Captain Christopher Newport, II

Male 1561 - Aft 1617  (~ 55 years)


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  1. 1.  Captain Christopher Newport, II was born 0Dec 1561, Greater London, Middlesex, England; was christened 29 Dec 1561, Harwich, Essex, England; died Aft 15 Aug 1617, Bantam, Indonesia.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Captain of the "Susan Constant"
    • Occupation: English Privateer, Ship Captain, and Adventurer

    Notes:

    Christopher Newport (1561-1617) was an English seaman and privateer. He is best known as the captain of the Susan Constant, the largest of three ships which carried settlers for the Virginia Company in 1607 on the way to found the settlement at Jamestown in the Virginia Colony, which became the first permanent English settlement in North America. He was also in overall command of the other two ships on that initial voyage, in order of their size, the Godspeed and the Discovery.

    He made several voyages of supply between England and Jamestown; in 1609, he became Captain of the Virginia Company's new supply ship, Sea Venture, which met a hurricane during the Third Supply mission, and was shipwrecked on the archipelago of Bermuda. Christopher Newport University in Newport News, Virginia, was named in his honor.

    Early life

    Christopher Newport was born in Limehouse, an important trading port on the River Thames in December 1561. He was the son of a shipmaster also named Christopher Newport who worked in the commercial shipping trade on the east coast of England. The maiden name of his mother Jane is unknown. Newport was christened at Harwich on 29 December.[1] Newport went to sea in 1580, and he quickly rose to the rank of a master mariner and dealt with trade going into London. On 19 October 1584 he married Katherine Proctor in Harwich.[2]

    Privateer

    From 1585 following the outbreak of the Anglo–Spanish War, Newport worked as a privateer who raided Spanish freighters off and on in the Caribbean. Over the years he commanded a series of privateer ships, including the Little John, the Margaret, and the Golden Dragon. In 1590 on an expedition to the Caribbean financed and organised by famed London Merchant John Watts whilst capturing a Spanish galleon Newport lost an arm in the fight. Despite this for almost twenty years, Newport continued with the raids working with Watts again - in particular his successful expedition off Cuba in June and July 1591. In August 1592, he captured a Portuguese ship, the Madre de Deus, off the Azores, taking the greatest English plunder of the century. His ship returned to port in England carrying five hundred tons of spices, silks, gemstones, and other treasures. In his last mission of the war he raided Puerto Caballos in 1603, the spoils from all these missions were shared with London merchants who funded them.[3] In 1605, after another mission to the Caribbean, he returned to England with two baby crocodiles and a wild boar to give as gifts to King James I who had a fascination with exotic animals.

    Jamestown

    It was Newport's experience as well as his reputation which led to his hiring in 1606 by the Virginia Company of London. The company had been granted a proprietorship to establish a settlement in the Virginia Colony by King James I. Newport took charge of the ship Susan Constant, and on the 1606–1607 voyage, she carried 71 colonists, all male, one of whom was John Smith. As soon as land was in sight, sealed orders from the Virginia Company were opened which named Newport as a member of the governing Council of the Colony. On 29 April, Newport erected a cross at the mouth of the bay, at a place they named Cape Henry, to claim the land for the Crown. In the following days, the ships ventured inland upstream along the James River seeking a suitable location for their settlement as defined in their orders. Newport (accompanied by Smith) then explored the Powhatan Flu (River) up to Richmond (the Powhatan Flu would soon be called the James River), then a few weeks after arriving at Jamestown he was allowed to assume his seat on the council.[4]

    First and Second Supply missions

    In June 1607, a week after the initial Fort at Jamestown was completed, Newport sailed back for London on the Susan Constant with a load of pyrite ("fools' gold") and other supposedly precious minerals,[4] leaving behind 104 colonists, and the tiny Discovery for the use of the colonists. The Susan Constant, which had been a rental ship that had customarily been used as a freight transport, did not return to Virginia again. However, Newport did return twice from England with additional supplies in the following 18 months, leading what were termed the First and Second Supply missions. Despite original intentions to grow food and trade with the Native Americans, the barely surviving colonists became dependent upon the supply missions. Before the arrival of the First Supply, over half of the colonists perished in the winter of 1607–08.


    The Coronation of Powhatan, oil on canvas, John Gadsby Chapman, 1835.

    Pocahontas is the daughter of Powhatan and 10th great grandmother of Sheila Mynatt Hennessee. View Pocahontas' page, http://thehennesseefamily.com/getperson.php?personID=I40737&tree=hennessee

    The urgently needed First Supply mission arrived in Jamestown on 8 January 1608. The two ships under Newport's command were the John and Francis and the Phoenix. However, despite replenishing the supplies, the two ships also brought an additional 120 men, so with the survivors of the initial group, there were now 158 colonists, as recorded later by John Smith.[5] Accordingly, Newport left again for England almost immediately, to make an additional trip and bring even more supplies. Newport took also Powhatan tribesman, Namontack to London on 10 April 1608. Namontack remained there for three months and returned to Virginia with Newport.

    The Second Supply arrived in September 1608, this time with Newport commanding the Mary Margaret, a ship of about 150 tons.[6][7] In addition to urgently needed supplies, the Second Supply delivered another 70 persons as well as the first two women from England, a "gentlewoman" and a woman servant.[5] Realizing that Powhatan's friendship was crucial to the survival of the small Jamestown colony, Newport was also ordered to "crown" the chief with a ceremonial crown to make him an English "vassal."[8] The coronation went badly however, because he stated he was already a king and refused to kneel to receive the crown. The need for another, ideally much larger, supply mission was conveyed to the leaders of the Virginia Company effectively when Newport returned to England. Additional funds and resources were gathered and readied. However, the Third Supply, as well as the company's new purpose-built flagship, the Sea Venture, were each to become big problems for Jamestown.

    Third Supply: ill-fated Sea Venture

    Sylvester Jordain's "A Discovery of the Barmudas".
    Newport made a third trip to America in June 1609, as captain of the Sea Venture and "Vice Admiral" of the Third Supply mission. However, on 24 July, the nine ships encountered a massive three-day-long storm, and became separated. The flagship of the mission, the Sea Venture, being newly built for the voyage, was leaking heavily, having lost her caulking. Sir George Somers, who had taken the helm, deliberately drove her upon a reef in Bermuda to prevent her foundering. Eventually, in May 1610, the survivors (150 colonists and crew members, and one dog) constructed two smaller ships, the Deliverance and the Patience, from the wreck and the abundant native Bermuda cedar. Arriving at Jamestown 10 months later than planned, where the death of over 80% of the colonists had occurred during the Starving Time, Newport and the others had precious few supplies to share. Both groups felt they had no alternative but to return to England. On 7 June, they boarded the ships, and started to sail downstream and abandon Jamestown. However, as they approached Mulberry Island, they were met by a 'fourth" supply mission sailing upstream headed by a new governor, Thomas West, who ordered the remaining settlers to return.

    Later voyages, death

    On 12 May 1611 Newport arrived once again back at Jamestown, accompanied by Sir Thomas Dale, departing 20 August, for what would be his last time.[9] In 1612, he joined the Royal Navy, accepting a commission first offered to him in 1606, and entered the English East India Company. In 1613, aboard the Expedition, Newport commanded the twelfth voyage of the Company to the Far East.[10] In 1615 he sailed to India. In November 1616 he wrote his will, and set out on his third voyage to the East Indies (this time accompanied by his son, also called Christopher, who joined the crew). By May 1617, he was in South Africa, but he died in Java (now part of Indonesia) sometime after 15 August 1617[11] of unknown causes.

    Captain Christopher Newport II
    Born Dec 1561 in Greater London, England
    Son of Christopher Newport I and [mother unknown]
    [sibling(s) unknown]
    Husband of Katherine (Proctor) Newport — married 1584 in England
    Husband of Ellen Heath — married 1590 in England
    Husband of Elizabeth (Glanville) Newport — married 1595 in England
    DESCENDANTS descendants
    Father of Molly (Newport) Bragg, John Newport, Christopher Newport III and Marian (Newporte) Hatcher
    Died after 15 Aug 1617 in Banten Roads, East Indies
    Profile managers: Robin Lee private message [send private message], Jack Day private message [send private message], Donna Hale private message [send private message], and Bill Sigmund private message [send private message]
    Newport-237 created 31 Jan 2014 | Last modified 4 Jun 2017
    This page has been accessed 977 times.

    Categories: Chesapeake Colony Ships | Sea Venture, sailed June 18, 1609 | Virginia Colony | Jamestown, Virginia Colony | Jamestown, Virginia | Susan Constant, sailed Dec 1606 | Banten, Java, Historic British Trade Station | Notables | US Southern Colonist.

