Sir George Wyatt

Male 1550 - Bef 1625  (~ 74 years)


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  1. 1.  Sir George Wyatt was born 0___ 1550, Allington Castle, Maidstone, Kent, England (son of Thomas Wyatt and Jane Haute); died Bef 1625, Ireland; was buried Boxley, Kent, England.

    Notes:

    George Wyatt aka Wiat
    Born 1550 in Allington Castle, Maidstone, Kent County, England
    ANCESTORS ancestors
    Son of Thomas Wyatt and Jane (Haute) Wyatt
    Brother of Thomas Wyatt, Edward Wyatt, Carolus Wyatt, Richard Wyatt, Henry Wyatt, Charles Wyatt, Anne (Wyatt) Twisden, Arthur Wyatt, Jane Wyatt, Abb Wyatt, Ursula Wyatt, Frances Wyatt, Jocosa Wyatt, Henry Wyatt, Jethro Wyatt and Joan Wyatt
    Husband of Jane (Finch) Wyatt — married 8 Oct 1582 in Eastwell, Kent
    DESCENDANTS descendants
    Father of Joan Wyatt, Katherine Wyatt, Francis Wyatt, Eleanor Wyatt, Anne Wyatt, Hawte Wyatt, Margaret Wyatt, Henry Wyatt, George Wyatt, Thomas Wyatt, Isabel (Wyatt) Page and Jane Wyatt
    Died before 1 Sep 1624 in Ireland

    Biography

    Sir George Wyatt was born about 1550 in Allington Castle, Maidstone, Kent County, England, the son of Thomas Wyatt and Jane (Haute) Wyatt. [1] He was the brother of Thomas Wyatt, Edward Wyatt, Carolus Wyatt, Richard Wyatt, Henry Wyatt, Charles Wyatt, Anne Wyatt, Arthur Wyatt, Jane Wyatt, Abb Wyatt, Frances Wyatt, Joan Wyatt, Jethro Wyatt, Henry Wyatt, Jocosa Wyatt and Ursula Wyatt.[2] [3] George's father led the unsuccessful Wyatt's rebellion in 1554, was imprisoned in the Tower of London and was executed in 1554.

    George was admitted to Grays’ Inn when 17. At the age of 18, he married. Sir George married Jane Finch, the daughter of Sir Thomas Finch, on October 8, 1582 in Eastwell, Kent. They had the following children: [4]

    Francis Wyatt,
    Eleanor Wyatt,
    Hawte Wyatt,
    Henry Wyatt,
    George Wyatt,
    Thomas Wyatt[2]
    In 1571 George and his family were restored in blood and arms after having been deprived of them in consequence of Bill of Attainment and execution of his father.

    Sir George was a sixteenth-century writer. He was the first biographer of Henry VIII's second queen, Anne Boleyn. His grandfather, Thomas Wyatt the Elder, had been a cousin and early admirer of Anne's.[5]

    Sir George died September 16, 1623 in Ireland. He was buried at St Mary the Virgin and All Saints Churchyard, Boxley, Maidstone Borough, Kent, England[2]

    Sources

    ? Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families Vol IV, page 383 #16
    ? 2.0 2.1 2.2 Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families
    ? Faris, David. Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists. Baltimore, MD, USA: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1996
    ? Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families Vol IV, page 383 #16
    ? Wikipedia: George Wyatt
    See also:

    Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, (2011), Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, Royal Ancestry series, 2nd edition, 4 vols., ed. Kimball G. Everingham, (Salt Lake City, Utah: the author, 2011), volume IV, page 383, #16.
    Richardson, Douglas, and Kimball G. Everingham. Royal Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families. Vol. V. Salt Lake City, UT.: Douglas Richardson., 2013. Pages 412, 413.

    end of biography

    Buried:
    at St Mary the Virgin and All Saints Churchyard

    George married Jane Finch 8 Oct 1582, Eastwell, Kent, England. Jane was born 0___ 1555; died 27 Mar 1644. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. Hawte Wyatt was born ~ 4 Jun 1594, Allington Castle, Maidstone, Kent, England; died ~31 Jul 1638.

Generation: 2

  1. 2.  Thomas WyattThomas Wyatt was born ~ 1522, Allington Castle, Maidstone, Kent, England (son of Thomas Wyatt, Knight and Elizabeth Brooke); died 11 Apr 1554, Tower Hill, London, England.

    Notes:

    Sir Thomas "Rebel, The Younger, Traitor" Wyatt
    Born about 1522 in Allington Castle, Maidstone, Kent County, Englandmap
    Son of Thomas Wyatt and Elizabeth (Brooke) Warner
    Brother of Ann Wyatt [half], Walter Wyatt [half], Charles Wyatt [half], Henry Warner [half] and Edward Warner [half]
    Husband of Jane (Haute) Wyatt — married 1537 [location unknown]
    Father of Edward Wyatt, Thomas Wyatt, Carolus Wyatt, Richard Wyatt, Henry Wyatt, Charles Wyatt, Anne (Wyatt) Twisden, Arthur Wyatt, Jane Wyatt, Abb Wyatt, George Wyatt, Frances Wyatt, Henry Wyatt, Jethro Wyatt, Joan Wyatt, Jocosa Wyatt and Ursula Wyatt
    Died 11 Apr 1554 in Tower Hill, London, Middlesex, Englandmap
    Profile managers: April Dauenhauer private message [send private message] and Lindsay Coleman private message [send private message]
    Wyatt-244 created 18 Feb 2011 | Last modified 6 Nov 2016


    Categories: Magna Carta | Malet-18 Descendants.

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    The Wyatt Rebellion of 1554

    The fear of England becoming re-Catholicised combined with the proposed marriage between Mary and Philip of Spain, led to the Wyatt Rebellion of 1554. This was a rebellion led by nobles – principally Sir Thomas Wyatt from Kent, Sir Peter Carew from Devon, Sir James Croft from Herefordshire and the Duke of Suffolk from Leicestershire. However, it had one major weakness – it did not have the popular support of the people across the land and was doomed to failure.

    There were those in England who opposed Mary’s staunch Catholicism and who feared the return of Papal authority in England and Wales. These men were equally alarmed by Mary’s proposed marriage to Philip of Spain, as they feared that this would lead to Spain having an undue influence on English politics. France who could not countenance a Habsburg king of England, with all that it might entail, shared this fear. With the Holy Roman Empire to the east and with Habsburg Spain on her southwest border, the last thing France wanted was an extension of Habsburg influence across the Channel.

    After her coronation on October 1st 1553, Mary quickly placed Catholics in posts of responsibility, including increasing the numbers in the Privy Council to 43. The Privy Council was the most important body in government and the senior nobles in it had easy access to the Queen.

    The plan itself involved too many ‘ifs’ and ‘buts’ if it was to succeed. The noble conspirators planned to remove Mary, instate Elizabeth as Queen and arrange for her to marry Edward Courtenay – a man Mary had already rejected as a husband.

    The plan was for three rebellions to take place in separate parts of the country. They would occur at the same time – in the Midlands, the West Country and Kent. The plan was that the government would not know which one to put down first and each would blossom as a result of their localised success and attract more and more supporters among the common people.

    The French Navy would blockade the English Channel with eighty ships so that the Habsburgs would not be able to help Mary.

    The plan failed miserably. The Imperial Ambassador, Simon Renard, had heard rumours that such a plot existed and informed the Lord Chancellor, Stephen Gardner, of his concerns. Gardner brought in Courtenay for questioning as Renard had mentioned his name. The records stated that Gardner’s questioning was ‘robust’ and Courtenay was not a man who could stand up to this. Edward Courtenay told Gardner all that he knew about the plot so that the government knew about the plot even before it had begun – even if Courtenay would not have known about the details.

