Sir William Herbert, 2nd Earl of Pembroke

Male 1451 - 1490  (38 years)


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Generation: 1

  1. 1.  Sir William Herbert, 2nd Earl of Pembroke was born 5 Mar 1451 (son of William Herbert, 1st Earl of Pembroke and Anne Devereux); died 0___ 1490.

    William married Mary Woodville, Countess of Pembroke 0Jan 1467, St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle, Windsor, Berkshire, England. Mary (daughter of Richard Woodville, Knight, 1st Earl Rivers and Jacquetta of Luxembourg, Countess Rivers) was born ~ 1456; died 0___ 1481. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. Elizabeth Herbert, 3rd Baroness Herbert was born ~ 1476; died 27 Aug 1507; was buried St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle, Windsor, Berkshire, England.

Generation: 2

  1. 2.  William Herbert, 1st Earl of Pembroke was born ~ 1423, (Wales); died 27 Jul 1469.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Black William

    Notes:

    William Herbert, 1st Earl of Pembroke KG (c. 1423 – 27 July 1469), known as "Black William", was a Welsh nobleman, politician, and courtier. He was the son of William ap Thomas, founder of Raglan Castle, and Gwladys ferch Dafydd Gam, and grandson of Dafydd Gam, an adherent of King Henry V of England.

    His father had been an ally of Richard of York, and Herbert supported the Yorkist cause in the Wars of the Roses. In 1461 Herbert was rewarded by King Edward IV with the title Baron Herbert of Raglan (having assumed an English-style surname in place of the Welsh patronymic), and was invested as a Knight of the Garter.

    Soon after the decisive Yorkist victory at the Battle of Towton in 1461, Herbert replaced Jasper Tudor [Editor's Note: view Sir Jasper's page; http://thehennesseefamily.com/getperson.php?personID=I47779&tree=hennessee, as Earl of Pembroke which gave him control of Pembroke Castle. However, he fell out with Lord Warwick "the Kingmaker" in 1469, when Warwick turned against the King. William and his brother Richard were executed by the Lancastrians, now led by Warwick, after the Battle of Edgecote Moor, near Banbury.[1]

    Herbert was succeeded by his son, William, but the earldom was surrendered in 1479. It was later revived for a grandson, another William Herbert, the son of Black William's illegitimate son, Sir Richard Herbert of Ewyas.

    Marriage and children

    He married Anne Devereux, daughter of Walter Devereux, Lord Chancellor of Ireland and Elizabeth Merbury. They had at least ten children:

    William Herbert, 2nd Earl of Pembroke (5 March 1451 – 16 July 1491).
    Sir Walter Herbert. (c. 1452 - d. 16 September 1507) Married Lady Anne Stafford, sister to the Duke of Buckingham.
    Sir George Herbert of St. Julians.
    Philip Herbert of Lanyhangel.
    Cecilie Herbert.
    Maud Herbert. Married Henry Percy, 4th Earl of Northumberland.
    Katherine Herbert. Married George Grey, 2nd Earl of Kent.
    Anne Herbert. Married John Grey, 1st Baron Grey of Powis, 9th Lord of Powys (died 1497).
    Isabel Herbert. Married Sir Thomas Cokesey.
    Margaret Herbert. Married first Thomas Talbot, 2nd Viscount Lisle and secondly Sir Henry Bodringham.
    William had three illegitimate sons but the identities of their mothers are unconfirmed:

    Sir Richard Herbert of Ewyas. Father of William Herbert, 1st Earl of Pembroke (10th Creation). Probably son of Maud, daughter of Adam ap Howell Graunt (Gwynn).
    Sir George Herbert. The son of Frond verch Hoesgyn. Married Sybil Croft.[2]
    Sir William Herbert of Troye. Son of Frond verch Hoesgyn. Married, second, Blanche Whitney (nâee Milborne) see Blanche Milborne. They had two sons.[3]
    See also[edit]
    The White Queen (TV series)

    William married Anne Devereux Herefordshire, England. Anne (daughter of Walter Devereux and Elizabeth Merbury) was born ~ 1430, Bodenham, England; died > 25 June 1486. [Group Sheet]


  2. 3.  Anne Devereux was born ~ 1430, Bodenham, England (daughter of Walter Devereux and Elizabeth Merbury); died > 25 June 1486.

    Notes:

    Anne Devereux (c. 1430 in Bodenham – after 25 June 1486), was the daughter of Sir Walter Devereux, the Lord Chancellor of Ireland, and his wife Elizabeth Merbury.[1] Anne's grandfather, Walter, was the son of Agnes Crophull. By Crophull's second marriage to Sir John Parr, Anne was a cousin to the Parr family which included Sir Thomas Parr; father of King Henry VIII's last queen consort, Catherine Parr.[2][3][4]

    Marriage

    About 1445, Anne married William Herbert, 1st Earl of Pembroke, in Herefordshire, England. He was the second son of Sir William ap Thomas of Raglan, a member of the Welsh Gentry Family, and his second wife Gwladys ferch Dafydd Gam.[1]

    William Herbert was a very ambitious man. During the War of the Roses, Wales heavily supported the Lancastrian cause. Jasper Tudor, 1st Earl of Pembroke and other Lancastrians remained in control of fortresses at Pembroke, Harlech, Carreg Cennen, and Denbigh. On 8 May 1461, as a loyal supporter of King Edward IV, Herbert was appointed Life Chamberlain of South Wales and steward of Carmarthenshire and Cardiganshire. King Edward's appointment signaled his intention to replace Jasper Tudor with Herbert, who thus would become the premier nobleman in Wales. Herbert was created Lord Herbert on 26 July 1461. Herbert was then ordered to seize the county and title of Earl of Pembroke from Jasper Tudor. By the end of August, Herbert had taken back control of Wales with the well fortified Pembroke Castle capitulating on 30 September 1461. With this victory for the House of York came the inmate at Pembroke; the five-year-old nephew of Jasper Tudor, Henry, Earl of Richmond. Determined to enhance his power and arrange good marriages for his daughters, in March 1462 he paid 1,000 for the wardship of Henry Tudor. Herbert planned a marriage between Tudor and his eldest daughter, Maud. At the same time, Herbert secured the young Henry Percy who had just inherited the title of Earl of Northumberland. Herbert's court at Raglan Castle was where young Henry Tudor would spend his childhood, under the supervision of Herbert's wife, Anne Devereux. Anne insured that young Henry was well cared for.[5]

    Issue

    The Earl and Countess of Pembroke had three sons and seven daughters:[1]

    Sir William Herbert, 2nd Earl of Pembroke, Earl of Huntingdon,[1] married firstly to Mary Woodville; daughter of Richard Woodville, 1st Earl Rivers and thus sister to King Edward IV's queen consort Elizabeth Woodville. He married secondly to Lady Katherine Plantagenet, the illegitimate daughter of King Richard III.[1]
    Sir Walter Herbert,[1] husband of Lady Anne Stafford
    Sir George Herbert[1]
    Lady Maud Herbert, wife of Sir Henry Percy, 4th Earl of Northumberland, 7th Lord Percy.[1]
    Lady Katherine Herbert, wife of Sir George Grey, 2nd Earl of Kent.[1]
    Lady Anne Herbert, wife of Sir John Grey, 1st Baron Grey of Powis.[1]
    Lady Margaret Herbert, wife of Sir Thomas Talbot, 2nd Viscount Lisle, and of Sir Walter Bodrugan.[1]
    Lady Cecily Herbert, wife of John Greystoke.[1]
    Lady Elizabeth Herbert, wife of Sir Thomas Cokesey.[1]
    Lady Crisli Herbert, wife of Mr. Cornwall.[1]
    The Earl of Pembroke also fathered several children by various mistresses.[1]

    Children:
    1. 1. William Herbert, 2nd Earl of Pembroke was born 5 Mar 1451; died 0___ 1490.
    2. Maud Herbert, Countess of Northumberland was born ~ 1453, Llnfhngl Clcrnl, Abergavenny, Monmouth, Wales; died 0___ 1485; was buried Beverley Minster, East Riding, Yorkshire, England.