    Notables
    Christopher Newport II is notable.
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    US Southern Colonies.
    Christopher Newport II settled in the Southern Colonies in North America prior to incorporation into the USA.
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    Contents

    [hide]
    1 Summary
    2 Birth and Family
    2.1 Name
    2.2 1561 Birth
    2.3 1561 Baptism and Parentage
    3 Privateer
    3.1 1580 First Voyage
    3.2 1584 First Marriage to Katherine Proctor
    3.3 1585 Spanish
    3.4 1587 Sir Francis Drake
    3.5 1590 Second Marriage to Ellen Ade
    3.6 1590 Lost Arm
    3.7 1592 Capture of Madre de Deus
    3.8 1595 Mediterranean
    3.9 1595 Third Marriage to Elizabeth Glanville
    3.10 1605 Exotic Animals for the King
    4 Establishment of Jamestown
    4.1 1606 Virginia Company
    4.2 1606, December Voyage of the Susan Constant
    4.3 1607, April, Arrival in Chesapeake Bay
    4.4 1607, May: Exploration, seeking a site
    4.5 1607, May: Indian Trouble
    4.6 1607, May: Choice of Jamestown
    4.7 1607, June -- First Supply MIssion
    4.8 1608 Second Supply Mission
    4.9 1608 Powhatan's Mantle
    4.10 1609 Third Supply: ill-fated Sea Venture
    4.11 Third Supply
    4.12 1611 Last Trip to Jamestown
    5 1612 British East India Company
    5.1 1613 First East India Voyage: Banten
    5.2 1615 Second East India Voyage: India
    5.3 1617 Third East India Voyage: Banten
    5.4 1617 Will and Death
    6 Children
    7 Legacy
    8 Sources
    8.1 Wikipedia References
    8.2 Further reading (Wikipedia)
    9 Further Reading Recommended by Salmon
    Summary

    Christopher Newport (1561–1617) was an English seaman and privateer. He is best known as the captain of the Susan Constant, the largest of three ships which carried settlers for the Virginia Company in 1607 on the way to found the settlement at Jamestown in the Virginia Colony, which became the first permanent English settlement in North America. He was also in overall command of the other two ships on that initial voyage, in order of their size, the Godspeed and the Discovery.[1]

    He made several voyages of supply between England and Jamestown; in 1609, he became Captain of the Virginia Company's new supply ship, Sea Venture, which met a hurricane during the Third Supply mission, and was shipwrecked on the archipelago of Bermuda. Christopher Newport University in Newport News, Virginia, were named in his honor. [1]

    Christopher Newport was an English privateer, ship captain, and adventurer who helped to establish the first permanent English colony in North America at Jamestown in 1607. [2]

    Born the son of a shipmaster on the east coast of England, he worked in the commercial shipping trade and, beginning in 1585, as a privateer, or sanctioned pirate, in the war between England and Spain. [2]

    Birth and Family

    Name

    Name: Capt. Christopher /Newport -founder & Admiral of Jamestown,Va./[3][4][5][6][7]
    1561 Birth

    Christopher Newport was born in 1561, the son of a shipmaster on the east coast of England. [2]

    1561 Baptism and Parentage

    December 29, 1561 - Christopher Newport is christened at Harwich, England. He is the son of Christopher Newport, a shipmaster.[2]

    Newport was christened at Harwich, a prominent port town on the east cost of England, on December 29, 1561. His father, also named Christopher Newport, was a shipmaster; the maiden name of his mother, Jane, is unknown.[2]

    Privateer

    For almost twenty years, Newport worked as a privateer who raided Spanish freighters off and on in the Caribbean during the Anglo–Spanish War. Over the years he commanded a series of privateer ships, including the Little John, the Margaret, and the Golden Dragon. [1]

    1580 First Voyage

    At about age nineteen, Newport sailed from Harwich for Brazil on November 3, 1580, aboard the merchant vessel Minion of London. He jumped ship with some other crewmen at Baya (Bahia), Brazil, in 1581 after a quarrel erupted with the ship's master, Stephen Hare. Newport may have returned to England by 1582, when his name appeared on a list of shipmasters in Harwich. [2]

    1584 First Marriage to Katherine Proctor

    He married Katherine Proctor there on October 19, 1584.[2]

    1585 Spanish

    The next year, 1585, marked the beginning of a long, undeclared war between England and Spain that eventually concluded in 1604. During the intervening years, in accordance with international practice, England and Spain commissioned private seafarers to prey on each other's shipping. Essentially licensed pirates, the privateers of both sides varied in effectiveness, although a capable captain and his men could become quite wealthy if they were fortunate enough to seize numerous prizes while escaping death or capture. It was during this conflict—notable for the wreck of the Spanish Armada in 1588—that Newport and several other English privateers made their fortunes and their reputations.[2]

    1587 Sir Francis Drake

    By 1587, Newport was master's mate of the privateering ship the Drake, and he sailed with Sir Francis Drake to Câadiz, where Drake destroyed Spanish ships. Afterward, Newport's privateer cruised the Spanish coast searching for prizes. Newport, referred to subsequently as "of Limehouse, mariner," was master of the Margaret, out of London, in 1589. In 1590, he served in his first major command, as captain of the Little John in a fleet that sailed for the West Indies and Virginia. Off the northwestern coast of Cuba, Newport lost his right arm as he tried to capture two Mexican prizes; Virginia would have to wait.[2]

    Over the next four years, Newport made four voyages to the West Indies, continuing in the employment of London merchants but also remaining active as a privateer. Beginning in 1592, he captained the Golden Dragon. Because of his growing reputation and accomplishments, he commanded a flotilla of privateers and led attacks on Spanish towns in the Caribbean. He helped capture the extremely rich Madre de Dios in 1592 and sailed it back to England.

    1587 - Christopher Newport serves as a privateer against the Spanish for English merchants. He is a master's mate on John Watts's ship the Drake during an attack on the Spanish port city of Câadiz.[2]

    1589 - Christopher Newport is the master of the ship the Margaret, of London, the property of merchant Robert Cobb and others.[2]

    1590 Second Marriage to Ellen Ade

    (His first wife had died by 1590, when he married Ellen Ade, who subsequently died.)[2]

    1590 - Christopher Newport marries Ellen Ade after his first wife, Katherine Proctor Newport, dies.[2]

    1590 Lost Arm

    In 1590 whilst capturing a Spanish galleon Newport lost an arm but despite this for almost twenty years, Newport raided Spanish freighters in the Caribbean and Atlantic waters, in particular Watts' successful expedition off Cuba in June and July 1591. [1]

    1591 - Christopher Newport, again sailing for John Watts, is promoted to captain of the Little John. He makes his first privateering trip to the Caribbean and loses his right arm while engaging two Spanish treasure ships off Cuba. He also takes part in the Barbary Coast trade.[2]

    1592 Capture of Madre de Deus

    In August 1592, he captured a Portuguese ship, the Madre de Deus, off the Azores, taking the greatest English plunder of the century. His ship returned to port in England carrying five hundred tons of spices, silks, gemstones, and other treasures. In his last mission of the war he raided Puerto Caballos in 1603, the spoils from all these missions were shared with London merchants who funded them.[1][1]

    His assistance in the capture of the Spanish ship Madre de Dios in 1592 won him such wealth and prestige that in 1606 the Virginia Company of London appointed him leader of the voyage to the newly chartered colony. In the first few months, he played a key role in negotiating between Virginia's often-fractious leaders. He also sailed between the colony and England, carrying news and delivering precious supplies. In 1608, he participated in an unsuccessful "coronation" of the Indian chief Powhatan, who refused to submit himself to the English. [2]

    1595 Mediterranean

    In 1595, Newport made his only voyage to the Mediterranean. [2]

    1592–1595 - Christopher Newport is made captain of the Golden Dragon, owned by John Moore, and sails in the West Indies.[2]
    1592 - Christopher Newport commands a flotilla of privateers and attacks Spanish towns in the Caribbean. Near the Azores, he helps to capture the very rich Spanish ship Madre de Dios and sails it back to England.[2]
    1595 Third Marriage to Elizabeth Glanville

    That year he also married his third wife, Elizabeth Glanville, the daughter of a leading London goldsmith. [2]

    When Newport married into the Glanville family, his status changed from an employee of London merchants to a partner with five of them—his brothers-in-law. He became a one-sixth owner of the new, heavily armed trading and privateering vessel Neptune. Between 1595 and the end of the Anglo-Spanish War in 1604, Newport annually raided Spanish-Caribbean settlements and ships. He became one of the most experienced ship captains in England in terms of voyages to and from the Caribbean. After the peace treaty was signed, he turned from privateering to trade and met equal success.[2]

    1595 - Christopher Newport marries Elizabeth Glanville, a London goldsmith's daughter. Soon after, he partners with her brothers and others as one-sixth owner of the heavily armed ship the Neptune.[2]

    1595–1603 - As captain of the ship the Neptune, Christopher Newport raids Spanish towns in the Caribbean.[2]

    1604 - Christopher Newport's privateering career ends when a peace agreement is signed between England and Spain.[2]

    1604–1605 - Christopher Newport leads trading voyages in the Caribbean.