    The ‘uprisings’ in the Midlands and the West Country were a failure as few of the people there gave Carew and the Duke of Suffolk the support they needed for success. It seems that though there was concern about Mary marrying a foreigner, loyalty to the Queen took precedence. Those in the Midlands did not want to commit treason (Suffolk raised a force of just 140 men) while many in the West were Catholic.

    Wyatt succeeded in raising an army in Kent of about 4,000 men and his proximity to London greatly worried the government there. A force led by the Duke of Norfolk was sent to deal with Wyatt but this collapsed when Wyatt was helped when 500 government troops deserted to his cause. Norfolk and what was left of his force retreated to London.

    There can be little doubt that there were those outside of noble circles who were gravely concerned by the thought of Mary marrying Philip and it was these people who joined Wyatt. At a trial held after the rebellion had failed, one rebel is recorded t have stated that the rebellion was “to prevent us from over-running with strangers”.

    However, Wyatt delayed his advance on London and gave the city time to organise its defences. His attempts to cross the River Thames near to the Tower were thwarted as the bridges had been deliberately damaged to stop this.

    Wyatt marched to the southwest of London and crossed the Thames there. He marched his men to what is now Hyde Park Corner and made for the City. To get into the City, Wyatt had planned to get in via Ludgate. However, the gate was heavily fortified and to get to it, the rebels had to move up narrow streets (via the Stand and Fleet Street). By using these narrow streets, Wyatt left his men open to being trapped by armed Londoners loyal to Mary. This is what happened and he was defeated.

    Wyatt was sent to the Tower of London, as were the other noblemen who were caught. Their guilt was obvious. Those rebels who were not killed were arrested. In fact, so many were caught that the authorities had nowhere to put them (in terms of prison space) and had to use local churches.

    Mary ordered that the offenders should be harshly dealt with. However, not all of her advisors shared this view. Mary listened to those advisors who suggested that leniency for the rebels would be the best way forward and would demonstrate her true Christian nature. She was told that this would raise her status still further in the eyes of the people.

    Only two of the leaders were executed for their treason – Wyatt and the Duke of Suffolk. Other minor nobles were also executed but some – guilty of treason – were spared. In total about 90 rebels were executed but many of the common people who had joined Wyatt and survived were spared. Two other casualties were Lady Jane Grey and her husband Guildford Dudley. Both had been in prison since the failed attempt to put Lady Jane on the throne and had nothing to do with Wyatt’s rebellion. However Mary felt that she could no longer risk anyone rallying to Lady Jane’s cause – hence her execution – especially as her father, the Duke of Suffolk, had been involved in this plot and had been executed for treason.

    It is thought that Wyatt was tortured so that he would admit that Princess Elizabeth was involved in the rebellion. This he refused to admit to and he made it clear on the scaffold just before he was executed that she was innocent of any involvement in the rebellion. When a government official at the execution tried to contradict Wyatt’s statement, the people who had gathered at Tower Hill greeted his comments with anger as the final words of a condemned man were always seen as being truthful.

    Princess Elizabeth was briefly imprisoned in the Tower but was quickly released.

    Did the rebellion have any chance of success? The rebellion started in the worst month in terms of weather – January – though it had been planned to start in March. The roads they planned to use to transport both men and equipment had become unusable due to the rain. Carriages carrying equipment from Kent to London lost their wheels on route to the city and the rebels had to leave behind equipment that might have helped them in London. Wyatt’s route into London was also fraught with difficulties for an attacking force. The roads in the City were narrow and made it very easy for a relatively small force to defend the imposing gates that surrounded the old City. If Wyatt and his men could not get through these gates, he would not have been able to get into the city itself. Therefore, the heart of government – capturing it was his goal – was safe. Another major weakness of the plot was the fact that it required all three uprisings to succeed if the authorities were going to be split in terms of where to deploy the military. If one failed, this became less of an issue for the government; if two failed, then the success of the rebellion rested on just one of the three uprisings. Secrecy was also a major issue in explaining the rebel’s failure. So many nobles were involved that leakages were almost certain – and this is what happened. While Gardner may not have been able to control events, he knew what was going to occur and could plan accordingly – hence the deliberate destruction of the bridges over the Thames near the City; hence the deployment of troops at Ludgate. The only thing Gardner failed to succeed in was his efforts to get Wyatt to admit that Elizabeth was involved.

    Marriage and Issue

    Sir Thomas Wyatt married Jane (or Joan) Haute in 1537.[1]

    They had six sons and four daughters.[2]

    Known sons:

    Richard[3]
    Charles[4]
    Arthur[5]
    Henry[6]
    Thomas[7]
    George[8]
    Known daughters:

    Joyce
    Ursula[9]
    Anne[10]
    Jane[11]
    Unproven Children of Sir Thomas Wyatt

    Edward
    Carolus
    Abb
    Frances
    Joan
    Jethro
    Henry
    Jocosa
    Sources

    ? 'Royal Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, vol. 5, p 412
    ? 'Royal Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, vol. 5, p 412
    ? 'Royal Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, vol. 5, p 412
    ? 'Royal Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, vol. 5, p 412
    ? 'Royal Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, vol. 5, p 412
    ? 'Royal Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, vol. 5, p 412
    ? 'Royal Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, vol. 5, p 412
    ? 'Royal Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, vol. 5, p 412
    ? 'Royal Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, vol. 5, p 412
    ? 'Royal Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, vol. 5, p 412
    ? 'Royal Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, vol. 5, p 412
    See also:
    Richardson, Douglas, and Kimball G. Everingham. Royal Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families. Vol. V. Salt Lake City, UT.: Douglas Richardson., 2013. Vol. V, Page 412.
    Magna Carta Ancestry: A study in Colonial and Medieval Families, Richardson, Douglas, (Kimball G. Everingham, editor. 2nd edition, 2011), vol. 4 p. 383 #15, record for Thomas Wyatt.
    Plantagenet Ancestry: A study in Colonial and Medieval Families, Richardson, Douglas, (Kimball G. Everingham, editor. 2nd edition, 2011), vol. 3 p. 531 #18, record for Thomas Wyatt.
    Complete Baronetage, 1611-1880 (1900-1906), Cokayne, George Edward, (5 volumes. Exeter [England]: W. Pollard, 1900-1906), FHL book 942 D22cg., vol. 1 p. 74.

    end

    Thomas — Jane Haute. Jane was born 0___ 1522; died Aft 1583, Maidstone, Kent, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 3.  Jane Haute was born 0___ 1522; died Aft 1583, Maidstone, Kent, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Joan Haute

    Children:
    1. 1. George Wyatt was born 0___ 1550, Allington Castle, Maidstone, Kent, England; died Bef 1625, Ireland; was buried Boxley, Kent, England.


Generation: 3

  1. 4.  Thomas Wyatt, KnightThomas Wyatt, Knight was born 0___ 1503, Allington Castle, Maidstone, Kent, England (son of Henry Wyatt and Anne Skinner); died 6 Oct 1542, Sherborne, Dorset, England; was buried Sherborne, Dorset, England.

    Notes:

    Sir Thomas "The elder, the poet" Wyatt
    Born 1503 in Allington Castle, Maidstone, Kent County, Englandmap
    Son of Henry Wyatt and Anne (Skinner) Wyatt
    Brother of Margaret (Wyatt) Lee
    Husband of Elizabeth (Brooke) Warner — married 1520 [location unknown]
    Father of Thomas Wyatt, Ann Wyatt, Walter Wyatt and Charles Wyatt
    Died 1542 in Clifton Maybank House, Dorset, Englandmap
    Profile managers: Katherine Patterson private message [send private message], Lindsay Coleman private message [send private message], Donald Gradeless private message [send private message], and Brian Williams private message [send private message]
    Wyatt-247 created 18 Feb 2011 | Last modified 11 Sep 2016

    Biography

    b. by 1504, 1st s. of Sir Henry Wyatt of Allington Castle by Anne, daughter of John Skinner of Reigate, Surrey.

