Lady Mary Woodville, Countess of Pembroke

Female 1456 - 1481  (~ 25 years)


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Generation: 1

  1. 1.  Lady Mary Woodville, Countess of Pembroke was born ~ 1456 (daughter of Richard Woodville, Knight, 1st Earl Rivers and Jacquetta of Luxembourg, Countess Rivers); died 0___ 1481.

    Notes:

    Mary Woodville, Countess of Pembroke (c. 1456–1481) was a sister of Edward IV's Queen consort, Elizabeth Woodville, and of Anthony Woodville, 2nd Earl Rivers. She later became the first wife of William Herbert, 2nd Earl of Pembroke, by whom she had one daughter.

    Countess of Pembroke
    Born 1456
    Died 1481 (aged 24-25)
    Spouse(s) William Herbert, 2nd Earl of Pembroke
    Issue
    Elizabeth Herbert, 3rd Baroness Herbert
    Father Richard Woodville, 1st Earl Rivers
    Mother Jacquetta of Luxembourg

    Biography

    She was born in about 1456 to Richard Woodville, 1st Earl Rivers and his wife, Jacquetta of Luxembourg. After King Edward IV's public recognition of Elizabeth Woodville as his wife, the new queen sought to raise her family's standing by arranging a series of advantageous marriages for her five brothers and seven unwed sisters. In September 1466, Mary was betrothed to William Herbert, the eldest son and heir of the first Earl of Pembroke. Lord Herbert had been Henry VII's guardian. The young William was recognized as Lord Dunster in view of his approaching marriage (a grant of the lordship of Dunster and all the possessions of its attainted lord, James Luttrell, in Somerset, Devon and Suffolk, had been secured by his father in June 1463).

    In January 1467, Mary Woodville was married to Lord Dunster at St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle "amid profuse magnificence."[citation needed] The bride was about ten or eleven years old; her groom, aged fifteen.

    Two years later, Lord Dunster's father, the first Earl of Pembroke, was executed on the orders of Richard Neville, the Earl of Warwick. Nothing seems to have aggravated Warwick more than the marriage of the Lady Mary, the Queen's sister, to Herbert's eldest son. Dunster became the second Earl of Pembroke following the death of his father in 1469 and henceforth Mary was styled Countess of Pembroke.

    Pembroke proved rather ineffectual in governing South Wales. Mary's death in 1481 considerably weakened her husband's links with the Prince of Wales's associates, and he was forced to give up the earldom of Pembroke for that of Huntingdon, and a less valuable endowment in Somerset and Dorset. In 1484, he took as his second wife, Katherine Plantagenet, the illegitimate daughter of King Richard III; however, this marriage failed to produce offspring.

    Ultimately, Herbert only had one child, a daughter by his first marriage, Elizabeth Herbert, 3rd Baroness Herbert, who later married Charles Somerset, later Earl of Worcester. Elizabeth was of great importance to the Somerset family, as she brought to them wealth and a legitimate relationship to royalty.[citation needed] The barony of Herbert was created by patent in favour of her husband, although during her lifetime she held the barony of Herbert in her own right.

    Mary married William Herbert, 2nd Earl of Pembroke 0Jan 1467, St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle, Windsor, Berkshire, England. William (son of William Herbert, 1st Earl of Pembroke and Anne Devereux) was born 5 Mar 1451; died 0___ 1490. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. Elizabeth Herbert, 3rd Baroness Herbert was born ~ 1476; died 27 Aug 1507; was buried St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle, Windsor, Berkshire, England.

Generation: 2

  1. 2.  Richard Woodville, Knight, 1st Earl RiversRichard Woodville, Knight, 1st Earl Rivers was born 0___ 1405, Maidstone, Kent, England (son of Richard Wydeville, Duke of Bedford and Joan Bittlesgate); died 12 Aug 1469, Kenilworth, Warwickshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Residence: France
    • Also Known As: Richard Wydeville

    Notes:

    Richard Woodville (or Wydeville), 1st Earl Rivers KG (1405 - 12 August 1469) was an English nobleman, best remembered as the father of Queen consort Elizabeth Woodville and the maternal grandfather of Edward V and the maternal great-grandfather of Henry VIII.

