Elizabeth Amyas

Female


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Generation: 1

  1. 1.  Elizabeth Amyas (daughter of Percival Amyas, o and Elizabeth Soothill).

    Elizabeth — John Bosville. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. John Bosville

Generation: 2

  1. 2.  Percival Amyas, o

    Percival — Elizabeth Soothill. [Group Sheet]


  2. 3.  Elizabeth Soothill (daughter of Thomas Soothill and Alice Nevill).
    Children:
    1. 1. Elizabeth Amyas


Generation: 3

  1. 6.  Thomas Soothill (son of John Sothill, Knight and Elizabeth Plumpton).

    Thomas — Alice Nevill. [Group Sheet]


  2. 7.  Alice Nevill (daughter of Robert Neville, of Liversedge and unnamed spouse).
    Children:
    1. 3. Elizabeth Soothill


Generation: 4

  1. 12.  John Sothill, Knight was born Abt 1440, Stockfaston, Leicestershire, England; died 7 Oct 1494, Stockfaston, Leicestershire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alt Death: Bef 1495, Stockfaston, Leicestershire, England

    Notes:

    John's ahnentafel (no sources) ...http://www.wikitree.com/genealogy/Sothill-Family-Tree-6

    John married Elizabeth Plumpton Abt 1475. Elizabeth (daughter of William Plumpton and Elizabeth Clifford) was born Abt 1453, Plompton, Yorkshire, England; died 21 Sep 1507, (Stockfaston, Leicestershire, England). [Group Sheet]


  2. 13.  Elizabeth Plumpton was born Abt 1453, Plompton, Yorkshire, England (daughter of William Plumpton and Elizabeth Clifford); died 21 Sep 1507, (Stockfaston, Leicestershire, England).
    Children:
    1. Christina Sothill was born 0___ 1465, Stockfaston, Leicestershire, England; died 8 Apr 1540; was buried Grey Friars Church, London, Middlesex, England.
    2. Barbara Sothill was born ~ 1474, Everingham, Yorkshire, England; died 14 Sep 1545; was buried Drax Priory, Everingham, Yorkshire, England.
    3. 6. Thomas Soothill

  3. 14.  Robert Neville, of Liversedge

    Robert — unnamed spouse. [Group Sheet]


  4. 15.  unnamed spouse
    Children:
    1. 7. Alice Nevill


Generation: 5

  1. 26.  William Plumpton was born 28 Feb 1435, Plompton, Yorkshire, England (son of William Plumpton and Elizabeth Stapleton); died 29 Mar 1461, Battle of Towton, Ferrybridge, Yorkshire, England.

    William married Elizabeth Clifford 0___ 1453. Elizabeth (daughter of Thomas Clifford, 8th Baron de Clifford and Joan Dacre, Baroness Clifford) was born Cal 1441, (Conisborough Castle, Doncaster, England); died Aft 1479. [Group Sheet]


  2. 27.  Elizabeth Clifford was born Cal 1441, (Conisborough Castle, Doncaster, England) (daughter of Thomas Clifford, 8th Baron de Clifford and Joan Dacre, Baroness Clifford); died Aft 1479.
    Children:
    1. 13. Elizabeth Plumpton was born Abt 1453, Plompton, Yorkshire, England; died 21 Sep 1507, (Stockfaston, Leicestershire, England).


Generation: 6

  1. 52.  William Plumpton was born 0___ 1404, (Plumpton Hall, Yorkshire) England (son of Robert Plumpton, Knight and Alice Foljambe); died 15 Oct 1480.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Seneschal of Knaresborough Castle
    • Military: French War 1427-1430
    • Military: War of the Roses
    • Occupation: 0___ 1447; High Sheriff of Yorkshire
    • Occupation: 0___ 1453; High Sheriff of Derbyshire

    Notes:

    Sir William Plumpton (1404 - 15 October 1480) was a 15th-century English aristocrat, landowner and administrator.

    He was the grandson of Sir William Plumpton executed in 1405 for treason by Henry IV and the son of Sir Robert Plumpton of Plumpton Hall, Yorkshire. On the death of his father in 1421 he became the ward of Henry Percy, 2nd Earl of Northumberland.

    He served in the French war 1427-30 and was knighted. On his return to England he was appointed by Northumberland as Seneschal of Knaresborough Castle and Steward of Northumberland's Spofforth estates.

    Plumpton's own estates included Plumpton Hall, Yorkshire, Mansfield Woodhouse, Nottinghamshire and Hassop Hall, Derbyshire. He represented Nottinghamshire in the Parliament of 1436. He served as High Sheriff of Yorkshire in 1447 and High Sheriff of Derbyshire in 1453.

    During the War of the Roses he fought on the Lancastrian side at the Battle of Towton in 1461, where his son William and his benefactor Henry Percy, 3rd Earl of Northumberland were slain. Plumpton was captured but later was pardoned by Edward IV and regained his offices in 1471.

    He married firstly in 1430, Elizabeth Stapleton of Carlton, Yorkshire and secondly in 1451 Joan Winteringham. He is a part-of the Worsley Family Tree.

    References

    This article includes a list of references, related reading or external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks inline citations. Please improve this article by introducing more precise citations. (April 2012)

    Oxford Dictionary of National Biography Keith Dockray 2004
    The Plumpton Letters and Papers Joan Kirby 1996. Google Books.

    William married Elizabeth Stapleton 0___ 1430, (Yorkshire) England. Elizabeth (daughter of Bryan Stapleton, Knight and Cecily Bardolf) was born 0___ 1406, Cartlon, Yorkshire, England; died ~ 1451, Plompton, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 53.  Elizabeth Stapleton was born 0___ 1406, Cartlon, Yorkshire, England (daughter of Bryan Stapleton, Knight and Cecily Bardolf); died ~ 1451, Plompton, Yorkshire, England.
    Children:
    1. 26. William Plumpton was born 28 Feb 1435, Plompton, Yorkshire, England; died 29 Mar 1461, Battle of Towton, Ferrybridge, Yorkshire, England.

  3. 54.  Thomas Clifford, 8th Baron de CliffordThomas Clifford, 8th Baron de Clifford was born 25 Mar 1414, Cumbria, England (son of John Clifford, Knight, 7th Baron Clifford and Elizabeth Percy); died 22 May 1455, First Battle of St. Albans, Hertfordshire, England; was buried St. Albans Abbey, St. Albans, Hertfordshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: High Sheriff of Westmorland
    • Also Known As: 8th Lord of Skipton

    Notes:

    Thomas Clifford, 8th Baron de Clifford, also 8th Lord of Skipton (25 March 1414 – 22 May 1455), was the elder son of John, 7th Baron de Clifford, and Elizabeth Percy, daughter of Henry "Hotspur" Percy and Elizabeth Mortimer.

    Family

    Thomas Clifford was born 25 March 1414, the elder son and heir of John, Lord de Clifford by Elizabeth Percy, daughter of Henry 'Hotspur' Percy and Elizabeth Mortimer, daughter of Edmund Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March. He had a younger brother, Henry Clifford,[1] and two sisters, Mary and Blanche.[2] [3] The Clifford family was seated at Skipton from 1310 to 1676.

    Career

    Clifford inherited the barony and the title of High Sheriff of Westmorland at the age of seven upon his father's death at the Siege of Meaux on 13 March 1422.[2][3] He made proof of age in 1435/6.[2]

    In 1435 Clifford campaigned with the Duke of Bedford in France, and about 1439 led the English forces which defended Pontoise against Charles VII of France.[4] In 1450/51 he was sent as an embassy for King James III of Scotland.[2]

    Clifford was slain fighting on the Lancastrian side at the First Battle of St Albans on 22 May 1455, the first battle in the Wars of the Roses, and was buried at St Alban's Abbey.[4] He was succeeded by his elder son, John, 9th Baron de Clifford.

    Marriage and issue

    After March 1424 Clifford married Joan Dacre, the daughter of Thomas, 6th Baron Dacre of Gilsland, by Philippa, daughter of Ralph Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland, by whom he had four sons and five daughters:[5]

    John Clifford, 9th Baron de Clifford, who married Margaret Bromflete, by whom he had two sons, Henry Clifford, 10th Baron de Clifford, and Richard Clifford, esquire, and a daughter, Elizabeth, who married Robert Aske. He was slain at Ferrybridge 24 March 1461 on the eve of the Battle of Towton.[5]

    Sir Roger Clifford, who married Joan Courtenay (born c.1447), the eldest daughter of Thomas Courtenay, 13th Earl of Devon, by Margaret Beaufort, the daughter of John Beaufort, 1st Earl of Somerset. Sir Roger Clifford was beheaded in 1485, and his widow married secondly, Sir William Knyvet of Buckenham, Norfolk.[4][6]

    Sir Robert Clifford (d. 15 March 1508), who married Elizabeth (nâee Barley), widow of Sir Ralph Jocelyn (d. October 25, 1478), twice Lord Mayor of London, and daughter of William Barley of Aspenden, Hertfordshire by Elizabeth Darcy. Both

    Sir Robert Clifford and his father-in-law, William Barley, were supporters of the pretender to the Crown, Perkin Warbeck.[4][7][8]

    Sir Thomas Clifford.

    Elizabeth Clifford, who married firstly, Sir William Plumpton of Knaresborough, Yorkshire,[9] slain at the Battle of Towton, and secondly, John Hamerton.[4][10]

    Maud Clifford, who married firstly Sir John Harrington of Hornby, Lancashire, slain at the Battle of Wakefield in 1460, and secondly, Sir Edmund Sutton of Dudley, Staffordshire.[4][11]

    Anne Clifford, who married firstly, Sir Richard Tempest, and secondly, William Conyers, esquire.[4]

    Joan Clifford, who married Sir Simon Musgrave.[4]

    Margaret Clifford, who married Robert Carre ( 12 April 1467) [4]

    Shakespeare and Thomas Clifford

    According to Shakespeare's, Henry VI, Part 3 following Hall's Chronicle and Holinshed's Chronicles, it was Thomas Clifford's son and heir, John Clifford, 9th Baron de Clifford, who slew, in cold blood after the Battle of Wakefield, the young Edmund, Earl of Rutland, son of Richard, 3rd Duke of York, cutting off his head and sending it crowned with paper to Henry VI's wife, Margaret of Anjou, although later authorities state that Lord Rutland had been slain during the battle.[2]

    Thomas married Joan Dacre, Baroness Clifford 0___ 1424. Joan (daughter of Thomas Dacre, 6th Baron Dacre of Gilsland and Philippa Neville, Baroness Dacre) was born Naworth Castle, Brampton, Cumberland, England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 55.  Joan Dacre, Baroness Clifford was born Naworth Castle, Brampton, Cumberland, England (daughter of Thomas Dacre, 6th Baron Dacre of Gilsland and Philippa Neville, Baroness Dacre).

    Notes:

    Birth:
    Naworth Castle, also known as, or recorded in historical documents as "Naward", is a castle in Cumbria, England, near the town of Brampton. It is adjacent to the A69 about two miles east of Brampton. It is on the opposite side of the River Irthing to, and just within sight of, Lanercost Priory. It was the seat of the Barons Dacre and is now that of their cognatic descendants, the Earls of Carlisle. It is a grade I listed building.

    Children:
    1. John Clifford, 9th Baron Clifford was born 8 Apr 1435, Conisborough Castle, Doncaster, England; died 28 Mar 1461, Battle of Ferrybridge, Yorkshire, England.
    2. 27. Elizabeth Clifford was born Cal 1441, (Conisborough Castle, Doncaster, England); died Aft 1479.


Generation: 7

  1. 104.  Robert Plumpton, Knight was born ~ 1381, Plumpton Hall, Yorkshire, England (son of William Plumpton, Knight and Alice of Gisburn); died 8 Dec 1421, Spofforth, Yorkshire, England.

    Notes:

    Father of Margaret, William, Robert, Alice, Elizabeth, Millicent, and Geoffrey

    Brother of Thomas, Isabella, Bryan, Katherine, Jane, George, William, and Richard

    Robert PLUMPTON

    Born: 1383 - Of, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England
    Marr: 16 Jan 1392/1393 - Of Tidewell, Yorkshire, England
    Died: 8 Dec 1421 -
    Father: William PLUMPTON, [SIR KNIGHT]

    Mother: Alice GISBURN

    Other Spouses: Alice REMSTON

    Wife
    Alice FOLJAMBE

    Born: 1386 - Of, Hassop, Derbyshire, England
    Died: 1416 - Spofforth, Yorkshire, England
    Father: Godfrey FOLJAMBE

    Mother: Isabel LEEKE

    Other Spouses:

    Children
    1. William PLUMPTON, [SIR KNIGHT]

    Born: 7 Oct 1404 - Of, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England
    Marr: 1451 - Joan WINTRINGHAM (other spouses)
    Died: 15 Oct 1480 - 2. Geoffrey (Godfrey) De PLUMPTON
    Born: ABT 1406 - Of, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England
    Marr: 1436 - Alice WINTRINGHAM
    Died: BEF 1486 - 3. Margaret PLUMPTON
    Born: ABT 1408 - Of, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England
    Marr: 1428 - Randolph PIGOT
    Died: - 4. Robert PLUMPTON
    Born: ABT 1410 - Of, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England
    Died: - 5. Alice PLUMPTON
    Born: ABT 1412 - Of, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England
    Marr: - John GRENE
    Died: - 6. Elizabeth PLUMPTON
    Born: ABT 1414 - Of, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England
    Died: - 7. Millicent PLUMPTON
    Born: ABT 1416 - Of, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England
    Died: -
    http://www.boydhouse.com/Darryl_data/gp1256.html

    ID: I03693

    Name: Robert Plumpton 1

    Sex: M

    Title: Sir

    Birth: 1383

    Death: 8 DEC 1421

    Note: "Sir Robert was knighted before January 15, 1410/11 and represented Yorkshire in Parliament which met November 3, 1411. He was Seneschal of the Honour of Knaresborough, one of the council of the King of his Ducy of Lancaster, and in 1315, was chosen to serve the Duke of Bedford for life. In 1416, he was Steward of Knaresborough Forest and Seneschal of the Honour of Knares borough. In 1419, he went to war in France and was slain there on Dec. 8, 1421, buried Plumpton Quire in Spofforth Church."

