Tomasina de Montfort

Female


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Generation: 1

  1. 1.  Tomasina de Montfort was born (Siena) Italy (daughter of Guy de Montfort, Count of Nola and Margherita Aldobrandesca, Lady of Sovana).

    Tomasina married Pietro di Vico (Italy). Pietro was born (Italy). [Group Sheet]


Generation: 2

  1. 2.  Guy de Montfort, Count of Nola was born 0___ 1244 (son of Simon de Montfort, V, Knight, 6th Earl of Leicester and Eleanor of Leicester); died 0___ 1288, Sicily.

    Notes:

    Guy de Montfort, Count of Nola (1244 – 1291) was the son of Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester and Eleanor of England.[1]

    Biography

    He participated in the Battle of Evesham against the royalist forces of his uncle, King Henry III of England, and his cousin, Prince Edward. Both his father and elder brother were traumatically killed during the disastrous battle, Guy de Montfort was extremely wounded and captured.[2]

    He was held at Windsor Castle until spring 1266, when he bribed his captors and escaped to France to rejoin his exiled family. Guy and his brother, Simon the younger, wandered across Europe for several years, eventually making their way to Italy.[2]

    Guy took service with Charles of Anjou, serving as his Vicar-General in Tuscany. He distinguished himself at the Battle of Tagliacozzo and was given Nola by Charles of Anjou.

    In 1271, Guy and Simon discovered that their cousin Henry of Almain (son of Richard, Earl of Cornwall) was in Viterbo at the church of San Silvestro.[3] In revenge for the deaths of their father and brother at Evesham, on 13 March, 1271, Guy and Simon murdered Henry while he clutched the altar, begging for mercy. "You had no mercy for my father and brothers", was Guy's reply. This murder was carried out in the presence of the Cardinals (who were conducting a papal Election), of King Philip III of France, and of King Charles of Sicily. For this crime the Montfort brothers were excommunicated, and Dante banished Guy to the river of boiling blood in the seventh circle of his Inferno (Canto XII).

    The news reached England, and King Edward I(Note: Edward didn't succeed to throne until 1272) dispatched a clerk of the royal household to inform the northern counties and Scotland about the excommunication.[2] Pope Gregory X wrote a letter (29 November, 1273) to King Edward from Lyons, where he was preparing for an ecumenical council, that Cardinal Riccardo Annibaldi and Cardinal Giovanni Orsini were still in Rome and had been ordered to find a secure place of imprisonment in the territories of the Church for Guy de Montfort.[4]

    Simon died later that year at Siena, "cursed by God, a wanderer and a fugitive". Guy was stripped of his titles and took service with Charles of Anjou again, but was captured off the coast of Sicily in 1287 by the Aragonese at the Battle of the Counts. He died in a Sicilian prison.[2]

    Family

    In Tuscany, he married an Italian noblewoman, Margherita Aldobrandesca, the Lady of Sovana.[5] With her he had two daughters:[6] Anastasia, who married Romano Orsini,[7] and Tomasina, who married Pietro di Vico.

    Among his direct descendants (via his elder daughter, Anastasia): late 15th century Kings of Naples, England's Queen-Consort Elizabeth Woodville, 16th century rulers of Poland, Dukes of Ferrera, and Dukes of Guise.

    end of biography

    Guy married Margherita Aldobrandesca, Lady of Sovana Tuscany, Italy. [Group Sheet]


  2. 3.  Margherita Aldobrandesca, Lady of Sovana
    Children:
    1. Anastasia de Montfort, Countess of Nola was born ~ 1274, (Siena) Italy.
    2. 1. Tomasina de Montfort was born (Siena) Italy.


Generation: 3

  1. 4.  Simon de Montfort, V, Knight, 6th Earl of LeicesterSimon de Montfort, V, Knight, 6th Earl of Leicester was born ~ 1208, Montfort-l'Amaury, France (son of Simon de Montfort, IV, 5th Earl of Leicester and Alix de Montmorency); died 4 Aug 1265, Evesham, Worcestershire, England; was buried Evesham Abbey, Evesham, Worcestershire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Simon de Munford

    Notes:

    Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester (c.?1208 – 4 August 1265), also called Simon de Munford and sometimes referred to as Simon V de Montfort to distinguish him from other Simons de Montfort, was a French-English nobleman who inherited the title and estates of the earldom of Leicester in England. He led the rebellion against King Henry III of England during the Second Barons' War of 1263–64, and subsequently became de facto ruler of England.[1] During his rule, Montfort called two famous parliaments. The first stripped the King of unlimited authority, the second included ordinary citizens from the towns.[1] For this reason, Montfort is regarded today as one of the progenitors of modern parliamentary democracy.[2] After a rule of just over a year, Montfort was killed by forces loyal to the King in the Battle of Evesham.[1]


    Family

    Montfort was a younger son of Simon de Montfort, 5th Earl of Leicester, a French nobleman and crusader, and Alix de Montmorency. His paternal grandmother was Amicia de Beaumont, the senior co-heiress to the Earldom of Leicester and a large estate owned by her brother Robert de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester, in England.

    With the irrevocable loss of Normandy, King John refused to allow the elder Simon to succeed to the earldom of Leicester and instead placed the estates and title into the hands of Montfort senior's cousin Ranulf, the Earl of Chester. The elder Simon had also acquired vast domains during the Albigensian Crusade, but was killed during the Siege of Toulouse in 1218 and his eldest son Amaury was not able to retain them. When Amaury was rebuffed in his attempt to get the earldom back, he agreed to allow his younger brother Simon to claim it in return for all family possessions in France.

    Simon arrived in England in 1229, with some education but no knowledge of English, and received a sympathetic hearing from King Henry, who was well-disposed towards foreigners speaking French, then the language of the English court. Henry was in no position to confront the powerful Earl of Chester, so Simon approached the older, childless man himself and convinced him to cede him the earldom. It would take another nine years before Henry formally invested him with the title Earl of Leicester.

    Simon de Montfort shared various levels of consanguinuity and "by-marriage" connections with both English and French royal lineages. For instance, his ancestor Simon I de Montfort was father of Bertrade de Montfort who herself was a paternal great-grandmother of King Henry II. He was also descended from William the Conqueror through one of the numerous progeny of Henry I.

    Early life

    Relief of Simon de Montfort in the Chamber of the United States House of Representatives
    As a younger son, Simon de Montfort attracted little public attention during his youth, and the date of birth remains unknown. He is first mentioned when his mother made a grant to him in 1217.[3] As a boy, Montfort accompanied his parents during his father's campaigns against the Cathars. He was with his mother at the Siege of Toulouse in 1218, where his father died after being struck on the head by a stone pitched by a mangonel. In addition to Amaury, Simon had another older brother, Guy, who was killed at the siege of Castelnaudary in 1220. As a young man, Montfort probably took part in the Albigensian Crusades of the early 1220s. He and Amaury both took part in the Barons' Crusade.

    In 1229 the two surviving brothers (Amaury and Simon) came to an arrangement with King Henry whereby Simon gave up his rights in France and Amaury gave up his rights in England. Thus freed from any allegiance to the King of France, Montfort successfully petitioned for the English inheritance, which he received the next year, although he did not take full possession for several years, and did not win formal recognition as Earl of Leicester until February 1239.

    As Lord of Leicester, he expelled the small Jewish community from Leicester in 1231, banishing them "in my time or in the time of any of my heirs to the end of the world". They moved to the eastern suburbs, which were controlled by Montfort's great-aunt Margaret, Countess of Winchester. He justified his action as being "for the good of my soul, and for the souls of my ancestors and successors": inspiration may have come from the hostility his parents had shown to Jews in France, where his father was known for his devout Christianity, and where his mother had given the Jews of Toulouse a choice of conversion or expulsion; as well as from the intellectual arguments of the scholar Robert Grosseteste (at this date Archdeacon of Leicester). It was also a strategy to enhance his popularity in his new domains by banishing the practice of usury (widely associated with Jews).[4][5]

    Montfort became a favourite of King Henry III and even issued a charter as "Earl of Leicester" in 1236, despite having not yet been granted the title.[6]

    In that same year Simon tried to get Joan, Countess of Flanders to marry him. The idea of an alliance between the rich County of Flanders and a close associate of Henry III of England did not sit well with the French crown. The French Queen Dowager Blanche of Castile convinced Joan to marry Thomas II of Savoy instead.

    Royal marriage

    Eleanor of England, who married Montfort in 1238

    In January 1238, Montfort married Eleanor of England, daughter of King John and Isabella of Angoulăeme and sister of King Henry III. While this marriage took place with the King's approval, the act itself was performed secretly and without consulting the great barons, as a marriage of such importance warranted. Eleanor had previously been married to William Marshal, 2nd Earl of Pembroke, and she swore a vow of perpetual chastity upon his death, when she was sixteen, which she broke by marrying Montfort. The Archbishop of Canterbury, Edmund Rich, condemned the marriage for this reason. The English nobles protested the marriage of the King's sister to a foreigner of modest rank. Most notably, the King's and Eleanor's brother Richard, 1st Earl of Cornwall, rose up in revolt when he learned of the marriage. King Henry eventually bought off Richard with 6,000 marks and peace was restored.

    The marriage brought the manor of Sutton Valence in Kent into Montfort's possession.[7] Relations between King Henry and Montfort were cordial at first. Henry lent him his support when Montfort embarked for Rome in March 1238 to seek papal approval for his marriage. When Simon and Eleanor's first son was born in November 1238 (despite rumours, more than nine months after the wedding), he was baptised Henry in honour of his royal uncle. In February 1239, Montfort was finally invested with the Earldom of Leicester. He also acted as the king's counsellor and was one of the nine godfathers of Henry's eldest son, Lord Edward, who would inherit the throne and become Edward I ("Longshanks").

    Crusade and turning against the King

    Shortly after Prince Edward's birth, however, there was a falling out between the brothers-in-law. Simon owed a great sum of money to Thomas II of Savoy, uncle of Queen Eleanor, and named King Henry as security for his repayment. The King evidently had not approved this, and was enraged when he discovered that Montfort had used his name. On 9 August 1239, Henry is reported to have confronted Montfort, called him an excommunicant and threatened to imprison him in the Tower of London. "You seduced my sister", King Henry said, "and when I discovered this, I gave her to you, against my will, to avoid scandal." Simon and Eleanor fled to France to escape Henry's wrath.

    Having announced his intention to go on crusade two years before, Simon raised funds and travelled to the Holy Land during the Barons' Crusade, but does not seem to have faced combat there. He was part of the crusading host which, under Richard of Cornwall, negotiated the release of Christian prisoners including Simon's older brother Amaury. In autumn 1241, he left Syria and joined King Henry's campaign against King Louis IX in Poitou. The campaign was a failure, and an exasperated Montfort declared that Henry should be locked up like King Charles the Simple. Like his father, Simon was a soldier as well as a capable administrator. His dispute with King Henry came about due to the latter's determination to ignore the swelling discontent within the country, caused by a combination of factors, including famine and a sense among the English Barons that King Henry was too quick to dispense favour to his Poitevin relatives and Savoyard in-laws.

    In 1248, Montfort again took the cross with the idea of following Louis IX of France to Egypt. But, at the repeated requests of King Henry, he gave up this project in order to act as viceroy in the unsettled and disaffected Duchy of Gascony. Bitter complaints were excited by the rigour with which Montfort suppressed the excesses of the Seigneurs and of contending factions in the great communes. Henry yielded to the outcry and instituted a formal inquiry into Simon's administration. Simon was formally acquitted on the charges of oppression, but his accounts were disputed by Henry and Simon retired to France in 1252. The nobles of France offered him the Regency of the kingdom, vacated by the death of Queen Blanche of Castile. The earl preferred to make his peace with Henry III, which he did in 1253, in obedience to the exhortations of the dying Robert Grosseteste, Bishop of Lincoln. He helped the King deal with disaffection in Gascony, but their reconciliation was a hollow one. In the Parliament of 1254, Simon led the opposition in resisting a royal demand for a subsidy. In 1256–57, when the discontent of all classes was coming to a head, Montfort nominally adhered to the royal cause. He undertook, with Peter of Savoy, the Queen's uncle, the difficult task of extricating the King from the pledges which he had given to the Pope with reference to the Crown of Sicily; and Henry's writs of this date mention Montfort in friendly terms. But at the "Mad Parliament" of Oxford (1258) Montfort appeared with the Earl of Gloucester,[8] at the head of the opposition. He was part of the Council of Fifteen who were to constitute the supreme board of control over the administration. The King's success in dividing the barons and in fostering a reaction, however, rendered such projects hopeless. In 1261, Henry revoked his assent to the Provisions of Oxford and Montfort, in despair, left the country.

    War against the King

    Main article: Second Barons' War

    Simon de Montfort returned to England in 1263, at the invitation of the barons who were now convinced of the King's hostility to all reform and raised a rebellion with the avowed object of restoring the form of government which the Provisions had ordained. Henry quickly gave in and allowed Montfort to take control of the council. His son Edward, however, began using patronage and bribes to win over many of the barons. Their disruption of parliament in October led to a renewal of hostilities, which saw the royalists able to trap Simon in London. With few other options available, Montfort agreed to allow Louis IX of France to arbitrate their dispute. Simon was prevented from presenting his case to Louis directly on account of a broken leg, but little suspected that the King of France, known for his innate sense of justice, would completely annul the Provisions in his Mise of Amiens in January 1264. Civil war broke out almost immediately, with the royalists again able to confine the reformist army in London. In early May 1264, Simon marched out to give battle to the King and scored a spectacular triumph at the Battle of Lewes on 14 May 1264, capturing the King, Lord Edward, and Richard of Cornwall, Henry's brother and the titular King of Germany. Montfort used his victory to set up a government based on the provisions first established at Oxford in 1258. Henry retained the title and authority of King, but all decisions and approval now rested with his council, led by Montfort and subject to consultation with parliament. His Great Parliament of 1265 (Montfort's Parliament) was a packed assembly to be sure, but it can hardly be supposed that the representation which he granted to the towns was intended to be a temporary expedient.

    Montfort sent his summons, in the King's name, to each county and to a select list of boroughs, asking each to send two representatives. This body was not the first elected parliament in England. In 1254, Henry was in Gascony and in need of money. He gave instructions for his regent, Queen Eleanor, to summon a parliament consisting of knights elected by their shires to ask for this 'aid'. Montfort, who was in that parliament, took the innovation further by including ordinary citizens from the boroughs, also elected, and it was from this period that parliamentary representation derives. The list of boroughs which had the right to elect a member grew slowly over the centuries as monarchs granted charters to more English towns. (The last charter was given to Newark in 1674.)

    The right to vote in Parliamentary elections for county constituencies was uniform throughout the country, granting a vote to all those who owned the freehold of land to an annual rent of 40 shillings (‘Forty-shilling Freeholders’). In the Boroughs, the electoral franchise varied and individual boroughs had varying arrangements.

    The reaction against his government was baronial rather than popular. The Welsh Marcher Lords were friends and allies of Prince Edward, and when he escaped in May 1265, they rallied around his opposition. The final nail was the defection of Gilbert de Clare, the Earl of Gloucester, the most powerful baron and Simon's ally at Lewes. Clare had grown resentful of Simon's fame and growing power. When he and his brother Thomas fell out with Simon's sons Henry, Simon, and Guy, they deserted the reforming cause and joined Edward.

    Though boosted by Welsh infantry sent by Montfort's ally Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, Simon's forces were severely depleted. Lord Edward attacked his cousin, his godfather's son Simon's forces at Kenilworth, capturing more of Montfort's allies. Montfort himself had crossed the Severn with his army, intending to rendezvous with his son Simon. When he saw an army approaching at Evesham, Montfort initially thought it was his son's forces. It was, however, Edward's army flying the Montfort banners they had captured at Kenilworth. At that point, Simon realised he had been outmaneuvered by Edward.

    Death

    A 13th-century cloth depiction of the mutilation of Montfort's body after the Battle of Evesham
    An ominous black cloud hung over the field of Evesham on 4 August 1265 as Montfort led his army in a desperate uphill charge against superior forces, described by one chronicler as the "murder of Evesham, for battle it was none".[9] On hearing that his son Henry had been killed, Montfort replied, "Then it is time to die."[10] During the battle, a twelve-man squad of Edward's men had stalked the battlefield independent of Edward's main army, their sole aim being to find the earl and cut him down. Montfort was hemmed in; Roger Mortimer killed Montfort by stabbing him in the neck with a lance.[11] Montfort's last words were said to have been "Thank God".[10] Also slain with Montfort were other leaders of his movement, including Peter de Montfort and Hugh Despenser.

    Montfort's body was mutilated in an unparalleled frenzy by the royalists. News reached the mayor and sheriffs of London that "the head of the earl of Leicester ... was severed from his body, and his testicles cut off and hung on either side of his nose";[11] and in such guise the head was sent to Wigmore Castle by Roger Mortimer, 1st Baron Mortimer, as a gift to his wife, Maud.[12] His hands and feet were also cut off and sent to diverse places to enemies of his as a great mark of dishonour to the deceased.[13] Such remains as could be found were buried under the altar of Evesham Abbey by the canons. It was visited as holy ground by many commoners until King Henry caught wind of it. He declared that Montfort deserved no spot on holy ground and had his remains reburied under an insignificant tree. The remains of some of Montfort's soldiers who had fled the battlefield were found in the nearby village of Cleeve Prior.

    Montfort's niece, Margaret of England, later killed one of the soldiers responsible for his death, purposely or inadvertently.

    Matthew Paris reports that the Bishop of Lincoln, Robert Grosseteste, once said to Montfort's eldest son, Henry, "My beloved child, both you and your father will meet your deaths on one day, and by one kind of death, but it will be in the name of justice and truth.

    Legacy

    In the years that followed his death, Simon de Montfort's grave was frequently visited by pilgrims. Napoleon Bonaparte described Simon de Montfort as "one of the greatest Englishmen".[14] Today, Montfort is mostly remembered as one of the fathers of representative government.[2][15][16]

    Evesham Abbey and the site of Montfort's grave were destroyed with the Dissolution of the Monasteries in the 16th century. In 1965 a memorial of stone from Montfort-l'Amaury was laid on the site of the former altar by Speaker of the House of Commons Sir Harry Hylton-Foster and Archbishop of Canterbury, Michael Ramsey.

    Statue of Montfort on the Haymarket Memorial Clock Tower in Leicester
    Various local honours were dedicated to his memory, and he has become eponymous several times over. De Montfort University in Leicester is named after him, as is the nearby De Montfort Hall, a concert venue. A statue of Montfort is one of four to adorn the Haymarket Memorial Clock Tower in Leicester. A relief of Montfort adorns the wall of the Chamber of the United States House of Representatives.