    Education: St. John’s, Camb. BA 1518, MA 1520.

    married by 1521, Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Brooke, 8th Lord Cobham, 1s. Sir Thomas II; 2s. illegit. by Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Edward Darrell of Littlecote, Wilts.; 1 daughter (?illegit.). Knghted. ?28 Mar. 1535. suc. father 10 Nov. 1536.[1]

    Esquire of the body by 1524; clerk of the King’s jewels 21 Oct. 1524; marshal, Calais by Sept. 1529-24 Nov. 1530; sewer extraordinary by 1533; sheriff, Kent 1536-7; ambassador to the Emperor 1537-40; Councillor by 1540-d.; commr. sewers, Kent 1540; steward, manor of Maidstone, Kent Mar. 1542.[2]

    Lady Elizabeth was first married to Sir Edward WARNER. At twelve years of age Thomas was admitted of St. John's College, Cambridge. He graduated there B.A. in 1518, and M.A. in 1520. As a boy he had made the acquaintance of Anne Boleyn, and long after the date of his marriage Wyatt was regarded as her lover. [Anne Boleyn had begun an affair with Henry Percy. Cardinal Wolsey put a stop to the romance, which could be why Anne engendered such a hatred of him later in life. The romance between Anne and Percy ended in 1522 and the King didn't notice Anne until 1526. Somewhere in this time, Anne also had a relationship of some sort with the poet Sir Thomas Wyatt. Wyatt was married in 1520, so the timing of the supposed affair is uncertain. Wyatt was separated from his wife, but there could be little suggestion of his eventual marriage to Anne. Theirs appears to be more of a courtly love. However, on May 2, 1536, Queen Anne was arrested at Greenwich and was informed of the charges against her: adultery, incest and plotting to murder the King. There were several more arrests. Sir Francis Weston and William Brereton were charged with adultery with the Queen. Sir Thomas Wyatt was also arrested, but later released.] Sir Thomas d. 1542 at Sherborne in Dorset; buried 11 October 1542 in the great church of Sherborne.

    Name

    Thomas Wyatt[3][4][5][6][7]
    Thomas Wyatt, the Poet
    Thomas Wyatt Knight 1503-1542
    Title

    Sir
    Birth

    1503 Maidstone, Kent, England[4][5][6]
    1503 Allington Castle, Boxley, Kent, England
    Marriage

    1521
    Wife: Elizabeth Brooke
    Child: Thomas Wyatt
    Education

    BA, 1518, St John's College, Cambridge; MA, 1520
    Occupation

    Poet; knighted 18 Mar 1536/7; Sheriff of Kent, 1537; ambassador to Spain
    Residence

    Oxford, Oxfordshire, England[3]
    Death

    6 Oct 1542 Sherbourne, Devon, England[4][5]
    10 OCT 1542 Sherborne, Dorset, England
    11 OCT 1542 Sherbourne, Dorset, England
    Burial

    11 OCT 1544 Sherborne Abbey, Doset
    Notes

    Allington Castle Postcard
    thomaswyattelder
    Allington Castle Postcard
    Wikipedia entry for Sir Thomas Wyatt the Elder
    Sir Thomas Wyatt
    Wikipedia entry for Sir Thomas Wyatt the Elder
    Admitted St John's College Cambridge at age 12
    Received B.A. degree at age 16
    Ambassador to Emperor Charles V
    Introduced the sonnet to English Poetry
    Poems and Satire published after his death.
    Thomas Wyatt of Allington Castle, Kent
    Sources

    Source: Richardson, Douglas; Everingham, Kimball G., Editor. Royal Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families. Vol. V, pg 411. Salt Lake City, Utah. 2013.
    Brydges, Samuel. The British Bibliographer (London, 1810) Vol. 1, Page 405
    Ancestry Family Trees (Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com) Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members. http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=15024057&pid=2466
    Library of Congress Photo Collection, 1840-2000 Various photo collections from the Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Washington D.C.
    http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=sse&db=locphotos&h=251277&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt
    Residence: USA
    Venn, John Alumni Cantabrigienses (Cambridge University Press, 1922)
    http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=sse&db=alumni6&h=78283&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt
    Birth: 1503
    Chalmers, Alexander. The General Biographical Dictionary (J. Nichols and Son, London, 1812-1)
    http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=sse&db=chalmersbiogdict&h=8955&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt
    Birth: 1503. Death: 1541
    Foster, Joseph, Alumni Oxonienses (Parker and Co., 1892)
    http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=sse&db=oxfordalum&h=259341&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt
    Residence: Oxford, Oxfordshire, England
    The Millennium File (Heritage Consulting, Salt Lake City, UT, USA)
    http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=sse&db=millind&h=10074382&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt
    Birth: 1503 Maidstone, Kent, England.
    Death: 6 Oct 1542 Sherbourne, Devon, England.
    Sir Thomas Wyatt, I (by 1504-42), of Allington Castle, Kent. Published in The History of Parliament: the House of Commons 1509-1558, ed. S.T. Bindoff, 1982; Available from Boydell and Brewer

    end

    Buried:
    at Sherbourne Abbey

    Died:
    in Clifton Maybank House, Dorset, England

    Thomas married Elizabeth Brooke 0___ 1520. Elizabeth (daughter of Thomas Brooke and Dorothy Heydon) was born 0___ 1503; died 0Aug 1560, Cobham, Kent, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 5.  Elizabeth Brooke was born 0___ 1503 (daughter of Thomas Brooke and Dorothy Heydon); died 0Aug 1560, Cobham, Kent, England.

    Notes:

    Elizabeth Brooke (1503–1560) was the wife of Thomas Wyatt, the poet, and the mother of Thomas Wyatt the younger who led Wyatt's Rebellion against Mary I. Her parents were Thomas Brooke, 8th Baron Cobham and Dorothy Heydon, the daughter of Sir Henry Heydon.[1] She was the sister of George Brooke, 9th Baron Cobham and was considered a possible candidate for the sixth wife of Henry VIII of England.

    Marriage and issue
    Elizabeth married twice.

    First Marriage

    Sir Thomas Wyatt, (1503–1542) Hans Holbein the Younger
    In 1520, Elizabeth married Sir Thomas Wyatt (1503-6 Oct 1542) and a year later, bore him a son:[1][3]

    Sir Thomas (1521–1554), who led an unsuccessful rebellion against Mary I in 1554. The aim of the rebellion was to replace the Catholic Queen Mary with her Protestant half-sister, Elizabeth.[4]

    Sir Thomas Wyatt (1521–1554)
    Early in the marriage, marital difficulties arose, with Wyatt claiming they were 'chiefly' her fault. He repudiated her as an adulteress, although there is no record linking her with any specific man. Elizabeth separated from Thomas Wyatt in 1526 and he supported her until around 1537, when he refused to do so any longer and sent her to live with her brother, Lord Cobham. In that same year, Lord Cobham attempted to force Wyatt to continue his financial support. He refused.[5] It wasn't until 1541, when Wyatt, accused of treason, was arrested and his properties confiscated, that the Brooke family was able to force a reconciliation as a condition for Wyatt’s pardon.[6]

    In a letter to Charles V, the imperial ambassador, Eustace Chapuys wrote that Wyatt had been released from the Tower at the request of Catherine Howard. Chapuys noted that the king had imposed two conditions; that Wyatt 'confess his guilt' and that 'he should take back his wife from whom he had been separated upwards of 15 years, on pain of death if he be untrue to her henceforth.' [7][8] It is unclear, however, whether this provision was ever enforced. After pursuing Anne Boleyn, before her relationship with the King, Wyatt had begun a long-term affair with Elizabeth Darrell and he continued his association with his mistress.[6]

