and Margaret Weston
    Husband of Margaret Weston
    Father of Thomas Weston; William Weston; Edmund Weston and John Weston, Jr.
    Brother of Richard Weston and Johanna Weston
    Managed by: Private User
    Last Updated: July 18, 2015

    About John Weston, Sr.

    The visitations of the county of Surrey : made and taken in the years 1530 by Thomas Benolte, Clarenceux king of arms ; 1572 by Robert Cooke, Clarenceux king of arms ; and 1623 by Samuel Thompson, Windsor herald, and Augustin Vincent, Rouge croix pursuivant, marshals and deputies to William Camden, Clarenceux king of arms (1899)
    https://archive.org/details/visitationsofcou43beno
    https://archive.org/stream/visitationsofcou43beno#page/215/mode/1up
    Weston. Pg.215-218

    etc.

    https://archive.org/stream/visitationsofcou43beno#page/217/mode/1up
    2. Willmus Weston de Sutton in Susex vice comes Sussex et Surr. 5 H. 5. = Matilda fil. et haer. Thom. Harberger de Sutton in com. Sussex Ao 5 H. 5. ; ch: Willmus (m. Margar' Skinner) Weston.
    Willmus Weston de Evere et de Langley in com. Buck 24 H. 6. = Margar' fil. et haer. Joh'is Skinner de Ockham Ar. ob. 26 H. 6. ; ch: Johannes (m. Margar' Metfford), Joh'a (m. Joh'is Gardiner) Weston.
    Johannes Weston de Ockham in com. Surr. 2 R. 3. = Margar' filia Joh'is Metfford de Ockham Ar. ob. 15 E. 4. ; ch: Joh'is (m. Allicia Edsaw) Weston
    Joh'is Weston de Ockham in Surr. 2 R. 3. = Allicia fil' Willmi Edsaw de Petworth in com. Sussex. ; ch: Joh'is (m. Juliana Sands & Agnes Hunt) Weston
    Joh'is Weston de Ockham fil. et her. 1 E. 6. = Juliana filia Oliveri Sands de Patesham in com. Surrey. ; ch: Ric'us (m. Bridget Lea), Juliana, Henricus, Joh'es (m. Juliana Freeland) Weston ; = Agnes filia Wi'm Hunt vxor 2. ; ch: Will'mus, Bartholemeus Weston.

    end of biography

    John married Margaret Mitford ~ 1458, Lichfield, Staffordshire, England. Margaret (daughter of John Mitford and Constance Ogle) was born ~ 1438, of Molesden, Mitford, Northumberland, England; died 31 Jan 1475, Kent, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 5.  Margaret Mitford was born ~ 1438, of Molesden, Mitford, Northumberland, England (daughter of John Mitford and Constance Ogle); died 31 Jan 1475, Kent, England.
    Children:
    1. 2. Edmund Weston, Sir was born ~ 1464, Boston, Lincolnshire, England.

  3. 6.  John Carmell was born 1418; died 1501.

    John — Isabelle Pavely. Isabelle was born 1418, Somerset, England; died 1495. [Group Sheet]


  4. 7.  Isabelle Pavely was born 1418, Somerset, England; died 1495.
    Children:
    1. 3. Catharine Camell was born ~ 1466, Skapwick, Dorsetshire, England; died 1506.


Generation: 4

  1. 8.  William Weston, VI

    William — Margaret Richking. Margaret (daughter of Edmund Richking and unnamed spouse) was born ~ 1410, Iver, Buckinghamshire, England; died 0___ 1448, Iver, Buckinghamshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 9.  Margaret Richking was born ~ 1410, Iver, Buckinghamshire, England (daughter of Edmund Richking and unnamed spouse); died 0___ 1448, Iver, Buckinghamshire, England.

    Notes:

    Margaret Richking
    Born about 1410 in Iver, Buckinghamshire, Englandmap
    Daughter of Edmund Richking and [mother unknown]
    [sibling(s) unknown]
    Wife of William Weston Esq. — married [date unknown] [location unknown]
    DESCENDANTS descendants
    Mother of John Weston Esq., Richard Weston and Johanna Weston
    Died 1448 in Iver, Buckinghamshire, Englandmap
    Profile manager: Ted Williams private message [send private message]
    Richking-3 created 22 Jun 2011 | Last modified 1 Oct 2017
    This page has been accessed 620 times.

    Contents

    [hide]
    1 Biography
    1.1 Name
    2 Sources
    3 Biography
    4 Sources
    Biography

    Listed in Brayley's Weston of West Horsley pedigree[1]

    Listed in Burke's Weston of West Horsley pedigree[2]

    Name

    Name: Margaret /Richking/[3][4]
    Sources

    WikiTree profile Richking-3 created through the import of WILLIAMS 2011.GED on Jun 22, 2011 by Ted Williams. See the Changes page for the details of edits by Ted and others.
    Source: S004386 Title: Ancestry Family Trees Publication: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members. Note: #NS043861
    No NOTE record found with id NS043861.

    Source: S004444 Title: Ancestry Family Trees Publication: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members. Note: #NS044441 Repository: Note: #NS044443
    No NOTE record found with id NS044441.