    Montfort's banner called the 'Arms of Honour of Hinckley', blazoned Per pale indented argent and gules, and displayed in stained glass in Chartres Cathedral, is especially used in the coat of arms of the town of Hinckley, part of his Earldom in Leicestershire, and by many of its local organizations. Combined with his personal Coat of Arms, the banner forms part of the club crest for the town's football club Hinckley A.F.C.[17]

    A school[18] and a bridge on the north east stretch of the A46 are named after him in Evesham.

    In fiction

    Sharon Penman's novel, Falls the Shadow, is a fictional retelling of Montfort's life from his arrival in England to his death. The Montfort story is the focus of the second part of The Brothers of Gwynedd Quartet by Edith Pargeter (who also wrote as Ellis Peters). The four books tell the story of Llewellyn Prince of Wales, who married Simon's daughter Eleanor, and his three brothers. More recently are the four speculative novels, Montfort, Vol. I-IV, by Katherine Ashe.[19] Simon de Montfort and (especially) his wife Eleanor feature in Doctor Mirabilis by James Blish, a semi-fictional novel about the medieval philosopher, Franciscan friar Roger Bacon.[citation needed]

    Descendants

    Simon de Montfort and Eleanor of Leicester had seven children, many of whom were notable in their own right:[20]

    Henry de Montfort (November 1238 – 1265)
    Simon the Younger de Montfort (April 1240 – 1271)
    Amaury de Montfort, Canon of York (1242/1243-1300)
    Guy de Montfort, Count of Nola (1244–1288). Elizabeth Woodville, Queen Consort of Edward IV of England, was one of Guy's descendants through his daughter, Anastasia de Montfort, Countess of Nola.
    Joanna de Montfort (born and died in Bordeaux between 1248 and 1251).
    Richard de Montfort (d.1266). Date of death is not certain.
    Eleanor de Montfort (1252–1282). She married Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, Prince of Wales, honouring an agreement that had been made between Earl Simon and Llywelyn. Eleanor, Lady of Wales, died on 19 June 1282 at the royal Welsh home at Abergwyngregyn, on the north coast of Gwynedd, giving birth to a daughter, Gwenllian of Wales. After Llywelyn's death on 11 December 1282, Gwenllian was captured by King Edward I and spent the rest of her life in a convent.

    end of biography

    Simon married Eleanor of Leicester 7 Jan 1238. Eleanor (daughter of John I, King of England and Isabelle of Angouleme, Queen of England) was born 0___ 1215, Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England; died 13 Apr 1275, Montargis Abbey, France; was buried Montargis Abbey, France. [Group Sheet]


  2. 5.  Eleanor of Leicester was born 0___ 1215, Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England (daughter of John I, King of England and Isabelle of Angouleme, Queen of England); died 13 Apr 1275, Montargis Abbey, France; was buried Montargis Abbey, France.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Eleanor of England
    • Also Known As: Eleanor Plantagenet

    Notes:

    Eleanor of Leicester (also called Eleanor Plantagenet [1] and Eleanor of England) (1215 - 13 April 1275) was the youngest child of King John of England and Isabella of Angoulăeme.

    Early life

    Eleanor
    At the time of Eleanor's birth at Gloucester, King John's London was in the hands of French forces, John had been forced to sign the Magna Carta and Queen Isabella was in shame. Eleanor never met her father, as he died at Newark Castle when she was barely a year old. The French, led by Prince Louis the Lion, the future Louis VIII, were marching through the south. The only lands loyal to her brother, Henry III of England, were in the Midlands and southwest. The barons ruled the north, but they united with the royalists under William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke, who protected the young king Henry, and Louis was defeated.

    Before William the Marshal died in 1219 Eleanor was promised to his son, also named William. They were married on 23 April 1224 at New Temple Church in London. The younger William was 34 and Eleanor only nine. He died in London on 6 April 1231, days before their seventh anniversary. There were no children of this marriage.

    Eleanor had brought a dowry of 10 manors and 200 pounds per year to this marriage. According to the law of the time, widows were allowed to retain one third of the estates of the marriage. However, her brother-in-law Richard took all of the estates and sold many, including her dowry, to pay William's debts. Eleanor strove for many years to try and recover her lost property.[2]

    The widowed Eleanor swore a holy oath of chastity in the presence of Edmund Rich, Archbishop of Canterbury.[3]

    Simon de Montfort

    Seven years later, she met Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester. According to Matthew Paris, Simon was attracted to Eleanor's beauty and elegance as well as her wealth and high birth. They fell in love and married secretly on 7 January 1238 at the King's chapel in Westminster Palace. Her brother King Henry later alleged that he only allowed the marriage because Simon had seduced Eleanor. The marriage was controversial because of the oath Eleanor had sworn several years before to remain chaste. Because of this, Simon made a pilgrimage to Rome seeking papal approval for their union. Simon and Eleanor had seven children:

    Henry de Montfort (November 1238 – 1265)
    Simon the younger de Montfort (April 1240 – 1271)
    Amaury de Montfort, Canon of York (1242/1243-1300)
    Guy de Montfort, Count of Nola (1244–1288)
    Joanna, born and died in Bordeaux between 1248 and 1251.
    Richard de Montfort (1252–1281)
    Eleanor de Montfort Princess of Wales (1258–1282)
    Simon de Montfort had the real power behind the throne, but when he tried to take the throne, he was defeated with his son at the Battle of Evesham on 4 August 1265. Eleanor fled to exile in France where she became a nun at Montargis Abbey, a nunnery founded by her deceased husband's sister Amicia, who remained there as abbess. There she died on 13 April 1275, and was buried there. She was well treated by Henry, retained her incomes, and her proctors were allowed to pursue her litigation concerning the Leicester inheritance in the English courts; her will and testament were executed without hindrance.[4]

    Through her son Guy, Eleanor was an ancestor of Elizabeth Woodville, queen consort of Edward IV.

    Eleanor's daughter, Eleanor de Montfort, was married, at Worcester in 1278, to Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, Prince of Wales. She would die giving birth to their only child, Gwenllian of Wales. After the conquest of Wales, Gwenllian was imprisoned by Edward I of England, her mother's first cousin, at Sempringham priory, where she died 1337.

    Notes:

    Married:
    In January 1238, Montfort married Eleanor of England, daughter of King John and Isabella of Angoulăeme and sister of King Henry III.

    While this marriage took place with the King's approval, the act itself was performed secretly and without consulting the great barons, as a marriage of such importance warranted. Eleanor had previously been married to William Marshal, 2nd Earl of Pembroke, and she swore a vow of perpetual chastity upon his death, when she was sixteen, which she broke by marrying Montfort.

    The Archbishop of Canterbury, Edmund Rich, condemned the marriage for this reason.

    The English nobles protested the marriage of the King's sister to a foreigner of modest rank. Most notably, the King's and Eleanor's brother Richard, 1st Earl of Cornwall, rose up in revolt when he learned of the marriage. King Henry eventually bought off Richard with 6,000 marks and peace was restored.

    Children:
    1. Henry de Montfort was born 0Nov 1238; died 0___ 1265.
    2. Simon de Montfort was born 0Apr 1240; died 0___ 1271, Siena, Italy.
    3. Amaury de Montfort was born 1242-1243; died 0___ 1300.
    4. 2. Guy de Montfort, Count of Nola was born 0___ 1244; died 0___ 1288, Sicily.
    5. Eleanor Montfort, Princess of Wales was born 0___ 1258; died 0___ 1282.


Generation: 4

  1. 8.  Simon de Montfort, IV, 5th Earl of Leicester was born 0___ 1175 (son of Simon de Montfort, IV, Lord of Montfort l'Amaury and Amicia de Beaumont, Countess of Leicester); died 25 Jun 1218, Touloise, France.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Simon de Montfort the elder

    Notes:

    Simon IV[1] of Montfort, lord of Montfort-l'Amaury, 5th earl of Leicester (c.?1175 – 25 June 1218), also known as Simon de Montfort the elder, was a French warlord who took part in the Fourth Crusade (1202–1204) and was a prominent leader of the Albigensian Crusade. He died at the siege of Toulouse in 1218.

    Early life

    He was the son of Simon IV de Montfort (d. 1188), lord of Montfort l'Amaury in France near Paris, and Amicia de Beaumont, daughter of Robert de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester—the Montfort line itself descends from the House of Reginar. He succeeded his father as lord of Montfort in 1181; in 1190 he married Alix de Montmorency, the daughter of Bouchard III de Montmorency. She shared his religious zeal and would accompany him on his campaigns.[2]

    In 1199, while taking part in a tournament at Ecry-sur-Aisne, he took the cross in the company of Count Thibaud de Champagne. The crusade soon fell under Venetian control, and was diverted to Zara on the Adriatic Sea. Pope Innocent III had specifically warned the Crusaders not to attack fellow Christians; Simon opposed the attack and urged a waiting Zara delegation to not surrender, claiming the Frankish troops would not support the Venetians in this. As a result, the delegation returned to Zara and the city resisted.[3] Since most Frankish lords were in debt to the Venetians, they did support the attack and the city was sacked in 1202. Simon did not participate in this action and was one of its most outspoken critics. He and his associates, including Abbot Guy of Vaux-de-Cernay, left the crusade when the decision was taken to divert once more to Constantinople to place Alexius IV Angelus on the throne. Instead, Simon and his followers travelled to the court of King Emeric of Hungary and thence to Acre.[4]

    His mother was the eldest daughter of Robert of Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester. After the death of her brother Robert de Beaumont, 4th Earl of Leicester without children in 1204, she inherited half of his estates, and a claim to the Earldom of Leicester. The division of the estates was effected early in 1207, by which the rights to the earldom were assigned to Amicia and Simon. However, King John of England took possession of the lands himself in February 1207, and confiscated its revenues. Later, in 1215, the lands were passed into the hands of Simon's cousin, Ranulph de Meschines, 4th Earl of Chester.

    Later life

    Simon remained on his estates in France before taking the cross once more, this time against Christian dissidence. He participated in the initial campaign of the Albigensian Crusade in 1209, and after the fall of Carcassonne, was elected leader of the crusade and viscount of the confiscated territories of the Raymond-Roger Trencavel family.

    Simon was rewarded with the territory conquered from Raymond VI of Toulouse, which in theory made him the most important landowner in Occitania. He became feared for his ruthlessness. In 1210 he burned 140 Cathars in the village of Minerve who refused to recant - though he spared those who did. In another widely reported incident, prior to the sack of the village of Lastours, he brought prisoners from the nearby village of Bram and had their eyes gouged out and their ears, noses and lips cut off. One prisoner, left with a single good eye, led them into the village as a warning.

    Simon's part in the crusade had the full backing of his feudal superior, the King of France, Philip Augustus. But historian Alistaire Horne, in his book Seven Ages of Paris, states that Philip "turned a blind eye to Simon de Montfort's crusade...of which he disapproved, but readily accepted the spoils to his exchequer". Following the latter's success in winning Normandy from John Lackland of England, he was approached by Innocent III to lead the crusade but turned this down. He was heavily committed to defend his gains against John and against the emerging alliance among England, the Empire and Flanders.

    But, Philip claimed full rights over the lands of the house of St Gilles; some historians believe his dispatch of de Montfort and other northern barons to be, at the very least, an exploratory campaign to reassert the rights of the French Crown in Le Midi. Philip may well also have wanted to appease the papacy after the long dispute over his marriage, which had led to excommunication. He also sought to counter any adventure by John of England, who had marriage and fealty ties also with the Toulouse comtal house. Meanwhile, others have assessed Philip's motives to include removing over-mighty subjects from the North, and distracting them in adventure elsewhere, so they could not threaten his increasingly successful restoration of the power of the French crown in the north.

    Simon is described as a man of unflinching religious orthodoxy, deeply committed to the Dominican order and the suppression of heresy. Dominic Guzman, later Saint Dominic, spent several years during the war in the Midi at Fanjeau, which was Simon's headquarters, especially in the winter months when the crusading forces were depleted. Simon had other key confederates in this enterprise, which many historians view as a conquest of southern lands by greedy men from the north. Many of them had been involved in the Fourth Crusade. One was Guy Vaux de Cernay, head of a Cistercian abbey not more than twenty miles from Simon's patrimony of Montfort Aumary, who accompanied the crusade in the Languedoc and became bishop of Carcassonne. Meanwhile, Peter de Vaux de Cernay, the nephew of Guy, wrote an account of the crusade. Historians generally consider this to be propaganda to justify the actions of the crusaders; Peter justified their cruelties as doing "the work of God" against morally depraved heretics. He portrayed outrages committed by the lords of the Midi as the opposite.

    Simon was an energetic campaigner, rapidly moving his forces to strike at those who had broken their faith with him - and there were many, as local lords switched sides whenever the moment seemed propitious. The Midi was a warren of small fortified places, as well as home to some highly fortified cities, such as Toulouse, Carcassonne and Narbonne. Simon showed ruthlessness and daring as well as being particularly brutal with those who betrayed their pledges - as for example, Martin Algai, lord of Biron.[5] In 1213 Simon defeated Peter II of Aragon at the Battle of Muret. This completed the defeat of the Albigensians, but Simon carried on the campaign as a war of conquest. He was appointed lord over all the newly acquired territory as Count of Toulouse and Duke of Narbonne (1215). He spent two years in warfare in many parts of Raymond's former territories; he besieged Beaucaire, which had been taken by Raymond VII of Toulouse, from 6 June 1216 to 24 August 1216.


    Plaque commemorating the death of Simon de Montfort
    Raymond spent most of this period in the Crown of Aragon, but corresponded with sympathisers in Toulouse. There were rumours in September 1216 that he was on his way to Toulouse. Abandoning the siege of Beaucaire, Simon partially sacked Toulouse, perhaps intended as punishment of the citizens. Raymond returned in October 1217 to take possession of Toulouse. Simon hastened to besiege the city, meanwhile sending his wife, Alix de Montmorency, with bishop Foulques of Toulouse and others, to the French court to plead for support. After maintaining the siege for nine months, Simon was killed on 25 June 1218 while combating a sally by the besieged. His head was smashed by a stone from a mangonel, operated, according to one source, by the donas e tozas e mulhers ("ladies and girls and women") of Toulouse.[6] He was buried in the Cathedral of Saint-Nazaire at Carcassonne.[7] His body was later moved by one of his sons to be reinterred at Montfort l'Amaury. A tombstone in the South Transept of the Cathedral is inscribed "of Simon de Montfort".

    Legacy

    Simon left three sons: his French estates passed to his eldest son, Amaury VI de Montfort, while his younger son, Simon, eventually gained possession of the earldom of Leicester and played a major role in the reign of Henry III of England. He led the barons' rebellion against Henry during the Second Barons' War, and subsequently became de facto ruler of England. During his rule, de Montfort called the first directly elected parliament in medieval Europe. For this reason, de Montfort is regarded today as one of the progenitors of modern parliamentary democracy. Another son, Guy, was married to Petronille, Countess of Bigorre, on 6 November 1216, but died at the siege of Castelnaudary on 20 July 1220. His daughter, Petronilla, became an abbess at the Cistercian nunnery of St. Antoine's. Another daughter, Amicia, founded the convent at Montargis and died there in 1252.

    Notes

    Jump up ^ Complete Peerage, vii p. 716
    Jump up ^ Maddicott, John Robert (1994). Simon de Montfort. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. p. 5.
    Jump up ^ Crowley, Roger (2011). City of Fortune: How Venice won and lost a Naval Empire. London: Bloomsberry House. p. 54.
    Jump up ^ Phillips, Jonathan. The Fourth Crusade and the Sack of Constantinople, 2004. page 137.
    Jump up ^ Sumption, Jonathan (1978). The Albigensian Crusade (1999 paperback ed.). Faber. p. 149. ISBN 0-571-20002-8.
    Jump up ^ Chanson de la Croisade Albigeoise laisse 205.
    Jump up ^ Chanson de la Croisade Albigeoise laisse 206; Peter of les Vaux-de-Cernay, Historia Albigensis 615.

    References

    Sumption, Jonathan. The Albigensian Crusade, 2000
    Wikisource-logo.svg Herbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "Simon de Montfort". Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company.

    Simon married Alix de Montmorency 0___ 1190. [Group Sheet]


  2. 9.  Alix de Montmorency
    Children:
    1. 4. Simon de Montfort, V, Knight, 6th Earl of Leicester was born ~ 1208, Montfort-l'Amaury, France; died 4 Aug 1265, Evesham, Worcestershire, England; was buried Evesham Abbey, Evesham, Worcestershire, England.

  3. 10.  John I, King of EnglandJohn I, King of England was born 24 Dec 1166, Beaumont Palace, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England (son of Henry II, King of England and Eleanore de Aquitaine, Queen of England); died 19 Oct 1216, Newark Castle, Nottinghamshire, England; was buried 19 Oct 1216, Worcester Cathedral, Worcester, Warwickshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Johan sanz Terre
    • Also Known As: John de Normandie, King of England
    • Also Known As: John I, King of England
    • Also Known As: John Lackland
    • Also Known As: John Plantagenet, King of England

    Notes:

    John (24 December 1166 - 19 October 1216), also known as John Lackland (Norman French: Johan sanz Terre),[1] was King of England from 6 April 1199 until his death in 1216.

    Following the battle of Bouvines, John lost the duchy of Normandy to King Philip II of France, which resulted in the collapse of most of the Angevin Empire and contributed to the subsequent growth in power of the Capetian dynasty during the 13th century.

    The baronial revolt at the end of John's reign led to the sealing of the Magna Carta, a document sometimes considered to be an early step in the evolution of the constitution of the United Kingdom.

    more on King John ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John,_King_of_England

    More images of King John ...

    https://www.google.com/search?q=john+lackland+coat+of+arms&rlz=1C1KMZB_enUS591US591&espv=2&biw=1440&bih=810&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiNnKWp6aPPAhULXB4KHb1qCnQQsAQIKw&dpr=1#imgrc=F8SAOkDV1jsAEM%3A

    *

    Baronial Order of Magna Charta:

    The Baronial Order of Magna Charta ("BOMC") is a scholarly, charitable, and lineage society founded in 1898. The BOMC was originally named the Baronial Order of Runnemede, but the name was subsequently changed to better reflect the organization's purposes relating to the Magna Charta and the promulgation of "freedom of man under the rule of law." view its membership list: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baronial_Order_of_Magna_Charta

    These 25 barons were Sureties for the concessions made by John, King of England, d. 18 Oct 1216.