    On February 14, 1542 the night after Catherine Howard had been condemned to death for adultery, Henry VIII held a dinner for many men and women. The king was said to pay great attention to Elizabeth and to Anne Bassett and both were thought to be possible choices for his sixth wife.[2] In early 1542, more than a year before Wyatt’s death, Elizabeth Brooke's name appeared in Spanish dispatches as one of three ladies in whom Henry VIII was said to be interested as a possible sixth wife.[2]

    The imperial ambassador, Chapuys, wrote that the lady for whom the king 'showed the greatest regard was a sister of Lord Cobham, whom Wyatt, some time ago, divorced for adultery. She is a pretty young creature, with wit enough to do as badly as the others if she were to try.' It would appear that the ambassador was mistaken, as at the time, Elizabeth Brooke was nearly forty years old. It is probable that Elizabeth Brooke had been confused with her beautiful young niece, Elisabeth Brooke, the eldest daughter of George Brooke, 9th Baron Cobham, who married William Parr, 1st Marquess of Northampton. Elisabeth Brooke, Lord Cobham’s daughter, may have been at court on this occasion, since she was definitely there the following year. She would have been nearly sixteen in January 1542 and in later years was accounted one of the most beautiful women of her time. More important to a king who had just rid himself of a wife (Catherine Howard) who had committed adultery, this second Elisabeth had a spotless reputation.[6]

    Second marriage

    Following Wyatt’s death, Elizabeth Brooke married Sir Edward Warner (1511–1565), of Polstead Hall and Plumstead, Norfolk, Lord Lieutenant of the Tower. The couple had three sons:[9]

    Edward, who died in infancy
    Thomas
    Henry
    Warner was removed from his position on July 28, 1553, at the start of the reign of Mary I, and was arrested on suspicion of treason the following January at his house in Carter Lane when Thomas Wyatt the younger rebelled against the Crown. Warner was held for nearly a year. Elizabeth’s son was executed. Edward, the son she had with Warner, died young. Two other sons died in infancy. The family fortunes were restored under Elizabeth I and Warner reclaimed his post at the Tower of London. His wife died there in August 1560 and was buried within its precincts.[6]

    Ancestry[edit]
    [hide]Ancestors of Elizabeth Brooke (1503–1560)


    end of biography

    Children:
    1. 2. Thomas Wyatt was born ~ 1522, Allington Castle, Maidstone, Kent, England; died 11 Apr 1554, Tower Hill, London, England.


Generation: 4

  1. 8.  Henry Wyatt was born ~ 1460; died 10 Nov 1537; was buried Milton, Kent, England.

    Notes:

    Sir Henry Wyatt (1460-1537) was an English courtier.

    Early life to 1485

    A younger son of a Yorkshire family, little is known of Henry Wyatt before he adopted the cause of Henry Tudor, later to become king Henry VII. Many myths and assumptions have been woven around his privations in prison as a supporter of the Tudor party’s opposition to Richard III in the years 1483-85, and are still to be found recounted as facts. Some of them occur in the widely cited entry in the Dictionary of National Biography (c.1900, available online), s.v. Thomas Wyatt (poet), although the entry has since been modified by the 2004 Oxford Dictionary of National Biography.

    The Wyatt family papers in the British Library[1] contain material which provides the nearest that can be found to an authentic account of this period of his life. Recently transcribed and published in full, the relevant documents, although collated and written up in the 18th century, incorporate a self-contained narrative about Wyatt which can be dated to the mid 17th century. At this date the family was intent on reclaiming its former status after falling into disgrace with the execution and attainder of his grandson. The aim was to play up the glory days of Henry’s adherence to the Tudor cause, describing him inter alia as ‘his Country’s martyr’.[2]

    It is unknown why and in what precise capacity he came to act on behalf of the exiled Tudor, or how he came to be imprisoned. He appears to have had contacts among those close to the Scots king James III and may have been an intermediary in attempts to secure Scottish support for Henry Tudor’s invasion. Possibly he fell into the hands of ‘some Scottish baron with Yorkist sympathies, only to be released when Henry VII was securely on the throne, after a considerable period of cruel imprisonment, and on the promise of a huge ransom’.[3]

    His exploits in the Wyatt family papers include being ‘imprisoned often, once in a cold and narrow Tower’, where he would have starved but for the ministrations of a kindly cat who befriended him and brought him food. During his incarceration he suffered tortures involving the use of horse-barnacles and being force-fed mustard and vinegar. On one occasion ‘the Tyrant himself examined him’, trying unsuccessfully to persuade Wyatt to change sides. Eventually in 1485 he was released from imprisonment in Scotland and received the thanks of the newly crowned Henry VII. His first recorded grant was on 11 October 1485 when he was appointed keeper of Norwich castle and gaol.[2] A grant of Henry VIII on 22 August 1515 confirms that Wyatt still needed money to pay off his remaining Scottish ransom.[4]

    In a surviving letter[5] written a few months after Wyatt’s death, his son Thomas wrote that God had preserved his father ‘in prison from the handes of the tirant that could find in his hart to see him rakkid, from two yeres and more prisonment in Scotland in Irons and Stoks,’ and from other tribulations.

    The myth that he was imprisoned in the Tower of London finds its first appearance in 1702 on a stone tablet in Boxley church erected by Edwin Wyatt, Henry’s great-great-great-grandson. The claim is unlikely and finds no support in any records including those of the Tower of London authorities. Two reasons may account for the error. First, the association with Henry’s son and grandson, each of whom was thrown into the Tower under the Tudors. The second lies in the letter’s oblique reference to being racked, which may however be figurative rather than literal. Certainly the Wyatt family papers never mention the rack, as one would have expected them to, when describing the privations he suffered.[2]

    The 2004 Oxford DNB states that his support for Henry Tudor began before 1483, and that he probably participated in Buckingham's Rebellion. No evidentiary support is available for either statement. The entry continues, ‘Family legend has it that he was imprisoned and interrogated by Richard III himself.’[6] However, Richard III is never named by the Wyatt family. The assumption is derived from two instances of the word ‘tyrant’ applied to Wyatt’s captor, a term which in the 16th century could refer to ‘Anyone who acts in a cruel, violent, or wicked manner’.[7] More likely it referred to the Scottish baron postulated by Conway (above). Records show that Richard III never set foot in Scotland during his reign.[8]

    Life under the Tudors[edit]
    Wyatt’s close connections with Scotland came to the fore in his later career as Henry VII’s agent in that country,[9] for which there is ample evidence of his employment on secret and sensitive missions.[3]

    He assumed high places at court,[10] being admitted to the privy council, and remained high in the royal favour. He was one of Henry VII's executors, and one of Henry VIII's guardians. He was admitted to the privy council of the new king in April 1509, and became a knight of the Bath on 23 July of the same year. In 1511 he was made jointly with Sir Thomas Boleyn constable of Norwich Castle, and on 29 July of the same year was granted an estate, Maidencote, at Estgarstone in Berkshire. At the battle of the Spurs he served in the vanguard (16 August 1513).[10]

    Allington Castle[edit]
    He purchased in 1492 Allington Castle and its estate, near Maidstone in Kent, and made the place his principal residence. Henry VIII visited him there in 1527 to meet Wolsey on his return from the continent. Wyatt remained on good terms with Sir Thomas Boleyn, who resided at Hever Castle.[10] The proximity (about 20 miles) accounts for the meeting in a family setting of Sir Henry's poet son Thomas, and Sir Thomas's daughter Anne, the future queen, and the poetry in the courtly love tradition that resulted.[11]

    Marriage and issue[edit]
    About 1502 Wyatt married Anne Skinner, the daughter of John Skinner of Reigate, Surrey, by whom he had two sons and a daughter:[12]

    Sir Thomas Wyatt, who married Elizabeth Brooke, the daughter of Thomas Brooke, 8th Baron Cobham, by Dorothy Heydon, daughter of Sir Henry Heydon and Elizabeth or Anne Boleyn, daughter of Sir Geoffrey Boleyn[13]
    Henry Wyatt, assumed to have died an infant.[14]
    Margaret Wyatt, who married Sir Anthony Lee (d.1549), by whom she was the mother of Queen Elizabeth's champion, Sir Henry Lee[15]
    Death[edit]
    Wyatt died on 10 November 1537, and, in accordance with the directions in his will, was buried at Milton, near Gravesend.[10]

    end of biography

    Henry married Anne Skinner ~ 1502. Anne was born ~ 1475, (Reigate, Surrey, England); died Aft 1504. [Group Sheet]


  2. 9.  Anne Skinner was born ~ 1475, (Reigate, Surrey, England); died Aft 1504.