    1605 Exotic Animals for the King

    In 1605, after another mission to the Caribbean, he returned to England with two baby crocodiles and a wild boar to give as gifts to King James I who had a fascination with exotic animals.[1]

    Establishment of Jamestown

    The Susan Constant, Godspeed and Discovery, carrying 105 passengers, one of whom died during the voyage, departed from England in December 1606 and reached the Virginia coast in late April 1607. The expedition was led by Captain Christopher Newport. On May 13, after two weeks of exploration, the ships arrived at a site on the James River selected for its deep water anchorage and good defensive position. The passengers came ashore the next day, and work began on the settlement. Initially, the colony was governed by a council of seven, with one member serving as president.

    1606 Virginia Company

    It was Newport's experience as well as his reputation which led to his hiring in 1606 by the Virginia Company of London. The company had been granted a proprietorship to establish a settlement in the Virginia Colony by King James I.[1]

    In 1606, the Virginia Company of London chose Newport to lead the voyage to Virginia because of his reputation as a "mariner well practised." (He was also named "principal master" of the Royal Navy in 1606.) [2]

    1606 - Christopher Newport receives a post as a master of the Royal Navy. The Virginia Company of London gives him command of its first fleet to sail to Virginia.[2]

    1606, December Voyage of the Susan Constant

    Newport took command of the Susan Constant and received his formal instructions from the company on December 10, 1606. Because of a lawsuit over a collision that had occurred on November 23 between the Susan Constant and the Philip and Francis, the voyage did not get under way until December 20. On that date, the Susan Constant, the Godspeed (captained by Bartholomew Gosnold), and the Discovery (captained by John Ratcliffe) finally sailed down the Thames River on their way to Virginia.[2]

    The journey did not go well. Storms delayed the vessels off the coast of Kent for about six weeks, long enough for a clash of egos to emerge among two of the expedition's leaders aboard the Susan Constant. Edward Maria Wingfield and Captain John Smith locked horns, and after Newport sided with Wingfield, Smith was arrested and nearly hanged at Nevis, in the West Indies.

    December 20, 1606 - Three ships carrying 104 settlers sail from London bound for Virginia. Christopher Newport captains the Susan Constant, Bartholomew Gosnold the Godspeed, and John Ratcliffe the Discovery.[2]

    1607, April, Arrival in Chesapeake Bay

    The fleet left the West Indies on April 10 and, after surviving a violent storm, finally landed at the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay in Virginia on April 26.[2]

    April 26, 1607 - Jamestown colonists first drop anchor in the Chesapeake Bay, and after a brief skirmish with local Indians, begin to explore the James River.[2]

    1607, May: Exploration, seeking a site

    As soon as land was in sight, sealed orders from the Virginia Company were opened which named Captain John Smith as a member of the governing Council of the Colony.[2] On the voyage over, Smith had been placed under shipboard arrest, charged for "concealing a mutiny" by the aristocrat Wingfield. Smith had been scheduled to be sent back to Britain with Newport to answer this charge.[1]

    Upon arrival, the group then proceeded in their ships into the Chesapeake Bay to what is now called Old Point Comfort in the City of Hampton. In the following days, the ships ventured inland upstream along the James River seeking a suitable location for their settlement as defined in their orders. The James River and the initial settlement they sought to establish, Jamestown (originally called "James Cittie") were named in honour of King James I.[1]

    Smith so proved himself worthy when accompanying Captain Newport exploring the Powhatan Flu (River) up to Richmond (the Powhatan Flu would soon be called the James River), that a few weeks after arriving at Jamestown he was allowed to assume his seat on the council.[3][1]

    The landing was no less difficult. Newport went ashore with Wingfield, Gosnold, and a group of about thirty men. They saw "faire meddows and goodly tall Trees, with such Fresh-waters running through the woods," wrote George Percy, "as I was almost ravished at the first sight thereof." The woods, however, concealed a group of Virginia Indians who charged the newcomers as they were returning to their ships and wounded several of them with arrows before being driven off.[2]

    That night, according to instructions from the Virginia Company of London, Newport opened a box that contained the names of the seven councilmen who would elect a president and govern the colony. They included Newport, Wingfield, Gosnold, Ratcliffe, Smith, Captain John Martin, and Captain George Kendall. Smith, however, was not allowed to take his seat, which further strained relations among him, Newport, and the newly elected President Wingfield.[2]

    On April 29, Newport erected a cross at the mouth of the bay, at a place they named Cape Henry, to claim the land for the Crown. During the next two weeks, Newport directed the exploration of the lower Chesapeake Bay and the James River. Despite the inauspicious first encounter with the Algonquian-speaking Indians of Tsenacomoco, subsequent interactions were cautiously friendly. The Englishmen took care to visit each town and greet each chief as the ships worked their way west up the James River, which Newport learned was navigable at least as far as the Appomattox River. After debating several possible sites for the new settlement, the leaders decided on a marshy peninsula they called Jamestown Island. Once a start was made there, Newport continued his exploration of the James with a small party, sailing as far as the falls (present-day Richmond) and erecting a cross there to mark possession of the river westward from Cape Henry. He and his men then sailed back to Jamestown.[2]

    May 21–27, 1607 - Captain Christopher Newport, Captain John Smith, George Percy, and others explore the James River, making mostly friendly contact with the Kecoughtans, the Paspaheghs, the Quiyoughcohannocks, and the Appamattucks.[2]

    1607, May: Indian Trouble

    When they returned on May 27, Newport discovered that several nearby Indian tribes had attacked the settlement only the day before. He and the other leaders immediately set the men to constructing a triangular fort with a bastion in each corner. Although the English had driven off the attackers, the colony's leaders anticipated stronger assaults from the Indians in the future. In addition, the Spaniards in present-day Florida were threatened by the English presence and inclined to drive them off.[2]

    May 26, 1607 - While Christopher Newport and a party of colonists explore the James River, an alliance of five Algonquian-speaking Indian groups—the Quiyoughcohannocks, the Weyanocks, the Appamattucks, the Paspaheghs, and the Chiskiacks—attacks Jamestown, wounding ten and killing two.[2]

    1607, May: Choice of Jamestown

    Arriving on 14 May 1607, Captain Edward Maria Wingfield, president of the council, chose Jamestown Island for their settlement largely because the Virginia Company advised the colonists to select a location that could be easily defended from ocean-going navies of the other European states that were also establishing New World colonies and were periodically at war with England, notably the Dutch Republic, France and especially Spain. The peninsula had excellent visibility up and down what is today called the James River and it was far enough inland to avoid enemy ships. The water immediately adjacent to the land was deep enough to permit the colonists to anchor their ships yet have an easy and quick departure if necessary. An additional benefit of the site was that the land was not occupied by Native Americans, most of whom in the area were affiliated with the Powhatan Confederacy. Chief Powhatan was the chief of the local Indians.[1]

    It soon became apparent why the Native Americans did not occupy the site, and the inhospitable conditions severely challenged the settlers. Jamestown Island is a swampy area, and furthermore, it was isolated from most potential hunting game such as deer and bears which like to forage over much larger areas. The settlers quickly hunted and killed off all the large and smaller game that was to be found on the tiny peninsula. The low, marshy area was infested with mosquitoes and other airborne pests and the brackish water of the tidal James River was not a good source of drinking water.[1]

    The settlers who came over on the initial three ships were not well-equipped for the life they found in Jamestown. They consisted mainly of English farmers and two or three German and Polish woodcutters hired in Royal Prussia. Many suffered from saltwater poisoning which led to infection, fevers and dysentery. As a result of these conditions, most of the early settlers died of disease and starvation.[1]

    Despite the immediate area of Jamestown being uninhabited, the settlers were attacked, less than a fortnight after their arrival on 14 May, by Paspahegh Indians who succeeded in killing one of the settlers and wounding eleven more. By 15 June, the settlers finished the initial triangle James Fort.[1]

    1607, June -- First Supply MIssion

    In June 1607, a week after the initial Fort at Jamestown was completed, Newport sailed back for London on the Susan Constant with a load of pyrite ("fools' gold") and other supposedly precious minerals,[3] leaving behind 104 colonists, and the tiny Discovery for the use of the colonists. The Susan Constant, which had been a rental ship that had customarily been used as a freight transport, did not return to Virginia again.[1]