    1. William d'Albini, Lord of Belvoir Castle, d. 1236.
    ((26th, 27th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Vernia Swindell "Ma" Byars;
    24th, 25th & 26th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Jesse D Hennessee: http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=&secondpersonID=I3&maxrels=12&disallowspouses=0&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I46884

    2. Roger Bigod, (43132) Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk, d. 1220.
    (26th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Perry Green "Pop" Byars: http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=&secondpersonID=I3&maxrels=6&disallowspouses=1&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I43132

    3. Hugh Bigod, (43271) heir to the earldoms of Norfolk and Suffolk, d. 1225.
    (25th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Perry Green "Pop" Byars: http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=I3&secondpersonID=&maxrels=6&disallowspouses=1&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I43271

    4. Henry de Bohun, Earl of Hereford, (46127) d. 1220.
    (26th, 27th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Vernia Swindell "Ma" Byars;
    25th & 26th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Jesse D Hennessee: http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=&secondpersonID=I3&maxrels=6&disallowspouses=1&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I46127


    5. Richard de Clare, Earl of Hertford, (46129) d. 1217.
    (25th, 26th & 27th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Vernia Swindell "Ma" Byars: http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=I3&secondpersonID=&maxrels=6&disallowspouses=1&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I46129

    6. Gilbert de Clare, heir to the earldom of Hertford, (45550) d. 1230.
    (24th, 26th & 27th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Vernia Swindell "Ma" Byars;
    25th & 27th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Perry Green "Pop" Byars;
    24th & 25th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Jesse D Hennessee: http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=I3&secondpersonID=&maxrels=16&disallowspouses=1&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I45550

    John FitzRobert, Lord of Warkworth Castle, Northumberland, d. 1240.

    7. Robert FitzWalter, Lord of Dunmow Castle, Essex, d. 1234.
    (28th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Perry Green "Pop" Byars)

    William de Fortibus, Earl of Albemarle, d. 1241, no great-grandchildren.
    William Hardell, Mayor of the City of London, d. after 1216, no known issue.
    William de Huntingfield, Sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk, d. 1220.
    John de Lacie, Lord of Pontefract Castle, d. 1240.
    William de Lanvallei, Lord of Standway Castle, Essex, d. 1217.
    William Malet, Sheriff of Somerset and Dorset, d. about 1217.
    Geoffrey de Mandeville, Earl of Essex and Gloucester, d. 1216, d.s.p..

    William Marshall jr, heir to the earldom of Pembroke, d. 1231, (43947) d.s.p..
    A cousin to the grandchildren of Vernia Swindell "Ma" Byars & Perry Green "Pop" Byars: http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=I3&secondpersonID=&maxrels=6&disallowspouses=1&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I43947

    Roger de Montbegon, Lord of Hornby Castle, Lancashire, d. 1226, d.s.p..
    Richard de Montfichet, Baron, d. after 1258, d.s.p..

    8.. William de Mowbray, Lord of Axholme Castle, Lincolnshire, (46138) d. 1223
    (24th & 26th great grandfather to the grandchildren of Vernia Swindell "Ma" Byars: http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=&secondpersonID=I3&maxrels=6&disallowspouses=1&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I46138

    Richard de Percy, Baron, Yorkshire, d. 1244, d.s.p..

    9.Saire de Quincey, Earl of Winchester, (46162) d. 1219.
    (25th & 27th great grandfather to the grandchildren of Vernia Swindell "Ma" Byars;
    25th & 26th great grandfather to the grandchildren of Jesse D Hennessee;
    27th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Perry Green "Pop" Byars: http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=I3&secondpersonID=&maxrels=6&disallowspouses=1&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I46162

    10. Robert de Roos, Lord of Hamlake Castle, Yorkshire, (46148)d. 1226.
    (25th, 26th & 27th great grandfather to the grandchildren of Vernia Swindell "Ma" Byars: http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=&secondpersonID=I3&maxrels=12&disallowspouses=1&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I46148

    Geoffrey de Saye, Baron, d. 1230.

    11. Robert de Vere, heir to the earldom of Oxford, d. 1221.
    (25th, 27th great grandfather to the grandchildren of Vernia Swindell "Ma" Byars;
    25th, 26th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Jesse D Hennessee;
    27th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Perry Green "Pop" Byars; http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=&secondpersonID=I3&maxrels=12&disallowspouses=1&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I46155

    Eustace de Vesci, Lord of Alnwick Castle, Northumberland, d. 1216 d.s.p..

    Birth:
    Beaumont Palace, built outside the north gate of Oxford, was intended by Henry I about 1130 to serve as a royal palace conveniently close to the royal hunting-lodge at Woodstock (now part of the park of Blenheim Palace). Its former presence is recorded in Beaumont Street, Oxford. Set into a pillar on the north side of the street, near Walton Street, is a stone with the inscription: "Near to this site stood the King's Houses later known as Beaumont Palace. King Richard I was born here in 1157 and King John in 1167". The "King's House" was the range of the palace that contained the king's lodgings.

    Henry passed Easter 1133 in the nova aula, his "new hall" at Beaumont in great pomp, celebrating the birth of his grandson, the future Henry II.[1] Edward I was the last king to sojourn in Beaumont officially as a palace, and in 1275 he granted it to an Italian lawyer, Francesco Accorsi, who had undertaken diplomatic missions for him.[2] When Edward II was put to flight at the battle of Bannockburn in 1314, he is said to have invoked the Virgin Mary and vowed to found a monastery for the Carmelites (the White Friars) if he might escape safely. In fulfilment of his vow he remanded Beaumont Palace to the Carmelites in 1318.

    In 1318, the Palace was the scene for the beginnings of the John Deydras affair, in which a royal pretender, arguing that he was the rightful king of England, claimed the Palace for his own. John Deydras was ultimately executed for sedition.[3]


    When the White Friars were disbanded at the Reformation, most of the structure was dismantled and the building stone reused in Christ Church and St John's College.[4] An engraving of 1785[5] shows the remains of Beaumont Palace, the last of which were destroyed in the laying out of Beaumont Street in 1829.[6]

    Drawings, Sketches & Source ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beaumont_Palace

    Buried:
    Worcester Cathedral, before the English Reformation known as Worcester Priory, is an Anglican cathedral in Worcester, England; situated on a bank overlooking the River Severn. It is the seat of the Bishop of Worcester. Its official name is The Cathedral Church of Christ and the Blessed Mary the Virgin of Worcester. Built between 1084 and 1504, Worcester Cathedral represents every style of English architecture from Norman to Perpendicular Gothic.

    It is famous for its Norman crypt and unique chapter house, its unusual Transitional Gothic bays, its fine woodwork and its "exquisite" central tower,[1] which is of particularly fine proportions.

    Images, History & Source ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Worcester_Cathedral

    Died:
    Newark Castle, in Newark, in the English county of Nottinghamshire was founded in the mid 12th century by Alexander, Bishop of Lincoln. Originally a timber castle, it was rebuilt in stone towards the end of the century. Dismantled in the 17th century after the English Civil War, the castle was restored in the 19th century, first by Anthony Salvin in the 1840s and then by the corporation of Newark who bought the site in 1889. The Gilstrap Heritage Centre is a free-admission museum in the castle grounds about the history of the town of Newark.

    Images & Source ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newark_Castle,_Nottinghamshire

    John married Isabelle of Angouleme, Queen of England 26 Aug 1200, Cathedral of Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France. Isabelle was born 0___ 1188, Angouleme, France; died 31 May 1246, Fontevrault L'abbe, Maine-Ete-Loire, France; was buried 31 May 1246, Fontevrault L'abbe, Maine-Ete-Loire, France. [Group Sheet]


  4. 11.  Isabelle of Angouleme, Queen of EnglandIsabelle of Angouleme, Queen of England was born 0___ 1188, Angouleme, France; died 31 May 1246, Fontevrault L'abbe, Maine-Ete-Loire, France; was buried 31 May 1246, Fontevrault L'abbe, Maine-Ete-Loire, France.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Countess of Angouleme
    • Also Known As: Isabella de Taillefer, Queen of England
    • Alt Birth: Abt 1173
    • Alt Death: 14 Oct 1217
    • Alt Death: 4 Jun 1246

    Notes:

    Isabel of Gloucester (c. 1173 - 14 October 1217) was the first wife of John of England . She is known by an exceptionally large number of alternative names: Hadwisa, Hawisia, Hawise, Joan, Eleanor, Avise and Avisa.

    *

    Isabella of Angoulăeme (French: Isabelle d'Angoulăeme, IPA: [izab?l d?~gul?m]; c.1188 – 4 June 1246) was queen consort of England as the second wife of King John from 1200 until John's death in 1216. She was also reigning Countess of Angoulăeme from 1202 until 1246.

    She had five children by the king including his heir, later Henry III. In 1220, Isabella married Hugh X of Lusignan, Count of La Marche, by whom she had another nine children.

    Some of her contemporaries, as well as later writers, claim that Isabella formed a conspiracy against King Louis IX of France in 1241, after being publicly snubbed by his mother, Blanche of Castile for whom she had a deep-seated hatred.[1] In 1244, after the plot had failed, Isabella was accused of attempting to poison the king. To avoid arrest, she sought refuge in Fontevraud Abbey where she died two years later, but none of this can be confirmed.

    Queen of England

    She was the only daughter and heir of Aymer Taillefer, Count of Angoulăeme, by Alice of Courtenay, who was sister of Peter II of Courtenay, Latin Emperor of Constantinople and granddaughter of King Louis VI of France.

    Isabella became Countess of Angoulăeme in her own right on 16 June 1202, by which time she was already queen of England. Her marriage to King John took place on 24 August 1200, in Angoulăeme,[2] a year after he annulled his first marriage to Isabel of Gloucester. She was crowned queen in an elaborate ceremony on 8 October at Westminster Abbey in London. Isabella was originally betrothed to Hugh IX le Brun, Count of Lusignan,[3] son of the then Count of La Marche. As a result of John's temerity in taking her as his second wife, King Philip II of France confiscated all of their French lands, and armed conflict ensued.

    At the time of her marriage to John, the blonde and blue-eyed 12-year-old Isabella was already renowned by some for her beauty[4] and has sometimes been called the Helen of the Middle Ages by historians.[5] Isabella was much younger than her husband and possessed a volatile temper similar to his own. King John was infatuated with his young, beautiful wife; however, his acquisition of her had as much, if not more to do with spiting his enemies, than romantic love. She was already engaged to Hugh IX le Brun, when she was taken by John. It had been said that he neglected his state affairs to spend time with Isabella, often remaining in bed with her until noon. However, these were rumors, ignited by John's enemies to discredit him as being a weak and grossly irresponsible ruler. Given that at the time they were made John was engaging in a desperate war with King Phillip of France to hold on to the remaining Plantagenet dukedoms. The common people began to term her a "siren" or "Messalina", which spoke volumes as to common opinion .[6] Her mother-in-law, Eleanor of Aquitaine readily accepted her as John's wife.[7]

    On 1 October 1207 at Winchester Castle, Isabella gave birth to a son and heir who was named Henry after the King's father, Henry II. He was quickly followed by another son, Richard, and three daughters, Joan, Isabel, and Eleanor. All five children survived into adulthood, and would make illustrious marriages; all but Joan would produce offspring of their own.

    Second marriage

    When King John died in October 1216, Isabella's first act was to arrange the speedy coronation of her nine-year-old son at the city of Gloucester on 28 October. As the royal crown had recently been lost in The Wash, along with the rest of King John's treasure, she supplied her own golden circlet to be used in lieu of a crown.[8] The following July, less than a year after his crowning as King Henry III of England, she left him in the care of his regent, William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke and returned to France to assume control of her inheritance of Angoulăeme.

    In the spring of 1220, she married Hugh X of Lusignan, "le Brun", Seigneur de Luisignan, Count of La Marche, the son of her former fiancâe, Hugh IX, to whom she had been betrothed before her marriage to King John. It had been previously arranged that her eldest daughter Joan should marry Hugh, and the little girl was being brought up at the Lusignan court in preparation for her marriage. Hugh, however, upon seeing Isabella, whose beauty had not diminished,[9] preferred the girl's mother. Princess Joan was provided with another husband, King Alexander II of Scotland, whom she wed in 1221.

    Isabella had married Hugh without waiting to receive the consent of the King's council in England, which was the required procedure for a former Queen of England, as the Council had the power to not only choose the Queen Dowager's second husband, but to decide whether or not she should be allowed to marry at all. Isabella's flouting of this law caused the Council to confiscate her dower lands and stop the payment of her pension.[10] Isabella and her husband retaliated by threatening to keep Princess Joan, who had been promised in marriage to the King of Scotland, in France. The council first responded by sending furious letters, signed in the name of young King Henry, to the Pope, urging him to excommunicate Isabella and her husband, but then decided to come to terms with Isabella, as to avoid conflict with the Scottish king, who was eager to receive his bride. Isabella was granted, in compensation for her dower lands in Normandy, the stannaries in Devon and the revenue of Aylesbury for a period of four years. She also received ą3000 as payment for arrears in her pension.[11]

    By Hugh X, Isabella had nine more children. Their eldest son Hugh XI of Lusignan succeeded his father as Count of La Marche and Count of Angoulăeme in 1249.

    Isabella's children from her past marriage continued their lives in England.

    Rebellion and death[edit]
    Described by some contemporaries as "vain, capricious, and troublesome,"[12] Isabella could not reconcile herself with her less prominent position in France. Though Queen dowager of England, Isabella was now mostly regarded as a mere Countess of La Marche and had to give precedence to other women.[13] In 1241, when Isabella and Hugh were summoned to the French court to swear fealty to King Louis IX of France's brother, Alphonse, who had been invested as Count of Poitou, their mother, the Queen Dowager Blanche openly snubbed her. This so infuriated Isabella, who had a deep-seated hatred of Blanche due to the latter having fervently supported the French invasion of England during the First Barons' War in May 1216, that she began to actively conspire against King Louis. Isabella and her husband, along with other disgruntled nobles, including her son-in-law Raymond VII of Toulouse, sought to create an English-backed confederacy which united the provinces of the south and west against the French king.[14] She encouraged her son Henry in his invasion of Normandy in 1230, but then did not provide him the support she had promised.[15]

    In 1244, after the confederacy had failed and Hugh had made peace with King Louis, two royal cooks were arrested for attempting to poison the King; upon questioning they confessed to having been in Isabella's pay.[16] Before Isabella could be taken into custody, she fled to Fontevraud Abbey, where she died on 4 June 1246.[17]

    By her own prior arrangement, she was first buried in the Abbey's churchyard, as an act of repentance for her many misdeeds. On a visit to Fontevraud, her son King Henry III of England was shocked to find her buried outside the Abbey and ordered her immediately moved inside. She was finally placed beside Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine. Afterwards, most of her many Lusignan children, having few prospects in France, set sail for England and the court of Henry, their half-brother.

    Issue

    With King John of England: 5 children, all of whom survived into adulthood, including:
    King Henry III of England (1 October 1207 – 16 November 1272). Married Eleanor of Provence, by whom he had issue, including his heir, King Edward I of England.
    Richard, Earl of Cornwall and King of the Romans (5 January 1209 – 2 April 1272). Married firstly Isabel Marshal, secondly Sanchia of Provence, and thirdly Beatrice of Falkenburg. Had issue.
    Joan (22 July 1210 – 1238), the wife of King Alexander II of Scotland. Her marriage was childless.
    Isabella (1214–1241), the wife of Emperor Frederick II, by whom she had issue.
    Eleanor (1215–1275), who would marry firstly William Marshal, 2nd Earl of Pembroke; and secondly Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester, by whom she had issue.

    With Hugh X of Lusignan, Count of La Marche: nine children, all of whom survived into adulthood, including:

    Hugh XI of Lusignan (1221–1250), Count of La Marche and Count of Angoulăeme. Married Yolande de Dreux, Countess of Penthiáevre and of Porhoet, by whom he had issue.
    Aymer of Lusignan (1222–1260), Bishop of Winchester
    Agnáes de Lusignan (1223–1269). Married William II de Chauvigny (d. 1270), and had issue.
    Alice of Lusignan (1224 – 9 February 1256). Married John de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey, by whom she had issue.
    Guy of Lusignan (c. 1225 – 1264), killed at the Battle of Lewes. (Tufton Beamish maintains that he escaped to France after the Battle of Lewes and died there in 1269).
    Geoffrey of Lusignan (c. 1226 – 1274). Married in 1259 Jeanne, Viscountess of Chăatellerault, by whom he had issue.
    Isabella of Lusignan (c.1226/1227 14 January 1299). Married firstly before 1244 Maurice IV, seigneur de Craon (1224–1250),[18] by whom she had issue; she married secondly, Geoffrey de Rancon.[19]
    William of Lusignan (c. 1228 – 1296). 1st Earl of Pembroke. Married Joan de Munchensi, by whom he had issue.
    Marguerite de Lusignan (c. 1229 – 1288). Married firstly in 1243 Raymond VII of Toulouse; secondly c. 1246 Aimery IX de Thouars, Viscount of Thouars and had issue

    Birth:
    Aquitaine, Charente department...

    Notes:

    Married:
    Bordeaux Cathedral (Cathâedrale Saint-Andrâe de Bordeaux) is a Roman Catholic cathedral, seat of the Archbishop of Bordeaux-Bazas, located in Bordeaux.

    The cathedral was consecrated by Pope Urban II in 1096. Of the original Romanesque edifice, only a wall in the nave remains. The Royal Gate is from the early 13th century, while the rest of the construction is mostly from the 14th-15th centuries. The building is a national monument of France.

    In this church in 1137 the 13-year-old Eleanor of Aquitaine married the future Louis VII, a few months before she became Queen.


    Images, History & Source ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bordeaux_Cathedral

    Children:
    1. Henry III, King of England was born 1 Oct 1207, Winchester Castle, Hampshire, United Kingdom; was christened 0___ 1207, Bermondsey, London, Middlesex, England; died 16 Nov 1272, Westminster Palace, Westminster, London, Middlesex, England; was buried 20 Nov 1272, Westminster Abbey, 20 Deans Yd, London SW1P 3PA, United Kingdom.
    2. Richard Plantagenet, Knight, 1st Earl of Cornwall was born 5 Jan 1209, Winchester Castle, Castle Ave, Winchester, Hampshire SO23 8PJ, United Kingdom; was christened 0___ 1214, Winchester Castle, Castle Ave, Winchester, Hampshire SO23 8PJ, United Kingdom; died 2 Apr 1272, Berkhamsted Castle, Hertfordshire, England; was buried 13 Apr 1272, Hailes Abbey, Winchcombe, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire - GL54 5PB, England.
    3. Isabella Plantagenet was born 0___ 1214; died 0___ 1241.
    4. 5. Eleanor of Leicester was born 0___ 1215, Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England; died 13 Apr 1275, Montargis Abbey, France; was buried Montargis Abbey, France.


Generation: 5

  1. 16.  Simon de Montfort, IV, Lord of Montfort l'Amaury was born ~ 1128, Montfort-sur-Risle, Haute-Normandie, France; died 13 Mar 1181, Evreux, Normandy, France.