Generation: 3

  1. 6.  Walter Devereux was born 0___ 1411, Bodeham, Herefordshire, England (son of Walter Devereux and Elizabeth Bromwich); died 23 Apr 1459.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Lord Chancellor of Ireland

    Notes:

    Sir Walter Devereux (1411 – 22 April 1459) of Bodenham and Weobley was a loyal supporter of Richard of York, 3rd Duke of York during the Wars of the Roses. He was Lord Chancellor of Ireland from 1449 to 1451.

    Ancestry and Childhood

    Walter Devereux was born in 1411 in Bodenham, Herefordshire to a senior Walter Devereux (or Deverois, 1387–1420) and his wife Elizabeth Bromwich.[1][2]

    His maternal grandparents were Thomas Bromwich, Lord Justice of Ireland and Catherine Oldcastle. His paternal grandparents were an elder Walter Devereux (c. 1361–1402) and Agnes Crophull.[a] Agnes was mother of Sir Thomas Parr by a second marriage to John Parr of Kendal; and paternal grandmother of William Parr, 1st Baron Parr of Kendal, a noted courtier under Edward IV of England and grandfather of Queen Catherine Parr. Agnes Crophull's third husband was John Merbury, the father of Walter Devereux's wife by a previous marriage as indicated below.

    The Devereux arms were: Argent a fesse gules, in chief three torteaux.

    Marriage

    Walter Devereux married Elizabeth Merbury in 1427.[2] She was a daughter of Sir John Merbury,[3] Chief Justice of South Wales and his wife Alice Pembridge. They had the following children:

    Anne Devereux (c. 1430 - after 1486). Married William Herbert, 1st Earl of Pembroke.[1][2]
    Walter Devereux, 7th Baron Ferrers of Chartley (c. 1431 - 22 August 1485).[1][2]
    Isabella Devereux (born c. 1435).[2] Married Rowland Lenthall (o.s.p., 1422 to 12 May 1488).[4]
    Sir John Devereux (born c. 1438).[1][2][b]

    Wars of the Roses and Career

    Walter Devereux was 8 years old at the death of his father in 1419. Following his marriage in 1427, he established his first residence at Bodenham, the core of his Devereux family estates. On 8 July 1427 Thomas Barton, Thomas Smith and Thomas Lightfoot, granted John and Agnes Merbury the manors of Bonington, West Leake and Treswell; 3 messuages and 5 virgates of land in Thrumpton in the county of Nottingham; the manors of Hemington and Braunstone and the advowson of the church of Braunstone in the county of Leicester; and a third part of the manors of Market Rasen and East Rasen in the county of Lincoln. They were to be held for the lives of John and Agnes, and after their decease remain to Walter Devereux and Elizabeth, his wife, and the heirs of their bodies. On the Subsidy Rolls of 1428 Walter Devereux held 1/3 of half a fee in Byford, and ½ fee in Bodenham.[c] On 30 July 1428 Maurice Taylor, Roger Haynes, Richard Baby and William Mimm granted to Walter Devereux and his uncles, John and Richard Devereux, all the lands and tenements they held in Bradley and their fees of Weobley, Dilwyn, and King’s Pyon in Herefordshire.

    With the death of his grandmother, Agnes Crophull, on 9 February 1436, he inherited the remainder of his Devereux lands including Lyonshall Castle.[5] She withheld her Crophull lands, deeding a life interest in them to her third husband, John Merbury.[3] With his death on 3 February 1438, Walter Devereux inherited the Crophull lands[6] including Weobley,[d] and the Merbury estates. On 28 April 1438 Walter Devereux was certified as the heir of Agnes Crophul, and paid homage for his inheritance.

    Following the death of Edmund Mortimer, 5th Earl of March, on 18 January 1425, Richard, 3rd Duke of York inherited his estates along the Welsh Marches. This brought Walter Devereux into the retinue of the Duke,[7] and he remained his loyal supporter throughout the War of the Roses. Devereux had been knighted by 22 September 1429 when he first represented Herefordshire in Parliament.[8] He probably was in attendance on the Duke when he travelled with Henry VI to France for his coronation on 16 December 1429. On his return Devereux represented Herefordshire again in Parliament on 16 January 1430. He was listed on the subsidy rolls for Herefordshire of 12 January 1431 as holding his 1/3 of half a fee in Byford.

    Walter Devereux was appointed by the Duke of York as steward of his lordships of Radnor in 1435.[9] He represented Herefordshire in Parliament on 10 October 1435, and on 3 January 1436 was assigned to collect the tenth and fifteenth granted by the Parliament to the king.[10] Following York’s appointment as Lieutenant of France in May 1436, Devereux was probably in the army the Duke brought to Normandy to recapture Fecamp and hold the Pays de Caux.

    He represented Herefordshire in Parliament on 14 January 1440,[11] and was described as a knight coming to Parliament on 24 April 1440 when identified as responsible for the distribution of a sum excepted from the collection of the tenth and fifteenth granted by Parliament.[12] On 7 May 1440 Eustace Whitney of Whitney, and Mathew Hay of Chikwell committed to Walter Devereux the wardship and marriages of the daughters of John Walwayn (Ellen, Agnes, and Elizabeth) who were minors in the king’s care. This placed in his keeping two-thirds of a moiety of the manor of Wellington, and two-thirds of a moiety of the manor of Addesore, county Hereford; rendering for the keeping of Wellington 4L 3s 4d, and for Addesore 5s 4d. The grant was confirmed on 16 May 1441 by Devereux’s payment of 20L to the exchequer. On 8 June 1455 Urias and Elizabeth de la Hay; and Henry and Joan ap Griffith granted to Walter Devereux and his son; William Herbert; John Barrow, and Miles Skull a moiety of Wellington and Addesore manors; 100 acres of land and 20 shillings of rent in Wellington forever.[13][14]

    On 2 July 1440 the Duke of York was again appointed Lieutenant of France. On 28 January 1441 Walter Devereux was appointed Justice of the Peace for Herefordshire,[15] and on 18 February 1441 entrusted with collection of a tenth and fifteenth to fund an expedition by the Duke to defend English possessions in France.[16] In May 1441 Walter Devereux was granted protection and appointed an attorney while in France in the company of Richard, Duke of York.[17] During 1442 he was captain of the garrison at Arques (Normandy), and on 18 August led a garrison detachment to support the Siege of Conches, which surrendered on 7 September.[18][19] Henry VI diverted an army promised to York to the Duke of Somerset, and Devereux was back in England on 16 February 1443 when he was appointed again Justice of the Peace for Herefordshire.[20]

    In 1445 Walter Devereux was Bailly of Caus Castle in Shropshire.[21] On 18 November 1445 he was appointed to a commission to inquire why following the death of Sir John Cornewaill on 20 December 1243 his lands were not taken into the king’s hands.