    However, Newport did return twice from England with additional supplies in the following 18 months, leading what were termed the First and Second Supply missions. Despite original intentions to grow food and trade with the Native Americans, the barely surviving colonists became dependent upon the supply missions. Before the arrival of the First Supply, over half of the colonists perished in the winter of 1607–08.[1]

    The urgently needed First Supply mission arrived in Jamestown on 8 January 1608. The two ships under Newport's command were the John and Francis and the Phoenix. However, despite replenishing the supplies, the two ships also brought an additional 120 men, so with the survivors of the initial group, there were now 158 colonists, as recorded later by John Smith.[4] Accordingly, Newport left again for England almost immediately, to make an additional trip and bring even more supplies.[1]

    Newport sailed for England on June 22, carrying an optimistic letter from the council. The fort had been completed and a crop of wheat had been sown. Smith had been admitted to the council, in part because Newport had played peacemaker. The abundant resources of Virginia, in particular the rich forests, engendered optimism that the colony would thrive and turn a profit for its investors. In the hold of the Susan Constant, Newport carried what he and the other leaders believed to be gold-bearing ore—the best means of quick wealth for the investors.[2]

    After arriving in London on August 12, however, Newport learned that the gold was in fact iron pyrite, commonly called fool's gold. In the meantime, a series of disasters struck the colony. Illness, salt poisoning, starvation, and occasional Indian attacks reduced the English population by more than half over the fall and winter. Adding to the Englishmen's woes, relations among their leaders again deteriorated. Smith negotiated with the paramount chief Powhatan for food but was captured in December and two of his companions were killed. When he returned to Jamestown on January 2, 1608, he was accused of being responsible for the two colonists' deaths and sentenced to hang. He was saved only by the arrival, that day, of Newport, with the so-called first supply of new colonists.[2]

    Neither Newport nor Smith could save Jamestown from disaster a few days later, however, when the fort caught fire and practically burned to the ground along with most of the food and other supplies. The catastrophe made the upstart Smith more vital than ever to the settlement's survival because Powhatan regarded Smith as virtually an adopted member of his chiefdom. It was Smith who could negotiate for the colony most effectively. He and Newport sailed in February to Powhatan's principal town of Werowocomoco, negotiating with the paramount chief for corn. They returned to Jamestown on March 9 with enough corn to see the settlement through the rest of the winter.[2]

    June 22, 1607 - Christopher Newport departs from Jamestown for England, carrying a letter to the Virginia Company of London that exaggerates the Virginia colony's commercial possibilities.[2]

    August 12, 1607 - Christopher Newport arrives in London.[2]

    1608 Second Supply Mission

    Newport took Chief Powhatan's tribesman, Namontack to London on 10 April 1608. Namontack remained there for three months and returned to Virginia with Newport.[1]

    The Second Supply arrived in September 1608, this time with Newport commanding the Mary Margaret, a ship of about 150 tons.[5][6] In addition to urgently needed supplies, the Second Supply delivered another 70 persons as well as the first two women from England, a "gentlewoman" and a woman servant.[4][1]

    The need for another, ideally much larger, supply mission was conveyed to the leaders of the Virginia Company effectively when Newport returned to England. Additional funds and resources were gathered and readied. However, the Third Supply, as well as the company's new purpose-built flagship, the Sea Venture, were each to become big problems for Jamestown.[1]

    Once again, "gold" was found near Jamestown, and on April 10, 1608, his hold filled, Newport sailed for England. He arrived in London on May 21, but the gold once more proved false. During the summer, while Newport received additional instructions from the company and gathered more supplies and settlers, Smith undertook two voyages of exploration in the Chesapeake Bay. He established trading relations with numerous tribes both inside and outside Tsenacomoco, learned the approximate locations of mineral deposits (but no gold mines), satisfied himself that there was no "northwest passage" between the bay and the Pacific Ocean, and began drafting a comprehensive map of the Chesapeake. On September 10, Smith—who twice had faced death sentences from the council—was elected president. He quickly set about preparing the colony for the approaching winter.[2]

    In September 1608, Newport reappeared in Virginia with the second supply of colonists. His instructions were to search for any survivors of the Lost Colony of Roanoke, resume exploring for gold mines, and stage a "coronation" of Powhatan, making him a "sub-king" under James I. Smith objected to these instructions as unrealistic, and while the coronation was carried out, it became a farce. First, Powhatan refused to come to Jamestown, insisting that he already was a king in his own country and that the English could come to him if they wished to have a ceremony. (Powhatan, of course, already considered the English settlers to be a sort of sub-tribe under his authority; from his point of view, they survived only because of his beneficence.)[2]

    January 2, 1608 - John Smith returns to Jamestown after being held captive by Powhatan. Only thirty-eight colonists survive, Smith's seat on the Council is occupied by Gabriel Archer, and the Council accuses Smith of killing his companions. Smith is sentenced to hang, but the charge is dropped when Christopher Newport arrives with the first supplies from England.[2]

    1608 Powhatan's Mantle

    Newport, Smith, and a retinue duly made the trek to Werowocomoco, where they induced Powhatan to "bow" and receive his "crown" by "leaning hard" on his shoulders. In exchange for the crown and other gifts, Powhatan gave Newport an old pair of shoes and his "mantle" (perhaps the garment that currently resides in the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford, England). Afterward, Newport searched briefly for the Lost Colonists and gold mines, but to no avail. He then set sail for England. Instead of gold, his ships bore more practical products of the settlers' labors: clapboard, wainscot, "pitch, tarre, glasse, frankincense, and sope ashes." He arrived in London in mid-January 1609.[2]

    February 1608 - Christopher Newport and John Smith visit Powhatan, the paramount chief of Tsenacomoco, at his capital, Werowocomoco. Powhatan feeds them and their party lavishly, and Newport presents the chief with a suit of clothing, a hat, and a greyhound. The English continue upriver to visit Opechancanough at the latter's request.[2]

    1609 Third Supply: ill-fated Sea Venture

    Newport made a third trip to America in 1609, as captain of the Sea Venture and "Vice Admiral" of the Third Supply mission. However, the nine ships encountered a massive three-day-long storm, and became separated. The flagship of the mission, the Sea Venture, being new, was leaking like a sieve, having lost her caulking. Sir George Somers, who had taken the helm, deliberately drove her upon a reef to prevent her foundering. In an incident which is often credited as the inspiration for Shakespeare's play The Tempest, the passengers and crew found themselves stranded on the still-vexed Bermoothes (Bermuda).[7] In addition to Newport and Somers, notable personages aboard the Sea Venture included Sir Thomas Gates, John Rolfe, William Strachey, and Sylvester Jordain.[1]

    In 1609, as captain of the Sea Venture, Newport was shipwrecked off the islands of Bermuda, arriving in Virginia the next spring. [2]

    This began the permanent settlement of Bermuda, which had been discovered a century before, but which mariners had avoided as best as they could. Situated, as it is, astride the historical return route to Europe from the West Indies and the North American Atlantic Seaboard, many sailors failed, and numerous ships had been wrecked on Bermuda's reefs in the century before the Sea Venture, helping to give the archipelago its other early name, the "Isle of Devils". Bermuda, (also known officially as the Somers Isles after Sir George Somers, Admiral of the Virginia Company, who also survived the Sea Venture wreck) is still a territory (the current term for what were previously called possessions, dependencies, or colonies) of the United Kingdom almost 400 years later.[1]

    Eventually, the survivors of the Sea Venture (150 colonists and crew members, and one dog) constructed two smaller ships, the Deliverance and the Patience, from parts of the Sea Venture and the abundant native Bermuda cedar. These were sailed on to Jamestown, carrying most of the survivors (a number had been lost at sea as the result of an ill-considered mission to reach Jamestown aboard the Sea Venture's rigged lifeboat, others had died in Bermuda, and yet others born). Two (living) men, Carter and Waters, were left behind to hold the rights of the English claim to Bermuda.[1]

    Arriving at Jamestown 10 months later than planned, those aboard the Deliverance and Patience learned that the failure of the Sea Venture, carrying most of the Third Supply Mission's supplies, to arrive, combined with other factors, had resulted in the death of over 80% of the colonists during the Starving Time from the fall of 1609 until their arrival in May 1610. [1]

    Unfortunately for the colonists, Newport's arrival this time was not a long-term solution to the crisis at Jamestown. Newport and the survivors of the Sea Venture had precious few supplies to share with the Jamestown survivors. Both groups felt they had no alternative but to return to England. Several weeks later, they boarded the ships, and started to sail downstream and abandon Jamestown.[1]

    However, as they approached Mulberry Island, they were met by a new supply mission arriving from England sailing upstream. Heading this group equipped with additional colonists, a doctor, food, supplies was a new governor, Thomas West, Baron De La Warr, who forced the remaining settlers to stay, thwarting their plans to abandon the colony.[1]

