Thomas Soothill

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Generation: 1

  1. 1.  Thomas Soothill (son of John Sothill, Knight and Elizabeth Plumpton).

    Thomas — Alice Nevill. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. Elizabeth Soothill

Generation: 2

  1. 2.  John Sothill, Knight was born Abt 1440, Stockfaston, Leicestershire, England; died 7 Oct 1494, Stockfaston, Leicestershire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alt Death: Bef 1495, Stockfaston, Leicestershire, England

    Notes:

    John's ahnentafel (no sources) ...http://www.wikitree.com/genealogy/Sothill-Family-Tree-6

    John married Elizabeth Plumpton Abt 1475. Elizabeth (daughter of William Plumpton and Elizabeth Clifford) was born Abt 1453, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England; died 21 Sep 1507, (Stockfaston, Leicestershire, England). [Group Sheet]


  2. 3.  Elizabeth Plumpton was born Abt 1453, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England (daughter of William Plumpton and Elizabeth Clifford); died 21 Sep 1507, (Stockfaston, Leicestershire, England).
    Children:
    1. Christina Sothill was born 0___ 1465, Stockfaston, Leicestershire, England; died 8 Apr 1540; was buried Grey Friars Church, London, Middlesex, England.
    2. Barbara Sothill was born ~ 1474, Everingham, Yorkshire, England; died 14 Sep 1545; was buried Drax Priory, Everingham, Yorkshire, England.
    3. 1. Thomas Soothill


Generation: 3

  1. 6.  William Plumpton was born 28 Feb 1435, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England (son of William Plumpton and Elizabeth Stapleton); died 29 Mar 1461, Battle of Towton, Ferrybridge, Yorkshire, England.

    William married Elizabeth Clifford 0___ 1453. Elizabeth (daughter of Thomas Clifford, 8th Baron de Clifford and Joan Dacre, Baroness Clifford) was born Cal 1441, (Conisborough Castle, Doncaster, England); died Aft 1479. [Group Sheet]


  2. 7.  Elizabeth Clifford was born Cal 1441, (Conisborough Castle, Doncaster, England) (daughter of Thomas Clifford, 8th Baron de Clifford and Joan Dacre, Baroness Clifford); died Aft 1479.
    Children:
    1. 3. Elizabeth Plumpton was born Abt 1453, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England; died 21 Sep 1507, (Stockfaston, Leicestershire, England).


Generation: 4

  1. 12.  William Plumpton was born 0___ 1404, (Plumpton Hall, Yorkshire) England (son of Robert Plumpton, Knight and Alice Foljambe); died 15 Oct 1480.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Seneschal of Knaresborough Castle
    • Military: French War 1427-1430
    • Military: War of the Roses
    • Occupation: 0___ 1447; High Sheriff of Yorkshire
    • Occupation: 0___ 1453; High Sheriff of Derbyshire

    Notes:

    Sir William Plumpton (1404 - 15 October 1480) was a 15th-century English aristocrat, landowner and administrator.

    He was the grandson of Sir William Plumpton executed in 1405 for treason by Henry IV and the son of Sir Robert Plumpton of Plumpton Hall, Yorkshire. On the death of his father in 1421 he became the ward of Henry Percy, 2nd Earl of Northumberland.

    He served in the French war 1427-30 and was knighted. On his return to England he was appointed by Northumberland as Seneschal of Knaresborough Castle and Steward of Northumberland's Spofforth estates.

    Plumpton's own estates included Plumpton Hall, Yorkshire, Mansfield Woodhouse, Nottinghamshire and Hassop Hall, Derbyshire. He represented Nottinghamshire in the Parliament of 1436. He served as High Sheriff of Yorkshire in 1447 and High Sheriff of Derbyshire in 1453.

    During the War of the Roses he fought on the Lancastrian side at the Battle of Towton in 1461, where his son William and his benefactor Henry Percy, 3rd Earl of Northumberland were slain. Plumpton was captured but later was pardoned by Edward IV and regained his offices in 1471.

    He married firstly in 1430, Elizabeth Stapleton of Carlton, Yorkshire and secondly in 1451 Joan Winteringham. He is a part-of the Worsley Family Tree.

    References

    This article includes a list of references, related reading or external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks inline citations. Please improve this article by introducing more precise citations. (April 2012)

    Oxford Dictionary of National Biography Keith Dockray 2004
    The Plumpton Letters and Papers Joan Kirby 1996. Google Books.

    William married Elizabeth Stapleton 0___ 1430, (Yorkshire) England. Elizabeth (daughter of Bryan Stapleton, Knight and Cecily Bardolf) was born 0___ 1406, Cartlon, Yorkshire, England; died ~ 1451, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 13.  Elizabeth Stapleton was born 0___ 1406, Cartlon, Yorkshire, England (daughter of Bryan Stapleton, Knight and Cecily Bardolf); died ~ 1451, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England.
    Children:
    1. 6. William Plumpton was born 28 Feb 1435, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England; died 29 Mar 1461, Battle of Towton, Ferrybridge, Yorkshire, England.

  3. 14.  Thomas Clifford, 8th Baron de CliffordThomas Clifford, 8th Baron de Clifford was born 25 Mar 1414, Cumbria, England (son of John Clifford, Knight, 7th Baron Clifford and Elizabeth Percy); died 22 May 1455, First Battle of St. Albans, Hertfordshire, England; was buried St. Albans Abbey, St. Albans, Hertfordshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: High Sheriff of Westmorland
    • Also Known As: 8th Lord of Skipton

    Notes:

    Thomas Clifford, 8th Baron de Clifford, also 8th Lord of Skipton (25 March 1414 – 22 May 1455), was the elder son of John, 7th Baron de Clifford, and Elizabeth Percy, daughter of Henry "Hotspur" Percy and Elizabeth Mortimer.

    Family

    Thomas Clifford was born 25 March 1414, the elder son and heir of John, Lord de Clifford by Elizabeth Percy, daughter of Henry 'Hotspur' Percy and Elizabeth Mortimer, daughter of Edmund Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March. He had a younger brother, Henry Clifford,[1] and two sisters, Mary and Blanche.[2] [3] The Clifford family was seated at Skipton from 1310 to 1676.

    Career

    Clifford inherited the barony and the title of High Sheriff of Westmorland at the age of seven upon his father's death at the Siege of Meaux on 13 March 1422.[2][3] He made proof of age in 1435/6.[2]

    In 1435 Clifford campaigned with the Duke of Bedford in France, and about 1439 led the English forces which defended Pontoise against Charles VII of France.[4] In 1450/51 he was sent as an embassy for King James III of Scotland.[2]

    Clifford was slain fighting on the Lancastrian side at the First Battle of St Albans on 22 May 1455, the first battle in the Wars of the Roses, and was buried at St Alban's Abbey.[4] He was succeeded by his elder son, John, 9th Baron de Clifford.

    Marriage and issue

    After March 1424 Clifford married Joan Dacre, the daughter of Thomas, 6th Baron Dacre of Gilsland, by Philippa, daughter of Ralph Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland, by whom he had four sons and five daughters:[5]

    John Clifford, 9th Baron de Clifford, who married Margaret Bromflete, by whom he had two sons, Henry Clifford, 10th Baron de Clifford, and Richard Clifford, esquire, and a daughter, Elizabeth, who married Robert Aske. He was slain at Ferrybridge 24 March 1461 on the eve of the Battle of Towton.[5]

    Sir Roger Clifford, who married Joan Courtenay (born c.1447), the eldest daughter of Thomas Courtenay, 13th Earl of Devon, by Margaret Beaufort, the daughter of John Beaufort, 1st Earl of Somerset. Sir Roger Clifford was beheaded in 1485, and his widow married secondly, Sir William Knyvet of Buckenham, Norfolk.[4][6]

    Sir Robert Clifford (d. 15 March 1508), who married Elizabeth (nâee Barley), widow of Sir Ralph Jocelyn (d. October 25, 1478), twice Lord Mayor of London, and daughter of William Barley of Aspenden, Hertfordshire by Elizabeth Darcy. Both

    Sir Robert Clifford and his father-in-law, William Barley, were supporters of the pretender to the Crown, Perkin Warbeck.[4][7][8]

    Sir Thomas Clifford.

    Elizabeth Clifford, who married firstly, Sir William Plumpton of Knaresborough, Yorkshire,[9] slain at the Battle of Towton, and secondly, John Hamerton.[4][10]

    Maud Clifford, who married firstly Sir John Harrington of Hornby, Lancashire, slain at the Battle of Wakefield in 1460, and secondly, Sir Edmund Sutton of Dudley, Staffordshire.[4][11]

    Anne Clifford, who married firstly, Sir Richard Tempest, and secondly, William Conyers, esquire.[4]

    Joan Clifford, who married Sir Simon Musgrave.[4]

    Margaret Clifford, who married Robert Carre ( 12 April 1467) [4]

    Shakespeare and Thomas Clifford

    According to Shakespeare's, Henry VI, Part 3 following Hall's Chronicle and Holinshed's Chronicles, it was Thomas Clifford's son and heir, John Clifford, 9th Baron de Clifford, who slew, in cold blood after the Battle of Wakefield, the young Edmund, Earl of Rutland, son of Richard, 3rd Duke of York, cutting off his head and sending it crowned with paper to Henry VI's wife, Margaret of Anjou, although later authorities state that Lord Rutland had been slain during the battle.[2]

    Thomas married Joan Dacre, Baroness Clifford 0___ 1424. Joan (daughter of Thomas Dacre, 6th Baron Dacre of Gilsland and Philippa Neville, Baroness Dacre) was born Naworth Castle, Brampton, Cumberland, England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 15.  Joan Dacre, Baroness Clifford was born Naworth Castle, Brampton, Cumberland, England (daughter of Thomas Dacre, 6th Baron Dacre of Gilsland and Philippa Neville, Baroness Dacre).

    Notes:

    Birth:
    Naworth Castle, also known as, or recorded in historical documents as "Naward", is a castle in Cumbria, England, near the town of Brampton. It is adjacent to the A69 about two miles east of Brampton. It is on the opposite side of the River Irthing to, and just within sight of, Lanercost Priory. It was the seat of the Barons Dacre and is now that of their cognatic descendants, the Earls of Carlisle. It is a grade I listed building.

    Children:
    1. John Clifford, 9th Baron Clifford was born 8 Apr 1435, Conisborough Castle, Doncaster, England; died 28 Mar 1461, Battle of Ferrybridge, Yorkshire, England.
    2. 7. Elizabeth Clifford was born Cal 1441, (Conisborough Castle, Doncaster, England); died Aft 1479.


Generation: 5

  1. 24.  Robert Plumpton, Knight was born ~ 1381, Plumpton Hall, Yorkshire, England (son of William Plumpton, Knight and Alice of Gisburn); died 8 Dec 1421, Spofforth, Yorkshire, England.

    Notes:

    Father of Margaret, William, Robert, Alice, Elizabeth, Millicent, and Geoffrey

    Brother of Thomas, Isabella, Bryan, Katherine, Jane, George, William, and Richard

    Robert PLUMPTON

    Born: 1383 - Of, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England
    Marr: 16 Jan 1392/1393 - Of Tidewell, Yorkshire, England
    Died: 8 Dec 1421 -
    Father: William PLUMPTON, [SIR KNIGHT]

    Mother: Alice GISBURN

    Other Spouses: Alice REMSTON

    Wife
    Alice FOLJAMBE

    Born: 1386 - Of, Hassop, Derbyshire, England
    Died: 1416 - Spofforth, Yorkshire, England
    Father: Godfrey FOLJAMBE

    Mother: Isabel LEEKE

    Other Spouses:

    Children
    1. William PLUMPTON, [SIR KNIGHT]

    Born: 7 Oct 1404 - Of, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England
    Marr: 1451 - Joan WINTRINGHAM (other spouses)
    Died: 15 Oct 1480 - 2. Geoffrey (Godfrey) De PLUMPTON
    Born: ABT 1406 - Of, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England
    Marr: 1436 - Alice WINTRINGHAM
    Died: BEF 1486 - 3. Margaret PLUMPTON
    Born: ABT 1408 - Of, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England
    Marr: 1428 - Randolph PIGOT
    Died: - 4. Robert PLUMPTON
    Born: ABT 1410 - Of, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England
    Died: - 5. Alice PLUMPTON
    Born: ABT 1412 - Of, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England
    Marr: - John GRENE
    Died: - 6. Elizabeth PLUMPTON
    Born: ABT 1414 - Of, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England
    Died: - 7. Millicent PLUMPTON
    Born: ABT 1416 - Of, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England
    Died: -
    http://www.boydhouse.com/Darryl_data/gp1256.html

    ID: I03693

    Name: Robert Plumpton 1

    Sex: M

    Title: Sir

    Birth: 1383

    Death: 8 DEC 1421

    Note: "Sir Robert was knighted before January 15, 1410/11 and represented Yorkshire in Parliament which met November 3, 1411. He was Seneschal of the Honour of Knaresborough, one of the council of the King of his Ducy of Lancaster, and in 1315, was chosen to serve the Duke of Bedford for life. In 1416, he was Steward of Knaresborough Forest and Seneschal of the Honour of Knares borough. In 1419, he went to war in France and was slain there on Dec. 8, 1421, buried Plumpton Quire in Spofforth Church."

    Father: William Plumpton b: 1362

    Mother: Alice Gisburn

    Marriage 1 Alice Foljambe

    Children

    William Plumpton b: BET 7 AND 14 OCT 1404
    Godfrey Plumpton
    Robert Plumpton
    Joan Plumpton
    Alice Plumpton
    Sources:

    Title: Coat of Arms Sutliff, Sutliffe, or Sutcliffe

    Author: Compilation: Samuel Milton Sutliff, Jr. (1909); Donald D. Sutliff; Bennett Hurd Sutliff

    Publication: 1995

    Note: Not clear who published the final manuscript.

    Note: A monumental work.

    Repository:

    Note: Donald D. Sutliff, 605 SE 98th Ave., Vancouver, WA 98664 Phone 1-360-892-0949

    Media: Book

    Page: 36

    Son of Sir William Plumpton, Kt. and Alice Plumpton
    Husband of Alice Foljambe
    Father of Sir William Plumpton, I, Kt.; Geoffrey (Godfrey) Plumpton; Margaret Pigot; Robert Plumpton; Alice Plumpton and 2 others
    Brother of Jane (de Plumpton) Mallory; Thomas Plumpton; Richard Plumpton; Rev. George Plumpton; Bryan Plumpton and 3 others
    Half brother of Jane Mallory, Lady

    Robert married Alice Foljambe 16 Jan 1393, Tideswell, Derbyshire, England. Alice (daughter of Godfrey Foljambe, V, Knight and Isabel Leeke) was born ~ 1386, Hassop, Derbyshire, England; died 0___ 1416, Spofforth, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 25.  Alice Foljambe was born ~ 1386, Hassop, Derbyshire, England (daughter of Godfrey Foljambe, V, Knight and Isabel Leeke); died 0___ 1416, Spofforth, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alt Death: 0___ 1413

    Notes:

    DO NOT CONFUSE WITH ALICE GISBURNE, HER MOTHER-IN-LAW!

    Alt death year: 1413

    http://www.medievalgenealogy.org.uk/families/foljambe/foljambe.shtml

    Mother of Margaret, William, Robert, Alice, Elizabeth, Millicent, and Geoffrey.

    View All
    Immediate Family
    Photo ViewAdd Family
    Showing 12 people
    Daughter of Godfrey Foljambe, V and Isabel Foljambe
    Wife of Sir Robert Plumpton, Kt.
    Mother of Sir William Plumpton, I, Kt.; Geoffrey (Godfrey) Plumpton; Margaret Pigot; Robert Plumpton; Alice Plumpton and 2 others
    Half sister of Humphrey (Esq) Hercye, Esq

    Children:
    1. 12. William Plumpton was born 0___ 1404, (Plumpton Hall, Yorkshire) England; died 15 Oct 1480.

  3. 26.  Bryan Stapleton, Knight was born 0___ 1379, Ingham, Norfolk, England (son of Miles Stapleton, III, Knight and Ela de Ufford); died 17 Aug 1438, Ingham, Norfolk, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Sir Brian Stapleton

    Notes:

    About Sir Bryan:

    History:

    https://books.google.co.za/books?id=LJVZAAAAYAAJ&pg=PR91&lpg=PR91&dq=Bryan+of+ingham+Stapleton,+Knight&source=bl&ots=RBctqN3lsa&sig=0KvNfVcAhlGOC1EEwbOROT9tsX8&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwifv7-R4abJAhXDvBQKHY7gAIgQ6AEIQDAI#v=onepage&q=Bryan%20of%20ingham%20Stapleton%2C%20Knight&f=false

    https://books.google.co.za/books?id=X8UujEDqn9oC&pg=PA964&lpg=PA964&dq=Bryan+of+ingham+Stapleton,+Knight&source=bl&ots=5R-l8sbdfq&sig=M3HexDWPlPU9sQMYmMID9weJn9c&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwifv7-R4abJAhXDvBQKHY7gAIgQ6AEIPTAH#v=onepage&q=Bryan%20of%20ingham%20Stapleton%2C%20Knight&f=false

    http://www.knight-france.com/geneal/names/4451.htm

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miles_Stapleton

    Immediate Family

    Son of Sir Miles de Stapleton of Ingham and Ela Stapleton
    Husband of Cecily / Cecilia / Celia Stapleton
    Father of Anna Stapelton; Sir John Stapleton; Elizabeth Plumpton; Sir Miles Stapleton IV, Knight, Lord of Ingham and Brian II, Esq Stapleton
    Brother of Ela de Braose and Edmund Stapleton

    end

    Birth:
    Ingham is a small village and civil parish in the English county of Norfolk. It lies close to the village of Stalham, and is about 2 miles from Sea Palling on the North Sea coast.[1]

    The civil parish has an area of 6.13 km2 (2.37 sq mi) and in the 2001 census had a population of 376 in 153 households, falling slightly to 374 at the 2011 census.[2] For the purposes of local government, the parish falls within the district of North Norfolk.[3]

    There are the remains of a priory and the Ingham Poor's Allotment.

    Ingham is mentioned in the Domesday Book of 1086 as the village of Hincham[4] in the hundred of Happing.[5] Possible etymologies are "homestead or village of [a man called] Inga" or "home of the Inguiones" (an ancient Germanic tribe).

    The Lordship of Ingham was possessed at a very early date by the Ingham family. An Oliver de Ingham was living in 1183 and a John de Ingham is known to have been Lord in the reign of Richard I. The great grandson of John, the distinguished Oliver Ingham lived here and his son-in-law Miles Stapleton of Bedale, Yorkshire, inherited jure uxoris.[6]

    Ingham Old Hall has its origins in the medieval times having been built circa 1320.[7] In the fourteenth century the Hall was inhabited by the local Lord of the Manor, Sir Miles Stapleton, whose tomb stands in Ingham’s Holy Trinity church alongside that of his father in law, Sir Oliver de Ingham.

    Map & history of Ingham ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ingham,_Norfolk

    Bryan — Cecily Bardolf. Cecily (daughter of William Bardolf, Knight, 3rd & 4th Baron Damory and Agnes de Poynings, Vicountess of Wormegay) was born Abt 1371, Birling, Sussex, England; died 29 Sep 1432, Bedale, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 27.  Cecily Bardolf was born Abt 1371, Birling, Sussex, England (daughter of William Bardolf, Knight, 3rd & 4th Baron Damory and Agnes de Poynings, Vicountess of Wormegay); died 29 Sep 1432, Bedale, Yorkshire, England.

    Notes:

    Biography

    Cecilia Bardolf

    Cecily Bardolf, daughter of William Bardolf, Knt., 4th Lord Bardolf, by Agnes, daughter of Michael de Poynings, Knt., 1st Lord Poynings[1] married Brian Stapleton, Knt., de jure Lord Ingram, of Ingram, Norfolk..., etc., Sheriff of Nofolk and Suffolk, 1424-6, Knight of the Shire for Yorkshire, 1436-7, son and heir, born about 1379 (aged 40 in 1419). They had two sons (Miles, Knt., and Brian, Esq.) and one daughter (Anne, married Thomas Hethe and Wlater Trumpington, Knt.). Cecily died September 29, 1432. Sir Brian Stapleton died August 7, 1438. He and his wife Cecily were buried in the chancel of the church at Ingham, Norfolk.[2]

    Born 1371, Birling, Sussex,England[citation needed]
    circa 1380, "of Wormegay, Caister, Cantley, & Strumpshaw, Norfolk, England"[3]
    Parents: Sir William Bardolf, 4th Lord Bardolph of Wormgay (b. 21 Oct 1349, d. 29 Jan 1386) and Agnes Poynings (d. 12 Jun 1403)[3][2]
    Husband: Sir Brian Stapleton,[4] Sheriff of Norfolk & Suffolk, Lord Ingham (b. c1379, d. 7 Aug 1438), son of Sir Miles Stapleton and Ela Ufford[3]
    married c1406,[3] before 1409[citation needed]

    Children

    Sir Myles Stapleton, Sheriff of Norfolk & Suffolk, Lord Ingham (b. c1408, d. 1 Oct 1466)[3]
    Anne Stapleton, married (1) Thomas Hethe, (2) Sir Walter Trumpington[3]
    Brian Stapleton, Esq. (b. c1410, d. between 1462 and 1467)[3]
    Death 29 September 1432,[3] Bedale, North Ride,Yorkshire, England[citation needed]
    buried in the chancel at Ingham Priory, Norfolk.[3]
    Sources

    ? "see Bardolf 14 (#Richardson)
    ? 2.0 2.1 Royal Ancestry Vol V, pp 35-36 STAPLETON #12
    ? 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 3.7 3.8 Lewis:
    Cecily Bardolf, "Our Royal, Titled, Noble, and Commoner Ancestors and Cousins" (website, compiled by Mr. Marlyn Lewis, Portland, OR; accessed October 12, 2015), citing
    "Unknown author, The Complete Peerage, by Cokayne, Vol. VII, p. 64; Plantagenet Ancestry of 17th Century Colonists, by David Faris, p. 9. in unknown series (n.p.: n.pub., unknown publish date)."
    Richardson's Magna Carta Ancestry, Plantagenet Ancestry, and Royal Ancestry (MCA Vol. I, pp 109, 498; Vol. III, p. 438; PA p. 57; RA Vol. I, pp 103-104, 253-254, 260; Vol. IV, p. 476; Vol. V, pp 35-36)
    ? Royal Ancestry Vol IV, p 478 RICHERS
    Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 5 vols., ed. Kimball G. Everingham, (Salt Lake City, Utah: the author, 2013)
    See also:
    Ancestral File Number: HRKC-6D
    Memoirs of Chesters of Chicheley RJCW Ref 175a

    Children:
    1. John Stapleton was born ~ 1399, Bedale, Yorkshire, England; died 9 Jun 1455, Yorkshire, England; was buried Convent Church, Yorkshire, England.
    2. 13. Elizabeth Stapleton was born 0___ 1406, Cartlon, Yorkshire, England; died ~ 1451, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England.

  5. 28.  John Clifford, Knight, 7th Baron CliffordJohn Clifford, Knight, 7th Baron Clifford was born 1388-1389, Appleby, Westmorland, England; was christened 23 Apr 1389 (son of Thomas Clifford, Knight, 6th Baron de Clifford and Elizabeth de Ros); died 13 Mar 1422, Meaux, Seine-et-Marne, France; was buried Friars Minor, Ipswich, Suffolk, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: High Sheriff of Westmorland
    • Residence: Azincourt, Pas-de-Calais, France
    • Also Known As: 7th Lord of Skipton
    • Military: 18 Aug 1415; Siege of Harfleur
    • Military: 25 Oct 1415; Battle of Agincourt

    Notes:

    John Clifford, 7th Baron de Clifford (c.1389 - 13 March 1422), also 7th Lord of Skipton,[citation needed] KG, was an English peer. He was slain at the siege of Meaux.

    Family

    John Clifford, born about 1389, was the only son of Thomas Clifford, 6th Baron Clifford (d. 18 August 1391), and Elizabeth de Roos (d. March 1424), daughter of Thomas de Roos, 4th Baron Roos of Helmsley, by Beatrix Stafford, daughter of Ralph de Stafford, 1st Earl of Stafford.[1] He had a sister, Maud Clifford, who marred firstly, John Neville, 6th Baron Latimer, and secondly, Richard, 3rd Earl of Cambridge.[2]

    Career

    At his father's death on 18 August 1391, Clifford, then aged about three, inherited the title and the position of hereditary High Sheriff of Westmorland. He was summoned to Parliament from 21 September 1411 to 26 February 1421.[3]

    He took part in a great tournament at Carlisle between six English and six Scottish knights, and in the war in France.[3] He was at the Siege of Harfleur and at the Battle of Agincourt, where he was indented to serve Henry V with 3 archers.[4] He accepted the surrender of Cherbourg.[citation needed] He was made a Knight of the Garter on 3 May 1421.[3] He was a legatee in the will of his cousin, Henry V.[2]

    He was slain at the Siege of Meaux on 13 March 1422,[3] and is said to have been buried at Bolton Priory.[2] His widow, who died 26 October 1436,[3] is buried at Staindrop, Durham.[2]

    Marriage and issue

    He married, in about 1404, Elizabeth Percy, the daughter of Henry "Hotspur" Percy and Elizabeth Mortimer, daughter of Edmund Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March,[3] by whom he had two sons and two daughters:[5][6]

    Thomas Clifford, 8th Baron de Clifford, who married Joan Dacre, daughter of Thomas Dacre, 6th Baron Dacre, by Philippa de Neville, daughter of Ralph Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland.[5][7]
    Henry Clifford.[2][8]
    Mary Clifford, who married Sir Philip Wentworth (c.1424 – 18 May 1464) of Nettlestead, Suffolk, beheaded at Middleham, Yorkshire, after the Battle of Hexham, by whom she had a son and two daughters.[5][9]
    Blanche (or Beatrix) Clifford, who married Sir Robert Waterton (d. 10 December 1475), son of the Lancastrian retainer, Robert Waterton (d. 17 January 1425). There were no issue of the marriage.[2][10][11]
    After Clifford's death, his widow married secondly, in 1426, Ralph Neville, 2nd Earl of Westmorland (d. 3 November 1484),[3] by whom she had a son, Sir John Neville, who married Anne Holland, daughter of John Holland, 2nd Duke of Exeter.[12][13]

    Notes

    Jump up ^ Richardson I 2011, pp. 506–7.
    ^ Jump up to: a b c d e f Richardson I 2011, p. 507.
    ^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g Cokayne 1913, p. 293.
    Jump up ^ Joseph Hunter (1850). Agincourt: a contribution towards an authentic list of the commanders of the English host in King Henry the Fifth's expedition to France, in the third year of his reign. Cowen Tracts: Newcastle University. Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/60201871
    ^ Jump up to: a b c Richardson I 2011, pp. 507-8.
    Jump up ^ Richardson III 2011, p. 341.
    Jump up ^ Summerson 2004.
    Jump up ^ Cokayne states that Thomas was the only son of John Clifford, 7th Baron Clifford.
    Jump up ^ Richardson III 2011, p. 236.
    Jump up ^ Whitehead 2004.
    Jump up ^ Ellis & Tomlinson 1882, p. 421.
    Jump up ^ Richardson III 2011, pp. 250-1.
    Jump up ^ Pollard 2004.

    References

    Cokayne, George Edward (1913). The Complete Peerage, edited by H.A. Doubleday III. London: St. Catherine Press. p. 293.
    Ellis, Alfred Shelley; Tomlinson, George William, eds. (1882). "The Yorkshire Archaeological and Topographical Journal" VII. London: Bradbury, Agnew and Co.: 401–428. Retrieved 13 October 2013.
    Pollard, A.J. (2004). "Neville, Ralph, second earl of Westmorland (b. in or before 1407, d. 1484)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/19952. (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
    Richardson, Douglas (2011). Everingham, Kimball G., ed. Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families I (2nd ed.). Salt Lake City. ISBN 1449966373.
    Richardson, Douglas (2011). Everingham, Kimball G., ed. Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families III (2nd ed.). Salt Lake City. ISBN 144996639X.
    Summerson, Henry (2004). "Clifford, Thomas, eighth Baron Clifford (1414-1455)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/5663. (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
    Walker, Simon (2004). "Percy, Sir Henry (1364–1403)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/21931. (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
    Whitehead, J.R. (2004). "Waterton, Robert (d.1425)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/54421. (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)

    Further reading[edit]

    Blore, Thomas (1811). The History and Antiquities of the County of Rutland. Stanford: R. Newcomb.

    Military:
    The siege of Harfleur, Normandy, France, was a military action which occurred during the Hundred Years' War. It began on 18 August 1415 and ended on 22 September, when the French port of Harfleur surrendered to the English.

    Military:
    The Battle of Agincourt (Azincourt in French) was a major English victory in the Hundred Years' War.[a] The battle took place on Friday, 25 October 1415 (Saint Crispin's Day), near Azincourt, in northern France.[5][b] Henry V's victory at Agincourt, against a numerically superior French army, crippled France and started a new period in the war during which Henry V married the French king's daughter, and their son, later Henry VI of England and Henry II of France, was made heir to the throne of France as well as of England. English speakers found it easier to pronounce "Agincourt" with a "g" instead of the original "z". For all historians in the non-English speaking world, the battle is referred to with the toponymy of Azincourt, whereas English-only speaking historians kept the modified spelling of Agincourt.

    Henry V led his troops into battle and participated in hand-to-hand fighting. The French king of the time, Charles VI, did not command the French army himself as he suffered from severe psychotic illnesses with moderate mental incapacitation. Instead, the French were commanded by Constable Charles d'Albret and various prominent French noblemen of the Armagnac party.

    This battle is notable for the use of the English longbow in very large numbers, with English and Welsh archers forming most of Henry's army. The battle is the centrepiece of the play Henry V by William Shakespeare.

    more ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Agincourt

    Died:
    The Siege of Meaux was fought in 1422 between the English, under Henry V, and the French during the Hundred Years' War. The town's defence was led by the Bastard of Vaurus, by all accounts cruel and evil, but a brave commander all the same. The siege commenced on October 6, 1421, and mining and bombardment soon brought down the walls. Casualties began to mount in the English army, including John Clifford, 7th Baron de Clifford who had been at the siege of Harfleur, the Battle of Agincourt, and received the surrender of Cherbourg.