    Early in 1446 Walter Devereux contracted a marriage for his son, Walter, with Anne Ferrers, daughter of William de Ferrers, 6th Baron Ferrers of Chartley; and entails manors on his son and new daughter-in-law. On 1 June 1446, he was entrusted with the collection of a loan for the king necessary for Henry VI’s meeting in October with the King of France to negotiate a final peace.[22]

    While attending Parliament, Devereux witnessed the Duke of York’s grant of land to the house of friars minors at Babewell by Bury St Edmunds on 28 February 1447.[23] On 9 November 1447 he was appointed Sheriff of Herefordshire.[8][24] The manor of Leominster was placed in Walter Devereux’s keeping with the assent of the monastery of Reading on 12 February 1448.[25] On 10 April 1448 Nicholas Poynes and John Langeley granted to Sir Walter and Elizabeth Devereux the manor of Dymock, Gloucestershire.[26] Later on 7 December 1452 William Wykes of Moreton Geffrey, and John Hille of Weobley further committed to Sir Walter and Elizabeth Devereux four parts of the manor of Dymock, which had been taken into the king’s hand.[27]

    On 30 July 1448 the Duke of York was appointed Lieutenant of Ireland, and Devereux was appointed Lord Chancellor of Ireland. They went to Ireland in June 1449, but in June 1450 Jack Cade’s Rebellion broke out signaling growing discontent in England with the rule of Henry VI. In September 1450 the Duke returned to England and had an angry meeting with the King. Devereux yielded his position as Chancellor,[e] and on 1 August 1450 was granted L13 6s 8d from the Irish revenue for life for good and laudable services in the English and French Wars.[28] He represented Herefordshire at the Parliament of 6 November 1450, and a recognizance to the king was placed on Walter Devereux and others for ¹200 to insure that Robert Poynings, a supporter of the rebellion, appeared before Parliament before 7 December. Devereux was again in attendance at Parliament on 20 January 1450, and when it resumed on 5 May 1450. On 17 April 1451 Walter Devereux was appointed to determine the yearly value of the county, castle, and lordship of Pembroke; the castles, towns and lordships of Kilgarran, Llanstephan, Osterlowe, Treyne Clynton, and St Clear in Herefordshire.[29]

    York declared his loyalty to the King at Ludlow in February 1452 stating that the Court should free itself from bad advisors. The King did not respond, and York took to the field with his supporters, which included Walter Devereux, and marched on London. The King eventually found York entrenched at Dartford Heath. The confrontation was resolved following minor skirmishing, but Devereux was attainted for treason by Parliament later that year. At this time, he began holding Wigmore Castle for the Yorkists.

    On 5 January 1453 Jasper and Edmund Tudor were formally invested as the Earls of Pembroke, and Richmond respectively. From this time forward the Tudors intermittently fought a private war with William Herbert and Walter Devereux. On 6 March 1453 Devereux’s son, now Lord Ferrers, represented Herefordshire in Parliament in his place. On 20 March Walter Devereux and William Wylflete were placed under a recognizance of 200L and 50 marks to John, Bishop of St David's, and on 15 May the bishop granted them a moiety of Narberth Castle.[30] On 26 March Walter Devereux of Weobley; William Herbert of Raglan; Humphrey Stafford of Frome; Thomas Throgmerton of Coughton; John Throgmerton of Tewkesbury; and John Cassy of Wightfeld were place under a recognisance to the king of 40L for the good behavior of Thomas Herbert of Billingsley. Devereux granted his part of 80 acres of land in Suthwyk and Peryowe to the Duke of York on 15 June 1453, so that he in turn could grant it to John Lynne.[31] On 14 December 1453 Walter Devereux and his son were appointed to investigate the escape of prisoners in Herefordshire.[32] Devereux was appointed on 22 February 1455 to investigate specifically the misdeeds of John Cassy.[33]

    In August 1453 Bordeaux was lost to the French, and Henry VI became mentally incapacitated. On 27 March 1454 the Duke of York was made Protector of the Realm, but on 25 December 1454 the king regained his senses and set about reversing the Duke’s actions.

    On 22 May 1455, the first Battle of St. Albans was fought north of London, traditionally recognized as the first battle of the War of the Roses. A Yorkist victory that included the capture of the King, the Battle of St. Albans restored the Duke of York to complete power. Shortly after the victory Parliament pardoned Walter Devereux on 9 July.[7] On 4 November 1455 he was appointed Sheriff of Gloucestershire.[34] He was also appointed Justice of the Peace for Gloucestershire and Herefordshire, and would continue to hold one or both of these positions for the rest of his life.[35]

    As the King and the Lancasterian party maneuvered to reverse their losses, lawlessness increased on the Welsh Marches. Walter Devereux, as Constable of Wigmore Castle, was up in arms.[36][37] In the summer of 1456, he descended on Hereford with the castle’s garrison and captured the mayor and justices. Devereux then brought before the justices several local men whom he had the justices condemn to death by hanging. He mustered a force of 2000 archers from Gwent, and marched on the castles at Carmarthen and Aberystwyth, which he took by assault.[38] Afterwards he declared a commission of Oyer and terminer to judge and condemn men whom he believed hostile to York. Among his prisoners were Edmund Tudor, 1st Earl of Richmond, and Robert Rees, Keeper of the Welsh Seal. The king placed Walter Devereux under a recognizance of 1000L on 26 September 1456 to be paid if he didn’t immediately turn himself in at Windsor Castle.[39] He, and his son, were also among a group of prominent Herefordshire Yorkists placed under another recognizance of 5000 marks on 2 June 1457 to be paid if they did not turn themselves in for imprisonment at Marshalsea.[40] Devereux, along with Humphrey Stafford and Clement Spryce, were placed under an additional recognizance of 2000 marks on 3 June to be paid if Humphrey Stafford did not turn himself in at Marshalsea.[41] In early 1458 Henry VI granted Walter Devereux a pardon as part of his general effort at reconciliation with the Yorkists, and this was followed by a grant of land in Drogheda in Ireland in 1459.[1]

    Death

    Walter Devereux died on the 22 or 23 April in 1459.[1] Three writs were issued between 27 April to 30 April 1459 to the escheators of Nottinghamshire, Leicestershire, Gloucestershire, the march of Wales, Lincolnshire, Bedfordshire, and London to make inquiry into his holdings.[42]

    General Reference

    Cokayne, G.E. Complete Baronetage. (New York; St. Martin's Press, 1984). Volume V, page 321 to 333, Ferrers
    Duncumb, John. Collections Towards the History and Antiquities of the County of Hereford, Volume 2, Issue 1. (Hereford: EG Wright, 1812). Page 37, Broxash Hundred
    Mosley, Charles (editor). Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition. Chicago: Fitzroy Dearborn Publishers, 1999. Page 1378

    *

    Walter married Elizabeth Merbury 0___ 1427. [Group Sheet]


  2. 7.  Elizabeth Merbury
    Children:
    1. 3. Anne Devereux was born ~ 1430, Bodenham, England; died > 25 June 1486.
    2. Walter Devereux, KG, 7th Baron Ferrers of Chartley was born 0___ 1432, Weobly, Herefordshire, England; died 22 Aug 1485, Bosworth Field, Leicestershire, England.


Generation: 4

  1. 12.  Walter Devereux was born 25 Dec 1387, Bodeham, Herefordshire, England (son of Walter Devereux, Knight and Agnes Crophull); died 0___ 1420.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Walter Deverois

    Notes:

    Sir Walter Devereux of Bodenham was a prominent knight of Herefordshire during the reigns of Henry IV and Henry V. He is the ancestor of the Devereux Earls of Essex and Viscounts of Hereford.

    Childhood and Ancestry

    Walter Devereux was born on Christmas Day 1387,[1][2] and was 15 years old at the death of his father, Walter Devereux of Weobley.[3] He inherited only part of the lands of his father, and his mother, Agnes Crophull,[a] held the majority of his estates in dower during his lifetime.[4]

    His arms were: Argent a fesse gules, in chief three torteaux.