    Father: William Plumpton b: 1362

    Mother: Alice Gisburn

    Marriage 1 Alice Foljambe

    Children

    William Plumpton b: BET 7 AND 14 OCT 1404
    Godfrey Plumpton
    Robert Plumpton
    Joan Plumpton
    Alice Plumpton
    Sources:

    Title: Coat of Arms Sutliff, Sutliffe, or Sutcliffe

    Author: Compilation: Samuel Milton Sutliff, Jr. (1909); Donald D. Sutliff; Bennett Hurd Sutliff

    Publication: 1995

    Note: Not clear who published the final manuscript.

    Note: A monumental work.

    Repository:

    Note: Donald D. Sutliff, 605 SE 98th Ave., Vancouver, WA 98664 Phone 1-360-892-0949

    Media: Book

    Page: 36

    Son of Sir William Plumpton, Kt. and Alice Plumpton
    Husband of Alice Foljambe
    Father of Sir William Plumpton, I, Kt.; Geoffrey (Godfrey) Plumpton; Margaret Pigot; Robert Plumpton; Alice Plumpton and 2 others
    Brother of Jane (de Plumpton) Mallory; Thomas Plumpton; Richard Plumpton; Rev. George Plumpton; Bryan Plumpton and 3 others
    Half brother of Jane Mallory, Lady

    Robert married Alice Foljambe 16 Jan 1393, Tideswell, Derbyshire, England. Alice (daughter of Godfrey Foljambe, V, Knight and Isabel Leeke) was born ~ 1386, Hassop, Derbyshire, England; died 0___ 1416, Spofforth, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 105.  Alice Foljambe was born ~ 1386, Hassop, Derbyshire, England (daughter of Godfrey Foljambe, V, Knight and Isabel Leeke); died 0___ 1416, Spofforth, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alt Death: 0___ 1413

    Notes:

    DO NOT CONFUSE WITH ALICE GISBURNE, HER MOTHER-IN-LAW!

    Alt death year: 1413

    http://www.medievalgenealogy.org.uk/families/foljambe/foljambe.shtml

    Mother of Margaret, William, Robert, Alice, Elizabeth, Millicent, and Geoffrey.

    View All
    Immediate Family
    Photo ViewAdd Family
    Showing 12 people
    Daughter of Godfrey Foljambe, V and Isabel Foljambe
    Wife of Sir Robert Plumpton, Kt.
    Mother of Sir William Plumpton, I, Kt.; Geoffrey (Godfrey) Plumpton; Margaret Pigot; Robert Plumpton; Alice Plumpton and 2 others
    Half sister of Humphrey (Esq) Hercye, Esq

    Children:
    1. 52. William Plumpton was born 0___ 1404, (Plumpton Hall, Yorkshire) England; died 15 Oct 1480.

  3. 106.  Bryan Stapleton, Knight was born 0___ 1379, Ingham, Norfolk, England (son of Miles Stapleton, III, Knight and Ela de Ufford); died 17 Aug 1438, Ingham, Norfolk, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Sir Brian Stapleton

    Notes:

    About Sir Bryan:

    History:

    https://books.google.co.za/books?id=LJVZAAAAYAAJ&pg=PR91&lpg=PR91&dq=Bryan+of+ingham+Stapleton,+Knight&source=bl&ots=RBctqN3lsa&sig=0KvNfVcAhlGOC1EEwbOROT9tsX8&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwifv7-R4abJAhXDvBQKHY7gAIgQ6AEIQDAI#v=onepage&q=Bryan%20of%20ingham%20Stapleton%2C%20Knight&f=false

    https://books.google.co.za/books?id=X8UujEDqn9oC&pg=PA964&lpg=PA964&dq=Bryan+of+ingham+Stapleton,+Knight&source=bl&ots=5R-l8sbdfq&sig=M3HexDWPlPU9sQMYmMID9weJn9c&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwifv7-R4abJAhXDvBQKHY7gAIgQ6AEIPTAH#v=onepage&q=Bryan%20of%20ingham%20Stapleton%2C%20Knight&f=false

    http://www.knight-france.com/geneal/names/4451.htm

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miles_Stapleton

    Immediate Family

    Son of Sir Miles de Stapleton of Ingham and Ela Stapleton
    Husband of Cecily / Cecilia / Celia Stapleton
    Father of Anna Stapelton; Sir John Stapleton; Elizabeth Plumpton; Sir Miles Stapleton IV, Knight, Lord of Ingham and Brian II, Esq Stapleton
    Brother of Ela de Braose and Edmund Stapleton

    end

    Birth:
    Ingham is a small village and civil parish in the English county of Norfolk. It lies close to the village of Stalham, and is about 2 miles from Sea Palling on the North Sea coast.[1]

    The civil parish has an area of 6.13 km2 (2.37 sq mi) and in the 2001 census had a population of 376 in 153 households, falling slightly to 374 at the 2011 census.[2] For the purposes of local government, the parish falls within the district of North Norfolk.[3]

    There are the remains of a priory and the Ingham Poor's Allotment.

    Ingham is mentioned in the Domesday Book of 1086 as the village of Hincham[4] in the hundred of Happing.[5] Possible etymologies are "homestead or village of [a man called] Inga" or "home of the Inguiones" (an ancient Germanic tribe).

    The Lordship of Ingham was possessed at a very early date by the Ingham family. An Oliver de Ingham was living in 1183 and a John de Ingham is known to have been Lord in the reign of Richard I. The great grandson of John, the distinguished Oliver Ingham lived here and his son-in-law Miles Stapleton of Bedale, Yorkshire, inherited jure uxoris.[6]

    Ingham Old Hall has its origins in the medieval times having been built circa 1320.[7] In the fourteenth century the Hall was inhabited by the local Lord of the Manor, Sir Miles Stapleton, whose tomb stands in Ingham’s Holy Trinity church alongside that of his father in law, Sir Oliver de Ingham.

    Map & history of Ingham ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ingham,_Norfolk

    Bryan — Cecily Bardolf. Cecily (daughter of William Bardolf, Knight, 3rd & 4th Baron Damory and Agnes de Poynings, Vicountess of Wormegay) was born Abt 1371, Birling, Kent, England; died 29 Sep 1432, Bedale, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 107.  Cecily Bardolf was born Abt 1371, Birling, Kent, England (daughter of William Bardolf, Knight, 3rd & 4th Baron Damory and Agnes de Poynings, Vicountess of Wormegay); died 29 Sep 1432, Bedale, Yorkshire, England.

    Notes:

    Biography

    Cecilia Bardolf

    Cecily Bardolf, daughter of William Bardolf, Knt., 4th Lord Bardolf, by Agnes, daughter of Michael de Poynings, Knt., 1st Lord Poynings[1] married Brian Stapleton, Knt., de jure Lord Ingram, of Ingram, Norfolk..., etc., Sheriff of Nofolk and Suffolk, 1424-6, Knight of the Shire for Yorkshire, 1436-7, son and heir, born about 1379 (aged 40 in 1419). They had two sons (Miles, Knt., and Brian, Esq.) and one daughter (Anne, married Thomas Hethe and Wlater Trumpington, Knt.). Cecily died September 29, 1432. Sir Brian Stapleton died August 7, 1438. He and his wife Cecily were buried in the chancel of the church at Ingham, Norfolk.[2]

    Born 1371, Birling, Sussex,England[citation needed]
    circa 1380, "of Wormegay, Caister, Cantley, & Strumpshaw, Norfolk, England"[3]
    Parents: Sir William Bardolf, 4th Lord Bardolph of Wormgay (b. 21 Oct 1349, d. 29 Jan 1386) and Agnes Poynings (d. 12 Jun 1403)[3][2]
    Husband: Sir Brian Stapleton,[4] Sheriff of Norfolk & Suffolk, Lord Ingham (b. c1379, d. 7 Aug 1438), son of Sir Miles Stapleton and Ela Ufford[3]
    married c1406,[3] before 1409[citation needed]

    Children

    Sir Myles Stapleton, Sheriff of Norfolk & Suffolk, Lord Ingham (b. c1408, d. 1 Oct 1466)[3]
    Anne Stapleton, married (1) Thomas Hethe, (2) Sir Walter Trumpington[3]
    Brian Stapleton, Esq. (b. c1410, d. between 1462 and 1467)[3]
    Death 29 September 1432,[3] Bedale, North Ride,Yorkshire, England[citation needed]
    buried in the chancel at Ingham Priory, Norfolk.[3]
    Sources

    ? "see Bardolf 14 (#Richardson)
    ? 2.0 2.1 Royal Ancestry Vol V, pp 35-36 STAPLETON #12
    ? 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 3.7 3.8 Lewis:
    Cecily Bardolf, "Our Royal, Titled, Noble, and Commoner Ancestors and Cousins" (website, compiled by Mr. Marlyn Lewis, Portland, OR; accessed October 12, 2015), citing
    "Unknown author, The Complete Peerage, by Cokayne, Vol. VII, p. 64; Plantagenet Ancestry of 17th Century Colonists, by David Faris, p. 9. in unknown series (n.p.: n.pub., unknown publish date)."
    Richardson's Magna Carta Ancestry, Plantagenet Ancestry, and Royal Ancestry (MCA Vol. I, pp 109, 498; Vol. III, p. 438; PA p. 57; RA Vol. I, pp 103-104, 253-254, 260; Vol. IV, p. 476; Vol. V, pp 35-36)
    ? Royal Ancestry Vol IV, p 478 RICHERS
    Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 5 vols., ed. Kimball G. Everingham, (Salt Lake City, Utah: the author, 2013)
    See also:
    Ancestral File Number: HRKC-6D
    Memoirs of Chesters of Chicheley RJCW Ref 175a

    Children:
    1. John Stapleton was born ~ 1399, Bedale, Yorkshire, England; died 9 Jun 1455, Yorkshire, England; was buried Convent Church, Yorkshire, England.
    2. 53. Elizabeth Stapleton was born 0___ 1406, Cartlon, Yorkshire, England; died ~ 1451, Plompton, Yorkshire, England.

  5. 108.  John Clifford, Knight, 7th Baron CliffordJohn Clifford, Knight, 7th Baron Clifford was born 1388-1389, Appleby, Westmorland, England; was christened 23 Apr 1389 (son of Thomas Clifford, Knight, 6th Baron de Clifford and Elizabeth de Ros); died 13 Mar 1422, Meaux, Seine-et-Marne, France; was buried Friars Minor, Ipswich, Suffolk, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: High Sheriff of Westmorland
    • Residence: Azincourt, Pas-de-Calais, France
    • Also Known As: 7th Lord of Skipton
    • Military: 18 Aug 1415; Siege of Harfleur
    • Military: 25 Oct 1415; Battle of Agincourt

    Notes:

    John Clifford, 7th Baron de Clifford (c.1389 - 13 March 1422), also 7th Lord of Skipton,[citation needed] KG, was an English peer. He was slain at the siege of Meaux.

    Family

    John Clifford, born about 1389, was the only son of Thomas Clifford, 6th Baron Clifford (d. 18 August 1391), and Elizabeth de Roos (d. March 1424), daughter of Thomas de Roos, 4th Baron Roos of Helmsley, by Beatrix Stafford, daughter of Ralph de Stafford, 1st Earl of Stafford.[1] He had a sister, Maud Clifford, who marred firstly, John Neville, 6th Baron Latimer, and secondly, Richard, 3rd Earl of Cambridge.[2]

    Career

    At his father's death on 18 August 1391, Clifford, then aged about three, inherited the title and the position of hereditary High Sheriff of Westmorland. He was summoned to Parliament from 21 September 1411 to 26 February 1421.[3]

    He took part in a great tournament at Carlisle between six English and six Scottish knights, and in the war in France.[3] He was at the Siege of Harfleur and at the Battle of Agincourt, where he was indented to serve Henry V with 3 archers.[4] He accepted the surrender of Cherbourg.[citation needed] He was made a Knight of the Garter on 3 May 1421.[3] He was a legatee in the will of his cousin, Henry V.[2]

    He was slain at the Siege of Meaux on 13 March 1422,[3] and is said to have been buried at Bolton Priory.[2] His widow, who died 26 October 1436,[3] is buried at Staindrop, Durham.[2]

    Marriage and issue

    He married, in about 1404, Elizabeth Percy, the daughter of Henry "Hotspur" Percy and Elizabeth Mortimer, daughter of Edmund Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March,[3] by whom he had two sons and two daughters:[5][6]

    Thomas Clifford, 8th Baron de Clifford, who married Joan Dacre, daughter of Thomas Dacre, 6th Baron Dacre, by Philippa de Neville, daughter of Ralph Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland.[5][7]
    Henry Clifford.[2][8]
    Mary Clifford, who married Sir Philip Wentworth (c.1424 – 18 May 1464) of Nettlestead, Suffolk, beheaded at Middleham, Yorkshire, after the Battle of Hexham, by whom she had a son and two daughters.[5][9]
    Blanche (or Beatrix) Clifford, who married Sir Robert Waterton (d. 10 December 1475), son of the Lancastrian retainer, Robert Waterton (d. 17 January 1425). There were no issue of the marriage.[2][10][11]
    After Clifford's death, his widow married secondly, in 1426, Ralph Neville, 2nd Earl of Westmorland (d. 3 November 1484),[3] by whom she had a son, Sir John Neville, who married Anne Holland, daughter of John Holland, 2nd Duke of Exeter.[12][13]

    Notes

    Jump up ^ Richardson I 2011, pp. 506–7.
    ^ Jump up to: a b c d e f Richardson I 2011, p. 507.
    ^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g Cokayne 1913, p. 293.
    Jump up ^ Joseph Hunter (1850). Agincourt: a contribution towards an authentic list of the commanders of the English host in King Henry the Fifth's expedition to France, in the third year of his reign. Cowen Tracts: Newcastle University. Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/60201871
    ^ Jump up to: a b c Richardson I 2011, pp. 507-8.
    Jump up ^ Richardson III 2011, p. 341.
    Jump up ^ Summerson 2004.
    Jump up ^ Cokayne states that Thomas was the only son of John Clifford, 7th Baron Clifford.
    Jump up ^ Richardson III 2011, p. 236.
    Jump up ^ Whitehead 2004.
    Jump up ^ Ellis & Tomlinson 1882, p. 421.
    Jump up ^ Richardson III 2011, pp. 250-1.
    Jump up ^ Pollard 2004.