    The English also began to fall sick rather early into the siege, and it is estimated that one sixteenth of the besiegers died from dysentery and smallpox. On 9 March 1422, the town surrendered, although the garrison held out. Under continued bombardment, the garrison gave in as well on 10 March, following a siege of 8 months. The Bastard of Vaurus was decapitated, as was a trumpeter named Orace, who had once mocked King Henry. Sir John Fortescue was then installed as English Captain of Meaux Castle.

    John married Elizabeth Percy ~ 1404. Elizabeth (daughter of Henry "Harry Hotspur" Percy, Knight, 2nd Earl of Northumberland and Elizabeth Mortimer, Countess of Percy) was born ~ 1395, Alnwick Castle, Alnwick, Northumberland, England NE66 1NQ; died 26 Oct 1437; was buried Staindrop Church, Staindrop, Durham, England. [Group Sheet]


  6. 29.  Elizabeth Percy was born ~ 1395, Alnwick Castle, Alnwick, Northumberland, England NE66 1NQ (daughter of Henry "Harry Hotspur" Percy, Knight, 2nd Earl of Northumberland and Elizabeth Mortimer, Countess of Percy); died 26 Oct 1437; was buried Staindrop Church, Staindrop, Durham, England.

    Notes:

    Lady Elizabeth Percy (c. 1395 – 26 October 1436) was the daughter of Sir Henry Percy, known to history as 'Hotspur',[1][2] and Elizabeth Mortimer, the eldest daughter of Edmund Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March, and his wife, Philippa, the only child of Lionel, 1st Duke of Clarence, and Elizabeth de Burgh, Countess of Ulster.[3] After the death of Sir Henry Percy, Elizabeth Mortimer married, sometime after 3 June 1406, Thomas de Camoys, 1st Baron Camoys, who later commanded the rearguard of the English army at the Battle of Agincourt.[4][5]

    By her mother's first marriage to Sir Henry Percy, Elizabeth Percy had one brother, Henry Percy, 2nd Earl of Northumberland (3 February 1393 – 22 May 1455), who married Eleanor Neville (died c. 1473), widow of Richard le Despenser, and daughter of Ralph Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland, by his second wife, Joan Beaufort, legitimated daughter of John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster. They had nine sons and three daughters. He was slain at the First Battle of St Albans during the Wars of the Roses.[6]

    Elizabeth Percy also had a brother of the half blood, Sir Roger Camoys, the son of her mother's second marriage to Thomas de Camoys.[4][7]

    Elizabeth Percy died 26 October 1436. She was buried at Staindrop, Durham.[8]

    Through her daughter, Mary Clifford, Elizabeth Percy was the great-great-grandmother of Jane Seymour, third wife of Henry VIII.

    Marriages and issue

    Elizabeth Percy married firstly John Clifford, 7th Baron de Clifford, slain at the Siege of Meaux on 13 March 1422, by whom she had two sons and two daughters:[9][8]

    With John Clifford
    Name
    Thomas Married Joan Dacre, daughter of Thomas Dacre, 6th Baron Dacre by Philippa de Neville, daughter of Ralph Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland.[9][10]
    Henry [11]
    Mary Married Sir Philip Wentworth (c.1424 – 18 May 1464) of Nettlestead, Suffolk, beheaded at Middleham, Yorkshire, after the Battle of Hexham, by whom she had a son and two daughters.[9][12]
    Blanche (or Beatrix) Married Sir Robert Waterton (d. 10 December 1475), son of the Lancastrian retainer, Robert Waterton (d. 17 January 1425).[11][13][14]

    With Ralph Neville

    She married secondly, in 1426, Ralph Neville, 2nd Earl of Westmorland (d. 3 November 1484), by whom she had a son, Sir John Neville.

    Name
    Sir John married Anne Holland, daughter of John Holland, 2nd Duke of Exeter.[15][16] Sir John Neville died shortly before 16 March 1450 without issue. His widow, Anne Holand, married another Sir John Neville who was the brother of Elizabeth Percy's second husband, Ralph Neville, 2nd Earl of Westmorland (d. 3 November 1484). They had an only son, Ralph, 3rd Earl of Westmorland.[15]

    Notes

    Jump up ^ Cokayne 1936, pp. 713-14.
    Jump up ^ Walker 2004.
    Jump up ^ Richardson III 2011, pp. 193-4, 341.
    ^ Jump up to: a b Cokayne 1912, p. 508.
    Jump up ^ Leland 2004.
    Jump up ^ Richardson III 2011, pp. 343–4.
    Jump up ^ Richardson I 2011, p. 399.
    ^ Jump up to: a b Richardson III 2011, p. 250.
    ^ Jump up to: a b c Richardson I 2011, pp. 507-8.
    Jump up ^ Summerson 2004.
    ^ Jump up to: a b Richardson I 2011, p. 507.
    Jump up ^ Richardson III 2011, p. 236.
    Jump up ^ Whitehead 2004.
    Jump up ^ Ellis & Tomlinson 1882, p. 421.
    ^ Jump up to: a b Richardson III 2011, pp. 250-1.
    Jump up ^ Pollard 2004.

    References

    Cokayne, George Edward (1912). The Complete Peerage, edited by H.A. Doubleday II. London: St. Catherine Press. pp. 506–510.
    Cokayne, George Edward (1936). The Complete Peerage, edited by H.A. Doubleday IX. London: St. Catherine Press. pp. 713–714.
    Ellis, Alfred Shelley; Tomlinson, George William, eds. (1882). "The Yorkshire Archaeological and Topographical Journal" VII. London: Bradbury, Agnew and Co.: 401–428. Retrieved 13 October 2013.
    Leland, John L. (2004). "Camoys, Thomas, Baron Camoys (c.1350–1420/21)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/4461. (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
    Pollard, A.J. (2004). "Neville, Ralph, second earl of Westmorland (b. in or before 1407, d. 1484)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/19952. (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
    Richardson, Douglas (2011). Everingham, Kimball G., ed. Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families I (2nd ed.). Salt Lake City. ISBN 1449966373.
    Richardson, Douglas (2011). Everingham, Kimball G., ed. Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families III (2nd ed.). Salt Lake City. ISBN 144996639X.
    Summerson, Henry (2004). "Clifford, Thomas, eighth Baron Clifford (1414-1455)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/5663. (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
    Walker, Simon (2004). "Percy, Sir Henry (1364–1403)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/21931. (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
    Whitehead, J.R. (2004). "Waterton, Robert (d.1425)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/54421. (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)

    Children:
    1. 14. Thomas Clifford, 8th Baron de Clifford was born 25 Mar 1414, Cumbria, England; died 22 May 1455, First Battle of St. Albans, Hertfordshire, England; was buried St. Albans Abbey, St. Albans, Hertfordshire, England.
    2. Mary Clifford was born (Yorkshire) England; died (Yorkshire) England.

  7. 30.  Thomas Dacre, 6th Baron Dacre of Gilsland was born 27 Oct 1387, Naworth Castle, Brampton, Cumberland, England; was christened 28 Oct 1387, Brampton, Cumberland, England; died 5 Jan 1458; was buried Lanercost Priory, Brampton, Cumberland, England CA8 2HQ.

    Notes:

    was born at Naworth Castle, Cumberland, on 27 October 1387, the son of William Dacre, 5th Baron Dacre of Gilsland, by Joan Douglas, the illegitimate daughter of Sir William Douglas, 1st Earl of Douglas.

    Dacre married, before 20 July 1399, Philippa de Neville, the third daughter of Ralph Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland, by his first wife, Margaret Stafford.[1]

    They had seven sons and two daughters:[2]

    Sir Thomas Dacre (d. before 5 January 1458), who married Elizabeth Bowet, and by her had two daughters, Joan Dacre, suo jure 7th Baroness Dacre, wife of Richard Fiennes, and Philippa Dacre, wife of Sir Robert Fiennes.[3]
    Randolph Dacre, 1st Baron Dacre of the North, who married Eleanor FitzHugh,[citation needed] by whom he had no issue. He was slain at the Battle of Towton on 29 March 1461, and attainted, whereby his title was forfeited.[4]
    Humphrey Dacre, 1st Baron Dacre of Gilsland (d. 30 May 1485), who married Mabel Parr (d. 14 November 1508), and by her had six sons and three daughters.[5]
    Ralph Dacre.
    Richard Dacre.
    George Dacre.
    John Dacre.
    Joan Dacre, who married Thomas Clifford, 8th Baron de Clifford.
    Margaret Dacre, who married John le Scrope.
    Dacre died 5 January 1458. The date of his wife Philippa's death is unknown, although she was living 8 July 1453.

    Birth:
    The castle is thought to have late 13th-century origins, in the form of a square keep and bailey. It was first mentioned in 1323, and in 1335 a licence to crenellate was granted to Ralph Dacre. Residential quarters were added in the early 16th century by Thomas, Lord Dacre, and there were further additions in 1602, for his successor Lord William Howard. It is likely that an 18th-century walled garden lies within the boundaries of the original moat.

    Buried:
    The beautiful and now tranquil setting of Augustinian Lanercost Priory belies an often troubled history. Standing close to Hadrian's Wall, it suffered frequent attacks during the long Anglo-Scottish wars, once by Robert Bruce in person. The mortally sick King Edward I rested here for five months in 1306-7, shortly before his death on his final campaign. Yet there is still much to see in this best-preserved of Cumbrian monasteries. The east end of the noble 13th century church survives to its full height, housing within its dramatic triple tier of arches some fine monuments.

    Thomas married Philippa Neville, Baroness Dacre Bef 1399. Philippa (daughter of Ralph Neville, Knight, 1st Earl of Westmorland and Margaret Stafford, Countess of Westmorland) was born 0___ 1386, Castle Raby, Raby-Keverstone, Durham, England; died 0___ 1453. [Group Sheet]


  8. 31.  Philippa Neville, Baroness Dacre was born 0___ 1386, Castle Raby, Raby-Keverstone, Durham, England (daughter of Ralph Neville, Knight, 1st Earl of Westmorland and Margaret Stafford, Countess of Westmorland); died 0___ 1453.

    Notes:

    Philippa Neville was the third daughter of Ralph Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland, by his first wife, Margaret Stafford. She married, before 20 July 1399, Thomas Dacre, 6th Baron Dacre of Gilsland, born at Naworth Castle, Cumberland on 27 October 1387, the son of William Dacre, 5th Baron Dacre of Gilsland, by Joan Douglas, the illegitimate daughter of Sir William Douglas, 1st Earl of Douglas.[1]

    They had seven sons and two daughters:[2]

    Sir Thomas Dacre (d. before 5 January 1458), who married Elizabeth Bowet, and by her had two daughters, Joan Dacre, suo jure 7th Baroness Dacre, wife of Richard Fiennes, and Philippa Dacre, wife of Sir Robert Fiennes.[3]
    Randolph Dacre, 1st Baron Dacre of the North, who married Eleanor FitzHugh,[citation needed] by whom he had no issue. He was slain at the Battle of Towton on 29 March 1461, and attainted, whereby his title was forfeited.[4]
    Humphrey Dacre, 1st Baron Dacre of Gilsland (d. 30 May 1485), who married Mabel Parr (d. 14 November 1508), and by her had six sons and three daughters.[5]
    Ralph Dacre.
    Richard Dacre.
    George Dacre.
    John Dacre.
    Joan Dacre, who married Thomas Clifford, 8th Baron de Clifford.
    Margaret Dacre, who married John le Scrope.
    Philippa's husband, Thomas Dacre, 6th Baron Dacre of Gilsland, died 5 January 1458. The date of Philippa's death is unknown, although she was living 8 July 1453.

    Children:
    1. 15. Joan Dacre, Baroness Clifford was born Naworth Castle, Brampton, Cumberland, England.


Generation: 6

  1. 48.  William Plumpton, Knight was born ~ 1362, (Plumpton Hall, Yorkshire, England); died 0___ 1405.

    Notes:

    Died:
    executed in 1405 for treason by Henry IV

    William — Alice of Gisburn. [Group Sheet]


  2. 49.  Alice of Gisburn
    Children:
    1. 24. Robert Plumpton, Knight was born ~ 1381, Plumpton Hall, Yorkshire, England; died 8 Dec 1421, Spofforth, Yorkshire, England.

  3. 50.  Godfrey Foljambe, V, Knight was born 0___ 1367, Hassop, Derbyshire, England (son of Godfrey Foljambe, IV, Knight and Margaret de Villiers); died 0___ 1388, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England; was buried Bakewell, Derbyshire, England.

    Notes:

    Knight., aged 9½ at his grandfather's death, ob. 12 Rich 2, aged 21½, buried at Bakewell.

    from Pedigree of Foljambe, of Aldwarke Hall. from Joseph Foster, Pedigrees of the county families of Yorkshire, vol.1 (London, 1874)

    Online transcription http://www.medievalgenealogy.org.uk/families/foljambe/foljambe.shtml

    Godfrey FOLJAMBE

    Born: 1367/1368 - Of, Hassop, Derbyshire, England
    Marr: -
    Died: 1388 -
    Father: Godfrey FOLJAMBE

    Mother: Margaret DE VILLERS

    Other Spouses:

    Wife
    Isabel LEEKE

    Born: ABT 1371 - Of, Bakewell, Yorkshire, England
    Died: -
    Father: Simon LEEKE

    Mother:

    Other Spouses:

    Children
    1. Alice FOLJAMBE

    Born: 1386 - Of, Hassop, Derbyshire, England
    Marr: 1392 - Robert PLUMPTON
    Died: 1416 - Spofforth, Yorkshire, England
    http://www.boydhouse.com/Darryl_data/gp1279.html

    Godfrey — Isabel Leeke. Isabel (daughter of Simon Leeke, of Leake & Cotham and Margaret Vaux) was born 0___ 1371, Bakewell, Derbyshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 51.  Isabel Leeke was born 0___ 1371, Bakewell, Derbyshire, England (daughter of Simon Leeke, of Leake & Cotham and Margaret Vaux).

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Isabel Lecke
    • Also Known As: Margaret Leeke

    Children:
    1. 25. Alice Foljambe was born ~ 1386, Hassop, Derbyshire, England; died 0___ 1416, Spofforth, Yorkshire, England.

  5. 52.  Miles Stapleton, III, Knight was born 23 Jun 1357, Bedale, Yorkshire, England (son of Miles Stapleton, II, Knight and Joan de Ingham, Baroness Ingham); died 10 Apr 1419, Bedale, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Lord of Ingham

    Notes:

    About Sir Miles ...

    History ...

    https://books.google.co.za/books?id=cXU-AQAAIAAJ&pg=PA267&lpg=PA267&dq=Miles+III+de+Stapleton,+Lord+of+Ingham&source=bl&ots=f8WCt5TZG0&sig=bIMshcz26Jf5Ax48BIR1pvC2qEU&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiR34D746bJAhWMOxQKHZ2UBkUQ6AEINjAF#v=onepage&q=Miles%20III%20de%20Stapleton%2C%20Lord%20of%20Ingham&f=false

    Immediate Family ...

    Son of Sir Miles de Stapleton of Bedale and Joan or Jane de Ingham, Heiress of Ingham
    Husband of Ela Stapleton
    Father of Sir Bryan Stapleton, of Ingham; Ela de Braose and Edmund Stapleton
    Brother of Joan de Stapleton
    Half brother of John de Stapleton and Roger Lord Knokyn le Strange, Baron Strange of Knockyn

    Miles married Ela de Ufford 0___ 1378, Belstead, Suffolk, England. Ela (daughter of Edmund de Ufford and Sybil Pierrepoint) was born 0___ 1362, Belstead, Suffolk, England; died 10 Apr 1419, (Norfolkshire) England; was buried Ingham Priory, Norfolk, England. [Group Sheet]


  6. 53.  Ela de Ufford was born 0___ 1362, Belstead, Suffolk, England (daughter of Edmund de Ufford and Sybil Pierrepoint); died 10 Apr 1419, (Norfolkshire) England; was buried Ingham Priory, Norfolk, England.

    Notes:

    Biography

    Father Sir Edmund de Ufford8,2,3,9,5,10,7

    Mother Sybil de Pierrepoint9,10,7 b. c 1325

    Ela Ufford was born circa 1355 at of Great Belstead, Suffolk, England. She married Sir Miles Stapleton, son of Sir Miles de Stapleton and Joan de Ingham, before 1376; They had 2 sons (Sir Brian; & Edmund) and 2 daughters (Ela, wife of Sir Robert de Brewes; & Emma).2,3,4,5,6,7 Ela Ufford died in 1425; Buried in Ingham Priory, Norfolk.4,7

    Family

    Sir Miles Stapleton b. c 23 Jun 1357, d. 10 Apr 1419

    Children

    Sir Brian Stapleton, Sheriff of Norfolk & Suffolk, Lord Ingham+8,2,4,7 b. c 1379, d. 7 Aug 1438

    Ela Stapleton+11,3,4,5,7 b. c 1381

    John Stapleton+ b. c 1383

    Anna Stapleton+12 b. c 1390

    Sources

    [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. I, p. 109.
    [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. I, p. 390.
    [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. I, p. 497-498.
    [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. II, p. 61.
    [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. II, p. 230.
    [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. V, p. 35.
    [S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 57.
    [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. I, p. 497.
    [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. II, p. 229.
    Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999
    http://awtc.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=emsuggs&id=I39737 Eileen McKinnon-Suggs (suggs1@msn.com), Our Kingdom Come
    The Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999

    Created on 19 October 2010 through the import of Ancestors of Lois Greene.ged. Ufford-32 created through the import of Lupton file.ged on Jul 8, 2011 by Kim Ostermyer. Ufford-21 created through the import of FISCUS Family Tree.ged on Jun 6, 2011 by Liisa Small. Ufford-25 created through the import of FISCUS Family Tree.ged

    Children:
    1. 26. Bryan Stapleton, Knight was born 0___ 1379, Ingham, Norfolk, England; died 17 Aug 1438, Ingham, Norfolk, England.

  7. 54.  William Bardolf, Knight, 3rd & 4th Baron Damory was born 21 Oct 1349, Wormegay, Norfolk, England (son of John Bardolf, Knight Banneret, 3rd Lord Bardolf and Elizabeth d'Amory); died 29 Jan 1386, Norfolkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Lord Bardolf
    • Also Known As: Sir William Bardolf, Viscount of Wormegay
    • Military: French Wars
    • Military: Irish Wars
    • Occupation: 1376-1385; Member of Parliament

    Notes:

    William Bardolf, 4th Baron Bardolf and 3rd Baron Damory (21 October 1349 – 29 January 1386) of Wormegay, Norfolk, was an extensive landowner in Norfolk, Lincolnshire, Suffolk and Surrey. He was the son of John Bardolf, 3rd Baron Bardolf and Hon. Elizabeth Damory, suo jure 2nd Baroness Damory.[1] His maternal grandparents were Sir Roger Damory, Lord Damory and Lady Elizabeth de Clare, a granddaughter of King Edward I.[1] In 1382, Bardolf had livery of his lands from the Crown. He was a descendant of William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey.[citation needed]

    He was summoned to parliament from 20 January 1376 to 3 September 1385, as "William Bardolf of Wormegay". He served in the French and Irish wars, latterly under John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster.

    Family

    He married Agnes (d. 12 June 1403), daughter of Sir Michael de Poynings, 2nd Baron Poynings, Kt., of Bures (1317–1369). Coppinger wrote: "Sir Michael de Poynings, 2nd Baron, gave a thousand marks to Queen Philippa in 1366 for the wardship and marriage of William, son and heir of John Lord Bardolf, to the end that he might take Agnes his daughter to wife, who by the name of 'Agnes Bardolf' is mentioned as a legatee in the will of her mother, Joane Lady Poynings dated 12th May 1369 and by that of 'Lady Bardolf my sister' in the will of Thomas Lord Poynings 28th October 1374."

    Lord Bardolf and his wife had two sons and two daughters:[1]

    Thomas Bardolf, 5th Baron Bardolf[1]
    William Bardolf[1]
    Cecily Bardolf (d. 1432) married Sir Brian Stapleton, of Ingham (1379–1438), Sheriff of Norfolk, a veteran of the Battle of Agincourt, and had issue Sir Miles Stapleton.[1]
    Elizabeth Bardolf, wife of Robert Scales, 5th Lord Scales and secondly Sir Henry Percy, son of Sir Thomas Percy and Elizabeth Strabolgi.[1]
    Bardolf died in 1385, aged 36, and was succeeded by his son, Thomas Bardolf, 5th Baron Bardolf. His widow remarried Sir Thomas Mortimer, illegitimate son of Roger Mortimer, 2nd Earl of March. Thomas was attainted as a traitor in 1397 and died shortly before Agnes in 1403.

    References

    ^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g Douglas Richardson. Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study In Colonial And Medieval Families, Genealogical Publishing, 2005. pg 608. Google eBook
    Burke, John and John Bernard, The Royal Families of England, Scotland, and Wales, with their Descendants, Sovereigns and Subjects, London, 1851, vol.2, p.vii, and pedigree CXVII.
    Waters, Robert E.C., B.A., Barrister of the Inner Temple, Genealogical Memoirs of the Extinct Family of Chester of Chicheley &c., London, 1878, vol.1, p. 140.
    Burke, Sir Bernard, C.B.,LL.D., Ulster King of Arms, The Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire, London, 1883, p. 22)
    Coppinger, W.A., M.A., etc., The Manors of Suffolk, London, 1905, pp. 46–49.
    Rye, Walter, (editor), The Visitation of Norfolk, 1563 & 1613, made by William Hervey, Clarencieux King of Arms, Clarencieux Cooke, and John Raven, Richmond Herald, London, 1891, p. 65.
    Rye, Walter, Norfolk Families, part II, Norwich, 1912, p. 845.
    Carr-Calthrop, Colonel Christopher William, C.B.E.,M.D., etc., Notes on the Families of Calthorpe & Calthrop, etc., Third edition, London, 1933. A pedigree showing Bardolf's the descent from Edward I, King of England and his wife Eleanor of Castile is on p. 43.
    The Visitation of Suffolk, 1561, pp. 186 & 243.
    Weis, Frederick Lewis, et al., The Magna Charta Sureties 1215, 5th edition, Baltimore, 2002, p. 49.
    Richardson, Douglas, Magna Carta Ancestry, Baltimore, 2005, p. 40.

    Birth:
    The place-name 'Wormegay' is first attested in the Domesday Book of 1086, and means 'the island of Wyrm's people'.[4]

    Just to the west of the village centre lies Wormegay Castle, a motte and bailey earthwork.

    Map ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wormegay

    William married Agnes de Poynings, Vicountess of Wormegay Birling, Sussex, England. Agnes (daughter of Michael de Poynings, 1st Baron Poynings and Joan Ruxley, Lay Poynings) died 12 Jun 1403. [Group Sheet]


  8. 55.  Agnes de Poynings, Vicountess of Wormegay (daughter of Michael de Poynings, 1st Baron Poynings and Joan Ruxley, Lay Poynings); died 12 Jun 1403.
    Children:
    1. Thomas Bardolf, Knight, 5th Baron Bardolf was born 22 Dec 1369, Birling, Sussex, England; died 19 Feb 1408, Bramham Moor, Yorkshire, England.
    2. 27. Cecily Bardolf was born Abt 1371, Birling, Sussex, England; died 29 Sep 1432, Bedale, Yorkshire, England.

  9. 56.  Thomas Clifford, Knight, 6th Baron de CliffordThomas Clifford, Knight, 6th Baron de Clifford was born 1363-1364, Cumbria, England (son of Roger de Clifford, Knight, 5th Baron de Clifford and Maud Beauchamp); died 18 Aug 1391.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Governor of Carlisle Castle
    • Occupation: High Sheriff of Westmorland
    • Occupation: Master of the King's Horses
    • Occupation: Member of Parliament
    • Occupation: Warden of the West Marches
    • Also Known As: 6th Lord of Skipton
    • Also Known As: Thomas ed Clifford

    Notes:

    Thomas de Clifford, 6th Baron de Clifford, also 6th Lord of Skipton (c. 1363 – 1391) was a Knight of The Chamber, hereditary Sheriff of Westmorland, Governor of Carlisle Castle, and Warden of the West Marches.

    He was the son of Roger de Clifford, 5th Baron de Clifford. According to Dugdale, he was a knight of the king's chamber in 8 Richard II (1384-5). On 25 June 1386, Northampton, the herald, was allowed to carry a challenge from 'Thomas de Clifford, chivaler l'eisne Fitz-Rogeri, Sire de Clifford,' to Sir Bursigande, eldest son of 'le Sire Bursigande,' in France. According to Dugdale, Sir Thomas crossed the sea for this tournament in the following May. Rymer has preserved a document, dated 28 January 1387, in which the king licenses 'our very dear and loyal knight, Sir Thomas Clifford, to perform all manner of feats of arms' on the Scotch borders.[1]

    He inherited his estates and titles on his father's death in 1380. He and two other English knights challenged three French knights to a tourney in the marches between Boulogne and Calais ; and on 20 June 1390 he procured a safe-conduct through England for William de Douglas, who was coming to the English court with forty knights to a wager of battle with Clifford with reference to certain disputed lands.[1]

    In 1384, he was granted the custody of Carlisle Castle for life jointly with John Neville, and in 1386 was appointed a warden of the west march. In September 1388, he was master of the king's horses. He was summoned to Parliament by Writ from December 6, 1389. He was hereditary High Sheriff of Westmorland from 1389 until his own death in 1391. His name occurs in the council minutes for 28 April 1390 ; and according to Dugdale he received summonses to parliament in 1390-2.[1]

    In 1391, Clifford was in the Baltic, and became involved in a brawl with Sir William Douglas, an illegitimate son of the earl of Douglas, in which Douglas was killed. Clifford, overcome by remorse, set off for Jerusalem and died in 1391 on an unidentified Mediterranean island.[2] Dugdale gives the date of his death 18 August 1391.[1]


    He married before 1379 Elizabeth (died March 1424), daughter of Thomas de Ros, 4th Baron de Ros of Helmesley, by Beatrice, daughter of Ralph de Stafford, 1st Earl of Stafford, KG, by whom he had issue. He was succeeded by his eldest son John Clifford, 7th Baron de Clifford. [1]

    Lord Clifford is often styled in documents "King's kinsman".

    Issue:

    John Clifford, 7th Baron de Clifford, married Lady Elizabeth Percy, daughter of Henry 'Hotspur' Percy by Elizabeth, daughter of Edmund Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March.
    Maud Clifford married 1) John Neville, 6th Baron Latimer; 2) Richard of Conisburgh, 3rd Earl of Cambridge

    References

    ^ Jump up to: a b c d e Archer 1887.
    Jump up ^ Summerson 2004.

    Attribution

    This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Archer, Thomas Andrew (1887). "Clifford, Thomas de (d.1391?)". In Stephen, Leslie. Dictionary of National Biography 11. London: Smith, Elder & Co. p. 77.

    Sources

    Richardson, Douglas, Plantagenet Ancestry, Baltimore Md., 2004, p. 216. ISBN 0-8063-1750-7
    Summerson, Henry. "Clifford, Thomas". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/5662. (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)

    Died:
    ...and died in 1391 on an unidentified Mediterranean island.

    Thomas married Elizabeth de Ros Bef 1379, (Yorkshire) England. Elizabeth (daughter of Thomas de Ros, Knight, 4th Baron de Ros and Beatrice Stafford) was born Abt 1367, Helmsley, Yorkshire, England; died 26 Mar 1424, (Yorkshire) England. [Group Sheet]


  10. 57.  Elizabeth de Ros was born Abt 1367, Helmsley, Yorkshire, England (daughter of Thomas de Ros, Knight, 4th Baron de Ros and Beatrice Stafford); died 26 Mar 1424, (Yorkshire) England.
    Children:
    1. 28. John Clifford, Knight, 7th Baron Clifford was born 1388-1389, Appleby, Westmorland, England; was christened 23 Apr 1389; died 13 Mar 1422, Meaux, Seine-et-Marne, France; was buried Friars Minor, Ipswich, Suffolk, England.

  11. 58.  Henry "Harry Hotspur" Percy, Knight, 2nd Earl of NorthumberlandHenry "Harry Hotspur" Percy, Knight, 2nd Earl of Northumberland was born 20 May 1364, Alnwick, Northumberland, England (son of Henry Percy, Knight, 1st Earl of Northumberland and Margaret Neville, Baroness of Ros); died 21 Jul 1403, Shrewsbury, England.

    Notes:

    17th great grandfather to the grandchildren of Vernia Swindell Byars (1894-1985) ...

    http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=&secondpersonID=I3&maxrels=1&disallowspouses=0&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I37054

    Click here to view maps & history of Warkworth Castle ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Warkworth_Castle

    *

    Sir Henry Percy KG (20 May 1364 - 21 July 1403), commonly known as Sir Harry Hotspur, or simply Hotspur, was a late-medieval English nobleman. He was a significant captain during the Anglo-Scottish wars. He later led successive rebellions against Henry IV of England and was slain at the Battle of Shrewsbury in 1403 at the height of his career.