    Notes:

    Residence (Family):
    Photo, map & history of Allington Castle: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allington_Castle

    Children:
    1. 4. Thomas Wyatt, Knight was born 0___ 1503, Allington Castle, Maidstone, Kent, England; died 6 Oct 1542, Sherborne, Dorset, England; was buried Sherborne, Dorset, England.
    2. Margaret Wyatt

  3. 10.  Thomas Brooke was born 0___ 1465, (Cowling, Kent, England) (son of John Brooke, 7th Baron Cobham and Margaret Neville); died 19 Jul 1529, Cowling, Kent, England.

    Thomas — Dorothy Heydon. Dorothy (daughter of Henry Heydon and Anne Boleyn) was born 0___ 1470; died 29 Mar 1566, Norfolk, Norfolkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 11.  Dorothy Heydon was born 0___ 1470 (daughter of Henry Heydon and Anne Boleyn); died 29 Mar 1566, Norfolk, Norfolkshire, England.
    Children:
    1. 5. Elizabeth Brooke was born 0___ 1503; died 0Aug 1560, Cobham, Kent, England.


Generation: 5

  1. 20.  John Brooke, 7th Baron Cobham was born 10 Dec 1447, Cowling, Kent, England (son of Edward Brooke, 6th Baron Cobham and Elizabeth Touchet); died 9 Mar 1512, Cowling, Kent, England; was buried Colegiate Church, Cobham, Kent, England.

    Notes:

    About John Brooke 7th Lord Cobham of Kent
    8th Lord of Cobham -------------------- 7th Ld Cobham. Of Weycroft, Devon and Cooling, Kent. Succeeded to the title on 19 Aug 1472. From 1491 to 1492 he was in an expedition to Flanders with King Henry VII. He fought in the Cornish insurrection at Blackheath on 24 Jun 1497, with Lord Abergavenny. There exists reasonably strong evidence of a special relationship between Thomas Phelips and the Brooke-Cobham family, seated at Cooling, Kent. The Brooke family has West Country origins and, if Thomas Phelips had been the administator or surveyor of at least some of the Booke-Cobham estates, his migration from Kent to Somerset is easily explained. Such a relationship would also explain the presence of Brooke estate documents among the Phelips family papers in the Somerset County Record Office. Further, such an influencial connection, could explain his rise in rank form yeoman in 1460 to gentleman by 1466 and his appointment to the office of Escheator fro Somerset & Dorset in 1471 and 1478. [Ref.: Ibid, p. 3-4}. Further evidence of a relationship derives from a lease extant in the Kent County Record Office in which John, Lord Cobham leased his manor of Brooke Montacute to "Jane Phillip , widow." [ Ref.: Ibid p. 3, citing Kent County Record Office ref. U601 T202].

    ______________________
    http://our-royal-titled-noble-and-commoner-ancestors.com/p2148.htm#i64565
    'Sir John Brooke, 7th Lord Cobham1,2,3
    'M, b. circa 1450, d. 9 March 1512
    Father Sir Edward Brooke, 6th Lord Cobham4,2,3 b. c 1415, d. c 7 Jul 1464
    Mother Elizabeth Touchet4,2,3 b. c 1420, d. a 8 Nov 1464
    ' Sir John Brooke, 7th Lord Cobham was born circa 1450 at of Cooling & Cobham, Kent, England; Still a minor in 1467.2,3 He married Margaret Neville, daughter of Sir Edward Neville, 1st Baron Abergavenny and Katherine Howard, circa 1475; They had 8 sons (including Thomas, Edward, George, & Leonard) and 10 daughters (including Mary & Faith).1,5,6,2,3 Sir John Brooke, 7th Lord Cobham died on 9 March 1512; Buried at Cobham, Kent.1,2,3
    'Family Margaret Neville b. c 1450, d. 30 Sep 1506
    Child
    ?Sir Thomas Brooke, 8th Lord Cobham+7,8,2 d. 19 Jul 1529
    Citations
    1.[S11568] The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain, and the United Kingdom, by George Edward Cokayne, Vol. III, p. 346-347.
    2.[S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 777.
    3.[S15] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, p. 904.
    4.[S11568] The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain, and the United Kingdom, by George Edward Cokayne, Vol. III, p. 346.
    5.[S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 93.
    6.[S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 235.
    7.[S15] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, p. 904-905.
    8.[S11568] The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain, and the United Kingdom, by George Edward Cokayne, Vol. III, p. 347.
    ____________________
    http://www.tudorplace.com.ar/BROOKE1.htm#John BROOKE (2° B. Cobham)
    'John BROOKE (2° B. Cobham)
    'Born: 10 Dec 1447, Cowling, Kent, England
    'Died: 9 Mar 1511/12
    'Buried: 9 Mar 1511, Colegiate Church, Cobham, Kent, England
    'Notes: 7th Ld Cobham. Of Weycroft, Devon and Cooling, Kent. Succeeded to the title on 19 Aug 1472. From 1491 to 1492 he was in an expedition to Flanders with King Henry VII. He fought in the Cornish insurrection at Blackheath on 24 Jun 1497, with Lord Abergavenny. There exists reasonably strong evidence of a special relationship between Thomas Phelips and the Brooke-Cobham family, seated at Cooling, Kent. The Brooke family has West Country origins and, if Thomas Phelips had been the administator or surveyor of at least some of the Booke-Cobham estates, his migration from Kent to Somerset is easily explained. Such a relationship would also explain the presence of Brooke estate documents among the Phelips family papers in the Somerset County Record Office. Further, such an influencial connection, could explain his rise in rank form yeoman in 1460 to gentleman by 1466 and his appointment to the office of Escheator fro Somerset & Dorset in 1471 and 1478. [Ref.: Ibid, p. 3-4}. Further evidence of a relationship derives from a lease extant in the Kent County Record Office in which John, Lord Cobham leased his manor of Brooke Montacute to "Jane Phillip , widow." [ Ref.: Ibid p. 3, citing Kent County Record Office ref. U601 T202].
    Father: Edward BROOKE (1° B. Cobham)
    Mother: Elizabeth TOUCHET (B. Cobham)
    'Married 1: Margaret NEVILLE (B. Cobham)
    Children:
    1. Thomas BROOKE (3° B. Cobham)
    2. Mary BROOKE
    3. Edward BROOKE (Sir)
    4. Richard BROOKE
    5. Alelye BROOKE
    6. Edward BROOKE
    7. Peter BROOKE
    8. Faith BROOKE
    9. George BROOKE
    10. Dorothy BROOKE
    'Married 2: Eleanor AUSTELL (B. Cobham) AFT Sep 1506
    ________________________
    http://www.thepeerage.com/p1181.htm#i11808
    'John Brooke, 7th Lord Cobham (of Kent)1
    'M, #11808, b. after 1446, d. 9 March 1511/12
    Last Edited=9 Sep 2007
    Consanguinity Index=0.02%
    ' John Brooke, 7th Lord Cobham (of Kent) was born after 1446.2 He was the son of Edward Brooke, 6th Lord Cobham (of Kent) and Elizabeth Tuchet.1 He married, firstly, Eleanor Austell.2 He married, secondly, Margaret Neville, daughter of Sir Edward Neville, 1st Lord Abergavenny and Katherine Howard, before 1481.3 He died on 9 March 1511/12.
    ' John Brooke, 7th Lord Cobham (of Kent) succeeded to the title of 7th Lord Cobham [E., 1313] on 19 August 1472.1 From 1491 to 1492 he was in an expedition to Flanders with King Henry VII.2 He fought in the Cornish insurrection at Blackheath on 24 June 1497, with Lord Abergavenny.2
    'Child of John Brooke, 7th Lord Cobham (of Kent) and Margaret Neville
    1.Thomas Brooke, 8th Lord Cobham (of Kent)+1 d. 19 Jul 1529
    Citations
    1.[S21] L. G. Pine, The New Extinct Peerage 1884-1971: Containing Extinct, Abeyant, Dormant and Suspended Peerages With Genealogies and Arms (London, U.K.: Heraldry Today, 1972), page 78. Hereinafter cited as The New Extinct Peerage.
    2.[S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume III, page 346. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
    3.[S8] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, 106th edition, 2 volumes (Crans, Switzerland: Burke's Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 1999), volume 1, page 17. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, 106th edition.
    _____________________
    JOHN BROOKE 7th Baron of Cobham 10 Dec 1447 - 9 Mar 1511 ID Number: I74199 RESIDENCE: ENG BIRTH: 10 Dec 1447 DEATH: 9 Mar 1511 BURIAL: Colegiate Church, Cobham, Kent, England RESOURCES: See: [S1877] Family 1 : MARGARET NEVILLE +THOMAS BROOKE Baron of Cobham