    The colony was still critically short of food. If anything, this had been worsened by the addition of the hungry bellies which arrived with De La Warr. Somers returned to Bermuda with the Patience (which had been constructed to carry the food the Sea Venture survivors had stockpiled during their months in Bermuda) intending to obtain more foodstuffs, but died there of a "surfeit of pork". His nephew, Captain of the Patience, returned with the ship to Lyme Regis, instead of to Jamestown. A third man, Chard, remained behind with Carter and Waters. The Virginia Company, in effective possession of Bermuda, was given official control when its Third Charter, of 1612, extended the territorial limits of Virginia far enough across the Atlantic to include the archipelago (control was passed to a spin-off of the Virginia Company, the Somers Isles Company, in 1615).[1]

    Third Supply

    On May 23, 1609, the king issued a new charter for the Virginia Company of London to allow for reorganization and additional capital. Early in June, Newport sailed again for Virginia, this time as captain of the Sea Venture, the flagship of a nine-ship flotilla that represented the so-called third supply. Newport's vessel also carried Sir Thomas Gates, the new, Crown-appointed governor; Sir George Somers, admiral of the fleet; and William Strachey, who later became secretary of the colony. Avoiding the Spanish West Indies, the fleet sailed on as direct a course to Virginia as possible. Stifling heat and disease troubled the passengers and crew, but they were nothing compared to the violent three-day storm that struck on July 24, when the ships were about a week's voyage from their destination. The hurricane scattered the fleet and drove the Sea Venture onto a reef off the islands of Bermuda.[2]

    For the next eight months, as the other ships straggled into Jamestown, Gates, Somers, and Newport struggled to maintain order among the passengers and crew of the Sea Venture. Remarkably, all had lived through the shipwreck, but several did not survive the dissentions, intrigues, and charges of mutiny that surfaced in Bermuda and resulted in executions ordered by Gates. On February 11, 1610, Newport and William Strachey served as witnesses to the christening of John Rolfe's daughter, named Bermuda, and on March 25, Newport, Strachey, and James Swift became godfathers to a baby boy called Bermudas. (Rolfe's wife and daughter both died.) In May 1610, the party finally departed the islands in two small vessels that ship carpenters and crew had cobbled together from local trees and fragments salvaged from the wreck. They arrived in Jamestown later in the month and found disaster.

    Having endured the Starving Time over the winter, the few remaining colonists at Jamestown were barely alive. Most of the buildings had been burned for firewood, and the palisade surrounding the fort was down. To the relief of many there, Gates announced they would abandon Jamestown. On June 7, the survivors boarded ships and sailed down the James River to the Chesapeake Bay, where they spent the night. The next morning, while waiting for the tide to turn, they spied a longboat headed toward them from the east. It was the advance of an expedition led by the new, Virginia Company–appointed governor, Thomas West, twelfth baron De La Warr. On his orders, the colonists turned around.[2]

    De La Warr had brought with him more settlers, soldiers, and a year's worth of provisions. Most important, he brought a strict regimen of order and discipline, confirming and reinforcing a set of rules that came to be known as the Lawes Divine, Morall and Martiall. Newport returned to England by September, while De La Warr, who had fallen ill, set sail for home in March 1611.[2]

    April 10, 1608 - Aboard the John and Francis, Christopher Newport leaves Jamestown for England. Among those with him are Gabriel Archer, Edward Maria Wingfield, and the Indian Namontack.[2]

    May 21, 1608 - Christopher Newport arrives at Blackwell, England, having sailed from Virginia.[2]

    September 1608 - Christopher Newport returns from England with a plan to improve relations with Virginia Indians by bestowing on Powhatan various gifts and formally presenting him with a decorated crown. The subsequent crowning is made awkward by Powhatan's refusal to kneel, and relations sour.[2]

    December 1608 - Christopher Newport returns to England from Jamestown accompanied by the Indian Machumps. John Smith, meanwhile, attempts to trade for food with Indians from the Nansemonds to the Appamattucks, but on Powhatan's orders they refuse.[2]

    Mid-January 1609 - Christopher Newport arrives in London.[2]

    May 23, 1609 - The Crown approves a second royal charter for the Virginia Company of London. It replaces the royal council with private corporate control, extends the colony's boundaries to the Pacific Ocean, and installs a governor, Sir Thomas West, twelfth baron De La Warr, to run operations in Virginia.[2]

    June 2, 1609 - The largest fleet England has ever amassed in the West—nine ships, 600 passengers, and livestock and provisions to last a year—leaves England for Virginia. Led by the flagship Sea Venture, the fleet's mission is to save the failing colony. Sir Thomas Gates heads the expedition.[2]

    July 24, 1609 - A hurricane strikes the nine-ship English fleet bound for Virginia on a rescue mission. The flagship Sea Venture is separated from the other vessels and irreparably damaged by the storm.[2]

    Winter 1609–1610 - While the English colonists starve in Virginia, the shipwrecked crew and passengers of the Sea Venture make camp in Bermuda. They build two new boats, the Patience and Deliverance, from Bermuda cedar and the scavenged remains of the Sea Venture.[2]

    February 11, 1610 - Captain Christopher Newport and William Strachey serve as witnesses to the christening of John Rolfe's daughter, named Bermuda after the group of islands on which they are stranded. The girl and her mother both die.[2]

    March 25, 1610 - Captain Christopher Newport, William Strachey, and James Swift become godfathers to a baby boy called Bermudas after the group of islands on which they are stranded.[2]

    May 24, 1610 - The party of Virginia colonists headed by Sir Thomas Gates, , now aboard the Patience and Deliverance, arrives at Jamestown. They find only sixty survivors of a winter famine. Gates decides to abandon the colony for Newfoundland.[2]

    September 1610 - Christopher Newport returns to England.

    1611 Last Trip to Jamestown

    As Christopher Newport arrived once again back at Jamestown for what would prove to be his last time, after so many trips, he also would have had no way of knowing that he was finally bringing ashore the key to Jamestown and the Virginia Colony's permanency.[1]

    Among the colonists with him was John Rolfe, a survivor of the Sea Venture's shipwreck whose wife and young son had perished. Although his voyage to this arrival at Jamestown with Newport had also followed a long, painful, and most circuitous route, within a short time, John Rolfe would successfully cultivate and export his new, sweeter strains of tobacco. His ideas and work with tobacco resulted in the cash crop which brought about the Virginia colony's economic success.[1]

    In the spring of 1611, Newport sailed to Virginia for the last time, taking Sir Thomas Dale with him, and arrived on May 12. Dale, the marshal of Virginia and acting governor in De La Warr's and Gates's absence, ran the colony strictly and helped the English finally defeat the Indians in the First Anglo-Powhatan War (1609–1614). Newport remained in Virginia for several months, overseeing the construction of a bridge at Jamestown. He sailed for England about the end of August and arrived there late in October.[2]

    May 12, 1611 - Christopher Newport arrives at Jamestown for the last time, bringing Sir Thomas Dale with him.[2]

    August 20, 1611 - Christopher Newport sails from Virginia.[2]

    1612 British East India Company

    Years later (1613–1614) Newport sailed for the British East India Company to Asia. [1]

    October 1611 - Christopher Newport arrives in England.[2]

    1612 - Christopher Newport assumes his Royal Navy post of 1606 and enters the service of the East India Company.[2]

    Newport left the Virginia Company's employment in 1612 and entered the service of the East India Company. [2]

    In 1612, Newport took up the Royal Navy post of "principal master" to which he had been appointed in 1606 and also entered the service of the East India Company. [2]

    1613 First East India Voyage: Banten

    He made three long voyages over the next few years. The first, aboard the Expedition of London to Banten (also called Bantam), a major trading town on the west coast of Java, was undertaken early in 1613. [2]

    1613 - Christopher Newport sails to Banten (Bantam), Java.[2]

    1615 Second East India Voyage: India

    The second, to India, was made in 1615. Newport wrote his will on November 16, 1616, as he was about to sail to the East Indies for the third time. [2]

    He took his son, also named Christopher Newport, with him as his master's mate. [2]

    1615 - Christopher Newport sails to India.[2]

    1617 Third East India Voyage: Banten

    In May 1617, Captain Newport arrived at Saldanha Bay north of Cape Town, South Africa, and then sailed around the Cape of Good Hope. He dropped anchor at Banten on August 15. He died soon afterward.[2]

    1617 Will and Death

    November 16, 1616 - Christopher Newport writes his will. About to sail for the third time to the East Indies, he takes his son Christopher Newport with him as master's mate.[2]

    May 1617 - Christopher Newport arrives at Saldanha Bay north of Cape Town, South Africa.[2]

    August 15, 1617 - Christopher Newport arrives in Banten (Bantam), Java, and dies soon afterward.[2]

    He died after August 15, 1617) [2]

    He died in Banten (Bantam), Java, sometime after August 15, 1617. [2]

    File: http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=document&guid=166e28bd-dcbe-4b65-a991-1b126f3f3ab3&tid=62215837&pid=513
    Format: htm
    Title: Will of Capt Christopher Newport
    He died in Java (now part of Indonesia) in 1617 on a voyage to the East Indies. [1]

    Christopher Newport of London, mariner and one of the six Masters of His Majesty's Navy Royal, wrote his will 10 November 1616, proved 27 October 1618. [8]

    Being now by God's grace and assistance to go with the next wind and weather Captain of the good ship called the Hope of London for to sail into the East Indies, a long and dangerous voyage &c.