    Career

    Arms of Hotspur
    Henry Percy was born 20 May 1364 at either Alnwick Castle or Warkworth Castle in Northumberland, the eldest son of Henry Percy, 1st Earl of Northumberland, and Margaret Neville, daughter of Ralph de Neville, 2nd Lord Neville of Raby, and Alice de Audley.[1] He was knighted by King Edward III in April 1377, together with the future Kings Richard II and Henry IV.[2] In 1380, he was in Ireland with the Earl of March,[3] and in 1383, he travelled in Prussia.[4] He was appointed warden of the east march either on 30 July 1384 or in May 1385,[4] and in 1385 accompanied Richard II on an expedition into Scotland.[1] 'As a tribute to his speed in advance and readiness to attack' on the Scottish borders, the Scots bestowed on him the name 'Haatspore'.[2] In April 1386, he was sent to France to reinforce the garrison at Calais and led raids into Picardy. Between August and October 1387, he was in command of a naval force in an attempt to relieve the siege of Brest.[4] In appreciation of these military endeavours he was made a Knight of the Garter in 1388.[4] Reappointed as warden of the east march, he commanded the English forces against James Douglas, 2nd Earl of Douglas, at the Battle of Otterburn on 10 August 1388, where he was captured, but soon ransomed for a fee of 7000 marks.[2]

    During the next few years Percy's reputation continued to grow. He was sent on a diplomatic mission to Cyprus in June 1393 and appointed Governor of Bordeaux, deputy to John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster, in the Duchy of Aquitaine.[2] He returned to England in January 1395, taking part in Richard II's expedition to Ireland, and was back in Aquitaine the following autumn. In the summer of 1396, he was again in Calais.[3]

    Percy's military and diplomatic service brought him substantial marks of royal favour in the form of grants and appointments,[4] but despite this, the Percy family decided to support Henry Bolingbroke, the future Henry IV, in his rebellion against Richard II. On Henry's return from exile in June 1399, Percy and his father joined his forces at Doncaster and marched south with them. After King Richard's deposition, Percy and his father were 'lavishly rewarded' with lands and offices.[3]

    Under the new king, Percy had extensive civil and military responsibility in both the east march towards Scotland and in north Wales, where he was appointed High Sheriff of Flintshire in 1399. In north Wales, he was under increasing pressure as a result of the rebellion of Owain Glyndwr. In March 1402, Henry IV appointed Percy royal lieutenant in north Wales, and on 14 September 1402, Percy, his father, and the Earl of Dunbar and March were victorious against a Scottish force at the Battle of Homildon Hill. Among others, they made a prisoner of Archibald Douglas, 4th Earl of Douglas.[1]

    Rebellion and death

    In spite of the favour that Henry IV showed the Percys in many respects, they became increasingly discontented with him. Among their grievances was the king's failure to pay the wages due to them for defending the Scottish border; his favour towards Dunbar; his demand that the Percys hand over their Scottish prisoners; his failure to put an end to Owain Glyndwr's rebellion through a negotiated settlement; his increasing promotion of his son Prince Henry's military authority in Wales; and his failure to ransom Henry Percy's brother-in-law Sir Edmund Mortimer, whom the Welsh had captured in June 1402.[5]

    Spurred on by these grievances, the Percys rebelled in the summer of 1403 and took up arms against the king. According to J. M. W. Bean, it is clear that the Percys were in collusion with Glyndwr. On his return to England shortly after the victory at Homildon Hill, Henry Percy issued proclamations in Cheshire accusing the king of 'tyrannical government'.[3] Joined by his uncle, Thomas Percy, Earl of Worcester, he marched to Shrewsbury, where he intended to do battle against a force there under the command of the Prince of Wales. The army of his father, however, was slow to move south as well, and it was without the assistance of his father that Henry Percy and Worcester arrived at Shrewsbury on 21 July 1403, where they encountered the king with a large army. The ensuing Battle of Shrewsbury was fierce, with heavy casualties on both sides, but when Henry Percy himself was struck down and killed, his own forces fled.[3]

    The circumstances of Percy's death differ in accounts. The chronicler Thomas Walsingham stated, in his Historia Anglicana, that while he led his men in the fight rashly penetrating the enemy host, [Hotspur] was unexpectedly cut down, by whose hand is not known. Another is that he was struck in the face by an arrow when he opened his vizor for a better view.[6] The legend that he was killed by the Prince of Wales seems to have been given currency by William Shakespeare, writing at the end of the following century.


    Shortly after Henry died in battle, his uncle was executed. An attainder was issued and the family's property, including Wressle Castle in Yorkshire, was confiscated by the Crown.[7]
    The Earl of Worcester was executed two days later.[8]

    King Henry, upon being brought Percy's body after the battle, is said to have wept. The body was taken by Thomas Neville, 5th Baron Furnivall, to Whitchurch, Shropshire, for burial. However, when rumours circulated that Percy was still alive, the king 'had the corpse exhumed and displayed it, propped upright between two millstones, in the market place at Shrewsbury'.[3] That done, the king dispatched Percy's head to York, where it was impaled on the Micklegate Bar (one of the city's gates), whereas his four-quarters were sent to London, Newcastle upon Tyne, Bristol, and Chester before they were finally delivered to his widow. She had him buried in York Minster in November of that year.[9] In January 1404, Percy was posthumously declared a traitor, and his lands were forfeited to the Crown.[citation needed]

    Marriage and issue

    Henry Percy married Elizabeth Mortimer, the eldest daughter of Edmund Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March, and his wife, Philippa, the only child of Lionel, 1st Duke of Clarence, and Elizabeth de Burgh, Countess of Ulster.[10] By her he had two children:

    Name Lifespan Notes
    Henry 3 February 1393 – 22 May 1455 2nd Earl of Northumberland; married Eleanor Neville, by whom he had issue. He was slain at the First Battle of St Albans during the Wars of the Roses.[11]
    Elizabeth c.1395 – 26 October 1436 Married firstly John Clifford, 7th Baron de Clifford, slain at the Siege of Meaux on 13 March 1422, by whom she had issue, and secondly Ralph Neville, 2nd Earl of Westmorland (d. 3 November 1484), by whom she had a son, Sir John Neville.[12]
    Sometime after 3 June 1406, Elizabeth Mortimer married, as her second husband, Thomas de Camoys, 1st Baron Camoys, by whom she had a son, Sir Roger Camoys.[13] Thomas Camoys distinguished himself as a soldier in command of the rearguard of the English army at the Battle of Agincourt on 25 October 1415.[14]

    Legacy

    Warkworth Castle, the home of Henry Percy
    Henry Percy, 'Hotspur', is one of Shakespeare's best-known characters. In Henry IV, Part 1, Percy is portrayed as the same age as his rival, Prince Hal, by whom he is slain in single combat. In fact, he was 23 years older than Prince Hal, the future King Henry V, who was a youth of 16 at the date of the Battle of Shrewsbury.

    The name of one of England's top football clubs, Tottenham Hotspur F.C., acknowledges Henry Percy, whose descendants owned land in the neighbourhood of the club's first ground in the Tottenham Marshes.[15][16][17]

    A 14 feet (4.3 m) statue of Henry Percy was unveiled in Alnwick by the Duke of Northumberland in 2010.[18]

    *

    Died:
    in the Battle of Shrewsbury...

    Henry married Elizabeth Mortimer, Countess of Percy Bef 10 Dec 1379, Usk, Monmouthshire, Wales. Elizabeth (daughter of Edmund Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March, Earl of Ulster and Philippa Plantagenet, 5th Countess of Ulster) was born 12 Feb 1371, Usk, Monmouthshire, Wales; died 20 Apr 1417, Trotton, Sussex, England; was buried St. George's Church, Trotton, Chichester, Sussex, England. [Group Sheet]


  12. 59.  Elizabeth Mortimer, Countess of Percy was born 12 Feb 1371, Usk, Monmouthshire, Wales (daughter of Edmund Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March, Earl of Ulster and Philippa Plantagenet, 5th Countess of Ulster); died 20 Apr 1417, Trotton, Sussex, England; was buried St. George's Church, Trotton, Chichester, Sussex, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Baroness Camoys

    Notes:

    Elizabeth Mortimer, Baroness Camoys (12 February 1371 – 20 April 1417) was an English noblewoman, the granddaughter of Lionel of Antwerp, 1st Duke of Clarence, and great-granddaughter of King Edward III. Her first husband was Sir Henry Percy, known to history as 'Hotspur'. She married secondly Thomas de Camoys, 1st Baron Camoys. She is represented as 'Kate, Lady Percy,' in Shakespeare's Henry IV, Part 1, and briefly again as 'Widow Percy' in Henry IV, Part 2.

    Family, marriges, and issue

    Elizabeth Mortimer was born at Usk, Monmouthshire, Wales on 12 or 13 February 1371, the eldest daughter of Edmund Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March, and his wife, Philippa, the only child of Lionel, 1st Duke of Clarence, and Elizabeth de Burgh, Countess of Ulster. Elizabeth Mortimer had two brothers, Sir Roger (1374–1398) and Sir Edmund (1376–1409), and a younger sister, Philippa (1375–1401), who married firstly John Hastings, 3rd Earl of Pembroke (d.1389), secondly Richard de Arundel, 11th Earl of Arundel (1346–1397), and thirdly, Sir Thomas Poynings.[1]


    A romanticised painting of Elizabeth Mortimer and her first husband Henry "Hotspur" Percy
    It is unknown when Elizabeth was married to her first husband, Henry Percy, nicknamed 'Hotspur' (1364–1403), eldest son of Henry Percy, 1st Earl of Northumberland, who was already acquiring a reputation as a great soldier and warrior and responsible administrator. The couple resided at Alnwick Castle in Northumberland.[citation needed] They had two children:

    Henry Percy, 2nd Earl of Northumberland (3 February 1393 – 22 May 1455), who married Eleanor Neville, by whom he had issue. He was slain at the First Battle of St Albans.[2]
    Lady Elizabeth Percy (c.1395-26 October 1436), who married firstly John Clifford, 7th Baron de Clifford, slain at the Siege of Meaux on 13 March 1422, by whom she had issue, and secondly Ralph Neville, 2nd Earl of Westmorland (d. 3 November 1484), by whom she had a son, Sir John Neville.[3]

    On 21 July 1403, Elizabeth's husband was slain at the Battle of Shrewsbury[4] while commanding a rebel army that fought against the superior forces of King Henry IV. He was buried in Whitchurch, Shropshire, however when rumours circulated that he was still alive, 'Henry IV had the corpse exhumed and displayed it, propped upright between two millstones, in the market place at Shrewsbury'.[5] This done, the king dispatched Percy's head to York, where it was impaled on one of the city's gates; his four-quarters were first sent to London, Newcastle upon Tyne, Bristol, and Chester before they were finally delivered to Elizabeth. She had him buried in York Minster in November of that year.[6] In January 1404, Percy was posthumously declared a traitor and his lands were forfeited to the Crown.[citation needed] The king ordered Elizabeth herself arrested on 8 October 1403.[7]

    Sometime after 3 June 1406, Elizabeth Mortimer was married to her second husband, Thomas de Camoys, 1st Baron Camoys. Although Camoys was in his mid-sixties, she may have had a son by him, Sir Roger Camoys.[8] Like her first husband, Camoys was a renowned soldier who commanded the left wing of the English army at the Battle of Agincourt on 25 October 1415.[9]

    Death

    Elizabeth died on 20 April 1417 at the age of 46 years. She was buried in St. George's Church at Trotton, Sussex. Her second husband was buried beside her.[10] Their table-tomb with its fine monumental brass depicting the couple slightly less than life size and holding hands can be viewed in the middle of the chancel inside the church.

    King Henry VIII's Queen consort Jane Seymour was one of Elizabeth Mortimer's many descendants through her daughter Elizabeth Percy.

    In fiction

    Lady Elizabeth is represented as Kate, Lady Percy, in William Shakespeare's play Henry IV, Part 1.[11]

    Birth:
    Map & History of Usk ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Usk

    Buried:
    Image & history of St. George's ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St._George%27s_Church,_Trotton

    Notes:

    Married:
    Elizabeth was a Child Bride at the age of 9

    Children:
    1. Henry Percy, VI, Earl of Percy was born 3 Feb 1394, Alnwick Castle, Alnwick, Northumberland, England NE66 1NQ; died 22 May 1455, St. Albans, Hertford, England; was buried St. Albans Abbey, St. Albans, Hertfordshire, England.
    2. 29. Elizabeth Percy was born ~ 1395, Alnwick Castle, Alnwick, Northumberland, England NE66 1NQ; died 26 Oct 1437; was buried Staindrop Church, Staindrop, Durham, England.

  13. 62.  Ralph Neville, Knight, 1st Earl of WestmorlandRalph Neville, Knight, 1st Earl of Westmorland was born 0___ 1364, Castle Raby, Raby-Keverstone, Durham, England (son of John Neville, 3rd Baron Neville de Raby and Maud Percy); died 21 Oct 1425, Castle Raby, Raby-Keverstone, Durham, England; was buried 0Oct 1425, St. Mary's Church, Staindrop, Durham, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: 4th Lord Neville of Raby
    • Also Known As: Earl of Westmorland
    • Also Known As: Lord of Richmond

    Notes:

    Ralph Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland, 4th Baron Neville de Raby,[a] Earl Marshal, KG, PC (c. 1364 – 21 October 1425), was an English nobleman of the House of Neville.

    Family

    Ralph Neville was born about 1364, the son of John Neville, 3rd Baron Neville de Raby, and The Hon Maud Percy (d. before 18 February 1379), daughter of Henry de Percy, 2nd Baron Percy of Alnwick, Northumberland, by Idoine de Clifford, daughter of Robert de Clifford, 1st Baron de Clifford.[1] Neville had a younger brother, and five sisters:[2]

    Thomas Neville, 5th Baron Furnivall, who married Joan Furnival.
    Lady Alice Neville, who married Sir Thomas Gray.
    Lady Maud Neville
    Lady Idoine Neville
    Lady Eleanor Neville, who married Ralph de Lumley, 1st Baron Lumley.
    Lady Elizabeth Neville, who became a nun.
    Neville's father married secondly, before 9 October 1381, Elizabeth Latimer (d. 5 November 1395), daughter of William Latimer, 4th Baron Latimer. By his father's second marriage Neville had a brother and sister of the half blood:[3]

    John Neville, 6th Baron Latimer (c.1382 – 10 December 1430), who married firstly, Maud Clifford (c. 26 August 1446), daughter of Thomas Clifford, 6th Baron Clifford, whom he divorced before 1413-17, and by whom he had no issue. She married secondly, Richard of Conisburgh, 3rd Earl of Cambridge, beheaded 5 August 1415 for his part in the Southampton Plot.[4]
    Lady Elizabeth Neville, who married Sir Thomas Willoughby.
    Career[edit]
    Neville's first military service was in Brittany under King Richard II's uncle, Thomas of Woodstock, who knighted him at Saint-Omer in July 1380. On 14 November 1381 he and his cousin, Henry 'Hotspur' Percy, were commissioned to preside over a duel between an Englishman and a Scot, and on 1 December 1383 he and his father were commissioned to receive from the Scots 24,000 marks for the ransom of King David. On 26 October 1385 he was appointed joint governor of Carlisle with Sir Thomas Clifford, and on 27 March 1386 was appointed, together with Clifford, joint Warden of the West March.[5]

    Neville inherited the title at the age of 24 after his father's death on 17 October 1388, and was summoned to Parliament from 6 December 1389 to 30 November 1396 by writs directed to Radulpho de Nevyll de Raby. On 25 October 1388 he was appointed, with others, to survey the fortifications on the Scottish border, and on 24 May 1389 was made keeper for life of the royal forests north of the Trent. In 1393 and 1394 he was employed in peace negotiations with Scotland.[6]

    In 1397 Neville supported King Richard's proceedings against Thomas of Woodstock and the Lords Appellant, and by way of reward was created Earl of Westmorland on 29 September of that year. However his loyalty to the King was tested shortly thereafter. His first wife, Margaret Stafford, had died on 9 June 1396, and Neville's second marriage to Joan Beaufort before 29 November 1396 made him the son-in-law of King Richard's uncle, John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster. Thus, when King Richard banished John of Gaunt's eldest son and heir, Henry Bolingbroke, on 16 September 1398, and confiscated Bolingbroke's estates after John of Gaunt's death on 3 February 1399, Westmorland was moved to support his brother-in-law. Bolingbroke landed with a small force at Ravenspur in July 1399. Westmorland and the Earl of Northumberland were in the deputation at the Tower which received King Richard's abdication, and Westmorland bore the small sceptre called the 'virge' at Bolingbroke's coronation as King Henry IV on 13 October 1399.[7]

    For his support of the new King, Westmorland was rewarded with a lifetime appointment as Earl Marshal on 30 September 1399 (although he resigned the office in 1412), a lifetime grant of the honour of Richmond on 20 October (although the grant was not accompanied by a grant of the title Earl of Richmond), and several wardships.[8] Before 4 December he was appointed to the King's council. In March 1401, Westmorland was one of the commissioners who conducted negotiations for a marriage between the King's eldest daughter, Blanche of England, and Louis, son of Rupert, King of the Romans, and in 1403 was made a Knight of the Garter, taking the place left vacant by the death of Edmund of Langley, 1st Duke of York.[8]

    According to Tuck, Westmorland had little influence on the Scottish borders in the first years of Henry IV's reign, where the wardenships of the marches were monopolised by the Percys, leading to a growing rivalry between the two families. However in 1403 the Percys, spurred on by various grievances, took up arms against the King, and suffered defeat at the Battle of Shrewsbury on 21 July 1403. Northumberland's son, Henry 'Hotspur' Percy, was slain at Shrewsbury, and Northumberland's brother, the Earl of Worcester, was beheaded two days later. After Shrewsbury, King Henry ordered Westmorland to raise troops and prevent Northumberland's army, which was still in the north, from advancing south. On 6 August 1403,as a reward for his service in driving Northumberland back to Warkworth Castle, Westmorland was granted the wardenship of the West March which Northumberland had held since 1399, the wardenship of the East March, formerly held by Henry 'Hotspur' Percy, being granted to the King's 14-year-old son, John of Lancaster, 1st Duke of Bedford.[8]

    Two years later Northumberland, joined by Lord Bardolf, again took up arms against the King. It had been Northumberland's plan to capture the earl by surprise at the outset, and in early May 1405, with 400 men, Northumberland made a surprise attack at the castle of Witton-le-Wear, where he had been staying. The attempt failed, as Westmorland had already fled. The earl speedily gathered an army, defeated a force of Percy allies at Topcliffe, and then marched towards York with Henry IV's son, John of Lancaster, to confront a force of some 8000 men gathered on Shipton Moor under the leadership of Archbishop Richard Scrope, Thomas de Mowbray, 4th Earl of Norfolk, and Scrope's nephew, Sir William Plumpton. Outnumbered by Scrope's forces, Westmorland resorted to trickery,[9] and led Scrope and his allies to believe that their demands would be accepted and their personal safety guaranteed. Once Scrope's army had been disbanded on 29 May, Scrope, Mowbray and Plumpton were arrested, summarily condemned to death for treason, and beheaded outside the walls of York on 8 June 1405. Although Westmorland handed Scrope and his allies over to the King at Pontefract, he played no role in their hasty and irregular trial and execution, having been sent north by the King on 4 June to seize Northumberland's castles. It is unclear whether Northumberland had initially planned to rebel openly in concert with Scrope, but in the event he gave Scrope no support, and fled to Scotland after his failed attempt to capture Westmorland. His estates were subsequently forfeited to the crown, and Ralph, earl of Westmorland, as a reward for his quelling of the 1405 rebellion without significant bloodshed, received a large grant of former Percy lands in Cumberland and Northumberland in June 1405.[10]

    After the death of Henry IV Westmorland was mainly engaged in the defence of the northern border in his capacity as Warden of the West March (1403–1414). In 1415 he decisively defeated an invading Scottish army at the Battle of Yeavering.[1] Westmorland played no part in King Henry V's French campaigns, and Tuck notes that his relationship with Henry V was not close, perhaps partly because of the involvement of Westmorland's son-in-law, Sir Thomas Grey of Heaton, in the Southampton Plot.[11] After Henry V's death, Westmorland was a member of the Council of Regency during the minority of King Henry VI.[12]

    According to Tait, Westmorland was 'no inconsiderable builder', citing his rebuilding of Sheriff Hutton Castle on a scale so magnificent that Leland saw 'no house in the north so like a princely lodging', his doubling of the entrance gateway of Raby Castle and the corresponding tower, and possibly his responsibility for the 'tall and striking tower' of Richmond parish church. On 1 November 1410 Westmorland was granted licence to found a college for a master, six clerks, six 'decayed gentlemen' and others at Staindrop, towards the completion of which he left a bequest in his will.[12] He was probably responsible for the building of Penrith castle in Cumberland c. 1412-13.[13]

    Marriages and issue

    Miniature of the Earl of Westmorland with twelve of his children by Pol de Limbourg. A second miniature (not pictured) features his second wife, Lady Joan, with the rest of his children.

    Effigy of Ralph Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland and his two wives, Staindrop Church

    Neville married firstly, Margaret Stafford (d. 9 June 1396), the eldest daughter of Hugh Stafford, 2nd Earl of Stafford, and Philippa Beauchamp, the daughter of Thomas Beauchamp, 11th Earl of Warwick, by Katherine Mortimer, the daughter of Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March.[14] They had two sons and six daughters:

    Sir John Neville (c.1387 – before 20 May 1420), who married Elizabeth Holland, fifth daughter of Thomas Holland, 2nd Earl of Kent, and Alice FitzAlan, and by her had three sons, Ralph Neville, 2nd Earl of Westmorland, John Neville, Baron Neville, and Sir Thomas Neville, and a daughter, Margaret Neville.[15]
    Sir Ralph Neville (d. 25 Feb 1458), who married, before 1411, his stepsister, Mary Ferrers, daughter of Robert Ferrers, 2nd Baron Ferrers, and Joan Beaufort.[16]
    Maud Neville (d. October 1438), who married Peter de Mauley, 5th Baron Mauley.[15]
    Alice Neville, who married firstly Sir Thomas Grey, beheaded 2 August 1415 for his part in the Southampton Plot, and secondly Sir Gilbert Lancaster.[17]
    Philippa Neville, who married, before 20 July 1399, Thomas Dacre, 6th Baron Dacre of Gilsland (d. 5 January 1458).[18]
    Elizabeth Neville, who became a nun.
    Anne Neville (b. circa 1384), who married, before 3 February 1413, Sir Gilbert Umfraville, son of Sir Thomas Umfreville (d. 12 February 1391) and Agnes Grey (d. 25 October 1420), daughter of Sir Thomas Grey of Heaton (d. before 22 October 1369). He was slain at the Battle of Baugâe in Anjou on 22 March 1421.[19]
    Margaret Neville (d. 1463/4), who married firstly, before 31 December 1413, Richard Scrope, 3rd Baron Scrope of Bolton, and secondly, William Cressener, esquire.[20]
    Neville married secondly, before 29 November 1396, at Chãateau de Beaufort, Maine-et-Loire, Anjou, Joan Beaufort, the widow of Robert Ferrers, 2nd Baron Ferrers.[21] Joan was the legitimated daughter of John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster, by his mistress and later third wife, Katherine Swynford.

    They had nine sons and five daughters:[22]

    Richard Neville, 5th Earl of Salisbury (1400–1460), married Alice Montacute, 5th Countess of Salisbury. Their son was Richard Neville, 16th Earl of Warwick (1428–1471), 'The Kingmaker'.
    Henry Neville.
    Thomas Neville.
    Cuthbert Neville.
    Robert Neville, Bishop of Salisbury and Durham.
    William Neville, 1st Earl of Kent.
    John Neville.
    George Neville, 1st Baron Latimer.
    Edward Neville, 3rd Baron Bergavenny.
    Joan Neville, who became a nun.
    Katherine Neville, married firstly, on 12 January 1411 to John Mowbray, 2nd Duke of Norfolk, secondly to Sir Thomas Strangways, thirdly to John Beaumont, 1st Viscount Beaumont, fourthly to Sir John Woodville (d. 12 August 1469).
    Eleanor Neville (1398–1472), married firstly to Richard le Despencer, 4th Baron Burghersh, secondly to Henry Percy, 2nd Earl of Northumberland.
    Anne Neville (1414–1480), married firstly to Humphrey Stafford, 1st Duke of Buckingham, secondly to Walter Blount, 1st Baron Mountjoy.
    Cecily Neville (1415–1495), married to Richard, 3rd Duke of York. She was the mother of King Edward IV and King Richard III.
    Death[edit]


    The two wives of Ralph Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland, from his monumental effigy, Staindrop Church. His first wife, left, on his right-hand side
    Westmorland died on 21 October 1425. He was buried in the choir of his collegiate church of St. Mary at Staindrop. The magnificent alabaster tomb with effigies of himself and his two wives there has been termed the finest sepulchral monument in the north of England.[1] Neither of his wives is buried with him. His first wife, Margaret Stafford, was buried at Brancepeth, Durham, while his second wife, Joan Beaufort, was buried with her mother under a carved stone canopy in the sanctuary of Lincoln Cathedral.[23]

    Westmorland was predeceased by his eldest son, Sir John Neville, and was succeeded in the title by his grandson, Ralph Neville, 2nd Earl of Westmorland.[24]

    Westmorland is portrayed in Shakespeare's Henry IV, Part 1, Henry IV, Part 2, and Henry V.

    In the opening scene of Henry IV, Part 1, Westmorland is presented historically as an ally of King Henry IV against the Percys, and in the final scenes of the play as being dispatched to the north of England by the King after the Battle of Shrewsbury to intercept the Earl of Northumberland.[25]

    In Act IV of Henry IV, Part 2, Westmorland is portrayed historically as having been principally responsible for quelling the Percy rebellion in 1405 by Archbishop Scrope almost without bloodshed by successfully parleying with the rebels on 29 May 1405 at Shipton Moor.[25]

    However in Henry V Westmorland is unhistorically alleged to have resisted the arguments made in favour of war with France by Archbishop Chichele in the Parliament which began at Leicester on 30 April 1414. Following Hall and Holinshed, Shakespeare attributes these arguments to Chichele[26] at a time when Chichele was not yet formally Archbishop, although he had been appointed by the King immediately following the death of Archbishop Arundel on 14 February 1414. Moreover, it is said that the Parliamentary rolls do not record Chichele's presence, and according to Tait the question of war with France was not discussed. In addition, Westmorland's speech urging the advantages of war against Scotland rather than France is said to be adapted from a work by the Scottish historian, John Major, who was not born until half a century after the 1414 Parliament.[12]

    The First Folio text of Henry V also unhistorically gives these lines to Westmorland on the eve of Agincourt:

    O that we now had here
    But one ten thousand of those men in England
    That do no work today. (Henry V, IV.iii)

    Westmorland was not with King Henry V on the 1415 campaign in France. On 17 April 1415 he was appointed to the Council of Regency which was to govern England under the King's brother, John of Lancaster, 1st Duke of Bedford, during the King's absence in France, with special responsibility for the Scottish Marches.[27] In the first quarto text of the play, the foregoing lines are assigned to the Earl of Warwick.[25]

    It has been claimed by Brenda James and Professor William Rubinstein that Neville's great-great-grandson Sir Henry Neville wrote the works of William Shakespeare.

    *

    NEVILLE, RALPH, sixth Baron Neville of Raby and first Earl of Westmorland (1364-1425), was the eldest son of John de Neville, fifth baron Neville of Raby [q. v.], by his first wife, Maud, daughter of Henry, lord Percy (d. 1352) [q. v.], and aunt of the first earl of Northumberland (Swallow, De Nova Villa, p. 34; Dugdale, Baronage, i. 297).

    He first saw service in the French expedition of July 1380 under the king's uncle Thomas of Woodstock, earl of Buckingham, afterwards duke of Gloucester, who knighted him (Froissart, vii. 321, ed. Lettenhove). Doubtless spending the winter with the earl in Brittany, and returning with him in the spring of 1381, Ralph Neville, towards the close of the year, presided with his cousin Henry Percy, the famous Hotspur (whose mother was a Neville), over a duel between a Scot and an Englishman (Fœdera, xi. 334–5). In 1383 or 1384 he was associated with his father in receiving payment of the final instalments of David Bruce's ransom (Dugdale, i. 297). In the autumn of 1385 (26 Oct.), after the king's invasion of Scotland, he was appointed joint governor of Carlisle with the eldest son of his relative, Lord Clifford of Skipton in Craven, and on 27 March 1386 warden of the west march with the same colleague (Doyle, Official Baronage; Fœdera, vii. 538). On the death of his father (who made him one of his executors) at Newcastle, on 17 Oct. 1388, Ralph Neville at the age of twenty-four became Baron Neville of Raby, and was summoned to parliament under that title from 6 Dec. 1389 (Wills and Inventories, Surtees Soc. i. 42; Nicolas, Historic Peerage).

    A few days afterwards the new baron was appointed, with others, to survey the border fortifications, and in the spring of the next year his command in the west march was renewed for a further term (Doyle). He was made warden for life of the royal forests north of Trent (24 May 1389), and got leave to empark his woods at Raskelf, close to York and his castle of Sheriff-Hutton. The king also gave him a charter for a weekly market at Middleham, and a yearly fair on the day of St. Alkelda, the patron saint of the church (Dugdale). In July 1389, and again in June 1390, he was employed in negotiations with Scotland (Doyle); Fœdera, vii. 672). In June 1391 he obtained a license, along with Sir Thomas Colville of the Dale and other northern gentlemen, to perform feats of arms with certain Scots (Fœdera, vii. 703). The Duke of Gloucester taking the cross in this year, commissioners, headed by Lord Neville, were appointed (4 Dec.) to perform the duties of constable of England (Doyle)). In the summers of 1393 and 1394 he was once more engaged in negotiations for peace with Scotland, and rather later (20 Richard II, 1396–1397) he got possession of the strong castle of Wark on Tweed by exchange with Sir John de Montacute [q. v.], afterwards third earl of Salisbury.

    Neville's power was great in the North country, where he, as lord of Raby and Brancepeth in the bishopric of Durham, and Middleham and Sheriff-Hutton in Yorkshire, was fully the equal, simple baron though he was, of his cousin the head of the Percies. His support was therefore worth securing by King Richard when, in 1397, he took his revenge upon the Duke of Gloucester and other lords appellant of nine years before. The lord of Raby was already closely connected with the crown and the court party by marriage alliances. He had secured for his eldest son, John, the hand of Elizabeth, daughter of the king's stepbrother, Thomas Holland, earl of Kent, who was deep in Richard's counsels, and he himself had taken for his second wife Joan Beaufort, daughter of John of Gaunt, duke of Lancaster, the king's uncle (Dugdale, i. 297; Doyle). When the Earl of Arundel, one of the leading lords appellant, was put on his trial before parliament on Friday, 21 Sept. 1397, Neville, at the command of his father-in-law Lancaster, who presided as seneschal of England, removed the accused's belt and scarlet hood (Adam of Usk, p. 13; Ann. Ricardi II, p. 214). He was no doubt acting as constable, an office of Gloucester's. The Earl of Warwick was also in his custody (Ann. Hen. IV, p. 307). In the distribution of rewards among the king's supporters on 29 Sept., Neville was made Earl of Westmorland (Rot. Parl. iii. 355). He held no land in that county, but it was the nearest county to his estates not yet titularly appropriated, and the grant of the royal honour of Penrith gave him a footing on its borders (Dugdale). He took an oath before the shrine of Edward the Confessor in Westminster Abbey on Sunday, 30 Sept., to maintain what had been done in this ‘parliamentum ferale’ (Rot. Parl. iii. 355).