    Life

    Born at Maidstone in Kent, he was the son of Sir Richard Wydeville (Woodville), chamberlain to the Duke of Bedford, and Joan Bittlesgate (or Bedlisgate), the daughter of Thomas Bittlesgate of Knighteston, Devon.[1][2] He was also grandson to John Wydeville who was Sheriff of Northamptonshire (in 1380, 1385, 1390).[2]

    Following the duke's death, the younger Richard married the widowed duchess, Jacquetta of Luxembourg (1416–1472). This was initially a secret marriage, for which the couple were fined when it came to public notice.

    He was a captain in 1429, served in France in 1433 and was a knight of the regent Duke of Bedford in 1435. He was at Gerberoy in 1435 and served under William de la Pole, Duke of Suffolk, in 1435–6. He then fought under Somerset and Shrewsbury in 1439 and the Duke of York in 1441–2, when he was made captain of Alenðcon and knight banneret. He was appointed seneschal of Gascony in 1450 (but failed to reach it before its fall), lieutenant of Calais in 1454–5, and to defend Kent against invasion by the Yorkist earls in 1459–60 (but was captured at Sandwich). He was created Baron Rivers by Henry VI on 9 May 1448. Two years later, as Sir Richard, he was invested as a Knight of the Garter in 1450. He was appointed Warden of the Cinque Ports in 1459.

    In the Wars of the Roses, he was initially a Lancastrian, but he became a Yorkist when he thought that the Lancastrian cause was lost. He reconciled himself to the victorious Edward IV, his future son-in-law. On 1 May 1464, Edward married his daughter Elizabeth, widow of Sir John Grey of Groby. Richard was created Earl Rivers in 1466, appointed Lord Treasurer in March 1466 and Constable of England on 24 August 1467.

    The power of this new family was very distasteful to the old baronial party, and especially so to the Earl of Warwick. Rivers was regarded as a social upstart, and in an ironical episode, his future son-in-law in 1459, while accepting his submission, had rebuked him for daring, given his lowly birth, to fight against the House of York. The Privy Council, in its horrified response to the King's marriage, said bluntly that her father's low social standing in itself meant that the King must surely know "that Elizabeth was not the wife for him". Early in 1468, the Rivers estates were plundered by Warwick's partisans, and the open war of the following year was aimed at destroying the Woodvilles. After the Yorkist defeat at the Battle of Edgecote Moor on 26 July 1469, Rivers and his second son John were taken prisoners at Chepstow. Following a hasty show trial, they were beheaded at Kenilworth on 12 August 1469. His eldest son Anthony succeeded him in the earldom.

    Lord Rivers had a large family. His third son, Lionel (d. 1484) became the Bishop of Salisbury. All his daughters made great marriages: Catherine Woodville, his eighth daughter, was the wife of Henry Stafford, 2nd Duke of Buckingham.

    It is worth noting that "Woodville" is the modern spelling of the name and was not so spelled at the time, even though uniform spelling was not established for almost two centuries. The spelling used at the time was "Wydeville" or "Wydville".

    Children of Richard Woodville and Jacquetta of Luxembourg

    They had at least 13 children:[3]

    Elizabeth Woodville (c. 1437–1492), married Edward IV of England.
    Lewis Woodwille (c.1438?), died in childhood.
    Anne Woodville (1439–1489). Married first William Bourchier, Viscount Bourchier, and second George Grey, 2nd Earl of Kent.
    Anthony Woodville, 2nd Earl Rivers (1442–1483), married Elizabeth Scales, 8th Baroness Scales.
    Mary Woodville (1443–1481), married William Herbert, 2nd Earl of Pembroke.
    Jacquetta Woodville (1444–1509), married John le Strange, 8th Baron Strange of Knockin.
    John Woodville (1445–1469), married Catherine Neville, Dowager Duchess of Norfolk.
    Lionel Woodville (1447–1484), Bishop of Salisbury.
    Eleanor Woodville (1452–1512), married Sir Anthony Grey.
    Richard Woodville, 3rd Earl Rivers (c. 1453–1491).
    Edward Woodville, Lord Scales (d. 1488), soldier and courtier.
    Margaret Woodville (1454–1490), married Thomas Fitzalan, 17th Earl of Arundel.
    Catherine Woodville (c.1458[4]-1497[5]), married first Henry Stafford, 2nd Duke of Buckingham, second Jasper Tudor, 1st Duke of Bedford.
    Robert Glover, Somerset Herald, noted another 'Richard' who would seem to have been born before Richard the 3rd Earl.[6] It should also be noted that a 'Richard Woodville, esquire for the body' was present at the christening of Prince Arthur (son of Elizabeth and Henry VII) on 24 September 1486 in Winchester Cathedral; Arthur's grandmother, Elizabeth Woodville, served as his Godmother, and her younger brother Edward was also present at the ceremony.