    Notes:

    Also Known As: "/Le Chauve/", "Also referred to as Simon III and "le Chauve". Simon was a crusader from 1208 until 1213 and defeated Raymond III of Aragon at Muret in 1215. He laid seige to Toulouse in 1218. George Washington's 16-Great Grandfather.", "'the /Bold'/", ""l..."
    Birthdate: circa 1128
    Birthplace: Montfort-sur-Risle, Haute-Normandie, France
    Death: Died March 13, 1181 in Evreux, Normandy, France
    Place of Burial: âEvreux, Upper Normandy, France
    Immediate Family:
    Son of Amauri III de Montfort, comte d'Evreux and Agnáes de Garlande, comtesse de Rochefort
    Husband of Amicia de Beaumont, Countess of Leicester and Mathilde, comtesse d'Evreux
    Partner of Unknown mistress de Montfort
    Father of Amaury V de Montfort, comte d'Evreux; Simon IV de Montfort, Seigneur de Montfort et de Rochefort; Bertrade d'Everaux de Montfort, Comtess d'Evreux and Robert I de MONTFORT
    Brother of Amaury IV de Montfort, comte d'Evreux and Agnáes Elizabeth de Montfort, dame de Gournay
    Half brother of Simon, Seigneur de La Noue and Unknown Montlhery
    Occupation: Seigneur de Montfort-l'Amaury (1137-1181), comte d'âEvreux (1140), comte de Rochefort(Rochefort-en-Yvelines, Yvelines)
    Managed by: Private User
    Last Updated: July 14, 2016

    About Simon III "le Chauve" de Montfort, comte d'Evreux
    Simon III "le Chauve", Seigneur de Montfort et de Rochefort, Comte d'Evreux (d. 12/13 Mar 1181)

    --son of Amaury I de Montfort (Seigneur de Montfort and Comte d'Evreux) and second wife Agnes de Garlende

    --married Mathilde (Maud) ???

    Children:

    Amaury de Montfort, Comte d'Evreux m. Mabel of Gloucester
    Simon IV de Montfort, Seigneur de Montfort-l'Amaury m. Amicie de Leicester
    Bertrade de Montfort m. Hugh de Kevelioc (des Meschines), Earl of Chester
    From Medlands

    SIMON de Montfort (-12/13 Mar 1181, bur Evreux Cathedral). Robert of Torigny records that "frater eius Symon" succeeded in 1140 on the death of "comes Ebroicensis Amalricus"[1743]. He succeeded his brother as Comte d'Evreux, Seigneur de Montfort-l'Amaury. During the 1159 war between Henry II King of England and Louis VII King of France, Simon handed his castles of Rochefort, Montfort and Epernon to King Henry, which forced King Louis to make a truce as his communications between Paris, Orlâeans and Etampes were thereby cut[1744]. Robert of Torigny records the death in 1182 of "Simon comes Ebroicensis" and the succession "in comitatu Ebroicensis in Normannia" of "Amalricus filius eius" and "in comitatu de Rocha et in terra Francie" of "Simon alter filius eius"[1745]. The necrology of Haute-Bruyáere lists members of the Montfort family who are buried in the abbey, starting with "conte Amaury…qui premier fonda l'eglise, dou fil le conte Simon le Chauf qui gist a Evreux"[1746]. The necrology of the church of Evreux records the death "13 Mar" of "Symon comes Ebroicensis qui dedit c solidos" and the donation of "xl solidos" by "Amaricus filius eiusdem comitis"[1747]. m MATHILDE, daughter of ---. The primary source which confirms her marriage has not yet been identified. Simon & his wife had three children

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Other Event(s)

    Note 1:
    Also Comte de Rochefort et Evereux; Duc de Narbonne
    AKA (Facts Page):
    Simon 'the Bold', Comte de Evreux
    AKA (Facts Page):
    Simon III, Comte de Toulouse et al.
    Name: Simon III Chauve de Montfort , Count d'Evereux

    Sex: M

    Name: Simon de Montford D'Evreux 1

    Name: Simon II de Montfort

    Birth: 1123 in Montfort-l'Amaury, Yvelines, Ile-de-France, France

    Death: 13 MAR 1180/81 in Evreux, Eure, Normandy 2 3

    Burial: Evreux Cathedral, Normandy

    Note:

    THE ANCESTORS OF SIMON DE MONTFORT EARL OF LEICESTER (VIII)

    Simon de Monfort, Count of Evreux and Seigneur of Montfort, brother and heir [of Amauri] (a). Being a vassal both of the King of France and of the King of England (as Duke of Normandy), his postion was embarrassing when his two suzerains were at war in 1159. He adhered to England and handed over his castles at Rochefort, Montfort, and Epernon to Henry II, which forced Louis to make a truce by cutting his communications between Paris, Orleans, and Etampes. In 1173 Simon joined the revolt of the "young King", but was captured when the Count of Flanders took the castle of Aumale. In 1177 he attested the treaty of Ivry, and was with Henry II at Verneuil. He m. Maud, whose parentage is unknown. He d. 12 or 13 Mar 1180/1, and was buried in Evreux Cathedral. He left two sons, Amauri, who succeeded him as Count of Evreux in Normandy (b), and Simon, who succeeded him in the lordships of Montfort and Rochefort, also a daughter Bertrade (d).

    (a) He must have been a son of the second marriage of his father if his brother was. Moreover, Simon had Rochefort, which came through the second wife, and it was apparently from him that his sister Agnes received as dowry her mother's other lordship of Gournay-sur-Marne.

    (b) He m. Mabel, elder daughter and coheir of William, 2nd Earl of Gloucester. His son Amauri exchanged the Comte of Evreux for the Earldom of Gloucester, and dsp.

    (d) She m. Hugh, Earl of Chester.

    Note: Turton has Simon III and Simon IV de Montfort as one person with 2 wives

    Father: Amaury IV Seignour de Montfort , Comte Evreux b: ABT 1070 in Montfort-l'Amaury, Yvelines, Ile-de-France, France

    Mother: Agnes de Garlende , Heiress Rochfort & Gournay b: ABT 1095 in Rochefort-en-Yvelines, Yvelines, Ile-de-France, France

    Marriage 1 Maud (Mahaut) b: ABT 1130 in France

    Married: ABT 1150 3

    Married: ABT 1165 3

    Children

    Simon IV Seigneur de Montfort , & Rochefort b: ABT 1148 in Montfort-l'Amaury, Yvelines, Ile-de-France, France
    Amaury VI de Montfort , Count of Evreux b: ABT 1151 in Evereux, Eure, Normandy
    Bertrade de Montfort b: ABT 1155 in Montfort-l'Amaury, Yvelines, Ile-de-France, France
    Sources:

    Title: Directory of Royal Genealogical Data

    Author: Brian Tompsett, Dept of Computer Science

    Publication: Department of Computer Science, Hull University

    Note: usually reliable but sometimes includes hypothetical lines, mythological figures, etc

    Repository:

    Note: http://www.dcs.hull.ac.uk/public/genealogy/royal/catalog.html

    Media: Electronic

    Title: The Plantagenet Ancestry, 1993 Ed.

    Author: Turton, William H.

    Publication: Genalogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1928 (1993 edition)

    Repository:

    Media: Book

    Title: The Phillips, Weber, Kirk, & Staggs families of the Pacific Northwest

    Author: Weber, Jim

    Note: downloaded periodically 2001-2006. Updated frequently, with many sources.

    Repository:

    Media: Ancestry.com

    Inherited estates upon death of his older brother, he became Count of Evreux and Seigneur of Montfort. Being a vassal both of the King of France and of the King of England, his position was embarrassing when the two were at war in 1159. He adhered to England and handed over his castles of Rochefort, Montfort, and Epernon to Henry II, which forced Louis to make a truce by cutting his communications between Paris, Orleans, and Etampes. In 1173 Simon joined the revolt of the 'young king' but was captured when the Count of Flanders took the castle of Aumale. In 1177 he attested the treaty of Ivry and was with Henry II at Verneuil. (Complete Peerage, VII, Appendix D, p. 715)

    Simon III de Montfort, comte de âEvreux1

    b. after 1120, d. 12 March 1180/81

    Father Amauri III, 6th seigneur de Montfort2 b. circa 1080, d. 18 or 19 April

    Mother Agnes de Garlande2 b. circa 1098?, d. 1181

    Also called Simon III de Montfort. Simon III de Montfort, comte de âEvreux was born after 1120 at Montfort-l'Amaury, Yvelines, Île-de-France, France. He was the son of Amauri III, 6th seigneur de Montfort and Agnes de Garlande.2 Simon III de Montfort, comte de âEvreux was the successor of Amauri, 7th seigneur de Montfort; 7th Seigneur of Montfort.2 Count of âEvreux at Normandy between 1140 and March 1181. 8th Seigneur of Montfort at France between 1140 and March 1181.3 Simon III de Montfort, comte de âEvreux married Maud circa 1150 at France; His 1st. Simon III de Montfort, comte de âEvreux was a vassal of both the King of France and of the King of England (who was also Duke of Normandy), whose position was embarrassing when his two suzerains were at war.3 He adhered to England and handed over his castles of Rochefort, Montfort, and Epernon to Henry II, which forced the french king, Louis, to make a truce by cutting his communications between Paris, Orleans, and Etampes in 1159.3 He married Amicia de Beaumont, daughter of Robert III de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester and Petronilla de Grentesmesnil, between 1166 and 1169; His 2nd.4,5,6 Simon III de Montfort, comte de âEvreux died on 12 March 1180/81 at or 13th.5,3 Simon III de Montfort, comte de âEvreux was buried in âEvreux Cathedral, Normandy.7
    Family 1

    Maud b. circa 1130

    Child

    Bertrade de Montfort+ b. 1155, d. 12278,1,9

    Family 2

    Amicia de Beaumont b. say 1154

    Child

    Simon IV "le Macchabâee" de Montfort, 5th Earl of Leicester+ b. 1170, d. 25 Jun 121810

    Citations

    [S603] C.B., LL.D., Ulster King of Arms Sir Bernard Burke, B:xP, pg. 365.

    [S215] Revised by others later George Edward Cokayne CP, VII:App.D:714.

    [S215] Revised by others later George Edward Cokayne CP, VII:App.D:715.

    [S682] D.S.O. Lt.-Col. W. H. Turton, Turton, pg. 230.

    [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Montfort family (Fr. lords).

    [S215] Revised by others later George Edward Cokayne CP, III:167, footnote (c).

    [S215] Revised by others later George Edward Cokayne CP, VII:App.D:716.

    [S215] Revised by others later George Edward Cokayne CP, VI:647.

    [S215] Revised by others later George Edward Cokayne CP, III:167.

    [S1345] Anselme de Sainte-Marie (augustin dâechaussâe), Pere Anselme's Histoire, 3rd Ed., VI:74.

    Simon III de Montfort, comte de âEvreux, was Count of âEvreux in Normandy between 1140 and March 1181.

    Simon married Maud circa 1150 in France.

    He was a vassal of both the King of France and of the King of England (who was also Duke of Normandy), whose position was embarrassing when his two suzerains were at war. He adhered to England and handed over his castles of Rochefort, Montfort, and Epernon to Henry II, which forced the French king, Louis, to make a truce by cutting his communications between Paris, Orleans, and Etampes in 1159.

    Simon married Amicia de Beaumont, daughter of Robert III de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester and Petronilla de Grentesmesnil, between 1166 and 1169.

    Simon died on 12 March 1180/81 at or 13th.

    See "My Lines"

    ( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/p376.htm#i6797 )

    from Compiler: R. B. Stewart, Evans, GA

    ( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/index.htm )

    ID: I255184
    Name: Simon II Le Chauve De Montfort

    Sex: M

    Birth: BET 1117 AND 1121 in Of, Monfort Amuaury, IIe De France, France

    Death: 13 MAR 1180/81

    Burial: Cathedral Eveux, Normandy, France

    Note: Alt. Spelling: Simon D'Evreux, de Montfort, Comte D'Evreux

    Father: Amaury De MONTFORT b: ABT 1070 in Of, MONTFORT, Eure, France

    Mother: Agnes De Garlende b: ABT 1095 in Garlende, France

    Marriage 1 Maud Countess Of Evreux b: ABT 1130 in Of, France

    Married: ABT 1150 in Of, France

    Children

    Bertrade D' Evreux b: 1155 in Of, Chester, England
    Simon IV de Montfort b: ABT 1153 in Montfort Amaury, Ile de France, France
    Amauri De Monfort b: ABT 1151 in Of, Evreux, Normandy, France
    Son mariage avec Amicie de Beaumont apportera le comtâe de Leiceister dans la famille, manquant de reproduire le probláeme de double suzerainetâe. Robert of Torigny records the death in 1182 of "Simon comes Ebroicensis" and the succession "in comitatu Ebroicensis in Normannia" of "Amalricus filius eius" and "in comitatu de Rocha et in terra Francie" of "Simon alter filius eius"[1769]. He succeeded his father in 1181 as Seigneur de Montfort-l'Amaury.

    A charter dated Feb 1199 recalls a donation to the leprosery of Grand-Beaulieu near Chartres by "Amauricus de Monteforti", with the consent of "Amauricus parvus filius eiusdem Amaurici, qui erat sub custodia Amaurici de Mestenon", confirmed after his death by "Simon frater eius et successor", and a later donation by "Simon iste comes Ebroicensis et Mahaudis [presumably an error for Amicia] uxor eius"[1770]. The necrology of Haute-Bruyáere lists members of the Montfort family who are buried in the abbey, including "…comte Simon…et de sa femme la contesse Amicie…"[1771]. (Roglo)

    Comte d'Evreux, de Rochefort
    Earl of Evereux, le Chauve '
    HM George I s 14-oldefar.

    HRE Ferdinand I s 12-oldefar.

    Amerikanske prµsidents 16-oldefar.

    PM Churchills 20-oldefar.

    HM Margrethe II har 22-oldefar.

    Gen Pierpont Hamiltons 22-oldefar.

    Otto von Bismarcks 20-oldefar.

    Red Baron 'Richthofen s 19-oldefar.

    Poss. Agnes Harris '15-oldefar. Osawatomie 'Browns 21-oldefar.

    ---

    Wives / Partnere: Amice (Maud, Amicia) de Beaumont ; Eventuelt. Maud d'Evereux B˛rn: Alix Elis De Montfort , Guy De Montfort , Bertrade (de) MONTFORT , Simon IV De Montfort , Perronelle De Montfort , Guiburge De Montfort
    ---

    Hans (evt.) B˛rneb˛rn: Botho de Matha (Count) de Bigorre , Guglielmo (I) Stendardo [alt ped] , Mabel af CHESTER de MESCHINES , Maud (Matilda) KEVELIOC (KEVILIOC, KEVLIOC) , Hawise (af CHESTER) de KEVELIOCK , Agnes (de KEVELIOCK) de MESCHINES , (Miss) d 'INGRAM , Beatrice de KEVIELIOCK , Amicia (Amice) de MESCHINES , Simon V De Montfort , Amauri IV (VI VII) De Montfort , Laure de Montfort-l'Amaury ; Guy de Montfort-l'Amaury , Amicie De Montfort , Adele de Roye , Guy II de LEVIS
    ---

    Fra: http://fabpedigree.com/s050/f502267.htm

    ------------------------------------------

    Findes som Ane nr.234357250 pęa Helles side:

    http://www.aros-innovation.dk/Stam/stam-2012-Opdelt/Thora/specielt/ane234357250/ane234357250spec.php

    ---------------------------------------------

    Simon — Amicia de Beaumont, Countess of Leicester. Amicia (daughter of Robert de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester and Petronilla de Grandmesnil) was born 0___ 1160, Leicestershire, England; died 3 Sep 1215, Haute Bruyere, Rouen, Seine Et Maritime, France. [Group Sheet]


  2. 17.  Amicia de Beaumont, Countess of Leicester was born 0___ 1160, Leicestershire, England (daughter of Robert de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester and Petronilla de Grandmesnil); died 3 Sep 1215, Haute Bruyere, Rouen, Seine Et Maritime, France.

    Notes:

    Amicia de Beaumont, Countess of Leicester
    Also Known As: "Said to have entered a convent at Nuneaton", "England"
    Birthdate: 1160
    Birthplace: Of, Leicester, Leicestershire, England
    Death: Died September 3, 1215 in Haute Bruyere, Rouen, Seine Et Maritime, France
    Place of Burial: Hautes-Bruyáeres, France
    Immediate Family:
    Daughter of Robert de Beaumont, Third Earl of Leicester and Petronille (Pernel) De Grentmesnil
    Wife of Simon III "le Chauve" de Montfort, comte d'Evreux; Guillaume III des Barres, seigneur d'Oisery and Simon IV de Montfort, Seigneur de Montfort et de Rochefort
    Mother of Guillaume des Barres, comte de Chăalons; Bure des Des Barres; Guy de Montfort, Lord of Sidon, seigneur de Castres; Simon IV de Montfort, 5th Earl Leicester; Perronelle de Montfort and 1 other
    Sister of Margaret de Quincy, of Groby; Roger de Breteuil, Bishop of St. Andrews; Robert "Fitz-Parnell" de Breteuil, 4th Earl of Leicester; Hawise de Beaumont, [A Nun]; Pernel / Petronilla de Beaumont, Nun at Nuneaton Priory and 1 other
    Occupation: Comtesse, de Leicester, Dame, de Breteuil, Comtesse de leicester
    Managed by: Private User
    Last Updated: August 2, 2016

    About Amicia de Beaumont, Countess of Leicester
    Amicia de Beaumont1

    b. say 1154

    Father Robert III de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester1 b. circa 1121, d. 1190

    Mother Petronilla de Grentesmesnil1 b. circa 1134, d. 1 April 1212

    Amicia de Beaumont was ultimately the heiress of the English earldom of Leicester.2 She was sister of Robert IV, the last Beaumont earl of Leicester.3,4 She was born say 1154. She was the daughter of Robert III de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester and Petronilla de Grentesmesnil.1 Amicia de Beaumont married Simon III de Montfort, comte de âEvreux, son of Amauri III, 6th seigneur de Montfort and Agnes de Garlande, between 1166 and 1169; His 2nd.1,2,4
    Family

    Simon III de Montfort, comte de âEvreux b. after 1120, d. 12 March 1180/81

    Child

    Simon IV "le Macchabâee" de Montfort, 5th Earl of Leicester+ b. 1170, d. 25 Jun 12185

    Citations

    [S682] D.S.O. Lt.-Col. W. H. Turton, Turton, pg. 230.

    [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Montfort family (Fr. lords).

    [S862] Various EB CD 2001, Montfort, Simon de, Earl Of Leicester.

    [S215] Revised by others later George Edward Cokayne CP, III:167, footnote (c).

    [S1345] Anselme de Sainte-Marie (augustin dâechaussâe), Pere Anselme's Histoire, 3rd Ed., VI:74.