    But when Richard drove his brother-in-law Henry, earl of Derby, out of the realm, and refused him possession of the Lancaster estates on John of Gaunt's death, Westmorland took sides against the king, and was one of the first to join Henry when he landed in Yorkshire in July 1399 (Adam of Usk, p. 24). He and his relative Northumberland, who had joined Henry at the same time, represented the superior lords temporal in the parliamentary deputation which on 29 Sept. received in the Tower the unfortunate Richard's renunciation of the crown, and next day he was granted for life the office of marshal of England, which had been held by the banished Duke of Norfolk (Rot. Parl. iii. 416; Fœdera, viii. 89, 115). With Northumberland he conveyed Richard's message to convocation on 7 Oct. (Ann. Hen. IV, p. 289). At Henry IV's coronation (13 Oct.) Westmorland bore the small sceptre called the virge, or rod with the dove, his younger half-brother, John Neville, lord Latimer, who was still a minor, carrying the great sceptre royal (Adam of Usk, p. 33; Taylor, Glory of Regality, p. 66) [see under Neville, John, fifth Baron of Raby]. The grant a week later (20 Oct.) of the great honour and lordship of Richmond, forfeited in the late reign by John, duke of Brittany, united his Teesdale and his Wensleydale lands into a solid block of territory, and gave him besides a vast number of manors and fees scattered over great part of England (Doyle; Rot. Parl. iii. 427). The grant, however, was only made for his life, and clearly did not carry with it the title of Earl of Richmond, which was never borne by him, and was granted during his lifetime (1414) to John, duke of Bedford, with the reversion of the castle and lands on Westmorland's death (Third Report of the Lords on the Dignity of a Peer, pp. 96 et seq.). When the earl was in London he sat in the privy council, but as a great northern magnate he was chiefly employed upon the Scottish border (Ord. Privy Council, i. 100 et seq.; Fœdera, viii. 133). In March 1401, however, he was one of the royal commissioners who concluded with the ambassadors of Rupert, king of the Romans, a marriage between Henry's eldest daughter and Rupert's son Louis (ib. pp. 176, 178), and spent the summer in London (Ord. Privy Council, i. 144, 157). But in September he was employed on another Scottish mission, and in the March following was appointed captain of Roxburgh Castle (ib. p. 168; Fœdera, viii. 251; Doyle).

    The garter vacated by the death of Edmund, duke of York, in August 1402 was bestowed upon him. In July 1403 his relatives, the Percies, revolted, and Westmorland found an opportunity of weakening the great rival house in the north. One of Hotspur's grievances was the transference of his captaincy of Roxburgh Castle to Westmorland in the previous March (Rot. Scot. ii. 161). The day after the battle of Shrewsbury, in which Hotspur was slain, Henry wrote to Westmorland and other Yorkshire magnates charging them to levy troops and intercept the Earl of Northumberland, who was marching southward (Fœdera, viii. 319). Westmorland drove the old earl back to Warkworth, and sent an urgent message to Henry, advising him to come into the north, where reports of his death were being circulated by the Percies (Ann. Hen. IV, p. 371). The king arrived at Pontefract on 3 Aug., and three days later transferred the wardenship of the west marches, which Northumberland had held since 1399, to Westmorland (Doyle). Hotspur was replaced as warden of the east march by the king's second son, John, a lad of fourteen, who must necessarily have been much under the influence of the experienced earl. On his return south, Henry directed Westmorland and his brother Lord Furnival to secure the surrender of the Percy castles (Ord. Privy Council, i. 213). But the order was more easily given than executed, and in the parliament of the following February Northumberland was pardoned by the king and publicly reconciled to Westmorland (Rot. Parl. iii. 525). Westmorland and Somerset were the only earls in the council of twenty-two whom the king was induced by the urgency of the commons to designate in parliament (1 March 1404) as his regular advisers (ib. p. 530).

    Northumberland's reconciliation was a hollow one, and in the spring of 1405 he was again in revolt. Remembering how his plans had been foiled by Westmorland two years before, he began with an attempt to get his redoubtable cousin into his power by surprise. In April or May Westmorland happened to be staying in a castle which Mr. Wylie identifies with that of Witton-le-Wear, belonging to Sir Ralph Eure. It was suddenly beset one night by Northumberland at the head of four hundred men. But Westmorland had received timely warning, and was already flown (Ann. Hen. IV p. 400). Towards the close of May the flame of rebellion had broken out at three distinct points. Northumberland was moving southwards to effect a junction with Sir John Fauconberg, Sir John Colville of the Dale, and other Cleveland connections of the Percies and Mowbrays who were in arms near Thirsk, and with the youthful Thomas Mowbray, earl marshal [q. v.], and Archbishop Scrope, who raised a large force in York and advanced northwards. One of Mowbray's grievances was that the office of marshal of England had been given to Westmorland, leaving him only the barren title. Westmorland therefore had an additional spur to prompt action against this threatening combination. Taking with him the young prince John and the forces of the marches, he threw himself by a rapid march between the two main bodies of rebels, routed the Cleveland force at Topcliffe by Thirsk, capturing their leaders, and intercepted the archbishop and Mowbray at Shipton Moor, little more than five miles north of York (Rot. Parl. iii. 604; Eulogium, iii. 405; Ann. Hen. IV, p. 405). Westmorland, finding himself the weaker in numbers, had recourse to guile. Explanations were exchanged between the two camps, and Westmorland, professing approval of the articles of grievance submitted to him by Scrope, invited the archbishop and the earl marshal to a personal conference (ib. p. 406). They met, with equal retinues, between the two camps. Westmorland again declared their demands most reasonable, and promised to use his influence with the king. They then joyfully shook hands over the understanding, and, at Westmorland's suggestion, ratified it with a friendly cup of wine. The unsuspecting archbishop was now easily induced to send and dismiss his followers with the cheerful news. As soon as they had dispersed Westmorland laid hands upon Scrope and Mowbray, and carried them off to Pontefract Castle, where he handed them over to the king a few days later. Unless the consensus of contemporary writers does injustice to Westmorland, he was guilty of a very ugly piece of treachery (ib. p. 407; Chron. ed. Giles, p. 45; Eulogium, iii. 406). Their account is not indeed free from improbabilities, and Otterbourne (i. 256) maintained that Scrope and Mowbray voluntarily surrendered. Their forces were perhaps not wholly trustworthy, and they might have been discouraged by the fate of the Cleveland knights; but the authority of Otterbourne, who wrote under Henry V, can hardly be allowed to outweigh the agreement of more strictly contemporary writers. Westmorland, at all events, had no hand in the hasty and irregular execution of the two unhappy men, for he was despatched northwards from Pontefract on 4 June to seize Northumberland's castles and lands, and his brother-in-law, Thomas Beaufort, was appointed his deputy as marshal for the trial (Fœdera, viii. 399).

    This crisis over, Westmorland returned to his usual employments as warden of the march (in which his eldest son, John, was presently associated with him), and during the rest of the reign was pretty constantly occupied in negotiations with Scotland, whose sympathy with France and reception of Northumberland were counterbalanced by the capture of the heir to the throne (Fœdera, viii. 418, 514, 520, 678, 686, 737). He had made himself one of the great props of his brother-in-law's throne. Two of his brothers—Lord Furnival, who for a time was war treasurer, and Lord Latimer—were peers, and towards the close of the reign he began to make those fortunate marriages for his numerous family by his second wife which enabled the younger branch of Neville to play so decisive a part in after years. One of the earliest of these marriages was that of his daughter Catherine in 1412 to the young John Mowbray, brother and heir of the unfortunate earl marshal who had been entrusted to his guardianship by the king (Testamenta Eboracensia, iii. 321). Shortly after Henry V's accession Westmorland must have resigned the office of marshal of England into the hands of his son-in-law, in whose family it was hereditary (Fœdera, ix. 300).

    Thanks to Shakespeare, Westmorland is best known as the cautious old statesman who is alleged to have resisted the interested incitements of Archbishop Chichele and the clergy to war with France in the parliament at Leicester in April 1414, and was chidden by Henry for expressing a de- spondent wish the night before Agincourt that they had there

    But one ten thousand of those men in England

    That do no work to-day.

    But neither episode has any good historical warrant. They are first met with in Hall (d. 1547), from whom Shakespeare got them through Holinshed (Hall, Chronicle, p. 50). Chichele was not yet archbishop at the time of the Leicester parliament; the question of war was certainly not discussed there, and the speeches ascribed to Chichele and Westmorland are obviously of later composition. Westmorland, in urging the superior advantages of war upon Scotland, if war there must be, is made to quote from the Scottish historian John Major [q. v.], who was not born until 1469. The famous ejaculation before Agincourt was not made by Westmorland, for he did not go to France with the king. He was left behind to guard the Scottish marches and assist the regent Bedford as a member of his council (Ord. Privy Council, ii. 157). Henry had also appointed him one of the executors of the will which he made (24 July) before leaving England (Fœdera, ix. 289). The author of the ‘Gesta Henrici’ (p. 47), who was with the army in France, tells us that it was Sir Walter Hungerford [q. v.] who was moved by the smallness of their numbers to long openly for ten thousand English archers. The attitude imputed to Westmorland in these anecdotes is, however, sufficiently in keeping with his advancing age and absorption in the relations of England to Scotland, and may just possibly preserve a genuine tradition of opposition on his part to the French war. In any case, he never went to France, devoting himself to his duties on the borders, and leaving the hardships and the glory of foreign service to his sons. He was one of the executors of Henry's last will, and a member of the council of regency appointed to rule in the name of his infant son (Rot. Parl. iv. 175, 399). As late as February 1424 he was engaged in his unending task of negotiating with Scotland (Ord. Privy Council, iii. 139). On 21 Oct. in the following year he died, at what, in those days, was the advanced age of sixty-two, and was buried in the choir of the Church of Staindrop, at the gates of Raby, in which he had founded three chantries in 1343 (Swallow, p. 314). His stately and finely sculptured tomb of alabaster, in spite of the injuries it has received since its removal to the west end to make way for the tombs of the Vanes, remains the finest sepulchral monument in the north of England. It has been figured by Gough in his ‘Sepulchral Monuments’ (1786), by Stothard in his ‘Monumental Effigies’ (1817), and by Surtees in his ‘History of Durham.’ It bears recumbent effigies of Westmorland and his two wives. His features, so far as they are revealed by the full armour in which he is represented, are too youthful and too regular to allow us to regard it as a portrait (Swallow, De Nova Villa, p. 311; Oman, Warwick the Kingmaker, p. 17). The skeleton of the earl, which was discovered during some excavations in the chancel, is said to have been that of a very tall man with a diseased leg ({{sc|Swallow}, p. 315).

    In his will, made at Raby, 18 Oct. 1424, besides bequests to his children and the friars, nuns, and anchorites of the dioceses of York and Durham, he left three hundred marks to complete the college of Staindrop, and a smaller sum towards the erection of bridges over the Ure, near Middleham, and the Tees at Winston, near Raby (Wills and Inventories, Surtees Soc., i. 68–74). Westmorland was, in fact, no inconsiderable builder. He rebuilt the castle of Sheriff-Hutton, twelve miles north-east of York, on the ridge between Ouse and Derwent, on a scale so magnificent that Leland saw ‘no house in the north so like a princely lodging,’ and the Neville saltire impaling the arms of England and France for his second wife may still be seen on its crumbling and neglected ruins. The church of Sheriff-Hutton has had inserted some of those curious flat-headed windows which are peculiar to the churches on the Neville manors, and they may very well be Westmorland's additions (Murray, Yorkshire, under Staindrop, Well, and Sheriff-Hutton). At Staindrop he added the chamber for the members of his new college on the north side of the choir, and the last bay of the nave in which his tomb now lies. The license to establish a college for a master or warden, six clerks, six decayed gentlemen, six poor officers, and other poor men, for whose support the advowson of the church was set aside with two messuages and twelve acres of land for their residence, was granted on 1 Nov. 1410 (Monasticon Anglicanum, vi. 1401; cf. {{sc|Swallow}, p. 314). Westmorland doubled the entrance gateway of Raby Castle, and threw forward the south-western tower, now called Joan's tower, to correspond (see Pritchett in the Reports and Journal of the British Archµological Association, 1886, 1887, 1889). He is also said to have been the builder of the tall and striking tower of Richmond parish church.

    Westmorland was twice married: first (before 1370) to Margaret, daughter of Hugh, second earl of Stafford (d. 1386); and, secondly (before 20 Feb. 1397), to Joan Beaufort, daughter of John of Gaunt, duke of Lancaster, by Catherine Swynford, and widow of Sir Robert Ferrers. She survived him, dying on 13 Nov. 1440 and being buried in Lincoln Cathedral, though her effigy is also on her husband's tomb at Staindrop. The inscription on her monument is quoted by Swallow (p. 137). Joan had some taste for literature. Thomas Hoccleve [q. v.] dedicated a volume of his works to her, and we hear of her lending the ‘Chronicles of Jerusalem’ and the ‘Voyage of Godfrey Bouillon’ to her nephew, Henry V (Fœdera, x. 317).

    The Nevilles were a prolific race, but Westmorland surpassed them all. He had no less than twenty-three children by his two wives—nine by the first, and fourteen by the second. The children of the first marriage, seven of whom were females, were thrown into the shade by the offspring of his more splendid second alliance which brought royal blood into the family. Westmorland devoted himself indefatigably to found the fortunes of his second family by a series of great matches, and a good half of the old Neville patrimony, the Yorkshire estates, was ultimately diverted to the younger branch.

    Thus the later earls of Westmorland had a landed position inferior to that of their ancestors, who were simple barons, and the real headship of the Neville house passed to the eldest son of the second family. Westmorland's children by his first wife were: (1) John, who fought in France and on the Scottish borders, and died before his father (1423); he married Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Holland, earl of Kent, and their son Ralph succeeded his grandfather as second Earl of Westmorland in 1425 (see below). (2) Ralph of Oversley, near Alcester, in Warwickshire, in right of his wife Mary (b. 1393), daughter and coheiress of Robert, baron Ferrers of Wem in Shropshire. (3) Mathilda married Peter, lord Mauley (d. 1414). (4) Philippa married Thomas, lord Dacre of Gillsland (d. 1457). (5) Alice married, first, Sir Thomas Grey of Heton; and, secondly, Sir Gilbert Lancaster. (6) Elizabeth, who became a nun in the Minories. (7) Anne, who married Sir Gilbert Umfreville of Kyme. (8) Margaret, who married, first, Richard, lord le Scrope of Bolton in Wensleydale (d. 1420), and, secondly, William Cressener, dying in 1463; and (9) Anastasia.

    By his second wife Neville had nine sons and five daughters: (1) Richard Neville, earl of Salisbury [q. v.] (2) William, baron Fauconberg [q. v.] (3) George, summoned to parliament as Baron Latimer, 1432-69, his father having transferred to him that barony which he had bought from his childless half-brother John, who inherited it from his mother [see under Neville, John, d. 1388)]. George Neville's male descendants held the barony of Latimer till 1577, when it fell into abeyance [see Neville, John, third Baron Latimer]. (5) Robert [q. v.], bishop successively of Salisbury and Durham. (6) Edward, baron of Bergavenny [q. v.] (7–9) Three sons who died young. (10) Joan, a nun. (11) Catherine, married, first, John Mowbray, second duke of Norfolk [q. v.]; secondly, Thomas Strangways; thirdly, Viscount Beaumont (d. 1460); and, fourthly, John Wydeville, brother-in-law of Edward IV. (12) Anne, married, first, Humphrey, first duke of Buckingham (d. 1460) [q. v.]; and, secondly, Walter Blount, first baron Mountjoy (d. 1474). (13) Eleanor, married, first, Richard, lord le Despenser (d. 1414); and, secondly, Henry Percy, second earl of Northumberland (d. 1455). (14) Cicely, who married Richard Plantagenet, duke of York, and was mother of Edward IV.

    Ralph Neville, second Earl of Westmorland (d. 1484), son of John, the eldest son of the first earl by his first wife, married a daughter of Hotspur, and left active Lancastrian partisanship to his younger brothers. He died in 1484. His only son having perished at the battle of St. Albans in 1455, he was succeeded as third Earl of Westmorland by his nephew, Ralph (1456–1523), son of his brother John. This John Neville was a zealous Lancastrian. He took a prominent part in the struggle with the younger branch of the Nevilles for the Yorkshire lands of the first Earl of Westmorland, was summoned to parliament as Lord Neville after the Yorkist collapse in 1459, and was rewarded for his services at Wakefield in December 1460 with the custody of the Yorkshire castles of his uncle and enemy, Salisbury, who was slain there (see under Richard Neville, Earl of Salisbury;Nicolas, Historic Peerage, p. 345; Chron. ed. Davies, p. 106). A Yorkist chronicler accuses him of treacherously getting York's permission to raise troops, which he then used against him (ib.) A few months later he was slain at Towton (30 March 1461). When his son Ralph became third Earl of Westmorland, the barony of Neville merged in the earldom of Westmorland, which came to an end with the attainder of Charles Neville, sixth earl [q. v.], in 1571.

    [Rotuli Parliamentorum; Proceedings and Ordinances of the Privy Council, ed. Nicolas; Rymer's Fœdera, original edition; Lords' Report on the Dignity of a Peer; Adam of Usk. ed. Maunde Thompson; Annales Ricardi II et Hen- rici IV with Trokelowe in Rolls Ser.; Gesta Henrici V, ed. Williams for English Historical Society; Otterbourne's Chronicle, ed. Hearne; Testamenta Eboracensia and Wills and Inventories, published by the Surtees Soc.; Hall's Chronicle, ed. Ellis; Dugdale's Baronage and Monasticon Anglicanum, ed. Caley, Ellis, and Bandinel; Rowland's Account of the Noble Family of Nevill, 1830; Swallow, De Nova Villa, 1885; Nicolas's Historic Peerage, ed. Courthope; Wylie's Hist. of Henry IV; Ramsay's Lancaster and York; other authorities in the text.]

    *

    Westmorland was twice married: first (before 1370) to Margaret, daughter of Hugh, second earl of Stafford (d. 1386); and, secondly (before 20 Feb. 1397), to Joan Beaufort, daughter of John of Gaunt, duke of Lancaster, by Catherine Swynford, and widow of Sir Robert Ferrers. She survived him, dying on 13 Nov. 1440 and being buried in Lincoln Cathedral, though her effigy is also on her husband's tomb at Staindrop.

    The inscription on her monument is quoted by Swallow (p. 137). Joan had some taste for literature. Thomas Hoccleve [q. v.] dedicated a volume of his works to her, and we hear of her lending the 'Chronicles of Jerusalem' and the 'Voyage of Godfrey Bouillon' to her nephew, Henry V (Fœdera, x. 317).

    *

    Buried:
    Images of St. Mary's ... https://www.google.com/search?q=staindrop+church&rlz=1C1KMZB_enUS591US591&espv=2&biw=1440&bih=815&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjzxuiz6Z_LAhUKPCYKHQf1AA4QsAQIOA

    Died:
    Images and history of Raby Castle, Staindrop, Durham, England ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raby_Castle

    Ralph married Margaret Stafford, Countess of Westmorland Abt 1382, Chateau Beaufort, Meurthe-et-Moselle, France. Margaret (daughter of Hugh Stafford, Knight, 2nd Earl of Stafford and Philippa Beauchamp) was born Abt 1364, Stafford Castle, Stafford, Staffordshire, England; died 9 Jun 1396, Castle Raby, Raby-Keverstone, Durham, England. [Group Sheet]


  14. 63.  Margaret Stafford, Countess of Westmorland was born Abt 1364, Stafford Castle, Stafford, Staffordshire, England (daughter of Hugh Stafford, Knight, 2nd Earl of Stafford and Philippa Beauchamp); died 9 Jun 1396, Castle Raby, Raby-Keverstone, Durham, England.
    Children:
    1. 31. Philippa Neville, Baroness Dacre was born 0___ 1386, Castle Raby, Raby-Keverstone, Durham, England; died 0___ 1453.
    2. John Neville, II, Knight was born Abt 1387, Castle Raby, Raby-Keverstone, Durham, England; died Bef 20 Mar 1420, (Castle Raby, Raby-Keverstone, Durham, England).
    3. Anne Neville
    4. Ralph Neville died 25 Feb 1458.
    5. Margaret Neville was born 1396, Raby, Durham, England; died ~ 4 Mar 1463.


Generation: 7

  1. 100.  Godfrey Foljambe, IV, Knight was born ~ 1344, (Tideswell) Derbyshire, England (son of Godfrey de Foljambe, Knight and Avena Ireland); died 29 May 1376, Darley, Derbyshire, England.

    Godfrey married Margaret de Villiers 0___ 1364, Hassop, Derbyshire, England. Margaret was born 0___ 1345, Kinoulton, Nottinghamshire, England; died ~ 1398, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 101.  Margaret de Villiers was born 0___ 1345, Kinoulton, Nottinghamshire, England; died ~ 1398, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Margaret Villiers

    Children:
    1. 50. Godfrey Foljambe, V, Knight was born 0___ 1367, Hassop, Derbyshire, England; died 0___ 1388, Plumpton, Yorkshire, England; was buried Bakewell, Derbyshire, England.

  3. 102.  Simon Leeke, of Leake & Cotham was born ~ 1345, (Nottinghamshire, England) (son of John Leek and Isabel Towers); died ~ 1382.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Member of Parliament (for Nottinghamshire, England)
    • Also Known As: Sir Simon Lecke
    • Also Known As: Sir Simon Leek

    Notes:

    Simon Leeke, Esq.
    Also Known As: "Simon Leke"
    Birthdate: circa 1345 (81)
    Birthplace: Probably Cotham, Nottinghamshire, England
    Death: between 1426 and 1430 (77-89)
    England
    Immediate Family:
    Son of Sir John Leek, MP and Isabel Towers
    Husband of Margaret Vaux and Joan Leek
    Father of William Leek, MP; Ralph Leke; Margaret Leek; Elizabeth Hercye; Mary Daubeney and 1 other
    Brother of John Lake and Beatrice Leake
    Managed by: Patricia Norton Chong
    Last Updated: May 4, 2017

    About Simon Leek, MP, of Leake & Cotham
    Family and Education m. after June 1410, Isabel (d. Mar. 1436), da. and coh. of John Grey (d.1403) of Sandiacre and Sutton-in-the-Dale, Derbys. and Hickling, Notts. by his w. Emily (d.1435); wid. of John Walsh of Sibsey, Lincs., s.p.1

    Offices Held Commr. to make arrests, Staffs. Dec. 1411; raise a royal loan Nov. 1419, Jan. 1420.

    Sheriff, Staffs. 23 Nov. 1419-d.

    Biography Although his immediate ancestry remains somewhat obscure, it seems likely that Haughton was a grandson of Sir Thomas Haughton (d. by 1369), and therefore the nephew, or perhaps even the younger son of the Humphrey Haughton who died in 1387, seised of estates in Haughton and High Offley in Staffordshire. The property was farmed out at an annual rent of ¹10 by Richard II during the minority of Haughton’s son, Thomas, but at some point over the next 11 years it came into the hands of the subject of this biography.2 Marriage even more than inheritance helped to establish the shire knight as a figure of consequence in the north Midlands, since his wife, Isabel Walsh, was joint coheiress with her sister, Alice (the wife of John Leek*), to a substantial patrimony. Her father, John Grey, sometime sheriff of Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire, owned land in both counties, although it was from her long-lived mother that Isabel eventually inherited the holdings in Harston, Leicestershire, Horncastle and Gunthorpe, Lincolnshire, and Crowneast Court and Rugg’s Place, Worcestershire, which she occupied for barely a few months before she herself died in 1436. According to the tax returns of 1412, Haughton even then enjoyed a landed income of ¹20 from Derbyshire alone, so he had probably married by this date.3

    Very little is known about Haughton’s career, which evidently passed without incident until December 1411, when he served on his first royal commission. Not long afterwards he was involved as an accessory to the murder of William Crofts, a crime for which he was indicted at the beginning of Henry V’s reign. During the Easter term of 1414, Thomas Dunston sued him for cattle-stealing, but the action proved no more successful than one which Haughton himself brought two years later against a local man for poaching on his free warren at Forbridge, Staffordshire. He was again summoned to appear in court at Easter 1419, being fined on this occasion for his complicity in the theft of crops from a neighbouring farmer.4 But not all his energies were given over to litigation, and Haughton was sometimes caught up in the affairs of other landowners. In 1414, for example, he stood bail for Thomas Swynnerton, and he is known to have acted as a feoffee-to-uses, most notably for the latter’s kinsman, John Swynnerton*, various members of the Knightly family of Northamptonshire and the King’s esquire, John Hampton the elder.5 In March 1418 Haughton and Sir Robert Francis* were commissioned by the attorneys of Sir William Bourgchier* and his wife, Anne, dowager countess of Stafford, to assign dower to Thomasina Chetwynd. One of these attorneys was Roger Flore* of Oakham, the chief steward of the duchy of Lancaster, who may possibly have used his great influence in Staffordshire to secure Haughton’s election as a shire knight in the Parliament of March 1416.6

    In March 1420, Haughton made a personal contribution towards the loan of ¹2,873 raised by the Crown to finance the war with France. He died on 29 Aug. of that year, during his term as sheriff of Staffordshire. His widow was almost immediately sued by Nicholas and Isabel Rickhill for possession of her husband’s manors of Haughton, High Offley and Doxey, although since the Rickhills claimed to be heirs to the property the action may well have been collusive. Isabel Haughton died in March 1436, hardly a year after her mother’s estates had finally come into her possession. Since she was still childless, these and all her other holdings passed to her sister, Alice Leek, who was eventually succeeded, in 1459, by a young grandson.7

    Ref Volumes: 1386-1421 Author: C.R. Notes Variants: Halghton, Haloghton, Haloughton.

    1. C139/74/17; CFR, xii. 221, 237, xiii. 180, xvi. 215, 232, 291. 2.CIPM, xv. no. 453; ibid. (Rec. Comm.), iii. 250; CFR, x. 204; VCH Staffs. iv. 138-9; Wm. Salt Arch. Soc. xi. 149-50. 3. C139/74/17; CFR, xii. 237; Feudal Aids, vi. 413; PRO List ‘Sheriffs’, 103. 4.Wm. Salt Arch. Soc. xvii. 8, 36, 49-50, 56. 5. Ibid. iv. 15; xvii. 19, 95; n.s. ii. 157; Wm. Salt Lib. Stafford, D1790/A/3/87-88; Northants. Fams. 179. 6.Wm. Salt Arch. Soc. xii. 308-11; Staffs. Parl. Hist. i (Wm. Salt Arch. Soc.), 183. 7.Wm. Salt Arch. Soc. xvii. 80, 83-84; CFR, xvi. 232, 291; C139/74/17; E403/645.

    Simon Leek (d. 1420s) of Leake and Cotham, Notts

    Notes

    from Re: Talbot of Swannington, Bellers, and Leek 2004
    According to Simon Payling's *Political Society in Lancastrian England: The Greater Gentry of Nottinghamshire* (1991), Simon Leek (d. 1420s) of Leake and Cotham, Notts., was married to Joan Talbot, daughter of Sir John Talbot of Swannington. Payling indicates that Simon Leek and Joan Talbot were married ca. 1405. Roskell, in *The House of Commons 1386-1421*, mentions that Simon Leek's wife (Joan) was the cousin of a Walter Prest of Melton Mowbray.

    Links

    Leeke 1: Leeke of Cotham, Leke of Scarsdale, Leake /Leeke / Leke of Sutton
    1. Sir Simon not John Leeke of Cotham, Nottinghamshire b about 1375

    Named John by the Visitation but the SGM correspondence mentioned below reports that this was a mistake for Simon. The SGM correspondence identifies Simons's wife as Margaret Vaux

    Links

    http://www.multiwords.de/genealogy/leeke01.htm
    Named John by the Visitation but the SGM correspondence mentioned below reports that this was a mistake for Simon. The SGM correspondence identifies Simons's wife as ... m Margaret Vaux http://www.multiwords.de/genealogy/leeke01.htm

    end of biography

    Simon and his wife Margaret Vaux were related in the fourth degree on both sides, and contacted their marriage without banns. They received a dispensation and their children were declared legitimate.
    ---
    Of Hassop, Derbyshire?
    ---
    Roskell in HoP 1386-1421 Vol II (sub John Leek) refers to the fact that Sir Simon Leek, of Cotham, Notts (d c1383) had a papal dispensation in respect of his marriage. This is the source reference, from The Calendar of Papal Letters concerning England, Vol 3 1342-1362, p 456:

    "Kal. June 1351: to the Abbot of Welbeck: mandate to dispense Simon de Leyk, donsel, and Margaret de Vaux, so as to remain in the marriage which they contracted without banns, knowing that they are related in the 4th degree of kindred on both sides, first enjoining them a salutary penance, and declaring their offspring legitimate".

    I have been trying to ascertain the relationship between Simon Leek and his cousin-wife Margaret de Vaux, but without luck.

    As has been noted here before, Thoroton gave up trying to untangle the skein of Nottinghamshire Leeks, and thus is of little use. The Visitations for that county, as published by the Harleian Society, contain a Leek stemma, but this calls Sir Simon "Sir John Leek", and thus weakens the credence that can be placed on the further assertion that his father was also Sir John, of Cotham. I have also searched the published IPMs to no avail.

    The only reference to this Vaux family comes from Roskell, in which he states that the four daughters of Simon Leek, MP (the grandson of Sir Simon) put forward a claim to be the heirs of one John Vaux; I haven't yet chased up each of his references to see what the nature of this claim was.

    The off-spring whose legitimacy was thus preserved included Sir John Leek (whose granddaughters and eventual coheirs married Sir Giles Daubeney, Sir John Markham, Hugh Hercy and Richard Willoughby, respectively), William Leek, MP, and Margaret, successively wife of Godfrey Foljambe and Sir Thomas Rempston, KG. (mjcar and another on soc.genealogy.medieval)
    ---
    Payling, if I recall correctly (my notes are at home, so I'll have to verify this), indicated that the Leeks were an old (traceable back to the time of either Henry II or John if I'm not mistaken) family in the neighborhood, but not particularly distinguished, and that Sir Simon's marriage to Margaret Vaux was a real move up the social ladder (as it were) is rather interesting in light of [the fact that] hat they were related within a prohibited degree...