    References

    Cokayne, George Edward (1913). The Complete Peerage, edited by H.A. Doubleday III. London: St. Catherine Press. p. 293.
    Ellis, Alfred Shelley; Tomlinson, George William, eds. (1882). "The Yorkshire Archaeological and Topographical Journal" VII. London: Bradbury, Agnew and Co.: 401–428. Retrieved 13 October 2013.
    Pollard, A.J. (2004). "Neville, Ralph, second earl of Westmorland (b. in or before 1407, d. 1484)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/19952. (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
    Richardson, Douglas (2011). Everingham, Kimball G., ed. Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families I (2nd ed.). Salt Lake City. ISBN 1449966373.
    Richardson, Douglas (2011). Everingham, Kimball G., ed. Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families III (2nd ed.). Salt Lake City. ISBN 144996639X.
    Summerson, Henry (2004). "Clifford, Thomas, eighth Baron Clifford (1414-1455)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/5663. (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
    Walker, Simon (2004). "Percy, Sir Henry (1364–1403)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/21931. (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
    Whitehead, J.R. (2004). "Waterton, Robert (d.1425)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/54421. (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)

    Further reading[edit]

    Blore, Thomas (1811). The History and Antiquities of the County of Rutland. Stanford: R. Newcomb.

    Military:
    The siege of Harfleur, Normandy, France, was a military action which occurred during the Hundred Years' War. It began on 18 August 1415 and ended on 22 September, when the French port of Harfleur surrendered to the English.

    Military:
    The Battle of Agincourt (Azincourt in French) was a major English victory in the Hundred Years' War.[a] The battle took place on Friday, 25 October 1415 (Saint Crispin's Day), near Azincourt, in northern France.[5][b] Henry V's victory at Agincourt, against a numerically superior French army, crippled France and started a new period in the war during which Henry V married the French king's daughter, and their son, later Henry VI of England and Henry II of France, was made heir to the throne of France as well as of England. English speakers found it easier to pronounce "Agincourt" with a "g" instead of the original "z". For all historians in the non-English speaking world, the battle is referred to with the toponymy of Azincourt, whereas English-only speaking historians kept the modified spelling of Agincourt.

    Henry V led his troops into battle and participated in hand-to-hand fighting. The French king of the time, Charles VI, did not command the French army himself as he suffered from severe psychotic illnesses with moderate mental incapacitation. Instead, the French were commanded by Constable Charles d'Albret and various prominent French noblemen of the Armagnac party.

    This battle is notable for the use of the English longbow in very large numbers, with English and Welsh archers forming most of Henry's army. The battle is the centrepiece of the play Henry V by William Shakespeare.

    more ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Agincourt

    Died:
    The Siege of Meaux was fought in 1422 between the English, under Henry V, and the French during the Hundred Years' War. The town's defence was led by the Bastard of Vaurus, by all accounts cruel and evil, but a brave commander all the same. The siege commenced on October 6, 1421, and mining and bombardment soon brought down the walls. Casualties began to mount in the English army, including John Clifford, 7th Baron de Clifford who had been at the siege of Harfleur, the Battle of Agincourt, and received the surrender of Cherbourg.

    The English also began to fall sick rather early into the siege, and it is estimated that one sixteenth of the besiegers died from dysentery and smallpox. On 9 March 1422, the town surrendered, although the garrison held out. Under continued bombardment, the garrison gave in as well on 10 March, following a siege of 8 months. The Bastard of Vaurus was decapitated, as was a trumpeter named Orace, who had once mocked King Henry. Sir John Fortescue was then installed as English Captain of Meaux Castle.

    John married Elizabeth Percy ~ 1404. Elizabeth (daughter of Henry "Harry Hotspur" Percy, Knight, 2nd Earl of Northumberland and Elizabeth Mortimer, Countess of Percy) was born ~ 1395, Alnwick Castle, Alnwick, Northumberland, England NE66 1NQ; died 26 Oct 1437; was buried Staindrop Church, Staindrop, Durham, England. [Group Sheet]


  6. 109.  Elizabeth Percy was born ~ 1395, Alnwick Castle, Alnwick, Northumberland, England NE66 1NQ (daughter of Henry "Harry Hotspur" Percy, Knight, 2nd Earl of Northumberland and Elizabeth Mortimer, Countess of Percy); died 26 Oct 1437; was buried Staindrop Church, Staindrop, Durham, England.

    Notes:

    Lady Elizabeth Percy (c. 1395 – 26 October 1436) was the daughter of Sir Henry Percy, known to history as 'Hotspur',[1][2] and Elizabeth Mortimer, the eldest daughter of Edmund Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March, and his wife, Philippa, the only child of Lionel, 1st Duke of Clarence, and Elizabeth de Burgh, Countess of Ulster.[3] After the death of Sir Henry Percy, Elizabeth Mortimer married, sometime after 3 June 1406, Thomas de Camoys, 1st Baron Camoys, who later commanded the rearguard of the English army at the Battle of Agincourt.[4][5]

    By her mother's first marriage to Sir Henry Percy, Elizabeth Percy had one brother, Henry Percy, 2nd Earl of Northumberland (3 February 1393 – 22 May 1455), who married Eleanor Neville (died c. 1473), widow of Richard le Despenser, and daughter of Ralph Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland, by his second wife, Joan Beaufort, legitimated daughter of John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster. They had nine sons and three daughters. He was slain at the First Battle of St Albans during the Wars of the Roses.[6]

    Elizabeth Percy also had a brother of the half blood, Sir Roger Camoys, the son of her mother's second marriage to Thomas de Camoys.[4][7]

    Elizabeth Percy died 26 October 1436. She was buried at Staindrop, Durham.[8]

    Through her daughter, Mary Clifford, Elizabeth Percy was the great-great-grandmother of Jane Seymour, third wife of Henry VIII.

    Marriages and issue

    Elizabeth Percy married firstly John Clifford, 7th Baron de Clifford, slain at the Siege of Meaux on 13 March 1422, by whom she had two sons and two daughters:[9][8]

    With John Clifford
    Name
    Thomas Married Joan Dacre, daughter of Thomas Dacre, 6th Baron Dacre by Philippa de Neville, daughter of Ralph Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland.[9][10]
    Henry [11]
    Mary Married Sir Philip Wentworth (c.1424 – 18 May 1464) of Nettlestead, Suffolk, beheaded at Middleham, Yorkshire, after the Battle of Hexham, by whom she had a son and two daughters.[9][12]
    Blanche (or Beatrix) Married Sir Robert Waterton (d. 10 December 1475), son of the Lancastrian retainer, Robert Waterton (d. 17 January 1425).[11][13][14]

    With Ralph Neville

    She married secondly, in 1426, Ralph Neville, 2nd Earl of Westmorland (d. 3 November 1484), by whom she had a son, Sir John Neville.

    Name
    Sir John married Anne Holland, daughter of John Holland, 2nd Duke of Exeter.[15][16] Sir John Neville died shortly before 16 March 1450 without issue. His widow, Anne Holand, married another Sir John Neville who was the brother of Elizabeth Percy's second husband, Ralph Neville, 2nd Earl of Westmorland (d. 3 November 1484). They had an only son, Ralph, 3rd Earl of Westmorland.[15]

    Notes

    Jump up ^ Cokayne 1936, pp. 713-14.
    Jump up ^ Walker 2004.
    Jump up ^ Richardson III 2011, pp. 193-4, 341.
    ^ Jump up to: a b Cokayne 1912, p. 508.
    Jump up ^ Leland 2004.
    Jump up ^ Richardson III 2011, pp. 343–4.
    Jump up ^ Richardson I 2011, p. 399.
    ^ Jump up to: a b Richardson III 2011, p. 250.
    ^ Jump up to: a b c Richardson I 2011, pp. 507-8.
    Jump up ^ Summerson 2004.
    ^ Jump up to: a b Richardson I 2011, p. 507.
    Jump up ^ Richardson III 2011, p. 236.
    Jump up ^ Whitehead 2004.
    Jump up ^ Ellis & Tomlinson 1882, p. 421.
    ^ Jump up to: a b Richardson III 2011, pp. 250-1.
    Jump up ^ Pollard 2004.

    References

    Cokayne, George Edward (1912). The Complete Peerage, edited by H.A. Doubleday II. London: St. Catherine Press. pp. 506–510.
    Cokayne, George Edward (1936). The Complete Peerage, edited by H.A. Doubleday IX. London: St. Catherine Press. pp. 713–714.
    Ellis, Alfred Shelley; Tomlinson, George William, eds. (1882). "The Yorkshire Archaeological and Topographical Journal" VII. London: Bradbury, Agnew and Co.: 401–428. Retrieved 13 October 2013.
    Leland, John L. (2004). "Camoys, Thomas, Baron Camoys (c.1350–1420/21)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/4461. (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
    Pollard, A.J. (2004). "Neville, Ralph, second earl of Westmorland (b. in or before 1407, d. 1484)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/19952. (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
    Richardson, Douglas (2011). Everingham, Kimball G., ed. Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families I (2nd ed.). Salt Lake City. ISBN 1449966373.
    Richardson, Douglas (2011). Everingham, Kimball G., ed. Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families III (2nd ed.). Salt Lake City. ISBN 144996639X.
    Summerson, Henry (2004). "Clifford, Thomas, eighth Baron Clifford (1414-1455)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/5663. (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
    Walker, Simon (2004). "Percy, Sir Henry (1364–1403)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/21931. (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
    Whitehead, J.R. (2004). "Waterton, Robert (d.1425)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/54421. (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)

    Children:
    1. 54. Thomas Clifford, 8th Baron de Clifford was born 25 Mar 1414, Cumbria, England; died 22 May 1455, First Battle of St. Albans, Hertfordshire, England; was buried St. Albans Abbey, St. Albans, Hertfordshire, England.
    2. Mary Clifford was born (Yorkshire) England; died (Yorkshire) England.

  7. 110.  Thomas Dacre, 6th Baron Dacre of Gilsland was born 27 Oct 1387, Naworth Castle, Brampton, Cumberland, England; was christened 28 Oct 1387, Brampton, Cumberland, England; died 5 Jan 1458; was buried Lanercost Priory, Brampton, Cumberland, England CA8 2HQ.

    Notes:

    was born at Naworth Castle, Cumberland, on 27 October 1387, the son of William Dacre, 5th Baron Dacre of Gilsland, by Joan Douglas, the illegitimate daughter of Sir William Douglas, 1st Earl of Douglas.

    Dacre married, before 20 July 1399, Philippa de Neville, the third daughter of Ralph Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland, by his first wife, Margaret Stafford.[1]

    They had seven sons and two daughters:[2]

    Sir Thomas Dacre (d. before 5 January 1458), who married Elizabeth Bowet, and by her had two daughters, Joan Dacre, suo jure 7th Baroness Dacre, wife of Richard Fiennes, and Philippa Dacre, wife of Sir Robert Fiennes.[3]
    Randolph Dacre, 1st Baron Dacre of the North, who married Eleanor FitzHugh,[citation needed] by whom he had no issue. He was slain at the Battle of Towton on 29 March 1461, and attainted, whereby his title was forfeited.[4]
    Humphrey Dacre, 1st Baron Dacre of Gilsland (d. 30 May 1485), who married Mabel Parr (d. 14 November 1508), and by her had six sons and three daughters.[5]
    Ralph Dacre.
    Richard Dacre.
    George Dacre.
    John Dacre.
    Joan Dacre, who married Thomas Clifford, 8th Baron de Clifford.
    Margaret Dacre, who married John le Scrope.
    Dacre died 5 January 1458. The date of his wife Philippa's death is unknown, although she was living 8 July 1453.

    Birth:
    The castle is thought to have late 13th-century origins, in the form of a square keep and bailey. It was first mentioned in 1323, and in 1335 a licence to crenellate was granted to Ralph Dacre. Residential quarters were added in the early 16th century by Thomas, Lord Dacre, and there were further additions in 1602, for his successor Lord William Howard. It is likely that an 18th-century walled garden lies within the boundaries of the original moat.

    Buried:
    The beautiful and now tranquil setting of Augustinian Lanercost Priory belies an often troubled history. Standing close to Hadrian's Wall, it suffered frequent attacks during the long Anglo-Scottish wars, once by Robert Bruce in person. The mortally sick King Edward I rested here for five months in 1306-7, shortly before his death on his final campaign. Yet there is still much to see in this best-preserved of Cumbrian monasteries. The east end of the noble 13th century church survives to its full height, housing within its dramatic triple tier of arches some fine monuments.

    Thomas married Philippa Neville, Baroness Dacre Bef 1399. Philippa (daughter of Ralph Neville, Knight, 1st Earl of Westmorland and Margaret Stafford, Countess of Westmorland) was born 0___ 1386, Castle Raby, Raby-Keverstone, Durham, England; died 0___ 1453. [Group Sheet]


  8. 111.  Philippa Neville, Baroness Dacre was born 0___ 1386, Castle Raby, Raby-Keverstone, Durham, England (daughter of Ralph Neville, Knight, 1st Earl of Westmorland and Margaret Stafford, Countess of Westmorland); died 0___ 1453.

    Notes:

    Philippa Neville was the third daughter of Ralph Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland, by his first wife, Margaret Stafford. She married, before 20 July 1399, Thomas Dacre, 6th Baron Dacre of Gilsland, born at Naworth Castle, Cumberland on 27 October 1387, the son of William Dacre, 5th Baron Dacre of Gilsland, by Joan Douglas, the illegitimate daughter of Sir William Douglas, 1st Earl of Douglas.[1]

    They had seven sons and two daughters:[2]

    Sir Thomas Dacre (d. before 5 January 1458), who married Elizabeth Bowet, and by her had two daughters, Joan Dacre, suo jure 7th Baroness Dacre, wife of Richard Fiennes, and Philippa Dacre, wife of Sir Robert Fiennes.[3]
    Randolph Dacre, 1st Baron Dacre of the North, who married Eleanor FitzHugh,[citation needed] by whom he had no issue. He was slain at the Battle of Towton on 29 March 1461, and attainted, whereby his title was forfeited.[4]
    Humphrey Dacre, 1st Baron Dacre of Gilsland (d. 30 May 1485), who married Mabel Parr (d. 14 November 1508), and by her had six sons and three daughters.[5]
    Ralph Dacre.
    Richard Dacre.
    George Dacre.
    John Dacre.
    Joan Dacre, who married Thomas Clifford, 8th Baron de Clifford.
    Margaret Dacre, who married John le Scrope.
    Philippa's husband, Thomas Dacre, 6th Baron Dacre of Gilsland, died 5 January 1458. The date of Philippa's death is unknown, although she was living 8 July 1453.