    The family of Simon II de MONTFORT and Amicie de LEYCESTRE

    [133902] MONTFORT (de), Simon II (Amaury III & Agnáes de GARLANDE), seigneur de Montfort et comte d'âEvreux

    married 1165 France ? (France)
    LEYCESTRE (de), Amicie (Robert III & Perronelle de GRENTEMESNIL)

    1) Amaury V, married Melisende de GOURNAY
    2) Guy, seigneur de Castres et de La Fertâe-Alais, married 1202 fin Helvise d'YBELIN
    Bibliographie : Histoire de la maison royale de France (Páere Anselme)

    http://www.francogene.com/quebec--genealogy/133/133902.php

    The family of Simon II de MONTFORT and Amicie de LEYCESTRE

    [133902] MONTFORT (de), Simon II (Amaury III & Agnáes de GARLANDE), seigneur de Montfort et comte d'âEvreux

    married 1165 France ? (France)
    LEYCESTRE (de), Amicie (Robert III & Perronelle de GRENTEMESNIL)

    1) Amaury V, married Melisende de GOURNAY
    2) Guy, seigneur de Castres et de La Fertâe-Alais, married 1202 fin Helvise d'YBELIN
    Bibliographie : Histoire de la maison royale de France (Páere Anselme)

    http://www.francogene.com/quebec--genealogy/133/133902.php

    ID: I436315
    Name: Amicia De Beaumont

    Sex: F

    Birth: ABT 1160 in Of, Leicester, Leicestershire, England

    Death: 3 SEP 1215

    Note: Alt. Spelling: Amice de Beaumont

    Father: Robert De Beaumont , 3rd Earl Of Leicester b: ABT 1135 in Of, Leicester, Leicestershire, England

    Mother: Petronilla De Grandmesnil b: ABT 1134 in Of, Leicestershire, England

    Marriage 1 Simon IV de Montfort b: ABT 1153 in Montfort Amaury, Ile de France, France

    Children:
    1. 8. Simon de Montfort, IV, 5th Earl of Leicester was born 0___ 1175; died 25 Jun 1218, Touloise, France.

  3. 20.  Henry II, King of EnglandHenry II, King of England was born 5 Mar 1133, Le Mans, France; was christened 25 Mar 1133, Le Mans, France (son of Geoffrey "Le Bon" Plantagenet, Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy and Matilda of England, Queen of England); died 6 Jul 1189, Chinon Castle, France; was buried 7 Jul 1189, Fontevraud Abbey, France.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Count of Anjou
    • Also Known As: Count of Nantes
    • Also Known As: Curt Mantel
    • Also Known As: Duke of Aquitaine
    • Also Known As: Duke of Normandy
    • Also Known As: Henry Curtmantle
    • Also Known As: Henry FitzEmpress
    • Also Known As: Henry II, King of England

    Notes:

    Henry founded the Plantagenet Dynasty... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_II_of_England

    Henry II is the 27th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Jesse D Hennessee (1880-1952) through his 12th great granddaughter,

    Catherine Mountfort Booth (1450-1483) ...

    http://www.thehennesseefamily.com/getperson.php?personID=I32450&tree=hennessee

    Henry II (1133-1189) is the great-grandson of William the Conqueror (1024-1087) ergo

    William the Conqueror (1024-1087) is the 30th great-grandfather of all the grandchildren of Jesse D Hennessee (1880-1952)

    Who could forget Peter O'Toole's magnificient protrayal of Henry II in the 1968 movie production of "The Lion in Winter" and Katherine Hepburn's Eleanor of Aquitaine? ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Lion_in_Winter_(1968_film)

    History of Henry II and his reign... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_II_of_England

    Source: 'The World Book Encyclopedia', 1968, p H178. 'Royalty for Commoners', Roderick W. Stuart, 1993, p 37-38. Reigned 1154-1189.

    He ruled an empire that stretched from the Tweed to the Pyrenees. In spite of frequent hostitilties with the French King his own family and rebellious Barons (culminating in the great revolt of 1173-74) and his quarrel with Thomas Becket, Henry maintained control over his possessions until shortly before his death. His judicial and administrative reforms which increased Royal control and influence at the expense of the Barons were of great constitutional importance. Introduced trial by Jury. Duke of Normandy. Henry II 'Curt Mantel,' Duke of Normandy, Count of Maine and Anjou, King Of England became king in 1154.

    At the height of his power, Henry ruled England and almost all western France. His marriage to Eleanor of Aquitaine, the most famous woman of the age, brought the duchy of Aquitaine under his control. Henry also claimed to rule Scotland, Wales, and eastern Ireland. Henry II carried on his grandfather's policy of limiting the power of the nobles. He also tried to make the Roman Catholic Church in England submit to his authority. This policy brought him into conflict with Thomas a Becket, Achbishop of Canterbury. Four of the king's knights murdered Becket while he was at vespers in his cathedral. Henry made Anglo-Saxon common law, rather than the revised Roman law, the supreme law of the land. He introduced trial by jury and circuit courts. In his later years, Henry's sons often rebelled against him. Two of them, Richard the Lion-Hearted and John, became the next two kings of England.

    REF: "Falls the Shadow" Sharon Kay Penman: William the Conqueror requested a large number of Jews to move to England after his conquest. They spoke Norman & did well under his reign. They continued to thrive under William's grandson Henry II.

    REF: British Monarchy Official Website: Henry II (reigned 1154-89)

    ruled over an empire which stretched from the Scottish border to the Pyrenees. Married to Eleanor, the heiress of Aquitaine, the king spent only 13 years of his reign in England; the other 21 years were spent on the continent in his territories in what is now France. By 1158, Henry had restored to the crown some of the lands and royal power lost by Stephen. For example, locally chosen sheriffs were changed into royally appointed agents charged with enforcing the law and collecting taxes in the counties. Personally interested in government and law, Henry strengthened royal justice, making use of juries and re-introduced the sending of justices (judges) on regular tours of the country to try cases for the Crown. His legal reforms have led him to be seen as the founder of English Common Law. Henry's disagreements with his Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Becket, over Church/State relations ended in Becket's murder in 1170. Family disputes almost wrecked the king's achievements and he died in 1189 at war with his sons.

    Reigned 25 Oct 1154-1189. Invested As Duke Of Nomandy By His Parents In 1150.

    Ruled An Empire That Stretched From The Tweed To The Pyrenees.

    Numerous Quarrels With French King, & His Own Family.

    Quarreled With Thomas Becket.

    Beat Rebellious Barons (Culminating In The Great Revolt Of 1173-74).

    Retained Control Of His Possessions Until Shortly Before His Death.

    Important Judicial & Admin. Reforms Incr. Power Of King At The Expense Of Barons

    Introduced Trial By Jury.

    Count Of Anjou & Aquitaine.

    Buried:
    Click on this link to view images of Fontevraud Abbey ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fontevraud_Abbey

    Died:
    Images and commentary for Chinon Castle ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ch%C3%A2teau_de_Chinon

    Henry married Eleanore de Aquitaine, Queen of England 18 May 1152, Bordeaux, Aquitaine, France. Eleanore was born 0___ 1123, Chateau de Belin, Bordeaux, Aquitaine, France; died 31 Mar 1204, Poitiers, France; was buried 1 Apr 1204, Fontevraud Abbey, France. [Group Sheet]


  4. 21.  Eleanore de Aquitaine, Queen of EnglandEleanore de Aquitaine, Queen of England was born 0___ 1123, Chateau de Belin, Bordeaux, Aquitaine, France; died 31 Mar 1204, Poitiers, France; was buried 1 Apr 1204, Fontevraud Abbey, France.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Duchess of Aquitaine
    • Also Known As: Queen Consort of the Franks

    Notes:

    Eleanor of Aquitaine (French: Aliâenor, âElâeonore, Latin: Alienora; 1122 – 1 April 1204) was one of the wealthiest and most powerful women in western Europe during the High Middle Ages and a member of the Ramnulfid dynasty of rulers in southwestern France. She inherited the Duchy of Aquitaine from her father, William X, in 1137, and later became queen consort of France (1137–1152) and of England (1154–1189). She was the patron of literary figures such as Wace, Benoăit de Sainte-Maure, and Bernart de Ventadorn. She was a leader of the Second Crusade and of armies several times in her life.

    As Duchess of Aquitaine, Eleanor was the most eligible bride in Europe. Three months after she became duchess, she married King Louis VII of France, son of her guardian, King Louis VI. As Queen of France, she participated in the unsuccessful Second Crusade. Soon after, Eleanor sought an annulment of her marriage,[1] but her request was rejected by Pope Eugene III.[2] However, after the birth of her second daughter Alix, Louis agreed to an annulment given that their union had not produced a son after fifteen years of marriage.[3] The marriage was annulled on 11 March 1152 on the grounds of consanguinity within the fourth degree. Their daughters were declared legitimate and custody was awarded to Louis, while Eleanor's lands were restored to her.

    As soon as the annulment was granted, Eleanor became engaged to Henry, Duke of Normandy and Count of Anjou, who became King Henry II of England in 1154. Henry was her third cousin (cousin of the third degree), and eleven years younger. The couple married on 18 May 1152 (Whit Sunday), eight weeks after the annulment of Eleanor's first marriage, in a cathedral in Poitiers, France. Over the next thirteen years, she bore Henry eight children: five sons, three of whom would become kings; and three daughters. However, Henry and Eleanor eventually became estranged. Henry imprisoned her in 1173 for supporting her son Henry's revolt against her husband. She was not released until 6 July 1189, when Henry died and their son ascended the English throne as Richard I.

    Now queen dowager, Eleanor acted as regent while Richard went on the Third Crusade, where on his return he was captured and held prisoner. Eleanor lived well into the reign of her youngest son, John. By the time of her death, she had outlived all her children except for John and Eleanor.

    Film, radio and television

    Eleanor has featured in a number of screen versions of the Ivanhoe and Robin Hood stories. She has been played by Martita Hunt in The Story of Robin Hood and His Merrie Men (1952), Jill Esmond in the British TV adventure series The Adventures of Robin Hood (1955–1960), Phyllis Neilson-Terry in the British TV adventure series Ivanhoe (1958), Yvonne Mitchell in the BBC TV drama series The Legend of Robin Hood (1975), Siăan Phillips in the TV series Ivanhoe (1997), and Tusse Silberg in the TV series The New Adventures of Robin Hood (1997). She was portrayed by Lynda Bellingham in the BBC series Robin Hood. Most recently, she was portrayed by Eileen Atkins in Robin Hood (2010).

    In the 1964 film, "Becket" (1964), Eleanor is briefly played by Pamela Brown to Peter O'Toole's first performance as a young Henry II.

    In the 1968 film, The Lion in Winter, Eleanor is played by Katharine Hepburn, while Henry is again portrayed by O'Toole. The film is about the difficult relationship between them and the struggle of their three sons Richard, Geoffrey, and John for their father's favour and the succession. A 2003 TV film, The Lion in Winter (2003 film), starred Glenn Close as Eleanor and Patrick Stewart as Henry.

    She was portrayed by Mary Clare in the silent film, Becket (1923), by Prudence Hyman in Richard the Lionheart (1962), and twice by Jane Lapotaire; in the BBC TV drama series, The Devil's Crown (1978), and again in Mike Walker's BBC Radio 4 series, Plantagenet (2010). In the 2010 film, Robin Hood, starring Russell Crowe, Eleanor is played by Eileen Atkins. In the 2014 film, Richard the Lionheart: Rebellion, Eleanor is played by Debbie Rochon.

    More on Queen Eleanor ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eleanor_of_Aquitaine

    Click this link to view an image collage of Mirabell Castle ... http://bit.ly/1p8kovL

    Click on this link to view images of Fontevraud Abbey ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fontevraud_Abbey

    Henry II held his wife, Eleanor of Aquitaine , prisoner at Old Sarum. In the 1190s, the plain between Old Sarum and Wilton was one of five specially designated by Richard I for the holding of English tournaments

    Old Sarum is the site of the earliest settlement of Salisbury in England. Located on a hill about 2 miles (3 km) north of modern Salisbury near the A345 road , the settlement appears in some of the earliest records in the country.

    Buried:
    The abbey was originally the site of the graves of King Henry II of England, his wife Eleanor of Aquitaine, their son King Richard I of England, their daughter Joan, their grandson Raymond VII of Toulouse, and Isabella of Angoulăeme, wife of Henry and Eleanor's son King John. However, there is no remaining corporal presence of Henry, Eleanor, Richard, or the others on the site. Their remains were possibly destroyed during the French Revolution.

    Click on this link to view images of Fontevraud Abbey ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fontevraud_Abbey

    Notes:

    Married:
    thier marriage turned sour after Henry's affair with Rosamund Clifford...

    Children:
    1. Richard Plantagenet, I, King of England was born 8 Sep 1157, Beaumont Palace, Oxford, England; died 6 Apr 1199, Limousin, France; was buried Fontevraud Abbey, France.
    2. Eleanor of England, Queen of Castile was born 13 Oct 1162, Domfront Castle, Normandy, France; died 31 Oct 1214, Burgos, Spain; was buried Burgos, Spain.
    3. 10. John I, King of England was born 24 Dec 1166, Beaumont Palace, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England; died 19 Oct 1216, Newark Castle, Nottinghamshire, England; was buried 19 Oct 1216, Worcester Cathedral, Worcester, Warwickshire, England.


Generation: 6

  1. 34.  Robert de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester was born ~ 1120, Leicestershire, England (son of Robert de Beaumont, Knight, 2nd Earl of Leicester and Amice de Montfort, Countess of Leicester); died 31 Aug 1190, Albania.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Crusader

    Notes:

    Robert de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester (died 1190) was an English nobleman, one of the principal followers of Henry the Young King in the Revolt of 1173–1174 against his father Henry II. He is also called Robert Blanchemains (meaning "White Hands" in French).

    Life

    He was the son of Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester, a staunch supporter of Henry II, and he inherited from his father large estates in England and Normandy.

    When the revolt of the younger Henry broke out in April 1173, Robert went to his castle at Breteuil in Normandy. The rebels' aim was to take control of the duchy, but Henry II himself led an army to besiege the castle; Robert fled, and the Breteuil was taken on September 25 or 26.

    Robert apparently went to Flanders, where he raised a large force of mercenaries, and landed at Walton, Suffolk, on 29 September 1173. He joined forces with Hugh Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk, and the two marched west, aiming to cut England in two across the Midlands and to relieve the king's siege of Robert's castle at Leicester. However, they were intercepted by the king's supporters and defeated at the Battle of Fornham near Fornham, near Bury St Edmunds, on 17 October. Robert, along with his wife and many others, was taken prisoner. Henry II took away the earl's lands and titles as well.

    He remained in captivity until January 1177, well after most of the other prisoners had been released. The king was in a strong position and could afford to be merciful; not long after his release Robert's lands and titles were restored, but not his castles. All but two of his castles had been destroyed, and those two (Montsorrel in Leicestershire and Pacy in Normandy) remained in the king's hands.

    Robert had little influence in the remaining years of Henry II's reign, but was restored to favour by Richard I. He carried one of the swords of state at Richard's coronation in 1189. In 1190 Robert went on the third crusade to Palestine, but he died at Dyrrachium on his return journey.

    Family

    Robert married Petronilla, who was a daughter of William de Grandmesnil and great-granddaughter and eventual heiress to the English lands of Domesday baron, Hugh de Grandmesnil. They had five children:

    Robert, who succeeded his father as Earl of Leicester;
    Roger, who became Bishop of St Andrews in 1189;
    William, possibly the ancestor of the House of Hamilton;[1][2]
    Amicia, who married Simon de Montfort, and whose son Simon subsequently became Earl of Leicester;
    Margaret, who married Saer de Quincy, later 1st Earl of Winchester.

    *

    3rd Earl of Leicester Robert "Blanchmains" de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester
    Also Known As: "Robert de Harcourt", "Robert 'Blanchemains' de Beaumont", "Knight", "3rd Earl", "Robert (Sir) "The Crusader" de BEAUMONT", "Robert III 3rd Earl of Leicester BEAUMONT", "3rd Earl of Leicester Beaumont Robert III DE Beaumont"
    Birthdate: circa 1120
    Birthplace: Leicester, Leicestershire, England
    Death: Died August 31, 1190 in (now Albania), Durazzo Provence, Greece
    Cause of death: Died in Greece on his return journey from a pilgrimage to Palestine.
    Place of Burial: England
    Immediate Family:
    Son of Sir Robert de Beaumont, Knight, Earl of Leicester, Justiciar of England and Amice de Gačel, Heiress of Breteuil, Countess Of Leicester
    Husband of Petronille (Pernel) De Grentmesnil
    Father of Margaret de Quincy, of Groby; Roger de Breteuil, Bishop of St. Andrews; Robert "Fitz-Parnell" de Breteuil, 4th Earl of Leicester; Amicia de Beaumont, Countess of Leicester; Hawise de Beaumont, [A Nun] and 2 others
    Brother of Isabel (Elizabeth) de Beaumont; Hawise de Beaumont, Countess of Gloucester; Margaret de Beaumont and Hawise de Berkeley
    Occupation: Knight and 3rd Earl of Leicester, Crusader to the Holy Lands, de Winchester, 1st Earl of Leicester, 2nd Lord High Steward of England
    Managed by: Terry Jackson (Switzer)
    Last Updated: November 15, 2016

    About Robert de Beaumont, Third Earl of Leicester
    Robert de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester

    From Wikipedia:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_de_Beaumont,_3rd_Earl_of_Leicester

    Robert de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester (died 1190) was an English nobleman, one of the principal followers of Henry the Young King in the Revolt of 1173–1174 against his father Henry II. He is also called Robert Blanchemains (meaning "White Hands" in French).

    He was the son of Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester, a staunch supporter of Henry II, and he inherited from his father large estates in England and Normandy.

    When the revolt of the younger Henry broke out in April 1173, Robert went to his castle at Breteuil in Normandy. The rebels' aim was to take control of the duchy, but Henry II himself led an army to besiege the castle; Robert fled, and the Breteuil was taken on September 25 or 26.

    Robert apparently went to Flanders, where he raised a large force of mercenaries, and landed at Walton, Suffolk, on 29 September 1173. He joined forces with Hugh Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk, and the two marched west, aiming to cut England in two across the Midlands and to relieve the king's siege of Robert's castle at Leicester. However, they were intercepted by the king's supporters and defeated in battle at Fornham, near Bury St Edmunds, on 17 October. Robert, along with his wife and many others, was taken prisoner. Henry II took away the earl's lands and titles as well.

    He remained in captivity until January 1177, well after most of the other prisoners had been released. The king was in a strong position and could afford to be merciful; not long after his release Robert's lands and titles were restored, but not his castles. All but two of his castles had been destroyed, and those two (Montsorrel in Leicestershire and Pacy in Normandy) remained in the king's hands.

    Robert had little influence in the remaining years of Henry II's reign, but was restored to favour by Richard I. He carried one of the swords of state at Richard's coronation in 1189. In 1190 Robert went on pilgrimage to Palestine, but he died in Greece on his return journey.