    _UID: 14256554B19A40AD99C705D97C8274E3BD89
    Change Date: 26 JAN 2009

    Sources:

    Type: Book
    Periodical: Yorkshire Pedigrees
    Author: Foster
    Date: 1874
    Page: Foljambe
    Text: Jeffery A. Duvall

    Posting on GEN-MEDIEVAL-L or soc.genealogy.medieval

    end of biography

    Simon married Margaret Vaux Bef June 1351, (Nottinghamshire, England). Margaret was born ~ 1375, Nottinghamshire, England; died 0___ 1390, Cotham, Nottinghamshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 103.  Margaret Vaux was born ~ 1375, Nottinghamshire, England; died 0___ 1390, Cotham, Nottinghamshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Margaret de Vaux

    Notes:

    The only reference to this Vaux family comes from Roskell, in which he states that the four daughters of Simon Leek, MP (the grandson of Sir Simon) put forward a claim to be the heirs of one John Vaux; I haven't yet chased up each of his references to see what the nature of this claim was.
    (mjcar on soc.genealogy.medieval)
    ---
    Payling notes that Margaret Vaux brought the following properties to Sir Simon Leek (d. ca. 1382): "Cotham and lands over the Lincs border at Westborough, Dry Doddington, Stubton, and Thorp.
    ---
    History of Nottinghamshire by Robert Thoroton seems to support the descent of the Manor of Cotum from Vaus to Leeke.
    ---

    Political Society in Lancastrian England: The Greater Gentry of Nottinghamshire? - Page 64
    by Simon Payling - Political Science - 1991 - 276 pages
    ... the families of Saundby and Vaux to their own before they themselves failed
    ... the Cressy estates and later a large share of the Leek of Cotham lands, ...
    _UID: 8C824304B91E4CDEB205B08212FCAD686253
    Change Date: 26 JAN 2009

    end of note

    Margaret Vaux
    Birthdate: circa 1375 (15)
    Birthplace: Nottinghamshire, England
    Death: 1390 (11-19)
    Cotham, Nottinghamshire, England
    Immediate Family:
    Daughter of John Vaux
    Wife of Simon Leek, MP, of Leake & Cotham
    Mother of William Leek, MP and Ralph Leke
    Managed by: George J. Homs
    Last Updated: May 3, 2017

    end of profile

    Birth:
    daughter of Sir John Vaux...

    Children:
    1. 51. Isabel Leeke was born 0___ 1371, Bakewell, Derbyshire, England.

  5. 104.  Miles Stapleton, II, KnightMiles Stapleton, II, Knight was born 1318-1320, Bedale, Yorkshire, England (son of Gilbert Stapleton, Knight and Agnes FitzAlan); died 0Dec 1364, (Bedale, Yorkshire, England); was buried Holy Trinity Church, Ingham, Norfolkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Sir Miles Stapleton of Bedale

    Notes:

    Sir Miles Stapleton of Bedale (or of Cotherstone) KG (1320?-1364) was an English knight, one of the Knights Founder of the Order of the Garter. He was the eldest son of Gilbert de Stapleton, knt. (d. 1321), and the grandson of Miles de Stapleton (d. 1314). His mother was Matilda (b. 1298), also called Agnes, elder daughter and coheiress of Brian FitzAlan, lord of Bedale, Askham Bryan, and Cotherstone. Through his paternal line, he was a great-grandson of Dervorguilla of Galloway, mother of John Balliol, King of Scotland, and a descendant of the Bruces by Laderia, daughter of Peter III de Brus of Skelton and grandmother of Sir Gilbert. Sir Miles Stapleton of Bedale should not be confused with Sir Miles Stapleton of Haddlesey (ca. 1318–1372), occasionally identified as le seigneur.

    Only an infant at the death of his father, he was at the Siege of Tournai (1340) with his younger brother Brian Stapleton, and then fought in Brittany during the War of Breton Succession. He was probably at the siege of Calais in 1347. He participated in three tournaments between October 1347 and January 1348, at Bury St Edmunds, Eltham, and Windsor, after which he was described as a knight of the chamber in the Wardrobe accounts.

    In October 1351 Stapleton joined the newly knighted William Latimer abroad. In 1354 he participated in an embassy to Pope Innocent VI requesting intervention in the Anglo-French war. Stapleton joined Henry Lancaster's raid across Normandy in 1356 in support of Philippe de Navarre, whom he served in 1358 as a messenger. In June 1361 he received an annuity of 100l. from the exchequer for his ‘unwearied labours and laudable services.’.[1] He may have been the Miles Stapleton who was one of the witnesses to the treaty of Brâetigny in 1360. In March 1361 and August 1362 he served on commissions of peace with the Earl of Suffolk. In January 1363 Stapleton was one of a group of English knights recorded as borrowing money from local merchants at Thorn in Poland, most likely during a Prussian crusade.

    He died in December of 1364, possibly, as the family historian conjectures, of wounds received in the battle of Auray (29 September 1364).

    Family

    He was three times married. By his first wife he had a son John, who died in 1355. He married his second wife in 1350. This lady was Joan, daughter and coheiress of Oliver de Ingham in Norfolk, and widow of Roger Lestrange of Nockin. Henceforward Stapleton is as often described as 'of Ingham' as of 'Bedale', and became a considerable proprietor in Norfolk. Stapleton's eldest son John died before him, and he was succeeded at Ingham as well as Bedale by Miles, his son by the heiress of Ingham. Their only other issue was a daughter Joan, married to Sir John Plays. Another three generations in the male line succeeded Stapleton and Ingleton, after which the property was divided among coheiresses.

    References

    This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: "Stapleton, Miles de (d.1364) (DNB00)". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900.

    Caroline Shenton, ‘Stapleton, Sir Miles, of Bedale (1320?–1364)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, OUP, 2004;
    Jump up ^ Calendar of the patent rolls preserved in the Public Record Office, 1358–61, 429

    Buried:
    Sir Miles Stapleton, whose tomb stands in Ingham’s Holy Trinity church alongside that of his father in law, Sir Oliver de Ingham.

    Died:
    He died in December of 1364, possibly, as the family historian conjectures, of wounds received in the battle of Auray (29 September 1364).

    Miles married Joan de Ingham, Baroness Ingham 30 Nov 1350. Joan (daughter of Oliver de Ingham, Knight, Lord Ingham and Elizabeth la Zouche) was born ~ 1320, Ellesmere, Shropshire, England; died 12 Dec 1365, Ingham, Norfolkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  6. 105.  Joan de Ingham, Baroness Ingham was born ~ 1320, Ellesmere, Shropshire, England (daughter of Oliver de Ingham, Knight, Lord Ingham and Elizabeth la Zouche); died 12 Dec 1365, Ingham, Norfolkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Jane de Ingham

    Notes:

    Joan was the daughter and coheiress of Oliver de Ingham in Norfolk, and widow of Roger Le Strange of Nockin.

    Joan married Sir Roger Le Strange 4th Baron Strange of Knockyn, son of Sir John Le Strange 2nd Baron le Strange of Knockyn and Iseult (Isolda), before March 25, 1344.He was her 1st husband and his 2nd wife. (Sir Roger Le Strange 4th Baron Strange of Knockyn was born on 15 Aug 1301 in Knockin, Oswestry, Shropshire, England and died on 29 Jul 1349 in Sedgebrook, Lincolnshire, England

    Joan also married Sir Miles II Staplton K.G., of Bedale, son of Sir Gilbert de Stapleton of Bedale and Agnes FitzAlan Heiress of Bedale, on 30 Nov 1350. her 2nd husband and his 2nd wife. (Sir Miles II Staplton K.G., of Bedale was born in 1320 in Bedale, North Riding Yorkshire, England, died on 4 Oct 1364 in Battle of Auray, France and was buried in Ingham, Smallburgh, Norfolk, England.)

    Henceforward Stapleton is often described as 'of Ingham' as of 'Bedale', and became a considerable proprietor in Norfolk. Stapleton's eldest son John died before him, and he was succeeded at Ingham as well as Bedale by Miles, his son by the heiress of Ingham.

    *

    Died:
    at Ingham Manor...

    Children:
    1. 52. Miles Stapleton, III, Knight was born 23 Jun 1357, Bedale, Yorkshire, England; died 10 Apr 1419, Bedale, Yorkshire, England.

  7. 106.  Edmund de Ufford was born Bef 1314, Belstead, Suffolk, England; died 3 Oct 1374, Clavering, Essex, England; was buried Langley Abbey, Langley, Norfolkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Will: 1 Sep 1374
    • Probate: 3 Oct 1375

    Notes:

    Biography

    Father Sir Thomas de Ufford10,11 b. b 1286, d. 24 Jun 1314

    Mother Eve de Clavering10,11 b. bt 1295 - 1305, d. 20 Sep 1369

    Sir Edmund de Ufford married Alice before July 1338.12,5,8 Sir Edmund de Ufford married Sybil de Pierrepoint, daughter of Sir John de Pierrepoint and Ela de Calthorpe, circa 1348; They had 1 son (Sir Robert) and 1 daughter (Ela, wife of Sir Miles Stapleton).4,7,9 Sir Edmund de Ufford left a will on 1 September 1374.4,7 His estate was probated on 3 October 1375; Buried at Langley Abbey, Norfolk.4,7

    Family 1

    Alice d. b 25 Oct 1339

    Family 2

    Sybil de Pierrepoint b. c 1325

    Children

    Sir Robert de Ufford, Lord Clavering+13,4,7 b. c 1350, d. bt 7 Jan 1390 - 1393

    Ela Ufford+14,2,3,4,6,7,9 b. c 1355, d. 1425

    Sources

    [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. I, p. 109.
    [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. I, p. 390.
    [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. I, p. 497.
    [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. II, p. 350.
    [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. II, p. 61.
    [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. II, p. 229.
    [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. III, p. 218.
    [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. V, p. 35.
    [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. I, p. 494-495.
    [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. II, p. 227-228.
    Burke, John & Burke, Bernard. A General and Heraldic Dictionary of the Peerages of England, Ireland, and Scotland (Henry Colburn, 1846) Page 419
    "This Simon leaving a daughter (only), Sibilla, who m. Edmund Ufford"
    Page, Augustine. A Topographical and Genealogical History of the County of Suffolk (Ipswich: F. Pawsey, 1847) Page 7
    Sussex Archaeological Society. Sussex Archaeological Collections (Sussex Archaeological Society, H.Wolff, 64 High Street, Lewes, England, 1859) Vol. 11, Page 62, Vol. 12, Page 32
    Banks, Thomas. Baronia Anglica Concentrata (Simpkin, Marshall, and Co. London, 1843) Vol. 2, Page

    Buried:
    Langley Abbey was an abbey of Premonstratensian Canons in Langley Green, now in the civil parish of Langley with Hardley, Norfolk, England.

    There are remains of the church and barn as well as earthworks of other buildings and fish ponds. The site was partially restored and opened to the public to a museum in 2010.

    Photos, history & source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Langley_Abbey

    Edmund married Sybil Pierrepoint ~ 1348. [Group Sheet]


  8. 107.  Sybil Pierrepoint
    Children:
    1. 53. Ela de Ufford was born 0___ 1362, Belstead, Suffolk, England; died 10 Apr 1419, (Norfolkshire) England; was buried Ingham Priory, Norfolk, England.

  9. 108.  John Bardolf, Knight Banneret, 3rd Lord Bardolf was born 13 Jan 1314, Wormegay, Norfolk, England; died 29 Jul 1363, Assisi, Italy.

    Notes:

    John Bardolf, 3rd Baron Bardolf, Knight Banneret, (of Wormegay, Norfolk; 13 January 1314 – 29 July 1363), was a baron in the Peerage of England. He was the son of Thomas Bardolf, 2nd Baron Bardolf and Agnes Grandison, thought to be the daughter of William de Grandison, 1st Baron Grandison.[1]

    John Bardolf was in his minority when his father died in 1331 and in 1336, upon proof of his age being given, he did homage and was awarded livery of his lands which in addition to Wormegay included the lands and manors of Cantley, & Caistor, Norfolk, Owmby, Lincolnshire, and Addington, Surrey.

    He was summoned to parliament from 22 January 1336, to 1 June 1363 by Writs directed to Johanni Bardolf de Wirmegey.

    This nobleman participated in the glories of the martial reign of King Edward III, notably in Scotland, Brittany, and even Germany, and attained the dignity of Knight banneret.

    Family[edit]
    He married Elizabeth Damory, daughter and heiress of Sir Roger d'Amory, Lord Damory,[1] whom William Dugdale calls "that great woman", by whom he acquired a considerable accession of landed property. They had two daughters, Agnes and Elizabeth (or Isabel), and one son and heir, William.[1]

    John, Lord Bardolf, died at Assisi in Italy, and was succeeded by his son, William Bardolf, 4th Baron Bardolf.

    end

    John — Elizabeth d'Amory. [Group Sheet]


  10. 109.  Elizabeth d'Amory (daughter of Roger d'Amory, Lord d'Amory and Elizabeth de Clare).
    Children:
    1. 54. William Bardolf, Knight, 3rd & 4th Baron Damory was born 21 Oct 1349, Wormegay, Norfolk, England; died 29 Jan 1386, Norfolkshire, England.

  11. 110.  Michael de Poynings, 1st Baron Poynings was born ~ 1318, Bures St. Mary, Suffolkshire, England; died 7 Mar 1369; was buried Poynings, Sussex, England.

    Notes:

    Michael de Poynings, 1st Baron Poynings, Knt. (c.1318 - 7 March 1369),[1] of Bures St. Mary, Suffolk, was an English nobleman and soldier. He was present at the Battle of Crâecy.

    Michael de Poynings was summoned to Parliament by writs direct to Michaeli de Ponynges from 20 November 1348 to 24 February 1368.[2] On account of the valiant conduct of his father, Thomas, who died in 1339 in battle at the storming of Hunycourt in Vermandois, France, the King received Michael's homage, though the latter was under age, and granted him livery of his lands and full benefit of his marriage, taking security for the payment of the relief.

    Poynings gave a thousand marks to Queen Philippa of Hainault in 1366 for the wardship and marriage of William, son and heir of John Lord Bardolf, to the end that he might take Agnes, his daughter, to wife, who by the name of "Agnes Bardolf" is mentioned as a legatee in the will of her mother, Joane Lady Poynings, dated 12 May 1369, and by that of "Lady Bardolf my sister" in the will of Thomas Lord Poynings, dated 28 October 1374.

    Marriage and issue

    Poynings married, before 1348, Joan Ruxley (d. 11 May 1369), widow of John de Moleyns, son and heir apparent of John, Baron Moleyns,[2][1] and daughter of Sir Richard Rokesley.[citation needed]

    They were buried together[citation needed] in the parish church at Poynings, Sussex.

    He was succeeded by his son Thomas de Poynings, 2nd Baron Poynings.

    end

    Michael married Joan Ruxley, Lay Poynings Bef 1348. Joan (daughter of Richard Rokesley and unnamed spouse) was buried Poynings, Sussex, England. [Group Sheet]


  12. 111.  Joan Ruxley, Lay Poynings (daughter of Richard Rokesley and unnamed spouse); was buried Poynings, Sussex, England.

    Other Events:

    • Will: 12 May 1369

    Children:
    1. 55. Agnes de Poynings, Vicountess of Wormegay died 12 Jun 1403.

  13. 112.  Roger de Clifford, Knight, 5th Baron de Clifford was born 10 Jul 1333, Brougham Castle, Westmorland, England (son of Robert de Clifford, Knight, 3rd Baron de Clifford and Isabel de Berkeley); died 13 Jul 1389, Brougham Castle, Westmorland, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: 5th Baron of Westmorland

    Notes:

    Roger de Clifford, 5th Baron de Clifford, ninth Lord Clifford, fifth Baron of Westmoreland (10 July 1333[1] - 13 July 1389), was the son of Robert de Clifford, 3rd Baron de Clifford (d. 20 May 1344), second son of Robert de Clifford, 1st Baron de Clifford (1273–1314), the founder of the northern branch of the family. His mother was Isabella (d. 25 July 1362), daughter of Maurice, 2nd Lord Berkeley. He succeeded his elder brother, Robert de Clifford, 4th Baron de Clifford in 1350, on which day he made proof of his age.[2]

    Military career

    Clifford entered on his military career when hardly more than twelve, being armed at the time of Jacob van Artevelde's death on 17 July 1345.[3]

    In August 1350 he was engaged in the seafight with the Spaniards near Winchelsea; and in 1355 he accompanied his father-in-law, Thomas de Beauchamp, 11th Earl of Warwick, on the expedition to Gascony.[4] He again served in Gascony in 1359, 1360, and in the French expedition of the Duke of Lancaster in 1373.

    A document dated at Brougham 10 July 1369 shows him engaging the services of Richard le Fleming and his company for a year. In the same way he retained Sir Roger de Mowbray; and was himself retained, with his company of nearly eighty men, by Edmund Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March, on 25 September 1379.[5]

    On 15 March 1361 he was called upon to assist Lionel, duke of Clarence, in his great Irish expedition on pain of forfeiting his Irish estates. A similar summons to defend his lands in Ireland was issued on 28 July 1368.[6]

    His chief services, however, were rendered on the Scotch borders. In July 1370 he was appointed one of the wardens of the west marches; but according to Sir H. Nicolas he is found defending the northern borders fourteen years earlier.[7] Resigned the truce with Scotland on 24 August 1369, and was warden of both east and west marches on five occasions between 1380 and 1385.

    In August 1385 he accompanied Richard II's expedition against Scotland with sixty men-at-arms and forty archers. His last border sendee seems to have been in October 1388, when he was ordered to adopt measures of defence for the Scotch Marches.[8] In May 1388 he accompanied Richard FitzAlan, 11th Earl of Arundel, in his naval expedition to Brittany.[9]

    Political Offices

    He was hereditary High Sheriff of Westmorland from 1350? until his death in 1389. In 1377 he was made High Sheriff of Cumberland and governor of Carlisle, a city whose walls he appears to have inspected and found weak in the preceding year. To the last two offices he was reappointed on Richard II's accession.

    He was made a commissioner of array against the Scots (26 February 1372), and one of a body of commissioners to correct truce-breakers and decide border disputes 26 May 1373, having sat on a similar commission in September 1367.

    Parliament

    Clifford was summoned to all parliaments from 15 December 1356 to 28 July 1388.[10] He was trier of petitions in many parliaments from November 1373 to September 1377. In August 1374 he was appointed one of the commissioners to settle the dispute between Henry de Percy and William, Earl of Douglas, relative to the possession of Jedworth Forest. In the parliament of November 1381 he was member of a committee to confer with the House of Commons. On 12 October 1386 he gave evidence in the great Scrope and Grosvenor case at St. Margaret's Church, Westminster.

    Death and Succession

    Roger de Clifford died 13 July 1389, being then possessed of enormous estates, chiefly situated in Yorkshire, Northumberland, Cumberland, and Westmoreland, but spread over several other counties.[11] He was succeeded by his son Thomas de Clifford, 6th Baron de Clifford.

    Marriage and Issue

    He married Maud (d. 1403), daughter of Thomas de Beauchamp, 11th Earl of Warwick.[12]

    Thomas de Clifford, 6th Baron de Clifford (d. 1391 ?)
    William Clifford, the Governor of Berwick (d. 1419)
    Margaret, married Sir John Melton, knight
    Katherine, married Ralph, lord Greystock
    Philippa, married William Ferrers, 5th Baron Ferrers of Groby (Lewis, Ancestral Roots, 8th ed. (2006), line 11, no. 34)
    Dugdale gives him a third son, the Lollard, Sir Lewis Clifford (d. 1404), whom, however, Sir H. Nicolas shows to have been probably his brother, but certainly not his son[13]

    Magna Carta Ancestry by Douglas Richardson lists three sons, including a Roger, no additional information.

    Genealogy

    The genealogical table in Whitaker gives Clifford two brothers, John de Clifford and Thomas de Clifford, said to have been the ancestor of Richard de Clifford, Bishop of London, and three sisters.

    References

    Jump up ^ (Scr. and Gros. Roll, text, i. 197)
    Jump up ^ (Dugdale, i. 240; Whitaker, pp. 310-11; Hist. Peerage, 117; Hist. of Westmoreland, i. 279; Escheat Rolls, ii. 118, 248)
    Jump up ^ (Scr. and Gros. Roll, i. 197)
    Jump up ^ (Whitaker, 314- 315; Dugdale, i. 340)
    Jump up ^ (Dugdale, i. 340; Whitaker, 317)
    Jump up ^ (Rymer, vi. 319, 595)
    Jump up ^ (Rymer, vi. 657; Dugdale, i. 340; Scrope Roll, ii. 469, &c.)
    Jump up ^ (Rymer, vi. 570, 637, 714, vii. 9, 475; Nicolas, Scr. and Gros. Roll, ii. 469, &c.)
    Jump up ^ (Scr. and Gros. Roll, i. 197, ii. 469, &c.; Rymer, vii. 45)
    Jump up ^ (Dugdale, i. 340; Hist. Peerage, 117)
    Jump up ^ (Dugdale, i. 341; Escheat Rolls, iii. 113)
    Jump up ^ (cf. Escheat Rolls, iii. 286)
    Jump up ^ (Dugdale, i. 340-2; Whitaker, 314-16; Nicolas, Scr. and Gros. Roll, ii. 427, &c.)
    This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: "Clifford, Roger de (1333-1389)". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900.

    *

    Roger — Maud Beauchamp. Maud (daughter of Thomas de Beauchamp, Knight, 11th Earl of Warwick and Katherine de Mortimer, Countess of Warwick) was born 0___ 1335, Warwickshire, England; died 0Feb 1403, Brougham Castle, Westmorland, England. [Group Sheet]


  14. 113.  Maud Beauchamp was born 0___ 1335, Warwickshire, England (daughter of Thomas de Beauchamp, Knight, 11th Earl of Warwick and Katherine de Mortimer, Countess of Warwick); died 0Feb 1403, Brougham Castle, Westmorland, England.
    Children:
    1. Margaret Clifford was born Brougham Castle, Westmorland, England.
    2. 56. Thomas Clifford, Knight, 6th Baron de Clifford was born 1363-1364, Cumbria, England; died 18 Aug 1391.
    3. Catherine Clifford, Baroness of Ravensworth was born ~1367, Brougham Castle, Westmorland, England; was christened Ravensworth, Kirby, North Riding, Yorkshire, England; died 23 Apr 1413, (North Riding, Yorkshire) England.
    4. Phillippa Clifford, Baroness Ferrers of Groby was born 0___ 1371, Brougham Castle, Westmorland, England; died Bef 9 Aug 1416.

  15. 114.  Thomas de Ros, Knight, 4th Baron de Ros was born 13 Jan 1335, Helmsley, Yorkshire, England (son of William de Ros, Knight, 2nd Baron de Ros and Margery de Badlesmere); died 8 Jun 1383, Uffington, Lincolnshire, England; was buried Rievaulx Abbey, Helmsley, North Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Military: Crusader
    • Residence: 0___ 1364, The Holy Land

    Notes:

    Thomas de Ros, 4th Baron de Ros of Helmsley (1338 - 8 June 1383) was the son of William de Ros, 2nd Baron de Ros, and the brother of William de Ros, 3rd Baron de Ros. He was heir to his brother in 1352.

    In 1364, he accompanied the king of Cyprus to the Holy Land; and was in the French wars, from 1369 to 1371. He was summoned to parliament by both King Edward III of England and King Richard II of England. He died at Uffington, Lincolnshire, 8 June 1383, and was buried at Rievaulx Abbey. His widow became the wife of Sir Richard Burley.

    Marriage and issue

    Thomas de Ros married 12 Apr 1363, Beatrice Stafford (d. 13 Apr 1415), daughter of Ralph de Stafford, 1st Earl of Stafford, by whom he had four sons and two daughters:[2]

    John de Ros, 6th Baron de Ros.
    William de Ros, 7th Baron de Ros.
    Thomas de Ros.
    Robert de Ros.
    Elizabeth de Ros, who married Thomas de Clifford, 6th Baron de Clifford.
    Margaret de Ros, who married Reginald Grey, 3rd Baron Grey de Ruthyn.

    Footnotes

    Jump up ^ Debrett's Peerage, 1968, p.347
    Jump up ^ Richardson III 2011, pp. 453–5.

    References

    Cokayne, George Edward (1949). The Complete Peerage, edited by Geoffrey H. White XI. London: St. Catherine Press.
    Richardson, Douglas (2011). Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, ed. Kimball G. Everingham I (2nd ed.). Salt Lake City. ISBN 1449966373
    Richardson, Douglas (2011). Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, ed. Kimball G. Everingham III (2nd ed.). Salt Lake City. ISBN 144996639X

    Buried:
    Click here to view the history, map & pictures ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rievaulx_Abbey

    Thomas married Beatrice Stafford 1 Jan 1359, (Yorkshire) England. Beatrice (daughter of Ralph Stafford, Knight, 1st Earl of Stafford and Margaret de Audley, 2nd Baroness Audley) was born ~ 1341, Staffordshire, England; died 13 Apr 1415. [Group Sheet]


  16. 115.  Beatrice Stafford was born ~ 1341, Staffordshire, England (daughter of Ralph Stafford, Knight, 1st Earl of Stafford and Margaret de Audley, 2nd Baroness Audley); died 13 Apr 1415.

    Notes:

    Married:
    married firstly, in 1350, Maurice FitzGerald, 2nd Earl of Desmond (d. June 1358); married secondly, Thomas de Ros, 4th Baron de Ros, of Helmsley; married thirdly Sir Richard Burley, Knt

    Children:
    1. 57. Elizabeth de Ros was born Abt 1367, Helmsley, Yorkshire, England; died 26 Mar 1424, (Yorkshire) England.
    2. William de Ros, Knight, 6th Baron de Ros of Helmsley was born ~ 1370, Helmsley, Yorkshire, England; died 1 Sep 1414.
    3. Margaret de Ros, Baroness Grey de Ruthyn was born 0___ 1365, Helmsley, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1414, Ruthin, Denbighshire, Wales; was buried Rievaulx Abbey, Helmsley, Yorkshire, England.

  17. 116.  Henry Percy, Knight, 1st Earl of Northumberland was born 10 Nov 1341, Alnwick, Northumberland, England (son of Henry Percy, IV, 3rd Baron Percy and Mary Plantagenet, Baroness of Percy); died 20 Feb 1408, Bramham Moor, Yorkshire, England.

    Henry married Margaret Neville, Baroness of Ros 12 Jul 1358. Margaret (daughter of Ralph Neville, 4th Baron Neville de Raby and Alice de Audley) was born 12 Feb 1329, (Raby Castle, Staindrop, Durham, England); died 12 May 1372. [Group Sheet]


  18. 117.  Margaret Neville, Baroness of Ros was born 12 Feb 1329, (Raby Castle, Staindrop, Durham, England) (daughter of Ralph Neville, 4th Baron Neville de Raby and Alice de Audley); died 12 May 1372.
    Children:
    1. 58. Henry "Harry Hotspur" Percy, Knight, 2nd Earl of Northumberland was born 20 May 1364, Alnwick, Northumberland, England; died 21 Jul 1403, Shrewsbury, England.

  19. 118.  Edmund Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March, Earl of UlsterEdmund Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March, Earl of Ulster was born 1 Feb 1352, Llangoed, Llyswen, Brecon, Wales; was christened Llyswen, Brecknockshire, Wales (son of Roger Mortimer, Knight, 2nd Earl of March and Philippa Montagu); died 27 Dec 1381, Cork, Ireland; was buried Wigmore Abbey, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Lord Lieutenant of Ireland
    • Also Known As: Edmund "The Good" de Mortimer
    • Occupation: 0___ 1369; Marshal of England

    Notes:

    Edmund de Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March and jure uxoris Earl of Ulster (1 February 1352 - 27 December 1381) was son of Roger Mortimer, 2nd Earl of March, by his wife Philippa, daughter of William Montagu, 1st Earl of Salisbury and Catherine Grandison.

    Early life

    An infant at the death of his father, Edmund, as a ward of the crown, was placed by Edward III of England under the care of William of Wykeham and Richard Fitzalan, 10th Earl of Arundel.

    The position of the young earl, powerful on account of his possessions and hereditary influence in the Welsh marches, was rendered still more important by his marriage on 24 August 1369 at the age of 17 to the 14-year-old Philippa, the only child of the late Lionel of Antwerp, Duke of Clarence, the second son of Edward III.

    Lionel's late wife, Elizabeth, had been daughter and heiress of William Donn de Burgh, 3rd Earl of Ulster, and Lionel had himself been created Earl of Ulster before his marriage. Edmund inherited the title Earl of Ulster on Lionel's death.

    Therefore, the Earl of March not only represented one of the chief Anglo-Norman lordships in Ireland in right of his wife Philippa, but Philippa's line was also the second most senior line of descent in the succession to the crown, after Edward, the Black Prince and his son, King Richard II of England. John of Gaunt, younger brother of Prince Edward, had become the 1st Duke of Lancaster and thus the source of the House of Lancaster's claim to the throne.

    This marriage had, therefore, far-reaching consequences in English history, ultimately giving rise to the claim of the House of York to the crown of England contested in the Wars of the Roses between the Yorks and the Lancasters; Edward IV being descended from the second adult son of Edward III as great-great-grandson of Philippa, countess of March, and in the male line from Edmund of Langley, the first Duke of York and the fourth adult son of Edward III.

    Edmund Mortimer's son Roger Mortimer, 4th Earl of March would become heir presumptive to the English crown during the reign of Richard II.

    Political advancement

    Mortimer, now styled Earl of March and Ulster, became Marshal of England in 1369, and was employed in various diplomatic missions during the next following years. He was a member of the committee appointed by the Peers to confer with the Commons in 1373 —; the first instance of such a joint conference since the institution of representative parliaments on the question of granting supplies for John of Gaunt's war in France.

    He participated in the opposition to Edward III and the court party, which grew in strength towards the end of the reign, taking the popular side and being prominent in the Good Parliament of 1376 among the lords who supported the Prince of Wales and opposed the Court Party and John of Gaunt. The Speaker of the House of Commons in this parliament was March's steward, Peter de la Mare, who firmly withstood John of Gaunt in stating the grievances of the Commons, in supporting the impeachment of several high court officials, and in procuring the banishment of the king's mistress, Alice Perrers. March was a member of the administrative council appointed by the same parliament after the death of Edward, the Black Prince to attend the king and advise him in all public affairs.

    Following the end of the Good Parliament its acts were reversed by John of Gaunt, March's steward was jailed, and March himself was ordered to inspect Calais and other remote royal castles as part of his duty as Marshall of England. March chose instead to resign the post.[1]

    Sent to govern Ireland

    On the accession of Richard II, a minor, in 1377, the Earl became a member of the standing council of government; though as husband of the heir-presumptive to the crown he wisely abstained from claiming any actually administrative office. The richest and most powerful person in the realm was, however, the king's uncle John of Gaunt, whose jealousy led March to accept the office of Lord Lieutenant of Ireland in 1379. March succeeded in asserting his authority in eastern Ulster, but failed to subdue the O'Neills farther west. Proceeding to Munster to put down the turbulent southern chieftains, March was killed at Cork on 27 December 1381.[1] He was buried in Wigmore Abbey, of which he had been a benefactor, and where his wife Philippa was also interred.