    Note NS044443
    NAME Ancestry.com
    ADDR http://www.Ancestry.com
    NOTE
    ? Brayley's A Topographical History of Surrey
    ? Burke's Landed Gentry
    ? Source: #S004386 Page: Ancestry Family Trees Data: Text: http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=6436419&pid=-158470250
    ? Source: #S004444 Page: Ancestry Family Trees Data: Text: http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=13078823&pid=-128824691

    Biography

    Margaret Richking ... [5]

    No more info is currently available for Margaret Richking. Can you add to her biography?

    Sources

    Stacy Krout, firsthand knowledge. Click the Changes tab for the details of edits by Stacy and others.
    ? Brayley's A Topographical History of Surrey
    ? Burke's Landed Gentry
    ? Source: #S004386 Page: Ancestry Family Trees Data: Text: http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=6436419&pid=-158470250
    ? Source: #S004444 Page: Ancestry Family Trees Data: Text: http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=13078823&pid=-128824691
    ? Entered by Stacy Krout, Oct 11, 2012

    Children:
    1. 4. John Weston, Sr., Esquire was born ~ 1435, Oakham, Rutland, England; died 14 Jun 1483, Kent, England.

  3. 10.  John Mitford was born 8 Apr 1402, Molesden, Mitford, Northumberland, England; died 6 May 1457.

    John married Constance Ogle ~ 1427, Mitford, Northumberland, England. Constance (daughter of Robert Ogle, III and Maud Grey) was born ~ 1402, Kirkley, Ponteland, Northumberland, England; died Aft 6 Oct 1460. [Group Sheet]


  4. 11.  Constance Ogle was born ~ 1402, Kirkley, Ponteland, Northumberland, England (daughter of Robert Ogle, III and Maud Grey); died Aft 6 Oct 1460.
    Children:
    1. 5. Margaret Mitford was born ~ 1438, of Molesden, Mitford, Northumberland, England; died 31 Jan 1475, Kent, England.


Generation: 5

  1. 18.  Edmund Richking was born 0___ 1385, Langley, Buckinghamshire, England; died 0___ 1446.

    Edmund — unnamed spouse. [Group Sheet]


  2. 19.  unnamed spouse
    Children:
    1. 9. Margaret Richking was born ~ 1410, Iver, Buckinghamshire, England; died 0___ 1448, Iver, Buckinghamshire, England.

  3. 22.  Robert Ogle, III was born 24 Dec 1372, Ogle Castle, Whalton, Northumberland, England; died 12 Aug 1435, Ogle Castle, Whalton, Northumberland, England.

    Notes:

    Sir Robert (Robert III) Ogle
    Born 1379 in Ogle Castle, Northumberland, England
    ANCESTORS ancestors
    Son of Robert (Ogle) de Ogle and Joan (Heton) Ogle
    Brother of John (Ogle) Bertram
    Husband of Matilda (Grey) Ogle — married 21 May 1399 [location unknown]
    DESCENDANTS descendants
    Father of Unknown (Ogle) Whitfield, Unknown (Ogle) Lisle, Constance (Ogle) Mitford, Margaret Ogle, John Ogle Esq, Robert (Ogle) de Ogle, Elizabeth Ogle, William Ogle esq and Jannet (Ogle) Manners
    Died 12 Aug 1435 in Ogle Castle, Northumberland, England
    Profile managers: Bree Ogle private message [send private message], Katherine Patterson private message [send private message], Ted Williams private message [send private message], Rachel Russell private message [send private message], R.D. or Duane Franklin private message [send private message], and Bryan Patterson private message [send private message]
    Ogle-72 created 11 Mar 2010 | Last modified 18 Jul 2017
    This page has been accessed 3,263 times.

    Categories: Battle of Piperdean | Northumberland Ogles.

    Preceded by
    Baron of Hepple, Sir Richard Ogle, Knt. Sir Robert Ogle
    abt 1379 – 1437 Succeeded by
    Robert, Baron of Ogle
    Sir Robert Ogle III[1]

    b. c.1370[2] 1379;[3] 1380/6.[1]

    d. 1436/7[3][4]


    Sir Robert Ogle III (b. 1380/6),[2][1] succeeded his father in 1409 ... but he isn't remembered for being fair.[5][6] Along with 200 men, he stole Bothal castle and manor from his younger brother John Bertram. [6][7]


    It wasn't just a simple walk-in, either. Robert and his forces attacked the castle for four days in 1410.[7][1]


    One chronicler said Robert was jealous,[7] while Parliament still refers to Bertram as the family "favorite."[5]


    To say the least, Robert's actions were frowned upon. John complained to Parliament, and Robert had to go before the King to explain himself ... then give the property back![6][7] But at least some redemption was bound to happen...


    According to Ogle & Engler (2012), Robert was the more powerful of the two sons, and had the favor of the king. After he, "satisfied the council," his "lands were immediately restored." That same month, he landed on the commission looking for a truce with Scotland.