    Career

    Walter Devereux assumed a position in the retinue of Henry IV following the death of his father on 25 July 1402 at the Battle of Pilleth. On 13 December 1402 Sir Edmund Mortimer declared his rebellion against Henry IV, but Devereux stayed loyal to the king. He was probably present at the Battle of Shrewsbury on 21 July 1403, and subsequently was knighted.[b] Sir Walter Devereux was placed on a Commission of array for Herefordshire on 8 September 1403 to raise troops for the defense against the king’s enemies who have lately invaded the realm.[5] It is probable that Devereux was present when Henry IV faced off with a combined Welsh and French force in South Wales during the summer of 1405, but no major battle occurred and the English force had dispersed by October of that year. Devereux remained an important supporter of the efforts to suppress the rebellion in Wales as Prince Henry assumed responsibility for the fight. Walter Devereux would be among 14 men below the rank of baron who would be retained for life by Prince Henry (the future Henry V).[6]

    In 1406 Welsh raiders damaged Lyonshall Castle in the heart of Devereux territory. Walter Devereux shared a claim on the castle with the family of his distant cousin John Devereux, 1st Baron Devereux. These claims could only be inherited through the male line, and would result in the castle finally passing to his son in the 1430s. When the daughter of John Devereux, Joan 3rd Baroness Devereux and Baroness Fitzwalter, died on 11 May 1409 she still possessed Lyonshall. On 24 May 1409 an order was issued to the escheator and sheriff of Herefordshire to take the castle into the king’s hands, and arrest ‘certain of the king’s lieges’ who had entered and held it with a strong hand to the contempt of the king. This is probably a reference to Walter Devereux trying to assert his claim.

    As described in Shakespeare's plays, there is suggestion that when Henry V assumed the throne on 20 March 1413, the new king did not favor the companions of his youth who had supported him in his struggles with the partisans of his father, Henry IV. This loss of favor may have contributed to the shift of the Devereux family into the retinue of the newly reinstated Earl of March, and ultimately into the affinity of the House of York.

    On 12 November 1414 John and Agnes Cheverell granted for 200 marks to Agnes Crophul, mother of Walter Devereux, and her heirs 1 messuage, 20 acres of land, 5 acres of meadow, and 7 acres of pasture in Whitchurch maund; the manor and rent of Whitchurch maund; 7 messuages, 1 toft, 243 acres of land, 26 acres of meadow, and 28 acres of wood in Bodenham, which encompassed all the land concessions of Walter Devereux’s ancestor, William Devereux of Bodenham, to Baron John Devereux.

    Walter Devereux went with Henry V to France along with his brothers, Sir John Devereux[7] and Sir Richard Devereux.[8][9] He fought at the Siege of Harfleur, and the Battle of Agincourt on 25 October 1415.

    On 2 May 1417 Geoffrey Harley, Richard Hull, and John Monnington granted to John Merbury, and Agnes Crophul, his wife and the heirs of their body: Weobley Castle, and the manors of Weobley, Cotesbach, and Newbold Verdon; the manors of Arnold, Treswell, Hyde, Hemington (in Lockington), Sutton Bonington, Leake, Thrumpton, Braunstone, and the manor and vill of Market Rasen; 3 knights’ fees in Weobley, Straddle (in Vowchurch), Cusop, and Little Marcle in Herefordshire, one and a quarter knights’ fees in Bitterly and Blithelow (in Bishop's Castle) in Shropshire; 60 shillings of rent and the view of frankpledge of Skeffington in Leicestershire; the advowsons in Leicestershire of the priory of Grace Dieu; the churches of Braunstone, Skeffington, and Cotesbach; a fourth part of the church of Bosworth, the advowson of Ludlow in Shropshire; and a fourth part of a water mill in Luton and Wheathampstead (Bedfordshire). These lands would all pass together to the Devereux family following the marriage of Walter Devereux’s son to John Merbury’s daughter from a previous marriage.

    On 3 November 1417 Walter Devereux acquired 3 messuages, 7 tofts, 1 dovecote, 273 acres of land, 20 acres of meadow, 15 acres of pasture and 22 shillings 6 pence of rent in Lyde Muscegros, Lyde Godfrey, Lyde Saucy, and Lyde Prior in Herefordshire.[10] They would remain in the possession of the Devereux family for the next 100 years.

    On 20 January 1418 John Walwyn died holding a moiety of the manors of Wellington and Addesore, and left a widow and three underage daughters who became the wards of Walter Devereux. Walwyn’s widow died in 1419, and the next year the eldest daughter, Elena wife of Richard Monington, proved her full age before the escheator and jurors.[11]

    Death

    Walter Devereux died in 1419, and the escheator of Hereford and the adjacent march of Wales was ordered to take his lands in hand on 20 November 1419.[1][12]

    Marriage

    Walter Devereux married about 1409 to Elizabeth Maud Bromwich, daughter of Sir Thomas Bromwich.[3][1][13] They had at least one son, Walter Devereux his heir, in 1411, and a daughter, Elizabeth.[14][15][c]

    General Reference

    Brydges, Sir Egerton. "Collins's Peerage of England; Genealogical, Biographical, and Historical. Greatly Augmented, and Continued to the Present Time." (London: F.C. and J. Rivington, Otridge and Son; J. Nichols and Co.; T. Payne, Wilkie and Robinson; J. Walker, Clarke and Sons; W. Lowndes, R. Lea, J. Cuthell, Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Co.; White, Cochrane, and Co.; C. Law, Cadell and Davies; J. Booth, Crosby and Co.; J. Murray, J. Mawman, J. Booker, R. Scholey, J. Hatchard, R. Baldwin, Craddock and Joy; J. Fauldner, Gale, Curtis and Co.; Johnson and Co.; and G. Robinson, 1812). Volume VI, pages 1 to 22, Devereux, Viscount Hereford
    Duncumb, John. "Collections Towards the History and Antiquities of the County of Hereford." (Hereford: E.G. Wright, 1812). Part I of Volume II, page 37 and 49, Broxash Hundred
    Mosley, Charles (editor). Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition. Chicago: Fitzroy Dearborn Publishers, 1999. Page 1378
    Robinson, Charles J. "A History of the Castles of Herefordshire and their Lords." (Woonton: Logaston Press, 2002). pages 125 to 129, Lyonshall Castle

    *

    Walter married Elizabeth Bromwich ~ 1409. [Group Sheet]


  2. 13.  Elizabeth Bromwich (daughter of Thomas Bromwich and unnamed spouse).

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Elizabeth Maud Bromwich

    Children:
    1. 6. Walter Devereux was born 0___ 1411, Bodeham, Herefordshire, England; died 23 Apr 1459.


Generation: 5

  1. 24.  Walter Devereux, Knight was born ~ 1361, Weobly, Herefordshire, England; died 25 Jul 1402, Powys, Wales; was buried Weobly Church, Weobly, Herefordshire, England.

    Notes:

    Sir Walter Devereux of Bodenham and Weobley was a prominent knight in Herefordshire during the reigns of Richard II and Henry IV. He represented Hereford in Parliament, and gave rise to the Devereux Earls of Essex and Viscounts of Hereford.

    Ancestry and childhood

    Walter Devereux[1][2] was born about 1361, the son of Sir Walter Devereux (died c. 1383) [1][2][3] of Bodenham and a woman named Maud. His father was the cousin of John Devereux, 1st Baron Devereux of Whitchurch Maund,[a][b] and they were close allies. Walter’s grandfather, William Devereux of Bodenham,[4] had made land concessions in Bodenham Parish (Hereford) to John Devereux about 1360, and throughout his life Baron Devereux appears to have promoted the careers of his cousin’s family in the royal household.

    His arms were: Argent a fesse gules, in chief three torteaux.

    Career

    When Walter Devereux came of age, he joined the retinue of Thomas of Woodstock, 1st Duke of Gloucester, like his father. He was a King’s esquire by 8 February 1382 when he attended Parliament with his father. Both Devereux’s were appointed to a Royal Commission[2] to arrest William Solers for disseising John ap William ap Jankin of the manor of Dorstone.[5] Walter Devereux was also granted for life the office of Constable of Builth Castle in Radnorshire during the minority of Roger Mortimer, 4th Earl of March.[6]

    On 22 December 1384, Mary de Bohun had come of age, and the final transfer of the estate of the Earl of Hereford occurred to her husband, Henry Bolingbroke. These included Walter’s fee in Bodenham held by his grandfather, William Devereux, and ½ fee in Moccas and Sutton held by his father, Walter Devereux (died c. 1383).