    I give and bequeath unto my loving wife Elizabeth my now dwelling house situate and being upon Tower Hill, London, in the parish of All Hallows Barking together with my garden adjoining thereunto, only and for and during her natural life.
    After her decease I give and bequeath my fee simple of my said house and lease of my said garden &c. unto my two sons jointly together, by name Christopher and John Newport.
    If they die without issue then to my daughter Elizabeth &c. To my said daughter Elizabeth four hundred pounds (now employed in the East India Company), to be given her at her day of marriage or full age of twenty one years!
    To my daughter Jane five pounds in three months, and no more, in regard of many her great disobediences towards me and other misdemeanors, to my 'neat heart's gn [not legible].
    Item I give and bequeath unto my said two sons Christopher and John
    and to my said daughter Elizabeth, equally between them all and singular, my stock and adventure in general which I have in the Virginia Company &c.

    I make and ordain of this my last will and testament my loving wife Elizabeth and the Right Worshipful Sir Thomas Smith, knight, Governor of the East India Company, my full and whole executors.
    And I give to the said Sir Thomas Smith one diamond ring of the value of ten pounds of lawful English money.
    And as overseers I make and ordain my very good friends Mr. Matthias Springham and Mr. John Goodfellow, to each of whom I give a ring of forty shillings apiece. In Bantam Road this tenth of September 1617. (It appears that his son Christopher was then Master's Mate in the same ship. [9]
    Christofer Newport, Master's Mate of the Hope, 27 April 1618, proved 22 September 1618.

    A remembrance to the Hon. knight Sir Thomas Smith and to sundry friends (named). Among the gifts were Howes Chronicle, books of voyages, a jar of green ginger, a Cheshire cheese &c.
    To my loving mother Mrs. Elizabeth Newport one China box one Japan dish, three small China painted dishes &c. To my brother John Newporte a sword enlaid with silver, a pair of hangers and a small hoop ring of gold &c. To my sister Elizabeth Newport two pieces of branched damask, one red and one red and "yallowe" a China box, two gold rings one with a spark of a diamond and one with a garnet &c.
    To my aunt Amye Glunmeld (Glanville) one gold ring with garnet unset.
    To my kinswoman Elizabeth Gluufield (Glanville) one China box.
    To Elizabeth Chapell, Mr. Melson's daughter, one China box.
    To Dr. Meddowes preacher of God's word at Fanchurch six China dishes painted.
    To my sister Jane Newport ten pounds, conditionally that she have reformed her former course of life. But if she continue in her wonted courses then my will is that she have nothing.
    To my Aunt Johane Ravens ten pounds, in consideration of twenty four ryalls of eight remaining in my hands, which moneys I received of Henry Ravens deceased for her use, with an old silver cup.
    To Christofer Ravens (in consideration of a gift from his brother Henry Ravens).
    My linen, books and instruments belonging to the sea to be sold at the
    mast and the same registered in the purser's book.

    I give all to my brother John Newport and my sister Elizabeth Newport and I make them my executors.
    Aboard the Hope in the Road of Saldainin 27 April 1618. [8]
    Proved by John Newport, power reserved for Elizabeth Newport when she should come to seek it. Meade, 85. [8]

    [Next preceding the above will is the registered copy of the will of his cousin Henry Ravens to whom he refers. He also made his will on board of the Hope, as" Master. H. F. W.] [8]

    [Many references to Capt. Christopher Newport in "The Genesis of the United "States " will be pointed out by the Index. There is a sketch of him on pp. 956-958, of Sir Thomas Smith pp. 1012-1018, and of Mr. Matthias Spring- ham p. 1U22. Glunffield, I take to be Glanffield, i.e. Glanville. Sir Francis and Richard Glanville were members of the Va. Co. of London.— See p. 898. Mr. Melsou may be the Mr. Melshawe mentioned in the Va. Records, p. 178. Dr. James Meadows. Medust, etc.. p. 946, 982. In September, 1609, Henry Ravens, master's mate, and Thomas Wnittingham, cape merchant of " The Sea Venture," were sent after "The Tempest" from " the still-vex'd Bermoothes" for Virginia, and were never heard of again (p. 1053) in our records. He was probably of the same family as Henry Ravens, master of '< The Hope"; or as our earliest records are so incomplete, he may have survived the Bermudas voyage — and the master's mate of 1609 may have been the master of 1017. [8]

    Mr. John Newport, the only son and heir of Capt. Christopher Newport, at- tended the meetings of the Va. Co. of London, from time to time, during 1619-23, probably before and after. [8]

    On November 17, 1619, he desired the Virginia Court to lay out some of his land in Va. for him, and they wrote to Gov. Yeardley to do so. In the following February his mother sent six men to Virginia, at her charge, on board " The Jonathan." July 10, 1621, " upon the humble petition of Mrs. Newport, widow, the Va. Court ordered the Governor and Council in Va. to set out thirty-two shares of land in Va. heretofore bestowed upon Captain Christopher Newport, her late husband, deceased, in reward of his service, with an addition of three whole shares for the six men sent in " The Jonathan," in any place not already disposed of, which is commended to the care of Capt. Hamor, to see it done according to Mrs. Newport's desire." [8]

    On May 14, 1623, the Virginia Court confirmed the "32 shares to Mr. John Newport, descended unto him by the death of his father, Captain Christopher Newport, which confirmation having been read and approved in the preparative court, as also in the morning by the committee, was now put to the question and ordered to be sealed." [8]

    The exact location of these lands in Virginia is, I believe, still doubtful. As to New Port News, as yet I have seen no reason for changing the opinions ex pressed in The Genesis, pp. 95G, 958.— Alexander Brown, of Norwood, Va.} [8]

    Children

    It is possible that he had children by his first or second marriage. These would have been born in the 1585 or 1590 time frame. One is presently attached on WikiTree but without documentation:

    Molly Newport possibly Mary with a nickname Molly, married Bragg. Born, say 1586
    Four children are named in his will, and presumably all are children of his third marriage in 1595 to Elizabeth Glanville.

    [[Newport-623|John Newport, the surviving heir, claimed land in Virginia, born, say 1596
    Christopher Newport, III born England say 1598, named in will but died on the same East Indies voyage as his father.
    Jane, no record of marriage, virtually disinherited due to her lifestyle, born say 1600
    Elizabeth. Unmarried and under 21 when her father's will was written in 1618, therefore born after 1597, say 1602.
    In addition there is Marian Newport, married Hatcher, who was born about 1615, based on her age at death. She could have been the child of Christopher and Elizabeth, but is not named in his will. Is it possible that her father, on a long voyage, died before he learned of her birth?Day-1904 07:44, 7 July 2016 (EDT)

    Legacy

    Newport's legacy lives on in Virginia, where his name is most famously associated with the city of Newport News. On an unknown date, the Virginia Company granted Newport thirty-two shares of stock worth ą400. After he died, the grant was converted into 1,600 acres of land in Virginia, along with another 300 acres for six men whom his widow claimed as headrights in 1619. Presumably, the land was located in the area of present-day Newport News. Not all accounts of the origins of the city's name involve Newport, however. The captain's name was also given to Christopher Newport College (later University), founded in 1961 in Newport News.[2]

    Newport, Kentucky, was named in his honour.[8][1]

    Newport News Point (where the mouth of the James River joins the harbour of Hampton Roads) and the city of Newport News, Virginia, are widely believed to have been named for him, although this is disputed. Some scholars believe that it is more likely that it was named for settlers from Ireland with the surname of Neuce.[1]

    Christopher Newport University, in Newport News is named in honour of him. Captain Newport was portrayed by actors David Hemblen in Pocahontas: The Legend in 1999 and Christopher Plummer in Terrence Malick's 2005 film The New World, but did not appear in the 1995 Disney animated film or its 1998 direct-to-video sequel. In the Disney movies, his role is replaced by the villainous Governor Ratcliffe.[1]

    In 2005–2006 playwright Steven Breese wrote Actus Fidei (An Act of Faith), based on the life and times of Captain Christopher Newport, as part of the Jamestown 2007 Festival. This play received its world premiere in the Spring of 2007 at Christopher Newport University.[1]