    Well after the family feud, Robert helped the Earl of Northumberland capture James, King of Scotland in 1423. Three years later, he was Northumberland's Sheriff,[6][8] and in 1434 he and his son Robert, 1st Baron Ogle, were both serving as commissioners to keep the peace with Scotland.[9]


    By 1436/7, Robert died,[6][4] and was succeeded by his son and heir ... Sir Robert Ogle who became the first Baron, Lord Ogle.[6]

    Parents

    Robert Ogle and Joan Heaton[10][11]

    Marriage

    m. (21 May 1399) Maud Grey [3][2] Issue:[6][12]

    Sir Robert Ogle[6][13] (b. 1406)[9]
    Sir John[6] or John Ogle, Esq.[13]
    Sir William[6] or William Ogle, Esq[13][14]
    Margaret[6] "Margery" m. Bertram Harbottle
    Isabel (Elizabeth) m. John Middleton
    Constance m. Sir John Mitford, Knt.[13]
    Anne m. William Heron
    Jenetta "Joan or Janet" m. Robert Manners
    dau. m. Matthew Whitfield[13]
    dau. m. John Lilburne[13]
    dau. m. Thomas Lisle[13]
    Occupation

    ante 1408: knight.[3]
    1417: sheriff of Northumberland.[4]
    1419: constable of Wark.[5]
    1423: captain of Berwick.[6]
    1428: warden of Roxborough Castle[3]
    1428: King's knight.[7]
    Beaten at Battle of Piperdean (10 Sep 1436)[3][15]
    Sources

    "Bertram, John (d.1450), of Bothal, Northumb," (n.d.). The History of Parliament. The History of Parliament Trust, n.d. Web. 24 Jan. 2014.

    Bothal Conservation Area: Character Appraisal, (2008). North of England Civic Trust, (pp. 14). www.wansbeck.gov.uk. PDF.

    Burke, J. (1831). A General and Heraldic Dictionary of the Peerages of England, Ireland, and Scotland, Extinct, Dormant, and in Abeyance ... England. London: H. Colburn & R. Bentley. Google Books. Web. 12 Jan. 2014.

    Burley, P., Elliot, M. & Watson, H. (2013). The Battles of St Albans: Battleground War of the Roses. pp.33. Pen and Sword. Ebook.

    Flower, W. (1881). The Visitations of Yorkshire in the Years 1563 and 1564. (pp. 233). Google Books.

    Hodgson, John, and John Hodgson-Hinde. A History of Northumberland in Three Parts: Part 2. Vol. 2. N.p.: E. Walker, 1832. Google Books. Web. 26 Jan. 2014.

    Northumberland castle and fortalices in 1415. www.gatehouse-gazetteer.info

    Ogle, H.A.(1902). Ogle and Bothal: History of the baronies of Ogle, Bothal, and Hepple. FamilySearch.org. eBook.

    Ogle, R.W. & Engler, J.F. (2012). Looking Back at the Ogle Family: A Comprehensive History and Genealogy of the Ogle and Ogles Families in America, Volume 1 (pp. I-54 - I-55). The Ogle/Ogles Family Association, Inc. Seattle, WA: The Genealogy Printing Co. Print.

    "Ogle, Sir Robert (c.1370-1436), of Ogle, Northumb," (n.d.). www.historyofparliamentonline.org.

    The Peerage.[8][9][10]

    Richardson, D. (2011). Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, (2nd ed., pp.390). Google Books. (see screenshot [11]).

    end of biography

    Northumberland Ogles ... A resume of of OGLE persons & places: https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Category:Northumberland_Ogles

    end of comment

    Birth:
    Ogle Castle Images ... http://www.northofthetyne.co.uk/OgleCastle.html

    Died:
    Ogle Castle (grid reference NZ14057908) is a former fortified manor house at Ogle, near Whalton, Northumberland. It is a Scheduled Ancient Monument and a Grade I listed building.[1]

    William the Conqueror granted a deed to Humphrey de Hoggell (Ogle) to enjoy "all the liberties and royalties of his manor" after the conquest.[2] The Ogle family held the estate from before the Norman Conquest until 1597 when it passed by marriage to the Cavendish family and later to Hollis. Sir Robert Ogle was granted a licence to crenellate in 1341. David II of Scotland was brought here having been captured at the Battle of Neville's Cross in 1346.

    Today only the west wing remains from that period. This was the tower house of the medieval tower which had a projecting latrine. Still showing on the western and northern sides are parts of a double moat around a platform 45M across. The manor building that makes up most of today's still standing Ogle Castle appears to be 16th and 17th century work that the tower house was later incorporated into.



    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ogle_Castle

    Robert married Maud Grey 21 May 1399. Maud (daughter of Thomas Grey and Joan Mowbray) was born ~ 1382, Wark-Upon-Tweed, Northumberland, England; died Aft 21 Aug 1451. [Group Sheet]


  4. 23.  Maud Grey was born ~ 1382, Wark-Upon-Tweed, Northumberland, England (daughter of Thomas Grey and Joan Mowbray); died Aft 21 Aug 1451.
    Children:
    1. 11. Constance Ogle was born ~ 1402, Kirkley, Ponteland, Northumberland, England; died Aft 6 Oct 1460.


Generation: 6

  1. 46.  Thomas Grey was born 0___ 1359, Norham, Northumberland, England; was christened Wark-Upon-Tweed, Northumberland, England; died 26 Nov 1400.