    end of biography

    Siblings of Elizabeth Woodville:

    Jacquetta of Luxembourg and Richard Woodville had the following children (Elizabeth Woodville and her sisters and brothers):

    Elizabeth Woodville was born about 1437. She died in 1492.

    Lewis Wydeville or Woodville. He died in childhood.

    Anne Woodville was born about 1439. She died in 1489. She married William Bourchier, son of Henry Bourchier and Isabel of Cambridge. She married Edward Wingfield. She married George Grey, son of Edmund Grey and Katherine Percy. He was born in 1454. He died on 25 Dec 1505.

    Anthony Woodville was born about 1440 - 1442. He died on 25 Jun 1483. He married Elizabeth de Scales, then he married Mary Fitz-Lewis. He was executed with his nephew Richard Grey by King Richard III.

    John Woodville was born about 1444/45. He died on 12 Aug 1469. He married as her fourth husband Katherine Neville, Dowager Duchess of Norfolk, daughter of Ralph Neville and Joan Beaufort, and sister of Cecily Neville, his sister Elizabeth Woodville’s mother-in-law. Katherine Neville was born about 1400. She died after 1483, outliving her much younger husband.

    Jacquetta Woodville was born about 1444/45. She died in 1509. She married John le Strange, son of Richard Le Strange and Elizabeth de Cobham. He died on 16 Oct 1479.

    Lionel Woodville was born about 1446. He died about 23 Jun 1484. He became the Bishop of Salisbury.

    Richard Woodville. He died on 06 Mar 1491.

    Martha Woodville was born about 1450. She died in 1500. She married John Bromley.

    Eleanor Woodville was born about 1452. She died about 1512. She married Anthony Grey.

    Margaret Woodville was born about 1455. She died in 1491. She married Thomas FitzAlan, son of William FitzAlan and Joan Neville. He was born in 1450. He died on 25 Oct 1524.

    Edward Woodville. He died in 1488.

    Mary Woodville was born about 1456. She married William Herbert, son of William Herbert and Anne Devereux. He was born on 05 Mar 1451. He died on 16 Jul 1491.

    Catherine Woodville was born in 1458. She died on 18 May 1497. She married Henry Stafford, son of Humphrey Stafford and Margaret Beaufort (a different Margaret Beaufort than the mother of Henry VII). Henry Stafford was born on 04 Sep 1455. He was executed for treason by Richard III on 02 Nov 1483. Catherine Woodville and Henry Stafford had four children, two sons and two daughters. Catherine Woodville then married Jasper Tudor, son of Owen Tudor and Catherine of Valois (and half-brother to Henry VI). She then married Richard Wingfield, son of John Wingfield and Elizabeth FitzLewis. He died on 22 Jul 1525.

    end of siblings

    Richard married Jacquetta of Luxembourg, Countess Rivers Bef 23 Mar 1437. Jacquetta (daughter of Peter I, Count of Saint-Pol and Margaret of Baux) was born 1415-1416, Palace of Westminster, London, England; died 30 May 1472. [Group Sheet]


  2. 3.  Jacquetta of Luxembourg, Countess RiversJacquetta of Luxembourg, Countess Rivers was born 1415-1416, Palace of Westminster, London, England (daughter of Peter I, Count of Saint-Pol and Margaret of Baux); died 30 May 1472.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Duchess of Bedford

    Notes:

    Jacquetta of Luxembourg, Countess Rivers (1415/1416 – 30 May 1472) was the eldest daughter of Peter I of Luxembourg, Count of Saint-Pol, Conversano and Brienne and his wife Margaret of Baux (Margherita del Balzo of Andria). She was a prominent, though often overlooked, figure in the Wars of the Roses. Through her short-lived first marriage to the Duke of Bedford, brother of King Henry V, she was firmly allied to the House of Lancaster. However, following the emphatic Lancastrian defeat at the Battle of Towton, she and her second husband Richard Woodville sided closely with the House of York. Three years after the battle and the accession of Edward IV of England, Jacquetta's eldest daughter Elizabeth Woodville married him and became Queen consort of England. Jacquetta bore Woodville 14 children and stood trial on charges of witchcraft, for which she was exonerated.