    A biography on Captain Newport, by A. Bryant Nichols Jr., was published in 2007.[1]

    A statue commemorating Captain Newport was recently unveiled at his namesake University, CNU. The statue has been the subject of some controversy, as it depicts Newport with both hands, while it is historically documented that Newport lost one of his hands at sea. The creator of the statue says, in an interview, that we should "not remember our heroes as mutilated."[9][1]

    Great Grandson X 10 Brian Werner founder of Tiger Missing Link Foundation and its Tiger Creek Wildlife Refuge[1]

    Continuing the Newport leadership legacy, Christopher Newport, US Navy veteran was appointed to Chief of Staff for the City of Houston in 2014 - "one of the city's most powerful non-elected posts."[10][1]

    Sources

    ? 1.00 1.01 1.02 1.03 1.04 1.05 1.06 1.07 1.08 1.09 1.10 1.11 1.12 1.13 1.14 1.15 1.16 1.17 1.18 1.19 1.20 1.21 1.22 1.23 1.24 1.25 1.26 1.27 1.28 1.29 1.30 1.31 1.32 1.33 1.34 1.35 1.36 1.37 1.38 Christopher Newport. Wikipedia. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christopher_Newport. Accessed July 6, 2016
    ? 2.00 2.01 2.02 2.03 2.04 2.05 2.06 2.07 2.08 2.09 2.10 2.11 2.12 2.13 2.14 2.15 2.16 2.17 2.18 2.19 2.20 2.21 2.22 2.23 2.24 2.25 2.26 2.27 2.28 2.29 2.30 2.31 2.32 2.33 2.34 2.35 2.36 2.37 2.38 2.39 2.40 2.41 2.42 2.43 2.44 2.45 2.46 2.47 2.48 2.49 2.50 2.51 2.52 2.53 2.54 2.55 2.56 2.57 2.58 2.59 2.60 2.61 2.62 2.63 2.64 2.65 2.66 2.67 2.68 2.69 2.70 2.71 2.72 2.73 2.74 2.75 2.76 2.77 2.78 2.79 Salmon, John. "Christopher Newport (1561–after August 15, 1617)." Encyclopedia Virginia. Virginia Foundation for the Humanities, 7 Jun. 2016. Web. 6 Jul. 2016. First published: August 5, 2013 | Last modified: June 7, 2016. Contributed by John Salmon, historian for Virginia Civil War Trails, and author of The Official Virginia Civil War Battlefield Guide. He also helped author the National Park Service's Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail Feasibility Study and Environmental Assessment (2006). http://www.encyclopediavirginia.org/Newport_Christopher_1561-after_August_15_1617#start_entry
    ? Source: #S-339052704 APID: 1,3599::815268
    ? Source: #S-338632927 APID: 1,3578::33982743
    ? Source: #S-338528779 Page: Place: Jamestown, Virginia; Year: 1607; Page Number: 102 APID: 1,7486::1234599
    ? Source: #S-338528779 Page: Place: Virginia; Year: 1609-1610; Page Number: 16 APID: 1,7486::4107049
    ? Source: #S-333657433 APID: 1,1981::697
    ? 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 8.8 Genealogical gleanings in England. [Parts I-xxiii,xxv]" https://archive.org/stream/genealogicalglea02wate/genealogicalglea02wate_djvu.txt. Accessed July 6, 2016
    ? Meade, 92.
    Note: Christopher Newport
    http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=document&guid=1047ac5c-416c-4c8b-a270-20b2fbed75ea&tid=36450735&pid=1319
    Note: Christopher Newport
    http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=document&guid=24903259-ea1d-4784-910a-65542be074bb&tid=36450735&pid=1319
    WikiTree profile Newport-133 created through the import of Mock-Faulkenberry (3).ged on Jan 5, 2013 by Peggy Mock. See the Changes page for the details of edits by Peggy and others.
    UNKNOWN-242835 was created by Bill Sigmund through the import of Sigmund Family Tree.ged on Jul 1, 2014.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christopher_Newport (Indicates birth is 1561)
    Stephen, Sir Leslie, ed. Dictionary of National Biography, 1921–1922. Volumes 1–20, 22. London, England: Oxford University Press, 1921–1922 (Indicates that birth is est at 1565)
    Source: S-333657433 Repository: #R-898852530 Title: Dictionary of National Biography, Volumes 1-20, 22 Author: Ancestry.com Publication: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. APID: 1,1981::0
    Repository: R-898852530 Name: Ancestry.com
    Source: S-338528779 Repository: #R-898852530 Title: U.S. and Canada, Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1500s-1900s Author: Ancestry.com Publication: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc APID: 1,7486::0
    Source: S-338632927 Repository: #R-898852530 Title: Virginia, Compiled Census and Census Substitutes Index, 1607-1890 Author: Ancestry.com Publication: Ancestry.com Operations Inc APID: 1,3578::0
    Source: S-339052704 Repository: #R-898852530 Title: American Genealogical-Biographical Index (AGBI) Author: Godfrey Memorial Library, comp. Publication: Ancestry.com Operations Inc APID: 1,3599::0
    Source: S-339064341 Repository: #R-898852530 Title: Ancestry Family Trees Publication: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members. Page: Ancestry Family Tree Data: Text: http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=62215837&pid=513

    Wikipedia References

    [1]Fiske, John (1900). Old Virginia and Her Neighbours, p. 58. Houghton, Mifflin & Co. [2]Captain John Smith". Jamestowne Society website. Archived from the original on 5 July 2007. Retrieved 14 August 2007. Link expired, 2006-12-31 version. [3]a b Fiske (1900), p. 98. [4]a b http://memory.loc.gov/learn//features/timeline/colonial/jamestwn/observe.html [5] http://www.ghotes.net/descendants/captain_thomas_graves.htm [6]http://www.jstor.org/pss/1920592 [7]Fiske (1900), pp. 146–49. [8]Commonwealth of Kentucky. Office of the Secretary of State. Land Office. "Newport, Kentucky". Accessed 4 September 2013. [9]Hariwch: Remembering a hero, retrieved 8 September 2007 [10]http://www.houstonchronicle.com/news/politics/houston/article/Mayor-reshuffles-top-staff-5329270.php

    Further reading (Wikipedia)

    A. Bryant Nichols Jr., Captain Christopher Newport: Admiral of Virginia, Sea Venture, 2007
    David A. Price, Love and Hate in Jamestown: John Smith, Pocahontas, and the Start of A New Nation, Alfred A. Knopf, 2003
    Breese, Steven, Actus Fidei, Steven Breese and Associates, 2007
    Smith, John, The Generall Historie of Virginia ["G.H." London, 1623].

    Wingfield, Jocelyn R., Virginia's True Founder: Edward Maria Wingfield, etc., [Charleston, 2007, ISBN 978-1-4196-6032-0].
    Further Reading Recommended by Salmon

    Andrews, Kenneth R. Elizabethan Privateering: English Privateering During the Spanish War, 1585–1603. London: Cambridge University Press, 1964.
    Hakluyt, Richard. The Principall Navigations, Voiages, and Discoveries of the English Nation. London: 1589, 11: 34–39.
    Horn, James. A Land as God Made It: Jamestown and the Birth of America. New York: Basic Books, 2005.
    Ransome, David R. "Newport, Christopher." American National Biography. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999, 16: 354–355.
    Rountree, Helen C. Pocahontas, Powhatan, and Opechancanough: Three Indian Lives Changed by Jamestown. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2005.
    CHRISTOPHER NEWPORTE was born in 1563 in Boynton, Yorkshire, England, to DOROTHY JANE HATTON and CHRISTOPHER NEWPORTE.

    He married Katherine Proctor and they had one daughter together.

    Mary NEWPORTE 1585–


    He also had one daughter with Ellen Adey.

    Jane NEWPORTE 1594–


    He also had three sons and two daughters with ELIZABETH GLAUFIELD.

    Elizabeth NEWPORTE 1595–1700

    Joseph NEWPORTE 1599–

    MARIAN NEWPORTE 1611–1646

    William NEWPORTE 1612–

    John NEWPORTE 1614–

    He died August 16, 1617 in Bantam, Java at the age of 53.

    Burial: Buried at sea. https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=71450407

    Occupation: Sailor, privateer, ship owner and ship captain, explorer

    Admiral of Virginia and founder of Jamestown and the American Dream

    As a young man, Christopher Newport sailed with Sir Francis Drake in the daring attack on the Spanish fleet at Cadiz and participated in England's defeat of the Spanish Armada. During the war with Spain, Newport seized fortunes of Spanish and Portuguese treasure in fierce sea battles in the West Indies as a privateer for Queen Elizabeth I. He led more attacks on Spanish shipping and settlements than any other English privateer. After leading his men aboard an enemy ship off the coast of Cuba, his right arm was "strooken off", and Newport was referred to thereafter as, "Christopher Newport of the one hand."