    Children

    The earl had two sons and two daughters:[1]

    Lady Elizabeth married Henry Hotspur Percy, son of the Earl of Northumberland. She may have later married Thomas de Camoys, 1st Baron Camoys.[2]
    His elder son, Sir Roger, succeeded him as 4th Earl of March and Ulster.
    His second son, Sir Edmund played an important part, in conjunction with his brother-in-law Hotspur, in the fortunes of Owain Glyndwr.
    Lady Philippa married firstly John Hastings, 3rd Earl of Pembroke; after his death in 1389 she became the second wife of Richard Fitzalan, 11th Earl of Arundel; she married thirdly Sir Thomas de Poynings.[3]

    Buried:
    Map & History of Wigmore ... http://bit.ly/1sNCEw9

    Edmund married Philippa Plantagenet, 5th Countess of Ulster 0___ 1368, Queen's Chapel, Reading Abbey, Berkshire, England. Philippa (daughter of Lionel of Antwerp, Knight, 1st Duke of Clarence and Elizabeth de Burgh, Duchess of Clarence) was born 16 Aug 1355, Eltham Palace, London, England; died 5 Jan 1382, Cork, Ireland; was buried Wigmore Abbey, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  20. 119.  Philippa Plantagenet, 5th Countess of UlsterPhilippa Plantagenet, 5th Countess of Ulster was born 16 Aug 1355, Eltham Palace, London, England (daughter of Lionel of Antwerp, Knight, 1st Duke of Clarence and Elizabeth de Burgh, Duchess of Clarence); died 5 Jan 1382, Cork, Ireland; was buried Wigmore Abbey, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Philippa of Clarence

    Notes:

    Birth:
    Pictures & History of Eltham Palace ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eltham_Palace

    Buried:
    Map & History of Wigmore ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wigmore,_Herefordshire

    Died:
    Map & History of County Cork ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/County_Cork

    Notes:

    Married:
    Images & History of Reading Abbey ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reading_Abbey

    Children:
    1. 59. Elizabeth Mortimer, Countess of Percy was born 12 Feb 1371, Usk, Monmouthshire, Wales; died 20 Apr 1417, Trotton, Sussex, England; was buried St. George's Church, Trotton, Chichester, Sussex, England.
    2. Roger Mortimer, 4th Earl of March was born 11 Apr 1374, Usk, Monmouthshire, Wales; died 20 Jul 1398, Kells, Meath, Ireland.

  21. 124.  John Neville, 3rd Baron Neville de RabyJohn Neville, 3rd Baron Neville de Raby was born 1337-1340, Raby Castle, Staindrop, Durham, England (son of Ralph Neville, 4th Baron Neville de Raby and Alice de Audley); died 17 Oct 1388, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Northumberland, England; was buried Durham Cathedral, Durham, Durhamshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: John de Neville

    Notes:

    John Neville, 3rd Baron Neville de Raby, KG c.1337 - 17 October 1388) was an English peer and soldier.[a]

    John Neville, born at Raby Castle, Durham, between 1337 and 1340, was the eldest son of Ralph Neville, 2nd Baron Neville de Raby, and Alice Audley. He had five brothers, including Alexander Neville, Archbishop of York, and four sisters.[1]

    Cokayne notes that Neville's public career was as active as his father's had been. He fought against the Scots at the Battle of Neville's Cross on 17 October 1346 as a captain under his father, was knighted about 1360 after a skirmish near Paris while serving under Sir Walter Manny , and fought in Aquitaine in 1366, and again in 1373-4.

    At his father's death on 5 August 1367 he succeeded to the title, and had livery of his lands in England and Scotland in October of that year.

    From 1367 on he had numerous commissions issued to him, and in 1368 served as joint ambassador to France.[2] He was made a Knight of the Garter in 1369.[3]

    In July 1370 he was Admiral of the North, and in November of that year a joint commissioner to treat with Genoa . He was Steward of the King's Household in 1372, and in July of that year was part of an expedition to Brittany . For the next several years he served in Scotland and the Scottish Marches . In 1378 he had licence to fortify Raby Castle, and in June of the same year was in Gascony, where he was appointed Keeper of Fronsac Castle and Seneschal of Gascony .

    He spent several years in Gascony, and was among the forces which raised the siege of Mortaigne in 1381. On his return to England he was again appointed Warden of the Marches. In May 1383 and March 1387 he was a joint commissioner to treat of peace with Scotland, and in July 1385 was to accompany the King to Scotland.[4]

    Neville died at Newcastle upon Tyne on 17 October 1388. In his will he requested burial in Durham Cathedral by his first wife, Maud. He was succeeded by his eldest son, Ralph Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland .[5]

    Marriages and issue

    Neville married, before 1362, firstly, Maud Percy (d. before 18 February 1379), daughter of Henry de Percy, 2nd Baron Percy of Alnwick, Northumberland, and Idoine de Clifford, daughter of Robert de Clifford, 1st Baron de Clifford, by whom he had two sons and five daughters:[6]

    Ralph Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland.
    Sir Thomas Neville of Brancepeth, who married Maud Stanhope.
    Alice Neville, who married William Deincourt, 3rd Baron Deincourt.
    Maud Nevile.
    Idoine Neville.
    Eleanor Neville, who married Ralph de Lumley, 1st Baron Lumley.
    Elizabeth Neville, who became a nun.
    After his first wife Maud's death in 1379 Neville married secondly, before 9 October 1381, Elizabeth Latimer (d. 5 November 1395), daughter of William Latimer, 4th Baron Latimer, by whom he had a son and a daughter:[7]

    John Neville, 6th Baron Latimer (c.1382 – 10 December 1430), who married firstly, Maud Clifford (c.26 August 1446), daughter of Thomas de Clifford, 6th Baron de Clifford, whom he divorced before 1413x17, and by whom he had no issue. She married secondly, Richard of Conisburgh, 3rd Earl of Cambridge.[8]
    Elizabeth Neville, who married, before 27 May 1396, Sir Thomas Willoughby (died shortly before 20 August 1417) son of Robert Willoughby, 4th Baron Willoughby de Eresby (c.1348-50 – 9 August 1396), by whom she had one child, Sir John Willoughby (c.1400 – 24 February 1437).[9]
    After Neville's death, his widow, Elizabeth, married, as his second wife, Robert Willoughby, 4th Baron Willoughby de Eresby (c.1348-50 – 9 August 1396), by whom she had a daughter, Margaret Willoughby.[10]

    Birth:
    Raby Castle - history & images of this Neville Family Home ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raby_Castle

    John married Maud Percy 0Jul 1357, Alnwick, Northumberland, England. Maud (daughter of Henry Percy, Knight, 2nd Baron Percy of Alnwick and Idonia Clifford) was born Abt 1335, Warkworth Castle, Alnwick, Northumberland, England; died 18 Feb 1378; was buried Durham Cathedral, Durham, Durhamshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  22. 125.  Maud Percy was born Abt 1335, Warkworth Castle, Alnwick, Northumberland, England (daughter of Henry Percy, Knight, 2nd Baron Percy of Alnwick and Idonia Clifford); died 18 Feb 1378; was buried Durham Cathedral, Durham, Durhamshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Maud de Percy

    Notes:

    Maud's ahnentafel: https://histfam.familysearch.org//ahnentafel.php?personID=I1058&tree=EuropeRoyalNobleHous&parentset=0&generations=4

    Children:
    1. 62. Ralph Neville, Knight, 1st Earl of Westmorland was born 0___ 1364, Castle Raby, Raby-Keverstone, Durham, England; died 21 Oct 1425, Castle Raby, Raby-Keverstone, Durham, England; was buried 0Oct 1425, St. Mary's Church, Staindrop, Durham, England.
    2. Eleanor de Neville, Baroness of Lumley was born ~ 1379, Raby Castle, Staindrop, Durham, England; died ~ 1441, Raby Castle, Staindrop, Durham, England.

  23. 126.  Hugh Stafford, Knight, 2nd Earl of Stafford was born ~ 1344, Stafford Castle, Stafford, Staffordshire, England (son of Ralph Stafford, Knight, 1st Earl of Stafford and Margaret de Audley, 2nd Baroness Audley); died 16 Oct 1386, Rhodes, Greece; was buried Stone Priory, Staffordshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Military: Knight of the Garter

    Notes:

    Hugh de Stafford, 2nd Earl of Stafford, KG (c. 1344 - 16 October 1386) was an English nobleman.

    Early life

    Hugh de Stafford was born around 1344, the second and youngest son of Ralph Stafford, 1st Earl of Stafford and Margaret de Audley. His elder brother, Ralph, was intended to inherit the title and had been married to Maud Grosmont, daughter of Henry of Grosmont, 1st Duke of Lancaster and Isabel de Beaumont in 1344, with the expectation that he would expand the Stafford estates by inheriting the Lancastrian duchy. However, Ralph died early in 1347 and Hugh became heir.[1] Around 1358, Hugh became the 3rd Lord Audley. Hugh joined his father in the French campaigns in 1359, being part of the retinue of Edward, Prince of Wales, spending time in Gascony and northern Spain.

    Political career

    He spent many years in military service, before returning to England and being summoned to Parliament in 1371 as Lord Stafford and later as Earl Stafford. On 31 August 1372, he inherited the title of 2nd Earl of Stafford. He was a member of a number of royal commissions, such as ones on Scottish affairs and on coastal defence. He was on the committee of nobles who conferred regularly with the Commons, being deemed suitable by that House to be part of the new 'continual council' of state. He did not always make the best decisions though and was admonished by his peers for censuring John Philipot, the London MP and merchant who had mobilised a fleet to defend merchant shipping.[1]

    Marriage and children

    On or before 1 March 1350, Hugh de Stafford married Philippa de Beauchamp daughter of Thomas de Beauchamp, 11th Earl of Warwick and Katherine Mortimer. They had seven children.[2]

    Sir Ralph de Stafford (c. 1354 – 1385). Ralph was killed by King Richard II's half-brother, John Holland, 1st Duke of Exeter in a feud during an expedition against the Scots in May 1385, over a retainer's death by one of Ralph's archers.[1]
    Margaret de Stafford, (c. 1364 – 9 June 1396), married Ralph de Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland as his first wife.
    Thomas de Stafford, 3rd Earl of Stafford (c. 1368 – 4 July 1392). Inherited at age of 18. Married Anne of Gloucester, daughter of Thomas of Woodstock, 1st Duke of Gloucester and Eleanor de Bohun. No issue, the marriage was reportedly never consummated.
    William Stafford, 4th Earl of Stafford (21 September 1375 – 6 April 1395). Inherited from his brother at the age of 14. He was a ward of the Thomas of Woodstock, 1st Duke of Gloucester. He died at 19, no issue.
    Katherine de Stafford (c. 1376 – 8 April 1419), married Michael de la Pole, 2nd Earl of Suffolk.
    Edmund Stafford, 5th Earl of Stafford (2 March 1377 – 22 July 1403), inherited title from his brother at the age of 17. He married Anne of Gloucester, the widow of his elder brother Thomas. Edmund and Anne were the parents of Humphrey Stafford, 1st Duke of Buckingham.
    Joan de Stafford (1378 – 1 October 1442), married Thomas Holland, 1st Duke of Surrey. No issue.

    Later life and death

    Hugh's wife Phillippa died on 6 April 1386, and it was probably this combined with the death of his son that pushed him to undertake a series of pilgrimages. He went first to Walsingham and then sailed for Jerusalem. He only got to Rhodes, where he died in the hospital the knights of St John in October of that year. His bones were returned to Stone Priory, Staffs, for burial next to his wife.

    Hugh married Philippa Beauchamp Bef 1368, Stone, Kent, England. Philippa (daughter of Thomas de Beauchamp, Knight, 11th Earl of Warwick and Katherine de Mortimer, Countess of Warwick) was born 1334-1344, Elmley, Gloucestershire, England; died 6 Apr 1386. [Group Sheet]


  24. 127.  Philippa Beauchamp was born 1334-1344, Elmley, Gloucestershire, England (daughter of Thomas de Beauchamp, Knight, 11th Earl of Warwick and Katherine de Mortimer, Countess of Warwick); died 6 Apr 1386.

    Notes:

    Philippa de Beauchamp (before 1344-6 April 1386) was the daughter of Thomas de Beauchamp, 11th Earl of Warwick and Katherine Mortimer.

    On or before 1 March 1350 she married Hugh de Stafford, 2nd Earl of Stafford, son of Ralph de Stafford, 1st Earl of Stafford and Margaret Audley, Baroness Audley.

    Philippa and Hugh had seven children.[1]

    Sir Ralph de Stafford (born about 1354–1385). Ralph was killed by King Richard II's half-brother, Sir John Holland in a feud during an expedition against the Scots in May 1385, over a retainer's death by one of Ralph's archers.
    Margaret de Stafford, (b. abt. 1364–9 June 1396), married Ralph de Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland.
    Thomas de Stafford, 3rd Earl of Stafford (b. abt. 1368–4 July 1392). Inherited at age of 18. Married Anne Plantagenet, daughter of Thomas of Woodstock, 1st Duke of Gloucester and Eleanor de Bohun. No issue.(marriage was reportedly never consummated)
    William Stafford, 4th Earl of Stafford (21 September 1375–6 April 1395). Inherited from his brother at the age of 14. He was a ward of the Thomas of Woodstock, 1st Duke of Gloucester. He died at 19, no issue.
    Katherine de Stafford (b. abt. 1376–8 April 1419), married Michael de la Pole, 2nd Earl of Suffolk
    Edmund Stafford, 5th Earl of Stafford (2 March 1377–22 July 1403), inherited title from his brother at the age of 17. He married Anne of Gloucester, the widow of his elder brother Thomas.
    Joan de Stafford (1378–1 October 1442), married Thomas Holland, 1st Duke of Surrey. No issue.

    Children:
    1. 63. Margaret Stafford, Countess of Westmorland was born Abt 1364, Stafford Castle, Stafford, Staffordshire, England; died 9 Jun 1396, Castle Raby, Raby-Keverstone, Durham, England.
    2. Thomas Stafford, 3rd Earl of Stafford was born 0___ 1368, Stafford Castle, Stafford, Staffordshire, England; died 4 Jul 1392.
    3. Katherine de Stafford, Countess of Suffolk was born ~ 1376, Stafford Castle, Stafford, Staffordshire, England; died 8 Apr 1419.
    4. Edmund Stafford, Knight, 5th Earl of Stafford was born 3 Feb 1377, Stafford Castle, Stafford, Staffordshire, England; died 22 Jul 1403; was buried Austin Friars, Stafford, Staffordshire, England.


Generation: 8

  1. 200.  Godfrey de Foljambe, Knight was born 0___ 1317, Derbyshire, England (son of Thomas de Foljambe, IV, Knight and Alice de Furnival); died 0___ 1376.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Lord Chief Justice of Ireland
    • Occupation: Member of Parliament
    • Also Known As: Geoffrey Foljame

    Notes:

    Sir Godfrey de Foljambe (1317-1376) was a prominent landowner and politician in fourteenth-century England who went on to have a successful career as an Irish judge, including a period as Lord Chief Justice of Ireland. In later life he was an associate of John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster. His tomb can still be seen at All Saints Church, Bakewell.[1]

    He was born in Derbyshire in 1317, the fourth son of Sir Thomas de Foljambe.[2] The Foljambe family were Lords of the Manor of Tideswell and also held lands at Darley Dale. Godfrey, who succeeded to the family estates after the death of his three elder brothers, also acquired the manor of Bakewell, where he founded a chantry.[2]


    All Saints Church, Bakewell

    He sat in the House of Commons as knight of the shire for Derbyshire in several of the Parliaments of King Edward III of England.[2] In 1344 he went to Ireland as a Baron of the Court of Exchequer (Ireland), and was quickly transferred to the Court of King's Bench (Ireland). He served as Lord Chief Justice of Ireland from 1351 to 1354.[2]

    On his return to England he sat regularly on commissions for the peace in Derbyshire and Lancashire.[2] He enjoyed the trust and confidence of John of Gaunt, [go to link for more information http://thehennesseefamily.com/getperson.php?personID=I37410&tree=hennessee ] for whom he acted in numerous administrative capacities, including steward for the Duchy of Lancaster. For a number of years he had a lease on a substantial part of Newcastle under Lyme for which he paid ¹127 p.a. to John of Gaunt. He died in 1376.[3]

    He married (possibly his second marriage, though little is known of the first), Avena (died 1382), daughter of Sir Thomas Ireland of Hartshorne, by whom he had several sons, including Geoffrey Foljambe the younger (died 1375), and Thomas Foljambe (died 1433), who was a Baron of the Exchequer and chief steward of the duchy of Lancaster.[4] Among his descendants were Sir Francis Foljambe (died 1640), first and last of the Foljambe baronets, and the Earls of LIverpool, second creation.[5]

    The mural alabaster monument to Godfrey and Avena is said to be very rare with only two surviving to the present day. The Foljambe mural shows Foljambe and his wife as if they are looking out of a window and this can still be seen on the south wall of All Saints Church in Bakewell.[6] Below the mural is an explanatory inscription that dates from 1803 and was "added by Mr Blore".[7]

    References[edit]
    Jump up ^ Cox, John Charles Memorials of Old Derbyshire Bemrose and Sons 1907
    ^ Jump up to: a b c d e Ball. F. Elrington The Judges in Ireland 1221–1921 John Murray London 1926 Vol.1 p.78
    Jump up ^ 'Newcastle-under-Lyme: Buildings and castle', A History of the County of Stafford: Volume 8 (1963), pp. 8–15. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=53355 Date accessed: 31 August 2013
    Jump up ^ Roskell et al (Ed). "FOLJAMBE, Thomas (d.1433), of Walton and Brimington, Derbys". History of Parliament. Inst. Of Historical Research. Retrieved 30 August 2013.
    Jump up ^ Mosley, ed. Burke's Peerage 107th Edition Delaware 2003 Vol. 2 p. 2368
    Jump up ^ Gardner, Arthur (2011). Alabaster Tombs of the Pre-Reformation Period in England. Cambridge University Press. p. 13. ISBN 0521166209.
    Jump up ^ 'Parishes: Bakewell', Magna Britannia: volume 5: Derbyshire (1817), pp. 23–43. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=50721 Date accessed: 30 August 2013

    Godfrey — Avena Ireland. Avena (daughter of Thomas Ireland and Avena Villers) was born 0___ 1320, (Hartshorne, Derbyshire, England); died 13 Dec 1382, Bakewell, Derbyshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 201.  Avena Ireland was born 0___ 1320, (Hartshorne, Derbyshire, England) (daughter of Thomas Ireland and Avena Villers); died 13 Dec 1382, Bakewell, Derbyshire, England.

    Notes:

    Birth:
    Hartshorne is a village in the English county of Derbyshire. It is north of the town of Swadlincote. The name is pronounced Harts-horne; the sh is not a digraph, as this is a compound. However, locals pronounce it "Artsun". Wikipedia

    Notes:

    Married:
    2nd marriage...

    Children:
    1. 100. Godfrey Foljambe, IV, Knight was born ~ 1344, (Tideswell) Derbyshire, England; died 29 May 1376, Darley, Derbyshire, England.

  3. 204.  John Leek was born 0___ 1355, Cotham, Nottinghamshire, England; died 0___ 1415, Cotham, Nottinghamshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Johannes

    Notes:

    John Leek, MP
    Also Known As: "Johannes"
    Birthdate: 1355 (60)
    Birthplace: Cotham, Nottinghamshire, England
    Death: 1415 (60)
    Cotham, Nottinghamshire, England
    Immediate Family:
    Son of Sir John Leke and nn
    Husband of Isabel Towers
    Father of Simon Leek, MP, of Leake & Cotham; John Lake and Beatrice Leake
    Brother of William Leke de Sereton
    Managed by: Erica Howton
    Last Updated: May 4, 2017

    About Sir John Leek, MP
    Sir John Leeke, lord of Cotham b about 1350

    Links

    http://www.multiwords.de/genealogy/leeke01.htm
    A. Sir John Leeke or Leek of Cotham MP b about 1400 m Isabell Towers dau of John Towers of Somerby.

    Children include

    i. Sir Simon Leek of Cotham b about 1425 m Joan Talbot dau of Sir John Talbot of Swanington
    Links

    http://www.multiwords.de/genealogy/leeke01.htm
    Whitwood, Castleford, UK.

    http://books.google.ca/books?vid=OCLC05589614&id=mxQNAAAAIAAJ&q=peck+normanton&dq=peck+normanton&pgis=1&redir_esc=y

    MP & Sheriff of Nottingham in 1383,1387,1393,1400 http://www.historyofparliamentonline.org/volume/1386-1421/member/leek-sir-john-1415

    John — Isabel Towers. Isabel was born ~ 1364, Cotham, Nottinghamshire, England; died 0___ 1390, Newark, Nottinghamshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 205.  Isabel Towers was born ~ 1364, Cotham, Nottinghamshire, England; died 0___ 1390, Newark, Nottinghamshire, England.
    Children:
    1. 102. Simon Leeke, of Leake & Cotham was born ~ 1345, (Nottinghamshire, England); died ~ 1382.

  5. 208.  Gilbert Stapleton, Knight was born Carlton, Yorkshire, England (son of Miles de Stapleton and unnamed spouse); died 0___ 1321.

    Gilbert married Agnes FitzAlan 10 May 1306. Agnes (daughter of Bryan FitzAlan, Lord FitzAlan and Maud Balliol) was born 0___ 1298. [Group Sheet]


  6. 209.  Agnes FitzAlan was born 0___ 1298 (daughter of Bryan FitzAlan, Lord FitzAlan and Maud Balliol).

    Notes:

    Married:
    (when she was just 8 years old)

    Children:
    1. 104. Miles Stapleton, II, Knight was born 1318-1320, Bedale, Yorkshire, England; died 0Dec 1364, (Bedale, Yorkshire, England); was buried Holy Trinity Church, Ingham, Norfolkshire, England.

  7. 210.  Oliver de Ingham, Knight, Lord Ingham was born ~ 1287, Ingham, Norfolkshire, England (son of John de Ingham and Margery LNU); died Bef 1344; was buried Holy Trinity Church, Ingham, Norfolkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Knight Banneret
    • Residence: Scotland
    • Alt Birth: 0___ 1278

    Notes:

    Sir Oliver Ingham (about 1287–1344) was an English knight and landowner who served as a soldier and administrator under Kings Edward II and Edward III. He was responsible for the civil government and military defence of the Duchy of Aquitaine during the War of Saint-Sardos and the early part of the Hundred Years' War.[1]

    Early life

    Born about 1287, he was the son and heir of Sir John Ingham (1260-1309) of Ingham, Norfolk, who had served in the wars of King Edward I against the Scots, and his wife Margery. In 1310 he not only inherited his father's lands in Norfolk, Suffolk, Wiltshire and Hampshire but was himself summoned by King Edward II for military service against Scotland. Appointed a household knight of the king, he received many royal grants including the custody of Ellesmere Castle in Shropshire, keeper for the counties of Cheshire and Flintshire, and official positions in Shropshire and Wiltshire. As a knight banneret, he served in Scotland with the king in August 1322.[2][2]

    First term in Aquitaine

    In 1324 he was appointed adviser to the king's half-brother Edmund of Woodstock, 1st Earl of Kent, who represented Edward as his Lieutenant in Aquitaine. Tensions had led to the outbreak of war with France, which captured much of the ill-defended Agenais. Ingham, dispatched to Aquitaine with a force of Spanish and other mercenary troops, regained some of the losses in the Agenais and in Saintonge. After arranging a truce, the Earl of Kent departed for England in 1325 and in 1326 Ingham was appointed Seneschal of Gascony, the highest post in what remained in English possession, holding extensive powers over the law and finance of the duchy. Though he appears to have earned the confidence of many members of the Gascon nobility, an agreement with the French in 1327 led to his removal from Aquitaine.[2]

    Crises in England

    Partly as a result of English losses in the war, the political climate at home had changed dramatically. Edward II had been deposed and replaced by his young son Edward III, under the regency of his mother Queen Isabella and her lover Roger Mortimer. As the regents wanted peace, in the final treaty with France the loss of the Agenais was accepted and Ingham’s conquests there abandoned. Although he had been an associate of the Despensers, he largely escaped the retaliations that followed their fall. Becoming an adherent of Mortimer, he was summoned to parliament between June 1328 and September 1330 and was one of the not impartial judges in the trial of the conspirators who attempted to overthrow Mortimer in February 1329. In October 1330, when Mortimer was removed from power, Ingham was captured by the forces of Edward III at Nottingham and sent for trial to London. On 22 October, his lands and goods were declared forfeit. However he was pardoned on 8 December 1330, the new king acknowledging his loyal service in the past, and his property was restored to him with the important exception of grants from the crown.[2]

    Second term in Aquitaine

    From this time on, he served the king in Aquitaine and rarely returned to England. On 29 June 1331 he was reappointed as seneschal in Aquitaine, responsible for the peace, order, and defence of the duchy at a time of deteriorating Anglo-French relations, which culminated in the outbreak of the Hundred Years' War in 1337. The defences of the duchy had been undermined by the loss of several key castles in the previous war and the loyalty of the local nobility was divided, as many owned estates on both sides of the border. By August 1336 the duchy was on a war footing again, Ingham being ordered to forbid all Gascon men-at-arms to leave the land without licence and to ensure all major strongholds were properly garrisoned, equipped, and victualled.[2]

    On 24 May 1337, King Philip VI of France announced that he was confiscating Aquitaine and French commissioners were sent to take possession of the duchy. Ingham met them at Libourne and refused to surrender his territory. He then began military operations, mostly in the Agenais. Overall English strategy concentrated on attacking the north of France, with the result that Ingham in the south-west received neither troops nor funds from England and had to rely entirely on local resources. The income of the duchy depended mainly on tolls and custom dues from goods conveyed along the great rivers, but trade dried up almost entirely with the onset of war. Most of what revenue remained had to be used to support garrison commanders. As a result, Ingham’s government in the capital city of Bordeaux had very limited options over how to conduct the defence. Although losing Penne-d'Agenais, he successfully defended Bonnegarde and other strongholds and fought off a French attack on Bordeaux itself in 1339. Despite financial stringency, he retained substantial companies of Gascon nobles in his service. His services to the crown in Aquitaine were acknowledged when his and his ancestors' debts were written off.[2]

    Death and burial

    Leaving Aquitaine in 1343, he returned to England and died, probably at Ingham, on 29 January 1344. The inquisition post mortem recorded that in Ingham he held the manor and the advowson of the church, where he was buried in a tomb that has survived.[2] His widow died on 11 October 1350 and was buried beside him,[3][4] the inscription, in medieval French, having been recorded as: Mounsier Oliver de Ingham gist icy et Dame Elizabeth sa compagne que luy Dieux de les almes eit mercy (Sir Oliver Ingham lies here and Dame Elizabeth his wife; may God have mercy on their souls).[2][5]

    Family

    With his wife Elizabeth Zouche, daughter of William Zouche, Baron Zouche, and his wife Maud Lovell, he had four children: Oliver (died 1326), John (died 1339), Elizabeth (dead by 1344), and Joan. As three of the children died before him, his inheritance was split between his granddaughter Mary, aged eight, only child of Elizabeth and her husband John Curzon, and Joan, aged 24.[2] Joan had married first Sir Roger Lestrange of Knockin (15 Aug 1301-29 Jul 1349), son of Sir John Lestrange and his wife Isolda Walton, and then, reportedly on 30 Nov 1350, Sir Miles Stapleton of Bedale (about 1318-4 Dec 1364 ), son of Sir Gilbert Stapleton and his wife Agnes (or Maud) FitzAlan. In June 1360 she and Miles founded a chantry at Ingham to commemorate the souls of, among others, her father and mother. She was dead by 1365, leaving as heir her son, Sir Miles Stapleton (1357-1419).[2]

    *

    Occupation:
    A knight banneret, sometimes known simply as banneret, was a medieval knight ("a commoner of rank")[1] who led a company of troops during time of war under his own banner (which was square-shaped, in contrast to the tapering standard or the pennon flown by the lower-ranking knights) and was eligible to bear supporters in English heraldry.

    The military rank of a knight banneret was higher than a knight bachelor (who fought under another's banner), but lower than an earl or duke; the word derives from the French banneret, from bannire, banner, elliptical for seigneur - or chevalier banneret, Medieval Latin banneretus.

    Under English custom the rank of knight banneret could only be conferred by the sovereign on the field of battle. There were some technical exceptions to this; when his standard was on the field of battle he could be regarded as physically present though he was not. His proxy could be regarded as a sufficient substitution for his presence.

    ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knight_banneret

    Oliver — Elizabeth la Zouche. Elizabeth (daughter of Eudo la Zouche and Millicent de Cantilupe) was born ~ 1272, Ellesmere, Shropshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  8. 211.  Elizabeth la Zouche was born ~ 1272, Ellesmere, Shropshire, England (daughter of Eudo la Zouche and Millicent de Cantilupe).

    Notes:

    Elizabeth La ZOUCHE

    Born: ABT 1272, Ellesmere, Shropshire, England

    Father: Eudo La ZOUCHE

    Mother: Å?

    Married: Oliver De INGHAM (Sir Knight) (b. 1278 - d. BEF 1344) (son of Sir John De Ingham and Margery ?)

    Children:

    1. Joan De INGHAM (b. 1299 / 1337) (m.1 Miles De Stapelton - m.2 Roger Le Strange)

    *

    Children:
    1. 105. Joan de Ingham, Baroness Ingham was born ~ 1320, Ellesmere, Shropshire, England; died 12 Dec 1365, Ingham, Norfolkshire, England.

  9. 218.  Roger d'Amory, Lord d'Amory was born Oxfordshire, England; died Bef 14 Mar 1322; was buried Ware, Hertfordshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Baron d'Amory in Ireland
    • Also Known As: Roger Damory

    Notes:

    Roger Damory, Lord d'Amory, Baron d'Amory in Ireland, (d. bef. 14 March 1321/1322) was a nobleman and Constable of Corfe Castle.[1]

    He was the younger son of Sir Robert D'Amory, Knight, of Bucknell and Woodperry, Oxfordshire. Sir Roger also possessed in his own right the manors of Bletchington and Holton, Oxfordshire, Standon in Hertfordshire, Caythorpe in Lincolnshire, and Knaresborough and St. Briavels' Castles.