    Family

    Robert married Petronilla[1], who was either a granddaughter or great-granddaughter of Hugh de Grandmesnil. They had five children:

    * Robert, who succeeded his father as Earl of Leicester;
    * Roger, who became Bishop of St Andrews in 1189;
    * William, who was a leper;
    * Amicia, who married Simon III de Montfort, and whose son Simon subsequently became Earl of Leicester;
    * Margaret, who married Saer de Quincy, later 1st Earl of Winchester.
    -------------------------

    http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/NORMAN%20NOBILITY.htm#RobertBeaumontLeicesterdied1118B

    ROBERT de Beaumont "le Bossu" (1104-5 Apr 1168, bur [Sainte-Marie de Prâe]). Twin with Walâeran. He and his twin brother were brought up at the court of Henry I King of England[1733]. He succeeded his father in 1118 as Earl of Leicester. He supported King Stephen during the civil war with Empress Matilda. Henry Duke of Normandy restored property to "Rodberto filio comitis Legrec…Rodberti comitis" held by "patris sui…sicut comes Rodbertus de Mellend avus suus…Willelmus de Britolio", and granted him the property of "Willelmus de Pasci in Anglia et in Normannia" by charter dated to [Jan/Aug] 1153, witnessed by "…Guarino filio Geraldi, Henrico duo fratre…"[1734]. He became Steward of England and Normandy under King Henry II in 1154, and acted as Viceroy during the king's absence from England Dec 1158 to 25 Jan 1163 and again in 1165[1735]. Robert of Torigny records the death in 1168 of "Robertus comes Leecestriµ"[1736]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "Non Apr" of "Robertus comes Leecestrie"[1737]. The necrology of Saint-Nicaise de Meulan records the death of "Robertus comes Leicestrie", undated but among other deaths listed in early April[1738]. The necrology of Lyre monastery records the death "5 Apr" of "Robertus comes Legrecestriµ"[1739]. m (after 25 Nov 1120) AMICE de Gačel, heiress of Breteuil, daughter of RAOUL Seigneur de Gačel et de Montfort & his wife --- (-31 Aug [1168 or after]). She is named by Orderic Vitalis, who also names her father and specifies that her marriage was arranged by Henry I King of England after she had been betrothed to his deceased son Richard[1740]. She is said to have become a nun at Nuneaton after her husband's death[1741]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "II Kal Sep" of "Amicia comitissa Leecestre"[1742]. The necrology of Lyre monastery records the death "31 Aug" of "Robertus comes Leicestriµ, Amicia comitissa"[1743]. Earl Robert & his wife had four children:

    a) ISABELLE de Beaumont (-after 1188). Robert of Torigny refers to the wife of "Symone comite Huntedoniµ" as "filia Roberti comitis Legecestriµ" but does not name her[1744]. "R. comes Legrecestrie" granted tithes to "Isabele comitisse de Norhamtone sororis mee" by charter dated to the middle of the reign of King Henry II[1745]. "I. comitissa Northamptonie" donated land at Groby to Nuneaton priory, for the souls of "patris mei et fratris mei R. comitis Legrecestrie" by charter dated to the middle of the reign of King Henry II[1746]. It is likely that Isabelle was the eldest child as she gave birth to her own first child in [1138]. Her second marriage is confirmed by charter dated 1187 under which “Gervasius Paganellus” donated property to Tykford Priory, with the consent of “uxoris meµ Isabellµ comitissµ de Norhamton”, which names “Fulcodius Paganellus avus meus et Radulfus Paganellus pater meus”, witnessed by “Simone comite Northamptoniµ, Isabella comitissa matre eius”[1747]. “G. Painel”, considering the proposal of “Radulfi Painel patris mei”, founded Dudley priory, for the salvation of “Isabellµ uxoris meµ et Roberti filii mei”, by undated charter (dated by Dugdale to "before 1161")[1748]. m firstly (before 1138) SIMON de Senlis, son of SIMON de Senlis Earl of Huntingdon and Northampton & his wife Matilda [Matilda] of Huntingdon (-Aug 1153, bur St Andrew's Priory). He was restored as Earl of Huntingdon and Northampton [before 1141]. m secondly GERVASE Paynell Baron of Dudley, Worcestershire, son of RALPH Paynell & his wife --- (-1194[1749]).

    b) ROBERT de Beaumont "áes Blanchemains" (-Durazzo 1190). Robert of Torigny records the death in 1168 of "Robertus comes Leecestriµ" and the succession of "filium Robertum"[1750]. He succeeded his father in 1168 as Earl of Leicester. - see below.

    c) HAVISE de Beaumont (-24 Apr or 25 May 1197). The Chronica de Fundatoribus et Fundatione of Tewkesbury Abbey records that “comes Willielmus” married “Hawisia filia comitis Leicestriµ”[1751]. The Obituary of Lyre records the death 25 May of “Hawis comitissa Gloecestrµ”[1752]. The Annals of Tewkesbury record the death “VIII Kal Mai” in 1197 of “Hawisa comitissa Glocestriµ”[1753]. The necrology of Lyre monastery records the death "25 May" of "Hawis comitissa Gloecestrµ"[1754]. m ([1150]) WILLIAM FitzRobert Earl of Gloucester, son of ROBERT Fitzroy Earl of Gloucester & his wife Mabel [Matilda or Sibylle] FitzRobert (23 Nov [1112]-23 Nov 1183, bur Keynsham Abbey, Somerset),

    d) MARGUERITE de Beaumont ([1125]-after 1185). Robert of Torigny refers to the wife of "Radulfus de Toene" as "filia Roberti comitis Leccestriµ" but does not name her[1755]. The 1163/64 Pipe Roll records "Margareta uxor Rad de Toeni" making payment "de Suppl de Welcumesto" in Essex/Hertfordshire[1756]. The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records “Margareta de Tony…lx annorum” and her land “in Welcumestowe"[1757]. m (after 1155) RAOUL [V] de Tosny, son of ROGER [III] Seigneur de Tosny & his wife Gertrude [Ida] de Hainaut (-1162).

    Sources

    [1734] Gurney (1858), Supplement, 63, p. 756.
    [1735] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 19.
    [1736] Red Book Exchequer, Part II, Inquisitiones…Regis Johannis…anno regno XII et XIII…de servitiis militum, p. 477.
    [1737] Gurney (1845), p. 176, quoting Close Rolls, 16 John, p. 172.
    [1738] Luard, H. R. (ed.) (1866) Annales Monastici Vol. III, Annales Prioratus de Dunstaplia, Annales Monasterii de Bermundeseia (London), Annales de Dunstaplia, p. 42.
    [1739] Gurney (1845), p. 141, quoting Neustria Pia, p. 891, article Belozanne.
    [1740] Gurney (1858), Supplement, 63, p. 756.
    [1741] Gurney (1845), p. 146, quoting Vitis Calthorpiana, Harl. 970, MS British Museum.
    [1742] Gurney (1845), p. 176, quoting Close Rolls, 16 John, p. 172.
    [1743] Gurney (1845), p. 146, quoting Vitis Calthorpiana, Harl. 970, MS British Museum.
    [1744] Patent Rolls Henry III 1215-1225 (1901), p. 37.
    [1745] Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus, 17/18 John, p. 596.
    [1746] Maclean, J. (ed.) (1883) The Lives of the Berkeleys by John Smyth (Gloucester) ("Berkeleys Lives"), Vol. I, p. 98.
    [1747] Testa de Nevill, Part I, p. 378.
    [1748] Inquisitions Post Mortem, Vol. II, Edward I, 772, p. 468.
    [1749] Sayles, G. O. (ed.) Select Cases in the Court of King´s Bench, Vol. III, Edw I (Selden Society, vol. LVIII, 1939), p. cxv (entry e), summary of content available at (25 Jun 2008). [Margaret Schooling]
    [1750] Heley Chadwyck-Healey, C. E. and Landon, L. (1923) Somersetshire Pleas, Roll no. 1205, p. 97 footnote 1, citing Calendar of Charter Rolls, Vol. I, p. 305, and Hundred Rolls, Vol. II, p. 133. [Margaret Schooling]
    [1751] Somersetshire Pleas (1923), Roll no. 1205, pp. 96-7, [41 end, Henry III Vol. 36 500 (O62)]. [Margaret Schooling]
    [1752] Paris Notre-Dame, Tome I, XIII, p. 428.
    [1753] Paris Notre-Dame, Tome I, XIII, p. 428.
    [1754] Paris Notre-Dame, Tome I, XIII, p. 428.
    [1755] Paris Notre-Dame, Tome I, XIII, p. 428.
    [1756] Willelmi Gemmetencis Historiµ (Du Chesne, 1619), Liber VIII, XXXVII, p. 312.
    [1757] Orderic Vitalis (Prâevost), Vol. III, Liber VIII, IX, p. 320.
    Nickname: "Blanchmains" Ancestral File Number: 9Q8B-16 On Leiceste r, Earldom of [Burke's Peerage, p. 1671]:

    The 3rd Earl of this creation, yet another Robert, rebelled against Henry II and the town of Leicester was captur ed and set fire to by the King in 1173, although the castle itself was not take n. The 3rd Earl was later captured by Henry II, however, and the King then pul led the castle down.

    Copyrighted but use freely for your self and families Not to be sent to for profit company's

    Father: Robert II Earl of Leicester de BEAUMONT b: 1104 in Leicester, Leicestershire, England Mother: Amice de MONTFORT b: 1108 in Montford de Gael, Brittany, France

    Marriage 1 Petronilla (Pernel) GRENTEMESNIL b: ABT 1129 in Of, Leicestershire, England Married: ABT 1155 8 Sealing Spouse: 21 NOV 1972 in LANGE Children Has Children Margaret de BEAUMONT b: 1154 in Leicester, Leicestershire, England Has No Children Robert "Fitz-Parnell" HARCOURT b: ABT 1156 in Of, Bramber, Sussex, England Has No Children Roger HARCOURT b: ABT 1158 in Of Beaumont, France Has Children William Constable of Norwich Castle BEAUMONT b: ABT 1157 in Leicestershire, England Has No Children Amicia HARCOURT b: ABT 1160 in Of, Leicester, Leicestershire, England Has No Children Geoffrey de BEAUMONT b: ABT 1161 in Of, Leicester, Leicestershire, England Has No Children Mabel de BEAUMONT b: ABT 1162 in Of, Leicester, Leicestershire, England Has No Children Hawise de BEAUMONT b: ABT 1164 in Of, Leicester, Leicestershire, England Has No Children Pernel de BEAUMONT b: ABT 1166 in Of, Leicester, Leicestershire, England

    Sources: Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick LewisWeis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999 Note: Source Medium: Book

    Page: 53-26 Title: The Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999 Note: Source Medium: Book

    Page: 74-1 Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999 Page: 1671 Footnote: 23 May 2002. Footnote: 28 May 2002. Footnote: 27 May 2002. Footnote: 16 Jul 2001. Title: The Plantagenet Ancestry, by William Henry Turton, 1968 Note: Source Medium: Book

    Page: 53-26

    ROBERT, Third Earl of Leicester

    Died:
    Died August 31, 1190 in (now Albania), Durazzo Provence, Greece
    Cause of death: Died in Greece on his return journey from a pilgrimage to Palestine.

    Robert — Petronilla de Grandmesnil. [Group Sheet]


  2. 35.  Petronilla de Grandmesnil
    Children:
    1. Margaret de Beaumont died 0___ 1235.
    2. 17. Amicia de Beaumont, Countess of Leicester was born 0___ 1160, Leicestershire, England; died 3 Sep 1215, Haute Bruyere, Rouen, Seine Et Maritime, France.

  3. 40.  Geoffrey "Le Bon" Plantagenet, Count of Anjou, Duke of NormandyGeoffrey "Le Bon" Plantagenet, Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy was born 24 Sep 1113, Anjou, France; died 7 Sep 1151, Chateau-Du-Loir, Eure-Et-Loire, France; was buried Saint Julian Church, Le Mans, France.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Duke of Normandy

    Notes:

    More on Geoffrey's biography and history with photos ... http://bit.ly/1i49b9d

    Geoffrey married Matilda of England, Queen of England 3 Apr 1127, Le Massachusetts, Sarthe, France. Matilda (daughter of Henry I, King of England and Matilda of Scotland, Queen of England) was born 7 Feb 1102, London, Middlesex, England; was christened 7 Apr 1141; died 10 Sep 1167, Notre Dame, Rouen, Seine-Maritime, France; was buried 10 Sep 1169, Bec Abbey, Le Bec-Hellouin, Eure, France. [Group Sheet]


  4. 41.  Matilda of England, Queen of England was born 7 Feb 1102, London, Middlesex, England; was christened 7 Apr 1141 (daughter of Henry I, King of England and Matilda of Scotland, Queen of England); died 10 Sep 1167, Notre Dame, Rouen, Seine-Maritime, France; was buried 10 Sep 1169, Bec Abbey, Le Bec-Hellouin, Eure, France.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Empress Matilda
    • Also Known As: Empress Maude
    • Also Known As: Empress of Germany
    • Also Known As: Queen of Italy

    Notes:

    Empress Matilda (c. 7 February 1102 – 10 September 1167), also known as the Empress Maude,[nb 1] was the claimant to the English throne during the civil war known as the Anarchy. The daughter of King Henry I of England, she moved to Germany as a child when she married the future Holy Roman Emperor Henry V. She travelled with her husband into Italy in 1116, was controversially crowned in St. Peter's Basilica, and acted as the imperial regent in Italy. Matilda and Henry had no children, and when Henry died in 1125, the crown was claimed by Lothair II, one of his political enemies.

    Meanwhile, Matilda's younger brother, William Adelin, died in the White Ship disaster of 1120, leaving England facing a potential succession crisis. On Henry V's death, Matilda was recalled to Normandy by her father, who arranged for her to marry Geoffrey of Anjou to form an alliance to protect his southern borders. Henry I had no further legitimate children and nominated Matilda as his heir, making his court swear an oath of loyalty to her and her successors, but the decision was not popular in the Anglo-Norman court. Henry died in 1135 but Matilda and Geoffrey faced opposition from the Norman barons and were unable to pursue their claims. The throne was instead taken by Matilda's cousin Stephen of Blois, who enjoyed the backing of the English Church. Stephen took steps to solidify his new regime, but faced threats both from neighbouring powers and from opponents within his kingdom.

    In 1139 Matilda crossed to England to take the kingdom by force, supported by her half-brother, Robert of Gloucester, and her uncle, King David I of Scotland, while Geoffrey focused on conquering Normandy. Matilda's forces captured Stephen at the Battle of Lincoln in 1141, but the Empress's attempt to be crowned at Westminster collapsed in the face of bitter opposition from the London crowds. As a result of this retreat, Matilda was never formally declared Queen of England, and was instead titled the Lady of the English. Robert was captured following the Rout of Winchester in 1141, and Matilda agreed to exchange him for Stephen. Matilda became trapped in Oxford Castle by Stephen's forces that winter, and was forced to escape across the frozen River Isis at night to avoid capture. The war degenerated into a stalemate, with Matilda controlling much of the south-west of England, and Stephen the south-east and the Midlands. Large parts of the rest of the country were in the hands of local, independent barons.

    Matilda returned to Normandy, now in the hands of her husband, in 1148, leaving her eldest son to continue the campaign in England; he eventually succeeded to the throne as Henry II in 1154. She settled her court near Rouen and for the rest of her life concerned herself with the administration of Normandy, acting on Henry's behalf when necessary. Particularly in the early years of her son's reign, she provided political advice and attempted to mediate during the Becket controversy. She worked extensively with the Church, founding Cistercian monasteries, and was known for her piety. She was buried under the high altar at Bec Abbey after her death in 1167.

    Notes:

    Married:
    The marriage was meant to seal a peace between England/Normandy and Anjou. She was eleven years older than Geoffrey, and very proud of her status as an Empress (as opposed to being a mere Countess). Their marriage was a stormy one with frequent long separations, but she bore him three sons and survived him.

    Children:
    1. 20. Henry II, King of England was born 5 Mar 1133, Le Mans, France; was christened 25 Mar 1133, Le Mans, France; died 6 Jul 1189, Chinon Castle, France; was buried 7 Jul 1189, Fontevraud Abbey, France.


Generation: 7

  1. 68.  Robert de Beaumont, Knight, 2nd Earl of Leicester was born 0___ 1104, (Meulan, France) (son of Robert de Beaumont, Knight, 1st Earl of Leicester and Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester); died 5 Apr 1168, Brackley, Northamptonshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Justiciar of England, 1155-1168
    • Also Known As: Earl of Hereford
    • Military: The Anarchy

    Notes:

    Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester (1104 - 5 April 1168) was Justiciar of England 1155-1168.

    The surname "de Beaumont" is given him by genealogists. The only known contemporary surname applied to him is "Robert son of Count Robert". Henry Knighton, the fourteenth-century chronicler notes him as Robert "Le Bossu" (meaning "Robert the Hunchback" in French).

    Early life and education

    Robert was an English nobleman of Norman-French ancestry. He was the son of Robert de Beaumont, Count of Meulan and 1st Earl of Leicester, and Elizabeth de Vermandois, and the twin brother of Waleran de Beaumont. It is not known whether they were identical or fraternal twins, but the fact that they are remarked on by contemporaries as twins indicates that they were probably identical.

    The two brothers, Robert and Waleran, were adopted into the royal household shortly after their father's death in June 1118 (upon which Robert inherited his father's second titles of Earl of Leicester). Their lands on either side of the Channel were committed to a group of guardians, led by their stepfather, William, Earl of Warenne or Surrey. They accompanied King Henry I to Normandy, to meet with Pope Callixtus II in 1119, when the king incited them to debate philosophy with the cardinals. Both twins were literate, and Abingdon Abbey later claimed to have been Robert's school, but though this is possible, its account is not entirely trustworthy. A surviving treatise on astronomy (British Library ms Royal E xxv) carries a dedication "to Earl Robert of Leicester, that man of affairs and profound learning, most accomplished in matters of law" who can only be this Robert. On his death he left his own psalter to the abbey he founded at Leicester, which was still in its library in the late fifteenth century. The existence of this indicates that like many noblemen of his day, Robert followed the canonical hours in his chapel.

    Career at the Norman court

    In 1120 Robert was declared of age and inherited most of his father's lands in England, while his twin brother took the French lands. However in 1121, royal favour brought Robert the great Norman honors of Breteuil and Pacy-sur-Eure, with his marriage to Amice de Gael, daughter of a Breton intruder the king had forced on the honor after the forfeiture of the Breteuil family in 1119. Robert spent a good deal of his time and resources over the next decade integrating the troublesome and independent barons of Breteuil into the greater complex of his estates. He did not join in his brother's great Norman rebellion against King Henry I in 1123–24. He appears fitfully at the royal court despite his brother's imprisonment until 1129. Thereafter the twins were frequently to be found together at Henry I's court.

    Robert held lands throughout the country. In the 1120s and 1130s he tried to rationalise his estates in Leicestershire. Leicestershire estates of the See of Lincoln and the Earl of Chester were seized by force. This enhanced the integrity of Robert's block of estates in the central midlands, bounded by Nuneaton, Loughborough, Melton Mowbray and Market Harborough.