    Walter Devereux was assigned on 20 February 1385 to investigate the murder of John Kings of Whiteborn, and any who may have harbored the murderers.[7] Later on 26 February 1388 during the “Merciless Parliament” he was relieved of any responsibility for failing to execute this order claiming under oath that he did not receive notice of it.

    On 26 April 1385 he was appointed to a Commission of array for Herefordshire to prepare for an imminent French invasion.[8] Devereux participated in Richard II’s expedition to Scotland in the summer of 1385, and probably was knighted during this time. On 9 November 1385 Walter was appointed Justice of the Peace, and to a commission of Oyer and terminer for Herefordshire along with his liege, Thomas of Woodstock.[9] He would continue to hold the position of Justice of the Peace through 1399.[10]

    In the “Wonderful Parliament” of 01 October 1386 Richard II was forced to accept a commission of 11 members to control the royal household for 1 year to counter growing anger with his financial excesses. Walter’s cousin and ally, Baron John Devereux, was a member of the commission. The Lords Appellant led this movement and included Thomas of Woodstock, Duke of Gloucester; Richard FitzAlan, Earl of Arundel; Thomas de Beachamp, Earl of Warwick; and later Henry Bolingbroke, Earl of Derby; and Thomas de Mowbray, Earl of Nottingham. The Earl of Arundel was appointed admiral of the fleet on 10 December 1386, and Sir Walter Devereux served under Captain Sir Thomas Mortimer in his naval expedition.[11] Arundel took command of the fleet on 16 March 1386 at Sandwich, and led them in the Battle of Cadsand on 24 March. Fought off Margate, the English were victorious over a Franco-Flemish fleet ending the threat of a French invasion. The English pursued the remnants of the enemy to Sluis, and then pillaged the surrounding countryside before bringing the fleet back to England on 14 April. They then made another foray to Brest in Brittany before returning to England in June 1387.

    Walter Devereux was probably present at the Battle of Radcot Bridge on 19 December 1387 when Thomas of Woodstock led the Appellants to victory. He also attended the “Merciless Parliament” on 3 February 1388 where he received a writ of supersedeas omnino noted above. At the close of the parliament on 20 March a writ was issued to Walter Devereux and the sheriff of Herefordshire to administer an oath of loyalty to the men of Herefordshire not present at Parliament, and bring a list of their names on the quinzaine of Easter. The form of oath to state that they shall keep the peace, and shall with all their might oppose any who do the contrary, that they shall to the end of this parliament side with the five following lords, to wit Thomas duke of Gloucester; Henry earl of Derby; Richard earl of Arundel and Surrey; Thomas earl of Warwick; and Thomas earl marshal; if any man will do aught against their bodies, and shall maintain them to the death against every man without exception, saving always their allegiance to the king, the prerogative of the crown, the laws and good customs of the realm.

    On 5 May 1388 Simon de Burley was among the lords convicted by Parliament. Among his forfeited properties was Lyonshall Castle. Baron Devereux was granted the return of the castle, which had been his family’s caput and alienated 87 years earlier, and Walter Devereux also received his inheritance rights to the castle as well.

    On 10 November 1388 Walter Devereux witnessed John de Cornewaile of Kinlet’s grant of warranty for life to Cornewaile’s mother of two thirds of the manor of Ashton, Herefordshire, if she should outlive his father, Sir Brian. On 28 June 1390 he was place on a commission of Oyer and terminer in addition to his role as Justice of the Peace for Herefordshire. On 15 July Devereux was on the commission conducting the inquiry post-mortem of John Hastings, 3rd Earl of Pembroke, who had died before coming of age. He was directed to inquire what lands had been held in dower at the death of the earl’s widowed mother, Anne Manny, on 3 April 1384, and the widow of Aymer de Valence, 2nd Earl of Pembroke, Marie de St Pol, on her death 16 March 1377. On 27 October 1391 there were adjustments to the rent of the lordship of Bergevenny based on his findings.

    On 8 February 1391 Devereux conducted an inquiry into the alienation of the manor of Eaton Tregoes, Herefordshire.[12] On 20 January John and Julian Kirby of La Verne sold for 100L Kimbolton manor, Huntingdonshire; and 2 carucates of land, 12 acres of meadow, and 13 shillings of rent in Laysters, Weston, Mappenore, Leominster, and Aston in Herefordshire to Walter Devereux. A writ was issued in Herefordshire on 17 February 1392 for Thomas, son of Llewelyn le Taillour, for not appearing to answer Walter Devereux regarding a debt of 40L.[13] On 1 March 1392 Devereux was assigned to raise troops in Hertfordshire to resist an invasion in case of war after the expiration of the current truce.[14]

    On 27 September 1393 Devereux was mandated to suppress the Lollards in Herefordshire.[15] Specifically cited was Walter Brut and other sons of iniquity who obstinately held, affirmed and preached secretly and openly in various places in the diocese of Hereford certain articles and conclusions notoriously repugnant to sound doctrine, definitively condemned by Holy Church, some as heresies, others as errors.[16]

    On 18 June 1394 Walter Devereux was again placed on a commission of Oyer and Terminer for Herefordshire.[17] On 7 August he was granted clause volumus (protection) for one half year[18] while accompanying Richard II to Ireland, and on 28 September nominated Roger Wigmore and Thomas Oldcastle as his attorneys in his absence.[19] Devereux was probably serving in the retinue of Thomas of Woodstock who accompanied the king. The army landed and marched towards Kilkenny undergoing harassment by Irish forces the entire way. After suffering heavy losses, Richard II agreed to negotiate, and brought the army to Dublin by December. The king abruptly returned to England to deal with the Lollard threat, and left part of the army behind under the nominal leadership of the under-age, Roger Mortimer, 4th Earl of March.

    On 4 May 1397 Walter and Agnes Devereux paid 13s 4d for the inspection and confirmation of Agnes right as heir for the Crophul charter of 12 May 1327 involving Bonington and Sutton in Nottinghamshire.[20] Shortly after this Richard II begins to move against the prior Lords Appellant. Thomas of Woodstock is captured and sent to Calais, and Sir Thomas Mortimer flees the country to avoid a treason charge. On 27 July Walter Devereux is appointed to a commission of Oyer and terminer in Herefordshire in addition to his duties as Justice of the Peace.[21] On 17 September Thomas of Woodstock was murdered, and Devereux joined the retinue of Henry Bolingbroke, husband of the last Bohun heir, Mary.

    Following the death of John Devereux, 2nd Baron of Devereux, on 13 November 1396 his sister Joan Devereux inherited the barony. She married Walter fitzWalter in 1397, and shortly after Walter Devereux was appointed Lieutenant of the Lord FitzWalter’s manors in Herefordshire.

    During 1398, Henry Bolingbroke was accused of treason by Thomas de Mowbray, and the two prepared to meet in a duel of honor. Richard II stopped the duel, and instead banished them both from the kingdom. Following the death of Bolingbroke’s father, John of Gaunt, on 3 February 1399, Richard II revoked the patents allowing Henry Bolingbroke to inherit his estates by proxy on 18 March. Richard II left for Ireland in late May, and Bolingbroke landed at Ravenspurn, Yorkshire, raising a rebellion. Although, placed on a commission of Oyer and terminer on 2 March for Herefordshire,[22] Walter Devereux came out in support of the rebels. When Richard II returned and landed in Wales on 24 July, Devereux was probably among the rebel forces that eventually captured the king at Flint Castle. Following Richard II’s abdication, Bolingbroke was crowned Henry IV on 13 October 1399. Walter Devereux was appointed to a Commission of array in Herefordshire on 18 December 1399.[23] On 6 January 1400 Henry IV did not show up for the Epiphany feast being forewarned of a plot, and the conspirators scattered only to be captured, killed, and attainted over the next 2 weeks.