    http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~mysouthernfamily/myff/d0067/g0000049.html -------------------- John Brooke, 7th Baron Cobham (of Kent) (after 1446 - 9 March 1511/1512) was an English aristocrat. His parents were Edward Brooke, 6th Baron Cobham, who he succeeded on 19 August 1472, and Elizabeth Tuchet. From 1491 to 1492 he was in an expedition to Flanders with King Henry VII and fought in the Cornish insurrection at Blackheath on 24 June 1497, with his half-brother-in-law's son and son-in-law Lord Bergavenny, who was married firstly to his daughter Mary Brooke. He married firstly Eleanor Austell, from Suffolk, who died without issue. He married secondly before 1481 Margaret Nevill, who died on 30 September 1506 and was buried at Cobham, Kent, daughter of Sir Edward Nevill, 3rd Baron Bergavenny and second wife Katherine Howard. He was succeeded by their son Thomas Brooke, 8th Baron Cobham.

    John married Margaret Neville ~ 1475. Margaret (daughter of Edward Neville, 3rd Baron of Abergavenny and Catherine Howard, Baroness of Abergavenny) was born ~ 1450, Raby Castle, Staindrop, Durham, England; died 30 Sep 1506. [Group Sheet]


  2. 21.  Margaret Neville was born ~ 1450, Raby Castle, Staindrop, Durham, England (daughter of Edward Neville, 3rd Baron of Abergavenny and Catherine Howard, Baroness of Abergavenny); died 30 Sep 1506.
    Children:
    1. 10. Thomas Brooke was born 0___ 1465, (Cowling, Kent, England); died 19 Jul 1529, Cowling, Kent, England.

  3. 22.  Henry Heydon was born (England) (son of John Heydon and Eleanor Winter).

    Henry — Anne Boleyn. Anne (daughter of Geoffrey Boleyn and Anne Hastings) was born (Norfolkshire) England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 23.  Anne Boleyn was born (Norfolkshire) England (daughter of Geoffrey Boleyn and Anne Hastings).
    Children:
    1. 11. Dorothy Heydon was born 0___ 1470; died 29 Mar 1566, Norfolk, Norfolkshire, England.


Generation: 6

  1. 40.  Edward Brooke, 6th Baron Cobham was born ~ 1411-1415, Brooke, Somerset, England; died 6 Jun 1464, Cobham, Kent, England; was buried Cobham, Kent, England.

    Other Events:

    • Military:
    • Occupation: 0___ 1442; Member of Parliament

    Notes:

    About Edward Brooke, 6th Baron Cobham
    6º B. Cobham of Olditch. Succeeded to the title in 1442. Staunch Yorkist. He fought in the Battle of St. Albans on 23 May 1455. He fought in the Battle of Northampton on 10 Jul 1460.

    _____________________
    'Sir Edward Brooke, 6th Lord Cobham1,2,3
    'M, b. circa 1415, d. circa 7 July 1464
    Father Sir Thomas Brooke, Sheriff of Devonshire1,4,3 b. c 1392, d. 12 Aug 1439
    Mother Joan Braybrooke1,4,3 b. c 1396, d. 25 Nov 1442
    ' Sir Edward Brooke, 6th Lord Cobham was born circa 1415 at of Cobham, Kent, England; Age 24 in 1439.2,3 He married Elizabeth Touchet, daughter of Sir James Touchet, 5th Lord Audley and Margaret Roos, before 2 February 1437.1,5,2 Sir Edward Brooke, 6th Lord Cobham died circa 7 July 1464.1,2,3
    'Family Elizabeth Touchet b. c 1420, d. a 8 Nov 1464
    Children

    Elizabeth Brooke+2,3 b. c 1439, d. 26 Aug 1503
    Sir John Brooke, 7th Lord Cobham+1,2,3 b. c 1450, d. 9 Mar 1512