    Family and ancestry

    Her father Peter of Luxembourg, Count of Saint-Pol, was also the hereditary Count of Brienne from 1397 until his death in 1433.

    Peter had succeeded his father John of Luxembourg, Lord of Beauvoir, and mother Marguerite of Enghien. They had co-reigned as Count and Countess of Brienne from 1394 to her death in 1397. John had been a fourth-generation descendant of Waleran I of Luxembourg, Lord of Ligny, second son of Henry V of Luxembourg and Margaret of Bar. This cadet line of the House of Luxembourg reigned in Ligny-en-Barrois.

    Jacquetta's paternal great-grandmother, Mahaut of Chãatillon, was descended from Beatrice of England, daughter of King Henry III of England and Eleanor of Provence.[1] Jacquetta's mother, Margherita del Balzo, was a daughter of Francesco del Balzo, 1st Duke of Andria, and Sueva Orsini.[2] Sueva descended from Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester and Eleanor of England, the youngest child of King John of England and Isabella of Angoulãeme.[2]

    The Luxembourgs claimed to be descended from the water deity Melusine through their ancestor Siegfried of Luxembourg (AD 922-998).[3] Jacquetta was a fourth cousin twice removed of Sigismund of Luxembourg, the reigning Holy Roman Emperor and king of Bohemia and Hungary.

    Early life

    Most of Jacquetta's early life is a mystery. She was born as the Lancastrian phase of the Hundred Years War began. Her uncle, John II of Luxembourg, Count of Ligny, was the head of the military company that captured Joan of Arc. John held Joan prisoner at Beauvoir and later sold her to the English.

    First marriage

    On 22 April 1433 at age 17, Jacquetta married John of Lancaster, 1st Duke of Bedford at Therouenne. The Duke was the third son of King Henry IV of England and Mary de Bohun, and thus the grandson of John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster, himself the third son of Edward III. The marriage was childless and the Duke died on 15 September 1435 at Rouen. As was customary at the time, after her second marriage Jacquetta retained the title of her first husband and was always known as the Duchess of Bedford, this being a higher title than that of countess. Jacquetta inherited one-third of the Duke's main estates as her widow's share.[4]

    Second marriage

    Sir Richard Woodville, son of Sir Richard Wydevill, who had served as the late Duke's chamberlain, was commissioned by Henry VI of England to bring Bedford's young widow to England. During the journey, the couple fell in love and married in secret (before 23 March 1437), without seeking the king's permission. Jacquetta had been granted dower lands following her first husband's death on condition that she did not remarry without a royal licence. On learning of the marriage, Henry VI refused to see them, but was mollified by the payment of a fine of ¹1000. The marriage was long and very fruitful: Jacquetta and Richard had fourteen children, including the future Queen Consort Elizabeth Woodville. She lost her first-born son Lewis to a fever when he was 12 years old. A daughter also named Jacquetta (Woodville) married John le Strange, 8th Baron Strange.

    By the mid-1440s, the Woodvilles were in a powerful position. Jacquetta was related to both King Henry and Queen Margaret by marriage. Her sister, Isabelle de Saint Pol, married Margaret's uncle Charles du Maine while Jacquetta was the widow of Henry VI's uncle. She outranked all ladies at court with the exception of the queen. As a personal favourite, she also enjoyed special privileges and influence at court. Margaret influenced Henry to create Richard Woodville Baron Rivers in 1448, and he was a prominent partisan of the House of Lancaster as the Wars of the Roses began.[3]

    Wars of the Roses

    The Yorkists crushed the Lancastrians at the Battle of Towton on 29 March 1461, and Edward IV, the first king from the House of York, took the throne. The husband of Jacquetta's oldest daughter Elizabeth (Sir John Grey) had been killed a month before at the Second Battle of St. Albans, a Lancastrian victory under the command of Margaret of Anjou. At Towton, however, the tables turned in favour of the Yorkists.