    Children:
    1. 55. Joan Dacre, Baroness Clifford was born Naworth Castle, Brampton, Cumberland, England.


Generation: 8

  1. 208.  William Plumpton, Knight was born ~ 1362, (Plumpton Hall, Yorkshire, England); died 0___ 1405.

    Notes:

    Died:
    executed in 1405 for treason by Henry IV

    William — Alice of Gisburn. [Group Sheet]


  2. 209.  Alice of Gisburn
    Children:
    1. 104. Robert Plumpton, Knight was born ~ 1381, Plumpton Hall, Yorkshire, England; died 8 Dec 1421, Spofforth, Yorkshire, England.

  3. 210.  Godfrey Foljambe, V, Knight was born 0___ 1367, Hassop, Derbyshire, England (son of Godfrey Foljambe, IV, Knight and Margaret de Villiers); died 0___ 1388, Plompton, Yorkshire, England; was buried Bakewell, Derbyshire, England.

    Notes:

    Knight., aged 9˝ at his grandfather's death, ob. 12 Rich 2, aged 21˝, buried at Bakewell.

    from Pedigree of Foljambe, of Aldwarke Hall. from Joseph Foster, Pedigrees of the county families of Yorkshire, vol.1 (London, 1874)

    Online transcription http://www.medievalgenealogy.org.uk/families/foljambe/foljambe.shtml

    Godfrey FOLJAMBE

    Born: 1367/1368 - Of, Hassop, Derbyshire, England
    Marr: -
    Died: 1388 -
    Father: Godfrey FOLJAMBE

    Mother: Margaret DE VILLERS

    Other Spouses:

    Wife
    Isabel LEEKE

    Born: ABT 1371 - Of, Bakewell, Yorkshire, England
    Died: -
    Father: Simon LEEKE

    Mother:

    Other Spouses:

    Children
    1. Alice FOLJAMBE

    Born: 1386 - Of, Hassop, Derbyshire, England
    Marr: 1392 - Robert PLUMPTON
    Died: 1416 - Spofforth, Yorkshire, England
    http://www.boydhouse.com/Darryl_data/gp1279.html

    Godfrey — Isabel Leeke. Isabel (daughter of Simon Leeke, of Leake & Cotham and Margaret Vaux) was born 0___ 1371, Bakewell, Derbyshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 211.  Isabel Leeke was born 0___ 1371, Bakewell, Derbyshire, England (daughter of Simon Leeke, of Leake & Cotham and Margaret Vaux).

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Isabel Lecke
    • Also Known As: Margaret Leeke

    Children:
    1. 105. Alice Foljambe was born ~ 1386, Hassop, Derbyshire, England; died 0___ 1416, Spofforth, Yorkshire, England.

  5. 212.  Miles Stapleton, III, Knight was born 23 Jun 1357, Bedale, Yorkshire, England (son of Miles Stapleton, II, Knight and Joan de Ingham, Baroness Ingham); died 10 Apr 1419, Bedale, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Lord of Ingham

    Notes:

    About Sir Miles ...

    History ...

    https://books.google.co.za/books?id=cXU-AQAAIAAJ&pg=PA267&lpg=PA267&dq=Miles+III+de+Stapleton,+Lord+of+Ingham&source=bl&ots=f8WCt5TZG0&sig=bIMshcz26Jf5Ax48BIR1pvC2qEU&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiR34D746bJAhWMOxQKHZ2UBkUQ6AEINjAF#v=onepage&q=Miles%20III%20de%20Stapleton%2C%20Lord%20of%20Ingham&f=false

    Immediate Family ...

    Son of Sir Miles de Stapleton of Bedale and Joan or Jane de Ingham, Heiress of Ingham
    Husband of Ela Stapleton
    Father of Sir Bryan Stapleton, of Ingham; Ela de Braose and Edmund Stapleton
    Brother of Joan de Stapleton
    Half brother of John de Stapleton and Roger Lord Knokyn le Strange, Baron Strange of Knockyn

    Miles married Ela de Ufford 0___ 1378, Belstead, Suffolk, England. Ela (daughter of Edmund de Ufford and Sybil Pierrepoint) was born 0___ 1362, Belstead, Suffolk, England; died 10 Apr 1419, (Norfolkshire) England; was buried Ingham Priory, Norfolk, England. [Group Sheet]


  6. 213.  Ela de Ufford was born 0___ 1362, Belstead, Suffolk, England (daughter of Edmund de Ufford and Sybil Pierrepoint); died 10 Apr 1419, (Norfolkshire) England; was buried Ingham Priory, Norfolk, England.

    Notes:

    Biography

    Father Sir Edmund de Ufford8,2,3,9,5,10,7

    Mother Sybil de Pierrepoint9,10,7 b. c 1325

    Ela Ufford was born circa 1355 at of Great Belstead, Suffolk, England. She married Sir Miles Stapleton, son of Sir Miles de Stapleton and Joan de Ingham, before 1376; They had 2 sons (Sir Brian; & Edmund) and 2 daughters (Ela, wife of Sir Robert de Brewes; & Emma).2,3,4,5,6,7 Ela Ufford died in 1425; Buried in Ingham Priory, Norfolk.4,7

    Family

    Sir Miles Stapleton b. c 23 Jun 1357, d. 10 Apr 1419

    Children

    Sir Brian Stapleton, Sheriff of Norfolk & Suffolk, Lord Ingham+8,2,4,7 b. c 1379, d. 7 Aug 1438

    Ela Stapleton+11,3,4,5,7 b. c 1381

    John Stapleton+ b. c 1383

    Anna Stapleton+12 b. c 1390

    Sources

    [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. I, p. 109.
    [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. I, p. 390.
    [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. I, p. 497-498.
    [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. II, p. 61.
    [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. II, p. 230.
    [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. V, p. 35.
    [S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 57.
    [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. I, p. 497.
    [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. II, p. 229.
    Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
    http://awtc.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=emsuggs&id=I39737 Eileen McKinnon-Suggs (suggs1@msn.com), Our Kingdom Come
    The Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999

    Created on 19 October 2010 through the import of Ancestors of Lois Greene.ged. Ufford-32 created through the import of Lupton file.ged on Jul 8, 2011 by Kim Ostermyer. Ufford-21 created through the import of FISCUS Family Tree.ged on Jun 6, 2011 by Liisa Small. Ufford-25 created through the import of FISCUS Family Tree.ged

    Children:
    1. 106. Bryan Stapleton, Knight was born 0___ 1379, Ingham, Norfolk, England; died 17 Aug 1438, Ingham, Norfolk, England.

  7. 214.  William Bardolf, Knight, 3rd & 4th Baron Damory was born 21 Oct 1349, Wormegay, Norfolk, England (son of John Bardolf, Knight Banneret, 3rd Lord Bardolf and Elizabeth d'Amory); died 29 Jan 1386, Norfolkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Lord Bardolf
    • Also Known As: Sir William Bardolf, Viscount of Wormegay
    • Military: French Wars
    • Military: Irish Wars
    • Occupation: 1376-1385; Member of Parliament

    Notes:

    William Bardolf, 4th Baron Bardolf and 3rd Baron Damory (21 October 1349 – 29 January 1386) of Wormegay, Norfolk, was an extensive landowner in Norfolk, Lincolnshire, Suffolk and Surrey. He was the son of John Bardolf, 3rd Baron Bardolf and Hon. Elizabeth Damory, suo jure 2nd Baroness Damory.[1] His maternal grandparents were Sir Roger Damory, Lord Damory and Lady Elizabeth de Clare, a granddaughter of King Edward I.[1] In 1382, Bardolf had livery of his lands from the Crown. He was a descendant of William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey.[citation needed]

    He was summoned to parliament from 20 January 1376 to 3 September 1385, as "William Bardolf of Wormegay". He served in the French and Irish wars, latterly under John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster.

    Family

    He married Agnes (d. 12 June 1403), daughter of Sir Michael de Poynings, 2nd Baron Poynings, Kt., of Bures (1317–1369). Coppinger wrote: "Sir Michael de Poynings, 2nd Baron, gave a thousand marks to Queen Philippa in 1366 for the wardship and marriage of William, son and heir of John Lord Bardolf, to the end that he might take Agnes his daughter to wife, who by the name of 'Agnes Bardolf' is mentioned as a legatee in the will of her mother, Joane Lady Poynings dated 12th May 1369 and by that of 'Lady Bardolf my sister' in the will of Thomas Lord Poynings 28th October 1374."

    Lord Bardolf and his wife had two sons and two daughters:[1]

    Thomas Bardolf, 5th Baron Bardolf[1]
    William Bardolf[1]
    Cecily Bardolf (d. 1432) married Sir Brian Stapleton, of Ingham (1379–1438), Sheriff of Norfolk, a veteran of the Battle of Agincourt, and had issue Sir Miles Stapleton.[1]
    Elizabeth Bardolf, wife of Robert Scales, 5th Lord Scales and secondly Sir Henry Percy, son of Sir Thomas Percy and Elizabeth Strabolgi.[1]
    Bardolf died in 1385, aged 36, and was succeeded by his son, Thomas Bardolf, 5th Baron Bardolf. His widow remarried Sir Thomas Mortimer, illegitimate son of Roger Mortimer, 2nd Earl of March. Thomas was attainted as a traitor in 1397 and died shortly before Agnes in 1403.

    References

    ^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g Douglas Richardson. Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study In Colonial And Medieval Families, Genealogical Publishing, 2005. pg 608. Google eBook
    Burke, John and John Bernard, The Royal Families of England, Scotland, and Wales, with their Descendants, Sovereigns and Subjects, London, 1851, vol.2, p.vii, and pedigree CXVII.
    Waters, Robert E.C., B.A., Barrister of the Inner Temple, Genealogical Memoirs of the Extinct Family of Chester of Chicheley &c., London, 1878, vol.1, p. 140.
    Burke, Sir Bernard, C.B.,LL.D., Ulster King of Arms, The Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire, London, 1883, p. 22)
    Coppinger, W.A., M.A., etc., The Manors of Suffolk, London, 1905, pp. 46–49.
    Rye, Walter, (editor), The Visitation of Norfolk, 1563 & 1613, made by William Hervey, Clarencieux King of Arms, Clarencieux Cooke, and John Raven, Richmond Herald, London, 1891, p. 65.
    Rye, Walter, Norfolk Families, part II, Norwich, 1912, p. 845.
    Carr-Calthrop, Colonel Christopher William, C.B.E.,M.D., etc., Notes on the Families of Calthorpe & Calthrop, etc., Third edition, London, 1933. A pedigree showing Bardolf's the descent from Edward I, King of England and his wife Eleanor of Castile is on p. 43.
    The Visitation of Suffolk, 1561, pp. 186 & 243.
    Weis, Frederick Lewis, et al., The Magna Charta Sureties 1215, 5th edition, Baltimore, 2002, p. 49.
    Richardson, Douglas, Magna Carta Ancestry, Baltimore, 2005, p. 40.

    Birth:
    The place-name 'Wormegay' is first attested in the Domesday Book of 1086, and means 'the island of Wyrm's people'.[4]

    Just to the west of the village centre lies Wormegay Castle, a motte and bailey earthwork.

    Map ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wormegay

    William married Agnes de Poynings, Vicountess of Wormegay Birling, Kent, England. Agnes (daughter of Michael de Poynings, 1st Baron Poynings and Joan Ruxley, Lay Poynings) died 12 Jun 1403. [Group Sheet]


  8. 215.  Agnes de Poynings, Vicountess of Wormegay (daughter of Michael de Poynings, 1st Baron Poynings and Joan Ruxley, Lay Poynings); died 12 Jun 1403.
    Children:
    1. Thomas Bardolf, Knight, 5th Baron Bardolf was born 22 Dec 1369, Birling, Kent, England; died 19 Feb 1408, Bramham Moor, Yorkshire, England.
    2. 107. Cecily Bardolf was born Abt 1371, Birling, Kent, England; died 29 Sep 1432, Bedale, Yorkshire, England.

  9. 216.  Thomas Clifford, Knight, 6th Baron de CliffordThomas Clifford, Knight, 6th Baron de Clifford was born 1363-1364, Cumbria, England (son of Roger de Clifford, Knight, 5th Baron de Clifford and Maud Beauchamp); died 18 Aug 1391.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Governor of Carlisle Castle
    • Occupation: High Sheriff of Westmorland
    • Occupation: Master of the King's Horses
    • Occupation: Member of Parliament
    • Occupation: Warden of the West Marches
    • Also Known As: 6th Lord of Skipton
    • Also Known As: Thomas ed Clifford

    Notes:

    Thomas de Clifford, 6th Baron de Clifford, also 6th Lord of Skipton (c. 1363 – 1391) was a Knight of The Chamber, hereditary Sheriff of Westmorland, Governor of Carlisle Castle, and Warden of the West Marches.