    In 1135, the twins were present at King Henry's deathbed. Robert's actions in the succession period are unknown, but he clearly supported his brother's decision to join the court of the new king Stephen before Easter 1136. During the first two years of the reign Robert is found in Normandy fighting rival claimants for his honor of Breteuil. Military action allowed him to add the castle of Pont St-Pierre to his Norman estates in June 1136 at the expense of one of his rivals. From the end of 1137 Robert and his brother were increasingly caught up in the politics of the court of King Stephen in England, where Waleran secured an ascendancy which lasted till the beginning of 1141. Robert participated in his brother's political coup against the king's justiciar, Roger of Salisbury (the Bishop of Salisbury).

    Civil war in England

    The outbreak of civil war in England in September 1139 brought Robert into conflict with Earl Robert of Gloucester, the bastard son of Henry I and principal sponsor of the Empress Matilda. His port of Wareham and estates in Dorset were seized by Gloucester in the first campaign of the war. In that campaign the king awarded Robert the city and castle of Hereford as a bid to establish the earl as his lieutenant in Herefordshire, which was in revolt. It is disputed by scholars whether this was an award of a second county to Earl Robert. Probably in late 1139, Earl Robert refounded his father's collegiate church of St Mary de Castro in Leicester as a major Augustinian abbey on the meadows outside the town's north gate, annexing the college's considerable endowment to the abbey.

    The battle of Lincoln on 2 February 1141 saw the capture and imprisonment of King Stephen. Although Count Waleran valiantly continued the royalist fight in England into the summer, he eventually capitulated to the Empress and crossed back to Normandy to make his peace with the Empress's husband, Geoffrey of Anjou. Earl Robert had been in Normandy since 1140 attempting to stem the Angevin invasion, and negotiated the terms of his brother's surrender. He quit Normandy soon after and his Norman estates were confiscated and used to reward Norman followers of the Empress. Earl Robert remained on his estates in England for the remainder of King Stephen's reign. Although he was a nominal supporter of the king, there seems to have been little contact between him and Stephen, who did not confirm the foundation of Leicester Abbey till 1153. Earl Robert's principal activity between 1141 and 1149 was his private war with Ranulf II, Earl of Chester. Though details are obscure it seems clear enough that he waged a dogged war with his rival that in the end secured him control of northern Leicestershire and the strategic Chester castle of Mountsorrel. When Earl Robert of Gloucester died in 1147, Robert of Leicester led the movement among the greater earls of England to negotiate private treaties to establish peace in their areas, a process hastened by the Empress's departure to Normandy, and complete by 1149. During this time the earl also exercised supervision over his twin brother's earldom of Worcester, and in 1151 he intervened to frustrate the king's attempts to seize the city.

    Earl Robert and Henry Plantagenet

    The arrival in England of Duke Henry, son of the Empress Mathilda, in January 1153 was a great opportunity for Earl Robert. He was probably in negotiation with Henry in that spring and reached an agreement by which he would defect to him by May 1153, when the duke restored his Norman estates to the earl. The duke celebrated his Pentecost court at Leicester in June 1153, and he and the earl were constantly in company till the peace settlement between the duke and the king at Winchester in November 1153. Earl Robert crossed with the duke to Normandy in January 1154 and resumed his Norman castles and honors. As part of the settlement his claim to be chief steward of England and Normandy was recognised by Henry.

    Earl Robert began his career as chief justiciar of England probably as soon as Duke Henry succeeded as King Henry II in October 1154.[1] The office gave the earl supervision of the administration and legal process in England whether the king was present or absent in the realm. He appears in that capacity in numerous administrative acts, and had a junior colleague in the post in Richard de Luci, another former servant of King Stephen. The earl filled the office for nearly fourteen years until his death,[1] and earned the respect of the emerging Angevin bureaucracy in England. His opinion was quoted by learned clerics, and his own learning was highly commended.

    He died on 5 April 1168,[1] probably at his Northamptonshire castle of Brackley, for his entrails were buried at the hospital in the town. He was received as a canon of Leicester on his deathbed, and buried to the north of the high altar of the great abbey he had founded and built. He left a written testament of which his son the third earl was an executor, as we learn in a reference dating to 1174.

    Church patronage

    Robert founded and patronised many religious establishments. He founded Leicester Abbey and Garendon Abbeyin Leicestershire, the Fontevraldine Nuneaton Priory in Warwickshire, Luffield Abbey in Buckinghamshire, and the hospital of Brackley, Northamptonshire. He refounded the collegiate church of St Mary de Castro, Leicester, as a dependency of Leicester abbey around 1164, after suppressing it in 1139. Around 1139 he refounded the collegiate church of Wareham as a priory of his abbey of Lyre, in Normandy. His principal Norman foundations were the priory of Le Dâesert in the forest of Breteuil and a major hospital in Breteuil itself. He was a generous benefactor of the Benedictine abbey of Lyre, the oldest monastic house in the honor of Breteuil. He also donated land in Old Dalby, Leicestershire to the Knights Hospitallers who used it to found Dalby Preceptory.

    Family and children

    He married after 1120 Amice de Montfort, daughter of Raoul II de Montfort, himself a son of Ralph de Gael, Earl of East Anglia. Both families had lost their English inheritances through rebellion in 1075. They had four children:

    Hawise de Beaumont, who married William Fitz Robert, 2nd Earl of Gloucester and had descendants.
    Robert de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester who married Petronilla de Grandmesnil and had descendants.
    Isabel, who married: Simon de St. Liz, Earl of Huntingdon and had descendants.
    Margaret, who married Ralph V de Toeni and had descendants through their daughter, Ida de Tosny.

    Occupation:
    In medieval England and Scotland the Chief Justiciar (later known simply as the Justiciar) was roughly equivalent to a modern Prime Minister[citation needed] as the monarch's chief minister. Similar positions existed on the European Continent, particularly in Norman Italy. The term is the English form of the medieval Latin justiciarius or justitiarius ("man of justice", i.e. judge).

    source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Justiciar

    Military:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Anarchy

    Robert married Amice de Montfort, Countess of Leicester Aft 1120, Brittany, France. Amice was born 0___ 1108, Norfolk, England; died 31 Aug 1168, Nuneaton, Warwickshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 69.  Amice de Montfort, Countess of Leicester was born 0___ 1108, Norfolk, England; died 31 Aug 1168, Nuneaton, Warwickshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Amicia de Gael

    Notes:

    Click this link to view 5 generations of her issue ... http://www.wikitree.com/genealogy/Gael-Descendants-3

    Children:
    1. Margaret de Beaumont was born 0___ 1125, (Leicestershire, England); died Aft 1185.
    2. Hawise de Beaumont was born Leicestershire, England.
    3. 34. Robert de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester was born ~ 1120, Leicestershire, England; died 31 Aug 1190, Albania.

  3. 82.  Henry I, King of EnglandHenry I, King of England was born 0___ 1070, Selby, Yorkshire, England; was christened 5 Aug 1100, Selby, Yorkshire, England (son of William the Conqueror, King of England, Duke of Normandy and Matilda of Flanders, Queen of England); died 1 Dec 1135, Saint-Denis-en-Lyons, Normandy, France; was buried 4 Jan 1136, Reading Abbey, Reading, Berkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Henry Beauclerc
    • Also Known As: Henry of Normandie

    Notes:

    Born: ABT Sep 1068, Selby, Yorkshire, England
    Acceded: 6 Aug 1100, Westminster Abbey, London, England
    Died: 1 Dec 1135, St Denis-le-Fermont, near Gisors
    Buried: Reading Abbey, Berkshire, England

    Notes: Reigned 1100-1135. Duke of Normandy 1106-1135.

    His reign is notable for important legal and administrative reforms, and for the final resolution of the investiture controversy. Abroad, he waged several campaigns in order to consolidate and expand his continental possessions. Was so hated by his brothers that they vowed to disinherit him. In 1106 he captured Robert and held him til he died. He proved to be a hard but just ruler. One of his lovers, Nest, Princess of Deheubarth, was known as the most beautiful woman in Wales; she had many lovers.

    He apparently died from over eating Lampreys. During a Christmas court at Windsor Castle in 1126 that Henry I, who had no legitimate male heir, tried to force his barons to accept his daughter Matilda as his successor.

    The Anglo-Saxon Chronicles reported that "...there he caused archbishops and bishops and abbots and earls all the thegns that were there to swear to give England and Normandy after his death into the hand of his daughter". Swear they did, but they were not happy about it. None of those present were interested in being among the first to owe allegiance to a woman. The stage was set for the 19-year-long bloody struggle for the throne that rent England apart after Henry's death. Ironically, the final resolution to that civil war, the peace treaty between King Stephen and Matilda's son Henry of Anjou, was ratified on Christmas Day at Westminster in 1153.

    *

    more...

    History & issue of Henry I, King of England ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_I_of_England

    Family and children

    Legitimate

    House of Normandy
    Bayeux Tapestry WillelmDux.jpg
    William the Conqueror invades England
    William I[show]
    William II[show]
    Henry I[show]
    Stephen[show]
    Monarchy of the United Kingdom
    v t e
    Wikimedia Commons has media related to Henry I of England.

    Henry and his first wife, Matilda, had at least two legitimate children:

    Matilda, born in 1102, died 1167.[89]
    William Adelin, born in 1103, died 1120.[89]
    Possibly Richard, who, if he existed, died young.[100]
    Henry and his second wife, Adeliza, had no children.

    Illegitimate

    Henry had a number of illegitimate children by various mistresses.[nb 32]

    Sons

    Robert of Gloucester, born in the 1090s.[332]
    Richard, born to Ansfride, brought up by Robert Bloet, the Bishop of Lincoln.[333]
    Reginald de Dunstanville, Earl of Cornwall, born in the 1110s or early 1120s, possibly to Sibyl Corbet.[334]
    Robert the King's son, born to Ede, daughter of Forne.[335]
    Gilbert, possibly born to an unnamed sister or daughter of Walter of Gand.[336]
    William de Tracy, possibly born in the 1090s.[336]
    Henry the King's son, possibly born to Nest ferch Rhys.[335][nb 33]
    Fulk the King's son, possibly born to Ansfride.[335]
    William, the brother of Sybilla de Normandy, probably the brother of Reginald de Dunstanville.[337]

    Daughters

    Matilda FitzRoy, Countess of Perche.[338]
    Matilda FitzRoy, Duchess of Brittany.[338]
    Juliana, wife of Eustace of Breteuil, possibly born to Ansfrida.[339]
    Mabel, wife of William Gouet.[340]
    Constance, Vicountess of Beaumont-sur-Sarthe.[341]
    Aline, wife of Matthew de Montmorency.[342]
    Isabel, daughter of Isabel de Beaumont, Countess of Pembroke.[342]
    Sybilla de Normandy, Queen of Scotland, probably born before 1100.[342][nb 34]
    Matilda Fitzroy, Abbess of Montvilliers.[342]
    Gundrada de Dunstanville.[342]
    Possibly Rohese, wife of Henry de la Pomerai.[342][nb 35]
    Emma, wife of Guy of Laval.[343]
    Adeliza, the King's daughter.[343]
    The wife of Fergus of Galloway.[343]
    Possibly Sibyl of Falaise.[343][nb 36]

    Birth:
    History, maps & photos of Selby, England ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Selby

    Buried:
    Reading Abbey is a large, ruined abbey in the centre of the town of Reading, in the English county of Berkshire. It was founded by Henry I in 1121 "for the salvation of my soul, and the souls of King William, my father, and of King William, my brother, and Queen Maud, my wife, and all my ancestors and successors".

    For more history & images of Reading Abbey, go to: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reading_Abbey

    Henry married Matilda of Scotland, Queen of England 11 Nov 1100, Westminster Abbey, 20 Deans Yd, London SW1P 3PA, United Kingdom. Matilda (daughter of Malcom III of Scotland, King of Scots and Margaret of Wessex) was born 0___ 1080, Dumfermline, Scotland; died 1 May 1118, Westminster Palace, Westminster, London, Middlesex, England; was buried Westminster Abbey, 20 Deans Yd, London SW1P 3PA, United Kingdom. [Group Sheet]


  4. 83.  Matilda of Scotland, Queen of EnglandMatilda of Scotland, Queen of England was born 0___ 1080, Dumfermline, Scotland (daughter of Malcom III of Scotland, King of Scots and Margaret of Wessex); died 1 May 1118, Westminster Palace, Westminster, London, Middlesex, England; was buried Westminster Abbey, 20 Deans Yd, London SW1P 3PA, United Kingdom.

    Other Events:

    • Residence: Normandy, France
    • Also Known As: Edith
    • Also Known As: Matilda Atheling Canmore

    Notes:

    Matilda of Scotland (c. 1080 – 1 May 1118), originally christened Edith,[1] was Queen of England as the first wife of King Henry I.

    Matilda was the daughter of the English princess Saint Margaret and the Scottish king Malcolm III. At the age of about six Matilda was sent with her sister to be educated in a convent in southern England, where her aunt Cristina was abbess. It is not clear if she spent much time in Scotland thereafter. In 1093, when she was about 13, she was engaged to an English nobleman when her father and brother Edward were killed in a minor raid into England, and her mother died soon after; her fiance then abandoned the proposed marriage. In Scotland a messy succession conflict followed between Matilda's uncle Donald III, her half-brother Duncan II and brother Edgar until 1097. Matilda's whereabouts during this no doubt difficult period are uncertain.

    But after the suspicious death of William II of England in 1100 and accession of his brother Henry I, Matilda's prospects improved. Henry moved quickly to propose to her. It is said that he already knew and admired her, and she may indeed have spent time at the English court. Edgar was now secure on the Scottish throne, offering the prospect of better relations between the two countries, and Matilda also had the considerable advantage of Anglo-Saxon royal blood, which the Norman dynasty largely lacked.[2] There was a difficulty about the marriage; a special church council was called to be satisfied that Matilda had not taken vows as a nun, which her emphatic testimony managed to convince them of.

    Matilda and Henry married in late 1100. They had two children who reached adulthood and two more who died young. Matilda led a literary and musical court, but was also pious. She embarked on building projects for the church, and took a role in government when her husband was away; many surviving charters are signed by her. Matilda lived to see her daughter Matilda become Holy Roman Empress but died two years before the drowning of her son William. Henry remarried, but had no further legitimate children, which caused a succession crisis known as The Anarchy. Matilda is buried in Westminster Abbey and was fondly remembered by her subjects as "Matilda the Good Queen" and "Matilda of Blessed Memory". There was an attempt to have her canonized, which was not pursued.

    Early life

    Matilda was born around 1080 in Dunfermline, the daughter of Malcolm III of Scotland and Saint Margaret. She was christened (baptised) Edith, and Robert Curthose, Duke of Normandy, stood as godfather at the ceremony. The English queen Matilda of Flanders was also present at the baptismal font and served as her godmother. Baby Matilda pulled at Queen Matilda's headdress, which was seen as an omen that the younger Matilda would be queen one day.[3]

    The Life of St Margaret, Queen of Scotland was later written for Matilda possibly by Turgot of Durham. It refers to Matilda's childhood and her relationship with her mother. In it, Margaret is described as a strict but loving mother. She did not spare the rod when it came to raising her children in virtue, which the author presupposed was the reason for the good behaviour Matilda and her siblings displayed, and Margaret also stressed the importance of piety.[4]

    When she was about six years old, Matilda of Scotland (or Edith as she was then probably still called) and her sister Mary were sent to Romsey Abbey, near Southampton in southern England, where their aunt Cristina was abbess. During her stay at Romsey and, some time before 1093, at Wilton Abbey, both institutions known for learning,[5] the Scottish princess was much sought-after as a bride; refusing proposals from William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey, and Alan Rufus, Lord of Richmond. Hâeriman of Tournai claimed that William Rufus considered marrying her. Her education went beyond the standard feminine pursuits. This was not surprising as her mother was a great lover of books. Her daughters learned English, French, and some Latin, and were sufficiently literate to read St. Augustine and the Bible.[6]

    In 1093, her parents betrothed her to Alan Rufus, Lord of Richmond, one of her numerous suitors. However, before the marriage took place, her father entered into a dispute with William Rufus. In response, he marauded the English king's lands where he was surprised by Robert de Mowbray, Earl of Northumbria and killed along with his son, Edward. Upon hearing of her husband and son's death, Margaret, already ill, died on 16 November. Edith was now an orphan. She was abandoned by her betrothed who ran off with a daughter of Harold Godwinson, Gunhild of Wessex. However, he died before they could be married.[7]

    She had left the monastery by 1093, when Anselm, Archbishop of Canterbury, wrote to the Bishop of Salisbury ordering that the daughter of the King of Scotland be returned to the monastery that she had left. She did not return to Wilton and until 1100, is largely unaccounted for in chronicles.[8]

    Marriage

    After William II's death in the New Forest in August 1100, his brother, Henry, immediately seized the royal treasury and crown. His next task was to marry and Henry's choice was Matilda. Because Matilda had spent most of her life in a convent, there was some controversy over whether she was a nun and thus canonically ineligible for marriage. Henry sought permission for the marriage from Archbishop Anselm, who returned to England in September 1100 after a long exile. Professing himself unwilling to decide so weighty a matter on his own, Anselm called a council of bishops in order to determine the canonical legality of the proposed marriage. Matilda testified that she had never taken holy vows, insisting that her parents had sent her and her sister to England for educational purposes, and her aunt Cristina had veiled her to protect her "from the lust of the Normans." Matilda claimed she had pulled the veil off and stamped on it, and her aunt beat and scolded her for this act. The council concluded that Matilda was not a nun, never had been and her parents had not intended that she become one, giving their permission for the marriage.

    Matilda and Henry seem to have known one another for some time before their marriage — William of Malmesbury states that Henry had "long been attached" to her, and Orderic Vitalis says that Henry had "long adored" her character. It is possible that Matilda had spent some time at William Rufus's court and that the pair had met there. It is also possible Henry was introduced to his bride by his teacher Bishop Osmund. Whatever the case, it is clear that the two at least knew each other prior to their wedding. Additionally, the chronicler William of Malmesbury suggests that the new king loved his bride.[9]

    Matilda's mother was the sister of Edgar the Ątheling, proclaimed but uncrowned King of England after Harold, and, through her mother, Matilda was descended from Edmund Ironside and thus from the royal family of Wessex, which in the 10th century had become the royal family of a united England. This was extremely important because although Henry had been born in England, he needed a bride with ties to the ancient Wessex line to increase his popularity with the English and to reconcile the Normans and Anglo-Saxons.[10] In their children, the two factions would be united, further unifying the new regime. Another benefit was that England and Scotland became politically closer; three of Matilda's brothers became kings of Scotland in succession and were unusually friendly towards England during this period of unbroken peace between the two nations: Alexander married one of Henry I's illegitimate daughters and David lived at Henry's court for some time before his accession.[11]

    Matilda had a small dower but it did incorporate some lordship rights. Most of her dower estates were granted from lands previously held by Edith of Wessex. Additionally, Henry made numerous grants on his wife including substantial property in London. Generosity aside, this was a political move in order to win over the unruly Londoners who were vehement supporters of the Wessex kings.[12]

    Queen

    The seal of Matilda
    After Matilda and Henry were married on 11 November 1100 at Westminster Abbey by Archbishop Anselm of Canterbury, she was crowned as "Matilda," a hallowed Norman name. By courtiers, however, she and her husband were soon nicknamed 'Godric and Godiva'.[13] These two names were typical English names from before The Conquest and mocked their more rustic style, especially when compared to the flamboyance of William II.