    He fought at the Battle of Bannockburn where he provided "good services", following which he was granted the manors of Sandal, Yorkshire and Vauxhall, Surrey, in 1317.

    He was summoned to parliament on 20 November 1317, and in the 11th (1318), 12th (1319), 13th (1320) and 14th (1321) years of the reign of King Edward II, whereby he is held to have become Lord d'Amory.

    He had been a favourite of King Edward II of England until he was displaced by Hugh the younger Despenser. D'Amory took an active part in the Despenser War in 1321–1322 and was one of the principals in this affair. He captured Gloucester, burnt Bridgnorth, was at the siege of Tickhill and the battle at Burton-on-Trent. As a result, his lands were confiscated and orders were issued for his arrest. Retreating before the King's forces, being either sick or wounded he was left behind at Tutbury Castle, Staffordshire, where he was captured on 11 March 1322 (1321/1322). He was quickly tried and condemned to death. It appears, however, that his illness beat the executioner as he died there "of illness" two days later, and was buried at St. Mary's, Ware, Hertfordshire.

    He married shortly before 3 May 1317 Elizabeth de Clare, being her third husband. They had one child:

    Elizabeth d'Amory (died before her husband) who married John Bardolf, 3rd Lord Bardolf (1311–1363) and was mother to William 4th Lord Bardolf (1349–1386).

    end

    Buried:
    at st. Mary's

    Roger married Elizabeth de Clare Bef 3 May 1317. Elizabeth (daughter of Gilbert de Clare, Knight, Earl of Hertford and Joan (Plantagenet) of Acre) was born 14 Sep 1295, Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England. [Group Sheet]


  10. 219.  Elizabeth de Clare was born 14 Sep 1295, Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England (daughter of Gilbert de Clare, Knight, Earl of Hertford and Joan (Plantagenet) of Acre).
    Children:
    1. 109. Elizabeth d'Amory

  11. 222.  Richard Rokesley

    Richard — unnamed spouse. [Group Sheet]


  12. 223.  unnamed spouse
    Children:
    1. 111. Joan Ruxley, Lay Poynings was buried Poynings, Sussex, England.

  13. 224.  Robert de Clifford, Knight, 3rd Baron de Clifford was born 5 Nov 1305, (Skipton, North Yorkshire, England) (son of Robert de Clifford, Knight, 1st Baron de Clifford and Maude de Clare); died 20 May 1344.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: 3rd Lord of Skipton

    Notes:

    Robert de Clifford, 3rd Baron de Clifford, also 3rd Lord of Skipton (5 November 1305–20 May 1344) was a member of the Clifford family which held the seat of Skipton from 1310 to 1676.

    He was the second son of Robert de Clifford, 1st Baron de Clifford and Maud de Clare, eldest daughter of Thomas de Clare, Lord of Thomond and Juliana FitzGerald.

    His title was restored to him in 1327 after being forfeited by his elder brother Roger de Clifford, 2nd Baron de Clifford who was hanged for treason.

    He married Isabel de Berkeley, daughter of Maurice de Berkeley, 2nd Baron Berkeley at Berkeley Castle in 1328. They had 7 children. He was succeeded as Baron De Clifford by the eldest, Robert de Clifford, 4th Baron de Clifford

    Robert married Isabel de Berkeley 0Jun 1328. Isabel (daughter of Maurice de Berkeley, III, Knight, 2nd Baron Berkeley and Eva la Zouche) was born 0___ 1307; died 25 Jul 1362, Berkeley Castle, Berkeley, Gloucestershire, England. [Group Sheet]


  14. 225.  Isabel de Berkeley was born 0___ 1307 (daughter of Maurice de Berkeley, III, Knight, 2nd Baron Berkeley and Eva la Zouche); died 25 Jul 1362, Berkeley Castle, Berkeley, Gloucestershire, England.
    Children:
    1. Robert Clifford, Lord of Northumberland was born 0___ 1328, England; died Bef 1354, England.
    2. 112. Roger de Clifford, Knight, 5th Baron de Clifford was born 10 Jul 1333, Brougham Castle, Westmorland, England; died 13 Jul 1389, Brougham Castle, Westmorland, England.
    3. Eleanor Clifford was born ~ 1343.

  15. 226.  Thomas de Beauchamp, Knight, 11th Earl of WarwickThomas de Beauchamp, Knight, 11th Earl of Warwick was born 14 Feb 1313, Warwick Castle, Warwick, Warwickshire, England (son of Guy de Beauchamp, Knight, 10th Earl of Warwick and Alice de Toeni, Countess of Warwick); died 13 Nov 1369, (Warwickshire) England; was buried St. Mary's Church, Warwick, Warwickshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Thomas de Beauchamp

    Notes:

    Thomas de Beauchamp, 11th Earl of Warwick, KG (c. 14 February 1313 – 13 November 1369) was an English nobleman and military commander during the Hundred Years' War. In 1348 he became one of the founders and the third Knight of the Order of the Garter.

    Early life

    Thomas de Beauchamp, 11th Earl of Warwick depicted in 1347 as one of the 8 mourners attached to the monumental brass of Sir Hugh Hastings (d. 1347) at St Mary's Church, Elsing, Norfolk. He displays the arms of Beauchamp on his tunic
    Thomas de Beauchamp was born at Warwick Castle, Warwickshire, England to Guy de Beauchamp, 10th Earl of Warwick and Alice de Toeni. He served in Scotland frequently during the 1330s, being captain of the army against the Scots in 1337. He was hereditary High Sheriff of Worcestershire from 1333 until his death (in 1369). In 1344 he was also made High Sheriff of Warwickshire and Leicestershire for life.[citation needed]

    Victor at Crâecy and Poitiers


    Left:Seal (obverse) of Thomas de Beauchamp, 11th Earl of Warwick, dated 1344: S(IGILLUM) THO(M)E COMITIS WARRWYCHIE ANNO REGNI REGIS E(DWARDII) TE(RT)II...(continued on counter-seal) ("Seal of Thomas, Count (Earl) of Warwick in the year of the reign of King Edward the Third..."). He displays on his surcoat, shield and horse's caparison the arms of Beauchamp, and carries on his helm as crest a swan's head and neck; right: Counter-seal/reverse: (legend continued from face of seal) ...POST CO(N)QUESTU(M) ANGLIE SEPTI(M)O DECIM(0) ET REGNI SUI FRANCIE QUARTO ("...after the Conquest of England the seventeenth and of his reign of the Kingdom of France the fourth"). This dates the seal to 1344. The arms are those of de Newburgh, the family of the Beaumont Earls of Warwick: Checky azure and or, a chevron ermine. This same display of double arms was used on the seal of his father Guy de Beauchamp, 10th Earl of Warwick on his seal affixed to the Barons' Letter, 1301
    Warwick was Marshall of England from 1343/4 until 1369, and was one of the commanders at the great English victories at Crâecy and Poitiers.

    Thomas de Beauchamp fought in all the French wars of King Edward III; he commanded the center at the Battle of Crecy (where many of his relatives were killed including his younger half-brother Alan la Zouche de Mortimer). He was trusted to be guardian of the sixteen-year-old Black Prince. Beauchamp fought at Poitiers in 1356 and at the Siege of Calais (1346).

    He began the rebuilding of the Collegiate Church of Saint Mary in Warwick using money received from the ransom of a French Archbishop. He died of plague in Calais on 13 November 1369 and was entombed in the Beauchamp Chapel. The chapel contains the finest example of the use of brisures for cadency in medieval heraldry -- seven different Beauchamp coats of arms.

    Marriage and children

    He married Katherine Mortimer, daughter of Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March. They had five sons and ten daughters:[1]

    Thomas b. 16 Mar 1338 d. 8 Aug 1401, who married Margaret Ferrers and had descendants. His son Richard succeeded him as Earl and inherited most of his property.
    Guy (d. 28 April 1360). He had two daughters who by entail were excluded from their grandfather's inheritance: Elizabeth (d. c.1369), and Katherine, who became a nun.
    Reinbrun, (d. 1361); he was named for a character in Guy of Warwick.
    William (c. 1343–1411), who inherited the honour of Abergavenny. Married Joan FitzAlan.
    Roger (d. 1361)
    Maud (d. 1403), who married Roger de Clifford, 5th Baron de Clifford.
    Philippa de Beauchamp who married Hugh de Stafford, 2nd Earl of Stafford.
    Alice (d. 1383), who married first John Beauchamp, 3rd Baron Beauchamp and then Sir Matthew Gournay.
    Joan, who married Ralph Basset, 4th Baron Basset de Drayton.
    Isabell (d. 1416) who married first John le Strange, 5th Baron Strange, and then to William de Ufford, 2nd Earl of Suffolk. After the latter's death she became a nun.
    Margaret, who married Guy de Montfort and after his death became a nun.
    Elizabeth, married Thomas de Ufford, KG
    Anne, married Walter de Cokesey
    Juliana
    Katherine, became a nun at Shouldham

    Catherine Montacute, Countess of Salisbury was not his daughter, although she is presented as such in William Painter's Palace of Pleasure and in the Elizabethan play, Edward III that may be by William Shakespeare.

    Thomas married Katherine de Mortimer, Countess of Warwick 19 Apr 1319, (Warwickshire) England. Katherine (daughter of Roger de Mortimer, 1st Earl of March and Joan de Geneville, 2nd Baroness Geneville) was born 0___ 1314, Wigmore Castle, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England; died 4 Aug 1369, (Warwickshire) England; was buried St. Mary's Church, Warwick, Warwickshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  16. 227.  Katherine de Mortimer, Countess of Warwick was born 0___ 1314, Wigmore Castle, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England (daughter of Roger de Mortimer, 1st Earl of March and Joan de Geneville, 2nd Baroness Geneville); died 4 Aug 1369, (Warwickshire) England; was buried St. Mary's Church, Warwick, Warwickshire, England.

    Notes:

    Katherine Mortimer, Countess of Warwick (1314 - 4 August 1369) was the wife of Thomas de Beauchamp, 11th Earl of Warwick KG, an English peer, and military commander during the Hundred Years War. She was a daughter and co-heiress of Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March and Joan de Geneville, Baroness Geneville.

    Sometime before 1355, she became an important figure at the royal court of King Edward III.

    Family and lineage

    Katherine Mortimer was born at Ludlow Castle, Shropshire, England, in 1314, one of the twelve children and a co-heiress of Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March and Joan de Geneville, Baroness Geneville. Her paternal grandparents were Edmund Mortimer, 2nd Baron Mortimer and Margaret de Fiennes, and her maternal grandparents were Sir Piers de Geneville, of Trim Castle and Ludlow, and Jeanne of Lusignan.

    Her father was de facto ruler of England together with his mistress Isabella of France, Queen consort of King Edward II, until his eventual capture and execution by the orders of King Edward III, eldest son of Isabella and King Edward II. The latter had been deposed in November 1326, and afterwards cruelly murdered by assassins acting under the orders of Mortimer and Queen Isabella. Katherine was sixteen years old when her father was hanged, Tyburn, London on 29 November 1330. Roger Mortimer was NOT Hanged drawn and quartered as stated but only hanged and his body was left until monks from Greyfriars in London took it down.

    Marriage

    On 19 April 1319, when she was about five years old, Katherine married Thomas de Beauchamp, 11th Earl of Warwick, eldest son of Guy de Beauchamp, 10th Earl of Warwick and Alice de Toeni.[1] Their marriage required a Papal dispensation as they were related within the prohibited third and fourth degrees. Beauchamp had succeeded to the earldom at the age of two, therefore Katherine was styled Countess of Warwick from the time of her marriage until her death. The marriage had been arranged in July 1318 in order to settle a quarrel between the two families over the lordship of Elfael, which was thus given to Katherine as her marriage portion.[2] For the term of his minority, Beauchamp's custody had been granted to Katherine's father, Roger Mortimer.[3]

    Katherine later became an important personage at the court of King Edward III. As a sign of royal favour she was chosen to stand as one of the godmothers, along with Queen Philippa of Hainault, to the latter's granddaughter, Philippa, Countess of Ulster in 1355. This honour bestowed on Katherine is described by 19th century author Agnes Strickland according to the Friar's Genealogy: "Her [Philippa, Countess of Ulster] godmother also was of Warwick Countess, a lady likewise of great worthiness".[4]

    Issue

    Katherine and Beauchamp together had fifteen children:[5]

    Guy de Beauchamp (died 28 April 1360), married Philippa de Ferrers, daughter of Henry de Ferrers, 2nd Lord Ferrers of Groby and Isabel de Verdun, by whom he had two daughters.[6]
    Thomas de Beauchamp, 12th Earl of Warwick (16 March 1339- 1401), married Margaret Ferrers, daughter of William Ferrers, 3rd Lord of Groby and Margaret de Ufford, by whom he had issue, including Richard de Beauchamp, 13th Earl of Warwick.
    Reinbrun de Beauchamp
    William de Beauchamp, 1st Baron Bergavenny (c. 1343- 8 May 1411), on 23 July 1392, married Lady Joan FitzAlan, daughter of Richard Fitzalan, 11th Earl of Arundel and Elizabeth de Bohun, by whom he had a son Richard de Beauchamp, 1st Earl of Worcester, and a daughter, Joan de Beauchamp, 4th Countess of Ormond. Queen consort Anne Boleyn was a notable descendant of the latter.
    Roger de Beauchamp (died 1361)
    Maud de Beauchamp (died 1403), married Roger de Clifford, 5th Baron Clifford, by whom she had issue, including Thomas de Clifford, 6th Baron Clifford.
    Philippa de Beauchamp, married Hugh de Stafford, 2nd Earl of Stafford, by whom she had nine children.
    Alice Beauchamp (died 1383), married firstly John Beauchamp, 3rd Baron Beauchamp of Somerset, and secondly Sir William Gournay.[7] She died childless.
    Joan de Beauchamp, married Ralph Basset, 3rd Baron Basset of Drayton. She died childless.
    Isabella de Beauchamp (died 29 September 1416), married firstly John le Strange, 5th Baron Strange, and secondly, William de Ufford, 2nd Earl of Suffolk. Upon the latter's death, she became a nun. She died childless.
    Margaret de Beauchamp, married Guy de Montfort, and after his death, she became a nun. She died childless.
    Elizabeth de Beauchamp, married Thomas de Ufford KG,
    Anne de Beauchamp, married Walter de Cokesey.
    Juliana de Beauchamp
    Katherine de Beauchamp, became a nun at Shouldham Priory.

    Death and effigy

    Katherine Mortimer died on 4 August 1369 at the age of about fifty-five. Two years before her death, in 1367, Katherine was a legatee in the will of her sister Agnes de Hastings, Countess of Pembroke.[8] Katherine was buried in St. Mary's Church, Warwick, Warwickshire. She lies alongside her husband, who died three months after her of the Black Death. Their tomb with well-preserved, alabaster effigies can be seen in the centre of the quire. Katherine is depicted wearing a frilled veil with a honeycomb pattern and she is holding hands with Beauchamp. The sides of the tomb chest are decorated with figures of mourners, both male and female.

    Children:
    1. 113. Maud Beauchamp was born 0___ 1335, Warwickshire, England; died 0Feb 1403, Brougham Castle, Westmorland, England.
    2. Thomas de Beauchamp, Knight, 12th Earl of Warwick was born 16 Mar 1338, Warwick Castle, Warwick, Warwickshire, England; died 10 Apr 1401, (Warwickshire) England.
    3. 127. Philippa Beauchamp was born 1334-1344, Elmley, Gloucestershire, England; died 6 Apr 1386.
    4. William de Beauchamp, 1st Baron Bergavenny was born 1343-1345, Warwick, Warwickshire, England; died 8 May 1411, Warwick, Warwickshire, England; was buried Black Friars Churchyard, Hereford, Herefordshire, England.
    5. Guy de Beauchamp

  17. 228.  William de Ros, Knight, 2nd Baron de RosWilliam de Ros, Knight, 2nd Baron de Ros was born 0___ 1288, Helmsley, Yorkshire, England (son of William de Ros, Knight, 1st Baron de Ros of Hamlake and Maud de Vaux); died 3 Feb 1343, Kirkham, Yorkshire, England; was buried Kirkham Priory, Kirkham, North Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Member of Parliament
    • Also Known As: 3rd Baron de Ros of Hamlake, Werke, Trusbot & Belvoir
    • Also Known As: Lord Ross of Werke
    • Military: Lord High Admiral

    Notes:

    William de Ros, 2nd Baron de Ros of Helmsley (c.1288 - 3 February 1343) was the son of William de Ros, 1st Baron de Ros.

    Biography

    As 2nd Baron de Ros of Hamlake, Werke, Trusbut & Belvoir, he was summoned to Parliament during the reigns of Edward II and Edward III of England. In 1321 he completed the religious foundation which his father had begun at Blakeney. He was created Lord Ross of Werke. He was appointed Lord High Admiral and was one of the commissioners with the Archbishop of York, and others, to negotiate peace between the king and Robert de Bruce, who had assumed the title of king of Scotland.

    William de Ros was buried at Kirkham Priory, near the great altar.

    Family

    William de Ros married, before 25 November 1316, Margery De Badlesmere (c.1306 - 18 October 1363), eldest daughter of Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 1st Baron Badlesmere, with Margaret, daughter of Sir Thomas de Clare, with whom he had two sons and three daughters:[2]

    William, who succeeded his father as Baron.
    Thomas, who succeeded his brother as Baron.
    Margaret, who married Sir Edward de Bohun.
    Maud, who married John de Welles, 4th Baron Welles.
    Elizabeth, who married William la Zouche, 2nd Lord Zouche of Haryngworth, a descendant of Breton nobility.

    Maud survived her husband by many years and was one of the very few English people present at the Jubilee, at Rome, in 1350; the king had tried to prevent the attendance of his subjects at this ceremony on account of the large sums of money usually taken out of the kingdom on such occasions.

    *

    Biography

    more...

    Residing in Wark Castle in August 1310. He was summoned for service in Scotland 1316-19, 1322, 1323, 1327, and 1335, and to Parliament 20 November 1317 to 21 Feb 1339/40. Received the surrender of Knaresborough, as a joint commander in January 1317/18, and remained loyal during the Earl of Lancaster's rebellion in 1321-22. Summoned for service in Gascony in December of 1324. He was appointed, by Prince Edward's government, Sheriff of Yorkshire (Nov 1326) and was a member of the Council of Regency in February 1326/27. In November 1327, he served as a commissioner to negotiate with the Scots for peace, as well as a similar role with France in February 1329/30. In 1334, he entertained the King at Helmsley, and during the King's absence in Flanders, he was one of the commissioners to preserve the peace in that country. He took part in the defense of Newcastle against the Scots. Buried at Kirkham in Lancashire.

    Children

    They had two sons, William, Knt. [3rd Lord Roos of Helmsley] and Thomas, Knt. [4th Lord Roos of Helmsley], and three daughters, Margaret, Maud, and Elizabeth. (Ref: Magna Carta Ancestry)

    William de Ros, 3rd Baron de Ros

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    William de Ros, 3rd Baron de Ros (died February 16, 1342) was the son of William de Ros, 2nd Baron de Ros.

    As 3rd Baron de Ros of Hamlake, Werke, Trusbut & Belvoir, he was summoned to Parliament during the reigns of Edward II and Edward III of England. In 1321 he completed the religious foundation which his father had begun at Blakeney. He was created Lord Ross of Werke. He was appointed Lord High Admiral and was one of the commissioners with the Archbishop of York, and others, to negotiate peace between the king and Robert de Bruce, who had assumed the title of king of Scotland.
    He married Margery De Badlesmere (1306-1363), the eldest sister and co-heir of Giles de Badlesmere, 2nd Baron Badlesmere of Leeds Castle, county of Kent. She survived her husband by many years and was one of the very few English people present at the Jubilee, at Rome, in 1350; the king had tried to prevent the attendance of his subjects at this ceremony on account of the large sums of money usually taken out of the kingdom on such occasions.

    Their children were:

    * William de Ros, 4th Baron de Ros
    * Thomas de Ros, 5th Baron de Ros
    * Sir John De Ros
    * Margaret de Ros
    * Matilda de Ros

    William de Ros was buried at Kirkham Priory, near the great altar.

    *

    more...

    Baron de Ros (pronounced "Roose") is one of the most ancient baronial titles in the Peerage of England . (The spelling of the title and of the surname of the original holders has been rendered differently in various texts. The word "Ros" is sometimes spelt "Roos", and the word "de" is sometimes dropped.)


    Barons de Ros of Helmsley (1264)[edit]
    William de Ros, 1st Baron de Ros (d. 1317)
    William de Ros, 2nd Baron de Ros (d. 1343)
    William de Ros, 3rd Baron de Ros (c. 1326–1352)
    Thomas de Ros, 4th Baron de Ros (1336–1384)
    John de Ros, 5th Baron de Ros (c. 1360–1394)
    William de Ros, 6th Baron de Ros (c. 1369–1414)
    John de Ros, 7th Baron de Ros (d. 1421)
    Thomas de Ros, 8th Baron de Ros (c. 1405–1431)
    Thomas de Ros, 9th Baron de Ros (c. 1427–1464) (forfeit 1464)
    Edmund de Ros, 10th Baron de Ros (d. 1508) (restored 1485, barony abeyant in 1508)
    George Manners, 11th Baron de Ros (d. 1513) (abeyance terminated about 1512)
    Thomas Manners, 1st Earl of Rutland, 12th Baron de Ros (d. 1543)
    Henry Manners, 2nd Earl of Rutland, 13th Baron de Ros (1526–1563)
    Edward Manners, 3rd Earl of Rutland, 14th Baron de Ros (1549–1587)
    Elizabeth Cecil, 16th Baroness de Ros (c. 1572–1591)
    William Cecil, 17th Baron de Ros (1590–1618)
    Francis Manners, 6th Earl of Rutland, 18th Baron de Ros (1578–1632)
    Katherine Villiers, Duchess of Buckingham, 19th Baroness de Ros (d. 1649)
    George Villiers, 2nd Duke of Buckingham, 20th Baron de Ros (1628–1687) (barony abeyant 1687)
    Charlotte FitzGerald-de Ros, 21st Baroness de Ros (1769–1831) (abeyance terminated 1806)
    Henry William FitzGerald-de Ros, 22nd Baron de Ros (1793–1839)
    William Lennox Lascelles FitzGerald-de Ros, 23rd Baron de Ros (1797–1874)
    Dudley Charles FitzGerald-de Ros, 24th Baron de Ros (1827–1907)
    Mary Dawson, Countess of Dartrey, 25th Baroness de Ros (1854–1939) (abeyant 1939)
    Una Mary Ross, 26th Baroness de Ros (1879–1956) (abeyance terminated 1943; abeyant 1956)
    Georgiana Angela Maxwell, 27th Baroness de Ros (1933–1983) (abeyance terminated 1958)
    Peter Trevor Maxwell, 28th Baron de Ros (b. 1958)
    The heir apparent is the present holder's son Hon. Finbar James Maxwell (b. 1988).

    Footnotes

    Jump up ^ Debrett's Peerage, 1968, p.347
    Jump up ^ The British herald; or, Cabinet of armorial bearings of the nobility & gentry of Great Britain & Ireland, from the earliest to the present time: with a complete glossary of heraldic terms: to which is prefixed a History of heraldry, collected and arranged ...
    Jump up ^ Cokayne 1949, p. 95; Richardson III 2011, p. 448.
    Jump up ^ Cokayne 1949, p. 95.
    Jump up ^ http://www.cracroftspeerage.co.uk/online/content/Ros1299.htm

    References

    Cokayne, George Edward (1949). The Complete Peerage, edited by Geoffrey H. White XI. London: St. Catherine Press.
    Richardson, Douglas (2011). Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, ed. Kimball G. Everingham III (2nd ed.). Salt Lake City. ISBN 144996639X

    Birth:
    (pronounced "Roose")

    Buried:
    The ruins of Kirkham Priory are situated on the banks of the River Derwent, at Kirkham, North Yorkshire, England. The Augustinian priory was founded in the 1120s by Walter l'Espec, lord of nearby Helmsley, who also built Rievaulx Abbey ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kirkham_Priory

    Images for Kirkham Priory ... https://www.google.com/search?q=Kirkham+Priory&rlz=1C1KMZB_enUS591US591&espv=2&biw=1440&bih=810&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjYj6LQuIzPAhXCJiYKHVRGC3wQsAQIMA

    William married Margery de Badlesmere Bef 25 Nov 1316. Margery (daughter of Bartholomew de Badlesmere, Knight, 1st Baron Badlesmere and Margaret de Clare, Baroness Badlesmere) was born 0___ 1306, Badlesmere Manor, Kent, England; died 18 Oct 1363. [Group Sheet]


  18. 229.  Margery de Badlesmere was born 0___ 1306, Badlesmere Manor, Kent, England (daughter of Bartholomew de Badlesmere, Knight, 1st Baron Badlesmere and Margaret de Clare, Baroness Badlesmere); died 18 Oct 1363.
    Children:
    1. Elizabeth de Ros was born 0___ 1325, Helmsley, Yorkshire, England; died 24 May 1380, Harringworth, Northamptonshire, , England.
    2. 114. Thomas de Ros, Knight, 4th Baron de Ros was born 13 Jan 1335, Helmsley, Yorkshire, England; died 8 Jun 1383, Uffington, Lincolnshire, England; was buried Rievaulx Abbey, Helmsley, North Yorkshire, England.
    3. Maud de Ros, Lady Welles was born (Helmsley, Yorkshire, England); died 9 Dec 1388.

  19. 230.  Ralph Stafford, Knight, 1st Earl of StaffordRalph Stafford, Knight, 1st Earl of Stafford was born 24 Sep 1301, Staffordshire, England; died 31 Aug 1372; was buried Tonbridge Priory, Kent, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: 2nd Baron Stafford
    • Military: Knight of the Garter

    Notes:

    Ralph de Stafford, 2nd Baron Stafford, 1st Earl of Stafford, KG (24 September 1301 - 31 August 1372) was an English nobleman and notable soldier during the Hundred Years War against France.

    Early life and family

    Ralph was born on 24 September 1301, the son of Edmund de Stafford, 1st Baron Stafford and Margaret Bassett.[1] Having lost his father at the age of seven, Ralph grew up in the midlands with his mother's relatives, including her second husband Thomas Pipe. He had his first experience of royal service, along with his brothers and stepfather, when he joined the retinue of Ralph, 2nd Lord Bassett.[2]

    Career

    Stafford was made a Knight banneret in 1327 and was fighting the Scots shortly afterwards. He supported the plot to free Edward III of England from the control of Roger Mortimer, which earned the king's gratitude. By the summer of 1332, he was a commissioner of the peace in Staffordshire and had served abroad on royal business, accompanying Hugh de Audley, 1st Earl of Gloucester. He was also still fighting the Scots, commanding archers at the Battle of Dupplin Moor on 11 Aug 1332 and on three further Scottish campaigns.[2]

    He was first summoned to Parliament by writ as Lord Stafford on 29 November 1336 and continued to attend until 1350.

    His military career continued, accompanying King Edward to France in 1338 as an advisor and being present at the naval battle of Sluys on 24 June 1340. He also fought at the relief of Brest and the siege of Morlaix. He was captured at Vannes but was exchanged in time to negotiate a truce at Malestroit.

    On 6 January 1341, he was made Steward of the Royal Household but resigned that post on 29 March 1345 having assumed the office of Seneschal of Aquitaine, an English possession in France, where he stayed for about a year. Further battles included the battle of Auberoche, the siege of Aiguillon, from where he escaped prior to its lifting, a raid on Barfleur and the English victory at the Battle of Crecy, on 26 August 1346. He became one of the twenty-six founding members and the fifth Knight of the Order of the Garter in 1348.[2]

    In November 1347, his wife's father died; they were able to take possession of his estates without paying the king's homage, an indication of the relationship between them. Ralph was now a very wealthy man, from his estates and from the many prizes from the French war.[2]

    Edward III created a number of new peerage titles to honour his war captains and to mark his jubilee year. Ralph was created the 1st Earl of Stafford on 5 March 1350, with an annuity of 1000 marks. He now replaced Henry of Grosmont, 1st Duke of Lancaster as the king's lieutenant in Gascony, he committed to serve with 200 men at his expense with the expectation of this being doubled in March 1353 at the king's expense. The campaigns provided several captives that were ransomed, but were ultimately unsuccessful, leading to the appointment of Edward, Prince of Wales to command.[2]

    Even at the age of sixty, Stafford continued to command troops and act as a royal envoy, both in France and in Ireland in 1361, accompanying Lionel of Antwerp to try and restore English control.

    Marriages and children

    Around 1326, Stafford married his first wife, Katherine Hastang (also known as Katherine Hastings).[1][3] Katherine was the daughter of Sir John de Hastang, Knight, of Chebsey, Staffordshire.[4] Ralph and Katherine had two daughters:

    Margaret, married Sir John of Bramshall (or Wickham) de Stafford, Knight.
    Joan, married Sir Nicholas de Beke, Knight.
    He later sensationally abducted Margaret de Audley, 2nd Baroness Audley, daughter of Hugh de Audley, 1st Earl of Gloucester and Margaret de Clare, who was worth at least ¹2314 a year, more than ten times his own estates. Her parents filed a complaint with King Edward III of England, but the King supported Stafford's actions. In compensation, the King appeased Hugh and Margaret by creating Hugh the 1st Earl of Gloucester. Margaret de Audley and Stafford married before 6 July 1336 and they subsequently had two sons and four daughters:

    Ralph de Stafford (d. 1347), married Maud of Lancaster, daughter of Henry of Grosmont, 1st Duke of Lancaster and Isabel de Beaumont in 1344.[2][5]
    Hugh de Stafford, 2nd Earl of Stafford, born circa 1336 in Staffordshire, England, married Philippa de Beauchamp; they were the ancestors of the Dukes of Buckingham (1444 creation).[5]
    Elizabeth de Stafford, born circa 1340 in Staffordshire, England, died 7 August 1376, married firstly Fulk le Strange;[5] married secondly, John de Ferrers, 3rd Baron Ferrers of Chartley; married thirdly Reginald de Cobham, 2nd Baron Cobham.[6]
    Beatrice de Stafford, born circa 1341 in Staffordshire, England, died 1415, married firstly, in 1350, Maurice FitzGerald, 2nd Earl of Desmond (d. June 1358); married secondly, Thomas de Ros, 4th Baron de Ros, of Helmsley; married thirdly Sir Richard Burley, Knt.[5]
    Joan de Stafford, born in 1344 in Staffordshire, England, died 1397, married firstly, John Charleton, 3rd Baron Cherleton;[5] married secondly Gilbert Talbot, 3rd Baron Talbot.[7]
    Katherine de Stafford, born circa 1348 in Staffordshire, England and died in December 1361. On 25 December 1357, she married Sir John de Sutton III (1339 – c. 1370 or 1376), Knight, Master of Dudley Castle, Staffordshire.[8] They were parents of Sir John de Sutton IV, hence grandparents of Sir John de Sutton V.[9]
    Death[edit]
    He died on 31 August 1372 at Tonbridge Castle, Kent, England.[2] He was buried at Tonbridge Priory,[10] next to his second wife and her parents.[2]

    Buried:
    Tonbridge Priory was a priory in Tonbridge , Kent , England that was established in 1124. It was destroyed by fire in 1337 and then rebuilt. The priory was disestablished in 1523.