    He was the son of Roger de Clifford, 5th Baron de Clifford. According to Dugdale, he was a knight of the king's chamber in 8 Richard II (1384-5). On 25 June 1386, Northampton, the herald, was allowed to carry a challenge from 'Thomas de Clifford, chivaler l'eisne Fitz-Rogeri, Sire de Clifford,' to Sir Bursigande, eldest son of 'le Sire Bursigande,' in France. According to Dugdale, Sir Thomas crossed the sea for this tournament in the following May. Rymer has preserved a document, dated 28 January 1387, in which the king licenses 'our very dear and loyal knight, Sir Thomas Clifford, to perform all manner of feats of arms' on the Scotch borders.[1]

    He inherited his estates and titles on his father's death in 1380. He and two other English knights challenged three French knights to a tourney in the marches between Boulogne and Calais ; and on 20 June 1390 he procured a safe-conduct through England for William de Douglas, who was coming to the English court with forty knights to a wager of battle with Clifford with reference to certain disputed lands.[1]

    In 1384, he was granted the custody of Carlisle Castle for life jointly with John Neville, and in 1386 was appointed a warden of the west march. In September 1388, he was master of the king's horses. He was summoned to Parliament by Writ from December 6, 1389. He was hereditary High Sheriff of Westmorland from 1389 until his own death in 1391. His name occurs in the council minutes for 28 April 1390 ; and according to Dugdale he received summonses to parliament in 1390-2.[1]

    In 1391, Clifford was in the Baltic, and became involved in a brawl with Sir William Douglas, an illegitimate son of the earl of Douglas, in which Douglas was killed. Clifford, overcome by remorse, set off for Jerusalem and died in 1391 on an unidentified Mediterranean island.[2] Dugdale gives the date of his death 18 August 1391.[1]


    He married before 1379 Elizabeth (died March 1424), daughter of Thomas de Ros, 4th Baron de Ros of Helmesley, by Beatrice, daughter of Ralph de Stafford, 1st Earl of Stafford, KG, by whom he had issue. He was succeeded by his eldest son John Clifford, 7th Baron de Clifford. [1]

    Lord Clifford is often styled in documents "King's kinsman".

    Issue:

    John Clifford, 7th Baron de Clifford, married Lady Elizabeth Percy, daughter of Henry 'Hotspur' Percy by Elizabeth, daughter of Edmund Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March.
    Maud Clifford married 1) John Neville, 6th Baron Latimer; 2) Richard of Conisburgh, 3rd Earl of Cambridge

    References

    ^ Jump up to: a b c d e Archer 1887.
    Jump up ^ Summerson 2004.

    Attribution

    This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Archer, Thomas Andrew (1887). "Clifford, Thomas de (d.1391?)". In Stephen, Leslie. Dictionary of National Biography 11. London: Smith, Elder & Co. p. 77.

    Sources

    Richardson, Douglas, Plantagenet Ancestry, Baltimore Md., 2004, p. 216. ISBN 0-8063-1750-7
    Summerson, Henry. "Clifford, Thomas". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/5662. (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)

    Died:
    ...and died in 1391 on an unidentified Mediterranean island.

    Thomas married Elizabeth de Ros Bef 1379, (Yorkshire) England. Elizabeth (daughter of Thomas de Ros, Knight, 4th Baron de Ros and Beatrice Stafford) was born Abt 1367, Helmsley, Yorkshire, England; died 26 Mar 1424, (Yorkshire) England. [Group Sheet]


  10. 217.  Elizabeth de Ros was born Abt 1367, Helmsley, Yorkshire, England (daughter of Thomas de Ros, Knight, 4th Baron de Ros and Beatrice Stafford); died 26 Mar 1424, (Yorkshire) England.
    Children:
    1. 108. John Clifford, Knight, 7th Baron Clifford was born 1388-1389, Appleby, Westmorland, England; was christened 23 Apr 1389; died 13 Mar 1422, Meaux, Seine-et-Marne, France; was buried Friars Minor, Ipswich, Suffolk, England.

  11. 218.  Henry "Harry Hotspur" Percy, Knight, 2nd Earl of NorthumberlandHenry "Harry Hotspur" Percy, Knight, 2nd Earl of Northumberland was born 20 May 1364, Alnwick, Northumberland, England (son of Henry Percy, Knight, 1st Earl of Northumberland and Margaret Neville, Baroness of Ros); died 21 Jul 1403, Shrewsbury, England.

    Notes:

    17th great grandfather to the grandchildren of Vernia Swindell Byars (1894-1985) ...

    http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=&secondpersonID=I3&maxrels=1&disallowspouses=0&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I37054

    Click here to view maps & history of Warkworth Castle ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Warkworth_Castle

    *

    Sir Henry Percy KG (20 May 1364 - 21 July 1403), commonly known as Sir Harry Hotspur, or simply Hotspur, was a late-medieval English nobleman. He was a significant captain during the Anglo-Scottish wars. He later led successive rebellions against Henry IV of England and was slain at the Battle of Shrewsbury in 1403 at the height of his career.

    Career

    Arms of Hotspur
    Henry Percy was born 20 May 1364 at either Alnwick Castle or Warkworth Castle in Northumberland, the eldest son of Henry Percy, 1st Earl of Northumberland, and Margaret Neville, daughter of Ralph de Neville, 2nd Lord Neville of Raby, and Alice de Audley.[1] He was knighted by King Edward III in April 1377, together with the future Kings Richard II and Henry IV.[2] In 1380, he was in Ireland with the Earl of March,[3] and in 1383, he travelled in Prussia.[4] He was appointed warden of the east march either on 30 July 1384 or in May 1385,[4] and in 1385 accompanied Richard II on an expedition into Scotland.[1] 'As a tribute to his speed in advance and readiness to attack' on the Scottish borders, the Scots bestowed on him the name 'Haatspore'.[2] In April 1386, he was sent to France to reinforce the garrison at Calais and led raids into Picardy. Between August and October 1387, he was in command of a naval force in an attempt to relieve the siege of Brest.[4] In appreciation of these military endeavours he was made a Knight of the Garter in 1388.[4] Reappointed as warden of the east march, he commanded the English forces against James Douglas, 2nd Earl of Douglas, at the Battle of Otterburn on 10 August 1388, where he was captured, but soon ransomed for a fee of 7000 marks.[2]

    During the next few years Percy's reputation continued to grow. He was sent on a diplomatic mission to Cyprus in June 1393 and appointed Governor of Bordeaux, deputy to John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster, in the Duchy of Aquitaine.[2] He returned to England in January 1395, taking part in Richard II's expedition to Ireland, and was back in Aquitaine the following autumn. In the summer of 1396, he was again in Calais.[3]

    Percy's military and diplomatic service brought him substantial marks of royal favour in the form of grants and appointments,[4] but despite this, the Percy family decided to support Henry Bolingbroke, the future Henry IV, in his rebellion against Richard II. On Henry's return from exile in June 1399, Percy and his father joined his forces at Doncaster and marched south with them. After King Richard's deposition, Percy and his father were 'lavishly rewarded' with lands and offices.[3]

    Under the new king, Percy had extensive civil and military responsibility in both the east march towards Scotland and in north Wales, where he was appointed High Sheriff of Flintshire in 1399. In north Wales, he was under increasing pressure as a result of the rebellion of Owain Glyndwr. In March 1402, Henry IV appointed Percy royal lieutenant in north Wales, and on 14 September 1402, Percy, his father, and the Earl of Dunbar and March were victorious against a Scottish force at the Battle of Homildon Hill. Among others, they made a prisoner of Archibald Douglas, 4th Earl of Douglas.[1]

    Rebellion and death

    In spite of the favour that Henry IV showed the Percys in many respects, they became increasingly discontented with him. Among their grievances was the king's failure to pay the wages due to them for defending the Scottish border; his favour towards Dunbar; his demand that the Percys hand over their Scottish prisoners; his failure to put an end to Owain Glyndwr's rebellion through a negotiated settlement; his increasing promotion of his son Prince Henry's military authority in Wales; and his failure to ransom Henry Percy's brother-in-law Sir Edmund Mortimer, whom the Welsh had captured in June 1402.[5]

    Spurred on by these grievances, the Percys rebelled in the summer of 1403 and took up arms against the king. According to J. M. W. Bean, it is clear that the Percys were in collusion with Glyndwr. On his return to England shortly after the victory at Homildon Hill, Henry Percy issued proclamations in Cheshire accusing the king of 'tyrannical government'.[3] Joined by his uncle, Thomas Percy, Earl of Worcester, he marched to Shrewsbury, where he intended to do battle against a force there under the command of the Prince of Wales. The army of his father, however, was slow to move south as well, and it was without the assistance of his father that Henry Percy and Worcester arrived at Shrewsbury on 21 July 1403, where they encountered the king with a large army. The ensuing Battle of Shrewsbury was fierce, with heavy casualties on both sides, but when Henry Percy himself was struck down and killed, his own forces fled.[3]

    The circumstances of Percy's death differ in accounts. The chronicler Thomas Walsingham stated, in his Historia Anglicana, that while he led his men in the fight rashly penetrating the enemy host, [Hotspur] was unexpectedly cut down, by whose hand is not known. Another is that he was struck in the face by an arrow when he opened his vizor for a better view.[6] The legend that he was killed by the Prince of Wales seems to have been given currency by William Shakespeare, writing at the end of the following century.


    Shortly after Henry died in battle, his uncle was executed. An attainder was issued and the family's property, including Wressle Castle in Yorkshire, was confiscated by the Crown.[7]
    The Earl of Worcester was executed two days later.[8]

    King Henry, upon being brought Percy's body after the battle, is said to have wept. The body was taken by Thomas Neville, 5th Baron Furnivall, to Whitchurch, Shropshire, for burial. However, when rumours circulated that Percy was still alive, the king 'had the corpse exhumed and displayed it, propped upright between two millstones, in the market place at Shrewsbury'.[3] That done, the king dispatched Percy's head to York, where it was impaled on the Micklegate Bar (one of the city's gates), whereas his four-quarters were sent to London, Newcastle upon Tyne, Bristol, and Chester before they were finally delivered to his widow. She had him buried in York Minster in November of that year.[9] In January 1404, Percy was posthumously declared a traitor, and his lands were forfeited to the Crown.[citation needed]

    Marriage and issue

    Henry Percy married Elizabeth Mortimer, the eldest daughter of Edmund Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March, and his wife, Philippa, the only child of Lionel, 1st Duke of Clarence, and Elizabeth de Burgh, Countess of Ulster.[10] By her he had two children:

    Name Lifespan Notes
    Henry 3 February 1393 – 22 May 1455 2nd Earl of Northumberland; married Eleanor Neville, by whom he had issue. He was slain at the First Battle of St Albans during the Wars of the Roses.[11]
    Elizabeth c.1395 – 26 October 1436 Married firstly John Clifford, 7th Baron de Clifford, slain at the Siege of Meaux on 13 March 1422, by whom she had issue, and secondly Ralph Neville, 2nd Earl of Westmorland (d. 3 November 1484), by whom she had a son, Sir John Neville.[12]
    Sometime after 3 June 1406, Elizabeth Mortimer married, as her second husband, Thomas de Camoys, 1st Baron Camoys, by whom she had a son, Sir Roger Camoys.[13] Thomas Camoys distinguished himself as a soldier in command of the rearguard of the English army at the Battle of Agincourt on 25 October 1415.[14]

    Legacy

    Warkworth Castle, the home of Henry Percy
    Henry Percy, 'Hotspur', is one of Shakespeare's best-known characters. In Henry IV, Part 1, Percy is portrayed as the same age as his rival, Prince Hal, by whom he is slain in single combat. In fact, he was 23 years older than Prince Hal, the future King Henry V, who was a youth of 16 at the date of the Battle of Shrewsbury.

    The name of one of England's top football clubs, Tottenham Hotspur F.C., acknowledges Henry Percy, whose descendants owned land in the neighbourhood of the club's first ground in the Tottenham Marshes.[15][16][17]

    A 14 feet (4.3 m) statue of Henry Percy was unveiled in Alnwick by the Duke of Northumberland in 2010.[18]

    *

    Died:
    in the Battle of Shrewsbury...

    Henry married Elizabeth Mortimer, Countess of Percy Bef 10 Dec 1379, Usk, Monmouthshire, Wales. Elizabeth (daughter of Edmund Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March, Earl of Ulster and Philippa Plantagenet, 5th Countess of Ulster) was born 12 Feb 1371, Usk, Monmouthshire, Wales; died 20 Apr 1417, Trotton, Sussex, England; was buried St. George's Church, Trotton, Chichester, Sussex, England. [Group Sheet]


  12. 219.  Elizabeth Mortimer, Countess of Percy was born 12 Feb 1371, Usk, Monmouthshire, Wales (daughter of Edmund Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March, Earl of Ulster and Philippa Plantagenet, 5th Countess of Ulster); died 20 Apr 1417, Trotton, Sussex, England; was buried St. George's Church, Trotton, Chichester, Sussex, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Baroness Camoys

    Notes:

    Elizabeth Mortimer, Baroness Camoys (12 February 1371 – 20 April 1417) was an English noblewoman, the granddaughter of Lionel of Antwerp, 1st Duke of Clarence, and great-granddaughter of King Edward III. Her first husband was Sir Henry Percy, known to history as 'Hotspur'. She married secondly Thomas de Camoys, 1st Baron Camoys. She is represented as 'Kate, Lady Percy,' in Shakespeare's Henry IV, Part 1, and briefly again as 'Widow Percy' in Henry IV, Part 2.