    Thomas married Joan Mowbray ~ 1375. Joan (daughter of John de Mowbray, Knight, 4th Baron Mowbray and Elizabeth Segrave) was born ~ 1361; died Aft 30 Nov 1402. [Group Sheet]


  2. 47.  Joan Mowbray was born ~ 1361 (daughter of John de Mowbray, Knight, 4th Baron Mowbray and Elizabeth Segrave); died Aft 30 Nov 1402.
    Children:
    1. 23. Maud Grey was born ~ 1382, Wark-Upon-Tweed, Northumberland, England; died Aft 21 Aug 1451.


Generation: 7

  1. 94.  John de Mowbray, Knight, 4th Baron Mowbray was born 24 Jun 1340, Epworth, Lincolnshire, England (son of John de Mowbray, Knight, 3rd Baron Mowbray and Joan Plantagenet, Baroness Mowbray); died 19 Oct 1368, Thrace, Turkey.

    Other Events:

    • Probate: 17 May 1369, Lincoln, Lincolnshire, England

    Notes:

    John de Mowbray, 4th Baron Mowbray (24 June 1340 – 1368) was an English peer. He was slain near Constantinople while en route to the Holy Land.

    Family

    John de Mowbray, born 25 June 1340 at Epworth, Lincolnshire, was the son of John de Mowbray, 3rd Baron Mowbray, of Axholme, Lincolnshire, by his second wife, Joan of Lancaster, sixth and youngest daughter of Henry, 3rd Earl of Lancaster.[1][2][3] He had two sisters, Blanche and Eleanor (for details concerning his sisters see the article on his father, John de Mowbray, 3rd Baron Mowbray.[4]

    Career

    He and twenty-six others were knighted by Edward III in July 1355[3] while English forces were at the Downs before sailing to France. In 1356 he served in a campaign in Brittany.[2][3] He had livery of his lands on 14 November 1361; however his inheritance was subject to the dower which his father had settled on his stepmother, Elizabeth de Vere.[3] By 1369 she had married Sir William de Cossington, son and heir of Stephen de Cossington of Cossington in Aylesford, Kent; not long after the marriage she and her new husband surrendered themselves to the Fleet prison for debt.[2][4] According to Archer, the cause may have been Mowbray's prosecution of his stepmother for waste of his estates; he had been awarded damages against her of almost ¹1000.[3]

    In about 1343 an agreement had been made for a double marriage between, on the one hand, Mowbray and Audrey Montagu, the granddaughter of Thomas of Brotherton, and on the other hand, Mowbray's sister, Blanche, and Audrey's brother, Edward Montagu. Neither marriage took place.[3] Instead, about 1349 a double marriage was solemnized between, on the one hand, Mowbray and Elizabeth Segrave, and on the other hand, Mowbray's sister Blanche, and Elizabeth Segrave's brother John, Pope Clement VI having granted dispensations for the marriages at the request of the Earl of Lancaster in order to prevent 'disputes between the parents', who were neighbours.[5][3] Mowbray had little financial benefit from his marriage during his lifetime as a result of the very large jointure which had been awarded to Elizabeth Segrave's mother, Margaret, Duchess of Norfolk, who lived until 1399.[6][3] However, when Elizabeth Segrave's father, John de Segrave, 4th Baron Segrave, died on 1 April 1353, Edward III allowed Mowbray to receive a small portion of his wife's eventual inheritance. Estate accounts for 1367 indicate that Mowbray enjoyed an annual income of almost ¹800 at that time.[3]

    Mowbray was summoned to Parliament from 14 August 1362 to 20 January 1366.[2] On 10 October 1367 he appointed attorneys in preparation for travel beyond the seas; these appointments were confirmed in the following year.[7] He was slain by the Turks near Constantinople while en route to the Holy Land.[8] A letter from the priory of 'Peyn' written in 1396 suggests that he was initially buried at the convent at Pera opposite Constantinople;[9][10] according to the letter, 'at the instance of his son Thomas' his bones had now been gathered and were being sent to England for burial with his ancestors.[7]

    His will was proved at Lincoln on 17 May 1369.[11][5] His wife, Elizabeth, predeceased him in 1368 by only a few months.[5]

    Marriage and issue

    Mowbray married, by papal dispensation dated 25 March 1349,[5] Elizabeth de Segrave (born 25 October 1338 at Croxton Abbey),[5] suo jure Lady Segrave, daughter and heiress of John de Segrave, 4th Baron Segrave (d.1353),[3] by Margaret, daughter and heiress of Thomas of Brotherton, son of Edward I.[12]

    They had two sons and three daughters:[12]

    John de Mowbray, 1st Earl of Nottingham (1 August 1365 – before 12 February 1383), who died unmarried, and was buried at the Whitefriars, London.[13]
    Thomas de Mowbray, 1st Duke of Norfolk.[14]
    Eleanor Mowbray (born before 25 May 1364),[5] who married John de Welles, 5th Baron Welles.[13][15]
    Margaret Mowbray (d. before 11 July 1401), who married, by licence dated 1 July 1369, Sir Reginald Lucy (d. 9 November 1437) of Woodcroft in Luton, Bedfordshire.[16]
    Joan Mowbray, who married firstly Sir Thomas Grey (1359 – 26 November or 3 December 1400) of Heaton near Norham, Northumberland, son of the chronicler Sir Thomas Grey, and secondly Sir Thomas Tunstall of Thurland in Tunstall, Lancashire.[17][13]

    Died:
    while en route to the Holy Land...

    was slain by the Turks at Thrace on 17 June 1368.