    She gave birth to a daughter, Matilda, born in February 1102, and a son, William, called "Adelin", in November 1103. As queen, she resided primarily at Westminster, but accompanied her husband on his travels around England, and, circa 1106–1107, probably visited Normandy with him. Matilda was the designated head of Henry's curia and acted as regent during his frequent absences.[14]

    During the English investiture controversy (1103-07), she acted as intercessor between her husband and archbishop Anselm. She wrote several letters during Anselm's absence, first asking him for advice and to return, but later increasingly to mediate.[15]

    Works

    Matilda had great interest in architecture and instigated the building of many Norman-style buildings, including Waltham Abbey and Holy Trinity Aldgate.[16] She also had the first arched bridge in England built, at Stratford-le-Bow, as well as a bathhouse with piped-in water and public lavatories at Queenhithe.[17]

    Her court was filled with musicians and poets; she commissioned a monk, possibly Thurgot, to write a biography of her mother, Saint Margaret. She was an active queen and, like her mother, was renowned for her devotion to religion and the poor. William of Malmesbury describes her as attending church barefoot at Lent, and washing the feet and kissing the hands of the sick. Matilda exhibited a particular interest in leprosy, founding at least two leper hospitals, including the institution that later became the parish church of St Giles-in-the-Fields.[18] She also administered extensive dower properties and was known as a patron of the arts, especially music.

    Death

    After Matilda died on 1 May 1118 at Westminster Palace, she was buried at Westminster Abbey. The death of her son, William Adelin, in the tragic disaster of the White Ship (November 1120) and Henry's failure to produce a legitimate son from his second marriage led to the succession crisis of The Anarchy.

    Legacy

    After her death, she was remembered by her subjects as "Matilda the Good Queen" and "Matilda of Blessed Memory", and for a time sainthood was sought for her, though she was never canonized. Matilda is also thought to be the identity of the "Fair Lady" mentioned at the end of each verse in the nursery rhyme London Bridge Is Falling Down. The post-Norman conquest English monarchs to the present day are related to the Anglo-Saxon House of Wessex monarchs via Matilda of Scotland as she was the great-granddaughter of King Edmund Ironside, see House of Wessex family tree.

    Issue

    Matilda and Henry had issue

    Euphemia (July/August 1101), died young
    Matilda of England (c. February 1102 – 10 September 1167), Holy Roman Empress, Countess consort of Anjou, called Lady of the English
    William Adelin, (5 August 1103 – 25 November 1120), sometimes called Duke of Normandy, who married Matilda (d.1154), daughter of Fulk V, Count of Anjou.
    Elizabeth (August/September 1104), died young

    Appearance and character

    "It causes pleasure to see the queen whom no woman equals in beauty of body or face, hiding her body, nevertheless, in a veil of loose clothing. Here alone, with new modesty, wishes to conceal it, but what gleams with its own light cannot be hidden and the sun, penetrating his clouds, hurls his rays." She also had "fluent, honeyed speech." From a poem of Marbodius of Rennes.

    Children:
    1. 41. Matilda of England, Queen of England was born 7 Feb 1102, London, Middlesex, England; was christened 7 Apr 1141; died 10 Sep 1167, Notre Dame, Rouen, Seine-Maritime, France; was buried 10 Sep 1169, Bec Abbey, Le Bec-Hellouin, Eure, France.


Generation: 8

  1. 136.  Robert de Beaumont, Knight, 1st Earl of Leicester was born ~ 1049, Meulan, France (son of Roger de Beaumont and Adeline of Meulan); died 5 Jun 1118.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Count of Meulan
    • Also Known As: Robert of Meulan
    • Military: Battle of Hastings, 1066

    Notes:

    Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Leicester (Sometime between 1040 & 1050 – 5 June 1118), also known as Robert of Meulan, count of Meulan, was a powerful Norman nobleman, one of the Companions of William the Conqueror during the Norman Conquest of England, and was revered as one of the wisest men of his age. Chroniclers spoke highly of his eloquence, his learning, and three kings of England valued his counsel.

    Biography

    He was born between 1040-1050, the eldest son of Roger de Beaumont (1015-1094) by his wife Adeline of Meulan (died 1081), a daughter of Waleran III, Count de Meulan, and was an older brother of Henry de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Warwick (c. 1050-1119)

    Robert de Beaumont was one of only about 15 of the Proven Companions of William the Conqueror at the Battle of Hastings in 1066, and was leader of the infantry on the right wing of the Norman army, as evidenced in the following near contemporary account by William of Poitiers:

    "A certain Norman, Robert, son of Roger of Beaumont, being nephew and heir to Henry, Count of Meulan, through Henry's sister Adeline, found himself that day in battle for the first time. He was as yet but a young man and he performed feats of valour worthy of perpetual remembrance. At the head of a troop which he commanded on the right wing he attacked with the utmost bravery and success".[1]

    His service earned him the grant of more than 91 English manors confiscated from the defeated English, as listed in the Domesday Book of 1086.

    When his mother died in 1081, Robert inherited the title of Count of Meulan in Normandy, and the title, Viscount Ivry and Lord of Norton. He paid homage to King Philip I of France for these estates and sat as a French Peer in the Parliament held at Poissy.

    He and his brother Henry were members of the Royal hunting party in the New Forest in Hampshire when King William II Rufus (1087-1100) was shot dead accidentally by an arrow on 2 August 1100. He pledged allegiance to William II's brother, King Henry I (1100-1135), who created him Earl of Leicester in 1107.

    On the death of William Rufus, William, Count of âEvreux and Ralph de Conches made an incursion into Robert's Norman estates, on the pretence they had suffered injury through some advice that Robert had given to the king; their raid was successful and they collected a vast booty.

    During the English phase of the Investiture Controversy, he was excommunicated by Pope Paschal II on 26 March 1105 for advising King Henry to continue selecting the bishops of his realm in opposition to the canons of the church. Sometime in 1106, Henry succeeded in having Anselm, the exiled archbishop of Canterbury, revoke this excommunication. Anselm's (somewhat presumptuous) act was ultimately ratified by Paschal.

    According to Henry of Huntingdon, Robert died of shame after "a certain earl carried off the lady he had espoused, either by some intrigue or by force and stratagem." He was the last surviving Norman nobleman to have fought in the Battle of Hastings.[2]

    Family

    In 1096 he married Elizabeth (or Isabel) de Vermandois, daughter of Hugh Magnus (1053-1101) a younger son of the French king and Adelaide, Countess of Vermandois (1050-1120). After his death Elizabeth remarried in 1118 to William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey. He had the following progeny:

    Waleran IV de Beaumont, Count of Meulan, 1st Earl of Worcester (b. 1104), eldest twin and heir.
    Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester & Earl of Hereford (b. 1104), twin
    Hugh de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Bedford (b. circa 1106)
    Emma de Beaumont (born 1102)
    Adeline de Beaumont, married twice:
    Hugh IV of Montfort-sur-Risle;
    Richard de Granville of Bideford (d. 1147)
    Aubree de Beaumont, married Hugh II of Chăateauneuf-Thimerais.
    Agnes de Beaumont, a nun
    Maud de Beaumont, married William Lovel. (b. c. 1102)
    Isabel de Beaumont, a mistress of King Henry I. Married twice:
    Gilbert de Clare, 1st Earl of Pembroke;
    Hervâe de Montmorency, Constable of Ireland

    Sources

    icon Normandy portal
    Edward T. Beaumont, J.P. The Beaumonts in History. A.D. 850-1850. Oxford.
    References[edit]
    Jump up ^ Wm. of Poitiers, per Douglas (1959), p.227
    Jump up ^ Edward T. Beaumont, J.P. The Beaumonts in History. A.D. 850-1850. Oxford.

    end

    Robert married Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester ~ 1096. Isabel (daughter of Hugues de France and Adelaide of Vermandois) was born 0___ 1081, Basse-Normandie, France; died 17 Feb 1131, France; was buried Lewes Priory, Southover, Sussex, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 137.  Isabel de Vermandois, Countess of Leicester was born 0___ 1081, Basse-Normandie, France (daughter of Hugues de France and Adelaide of Vermandois); died 17 Feb 1131, France; was buried Lewes Priory, Southover, Sussex, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Elizabeth de Vermandois

    Notes:

    Birth: 1081
    Basse-Normandie, France
    Death: Feb. 17, 1131, France

    Countess of Leicester, Countess of Surrey

    Third daughter of Hugh Magnus and Adelaide of Vermandois, granddaughter of King Henry I of France and Anne of Kiev, Herbert IV, Count of Vermandois, and Adele of Valois. She was the heiress of the county of Vermandois and descendant of Charlemagne.

    Wife of Sir Robert de Beaumont, Count of Meulan, the son of Roger de Beaumont and Adeline of Meulan; Isabel became the Countess of Leicester. They married about 1096 and had three sons and at least five daughters:
    * Emma b 1101, probably died young
    * Waleran IV de Beaumont, Count of Meulan, twin
    * Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester, twin
    * Hugh de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Bedford
    * Adeline, wife of Hugh Montfort & Richard de Granville
    * Aubree, wife of Hugh II of Chăateauneuf-en-Thimerais
    * Maud, wife of William Lovel
    * Isabel, mistress of King Henry I, wife of Gilbert de Clare and mother of Richard Strongbow & wife of Hervâe de Montmorency

    Secondly, the wife of William de Warenne, son of William de Warenne, 1st Earl of Surrey and his first wife Gundred; Isabel became the Countess of Surrey. They married in 1118 and had three sons and two daughters:
    * William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey
    Ralph de Warenne
    * Reginald de Warenne
    * Gundrada de Warenne, wife of Roger de Beaumont& William de Lancaster
    * Ada de Warenne, wife of Henry of Scotland, 3rd Earl of Huntingdon, mother King Malcolm IV and King William I 'the Lion'

    Sir Robert de Beaumont, described as being "the wisest man in his time between London and Jerusalem", and aged over fifty was determined to marry Isabel, aged about eleven. Bishop Ivo dismissed their request based on their being within a few degrees of kindred. Isabel's father was able to sway Bishop Ivo, and saw his daughter married by April of 1096 when he left on a crusade.

    In 1115, Isabel was either carried away or willingly abducted by William de Warrene, revealing they had been lovers for some time. They were unable to marry until the death of Sir Robert, which occurred in 1118.

    The Beaumont sons were on opposite sides of support for King Stephen and Queen Matilda, but were not enemies.

    Sources vary on her death, reported as 1131 to outliving William who died in 1138.

    Family links:
    Parents:
    Hugues de France (1057 - 1102)

    Spouses:
    Robert de Beaumont (1049 - 1118)
    William II de Warenne (1065 - 1138)

    Children:
    Waleran de Beaumont (1104 - 1166)*
    Robert de Beaumont (1104 - 1168)*
    Reginald de Warenne (1113 - 1179)*
    William de Warenne (1118 - 1148)*
    Ada De Warenne De Huntingdon (1120 - 1178)*

    Sibling:
    Isabel Of Vermandois Beaumont de Warenne (1081 - 1131)
    Raoul I de Vermandois (1094 - 1152)*

    *Calculated relationship

    Burial:
    Lewes Priory
    Lewes
    Lewes District
    East Sussex, England

    end

    Children:
    1. Waleran de Beaumont, IV was born 0___ 1104, (Meulan, France); died 9 Apr 1166, Preaux, France.
    2. 68. Robert de Beaumont, Knight, 2nd Earl of Leicester was born 0___ 1104, (Meulan, France); died 5 Apr 1168, Brackley, Northamptonshire, England.
    3. Isabel de Beaumont

  3. 164.  William the Conqueror, King of England, Duke of NormandyWilliam the Conqueror, King of England, Duke of Normandy was born 14 Oct 1024, Chateau de Falaise, Falaise, Normandy, France; was christened 0___ 1066, Dives-sur-Mer, Normandie, France; died 9 Sep 1087, Rouen, Normandy, France; was buried Saint-Etienne de Caen, France.

    Other Events:

    • Residence: Hastings, England
    • Also Known As: Guillaume de Normandie
    • Also Known As: William I Normandie, King of England
    • Also Known As: William the Bastard
    • Military: Victor over the English in the Battle of Hastings, 1066
    • Burial: 10 Sep 1087, St. Stephen Abbey, Caen, Calvados, France

    Notes:

    Click here to view William the Conqueror's biography... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_I_of_England

    Click here to read about the historic Norman Conquest by William ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Norman_Conquest

    Click here to view his 9-generation pedigree ... http://www.ourfamilyhistories.org/ahnentafel.php?personID=I3527&tree=00&parentset=0&generations=9


    William the Conqueror is the 26th & 27th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Vernia Swindell Byars (1894-1985)

    *

    More...

    "The Last Kingdom"

    The Last Kingdom is a British television series, an eight-part adaptation of Bernard Cornwell’s historical novels series The Saxon Stories.[1] The series premiered on 10 October 2015 on BBC America,[2] and on BBC Two in the UK on 22 October 2015.

    Set in the late ninth century AD, when what is known as England today was several separate kingdoms. The Anglo-Saxon lands are attacked and, in many instances, ruled by Danes. The Kingdom of Wessex has been left standing alone.

    The protagonist Uhtred, the orphaned son of a Saxon nobleman, is captured by viking Danes and reared as one of them. Forced to choose between a kingdom that shares his ancestry and the people of his upbringing, his loyalties are constantly tested.[4]

    The first series' storyline roughly covers the plot of the original two novels, The Last Kingdom and The Pale Horseman although condensed for the purposes of television ...http://www.bbcamerica.com/shows/the-last-kingdom

    For a more complete genealogy including ancestors and descendants, see House of Wessex family tree ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edgar_the_Peaceful

    Alfred Saxon, King of England is the 5 x great uncle of William I Normandie, King of England ... http://www.ourfamilyhistories.org/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=I3527&secondpersonID=I3527&maxrels=1&disallowspouses=1&generations=9&tree=00&primarypersonID=I4276

    Alfred Saxon, King of England is the 4 x great grandfather of the wife of William I Normandie, King of England ... http://www.ourfamilyhistories.org/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=I3527&secondpersonID=I3527&maxrels=1&disallowspouses=0&generations=9&tree=00&primarypersonID=I4276

    More history on King Alfred of Wessex, the first English king ... http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/trail/conquest/wessex_kings/birth_england_wessex_05.shtml

    "Alfred the Great"

    "...Before Alfred arrived on the scene, England had consisted of a number of small kingdoms, but these were simply overrun and their royal families wiped out by the Vikings by the end of the 860s.
    At this point, the Vikings threatened to overrun the whole of England, and the King of Mercia fled overseas, as did a number of well-to-do West Saxons.

    But on the verge of total disaster, something happened which became part of the English myth in the Anglo-Saxon period, and still is. In early 878, Alfred the Great was surrounded in the marshes of Athelney in Somerset, almost finished. 'England' was on the ropes before it had even come into being..."

    ***

    Residence:
    Victor over the English in the Battle of 1066

    Military:
    a seminal moment in English history...

    Buried:
    The Abbey of Saint-âEtienne, also known as Abbaye aux Hommes ("Men's Abbey"), is a former Benedictine monastery in the French city of Caen, Normandy, dedicated to Saint Stephen. It was founded in 1063[1] by William the Conqueror and is one of the most important Romanesque buildings in Normandy.

    Photos, history & source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abbey_of_Saint-%C3%89tienne,_Caen

    Died:
    at the Priory of St. Gervase...

    William married Matilda of Flanders, Queen of England 0___ 1053, Normandie, France. Matilda was born Abt 1031, Flanders, Belgium; died 2 Nov 1083, Caen, Calvados, Normandie, France; was buried Abbaye aux Dames, Caen, Normandie, France. [Group Sheet]


  4. 165.  Matilda of Flanders, Queen of England was born Abt 1031, Flanders, Belgium; died 2 Nov 1083, Caen, Calvados, Normandie, France; was buried Abbaye aux Dames, Caen, Normandie, France.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Maud

    Notes:

    Matilda, or Maud, was the daughter of Baldwin V, Count of Flanders and Adáele of France , herself daughter of Robert II of France

    More on Queen Matilda... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matilda_of_Flanders

    Buried:
    (or Sainte Trinitâe) for women which was founded by Matilda around four years later (1063)...

    Notes:

    Married:
    The problem has been and maybe still is that William the Conqueror and Matilda (dau. of Baldwin V of Flanders & Adelaide of France) had relatively great difficulty is obtaining a papal dispensation for their marriage. It was not immediately obvious that there was any impediment that needed a dispensation. This problem of what the relationship between Matilda and William was that required a dispensation generated a vigorous debate earlier this century. Weis or Weis's source (as you report it) goes for a theory that makes Matilda and William cousins of sorts.

    Children:
    1. Adela of Normandy was born ~ 1067, Normandy, France; died 8 Mar 1137, Marcigny-sur-Loire, France.
    2. 82. Henry I, King of England was born 0___ 1070, Selby, Yorkshire, England; was christened 5 Aug 1100, Selby, Yorkshire, England; died 1 Dec 1135, Saint-Denis-en-Lyons, Normandy, France; was buried 4 Jan 1136, Reading Abbey, Reading, Berkshire, England.

  5. 166.  Malcom III of Scotland, King of Scots was born 0___ 1031, Scotland; died 13 Nov 1093, Alnwick, Northumberland, England.

    Malcom married Margaret of Wessex 0___ 1070. Margaret was born ~ 1045, Hungary; died 16 Nov 1093, Edinburgh Castle, Scotland; was buried Dunfermline Abbey, Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland. [Group Sheet]


  6. 167.  Margaret of Wessex was born ~ 1045, Hungary; died 16 Nov 1093, Edinburgh Castle, Scotland; was buried Dunfermline Abbey, Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: "The Pearl of Scotland"
    • Also Known As: Saint Margaret of Scotland

    Children:
    1. 83. Matilda of Scotland, Queen of England was born 0___ 1080, Dumfermline, Scotland; died 1 May 1118, Westminster Palace, Westminster, London, Middlesex, England; was buried Westminster Abbey, 20 Deans Yd, London SW1P 3PA, United Kingdom.