    Family, marriges, and issue

    Elizabeth Mortimer was born at Usk, Monmouthshire, Wales on 12 or 13 February 1371, the eldest daughter of Edmund Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March, and his wife, Philippa, the only child of Lionel, 1st Duke of Clarence, and Elizabeth de Burgh, Countess of Ulster. Elizabeth Mortimer had two brothers, Sir Roger (1374–1398) and Sir Edmund (1376–1409), and a younger sister, Philippa (1375–1401), who married firstly John Hastings, 3rd Earl of Pembroke (d.1389), secondly Richard de Arundel, 11th Earl of Arundel (1346–1397), and thirdly, Sir Thomas Poynings.[1]


    A romanticised painting of Elizabeth Mortimer and her first husband Henry "Hotspur" Percy
    It is unknown when Elizabeth was married to her first husband, Henry Percy, nicknamed 'Hotspur' (1364–1403), eldest son of Henry Percy, 1st Earl of Northumberland, who was already acquiring a reputation as a great soldier and warrior and responsible administrator. The couple resided at Alnwick Castle in Northumberland.[citation needed] They had two children:

    Henry Percy, 2nd Earl of Northumberland (3 February 1393 – 22 May 1455), who married Eleanor Neville, by whom he had issue. He was slain at the First Battle of St Albans.[2]
    Lady Elizabeth Percy (c.1395-26 October 1436), who married firstly John Clifford, 7th Baron de Clifford, slain at the Siege of Meaux on 13 March 1422, by whom she had issue, and secondly Ralph Neville, 2nd Earl of Westmorland (d. 3 November 1484), by whom she had a son, Sir John Neville.[3]

    On 21 July 1403, Elizabeth's husband was slain at the Battle of Shrewsbury[4] while commanding a rebel army that fought against the superior forces of King Henry IV. He was buried in Whitchurch, Shropshire, however when rumours circulated that he was still alive, 'Henry IV had the corpse exhumed and displayed it, propped upright between two millstones, in the market place at Shrewsbury'.[5] This done, the king dispatched Percy's head to York, where it was impaled on one of the city's gates; his four-quarters were first sent to London, Newcastle upon Tyne, Bristol, and Chester before they were finally delivered to Elizabeth. She had him buried in York Minster in November of that year.[6] In January 1404, Percy was posthumously declared a traitor and his lands were forfeited to the Crown.[citation needed] The king ordered Elizabeth herself arrested on 8 October 1403.[7]

    Sometime after 3 June 1406, Elizabeth Mortimer was married to her second husband, Thomas de Camoys, 1st Baron Camoys. Although Camoys was in his mid-sixties, she may have had a son by him, Sir Roger Camoys.[8] Like her first husband, Camoys was a renowned soldier who commanded the left wing of the English army at the Battle of Agincourt on 25 October 1415.[9]

    Death

    Elizabeth died on 20 April 1417 at the age of 46 years. She was buried in St. George's Church at Trotton, Sussex. Her second husband was buried beside her.[10] Their table-tomb with its fine monumental brass depicting the couple slightly less than life size and holding hands can be viewed in the middle of the chancel inside the church.

    King Henry VIII's Queen consort Jane Seymour was one of Elizabeth Mortimer's many descendants through her daughter Elizabeth Percy.

    In fiction

    Lady Elizabeth is represented as Kate, Lady Percy, in William Shakespeare's play Henry IV, Part 1.[11]

    Birth:
    Map & History of Usk ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Usk

    Buried:
    Image & history of St. George's ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St._George%27s_Church,_Trotton

    Notes:

    Married:
    Elizabeth was a Child Bride at the age of 9

    Children:
    1. Henry Percy, VI, Earl of Percy was born 3 Feb 1394, Alnwick Castle, Alnwick, Northumberland, England NE66 1NQ; died 22 May 1455, St. Albans, Hertford, England; was buried St. Albans Abbey, St. Albans, Hertfordshire, England.
    2. 109. Elizabeth Percy was born ~ 1395, Alnwick Castle, Alnwick, Northumberland, England NE66 1NQ; died 26 Oct 1437; was buried Staindrop Church, Staindrop, Durham, England.

  13. 222.  Ralph Neville, Knight, 1st Earl of WestmorlandRalph Neville, Knight, 1st Earl of Westmorland was born 0___ 1364, Castle Raby, Raby-Keverstone, Durham, England (son of John Neville, 3rd Baron Neville de Raby and Maud Percy); died 21 Oct 1425, Castle Raby, Raby-Keverstone, Durham, England; was buried 0Oct 1425, St. Mary's Church, Staindrop, Durham, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: 4th Lord Neville of Raby
    • Also Known As: Earl of Westmorland
    • Also Known As: Lord of Richmond

    Notes:

    Ralph Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland, 4th Baron Neville de Raby,[a] Earl Marshal, KG, PC (c. 1364 – 21 October 1425), was an English nobleman of the House of Neville.

    Family

    Ralph Neville was born about 1364, the son of John Neville, 3rd Baron Neville de Raby, and The Hon Maud Percy (d. before 18 February 1379), daughter of Henry de Percy, 2nd Baron Percy of Alnwick, Northumberland, by Idoine de Clifford, daughter of Robert de Clifford, 1st Baron de Clifford.[1] Neville had a younger brother, and five sisters:[2]

    Thomas Neville, 5th Baron Furnivall, who married Joan Furnival.
    Lady Alice Neville, who married Sir Thomas Gray.
    Lady Maud Neville
    Lady Idoine Neville
    Lady Eleanor Neville, who married Ralph de Lumley, 1st Baron Lumley.
    Lady Elizabeth Neville, who became a nun.
    Neville's father married secondly, before 9 October 1381, Elizabeth Latimer (d. 5 November 1395), daughter of William Latimer, 4th Baron Latimer. By his father's second marriage Neville had a brother and sister of the half blood:[3]

    John Neville, 6th Baron Latimer (c.1382 – 10 December 1430), who married firstly, Maud Clifford (c. 26 August 1446), daughter of Thomas Clifford, 6th Baron Clifford, whom he divorced before 1413-17, and by whom he had no issue. She married secondly, Richard of Conisburgh, 3rd Earl of Cambridge, beheaded 5 August 1415 for his part in the Southampton Plot.[4]
    Lady Elizabeth Neville, who married Sir Thomas Willoughby.
    Career[edit]
    Neville's first military service was in Brittany under King Richard II's uncle, Thomas of Woodstock, who knighted him at Saint-Omer in July 1380. On 14 November 1381 he and his cousin, Henry 'Hotspur' Percy, were commissioned to preside over a duel between an Englishman and a Scot, and on 1 December 1383 he and his father were commissioned to receive from the Scots 24,000 marks for the ransom of King David. On 26 October 1385 he was appointed joint governor of Carlisle with Sir Thomas Clifford, and on 27 March 1386 was appointed, together with Clifford, joint Warden of the West March.[5]

    Neville inherited the title at the age of 24 after his father's death on 17 October 1388, and was summoned to Parliament from 6 December 1389 to 30 November 1396 by writs directed to Radulpho de Nevyll de Raby. On 25 October 1388 he was appointed, with others, to survey the fortifications on the Scottish border, and on 24 May 1389 was made keeper for life of the royal forests north of the Trent. In 1393 and 1394 he was employed in peace negotiations with Scotland.[6]

    In 1397 Neville supported King Richard's proceedings against Thomas of Woodstock and the Lords Appellant, and by way of reward was created Earl of Westmorland on 29 September of that year. However his loyalty to the King was tested shortly thereafter. His first wife, Margaret Stafford, had died on 9 June 1396, and Neville's second marriage to Joan Beaufort before 29 November 1396 made him the son-in-law of King Richard's uncle, John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster. Thus, when King Richard banished John of Gaunt's eldest son and heir, Henry Bolingbroke, on 16 September 1398, and confiscated Bolingbroke's estates after John of Gaunt's death on 3 February 1399, Westmorland was moved to support his brother-in-law. Bolingbroke landed with a small force at Ravenspur in July 1399. Westmorland and the Earl of Northumberland were in the deputation at the Tower which received King Richard's abdication, and Westmorland bore the small sceptre called the 'virge' at Bolingbroke's coronation as King Henry IV on 13 October 1399.[7]

    For his support of the new King, Westmorland was rewarded with a lifetime appointment as Earl Marshal on 30 September 1399 (although he resigned the office in 1412), a lifetime grant of the honour of Richmond on 20 October (although the grant was not accompanied by a grant of the title Earl of Richmond), and several wardships.[8] Before 4 December he was appointed to the King's council. In March 1401, Westmorland was one of the commissioners who conducted negotiations for a marriage between the King's eldest daughter, Blanche of England, and Louis, son of Rupert, King of the Romans, and in 1403 was made a Knight of the Garter, taking the place left vacant by the death of Edmund of Langley, 1st Duke of York.[8]

    According to Tuck, Westmorland had little influence on the Scottish borders in the first years of Henry IV's reign, where the wardenships of the marches were monopolised by the Percys, leading to a growing rivalry between the two families. However in 1403 the Percys, spurred on by various grievances, took up arms against the King, and suffered defeat at the Battle of Shrewsbury on 21 July 1403. Northumberland's son, Henry 'Hotspur' Percy, was slain at Shrewsbury, and Northumberland's brother, the Earl of Worcester, was beheaded two days later. After Shrewsbury, King Henry ordered Westmorland to raise troops and prevent Northumberland's army, which was still in the north, from advancing south. On 6 August 1403,as a reward for his service in driving Northumberland back to Warkworth Castle, Westmorland was granted the wardenship of the West March which Northumberland had held since 1399, the wardenship of the East March, formerly held by Henry 'Hotspur' Percy, being granted to the King's 14-year-old son, John of Lancaster, 1st Duke of Bedford.[8]

    Two years later Northumberland, joined by Lord Bardolf, again took up arms against the King. It had been Northumberland's plan to capture the earl by surprise at the outset, and in early May 1405, with 400 men, Northumberland made a surprise attack at the castle of Witton-le-Wear, where he had been staying. The attempt failed, as Westmorland had already fled. The earl speedily gathered an army, defeated a force of Percy allies at Topcliffe, and then marched towards York with Henry IV's son, John of Lancaster, to confront a force of some 8000 men gathered on Shipton Moor under the leadership of Archbishop Richard Scrope, Thomas de Mowbray, 4th Earl of Norfolk, and Scrope's nephew, Sir William Plumpton. Outnumbered by Scrope's forces, Westmorland resorted to trickery,[9] and led Scrope and his allies to believe that their demands would be accepted and their personal safety guaranteed. Once Scrope's army had been disbanded on 29 May, Scrope, Mowbray and Plumpton were arrested, summarily condemned to death for treason, and beheaded outside the walls of York on 8 June 1405. Although Westmorland handed Scrope and his allies over to the King at Pontefract, he played no role in their hasty and irregular trial and execution, having been sent north by the King on 4 June to seize Northumberland's castles. It is unclear whether Northumberland had initially planned to rebel openly in concert with Scrope, but in the event he gave Scrope no support, and fled to Scotland after his failed attempt to capture Westmorland. His estates were subsequently forfeited to the crown, and Ralph, earl of Westmorland, as a reward for his quelling of the 1405 rebellion without significant bloodshed, received a large grant of former Percy lands in Cumberland and Northumberland in June 1405.[10]

    After the death of Henry IV Westmorland was mainly engaged in the defence of the northern border in his capacity as Warden of the West March (1403–1414). In 1415 he decisively defeated an invading Scottish army at the Battle of Yeavering.[1] Westmorland played no part in King Henry V's French campaigns, and Tuck notes that his relationship with Henry V was not close, perhaps partly because of the involvement of Westmorland's son-in-law, Sir Thomas Grey of Heaton, in the Southampton Plot.[11] After Henry V's death, Westmorland was a member of the Council of Regency during the minority of King Henry VI.[12]

    According to Tait, Westmorland was 'no inconsiderable builder', citing his rebuilding of Sheriff Hutton Castle on a scale so magnificent that Leland saw 'no house in the north so like a princely lodging', his doubling of the entrance gateway of Raby Castle and the corresponding tower, and possibly his responsibility for the 'tall and striking tower' of Richmond parish church. On 1 November 1410 Westmorland was granted licence to found a college for a master, six clerks, six 'decayed gentlemen' and others at Staindrop, towards the completion of which he left a bequest in his will.[12] He was probably responsible for the building of Penrith castle in Cumberland c. 1412-13.[13]

    Marriages and issue

    Miniature of the Earl of Westmorland with twelve of his children by Pol de Limbourg. A second miniature (not pictured) features his second wife, Lady Joan, with the rest of his children.

    Effigy of Ralph Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland and his two wives, Staindrop Church

    Neville married firstly, Margaret Stafford (d. 9 June 1396), the eldest daughter of Hugh Stafford, 2nd Earl of Stafford, and Philippa Beauchamp, the daughter of Thomas Beauchamp, 11th Earl of Warwick, by Katherine Mortimer, the daughter of Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March.[14] They had two sons and six daughters:

    Sir John Neville (c.1387 – before 20 May 1420), who married Elizabeth Holland, fifth daughter of Thomas Holland, 2nd Earl of Kent, and Alice FitzAlan, and by her had three sons, Ralph Neville, 2nd Earl of Westmorland, John Neville, Baron Neville, and Sir Thomas Neville, and a daughter, Margaret Neville.[15]
    Sir Ralph Neville (d. 25 Feb 1458), who married, before 1411, his stepsister, Mary Ferrers, daughter of Robert Ferrers, 2nd Baron Ferrers, and Joan Beaufort.[16]
    Maud Neville (d. October 1438), who married Peter de Mauley, 5th Baron Mauley.[15]
    Alice Neville, who married firstly Sir Thomas Grey, beheaded 2 August 1415 for his part in the Southampton Plot, and secondly Sir Gilbert Lancaster.[17]
    Philippa Neville, who married, before 20 July 1399, Thomas Dacre, 6th Baron Dacre of Gilsland (d. 5 January 1458).[18]
    Elizabeth Neville, who became a nun.
    Anne Neville (b. circa 1384), who married, before 3 February 1413, Sir Gilbert Umfraville, son of Sir Thomas Umfreville (d. 12 February 1391) and Agnes Grey (d. 25 October 1420), daughter of Sir Thomas Grey of Heaton (d. before 22 October 1369). He was slain at the Battle of Baugâe in Anjou on 22 March 1421.[19]
    Margaret Neville (d. 1463/4), who married firstly, before 31 December 1413, Richard Scrope, 3rd Baron Scrope of Bolton, and secondly, William Cressener, esquire.[20]
    Neville married secondly, before 29 November 1396, at Chăateau de Beaufort, Maine-et-Loire, Anjou, Joan Beaufort, the widow of Robert Ferrers, 2nd Baron Ferrers.[21] Joan was the legitimated daughter of John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster, by his mistress and later third wife, Katherine Swynford.