    Citations

    1.[S11568] The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain, and the United Kingdom, by George Edward Cokayne, Vol. III, p. 346.
    2.[S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 777.
    3.[S15] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, p. 904.
    4.[S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 776-777.
    5.[S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 722-723.
    http://our-royal-titled-noble-and-commoner-ancestors.com/p2696.htm#i81018
    ______
    'Edward Brooke, 6th Lord Cobham (of Kent)1
    'M, #11771, d. 6 June 1464
    Last Edited=20 Feb 2011
    ' Edward Brooke, 6th Lord Cobham (of Kent) was the son of Sir Thomas Brooke and Joan Braybroke, Baroness Cobham (of Kent).1 He married Elizabeth Tuchet, daughter of James Tuchet, 5th Lord Audley (of Heleigh) and Eleanor de Holland.1 He died on 6 June 1464.
    ' He held the office of Member of Parliament (M.P.) for Somerset in 1442.2 He succeeded to the title of 6th Lord Cobham [E., 1313] in 1442.1 He fought in the Battle of St. Albans on 23 May 1455, for the Yorkists.1,2 He fought in the Battle of Northampton on 10 July 1460.2
    'Child of Edward Brooke, 6th Lord Cobham (of Kent) and Elizabeth Tuchet
    1.John Brooke, 7th Lord Cobham (of Kent)+1 b. a 1446, d. 9 Mar 1511/12
    Citations
    1.[S21] L. G. Pine, The New Extinct Peerage 1884-1971: Containing Extinct, Abeyant, Dormant and Suspended Peerages With Genealogies and Arms (London, U.K.: Heraldry Today, 1972), page 78. Hereinafter cited as The New Extinct Peerage.
    2.[S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume III, page 346. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
    http://www.thepeerage.com/p1178.htm#i11771
    ______
    'Edward Brooke, 6th Baron Cobham (of Kent)[1] (died 6 June 1464) was a late medieval aristocrat.
    'His parents were Sir Thomas Brooke and Joan Braybroke, 5th Baroness Cobham[2].
    'He was a Member of Parliament for Somerset in 1442[3], the same year he succeeded to his mother's title[4]. An ardent supporter of Richard Duke of York, he fought on the Yorkist side at the First Battle of St Albans on 23 May 1455[5][6] and at the Battle of Northampton on 10 July 1460[7].
    'He married Elizabeth Touchet, born c. 1433, daughter of James Touchet, 5th Baron Audley and second wife Eleanor de Holland, and had at least two children, John Brooke, 7th Baron Cobham and Elizabeth Brooke, married to Robert Tanfield; their son, also named Robert Tanfield, born in 1461, married Catherine Nevill, born before 1473, daughter of Edward Nevill, 1st Baron Bergavenny and second wife Katherine Howard, and had issue. His widow remarried Christopher Worsley, before 8 November 1464.[8]
    References
    1.^ L. G. Pine, The New Extinct Peerage 1884-1971: Containing Extinct, Abeyant, Dormant and Suspended Peerages With Genealogies and Arms (London, U.K.: Heraldry Today, 1972), page 78.
    2.^ L. G. Pine, The New Extinct Peerage 1884-1971: Containing Extinct, Abeyant, Dormant and Suspended Peerages With Genealogies and Arms (London, U.K.: Heraldry Today, 1972), page 78.
    3.^ G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume III, page 346.
    4.^ L. G. Pine, The New Extinct Peerage 1884-1971: Containing Extinct, Abeyant, Dormant and Suspended Peerages With Genealogies and Arms (London, U.K.: Heraldry Today, 1972), page 78.
    5.^ L. G. Pine, The New Extinct Peerage 1884-1971: Containing Extinct, Abeyant, Dormant and Suspended Peerages With Genealogies and Arms (London, U.K.: Heraldry Today, 1972), page 78.
    6.^ G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume III, page 346.
    7.^ G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume III, page 346.
    8.^ L. G. Pine, The New Extinct Peerage 1884-1971: Containing Extinct, Abeyant, Dormant and Suspended Peerages With Genealogies and Arms (London, U.K.: Heraldry Today, 1972), page 78.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Brooke,_6th_Baron_Cobham
    ___________________
    QUANTOCK, later QUANTOCK DURBOROUGH, was held in 1066 by Alwig Banneson and in 1086 by Robert of Alfred d'Epaignes. (fn. 90) John Durburgh held it of Spaxton manor in 1328, probably in succession to his father Walter (d. by 1313), (fn. 91) and the land descended in the Durburgh family with Stogursey Hadley manor (fn. 92) until 1384 or later. (fn. 93) By 1412 and probably by 1399 it was held by Sir Thomas Brooke. (fn. 94) Sir Thomas died in 1418 and his widow Joan in 1437. Their son Sir Thomas (d. 1439) (fn. 95) was succeeded by his son 'Edward, Lord Cobham (d. 1464). Edward probably settled the manor on his daughter' Elizabeth for her marriage to Robert Tanfield. Elizabeth (d. 1502) (fn. 96) was followed in turn by her grandson William Tanfield (d. 1529) (fn. 97) and by her great-grandson Francis Tanfield (d. 1558). Francis left two young sons, John and Clement, both of whom probably died childless. Clement's widow Anne was in possession in 1588, (fn. 98) and there is no further reference to lordship. The land had become part of the Enmore estate by 1720 (fn. 99) and some was absorbed into Enmore park.
    In 1384 Sir Hugh Durburgh gave rents and reversions to William Taillour of Dunster. (fn. 1) The estate came to be called Little Quantock, and by 1476 it had been acquired by William Dodesham. (fn. 2) In 1560 it was held by one of his heirs, Joan Coombe, and from her passed to the Halswell family. They held it until 1754 (fn. 3) when it was sold to John Perceval, earl of Egmont, and was absorbed into the Enmore estate. (fn. 4) A small holding at Quantock Durborough formed part of Williton Hadley manor by 1542 (fn. 5) and descended like that manor in the Wyndham family. Before 1763 Charles Wyndham, earl of Egremont (d. 1763), sold it to the earl of Egmont. (fn. 6) There is no record of a manor house at Quantock Durborough.
    From: 'Spaxton: Manors and other estates', A History of the County of Somerset: Volume 6: Andersfield, Cannington, and North Petherton Hundreds (Bridgwater and neighbouring parishes) (1992), pp. 113-118. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=18589 Date accessed: 27 March 2011.
    ______________________
    'Proceedings ([n.d.])
    http://www.archive.org/details/proceedings43socigoog
    http://www.archive.org/stream/proceedings43socigoog#page/n128/mode/1up/search/Brook
    VI.— Thomas de Brook. He is included by Pole among "the men of best worth in Devon," during the reigns of Rich. II, Henry IV, and Henry V (1377-1413), and styles him Sir Thomas Brooke, de Holditch, Knt. In him we reach the most important member of the family while resident in the west, owing in large measure to his marriage with the wealthy widow of Robert Chedder, which gave him considerable influence in the counties of Somerset and Devon.
    Sir Thomas Brook married Johanna, second daughter and coheiress of Simon Hanap, or Hanham, of Gloucestershire (according to Hutchins so denominated from a place of that name, situate a short distance east of Bristol) and widow of Robert Chedder, Mayor of that city in 1360-1, who died 1382-4 ; and by whom she had four sons. She held in dower extensive landed possessions, and several advowsons, in Somerset, Gloucester, and Dorset, which passed at her death to Thomas Chedder, her only surviving son by this marriage. This family of Chedder will be further referred to.*
    http://www.archive.org/stream/proceedings43socigoog#page/n134/mode/1up/search/Brook
    VII.— Sir Thomas Brook, the son of Sir Thomas Brook and the Lady Johanna, was born about 1391, he being twenty- six years of age at the death of his father, 23rd January, 1417-8. He was Knight of the Shire for Dorset, 1 Henry V (1413-4) : for the county of Somerset, 8 Henry V (1420-1),
    http://www.archive.org/stream/proceedings43socigoog#page/n135/mode/1up/search/Brook
    His marriage with Joan, only surviving child and sole heiress of Joan de la Pole, Lady of Cobham, by her second husband Sir Reginald Braybroke, took place in 1409-10, and she proved a prolific mother, bringing him ten sons and four daughters. Of the sons '(1) Edward, eldest son and heir was summoned to Parliament as a Baron by writs from 13th January, 1444-5 (23 Henry VI), to 28th February, 1462-3 (2 Edw. IV), as Edward Broke de Cobham, Chivalier.' He was a strong adherent of the House of York, and as previously related, had his mansion at Olditch sacked by the Lancastrian Earl of Ormond ; was present at the first battle of St. Alban's, 23rd May, 1455 ; took part in the solemn procession to St. Paul's, London ; and commanded the left wing of the Yorkshire men at the battle of Northampton, 10th July, 1460, He married Elizabeth, daughter of James Touchet, Lord Audley, and died in 1464.' (2) Reginald, was of Aspall, in Suffolk, with descent still in existence. (3) Hugh : he married Petronel .... and his descendants settled in Somerset. John, his son, Sergeant-at-law to Henry VIII, married a daughter of Mericke, of Bristol, and had three sons : Thomas, married Joan Speke, and had issue ; Hugh, of Long Ashton ; Arthur, whose son Edward, was of Barrow-Gumey, and he had issue Hugh, who married Dorothy Preston, of Glastonbury, ; Thomas, also of Glastonbury Abbey (1623), who married Rebecca, daughter and co-heir of John Wyke, of Ninehead, ; and Sir Davy or David Brook, Lord Chief Baron of the Exchequer, Knighted 1 Mary (1553), who married Catherine, sister of John Bridges, Lord Chandois — this descent is given in the Somerset Visitation for 1623. (4) Thomas; (5) John; (6) Robert ; (7) Peter ; (8) Christopher ; (9) Henry ; (10) Morgan ; all died without issue. Of the daughters: (1) Margaret; (2) Christian, died without issue; (3) Joan, or query Isabel, married John Carrant ; (4) Elizabeth, John St, Maure, whose
    http://www.archive.org/stream/proceedings43socigoog#page/n136/mode/1up/search/Brook
    daughter Joan married John Blewitt, of Holcombe-Rogus, whose son Nicholas, ob. 22nd August, 1523.
    Although his wife styled herself Lady of Cobham, her husband was never summoned to Parliament as a Baron — the title remaining in abeyance thirty-two years, from 22nd March, 1413, temp. Sir John Oldcastle, until Sir Thomas Brook's son, Sir Edward Brook, had summons, 13th January, 1445. He survived his mother seven years, his mother-in-law five years only, and died in 1429. A continuation of the descent of Brook, will be given.
    ___________________
    -------------------- ' He held the office of Member of Parliament (M.P.) for Somerset in 1442. He succeeded to the title of 6th Lord Cobham [E., 1313] in 1442. He fought in the Battle of St. Albans on 23 May 1455, for the Yorkists. He fought in the Battle of Northampton on 10 July 1460.2 'Child of Edward Brooke, 6th Lord Cobham (of Kent) and Elizabeth Tuchet