    In mid-August 1400 Henry IV led an army into Scotland to suppress raiding, and Walter Devereux served as a captain in this expedition,[24] It ended after 2 weeks without accomplishing much, and on 16 September the Glyndwr Rising broke out in Wales. Henry IV diverted his returning army including Devereux to Wales, but they are unable come to grips with Owain Glyndwr.

    Walter Devereux represented Herefordshire in Parliament on 20 January 1401.[25] On 29 April he was placed on a commission to arrest John fitzPieres and Maurice ap Meweryk.[26] On 16 May Devereux was appointed Sheriff of Herefordshire,[27] appointed Justice of the Peace for Herefordshire,[28] and tasked with suppressing lawlessness in South Wales, Bergeveny, Herefordshire, and the March of Wales.[29] As the insurrection spread through the marches, Devereux was assigned on 26 August to inquire into the murder of Thomas Stannesbache of Bromyard, and the wounding of William Ranves at Bromyard.[30] On 11 May 1402 Walter Devereux was appointed to make a proclamation of Henry IV’s intention to govern well in Herefordshire.[31] Shortly after he set out with Sir Edmund Mortimer to fight the rebels.

    Death

    The English met the Welsh at the Battle of Pilleth on 22 June 1402.[c] During the battle, Walter Devereux was mortally wounded, and died 1 month latter on 25 July 1402.[32]

    Walter Devereux is believed to have been buried in Weobley Church. Provided is an excerpt from the Journal of the British Archeological Association on this subject: The two monuments on the north and south sides of the chancel are described by Silas Taylor in 1665. Speaking of the one on the north side, he says, “near him, on the wall, hangs a wooden shield with the arms of Devereux. Over against it on the south side, another shield hangs up with a cross engrailed between four spear-heads. I could not discern the colours… A little lower, near the remains of the quire are the effigies of a man in close armour, and a woman”… I am disposed to think that the single figure represents Sir W. Devereux, who died in 1402, and the two figures represent John Marbury and Agnes his wife. I think so partly because Silas Taylor says the Devereux shield hung on the north side and the Marbury shield on the south. [d][33][34]

    Marriage

    Walter Devereux was first contracted in marriage to Margaret Seys. He was granted an annulment of this marriage early in 1372, probably to clear the way for a more advantageous match with Agnes Crophull.[e]

    He married Agnes Crophull[1][35] (1371 to 9 February 1436) in October 1382.[36][37] She was the daughter of Thomas Crophull,[38] and granddaughter and heiress of John Crophull[39] and her cousin.

    On 25 October 1382 Walter Devereux, his father (Sir Walter Devereux), Sir John Devereux, and Sir John de Burley were placed under a recognizance of 400L to Sir John Crophul. On 4 November 1282 John Crophul was granted license following the payment of 20 marks to enfoeff Walter and Agnes Devereux in the manor of Newbold Verdon in Leicestershire.[40] Following John Crophul’s death on 3 July 1383, Agnes (age 12) was identified as Walter Devereux’s wife. Wardship of Agnes had been assigned to Roger Crophul. On 21 August 1383 Roger Crophul and Thomas Melton granted to Walter Devereux the keeping of all the lands of the late John Crophul except the manors of Hemington, Braunstone, and Bonington until the lawful age of his wife. Joan, widow of John Crophul’s son Thomas, was assigned Market Rasen as her dower on 20 September 1383. After the widow’s death and Agnes’ coming of age on 27 September 1385, Walter Devereux took possession of the remaining Crophul lands by right of marriage.[41] These included Weobley manor (Herefordshire); Sutton Bonington manor and lands at Arnold (Nottinghamshire); the manors of Navenby, Cotesbach, Braunstone, and Hemington (Leicestershire); and an estate at Market Rasen (Lincolnshire). Weobley would become his principal residence.

    They had children:[f] Sir Walter Devereux his heir (1387).,[1][g][42] Sir Richard Devereux (c. 1389) ),[1][42][43][44][45] Sir John Devereux (c. 1391),[1][42][44][46][47] Thomas (c. 1393), Margaret (c. 1396), and Elizabeth (c. 1401).[48][49][h]

    Agnes survived her husband and was the godmother of Humphrey, earl of Stafford on 15 August 1402.[50]She married a second time to John Parr of Kendall about 1403. John Parr died about September 1407, and his heir was a son Thomas (aged 2).[i] By their son, Thomas, John Parr and Agnes were ancestors of the sixth queen consort of King Henry VIII, Catherine Parr.

    Agnes Crophull married a 3rd time to John Merbury (died 3 February 1438) in 1416.[51] By 1428 John Merbury is indicated as holding one share of Lyonshall previously held by Lord Fitzwalter.

    When Agnes Crophull died on 9 February 1436, her heir was Walter Devereux, grandson of her first husband through their son, Walter Devereux (died 1420). Lyonshall passed to this grandson from her, and also by right of his wife, Elizabeth Merbury, who was the daughter of Agnes Crophull’s third husband, John Merbury, by a previous marriage. Agnes was buried at Weobley as described above.

    Biographical References

    Brydges, Sir Egerton. Collins's Peerage of England; Genealogical, Biographical, and Historical. Greatly Augmented, and Continued to the Present Time. (London: F.C. and J. Rivington, Otridge and Son; J. Nichols and Co.; T. Payne, Wilkie and Robinson; J. Walker, Clarke and Sons; W. Lowndes, R. Lea, J. Cuthell, Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Co.; White, Cochrane, and Co.; C. Law, Cadell and Davies; J. Booth, Crosby and Co.; J. Murray, J. Mawman, J. Booker, R. Scholey, J. Hatchard, R. Baldwin, Craddock and Joy; J. Fauldner, Gale, Curtis and Co.; Johnson and Co.; and G. Robinson, 1812). Volume VI, pages 1 to 22, Devereux, Viscount Hereford
    Duncumb, John. Collections Towards the History and Antiquities of the County of Hereford. (Hereford: E.G. Wright, 1812). Part I of Volume II, page 37 and 49, Broxash Hundred
    [10], accessed 4 November 2013, The History of Parliament Online; Sir Walter Devereux (d. 1402), of Weobley, Herefs.
    Mosley, Charles (editor). Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition. Chicago: Fitzroy Dearborn Publishers, 1999. Page 1378
    Robinson, Charles J. A History of the Castles of Herefordshire and their Lords. (Woonton: Logaston Press, 2002). pages 125 to 129, Lyonshall Castle

    *

    Walter married Agnes Crophull 0Oct 1382, (Herefordshire) England. Agnes (daughter of Thomas Crophull and unnamed spouse) was born 0___ 1371, (Herefordshire) England; died 9 Feb 1436, (Herefordshire) England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 25.  Agnes Crophull was born 0___ 1371, (Herefordshire) England (daughter of Thomas Crophull and unnamed spouse); died 9 Feb 1436, (Herefordshire) England.
    Children:
    1. 12. Walter Devereux was born 25 Dec 1387, Bodeham, Herefordshire, England; died 0___ 1420.

  3. 26.  Thomas Bromwich

    Thomas — unnamed spouse. [Group Sheet]


  4. 27.  unnamed spouse
    Children:
    1. 13. Elizabeth Bromwich


Generation: 6

  1. 50.  Thomas Crophull was born (Herefordshire) England (son of John Crophull and Margery Verdun).