    Edward IV met and soon married the widowed Elizabeth Woodville in secret; though the date is not accepted as exactly accurate, it is traditionally said to have taken place (with only Jacquetta and two ladies in attendance) at the Woodvile family home in Northamptonshire on 1 May 1464.[5] Elizabeth was crowned queen on 26 May 1465, the Sunday after Ascension Day. The marriage, once revealed, ruined the plans of Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick, Edward's cousin, who had been negotiating a much-needed alliance with France via a political marriage for Edward.

    With Elizabeth now Queen of England, the Woodvilles rose to great prominence and power. Jacquetta's husband Richard was created Earl Rivers and appointed Lord High Treasurer in March 1466. Jacquetta found rich and influential spouses for her children and helped her grandchildren achieve high posts.[6] She arranged for her 20-year-old son, John, to marry the widowed and very rich Katherine Neville, Duchess of Norfolk, who was at least 45 years older than John. The rise of the Woodvilles created widespread hostility among the Yorkists, including Warwick and the king's brothers George and Richard, who were being displaced in the king's favour by the former Lancastrians.

    In 1469, Warwick openly broke with Edward IV and temporarily deposed him. Earl Rivers and his son John were captured and executed by Warwick on 12 August at Kenilworth. Jacquetta survived her husband by three years and died in 1472, at about 56 years of age.

    Witchcraft accusations

    Shortly after her husband's execution by Warwick, Thomas Wake, a follower of Warwick’s, accused Jacquetta of witchcraft. Wake brought to Warwick Castle a lead image “made like a man-of-arms . . . broken in the middle and made fast with a wire,“ and alleged that Jacquetta had fashioned it to use for witchcraft and sorcery. He claimed that John Daunger, a parish clerk in Northampton, could attest that Jacquetta had made two other images, one for the king and one for the queen. The case fell apart when Warwick released Edward IV from custody, and Jacquetta was cleared by the king’s great council of the charges on February 21, 1470.[7] In 1484 Richard III in the act known as Titulus Regius[8] revived the allegations of witchcraft against Jacquetta when he claimed that she and Elizabeth had procured Elizabeth's marriage to Edward IV through witchcraft; however, Richard never offered any proof to support his assertions.

    Heritage

    Through her daughter Elizabeth, Jacquetta was the maternal grandmother of Elizabeth of York, wife and queen of Henry VII, and therefore an ancestor of all subsequent English monarchs.

    Children

    Elizabeth Woodville, Queen consort of England (c. 1437 – 8 Jun. 1492), married first Sir John Grey, second Edward IV of England.
    Lewis Woodville (c. 1438), died in childhood.
    Anne Woodville (1438/9 – 30 Jul. 1489). Married first William Bourchier, Viscount Bourchier, second Sir Edward Wingfield, third George Grey, 2nd Earl of Kent.
    Anthony Woodville, 2nd Earl Rivers (c. 1440 – 25 Jun. 1483), married first Elizabeth Scales, 8th Baroness Scales, second Mary Fitzlewis; not married to Gwentlian Stradling, the mother of Margaret.
    John Woodville (c. 1444 – 12 Aug. 1469), married Catherine Neville, Dowager Duchess of Norfolk.
    Jacquetta Woodville (1445–1509), married John le Strange, 8th Baron Strange of Knockin.
    Lionel Woodville, Bishop of Salisbury (c. 1446 – Jun. 1484).
    Eleanor Woodville (d. c. 1512), married Sir Anthony Grey.
    Margaret Woodville (c. 1450 – 1490/1), married Thomas Fitzalan, 17th Earl of Arundel.
    Martha Woodville (d. c. 1500), married Sir John Bromley.
    Richard Woodville, 3rd Earl Rivers (1453 – Mar. 1491).
    Edward Woodville, Lord Scales (1454/8 – 28 Jul. 1488).
    Mary Woodville (c. 1456 – 1481), married William Herbert, 2nd Earl of Pembroke.
    Catherine Woodville (c. 1458 – 18 May 1497), married first Henry Stafford, 2nd Duke of Buckingham, second Jasper Tudor, Duke of Bedford.[9]
    I
    end of biography

    Children:
    1. Elizabeth Lucy Wydeville, Queen of England was born ~ 1437, Grafton Regis, Northampton, England; died 8 Jun 1492, Bermondsey, London, England; was buried St. George's Chapel, Windsor, England.
    2. Anne Woodville, Viscountess Bourchier was born ~ 1438, Grafton Regis, Northampton, England; died 30 Jul 1489; was buried St. Leonard Churchyard, Warden, Bedfordshire, England.
    3. 1. Mary Woodville, Countess of Pembroke was born ~ 1456; died 0___ 1481.
    4. Katherine Woodville, Duchess of Buckingham was born ~ 1458, (Maidstone, Kent, England); died 18 May 1497.