    They had nine sons and five daughters:[22]

    Richard Neville, 5th Earl of Salisbury (1400–1460), married Alice Montacute, 5th Countess of Salisbury. Their son was Richard Neville, 16th Earl of Warwick (1428–1471), 'The Kingmaker'.
    Henry Neville.
    Thomas Neville.
    Cuthbert Neville.
    Robert Neville, Bishop of Salisbury and Durham.
    William Neville, 1st Earl of Kent.
    John Neville.
    George Neville, 1st Baron Latimer.
    Edward Neville, 3rd Baron Bergavenny.
    Joan Neville, who became a nun.
    Katherine Neville, married firstly, on 12 January 1411 to John Mowbray, 2nd Duke of Norfolk, secondly to Sir Thomas Strangways, thirdly to John Beaumont, 1st Viscount Beaumont, fourthly to Sir John Woodville (d. 12 August 1469).
    Eleanor Neville (1398–1472), married firstly to Richard le Despencer, 4th Baron Burghersh, secondly to Henry Percy, 2nd Earl of Northumberland.
    Anne Neville (1414–1480), married firstly to Humphrey Stafford, 1st Duke of Buckingham, secondly to Walter Blount, 1st Baron Mountjoy.
    Cecily Neville (1415–1495), married to Richard, 3rd Duke of York. She was the mother of King Edward IV and King Richard III.
    Death[edit]


    The two wives of Ralph Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland, from his monumental effigy, Staindrop Church. His first wife, left, on his right-hand side
    Westmorland died on 21 October 1425. He was buried in the choir of his collegiate church of St. Mary at Staindrop. The magnificent alabaster tomb with effigies of himself and his two wives there has been termed the finest sepulchral monument in the north of England.[1] Neither of his wives is buried with him. His first wife, Margaret Stafford, was buried at Brancepeth, Durham, while his second wife, Joan Beaufort, was buried with her mother under a carved stone canopy in the sanctuary of Lincoln Cathedral.[23]

    Westmorland was predeceased by his eldest son, Sir John Neville, and was succeeded in the title by his grandson, Ralph Neville, 2nd Earl of Westmorland.[24]

    Westmorland is portrayed in Shakespeare's Henry IV, Part 1, Henry IV, Part 2, and Henry V.

    In the opening scene of Henry IV, Part 1, Westmorland is presented historically as an ally of King Henry IV against the Percys, and in the final scenes of the play as being dispatched to the north of England by the King after the Battle of Shrewsbury to intercept the Earl of Northumberland.[25]

    In Act IV of Henry IV, Part 2, Westmorland is portrayed historically as having been principally responsible for quelling the Percy rebellion in 1405 by Archbishop Scrope almost without bloodshed by successfully parleying with the rebels on 29 May 1405 at Shipton Moor.[25]

    However in Henry V Westmorland is unhistorically alleged to have resisted the arguments made in favour of war with France by Archbishop Chichele in the Parliament which began at Leicester on 30 April 1414. Following Hall and Holinshed, Shakespeare attributes these arguments to Chichele[26] at a time when Chichele was not yet formally Archbishop, although he had been appointed by the King immediately following the death of Archbishop Arundel on 14 February 1414. Moreover, it is said that the Parliamentary rolls do not record Chichele's presence, and according to Tait the question of war with France was not discussed. In addition, Westmorland's speech urging the advantages of war against Scotland rather than France is said to be adapted from a work by the Scottish historian, John Major, who was not born until half a century after the 1414 Parliament.[12]

    The First Folio text of Henry V also unhistorically gives these lines to Westmorland on the eve of Agincourt:

    O that we now had here
    But one ten thousand of those men in England
    That do no work today. (Henry V, IV.iii)

    Westmorland was not with King Henry V on the 1415 campaign in France. On 17 April 1415 he was appointed to the Council of Regency which was to govern England under the King's brother, John of Lancaster, 1st Duke of Bedford, during the King's absence in France, with special responsibility for the Scottish Marches.[27] In the first quarto text of the play, the foregoing lines are assigned to the Earl of Warwick.[25]

    It has been claimed by Brenda James and Professor William Rubinstein that Neville's great-great-grandson Sir Henry Neville wrote the works of William Shakespeare.

    *

    NEVILLE, RALPH, sixth Baron Neville of Raby and first Earl of Westmorland (1364-1425), was the eldest son of John de Neville, fifth baron Neville of Raby [q. v.], by his first wife, Maud, daughter of Henry, lord Percy (d. 1352) [q. v.], and aunt of the first earl of Northumberland (Swallow, De Nova Villa, p. 34; Dugdale, Baronage, i. 297).

    He first saw service in the French expedition of July 1380 under the king's uncle Thomas of Woodstock, earl of Buckingham, afterwards duke of Gloucester, who knighted him (Froissart, vii. 321, ed. Lettenhove). Doubtless spending the winter with the earl in Brittany, and returning with him in the spring of 1381, Ralph Neville, towards the close of the year, presided with his cousin Henry Percy, the famous Hotspur (whose mother was a Neville), over a duel between a Scot and an Englishman (Fśdera, xi. 334–5). In 1383 or 1384 he was associated with his father in receiving payment of the final instalments of David Bruce's ransom (Dugdale, i. 297). In the autumn of 1385 (26 Oct.), after the king's invasion of Scotland, he was appointed joint governor of Carlisle with the eldest son of his relative, Lord Clifford of Skipton in Craven, and on 27 March 1386 warden of the west march with the same colleague (Doyle, Official Baronage; Fśdera, vii. 538). On the death of his father (who made him one of his executors) at Newcastle, on 17 Oct. 1388, Ralph Neville at the age of twenty-four became Baron Neville of Raby, and was summoned to parliament under that title from 6 Dec. 1389 (Wills and Inventories, Surtees Soc. i. 42; Nicolas, Historic Peerage).

    A few days afterwards the new baron was appointed, with others, to survey the border fortifications, and in the spring of the next year his command in the west march was renewed for a further term (Doyle). He was made warden for life of the royal forests north of Trent (24 May 1389), and got leave to empark his woods at Raskelf, close to York and his castle of Sheriff-Hutton. The king also gave him a charter for a weekly market at Middleham, and a yearly fair on the day of St. Alkelda, the patron saint of the church (Dugdale). In July 1389, and again in June 1390, he was employed in negotiations with Scotland (Doyle); Fśdera, vii. 672). In June 1391 he obtained a license, along with Sir Thomas Colville of the Dale and other northern gentlemen, to perform feats of arms with certain Scots (Fśdera, vii. 703). The Duke of Gloucester taking the cross in this year, commissioners, headed by Lord Neville, were appointed (4 Dec.) to perform the duties of constable of England (Doyle)). In the summers of 1393 and 1394 he was once more engaged in negotiations for peace with Scotland, and rather later (20 Richard II, 1396–1397) he got possession of the strong castle of Wark on Tweed by exchange with Sir John de Montacute [q. v.], afterwards third earl of Salisbury.

    Neville's power was great in the North country, where he, as lord of Raby and Brancepeth in the bishopric of Durham, and Middleham and Sheriff-Hutton in Yorkshire, was fully the equal, simple baron though he was, of his cousin the head of the Percies. His support was therefore worth securing by King Richard when, in 1397, he took his revenge upon the Duke of Gloucester and other lords appellant of nine years before. The lord of Raby was already closely connected with the crown and the court party by marriage alliances. He had secured for his eldest son, John, the hand of Elizabeth, daughter of the king's stepbrother, Thomas Holland, earl of Kent, who was deep in Richard's counsels, and he himself had taken for his second wife Joan Beaufort, daughter of John of Gaunt, duke of Lancaster, the king's uncle (Dugdale, i. 297; Doyle). When the Earl of Arundel, one of the leading lords appellant, was put on his trial before parliament on Friday, 21 Sept. 1397, Neville, at the command of his father-in-law Lancaster, who presided as seneschal of England, removed the accused's belt and scarlet hood (Adam of Usk, p. 13; Ann. Ricardi II, p. 214). He was no doubt acting as constable, an office of Gloucester's. The Earl of Warwick was also in his custody (Ann. Hen. IV, p. 307). In the distribution of rewards among the king's supporters on 29 Sept., Neville was made Earl of Westmorland (Rot. Parl. iii. 355). He held no land in that county, but it was the nearest county to his estates not yet titularly appropriated, and the grant of the royal honour of Penrith gave him a footing on its borders (Dugdale). He took an oath before the shrine of Edward the Confessor in Westminster Abbey on Sunday, 30 Sept., to maintain what had been done in this ‘parliamentum ferale’ (Rot. Parl. iii. 355).

    But when Richard drove his brother-in-law Henry, earl of Derby, out of the realm, and refused him possession of the Lancaster estates on John of Gaunt's death, Westmorland took sides against the king, and was one of the first to join Henry when he landed in Yorkshire in July 1399 (Adam of Usk, p. 24). He and his relative Northumberland, who had joined Henry at the same time, represented the superior lords temporal in the parliamentary deputation which on 29 Sept. received in the Tower the unfortunate Richard's renunciation of the crown, and next day he was granted for life the office of marshal of England, which had been held by the banished Duke of Norfolk (Rot. Parl. iii. 416; Fśdera, viii. 89, 115). With Northumberland he conveyed Richard's message to convocation on 7 Oct. (Ann. Hen. IV, p. 289). At Henry IV's coronation (13 Oct.) Westmorland bore the small sceptre called the virge, or rod with the dove, his younger half-brother, John Neville, lord Latimer, who was still a minor, carrying the great sceptre royal (Adam of Usk, p. 33; Taylor, Glory of Regality, p. 66) [see under Neville, John, fifth Baron of Raby]. The grant a week later (20 Oct.) of the great honour and lordship of Richmond, forfeited in the late reign by John, duke of Brittany, united his Teesdale and his Wensleydale lands into a solid block of territory, and gave him besides a vast number of manors and fees scattered over great part of England (Doyle; Rot. Parl. iii. 427). The grant, however, was only made for his life, and clearly did not carry with it the title of Earl of Richmond, which was never borne by him, and was granted during his lifetime (1414) to John, duke of Bedford, with the reversion of the castle and lands on Westmorland's death (Third Report of the Lords on the Dignity of a Peer, pp. 96 et seq.). When the earl was in London he sat in the privy council, but as a great northern magnate he was chiefly employed upon the Scottish border (Ord. Privy Council, i. 100 et seq.; Fśdera, viii. 133). In March 1401, however, he was one of the royal commissioners who concluded with the ambassadors of Rupert, king of the Romans, a marriage between Henry's eldest daughter and Rupert's son Louis (ib. pp. 176, 178), and spent the summer in London (Ord. Privy Council, i. 144, 157). But in September he was employed on another Scottish mission, and in the March following was appointed captain of Roxburgh Castle (ib. p. 168; Fśdera, viii. 251; Doyle).

    The garter vacated by the death of Edmund, duke of York, in August 1402 was bestowed upon him. In July 1403 his relatives, the Percies, revolted, and Westmorland found an opportunity of weakening the great rival house in the north. One of Hotspur's grievances was the transference of his captaincy of Roxburgh Castle to Westmorland in the previous March (Rot. Scot. ii. 161). The day after the battle of Shrewsbury, in which Hotspur was slain, Henry wrote to Westmorland and other Yorkshire magnates charging them to levy troops and intercept the Earl of Northumberland, who was marching southward (Fśdera, viii. 319). Westmorland drove the old earl back to Warkworth, and sent an urgent message to Henry, advising him to come into the north, where reports of his death were being circulated by the Percies (Ann. Hen. IV, p. 371). The king arrived at Pontefract on 3 Aug., and three days later transferred the wardenship of the west marches, which Northumberland had held since 1399, to Westmorland (Doyle). Hotspur was replaced as warden of the east march by the king's second son, John, a lad of fourteen, who must necessarily have been much under the influence of the experienced earl. On his return south, Henry directed Westmorland and his brother Lord Furnival to secure the surrender of the Percy castles (Ord. Privy Council, i. 213). But the order was more easily given than executed, and in the parliament of the following February Northumberland was pardoned by the king and publicly reconciled to Westmorland (Rot. Parl. iii. 525). Westmorland and Somerset were the only earls in the council of twenty-two whom the king was induced by the urgency of the commons to designate in parliament (1 March 1404) as his regular advisers (ib. p. 530).

    Northumberland's reconciliation was a hollow one, and in the spring of 1405 he was again in revolt. Remembering how his plans had been foiled by Westmorland two years before, he began with an attempt to get his redoubtable cousin into his power by surprise. In April or May Westmorland happened to be staying in a castle which Mr. Wylie identifies with that of Witton-le-Wear, belonging to Sir Ralph Eure. It was suddenly beset one night by Northumberland at the head of four hundred men. But Westmorland had received timely warning, and was already flown (Ann. Hen. IV p. 400). Towards the close of May the flame of rebellion had broken out at three distinct points. Northumberland was moving southwards to effect a junction with Sir John Fauconberg, Sir John Colville of the Dale, and other Cleveland connections of the Percies and Mowbrays who were in arms near Thirsk, and with the youthful Thomas Mowbray, earl marshal [q. v.], and Archbishop Scrope, who raised a large force in York and advanced northwards. One of Mowbray's grievances was that the office of marshal of England had been given to Westmorland, leaving him only the barren title. Westmorland therefore had an additional spur to prompt action against this threatening combination. Taking with him the young prince John and the forces of the marches, he threw himself by a rapid march between the two main bodies of rebels, routed the Cleveland force at Topcliffe by Thirsk, capturing their leaders, and intercepted the archbishop and Mowbray at Shipton Moor, little more than five miles north of York (Rot. Parl. iii. 604; Eulogium, iii. 405; Ann. Hen. IV, p. 405). Westmorland, finding himself the weaker in numbers, had recourse to guile. Explanations were exchanged between the two camps, and Westmorland, professing approval of the articles of grievance submitted to him by Scrope, invited the archbishop and the earl marshal to a personal conference (ib. p. 406). They met, with equal retinues, between the two camps. Westmorland again declared their demands most reasonable, and promised to use his influence with the king. They then joyfully shook hands over the understanding, and, at Westmorland's suggestion, ratified it with a friendly cup of wine. The unsuspecting archbishop was now easily induced to send and dismiss his followers with the cheerful news. As soon as they had dispersed Westmorland laid hands upon Scrope and Mowbray, and carried them off to Pontefract Castle, where he handed them over to the king a few days later. Unless the consensus of contemporary writers does injustice to Westmorland, he was guilty of a very ugly piece of treachery (ib. p. 407; Chron. ed. Giles, p. 45; Eulogium, iii. 406). Their account is not indeed free from improbabilities, and Otterbourne (i. 256) maintained that Scrope and Mowbray voluntarily surrendered. Their forces were perhaps not wholly trustworthy, and they might have been discouraged by the fate of the Cleveland knights; but the authority of Otterbourne, who wrote under Henry V, can hardly be allowed to outweigh the agreement of more strictly contemporary writers. Westmorland, at all events, had no hand in the hasty and irregular execution of the two unhappy men, for he was despatched northwards from Pontefract on 4 June to seize Northumberland's castles and lands, and his brother-in-law, Thomas Beaufort, was appointed his deputy as marshal for the trial (Fśdera, viii. 399).