    Thomas — unnamed spouse. unnamed was born (Herefordshire) England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 51.  unnamed spouse was born (Herefordshire) England.
    Children:
    1. 25. Agnes Crophull was born 0___ 1371, (Herefordshire) England; died 9 Feb 1436, (Herefordshire) England.


Generation: 7

  1. 100.  John Crophull was born ~ 1322, Bonnington, Nottinghamshire, , England; died 3 Jul 1383, Bosworth Field, Leicestershire, England; was buried Gracedieu Priory, Leicestershire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: John de Crophull
    • Will: 3 Jul 1383
    • Probate: 14 Jul 1383

    Notes:

    Sir John de Crophull formerly Crophull
    Born about 1322 in Bonnington, Nottinghamshire, , Englandmap
    Son of Thomas (Crophull) de Crophull and [mother unknown]
    [sibling(s) unknown]
    Husband of Margery (Verdun) de Crophull — married 1334 in Hemington, Northamptonshire, , Englandmap
    Father of Reginald Crophull, Roger Crophull, John Crophull, Matilda Crophull and Thomas (Crophull) de Crophull
    Died 3 Jul 1383 in Newbold, Leicestershire, Englandmap
    Profile manager: Ted Williams private message [send private message]
    Crophull-22 created 4 Dec 2014 | Last modified 1 Feb 2017 | Last edit:
    1 Feb 2017
    12:09: RJ Horace posted a message on the page for John (Crophull) de Crophull. [Thank RJ for this]
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    European Aristocracy
    John (Crophull) de Crophull is a member of royalty, nobility or aristocracy in the British Isles.
    Join: British Isles Royals and Aristocrats 742-1499 Project
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    Biography

    Father Thomas de Crophull b. c 1300, d. a 1332


    Sir John de Crophull was born circa 1322 at of Sutton Bonnington, Nottinghamshire, England; Age 60 in 1382.[1]

    He married Margery de Verdun, daughter of Sir Theobald de Verdun, Lord Weoberley, Baron Alton, 2nd Lord Verdun, Constable & Justiciar of Ireland and Maud de Mortimer, between 10 February 1346 and 10 September 1355; They had 1 son (Thomas) and 1 daughter (Maud).[2]

    He married (2) Joan, by whom he had 2 sons (Reginald; & Roger) & 2 daughters (Joan; & Maud).[3]

    Sir John de Crophull left a will on 3 July 1383; Requested burial at Gracedieu Priory, Leicestershire.[4]

    He died on 3 July 1383 at Battle of Bosworth Field, Market Bosworth, Leicestershire, England. [5]

    His estate was probated on 14 July 1383.


    Family 1

    Margery de Verdun b. 10 Aug 1310, d. b 12 Oct 1363
    Children

    Sir Thomas
    Maud

    Family 2

    Joan
    Children

    Reginald
    Roger
    Joan
    Maud
    Sources

    ? Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 248-249.
    ? Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. IV, p. 254.
    ? Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. II, p. 1.
    ? Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. V, p. 247.
    ? Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, p. 247.

    *

    Will:
    view his will ... https://archive.org/stream/earlylincolnwil00gibbgoog#page/n55/mode/2up

    John married Margery Verdun 0___ 1334, Hemington, Northamptonshire, England. Margery (daughter of Theobald de Verdun, II, Lord Weoberley and Maud de Mortimer) was born 10 Aug 1310, Alton Castle, Cheadle, Staffordshire, England; died 12 Oct 1363. [Group Sheet]


  2. 101.  Margery Verdun was born 10 Aug 1310, Alton Castle, Cheadle, Staffordshire, England (daughter of Theobald de Verdun, II, Lord Weoberley and Maud de Mortimer); died 12 Oct 1363.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Margaret de Verdun
    • Also Known As: Margery de Verdun

    Notes:

    Name: Margery de VERDUN , Heiress of Weobley 1
    Sex: F
    ALIA: Margeret de /Verdon/
    Birth: 10 AUG 1310 in Alton Castle, Cheadle, Staffordshire, England 1
    Death: BEF 1377 1
    Note:
    (iii) Margery, born and baptised 10 August 1310 at Alton, married, 1stly, before 20 February 1326/7, William (le Blount), Lord Blount, who died s.p. shortly before 3 October 1337. She married, 2ndly, before 18 October 1339, Sir Mark Husee (son and heir apparent of Henry, 2nd Lord Husee), who died v.p. shortly before 10 February 1345/6. She married, 3rdly, before 10 September 1355, as his 1st wife, Sir John de Crophull, of Bonnington, Notts, who died 3 July 1383. She died before him in or before 1377. Her representatives would appear to be those of Thomas Husee, her descendant by her 2nd marriage, living 1478 (g). [Complete Peerage XII/2:252, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)]

    (g) As, however, her issue by her 2nd husband appears to have been disinherited and her lands descended to the issue of her 3rd marriage, it is possible that her representatives may be found among those of Robert Devereux, Earl of Essex (who dsps 1646).

    ---------------------

    He [William le Blount] m. before 20 Feb 1326/7, Margery, 3rd daughter and coheir of Sir Theobald de Verdon, of Alton, co. Stafford [Lord Verdun], by his 1st wife, Maud, daughter of Sir Edmund de Mortimer, of Wigmore, co. Hereford. He and his wife had livery of her lands, 30 Oct 1328 and 26 Mar 1332. He dsp. shortly before 3 Oct 1337, when any Barony, that may be supposed to have been created by the writ of 1330, became extinct. His widow, who was b. 10 Aug 1310, at Alton, aforesaid, and baptized there the same day, inherited Weobley Castle, co. Hereford, &c., of which she (again) had livery, 15 Dec 1337. She m. before 18 Oct 1339, Sir Mark Husse. They had livery of her lands, 1 Mar 1343/4. He d. before 21 Jul 1349. She m., 3rdly, before 10 Sep 1355, as 1st wife, Sir John Crophull, of Bennington, co. Notts. He d. 3 Jul 1383. [Complete Peerage II:196]




    Father: Theobald 2nd Baron de VERDUN , MP, Sir b: 8 SEP 1278 in Alton Castle, Cheadle, Staffordshire, England
    Mother: Maud de MORTIMER b: ABT 1285 in Wigmore, Ludlow, Herefordshire, England

    Marriage 1 William 1st Baron le BLOUNT , of Sodington, Sir b: ABT 1295 in Sodington Hall, Mamble, Cleobury Mortimer, Worcestershire, England
    Married: BEF 20 FEB 1326/27 in 1st husband 2

    Marriage 2 Mark HUSEE , of Moreton & Standen, Sir b: ABT 1315 in South Moreton, Wallingford, Berkshire, England
    Married: BEF 18 OCT 1339 in 2nd husband 1
    Children
    Has No Children Henry 3rd Baron HUSEE , of Standen & Stourmouth b: ABT 1340 in Standen Hussey Manor, Hungerford, Berkshire, England

    Marriage 3 John de CROPHULL , of Bonnington, Sir b: ABT 1312 in Hemington, Leicestershire, England
    Married: BEF 10 SEP 1355 in 3rd husband 1st wife 1
    Children
    Has Children Thomas CROPHULL , of Newbold, Sir b: ABT 1355 in Sutton Bonington, Loughborough, Nottinghamshire, England

    Sources:
    Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000
    Page: XII/2:252
    Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000
    Page: II:196, XII/2:252

    *

    Notes:

    Married:
    3rd husband...

    Children:
    1. 50. Thomas Crophull was born (Herefordshire) England.