Generation: 3

  1. 4.  Richard Wydeville, Duke of Bedford was born 0___ 1385 (son of John Wydeville and Isabel Godard); died 0___ 1441.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Richard Woodeville
    • Also Known As: Richard Wydeville of Grafton

    Richard — Joan Bittlesgate. Joan (daughter of Thomas Bittlesgate and Joan Beauchamp) was born Devon, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 5.  Joan Bittlesgate was born Devon, England (daughter of Thomas Bittlesgate and Joan Beauchamp).

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Joan Bedisgate

    Notes:

    Birth:
    at Knighteston...

    Children:
    1. 2. Richard Woodville, Knight, 1st Earl Rivers was born 0___ 1405, Maidstone, Kent, England; died 12 Aug 1469, Kenilworth, Warwickshire, England.

  3. 6.  Peter I, Count of Saint-Pol

    Peter — Margaret of Baux. [Group Sheet]


  4. 7.  Margaret of Baux (daughter of Francis of Baux and Sueva Orsini).
    Children:
    1. 3. Jacquetta of Luxembourg, Countess Rivers was born 1415-1416, Palace of Westminster, London, England; died 30 May 1472.


Generation: 4

  1. 8.  John Wydeville was born 0___ 1341 (son of Richard de Wydeville and unnamed spouse); died 8 Sep 1403.

    John married Isabel Godard 0___ 1379. Isabel (daughter of John de Lyons and Alice de St. Liz) was born 5 Apr 1345; died 23 Nov 1392. [Group Sheet]


  2. 9.  Isabel Godard was born 5 Apr 1345 (daughter of John de Lyons and Alice de St. Liz); died 23 Nov 1392.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Isabel Gobion

    Children:
    1. 4. Richard Wydeville, Duke of Bedford was born 0___ 1385; died 0___ 1441.

  3. 10.  Thomas Bittlesgate was born 0___ 1350, (England) (son of John Bittlesgate and unnamed spouse); died 31 Dec 1360, England.

    Thomas — Joan Beauchamp. Joan (daughter of John de Beauchamp and Joan de Bridport) was born 0___ 1360; died 0___ 1368. [Group Sheet]


  4. 11.  Joan Beauchamp was born 0___ 1360 (daughter of John de Beauchamp and Joan de Bridport); died 0___ 1368.
    Children:
    1. 5. Joan Bittlesgate was born Devon, England.

  5. 14.  Francis of Baux

    Francis — Sueva Orsini. [Group Sheet]


  6. 15.  Sueva Orsini (daughter of Nicola Orsini and Jeanne de Sabran).
    Children:
    1. 7. Margaret of Baux


Generation: 5

  1. 16.  Richard de Wydeville

    Richard — unnamed spouse. [Group Sheet]


  2. 17.  unnamed spouse
    Children:
    1. 8. John Wydeville was born 0___ 1341; died 8 Sep 1403.

  3. 18.  John de Lyons

    John — Alice de St. Liz. [Group Sheet]


  4. 19.  Alice de St. Liz
    Children:
    1. 9. Isabel Godard was born 5 Apr 1345; died 23 Nov 1392.

  5. 20.  John Bittlesgate

    John — unnamed spouse. [Group Sheet]


  6. 21.  unnamed spouse
    Children:
    1. 10. Thomas Bittlesgate was born 0___ 1350, (England); died 31 Dec 1360, England.

  7. 22.  John de Beauchamp

    John — Joan de Bridport. [Group Sheet]


  8. 23.  Joan de Bridport
    Children:
    1. 11. Joan Beauchamp was born 0___ 1360; died 0___ 1368.

  9. 30.  Nicola Orsini (son of Roberto Orsini and Sueva del Balzo).