    John married Elizabeth Segrave ~ 1343. Elizabeth (daughter of John Segrave, 4th Baron Segrave and Margaret Brotherton, Countess of Norfolk) was born 25 Oct 1338, Blaby, Leicestershire, England; died 24 May 1368, Leicestershire, England; was buried Croxton Abbey, Blaby, Leicestershire, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 95.  Elizabeth SegraveElizabeth Segrave was born 25 Oct 1338, Blaby, Leicestershire, England (daughter of John Segrave, 4th Baron Segrave and Margaret Brotherton, Countess of Norfolk); died 24 May 1368, Leicestershire, England; was buried Croxton Abbey, Blaby, Leicestershire, England.

    Notes:

    Buried:
    Croxton Abbey, near Croxton Kerrial, Leicestershire, was a Premonstratensian monastery founded by William I, Count of Boulogne.

    images ... https://www.google.com/search?q=byland+abbey&espv=2&biw=1440&bih=815&site=webhp&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&sqi=2&ved=0ahUKEwj6svLG7MLKAhUEFh4KHfJ4BGgQsAQILg&dpr=1#tbm=isch&q=croxton+abbey

    Children:
    1. 47. Joan Mowbray was born ~ 1361; died Aft 30 Nov 1402.
    2. Thomas de Mowbray, Knight, 1st Duke of Norfolk was born 22 Mar 1366, Epworth, Isle of Axholme, Lincolnshire, England; died 22 Sep 1399, Venice, Itlaly.
    3. Eleanor de Mowbray was born Bef 1381; died 13 Aug 1417.


Generation: 8

  1. 188.  John de Mowbray, Knight, 3rd Baron Mowbray was born 29 Nov 1310, Hovingham, Yorkshire, England (son of John de Mowbray, I, 8th Baron Mowbray and Aline de Braose); died 4 Oct 1361, York, Yorkshire, England; was buried Bedford Greyfriars, Friars Minor, Bedford, Bedforshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Baron of Axholme
    • Also Known As: Baron of Bramber, Sussex
    • Also Known As: Keeper of Berwick-Upon-Tweed
    • Military: Battle of Neville's Cross

    Notes:

    Mowbray /'mo?bri/ is an Anglo-Norman baronial house, derived from Montbray in Normandy. From this village came Geoffrey de Montbray who came to be Bishop of Coutances and accompanied Duke William of Normandy at the Conquest of England in 1066.[1]

    For his support he was granted some 280 English manors (each about the size of a village). His nephew Robert de Montbrai became Earl of Northumberland in 1080, but he rebelled against William II (Rufus) and was captured and imprisoned in Windsor Castle for thirty years. His divorced wife, Matilda, married Nigel d'Aubigny (sometimes spelt d'Albini) whose family came from Saint-Martin-d'Aubigny, 16 km. west of Saint-Lão and 15 km. north of Coutances. However, Robert was the maternal uncle of Nigel and although Nigel inherited Robert's vast landholdings, the marriage was annulled for consanguinity before any issue. By his second wife, Gundred, he had a son and heir Roger whose name was changed by royal command from d'Aubigny to de Montbray. The family flourished (Baronial Pedigree) and the name spelling evolved to Mowbray.[citation needed]

    The baronial line died out in England with a young heiress ca. 1475, although a son of an earlier generation had founded a dynasty in Scotland where issue has survived. The family was active up and down the east side of the country and settled predominantly in the counties of Durham, Lincolnshire and Leicestershire in historic times. Since then there has been the usual migration into other areas and overseas.[citation needed]

    As with any name, there are numerous spelling variations over time, but the major ones are Moubray, the Scottish version, and Mowberry which stemmed from a Leicestershire migration into Glinton, Northamptonshire, where the variant became established and eventually spread into a Lincolnshire branch. One of the many heraldic badges of the house was a mulberry tree.[citation needed]

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    John de Mowbray, 3rd Baron Mowbray (29 November 1310 - 4 October 1361) was the only son of John de Mowbray, 2nd Baron Mowbray, by his first wife, Aline de Brewes,[1] daughter of William de Braose, 2nd Baron Braose.

    He was born 29 November 1310 at Hovingham, Yorkshire.[1]

    Mowbray's father, the 2nd Baron, sided with Thomas, 2nd Earl of Lancaster, at the Battle of Boroughbridge on 16 March 1322 against Edward II, and was taken prisoner at the battle. He was hanged at York on 23 March 1322, and his estates forfeited.[1] His wife and son John were imprisoned in the Tower of London until Edward II was deposed by his wife, Queen Isabella, and Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March. The Mowbrays were released in 1327.

    The 3rd Baron de Mowbray was reportedly in Edward III's good graces, being present in France in the War of the Breton Succession for the sieges of Nantes and Aguillon. He was also on the English side at the Battle of Neville's Cross in the Second War of Scottish Independence.