Generation: 8

  1. 202.  Theobald de Verdun, II, Lord Weoberley was born 8 Sep 1278, Alton Castle, Cheadle, Staffordshire, England (son of Theobald de Verdun and Margaret de Bohun); died 27 Jul 1316.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Justiciar of Ireland
    • Also Known As: 2nd Lord Verdun
    • Also Known As: Baron Alton

    Notes:

    Name: Theobald 2nd Baron de VERDUN , MP, Sir 1 2 3 4
    Sex: M
    ALIA: Theobald de /Verdon/
    Birth: 8 SEP 1278 in Alton Castle, Cheadle, Staffordshire, England 5 2 4
    Death: 27 JUL 1316 6 2
    Note:
    Sir Theobald de Verdon, Knight, b. 8 Sep 1278, d. Alton 27 July 1316, 2nd Lord Verdun, MP 1299-1314; m. (1) Wigmore 29 July 1302 Maud de Mortimer, d. 17 or 18 Sep 1312, daughter of Sir Edmund de Mortimer (147-4) and Margaret de Fiennes; m. (2) near Boston 4 Feb 1315/6 Elizabeth de Clare, b. Tewkesbury 16 Sep 1295, d. 4 Nov 1360, daughter of Sir Gilbert de Clare (28-4) and Joan Plantagenet, daughter of Edward I, King of England and Eleanor of Castile. [Magna Charta Sureties]

    -------------------------------

    Justiciar of Ireland. [Ancestral Roots]

    -------------------------------

    BARONY OF VERDUN (II)

    THEODALD (DE VERDUN), 2nd but 1st surviving son and heir, was born 8 September 1278.

    On the death of his brother John he was ordered by the King, 14 July 1297, to serve overseas in his place; and he was frequently summoned against the Scots till 1316; knighted by the King in Northumberland, 24 June 1298, and fought in the 2nd line at the battle of Falkirk, 22 July following.

    He was summoned v.p. to Parliament from 29 December 1299 to 16 October 1315, by writs directed (till his father's death) Theobaldo de Verdun junior, whereby he also is held to have become LORD VERDUN. He had seisin of his lands, 28 September 1309; and was Justiciar of Ireland, 30 April 1313-January 1314/5.

    He married, 1stly, 29 July 1302, at Wigmore, co. Hereford, Maud, daughter of Edmund (DE MORTIMER), LORD MORTIMER, by Margaret, daughter of Sir William DE FENLES. She died 17 or 18 September 1312 at Alton, after childbirth, and was buried 9 October in Croxden Abbey.

    He married, 2ndly, 4 February 1315/6, near Bristol (against the King's will and without his licence), Elizabeth, widow of John DE BURGH (who died v.p. 18 June 1313; 2nd but 1st surviving son and heir apparent of Richard, 2nd EARL OF ULSTER [IRL],

    3rd and youngest sister of the whole blood and coheir of Gilbert (DE CLARE), 7th EARL OF GLOUCESTER AND HERTFORD, daughter of Gilbert, 6th EARL OF GLOUCESTER AND HERTFORD, by his 2nd wife, Joan, "of Acre," daughter of EDWARD I.

    He died s.p.m. 27 July 1316 at Alton, aged 37, and was buried 19 September in Croxden Abbey. His widow, who had received the Honor of Clare in her purparty of her brother's estates, married, 3rdly, shortly before 3 May 1317, Roger (DAMORY), 1st LORD DAMORY, who died s.p.m. 13 or 14 March 1321/2.

    She, who was born 16 September 1295 at Tewkesbury, died 4 November 1360, aged 65. M.I. to her and her 3rd husband in St. Mary's, Ware.

    Will, desiring burial in the Convent of the Minoresses without Aldgate, London, dated at Clare, 25 September 1355, proved 3 December 1360.

    On Theobald's death the two Baronies of Verdun, supposed to have been created by the writs of 1295 (or 1290 and 1299, fell into abeyance, according to modern doctrine, among his 3 daughters and co-heirs, by his 1st wife, Joan, Elizabeth and Margery, and his posthumous daughter and coheir, by his 2nd wife, Isabel. [Complete Peerage XII/2:250-1, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)]

    (i) Joan, born 9 or 11 August 1303 at Wootton in Stanton Lacy, Salop, and baptised in the church of Onibury, in that co., married, 1stly, 28 April 1317, in the King's Chapel in Windsor Park, John de Montagu (1st son and heir apparent of William, 2nd Lord Montagu), who died s.p. and v.p., being buried 14 August 1317 in Lincoln Cathedral. She married, 2ndly, 24 February 1317/8, Thomas (de Furnivalle), Lord Furnivalle, who died 5, 7 or 14 October 1339. She died 2 October 1334 at Alton, aged 31, and was buried 7 or 8 January 1334/5 in Croxden Abbey. See FURNIVALLE. Her representatives are (1956) Lord Mowbray, Segrave and Stourton and Baroness Furnivall.

    [ii) Elizabeth, born circa 1306, married, before 11 June 1320, Bartholomew (Burghersh), Lord Burghersh, who died 3 August 1355. She died 1 May 1360. Her senior representative is (1956) Viscount Falmouth, the others being the descendants of Anne, suo jure Countess of Warwick, wife of Richard (Neville), Earl of Salisbury and Warwick, the "Kingmaker."

    (iii) Margery, born and baptised 10 August 1310 at Alton, married, 1stly, before 20 February 1326/7, William (le Blount), Lord Blount, who died s.p. shortly before 3 October 1337. She married, 2ndly, before 18 October 1339, Sir Mark Husee (son and heir apparent of Henry, 2nd Lord Husee), who died v.p. shortly before 10 February 1345/6. She married, 3rdly, before 10 September 1355, as his 1st wife, Sir John de Crophull, of Bonnington, Notts, who died 3 July 1383. She died before him in or before 1377. Her representatives would appear to be those of Thomas Husee, her descendant by her 2nd marriage, living 1478.


    Father: Theobald 1st Baron de VERDUN , Sir b: ABT 1248 in Alton Castle, Cheadle, Staffordshire, England
    Mother: Margery (Margaret) de BOHUN , Heiress of Bisley b: ABT 1252 in Bisley, Stroud, Gloucestershire, England

    Marriage 1 Maud de MORTIMER b: ABT 1285 in Wigmore, Ludlow, Herefordshire, England
    Married: 29 JUL 1302 in Wigmore, Herefordshire, England 2
    Married: 9 JUL 1302 in Wigmore, Herefordshire, England 7
    Children
    Has Children Joan de VERDUN , Heiress of Alton b: BET 9 AND 11 AUG 1303 in Wootton, Stanton Lacy, Shropshire, England
    Has Children Elizabeth de VERDUN b: ABT 1306 in Alton Castle, Cheadle, Staffordshire, England
    Has Children Margery de VERDUN , Heiress of Weobley b: 10 AUG 1310 in Alton Castle, Cheadle, Staffordshire, England

    Marriage 2 Elizabeth de CLARE b: 14 SEP 1295 in Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England
    Married: 4 FEB 1315/16 in 2nd husband, 2nd wife 8
    Children
    Has Children Isabel de VERDUN b: 21 MAR 1316/17 in Amesbury, Wiltshire, England

    *

    Theobald married Maud de Mortimer 29 Jul 1302, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England. Maud (daughter of Edmund Mortimer, Knight, 2nd Baron Mortimer and Margaret de Fiennes, Baroness Mortimer) was born (1295-1300), (Wigmore Castle, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England); died 18 Sep 1312, Alton Castle, Cheadle, Staffordshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 203.  Maud de Mortimer was born (1295-1300), (Wigmore Castle, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England) (daughter of Edmund Mortimer, Knight, 2nd Baron Mortimer and Margaret de Fiennes, Baroness Mortimer); died 18 Sep 1312, Alton Castle, Cheadle, Staffordshire, England.

    Notes:

    Died:
    in childbirth...

    Children:
    1. 101. Margery Verdun was born 10 Aug 1310, Alton Castle, Cheadle, Staffordshire, England; died 12 Oct 1363.
    2. Elizabeth de Verdun was born (Alton Castle, Cheadle, Staffordshire, England).