    Nicola — Jeanne de Sabran. [Group Sheet]


  10. 31.  Jeanne de Sabran
    Children:
    1. 15. Sueva Orsini


Generation: 6

  1. 60.  Roberto Orsini was born 0___ 1295, (Italy) (son of Romano Orsini, Senator of Rome and Anastasia de Montfort, Countess of Nola); died 15 Jan 1345.

    Roberto — Sueva del Balzo. Sueva (daughter of Hugues de Balzo, Count of Solena and Jacopa della Marra) was born (Italy). [Group Sheet]


  2. 61.  Sueva del Balzo was born (Italy) (daughter of Hugues de Balzo, Count of Solena and Jacopa della Marra).
    Children:
    1. 30. Nicola Orsini


Generation: 7

  1. 120.  Romano Orsini, Senator of Rome was born 0___ 1268, (Italy); died 0___ 1327.

    Romano married Anastasia de Montfort, Countess of Nola 8 Jun 1293, (Italy). Anastasia (daughter of Guy de Montfort, Count of Nola and Margherita Aldobrandesca, Lady of Sovana) was born ~ 1274, (Siena) Italy. [Group Sheet]


  2. 121.  Anastasia de Montfort, Countess of Nola was born ~ 1274, (Siena) Italy (daughter of Guy de Montfort, Count of Nola and Margherita Aldobrandesca, Lady of Sovana).

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Dame de Chailly
    • Also Known As: Dame de Longjumeau

    Notes:

    Anastasia de Montfort, Countess of Nola (born c.1274), was an Italian noblewoman and a wealthy heiress. She was the eldest daughter of Guy de Montfort, Count of Nola, himself the son of Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester. She held the title suo jure Countess of Nola after her father's death in 1291. She also held the titles of suo jure Dame de Chailly and suo jure Dame de Longjumeau. She was the wife of Romano Orsini, Senator of Rome, by whom she had at least three children. English queen consort Elizabeth Woodville was among her numerous

    Anastasia de Montfort
    suo jure Countess of Nola
    suo jure Dame de Chailly
    suo jure Dame de Longjumeau
    Born c. 1274
    Italy
    Died before January 15, 1345
    Noble family House of Montfort
    Spouse(s) Romano Orsini, Senator of Rome
    Issue
    Roberto Orsini, Count of Nola
    Guido Orsini, Count of Pitigliano
    Giovanna Orsini
    Father Guy de Montfort, Count of Nola
    Mother Margherita Aldobrandeschi, suo jure Countess of Sovana and Pitigliano

    Family

    Anastasia was born in Italy in about 1274, the eldest daughter of Guy de Montfort, Count of Nola, and Margherita Aldobrandeschi, Countess of Sovana and Pitigliano (c. 1255-after 1313).[1] She had a younger sister, Tommasia, who married Pietro Vico, but the marriage was childless. Her paternal grandparents were Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester and Eleanor of England, daughter of King John of England and Isabella of Angoulãeme. Her maternal grandparents were Ildebrandino Aldobrandeschi, Count of Sovana and Tommasia di Baschi.

    Her father, Guy, fled England in 1266 after he had escaped from prison, eventually arriving in Italy. He entered the service of Charles of Anjou who made him Count of Nola and Vicar-general of Tuscany. On 10 August 1270, Guy married Margherita Aldobrandeschi at Viterbo.[1] In 1271, her father was excommunicated for killing his cousin Henry of Almain inside San Silvestro church. Later he was captured by the Aragonese and died in a Sicilian prison in 1291.

    Upon his death, Anastasia became the suo jure Countess of Nola. In an effort to retain her lands, Anastasia's mother married four more times after Guy's death. Her four additional husbands were: Orsello Orsini, Loffredo Caetani, her cousin Guido Aldobrandeschi di Santa Fiora, and Nello de' Pannocchieschi.

    Marriage and issue

    On 8 June 1293 Anastasia married Romano Orsini (1268–1327), Senator of Rome and son of Gentile II Orsini, Senator of Rome and Claricia de Ruffo.[1] The marriage had been arranged by Cardinal Napoleon Orsini, who was her mother's guardian. Anastasia, being Margherita's eldest daughter and heiress, eventually brought the rich Aldobrandeschi and Sovana inheritances into the Orsini family.