    The building stood in 1735, but was a ruin by 1780. The remains of the priory were demolished in 1842 when the South Eastern Railway built the railway through Tonbridge, the original Tonbridge station standing on its site.

    Ralph married Margaret de Audley, 2nd Baroness Audley Bef 6 July 1336. Margaret (daughter of Hugh de Audley, 1st Baron Audley and Margaret de Clare) was born 1318-1322, Stratton Audley, Oxfordshire, England; died 7 Sep 1349, Tunbridge Castle, Tunbridge, Kent, England; was buried Tunbridge Priory, Kent, England. [Group Sheet]


  20. 231.  Margaret de Audley, 2nd Baroness Audley was born 1318-1322, Stratton Audley, Oxfordshire, England (daughter of Hugh de Audley, 1st Baron Audley and Margaret de Clare); died 7 Sep 1349, Tunbridge Castle, Tunbridge, Kent, England; was buried Tunbridge Priory, Kent, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Countess of Stafford

    Notes:

    Margaret de Audley, suo jure 2nd Baroness Audley and Countess of Stafford (1318 - between 1347 and 1351[1]) was an English noblewoman. She was the only daughter of Hugh de Audley, 1st Earl of Gloucester by his wife Lady Margaret de Clare.[2] Her mother was the daughter of Joan of Acre, Princess of England; thus making Margaret a great-granddaughter of King Edward I by his first consort, Eleanor of Castile. As the only daughter and heiress of her father, she succeeded to the title of 2nd Baroness Audley [E., 1317] on 10 November 1347.[1]

    Marriage and issue

    Margaret was abducted by Ralph, Lord Stafford, who had helped Edward III take the throne. At the time, her worth was at least ¹2314 a year, which was more than ten times Stafford's own estates. (However, he eventually rose to Earl of Stafford in 1350.) After the abduction, her parents filed a complaint with the king, but Edward supported Stafford. In compensation, the king appeased Hugh and Margaret by creating Hugh the 1st Earl of Gloucester.

    Margaret de Audley and Stafford married before 6 July 1336. They subsequently had two sons and four daughters:

    Sir Ralph de Stafford (d. 1347), married Maud of Lancaster, daughter of Henry of Grosmont, 1st Duke of Lancaster and Isabel of Beaumont in 1344.[3]
    Hugh de Stafford, 2nd Earl of Stafford, born circa 1336 in Staffordshire, England, married Philippa de Beauchamp; they were the ancestors of the Dukes of Buckingham (1444 creation).[3]
    Elizabeth de Stafford, born circa 1340 in Staffordshire, England, died 7 August 1376, married firstly Fulk le Strange;[3] married secondly, John de Ferrers, 3rd Baron Ferrers of Chartley; married thirdly Reginald de Cobham, 2nd Baron Cobham.[4]
    Beatrice de Stafford, born circa 1341 in Staffordshire, England, died 1415, married firstly, in 1350, Maurice FitzGerald, 2nd Earl of Desmond (d. June 1358); married secondly, Thomas de Ros, 4th Baron de Ros, of Helmsley; married thirdly Sir Richard Burley, Knt.[3]
    Joan de Stafford, born in 1344 in Staffordshire, England, died 1397, married firstly, John Charleton, 3rd Baron Cherleton;[3] married secondly Gilbert Talbot, 3rd Baron Talbot.[5]
    Katherine de Stafford, born circa 1348 in Staffordshire, England and died in December 1361. Married on 25 December 1357 Sir John de Sutton III (1339 – c. 1370 or 1376), Knight, Master of Dudley Castle, Staffordshire. They were parents of Sir John de Sutton IV, hence grandparents of Sir John de Sutton V.[6]

    Children:
    1. 115. Beatrice Stafford was born ~ 1341, Staffordshire, England; died 13 Apr 1415.
    2. Elizabeth de Stafford was born 0___ 1342, Staffordshire, England; died 7 Aug 1375.
    3. 126. Hugh Stafford, Knight, 2nd Earl of Stafford was born ~ 1344, Stafford Castle, Stafford, Staffordshire, England; died 16 Oct 1386, Rhodes, Greece; was buried Stone Priory, Staffordshire, England.

  21. 232.  Henry Percy, IV, 3rd Baron Percy was born 0___ 1322, Alnwick Castle, Alnwick, Northumberland, England NE66 1NQ (son of Henry Percy, Knight, 2nd Baron Percy of Alnwick and Idonia Clifford); died 18 May 1368, Berwick Castle, Berwick-upon-Tweed, England; was buried Alnwick, Northumberland, England.

    Notes:

    Sir Henry is the 19th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Vernie Swindell Byars (1894-1985)

    Click this link to view the lineage ... http://bit.ly/1v89p64

    Birth:
    More images of Alnwick Castle ... http://bit.ly/1C6Aiwe

    Died:
    Photo & Map of Berwick Castle ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berwick_Castle

    Henry married Mary Plantagenet, Baroness of Percy Bef 1334, Tutbury Castle, Staffordshire, England. Mary (daughter of Henry Plantagenet, 3rd Earl of Lancaster and Leicester and Maud Chaworth) was born 1319-1320, Tutbury Castle, Staffordshire, England; died 1 Sep 1362, Alnwick, Northumberland, England; was buried Alnwick, Northumberland, England. [Group Sheet]


  22. 233.  Mary Plantagenet, Baroness of Percy was born 1319-1320, Tutbury Castle, Staffordshire, England (daughter of Henry Plantagenet, 3rd Earl of Lancaster and Leicester and Maud Chaworth); died 1 Sep 1362, Alnwick, Northumberland, England; was buried Alnwick, Northumberland, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Mary of Lancaster

    Notes:

    Birth:
    Photos & History of Tutbury Castle ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tutbury_Castle

    Children:
    1. 116. Henry Percy, Knight, 1st Earl of Northumberland was born 10 Nov 1341, Alnwick, Northumberland, England; died 20 Feb 1408, Bramham Moor, Yorkshire, England.

  23. 234.  Ralph Neville, 4th Baron Neville de Raby was born 0___ 1291, Raby Castle, Staindrop, Durham, England (son of Ralph Neville, 1st Baron Neville of Raby and Euphemia Clavering, Baroness of Raby); died 5 Aug 1367, Durhamshire, England; was buried Durham Cathedral, Durham, Durhamshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: 0___ 1355; Governor of Berwick

    Notes:

    NEVILLE, RALPH, de, fourth Baron Neville of Raby (1291?-1367), was the second son and eventual heir of Ralph Neville, third baron (d. 1331), by his first wife, Euphemia, daughter and heiress of Sir John de Clavering of Warkworth, in Northumberland, and Clavering, in western Essex.

    His grandfather, Robert de Neville, who died during his father's lifetime [see Neville, Robert de, d. 1282], made one of those fortunate marriages which became traditional with this family, acquiring the lordship of Middleham, in Wensleydale, with the side valley of Coverdale, and the patronage of the abbey of Coverham, by his marriage with Mary, the heiress of the FitzRanulphs. His father, who, like his grandfather, bore none the best of reputations, did not die until 18 April 1331. Robert, the elder son, called the ‘Peacock of the North,’ whose monument may still be seen in Brancepeth Church, had been slain in a border fray by the Earl of Douglas in 1318; and his brother Ralph, who now became the heir of the Neville name, was carried off captive, but after a time was ransomed (Swallow, p. 11).

    Before his father's death Neville had served the king both on the Scottish borders and at court, where he was seneschal of the household (Dugdale, i. 292; Fœdera, iv. 256, 448). In June 1329 he had been joined with the chancellor to treat with Philip VI of France for marriages between the two royal houses (ib. iv. 392); and he had entered into an undertaking to serve Henry, lord Percy (d. 1352) [q. v.], for life in peace and war, with twenty men at arms against all men except the king (Dugdale, u.s., who gives the full terms). He tried to induce the prior and convent of Durham, to whom he had to do fealty for his Raby lands, to recognise the curious claim which his father had first made to the monks' hospitality on St. Cuthbert's day (4 Sept.) (cf. Dugdale, Baronage, i. 293; Letters from Northern Registers, p. 394).

    Neville was a man of energy, and King Edward kept him constantly employed. Scottish relations were then very critical, and Neville and Lord Percy, the only magnate of the north country whose power equalled his own, spent most of their time on the northern border. In 1334 they were made joint wardens of the marches, and were frequently entrusted with important negotiations. Neville was also governor of the castle of Bamborough, and warden of all the forests north of the Trent (Dugdale, i. 294; Swallow, p. 14; Fœdera, vols. iv.–v.). The Lanercost chronicler (p. 293) insinuates that he and Percy did less than their duty during the Scottish invasion of 1337. Neville took part in the subsequent siege of Dunbar (ib. p. 295). It was only at rare intervals that he could be spared from the north. Froissart is no doubt in error in bringing him to the siege of Tournay in 1340, but the truce with Scotland at the close of 1342 permitted his services to be used in the peace negotiations with France promoted by Pope Clement VI in the following year (Froissart, iii. 312, ed. Lettenhove; cf. Fœdera, v. 213; Dugdale). When the king was badly in want of money (1338), Neville advanced him wool from his Yorkshire estates, and in return for this and other services was granted various privileges. In October 1333 he was given the custody of the temporalities of the bishopric of Durham during its vacancy, and twelve years later the wardship of two-thirds of the lands of Bishop Kellawe, who had died in 1316 (Registrum Palatinum Dunelmense, iv. 175, 340).

    When David Bruce invaded England in 1346, Ralph and his eldest son, John, joined William de la Zouch, archbishop of York, at Richmond on 14 Oct., and, marching northwards by Barnard Castle and Auckland, shared three days later in the victory at the Red Hills to the west of Durham, near an old cross already, it would seem, known as Neville's Cross. This success saved the city of Durham, and made David Bruce a captive. Neville fought in the van, and the Lanercost writer now praises him as ‘vir verax et validus, audax et astutus et multum metuendus’ (Chron. de Lanercost, pp. 347, 350; Galfrid le Baker, p. 87). A sword is still shown at Brancepeth Castle which is averred to be that used by Ralph at Neville's Cross or Durham, as the battle was at first often called (Swallow, pp. 16–17). With Gilbert Umfreville, earl of Angus, he pursued the flying Scots across the border, took Roxburgh on terms, and harried the southern counties of Scotland (Chron. de Lanercost, p. 352). Tradition represents that he erected Neville's Cross on the Brancepeth road, half a mile out of Durham, in commemoration of the victory. The old cross was soon altered or entirely replaced by a more splendid one, which was destroyed in 1589, after the fall of the elder branch of Neville, and only the stump now remains; but a detailed description of it was printed in 1674 from an old Durham Roll by Davies in his ‘Rites and Monuments’ (Swallow, p. 16). The king rewarded Neville's services with a grant of 100l. and a license to endow two priests in the church of Sheriff-Hutton to pray for the souls of himself and his family (Dugdale). Towards the end of his life (1364) he endowed three priests in the hospital founded by his family at Well, near Bedale, not far from Middleham, for the same object (ib.)

    The imprisonment of David Bruce made the Scots much less dangerous to England; but there was still plenty of work on the borders, and the rest of Neville's life was almost entirely spent there as warden of the marches, peace commissioner, and for a time (1355) governor of Berwick. The protracted negotiations for the liberation of David Bruce also occupied him (ib.) Froissart mentions one or two visits to France, but with the exception of that of 1359, when he accompanied the king into Champagne, these are a little doubtful (ib.; Froissart, v. 365, vi. 221, 224, ed. Lettenhove). He died on 5 Aug. 1367, and, having presented a very rich vestment to St. Cuthbert, was allowed to be buried in the south aisle of Durham Cathedral, being the first layman to whom that favour was granted (Wills and Inventories, Surtees Soc., i. 26). The body was ‘brought to the churchyard in a chariot drawn by seven horses, and then carried upon the shoulders of knights into the church.’ His tomb, terribly mutilated by the Scottish prisoners confined in the cathedral in 1650, still stands in the second bay from the transept.

    Neville greatly increased the prestige of his family, and his descendants were very prosperous. He married Alice, daughter of Sir Hugh Audley, who, surviving him, married Ralph, baron of Greystock (d. 1417), in Cumberland, and, dying in 1374, was buried by the side of her first husband. They had five sons: (1) John, fifth baron Neville [q. v.]; (2) Robert, like his elder brother, a distinguished soldier in the French wars (Froissart, ed. Lettenhove, xxii. 289); (3) Ralph, the founder of the family of the Nevilles of Thornton Bridge, on the Swale, near Borough- bridge, called Ralph Neville of Condell (Cundall); (4) Alexander [q. v.], archbishop of York; (5) Sir William (d. 1389?) [q. v.] Their four daughters were: (1) Margaret, married, first (1342), William, who next year became Lord Ros of Hamlake (i.e. Helmsley, in the North Riding), and secondly, he dying in 1352, Henry Percy, first earl of Northumberland [q. v.]; (2) Catherine, married Lord Dacre of Gillsland; (3) Eleanor, who married Geoffrey le Scrope, and afterwards became a nun in the Minories, London (Wills and Inventories, i. 39); (4) Euphemia, who married, first, Reginald de Lucy; secondly, Robert Clifford, lord of Westmorland, who died before 1354; and, thirdly, Sir Walter de Heslarton (near New Malton). She died in 1394 or 1395. Surtees (iv. 159) adds a sixth son, Thomas, ‘bishop-elect of Ely,’ but this seems likely to be an error.

    [Rotuli Parliamentorum; Calendarium Genealogicum, published by the Record Commission; Rymer's Fœdera, original and Record editions; Robert de Avesbury, Adam de Murimuth, Walsingham, Letters from Northern Registers and Registrum Palatinum Dunelmense in the Rolls Ser.; Chronicon de Lanercost, Maitland Club ed.; Galfrid le Baker, ed. Maunde Thompson; Froissart, ed. Kervyn de Lettenhove; Surtees's Hist. of Durham, vol. iv.; Longman's Hist. of Edward III; Dugdale's Baronage; Nicolas's Historic Peerage, ed. Courthope; Segar's Baronagium Genealogicum, ed. Edmondson; Selby's Genealogist, iii. 107, &c.; Foster's Yorkshire Pedigrees.]

    end of biography

    Ralph Neville, 2nd Baron Neville de Raby (c.1291 – 5 August 1367) was an English aristocrat, son of Ralph Neville, 1st Baron Neville de Raby and Euphemia de Clavering .[1]

    Neville led the English forces to victory against the Scottish king David II of Scotland at the Battle of Neville's Cross on 17 October 1346

    end of comment

    Birth:
    Raby Castle - history & images of this Neville Family Home ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raby_Castle

    Ralph married Alice de Audley 14 Jan 1326, Stratton Audley, Oxfordshire, England. Alice (daughter of Hugh de Audley, 1st Baron Audley of Stratton and Isolde (Isabella) de Mortimer) was born 1302-1304, Hadley, Lambourne, Berkshire, England; died 12 Jan 1374, Greystoke Manor, Northumberland, England; was buried Durham Cathedral, Durham, Durhamshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  24. 235.  Alice de Audley was born 1302-1304, Hadley, Lambourne, Berkshire, England (daughter of Hugh de Audley, 1st Baron Audley of Stratton and Isolde (Isabella) de Mortimer); died 12 Jan 1374, Greystoke Manor, Northumberland, England; was buried Durham Cathedral, Durham, Durhamshire, England.
    Children:
    1. 117. Margaret Neville, Baroness of Ros was born 12 Feb 1329, (Raby Castle, Staindrop, Durham, England); died 12 May 1372.
    2. Ralph Neville was born Abt 1332, (Raby Castle, Staindrop, Durham, England); died Abt 1380.
    3. Alexander Neville was born 0___ 1332, (Raby Castle, Staindrop, Durham, England); died 16 May 1392, Leuven, Belgium; was buried Carmelite Churchyard, Leuven, Belgium.
    4. Robert Neville was born (Raby Castle, Staindrop, Durham, England).
    5. 124. John Neville, 3rd Baron Neville de Raby was born 1337-1340, Raby Castle, Staindrop, Durham, England; died 17 Oct 1388, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Northumberland, England; was buried Durham Cathedral, Durham, Durhamshire, England.
    6. William Neville was born Raby Castle, Staindrop, Durham, England.
    7. Catherine Neville was born (Raby Castle, Staindrop, Durham, England).
    8. Eleanor Neville was born (Raby Castle, Staindrop, Durham, England).
    9. Euphemia Neville was born (Raby Castle, Staindrop, Durham, England); died 1394-1395, England.

  25. 236.  Roger Mortimer, Knight, 2nd Earl of March was born 11 Nov 1328, Ludlow Castle, Shropshire, England (son of Edmund Mortimer and Elizabeth Badlesmere, Countess of Northampton); died 26 Feb 1360, Rouvray, Avallon, France.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: 4th Baron Mortimer

    Notes:

    Sir Roger de Mortimer, 2nd Earl of March, 4th Baron Mortimer, KG (11 November 1328 – 26 February 1360) was an English nobleman and military commander during the Hundred Years' War.

    He was the son of Sir Edmund Mortimer (d. 1331) and Elizabeth de Badlesmere, and grandson of Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March.

    Inheritance

    The Mortimer family lands and titles were lost after the first Earl of March's revolt and death by hanging in 1330, which was followed the next year by the death of Roger's father. Roger thus grew up with uncertain prospects, and re-acquired the family honours only gradually.

    Around 1342, he received back Radnor, and the next year the old family baronial seat at Wigmore, Herefordshire.

    Heraldic Coat of Arms: Barry Or and azure, on a chief of the first three pallets between two gyronnies based on the second, over all an inescucheon argent.

    Military career

    As a young man he distinguished himself in the wars in France, fighting at Crâecy and elsewhere in the campaign of 1347. Afterwards he was given livery of the rest of his lands, was one of the knights admitted at the foundation of the Order of the Garter,[1] and was summoned to parliament as a baron both in 1348.

    Earldom

    In 1354, the sentence passed against Mortimer's treacherous grandfather, the first earl, was reversed, and the next year he was summoned to parliament as Earl of March. Also in 1355 he received a number of important appointments, including Constable of Dover Castle and Warden of the Cinque Ports, and accompanied Edward III's expedition to France.

    Other honour

    On 19 October 1356 his grandmother, Joan de Geneville, 2nd Baroness Geneville, widow of the first earl, died, and Roger inherited her vast estates, including Ludlow Castle, which was thereafter the Mortimer family seat and power base.

    In the following years he became a member of the Royal Council, and was appointed Constable at the castles of Montgomery, Bridgnorth in Shropshire, and Corfe in Dorset.

    In 1359, and continuing into 1360, he was Constable of Edward III's invasion of France, fighting in the failed siege of Reims and capturing Auxerre. The English forces then moved into Burgundy, where Roger died suddenly at Rouvray near Avallon.

    Marriage and children

    Roger married Philippa de Montagu (1332–1381), daughter of William Montagu, 1st Earl of Salisbury and Catherine Grandison and had by her at least four children:

    Roger Mortimer, who died young;
    Edmund Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March;
    Margery Mortimer.[2]
    Janet Mortimer, who married Andrew Gray, father of Andrew Gray, 1st Lord Gray.
    Mortimer also had at least one illegitimate child:[3]

    Sir Thomas Mortimer, who acted as his nephew's (Roger Mortimer, 4th Earl of March) deputy in Ireland (1382–1383) and stood trial for the slaying of Richard II's commander, Sir Thomas Molineux after the Battle of Radcot Bridge (1387).

    Birth:
    Click this link to view images, history & map of the massive Ludlow Castle in Shropshire ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ludlow_Castle

    Roger married Philippa Montagu (England). Philippa (daughter of William Montagu, Knight, 1st Earl of Salisbury and Catherine Grandison, Countess of Salisbury) was born 0___ 1332, (Cassington, Oxfordshire, England); died 0___ 1381, (England). [Group Sheet]


  26. 237.  Philippa Montagu was born 0___ 1332, (Cassington, Oxfordshire, England) (daughter of William Montagu, Knight, 1st Earl of Salisbury and Catherine Grandison, Countess of Salisbury); died 0___ 1381, (England).
    Children:
    1. 118. Edmund Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March, Earl of Ulster was born 1 Feb 1352, Llangoed, Llyswen, Brecon, Wales; was christened Llyswen, Brecknockshire, Wales; died 27 Dec 1381, Cork, Ireland; was buried Wigmore Abbey, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England.

  27. 238.  Lionel of Antwerp, Knight, 1st Duke of Clarence was born 29 Nov 1338, Antwerp, Belgium (son of Edward III, King of England and Phillipa d'Avesnes, Queen of England); died 17 Oct 1368, Alba, Italy; was buried Clare Priory, Suffolk, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Lionel of Antwerp

    Notes:

    Lionel of Antwerp, 1st Duke of Clarence, jure uxoris 4th Earl of Ulster and 5th Baron of Connaught, KG (Norman: Leonell Duc de Clarence; 29 November 1338 – 7 October 1368) was the third son, but the second son to survive infancy, of Edward III of England and Philippa of Hainault. He was named for his birthplace, at Antwerp in the Duchy of Brabant.[1] Prince Lionel was born of a Flemish mother and was a grandson of William I, Count of Hainaut. He grew to be nearly seven feet in height and had an athletic build.[2][3]

    First marriage

    Betrothed as a child to Elizabeth de Burgh, 4th Countess of Ulster (died 1363), daughter and heiress of William Donn de Burgh, 3rd Earl of Ulster, he was married to her in 1352, but before this date he had entered into possession of her great Irish inheritance. He was called Earl of Ulster from 1347.[4]

    Ireland

    Having been named as his father's representative in England in 1345 and again in 1346, Lionel joined an expedition into France in 1355, but his chief energies were reserved for the affairs of Ireland.[4]

    Appointed governor of that country, he landed at Dublin in 1361, and in November of the following year was created Duke of Clarence, the third dukedom created in England, while his father made an abortive attempt to secure for him the crown of Scotland. His efforts to secure an effective authority over his Irish lands were only moderately successful. After holding a parliament at Kilkenny, which passed the celebrated Statute of Kilkenny in 1366, he dropped the task in disgust and returned to England.[4]

    The poet Geoffrey Chaucer was at one time a page in Lionel's household.[4]

    Second marriage

    After Lionel's first wife Elizabeth died in 1363, a second marriage was arranged with Violante Visconti, daughter of Galeazzo Visconti, lord of Pavia. Journeying to fetch his bride, Lionel was received in great state both in France and Italy and was married to Violante at Milan in June 1368. Some months were then spent in festivities, during which Lionel was taken ill at Alba, where he died on 7 October 1368.[4] There was strong speculation at the time that he had been poisoned by his father-in-law,[5] although this has never been proven.

    Issue

    Lionel had only one child, Philippa, daughter of his first wife Elizabeth. In 1368 she married Edmund Mortimer, 3rd Earl of March. Their granddaughter and eventual heir, Anne Mortimer, married into the Yorkist branch of the English royal family and was the mother of Richard Plantagenet, 3rd Duke of York. The House of York based its claim to the English throne on this line of descent from Lionel, who was the eldest son of King Edward III to establish a lasting blood line (Edward's first-born son, the Black Prince, had no legitimate descendants past his two sons Edward of Angoulãeme and King Richard II).[4] Lionel was the ancestor of Kings Edward IV, Edward V, Richard III and all later British monarchs beginning with Henry VIII (in other words, all later British monarchs except for Henry VII, whose wife Elizabeth of York was his descendant).

    Ancestry

    This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (March 2014) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)
    [show]Ancestors of Lionel of Antwerp, 1st Duke of Clarence

    Buried:
    (Augustine Friars)

    Died:
    in the Alba Longa region...

    Lionel married Elizabeth de Burgh, Duchess of Clarence 9 Sep 1342, Tower Hill, London, England. Elizabeth was born Abt 1338, Carrickfergus Castle, Carrickfergus, Antrim, Ireland; died 0Dec 1363, Dublin, Leinster, Ireland; was buried 11 Mar 1364, Priory, Clare, Suffolk, England. [Group Sheet]


  28. 239.  Elizabeth de Burgh, Duchess of Clarence was born Abt 1338, Carrickfergus Castle, Carrickfergus, Antrim, Ireland; died 0Dec 1363, Dublin, Leinster, Ireland; was buried 11 Mar 1364, Priory, Clare, Suffolk, England.
    Children:
    1. 119. Philippa Plantagenet, 5th Countess of Ulster was born 16 Aug 1355, Eltham Palace, London, England; died 5 Jan 1382, Cork, Ireland; was buried Wigmore Abbey, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England.

  29. 250.  Henry Percy, Knight, 2nd Baron Percy of Alnwick was born 0___ 1299, Alnwick Castle, Alnwick, Northumberland, England NE66 1NQ (son of Henry de Percy, Knight, 1st Baron Percy and Eleanor FitzAlan); died 0___ 1352.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Governor of Pickering Castle
    • Also Known As: 9th Baron Percy
    • Also Known As: Earl Henry III de Percy
    • Military:
    • Alt Birth: 6 Feb 1301, Leckonfield, Yorkshire, England
    • Alt Death: 25 Feb 1353, Alnwick Castle, Alnwick, Northumberland, England NE66 1NQ

    Notes:

    Henry de Percy, 9th Baron Percy and 2nd Baron Percy of Alnwick (1299-1352) was the son of Henry de Percy, 1st Baron Percy of Alnwick, and Eleanor Fitzalan, daughter of Richard FitzAlan, 8th Earl of Arundel.

    Henry was sixteen when his father died, so the Barony was placed in the custody of John de Felton.[1]

    In 1316 he was granted the lands of Patrick IV, Earl of March, in Northumberland, by King Edward II of England.[2] In 1322, was made governor of Pickering Castle and of the town and castle of Scarborough and was later knighted at York.[3] Henry joined with other barons to remove the Despensers, who were favorites of Edward II.

    Following a disastrous war with the Scots, Henry was empowered along with William Zouche to negotiate the Treaty of Edinburgh–Northampton.[4] This was an unpopular treaty and peace between England and Scotland lasted only five years.

    He was appointed to Edward III's Council in 1327 and was given the manor and castle of Skipton. Was granted, by Edward III, the castle and barony of Warkworth in 1328. He was at the siege of Dunbar and the Battle of Halidon Hill and was subsequently appointed constable of Berwick-upon-Tweed.[5] In 1346, Henry commanded the right wing of the English, at the Battle of Neville's Cross.[6]

    Married Idonia, daughter of Robert de Clifford, 1st Baron de Clifford,[7] and had five children;

    Henry, b.1320, succeeded his father as 3rd Baron Percy of Alnwick
    Thomas Percy, Bishop of Norwich
    Roger
    Maud Percy, married John Neville, 3rd Baron Neville de Raby
    Eleanor Percy, married John Fitzwalter, 3rd Baron Fitzwalter (c.1315 – 18 October 1361)[8]
    Isabel Percy, married Sir William de Aton, 2nd Lord Aton, and had a daughter, Katherine Aton. Katherine Aton's son, William Eure, married Maud FitzHugh, daughter of Henry FitzHugh, 3rd Baron FitzHugh.[9]
    In 1329, he founded a chantry, to celebrate divine service for his soul.[10]

    Military:
    In 1316 he was granted the lands of Patrick IV, Earl of March, in Northumberland, by King Edward II of England.[2] In 1322, was made governor of Pickering Castle and of the town and castle of Scarborough and was later knighted at York.[3] Henry joined with other barons to remove the Despensers, who were favorites of Edward II.

    Following a disastrous war with the Scots, Henry was empowered along with William Zouche to negotiate the Treaty of Edinburgh–Northampton.[4] This was an unpopular treaty and peace between England and Scotland lasted only five years.

    He was appointed to Edward III's Council in 1327 and was given the manor and castle of Skipton. Was granted, by Edward III, the castle and barony of Warkworth in 1328. He was at the siege of Dunbar and the Battle of Halidon Hill and was subsequently appointed constable of Berwick-upon-Tweed.[5] In 1346, Henry commanded the right wing of the English, at the Battle of Neville's Cross.

    Henry married Idonia Clifford 0___ 1314, Yorkshire, England. Idonia (daughter of Robert de Clifford, Knight, 1st Baron de Clifford and Maude de Clare) was born ~ 1303, Clifford Castle, Herefordshire, England; died 24 Aug 1365, (Yorkshire, England); was buried Beverley Minster, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  30. 251.  Idonia Clifford was born ~ 1303, Clifford Castle, Herefordshire, England (daughter of Robert de Clifford, Knight, 1st Baron de Clifford and Maude de Clare); died 24 Aug 1365, (Yorkshire, England); was buried Beverley Minster, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Idonia de Clifford

    Notes:

    Buried:
    Images, History & Source ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beverley_Minster

    Children:
    1. Isabel Percy was born 0___ 1320, Alnwick, Northumberland, England; died Bef 25 May 1368, Alnwick, Northumberland, England.
    2. Henry Percy, IV, 3rd Baron Percy was born 0___ 1322, Alnwick Castle, Alnwick, Northumberland, England NE66 1NQ; died 18 May 1368, Berwick Castle, Berwick-upon-Tweed, England; was buried Alnwick, Northumberland, England.
    3. 125. Maud Percy was born Abt 1335, Warkworth Castle, Alnwick, Northumberland, England; died 18 Feb 1378; was buried Durham Cathedral, Durham, Durhamshire, England.
    4. Alianore Percy was born ~ 1336, Alnwick Castle, Alnwick, Northumberland, England NE66 1NQ; died Bef 1361.