    As Admiral of Virginia, Newport led the fleet of colonists who established the first permanent English settlement in the New World. He chose the site for Jamestown, led the initial exploration for King James, and negotiated peacefully with Chief Powhatan's Indian tribes. Newport repeatedly rescued the colonists from famine with four resupply voyages. When the Sea Venture was shipwrecked on Bermuda during a hurricane, Newport organized 150 colonists to build two new vessels for their deliverance to Jamestown.

    http://www.captainchristophernewport.com/

    Christopher Newport was an English privateer, ship captain, and adventurer who helped to establish the first permanent English colony in North America at Jamestown in 1607. Born the son of a shipmaster on the east coast of England, he worked in the commercial shipping trade and, beginning in 1585, as a privateer, or sanctioned pirate, in the war between England and Spain. His assistance in the capture of the Spanish ship Madre de Dios in 1592 won him such wealth and prestige that in 1606 the Virginia Company of London appointed him leader of the voyage to the newly chartered colony. In the first few months, he played a key role in negotiating between Virginia's often-fractious leaders. He also sailed between the colony and England, carrying news and delivering precious supplies. In 1608, he participated in an unsuccessful "coronation" of the Indian chief Powhatan, who refused to submit himself to the English. In 1609, as captain of the Sea Venture, Newport was shipwrecked off the islands of Bermuda, arriving in Virginia the next spring. Newport left the Virginia Company's employment in 1612 and entered the service of the East India Company. He died in Banten (Bantam), Java, sometime after August 15, 1617.

    Time Line:

    December 29, 1561 - Christopher Newport is christened at Harwich, England. He is the son of Christopher Newport, a shipmaster.

    1580 - Christopher Newport jumps ship at Bahia, Brazil, while serving on the Minion of London.

    October 19, 1584 - Christopher Newport marries Katherine Proctor.

    1587 - Christopher Newport serves as a privateer against the Spanish for English merchants. He is a master's mate on John Watts's ship the Drake during an attack on the Spanish port city of Câadiz.

    1589 - Christopher Newport is the master of the ship the Margaret, of London, the property of merchant Robert Cobb and others.

    1590 - Christopher Newport marries Ellen Ade after his first wife, Katherine Proctor Newport, dies.

    1591 - Christopher Newport, again sailing for John Watts, is promoted to captain of the Little John. He makes his first privateering trip to the Caribbean and loses his right arm while engaging two Spanish treasure ships off Cuba. He also takes part in the Barbary Coast trade.

    1592–1595 - Christopher Newport is made captain of the Golden Dragon, owned by John Moore, and sails in the West Indies.

    1592 - Christopher Newport commands a flotilla of privateers and attacks Spanish towns in the Caribbean. Near the Azores, he helps to capture the very rich Spanish ship Madre de Dios and sails it back to England.

    1595 - Christopher Newport marries Elizabeth Glanville, a London goldsmith's daughter. Soon after, he partners with her brothers and others as one-sixth owner of the heavily armed ship the Neptune.

    1595–1603 - As captain of the ship the Neptune, Christopher Newport raids Spanish towns in the Caribbean.

    1604 - Christopher Newport's privateering career ends when a peace agreement is signed between England and Spain.

    1604–1605 - Christopher Newport leads trading voyages in the Caribbean.

    1606 - Christopher Newport receives a post as a master of the Royal Navy. The Virginia Company of London gives him command of its first fleet to sail to Virginia.

    December 20, 1606 - Three ships carrying 104 settlers sail from London bound for Virginia. Christopher Newport captains the Susan Constant, Bartholomew Gosnold the Godspeed, and John Ratcliffe the Discovery.

    April 26, 1607 - Jamestown colonists first drop anchor in the Chesapeake Bay, and after a brief skirmish with local Indians, begin to explore the James River.

    May 21–27, 1607 - Captain Christopher Newport, Captain John Smith, George Percy, and others explore the James River, making mostly friendly contact with the Kecoughtans, the Paspaheghs, the Quiyoughcohannocks, and the Appamattucks.

    May 26, 1607 - While Christopher Newport and a party of colonists explore the James River, an alliance of five Algonquian-speaking Indian groups—the Quiyoughcohannocks, the Weyanocks, the Appamattucks, the Paspaheghs, and the Chiskiacks—attacks Jamestown, wounding ten and killing two.

    June 22, 1607 - Christopher Newport departs from Jamestown for England, carrying a letter to the Virginia Company of London that exaggerates the Virginia colony's commercial possibilities.

    August 12, 1607 - Christopher Newport arrives in London.

    January 2, 1608 - John Smith returns to Jamestown after being held captive by Powhatan. Only thirty-eight colonists survive, Smith's seat on the Council is occupied by Gabriel Archer, and the Council accuses Smith of killing his companions. Smith is sentenced to hang, but the charge is dropped when Christopher Newport arrives with the first supplies from England.

    February 1608 - Christopher Newport and John Smith visit Powhatan, the paramount chief of Tsenacomoco, at his capital, Werowocomoco. Powhatan feeds them and their party lavishly, and Newport presents the chief with a suit of clothing, a hat, and a greyhound. The English continue upriver to visit Opechancanough at the latter's request.

    April 10, 1608 - Aboard the John and Francis, Christopher Newport leaves Jamestown for England. Among those with him are Gabriel Archer, Edward Maria Wingfield, and the Indian Namontack.

    May 21, 1608 - Christopher Newport arrives at Blackwell, England, having sailed from Virginia.

    September 1608 - Christopher Newport returns from England with a plan to improve relations with Virginia Indians by bestowing on Powhatan various gifts and formally presenting him with a decorated crown. The subsequent crowning is made awkward by Powhatan's refusal to kneel, and relations sour.

    December 1608 - Christopher Newport returns to England from Jamestown accompanied by the Indian Machumps. John Smith, meanwhile, attempts to trade for food with Indians from the Nansemonds to the Appamattucks, but on Powhatan's orders they refuse.

    Mid-January 1609 - Christopher Newport arrives in London.

    May 23, 1609 - The Crown approves a second royal charter for the Virginia Company of London. It replaces the royal council with private corporate control, extends the colony's boundaries to the Pacific Ocean, and installs a governor, Sir Thomas West, twelfth baron De La Warr, to run operations in Virginia.

    June 2, 1609 - The largest fleet England has ever amassed in the West—nine ships, 600 passengers, and livestock and provisions to last a year—leaves England for Virginia. Led by the flagship Sea Venture, the fleet's mission is to save the failing colony. Sir Thomas

    Birth: Dec., 1561
    Greater London, England
    Death: Aug., 1617, Indonesia

    Per Wikipedia: "He is best known as the captain of the Susan Constant, the largest of three ships which carried settlers for the Virginia Company in 1607 on the way to find the settlement at Jamestown in the Virginia Colony, which became the first permanent English settlement in North America. He was also in overall command of the other two ships on that initial voyage, in order of their size, the Godspeed and the Discovery".

    h/o Katherine Proctor, Ellen Ade, Elizabeth Glaufield & possibly one more wife.

    f/o Mary "Molly" Bragg via Katherine, Christopher & Jane via Ellen & Elizabeth, Joseph, John, William & Marian Hatcher via Elizabeth. But I've read that Christopher, Jane, Elizabeth & John were the only children mentioned in his will.


    Family links:
    Children:
    Christopher Newport (1597 - 1617)*
    Marian Newport Hatcher (1611 - 1646)*

    *Calculated relationship

    Burial:
    Non-Cemetery Burial
    Specifically: Buried at sea.

    Created by: DMLeForce
    Record added: Jun 15, 2011
    Find A Grave Memorial# 71450407

    end of biography

    Birth:
    Christopher Newport was born in Limehouse, an important trading port on the River Thames in December 1561.

    Christopher married Katherine Proctor 19 Oct 1584, Harwich, Essex, England. Katherine was born ~ 1566, England; died 0___ 1599, Shropshire, England. [Group Sheet]

    Notes:

    Residence (Family):
    ...took charge of the ship Susan Constant, and on the 1606-1607 voyage, she carried 71 colonists, all male, one of whom was John Smith.

    Children:
    1. Molly Newport was born 25 Mar 1585, London, Middlesex, England; died James City County, Virginia.
    2. John Newport
    3. Christopher Newport, III

    Christopher — Elizabeth Glanville. Elizabeth was born 8 Jun 1568, Winchester, Hampshire, England; died Aft 1615. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. Marian Newport was born 0___ 1615, Greater London, Middlesex, England; died 0___ 1646, Virginia.

Generation: 2