    He died of the plague at York on 4 October 1361, and was buried at the Friars Minor in Bedford.[2]

    Marriages and issue

    He married firstly, before 26 February 1322, Maud de Holand, daughter of Robert de Holland, 1st Baron Holand, by Maud la Zouche, daughter and coheiress of Alan la Zouche, 1st Baron la Zouche of Ashby. The marriage was later declared void.[3]

    He married secondly, between 28 February 1327 and 4 June 1328, Joan of Lancaster, sixth and youngest daughter of Henry, 3rd Earl of Lancaster, by whom he had a son and two daughters:[3]

    Blanche Mowbray (d. 21 July 1409), who was contracted to marry Edward de Montagu (d. before February 1359), son and heir apparent of Edward de Montagu, 1st Baron Montagu (died 3 July 1461), by Alice of Norfolk, daughter and heiress of Thomas of Brotherton; however the marriage did not take place.

    She married firstly, by papal dispensation dated 21 March 1349, John de Segrave (d. before 1 April 1353), son and heir apparent of John Segrave, 4th Baron Segrave by Margaret, Duchess of Norfolk, daughter and heiress of Thomas of Brotherton;
    secondly, as his second wife, Sir Robert Bertam (d.1363);
    thirdly, before 5 June 1372, Thomas de Poynings, 2nd Baron Poynings (d. before 25 June 1375), son and heir of Michael de Poynings, 1st Baron Poynings;
    fourthly, before 21 March 1378, Sir John de Worth (d. before 1 June 1391); and
    fifthly, before 5 November 1394, Sir John Wiltshire. She had no issue by any of her husbands.[5]

    Eleanor Mowbray, who married firstly, as his second wife, Roger la Warr, 3rd Baron De La Warr (d. 27 August 1370),[6] by whom she had a daughter, Joan La Warr, who married Thomas West, 1st Baron West; and secondly Sir Lewis Clifford of Princes Risborough, Buckinghamshire, brother of Hugh de Clifford.[6][7][8][9]

    He married thirdly, by papal dispensation of 4 May 1351, Elizabeth de Vere (d. 14 or 16 August 1375), widow of Sir Hugh Courtenay (d. before 2 September 1349), and daughter of John de Vere, 7th Earl of Oxford, by Maud de Badlesmere, daughter of Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 1st Baron Badlesmere.[2]

    After Mowbray's death, his widow, Elizabeth de Vere, married, before 26 November 1368, Sir William de Cossington.[2]

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    3rd Lord Mowbray, Baron of Axholme, Lincolnshire, Baron of Bramber, Sussex, lord of Gower in Wales, Keeper of Berwick-Upon-Tweed.

    Only son and heir to Sir John de Mowbray and Aline de Brewes. grandson of Sir Roger de Mowbray and Rose de Clare, William de Brewse and Agnes.

    Husband of Joan of Lancaster Plantagenet, youngest daughter of Henry of Lancaster and Maud de Chaworth. They were married between 1327 and 1328 and had one son and two daughters:
    Sir John, 4th Lord Mowbray
    Blanche, who would marry John Seagrave, Sir Robert Bertram, Lord Thomas de Poynings, John de Worth and John Wiltshire.
    Eleanor, who married Roger de la Warre

    Secondly, husband of Elizabeth de Vere, daughter of John, Earl of Oxford and Maud Badlesmere, daughter of Lord Badlesmere. They married before 04 May 1351, the date of their papal dispensation as they were related in the 3rd and 4th degree. John and Elizabeth had no surviving children.

    John was baptized at Hoveringham, and betrothed to Maud de Holand, daughter of Sir Robert de Holand and Maud de la Zouche at an early age, but the marriage never took place. After his father's execution in 1322, John was twelve, he and his mother were imprisoned at the Tower of London by the Despensers. When Edward III became King, they were released, their lands and properties returned. John was summoned to Parliament 1327 to 160, and served in the Scottish and French wars.

    Sir John was one of the commanders of the English Army at the Battle of Neville's Cross, Durham in 1346, where Lanercost (one of the chroniclers of the times) loudly sang his praises: "He was full of grace and kindness - the conduct both of himself and his men was such as to resound to their perpetual honour." He was also present at the siege of Calais in 1347. In 1354 his title to Gower was contested by Thomas Beauchamp, the Earl of Warwick, and the Court of Common Pleas settled with Warwick. Sir John witnessed the surrender of Balliol of the Scottish crown in favor of Edward in 1356.

    John died of the pestilence at York, and was buried at the Church of Friars Minor at Bedford. Elizabeth would remarry to Sir William Cossington of Kent, and she died 16 August 1375.

    Military:
    The Battle of Neville's Cross took place to the west of Durham, England, on 17 October 1346. The culmination of a Scottish invasion of northern England, the battle ended with the rout of the Scots and the capture of their king, David II of Scotland.

    Died:
    He died of the plague at York...

    John married Joan Plantagenet, Baroness Mowbray 1326-1327, (Yorkshire, England). Joan (daughter of Henry Plantagenet, 3rd Earl of Lancaster and Leicester and Maud Chaworth) was born ~ 1312, Norfolk, England; died 7 Jul 1349, Yorkshire, England; was buried Byland Abbey, Coxwold, North Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 189.  Joan Plantagenet, Baroness Mowbray was born ~ 1312, Norfolk, England (daughter of Henry Plantagenet, 3rd Earl of Lancaster and Leicester and Maud Chaworth); died 7 Jul 1349, Yorkshire, England; was buried Byland Abbey, Coxwold, North Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Joan of Lancaster
    • Alt Birth: 0___ 1312, Monmouthshire, Wales

    Notes:

    Joan of Lancaster (c.1312-7 July 1349) sometimes called Joan Plantagenet after her dynasty's name, was the third daughter of Henry, 3rd Earl of Lancaster and Maud Chaworth.