    This crisis over, Westmorland returned to his usual employments as warden of the march (in which his eldest son, John, was presently associated with him), and during the rest of the reign was pretty constantly occupied in negotiations with Scotland, whose sympathy with France and reception of Northumberland were counterbalanced by the capture of the heir to the throne (Fśdera, viii. 418, 514, 520, 678, 686, 737). He had made himself one of the great props of his brother-in-law's throne. Two of his brothers—Lord Furnival, who for a time was war treasurer, and Lord Latimer—were peers, and towards the close of the reign he began to make those fortunate marriages for his numerous family by his second wife which enabled the younger branch of Neville to play so decisive a part in after years. One of the earliest of these marriages was that of his daughter Catherine in 1412 to the young John Mowbray, brother and heir of the unfortunate earl marshal who had been entrusted to his guardianship by the king (Testamenta Eboracensia, iii. 321). Shortly after Henry V's accession Westmorland must have resigned the office of marshal of England into the hands of his son-in-law, in whose family it was hereditary (Fśdera, ix. 300).

    Thanks to Shakespeare, Westmorland is best known as the cautious old statesman who is alleged to have resisted the interested incitements of Archbishop Chichele and the clergy to war with France in the parliament at Leicester in April 1414, and was chidden by Henry for expressing a de- spondent wish the night before Agincourt that they had there

    But one ten thousand of those men in England

    That do no work to-day.

    But neither episode has any good historical warrant. They are first met with in Hall (d. 1547), from whom Shakespeare got them through Holinshed (Hall, Chronicle, p. 50). Chichele was not yet archbishop at the time of the Leicester parliament; the question of war was certainly not discussed there, and the speeches ascribed to Chichele and Westmorland are obviously of later composition. Westmorland, in urging the superior advantages of war upon Scotland, if war there must be, is made to quote from the Scottish historian John Major [q. v.], who was not born until 1469. The famous ejaculation before Agincourt was not made by Westmorland, for he did not go to France with the king. He was left behind to guard the Scottish marches and assist the regent Bedford as a member of his council (Ord. Privy Council, ii. 157). Henry had also appointed him one of the executors of the will which he made (24 July) before leaving England (Fśdera, ix. 289). The author of the ‘Gesta Henrici’ (p. 47), who was with the army in France, tells us that it was Sir Walter Hungerford [q. v.] who was moved by the smallness of their numbers to long openly for ten thousand English archers. The attitude imputed to Westmorland in these anecdotes is, however, sufficiently in keeping with his advancing age and absorption in the relations of England to Scotland, and may just possibly preserve a genuine tradition of opposition on his part to the French war. In any case, he never went to France, devoting himself to his duties on the borders, and leaving the hardships and the glory of foreign service to his sons. He was one of the executors of Henry's last will, and a member of the council of regency appointed to rule in the name of his infant son (Rot. Parl. iv. 175, 399). As late as February 1424 he was engaged in his unending task of negotiating with Scotland (Ord. Privy Council, iii. 139). On 21 Oct. in the following year he died, at what, in those days, was the advanced age of sixty-two, and was buried in the choir of the Church of Staindrop, at the gates of Raby, in which he had founded three chantries in 1343 (Swallow, p. 314). His stately and finely sculptured tomb of alabaster, in spite of the injuries it has received since its removal to the west end to make way for the tombs of the Vanes, remains the finest sepulchral monument in the north of England. It has been figured by Gough in his ‘Sepulchral Monuments’ (1786), by Stothard in his ‘Monumental Effigies’ (1817), and by Surtees in his ‘History of Durham.’ It bears recumbent effigies of Westmorland and his two wives. His features, so far as they are revealed by the full armour in which he is represented, are too youthful and too regular to allow us to regard it as a portrait (Swallow, De Nova Villa, p. 311; Oman, Warwick the Kingmaker, p. 17). The skeleton of the earl, which was discovered during some excavations in the chancel, is said to have been that of a very tall man with a diseased leg ({{sc|Swallow}, p. 315).

    In his will, made at Raby, 18 Oct. 1424, besides bequests to his children and the friars, nuns, and anchorites of the dioceses of York and Durham, he left three hundred marks to complete the college of Staindrop, and a smaller sum towards the erection of bridges over the Ure, near Middleham, and the Tees at Winston, near Raby (Wills and Inventories, Surtees Soc., i. 68–74). Westmorland was, in fact, no inconsiderable builder. He rebuilt the castle of Sheriff-Hutton, twelve miles north-east of York, on the ridge between Ouse and Derwent, on a scale so magnificent that Leland saw ‘no house in the north so like a princely lodging,’ and the Neville saltire impaling the arms of England and France for his second wife may still be seen on its crumbling and neglected ruins. The church of Sheriff-Hutton has had inserted some of those curious flat-headed windows which are peculiar to the churches on the Neville manors, and they may very well be Westmorland's additions (Murray, Yorkshire, under Staindrop, Well, and Sheriff-Hutton). At Staindrop he added the chamber for the members of his new college on the north side of the choir, and the last bay of the nave in which his tomb now lies. The license to establish a college for a master or warden, six clerks, six decayed gentlemen, six poor officers, and other poor men, for whose support the advowson of the church was set aside with two messuages and twelve acres of land for their residence, was granted on 1 Nov. 1410 (Monasticon Anglicanum, vi. 1401; cf. {{sc|Swallow}, p. 314). Westmorland doubled the entrance gateway of Raby Castle, and threw forward the south-western tower, now called Joan's tower, to correspond (see Pritchett in the Reports and Journal of the British Archµological Association, 1886, 1887, 1889). He is also said to have been the builder of the tall and striking tower of Richmond parish church.

    Westmorland was twice married: first (before 1370) to Margaret, daughter of Hugh, second earl of Stafford (d. 1386); and, secondly (before 20 Feb. 1397), to Joan Beaufort, daughter of John of Gaunt, duke of Lancaster, by Catherine Swynford, and widow of Sir Robert Ferrers. She survived him, dying on 13 Nov. 1440 and being buried in Lincoln Cathedral, though her effigy is also on her husband's tomb at Staindrop. The inscription on her monument is quoted by Swallow (p. 137). Joan had some taste for literature. Thomas Hoccleve [q. v.] dedicated a volume of his works to her, and we hear of her lending the ‘Chronicles of Jerusalem’ and the ‘Voyage of Godfrey Bouillon’ to her nephew, Henry V (Fśdera, x. 317).

    The Nevilles were a prolific race, but Westmorland surpassed them all. He had no less than twenty-three children by his two wives—nine by the first, and fourteen by the second. The children of the first marriage, seven of whom were females, were thrown into the shade by the offspring of his more splendid second alliance which brought royal blood into the family. Westmorland devoted himself indefatigably to found the fortunes of his second family by a series of great matches, and a good half of the old Neville patrimony, the Yorkshire estates, was ultimately diverted to the younger branch.

    Thus the later earls of Westmorland had a landed position inferior to that of their ancestors, who were simple barons, and the real headship of the Neville house passed to the eldest son of the second family. Westmorland's children by his first wife were: (1) John, who fought in France and on the Scottish borders, and died before his father (1423); he married Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Holland, earl of Kent, and their son Ralph succeeded his grandfather as second Earl of Westmorland in 1425 (see below). (2) Ralph of Oversley, near Alcester, in Warwickshire, in right of his wife Mary (b. 1393), daughter and coheiress of Robert, baron Ferrers of Wem in Shropshire. (3) Mathilda married Peter, lord Mauley (d. 1414). (4) Philippa married Thomas, lord Dacre of Gillsland (d. 1457). (5) Alice married, first, Sir Thomas Grey of Heton; and, secondly, Sir Gilbert Lancaster. (6) Elizabeth, who became a nun in the Minories. (7) Anne, who married Sir Gilbert Umfreville of Kyme. (8) Margaret, who married, first, Richard, lord le Scrope of Bolton in Wensleydale (d. 1420), and, secondly, William Cressener, dying in 1463; and (9) Anastasia.

    By his second wife Neville had nine sons and five daughters: (1) Richard Neville, earl of Salisbury [q. v.] (2) William, baron Fauconberg [q. v.] (3) George, summoned to parliament as Baron Latimer, 1432-69, his father having transferred to him that barony which he had bought from his childless half-brother John, who inherited it from his mother [see under Neville, John, d. 1388)]. George Neville's male descendants held the barony of Latimer till 1577, when it fell into abeyance [see Neville, John, third Baron Latimer]. (5) Robert [q. v.], bishop successively of Salisbury and Durham. (6) Edward, baron of Bergavenny [q. v.] (7–9) Three sons who died young. (10) Joan, a nun. (11) Catherine, married, first, John Mowbray, second duke of Norfolk [q. v.]; secondly, Thomas Strangways; thirdly, Viscount Beaumont (d. 1460); and, fourthly, John Wydeville, brother-in-law of Edward IV. (12) Anne, married, first, Humphrey, first duke of Buckingham (d. 1460) [q. v.]; and, secondly, Walter Blount, first baron Mountjoy (d. 1474). (13) Eleanor, married, first, Richard, lord le Despenser (d. 1414); and, secondly, Henry Percy, second earl of Northumberland (d. 1455). (14) Cicely, who married Richard Plantagenet, duke of York, and was mother of Edward IV.

    Ralph Neville, second Earl of Westmorland (d. 1484), son of John, the eldest son of the first earl by his first wife, married a daughter of Hotspur, and left active Lancastrian partisanship to his younger brothers. He died in 1484. His only son having perished at the battle of St. Albans in 1455, he was succeeded as third Earl of Westmorland by his nephew, Ralph (1456–1523), son of his brother John. This John Neville was a zealous Lancastrian. He took a prominent part in the struggle with the younger branch of the Nevilles for the Yorkshire lands of the first Earl of Westmorland, was summoned to parliament as Lord Neville after the Yorkist collapse in 1459, and was rewarded for his services at Wakefield in December 1460 with the custody of the Yorkshire castles of his uncle and enemy, Salisbury, who was slain there (see under Richard Neville, Earl of Salisbury;Nicolas, Historic Peerage, p. 345; Chron. ed. Davies, p. 106). A Yorkist chronicler accuses him of treacherously getting York's permission to raise troops, which he then used against him (ib.) A few months later he was slain at Towton (30 March 1461). When his son Ralph became third Earl of Westmorland, the barony of Neville merged in the earldom of Westmorland, which came to an end with the attainder of Charles Neville, sixth earl [q. v.], in 1571.

    [Rotuli Parliamentorum; Proceedings and Ordinances of the Privy Council, ed. Nicolas; Rymer's Fśdera, original edition; Lords' Report on the Dignity of a Peer; Adam of Usk. ed. Maunde Thompson; Annales Ricardi II et Hen- rici IV with Trokelowe in Rolls Ser.; Gesta Henrici V, ed. Williams for English Historical Society; Otterbourne's Chronicle, ed. Hearne; Testamenta Eboracensia and Wills and Inventories, published by the Surtees Soc.; Hall's Chronicle, ed. Ellis; Dugdale's Baronage and Monasticon Anglicanum, ed. Caley, Ellis, and Bandinel; Rowland's Account of the Noble Family of Nevill, 1830; Swallow, De Nova Villa, 1885; Nicolas's Historic Peerage, ed. Courthope; Wylie's Hist. of Henry IV; Ramsay's Lancaster and York; other authorities in the text.]

    *

    Westmorland was twice married: first (before 1370) to Margaret, daughter of Hugh, second earl of Stafford (d. 1386); and, secondly (before 20 Feb. 1397), to Joan Beaufort, daughter of John of Gaunt, duke of Lancaster, by Catherine Swynford, and widow of Sir Robert Ferrers. She survived him, dying on 13 Nov. 1440 and being buried in Lincoln Cathedral, though her effigy is also on her husband's tomb at Staindrop.

    The inscription on her monument is quoted by Swallow (p. 137). Joan had some taste for literature. Thomas Hoccleve [q. v.] dedicated a volume of his works to her, and we hear of her lending the 'Chronicles of Jerusalem' and the 'Voyage of Godfrey Bouillon' to her nephew, Henry V (Fśdera, x. 317).

    *

    Buried:
    Images of St. Mary's ... https://www.google.com/search?q=staindrop+church&rlz=1C1KMZB_enUS591US591&espv=2&biw=1440&bih=815&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjzxuiz6Z_LAhUKPCYKHQf1AA4QsAQIOA

    Died:
    Images and history of Raby Castle, Staindrop, Durham, England ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raby_Castle

    Ralph married Margaret Stafford, Countess of Westmorland Abt 1382, Chateau Beaufort, Meurthe-et-Moselle, France. Margaret (daughter of Hugh Stafford, Knight, 2nd Earl of Stafford and Philippa Beauchamp) was born Abt 1364, Stafford Castle, Stafford, Staffordshire, England; died 9 Jun 1396, Castle Raby, Raby-Keverstone, Durham, England. [Group Sheet]


  14. 223.  Margaret Stafford, Countess of Westmorland was born Abt 1364, Stafford Castle, Stafford, Staffordshire, England (daughter of Hugh Stafford, Knight, 2nd Earl of Stafford and Philippa Beauchamp); died 9 Jun 1396, Castle Raby, Raby-Keverstone, Durham, England.
    Children:
    1. 111. Philippa Neville, Baroness Dacre was born 0___ 1386, Castle Raby, Raby-Keverstone, Durham, England; died 0___ 1453.
    2. John Neville, II, Knight was born Abt 1387, Castle Raby, Raby-Keverstone, Durham, England; died Bef 20 Mar 1420, (Castle Raby, Raby-Keverstone, Durham, England).
    3. Anne Neville
    4. Ralph Neville died 25 Feb 1458.
    5. Margaret Neville was born 1396, Raby, Durham, England; died ~ 4 Mar 1463.