    Together Romano and Anastasia had at least three children:

    Roberto Orsini, Count of Nola (1295- 15 January 1345), married Sueva del Balzo,[1] the daughter of Hugues del Balzo, Count of Soleto and Seneschal of Naples, and Jacopa della Marra, by whom he had issue.
    Guido Orsini, Count of Pitigliano (died after 1348), married Agostina della Gherardesca, by whom he had issue.
    Giovanna Orsini, married in 1334 Nicolo Caetani by whom she had issue.
    Anastasia died on an unknown date, which occurred sometime before her eldest son, Roberto's death on 15 January 1345 as he had succeeded her as Count of Nola. Her husband Romano died in 1327.

    Children:
    1. 60. Roberto Orsini was born 0___ 1295, (Italy); died 15 Jan 1345.

  3. 122.  Hugues de Balzo, Count of Solena was born (Italy).

    Hugues — Jacopa della Marra. Jacopa was born (Italy). [Group Sheet]


  4. 123.  Jacopa della Marra was born (Italy).
    Children:
    1. 61. Sueva del Balzo was born (Italy).


Generation: 8

  1. 242.  Guy de Montfort, Count of Nola was born 0___ 1244 (son of Simon de Montfort, V, Knight, 6th Earl of Leicester and Eleanor of Leicester); died 0___ 1288, Sicily.

    Notes:

    Guy de Montfort, Count of Nola (1244 – 1291) was the son of Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester and Eleanor of England.[1]

    Biography

    He participated in the Battle of Evesham against the royalist forces of his uncle, King Henry III of England, and his cousin, Prince Edward. Both his father and elder brother were traumatically killed during the disastrous battle, Guy de Montfort was extremely wounded and captured.[2]

    He was held at Windsor Castle until spring 1266, when he bribed his captors and escaped to France to rejoin his exiled family. Guy and his brother, Simon the younger, wandered across Europe for several years, eventually making their way to Italy.[2]

    Guy took service with Charles of Anjou, serving as his Vicar-General in Tuscany. He distinguished himself at the Battle of Tagliacozzo and was given Nola by Charles of Anjou.

    In 1271, Guy and Simon discovered that their cousin Henry of Almain (son of Richard, Earl of Cornwall) was in Viterbo at the church of San Silvestro.[3] In revenge for the deaths of their father and brother at Evesham, on 13 March, 1271, Guy and Simon murdered Henry while he clutched the altar, begging for mercy. "You had no mercy for my father and brothers", was Guy's reply. This murder was carried out in the presence of the Cardinals (who were conducting a papal Election), of King Philip III of France, and of King Charles of Sicily. For this crime the Montfort brothers were excommunicated, and Dante banished Guy to the river of boiling blood in the seventh circle of his Inferno (Canto XII).

    The news reached England, and King Edward I(Note: Edward didn't succeed to throne until 1272) dispatched a clerk of the royal household to inform the northern counties and Scotland about the excommunication.[2] Pope Gregory X wrote a letter (29 November, 1273) to King Edward from Lyons, where he was preparing for an ecumenical council, that Cardinal Riccardo Annibaldi and Cardinal Giovanni Orsini were still in Rome and had been ordered to find a secure place of imprisonment in the territories of the Church for Guy de Montfort.[4]

    Simon died later that year at Siena, "cursed by God, a wanderer and a fugitive". Guy was stripped of his titles and took service with Charles of Anjou again, but was captured off the coast of Sicily in 1287 by the Aragonese at the Battle of the Counts. He died in a Sicilian prison.[2]

    Family

    In Tuscany, he married an Italian noblewoman, Margherita Aldobrandesca, the Lady of Sovana.[5] With her he had two daughters:[6] Anastasia, who married Romano Orsini,[7] and Tomasina, who married Pietro di Vico.

    Among his direct descendants (via his elder daughter, Anastasia): late 15th century Kings of Naples, England's Queen-Consort Elizabeth Woodville, 16th century rulers of Poland, Dukes of Ferrera, and Dukes of Guise.

    end of biography

    Guy married Margherita Aldobrandesca, Lady of Sovana Tuscany, Italy. [Group Sheet]


  2. 243.  Margherita Aldobrandesca, Lady of Sovana
    Children:
    1. 121. Anastasia de Montfort, Countess of Nola was born ~ 1274, (Siena) Italy.
    2. Tomasina de Montfort was born (Siena) Italy.