    Marriage

    Joan of Lancaster was born circa 1312.[1] She married John de Mowbray, 3rd Baron Mowbray sometime between February and June 1327.[1][2] They had three children:[2]

    Blanche de Mowbray (died 1409), married firstly John Segrave, secondly Robert Bertram, thirdly Thomas Poynings, fourthly Sir John Worth, and fifthly Sir John Wiltshire.
    Eleanor de Mowbray, married firstly Roger La Warre, Lord La Warre and secondly Sir Lewis de Clifford.
    John de Mowbray, 4th Baron Mowbray (25 June 1340–1368), married Elizabeth de Segrave
    She died in Yorkshire, England of plague. Her husband remarried to Elizabeth de Vere, widow of Sir Hugh de Courtenay.

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    Joan was the fifth daughter of Henry Plantagenet, Earl of Lancaster and Maud de Chaworth, granddaughter of Edmund of England, the son of King Henry III, and Blanche of Artois, Sir Patrick de Chaworth and Isabel de Beauchamp.

    Joan was the wife of Sir John de Mowbray, the son of Sir John de Mowbray and Aline de Brewes. They were married between 1327 and 1329 and had one son and two daughters:
    Sir John, 4th Lord Mowbray
    Blanche, who would marry John Seagrave, Sir Robert Bertram, Lord Thomas de Poynings, John de Worth and John Wiltshire.
    Eleanor, who married Roger de la Warre.

    Buried:
    Byland Abbey is a ruined abbey and a small village in the Ryedale district of North Yorkshire, England, in the North York Moors National Park.

    Images ... https://www.google.com/search?q=byland+abbey&espv=2&biw=1440&bih=815&site=webhp&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&sqi=2&ved=0ahUKEwj6svLG7MLKAhUEFh4KHfJ4BGgQsAQILg&dpr=1

    Died:
    She died in Yorkshire, England of plague...

    Notes:

    Married:
    sometime between February and June 1327 and his 2nd marriage...

    Children:
    1. Blanche Mowbray died 21 Jul 1409.
    2. 94. John de Mowbray, Knight, 4th Baron Mowbray was born 24 Jun 1340, Epworth, Lincolnshire, England; died 19 Oct 1368, Thrace, Turkey.

  3. 190.  John Segrave, 4th Baron Segrave was born 4 May 1315 (son of Stephen Segrave, 3rd Baron Segrave and Alice FitzAlan); died 1 Apr 1353, Repton, Derbyshire, England; was buried Grey Friars, London, Middlesex, England.

    Notes:

    John Segrave, 4th Baron Segrave (4 May 1315 – 1 April 1353) was an English peer and landowner in Leicestershire and Yorkshire. His family title of Baron Segrave is drawn from a village now spelled Seagrave, which uses a coat of arms similar to that of the barons.

    Segrave was the son of Stephen Segrave, 3rd Baron Segrave, and Alice Fitzalan. Little is known of his early life.

    About 1335 Segrave married Margaret, daughter and eventual sole heir of Thomas of Brotherton, son of Edward I by his second marriage,[2] by whom he had two sons and two daughters:[3]

    John de Segrave, who died young.[4]
    John de Segrave (d. before 1 April 1353), second of that name, who was contracted to marry Blanche of Lancaster, younger daughter and coheiress of Henry of Grosmont, 1st Duke of Lancaster. However the contract was later declared void.[4]

    About 1349 a double marriage was solemnized in which John Segrave married Blanche Mowbray, while John's sister, Elizabeth Segrave, married Blanche Mowbray's brother, John de Mowbray, 4th Baron Mowbray, Pope Clement VI having granted dispensations for the marriages at the request of Lancaster, in order to prevent 'disputes between the parents', who were neighbours.[5][6][4]

    Elizabeth de Segrave, 5th Baroness Segrave, who married John de Mowbray, 4th Baron Mowbray.[4]

    Margaret de Segrave, who died young, before 1353.[4]

    A year after the marriage his wife inherited her father's title and estates, becoming in her own right Countess of Norfolk and Earl Marshal of England.

    In 1350, Segrave and his wife sought a divorce, arguing that they had been contracted in marriage before Margaret was of age, and that she had never consented. The impetus for this was that Margaret wished to marry Walter Manny, 1st Baron Manny, with whom she was implicated.[7] However, Segrave died at Bretby in Repton, Derbyshire on 1 April 1353,[8] before the divorce had been granted. He was succeeded in the barony by his daughter Elizabeth.

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    John married Margaret Brotherton, Countess of Norfolk ~ 1335, (Norfolkshire, England). Margaret (daughter of Thomas of Brotherton, Knight, 1st Earl of Norfolk and Alice Hales, Countess of Norfolk) was born ~ 1320, Norfolk, Norfolkshire, England; died 24 Mar 1399, Tower of London, London, Middlesex, England; was buried Grey Friars, London, Middlesex, England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 191.  Margaret Brotherton, Countess of Norfolk was born ~ 1320, Norfolk, Norfolkshire, England (daughter of Thomas of Brotherton, Knight, 1st Earl of Norfolk and Alice Hales, Countess of Norfolk); died 24 Mar 1399, Tower of London, London, Middlesex, England; was buried Grey Friars, London, Middlesex, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Duchess of Norfolk
    • Also Known As: Earl Marshal
    • Also Known As: Margaret Marshal
    • Also Known As: Margaret Plantagenet

    Notes:

    Margaret, in her own right Countess of Norfolk (sometimes surnamed Brotherton or Marshal;[1] c.?1320–24 March 1399), was the daughter and eventual sole heir of Thomas of Brotherton, eldest son of Edward I, by his second marriage. In 1338 she succeeded to the earldom of Norfolk and the office of Earl Marshal.

    Family

    Born about 1320, Margaret was the daughter of Thomas of Brotherton, eldest son of Edward I by his second marriage to Margaret (1279?–1318), the daughter of Philippe III of France (d.1285).[2] Her mother was Alice de Hales (d. in or before 1330), daughter of Sir Roger de Hales of Hales Hall in Loddon in Roughton, Norfolk, by his wife, Alice.[3][4] She had a brother and sister:

    Edward of Norfolk, who married Beatrice de Mortimer, daughter of Roger de Mortimer, 1st Earl of March, but died without issue before 9 August 1334.[5]
    Alice of Norfolk, who married Sir Edward de Montagu.[6]
    Life[edit]
    In 1335 aged 15 (the typical age of marriage for maidens of that era), she was married to John Segrave, 4th Baron Segrave, and proceeded to have four children - two sons and two daughters - by him. In 1350, she sought a divorce on the ground that they had been contracted in marriage (in other words betrothed) before she was of marriageable age, and that she had never consented to cohabit with him. She made known her intention of traveling to the continent in order to plead personally with the Pope for a divorce. King Edward III prohibited her from leaving England, but she set off incognito anyway, having taken care to obtain a safe conduct from the King of France.

    The following year (1351) Edward III charged her with having crossed the English Channel in contravention of his prohibition.[7] The inquisition, regarding this incident, shows that Margaret unlawfully crossed the Channel and met with a servant of her future husband, Sir Walter de Mauny, who broke his lantern with his foot so she could pass unnoticed and acted as her guardian during her sojourn in France. This incident and the involvement of her future husband's retainer may indicate the real motivation for Margaret seeking a divorce.

    The divorce case was ultimately heard by the Pope's auditor, the Dean of St. Hilary's at Poitiers. However, Margaret's first husband died in 1353, before the divorce could be finalized. Shortly thereafter, and just before 30 May 1354, she married Sir Walter de Mauny without the King's licence. They were married 18 years, and had three children before he died at London on 8 or 13 January 1372.[8]

    On 29 September 1397, Margaret she was created Duchess of Norfolk for life.[8] She died 24 March 1399, and was buried in the choir of Grey Friars in the City of London.[8]

    The executors of her will are reported to be John Sileby & Walter fitz Piers, who in 1399 were reported to be attempting to recover money due to her estate. [9]

    Marriages and issue[edit]
    Margaret married firstly, about 1335,[4] John Segrave, 4th Baron Segrave, by whom she had two sons and two daughters:[10]

    John de Segrave, who died young.[10]
    John de Segrave (d. before 1 April 1353), second of that name, who was contracted to marry Blanche of Lancaster, younger daughter and coheiress of Henry of Grosmont, 1st Duke of Lancaster. However the contract was later declared void[11] and Blanche later married John of Gaunt. About 1349, a double marriage was solemnized in which John Segrave married Blanche Mowbray, while John's sister, Elizabeth Segrave, married Blanche Mowbray's brother, John de Mowbray, 4th Baron Mowbray, Pope Clement VI having granted dispensations for the marriages at the request of Lancaster, in order to prevent 'disputes between the parents', who were neighbours.[12][13][11]
    Elizabeth de Segrave, 5th Baroness Segrave, who married John de Mowbray, 4th Baron Mowbray.[11]
    Margaret de Segrave, who died young, before 1353.[11]
    Shortly before 30 May 1354, Margaret married secondly, and without the King's licence, Sir Walter Mauny,[14] by whom she had a son and two daughters:[11]

    Thomas Mauny, who was drowned in a well at Deptford at the age of ten.[11]
    Anne Mauny, who married John Hastings, 2nd Earl of Pembroke.[11]
    Isabel Mauny, who was living in 1358, but died without issue before 30 November 1371.[11]
    Distinction[edit]
    As her brother had died without issue, she succeeded to the earldom of Norfolk and the office of Earl Marshal at her father's death in 1338. To date, she is the only woman to have held the latter office.

    Buried:
    "One substantial gift was to the Greyfriars, London, where she donated 350 marks for the new choir stalls, and where she chose to be buried, next to her grandson John Hastings, earl of Pembroke." ...
    http://www.royaldescent.net/margaret-of-brotherton-duchess-of-norfolk/

    Children:
    1. 95. Elizabeth Segrave was born 25 Oct 1338, Blaby, Leicestershire, England; died 24 May 1368, Leicestershire, England; was buried Croxton Abbey, Blaby, Leicestershire, England.