    1.John Brooke, 7th Lord Cobham (of Kent)+1 b. a 1446, d. 9 Mar 1511/12
    -------------------- Edward Brooke Gender: Male Birth: Circa 1411 Brooke, Somerset Marriage: Heleigh, Staffordshire Death: Aug 12 1439 Cobham, Kent Father: Thomas Brooke Mother: Joan Brooke (born Braybrooke) Wife: Elizabeth Tuchet Siblings: Reginald Brooke Christian Brooke Elizabeth Brooke John Brooke Hugh Brooke Christopher Brooke Peter Brooke Robert Brooke Joan Brooke Henry Brooke Morgan Brooke Margaret Brooke Thomas Brooke Source: View full record on WikiTree website (wikitree.com)

    end of biography

    Military:
    An ardent supporter of Richard Duke of York, he fought on the Yorkist side at the First Battle of St Albans on 23 May 1455[ and at the Battle of Northampton on 10 July 1460

    Edward — Elizabeth Touchet. Elizabeth (daughter of James Touchet, Knight, 5th Baron Audley and Margaret de Ros) was born ~ 1420-1433, Heleigh Castle, Madeley, Staffordshire, England; died 8 Nov 1464. [Group Sheet]


  2. 41.  Elizabeth Touchet was born ~ 1420-1433, Heleigh Castle, Madeley, Staffordshire, England (daughter of James Touchet, Knight, 5th Baron Audley and Margaret de Ros); died 8 Nov 1464.

    Notes:

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Arms of Tuchet: Ermine, a chevron gules
    James Tuchet, 5th Baron Audley, 2nd Baron Tuchet (c. 1398–1459) was an English peer.

    James Tuchet, 5th Baron Audley, son of John Tuchet, 4th Baron Audley and his wife Elizabeth, was a distinguished veteran of the Hundred Years' War. In the opening phase of the Wars of the Roses he raised troops from his estates in Cheshire, Shropshire, Staffordshire and Derbyshire and commanded the Lancastrian force that moved to block the Yorkist Earl of Salisbury's route to Ludlow where he intended linking up with the rest of the Yorkist army.

    The two forces clashed in the Battle of Blore Heath on 23 September 1459 and Audley was killed by Sir Roger Kynaston of Stocks near Ellesmere (Kynaston incorporated emblems of the Audley coat-of-arms into his own). He was beheaded after the battle. Audley's Cross still stands on the battlefield to this day, and marks the spot where he died.

    Audley was buried in Darley Abbey, north of Derby, about 40 miles away from Blore Heath. Unfortunately, the Abbey no longer stands, so his final resting place is no longer marked.

    Marriages and children

    Audley and Margaret de Ros (c. 1400 - before 14 February 1430), daughter of William de Ros, 6th Baron de Ros and Margaret FitzAlan (D'Arundel), obtained a marriage license on 24 February 1415. They were granted a Papal Dispensation for being related in the 3rd and 4th degrees of kindred.[1][2][3]

    They were parents to three children:[1][2][3]

    Elizabeth Touchet (c. 1420 - before 8 November 1464), married Edward Brooke, 6th Baron Cobham.[1][2][3]
    Anne Touchet (c. 1424 - 1503), married Sir Thomas Dutton, who died at Blore Heath along with his father-in-law.[1][2][3]
    John Tuchet, 6th Baron Audley (c. 1426 - 26 September 1490).[1][2][3]
    Audley was married second to Eleanor de Holland, an illegitimate daughter of Edmund Holland, 4th Earl of Kent by Constance of York, daughter of Edmund of Langley, 1st Duke of York and Infanta Isabella of Castile. Audley and Eleanor obtained a marriage license on 14 September 1430. They were also granted a Papal Dispensation, they being related in the 3rd and 3rd degrees of affinity.[1][2][3]

    They were parents to seven children:[1][2][3]

    Margaret Touchet (c. 1431 - before 2 February 1481), married Richard Grey, 3rd Earl of Tankerville, son of Sir Henry Grey, 2nd Earl of Tankerville and Antigone Plantagenet, before 12 January 1459.[1][2][3]
    Constance Touchet (c. 1432), who married in 1464 Sir Robert Whitney (born 1436 - aft. 1467), son of Eustace Whitney and Jennet Trussell.[1][2][3]
    Sir Humphrey Touchet (c. 1434 - 6 May 1471), who married Elizabeth Courtenay, widow of Sir James Luttrell.[1][2][3] Like his father, he supported the House of Lancaster. He was taken prisoner at the battle of Tewkesbury and tried before Richard, Duke of Gloucester and the Duke of Norfolk. Executed with other Lancastrian leaders in the Market Square he was buried under the pavement in the Chapel of St Nicolas, in the Abbey Church of St Mary the Virgin.
    Thomas Touchet (c. 1440 - June 1507),[1][2][3] who married Catherine.[citation needed]
    Eleanor Touchet (born circa 1442), married Humphrey Grey, son of Sir Henry Grey, 2nd Earl of Tankerville and Antigone Plantagenet, in 1460.[1][2][3]
    Edmund Audley (c. 1443 - 23 August 1524), who became successively Bishop of Rochester, Bishop of Hereford and Bishop of Salisbury.[1][2][3]
    Anne Touchet (born circa 1446), married Sir Richard Delabere.[1][2][3]

    Birth:
    Heighley Castle (or Heleigh Castle) is a ruined medieval castle near Madeley, Staffordshire. The castle was completed by the Audley family in 1233 and for over 300 years was one of their ancestral homes. It was held for Charles I during the English Civil War and was destroyed by Parliamentary forces in the 1640s. The ruinous remains comprise masonry fragments, mostly overgrown by vegetation. The site is protected by Grade II listed building status and is a Scheduled Ancient Monument. The castle is privately owned and is not open to visitors.

    Children:
    1. 20. John Brooke, 7th Baron Cobham was born 10 Dec 1447, Cowling, Kent, England; died 9 Mar 1512, Cowling, Kent, England; was buried Colegiate Church, Cobham, Kent, England.
    2. Elizabeth Brooke was born ~ 1448, Cobham, Kent, England; died 26 Aug 1503.

  3. 42.  Edward Neville, 3rd Baron of AbergavennyEdward Neville, 3rd Baron of Abergavenny was born 0___ 1414, Raby Castle, Staindrop, Durham, England (son of Ralph Neville, Knight, 1st Earl of Westmorland and Joan Beaufort, Countess of Westmorland); died 18 Oct 1476, (Raby-Keverstone Castle, Staindrop, Durham, England).

    Other Events:

    • Military: a captain in Edward IV's army in the North

    Notes:

    NEVILLE, EDWARD (d. 1476), Baron of Bergavenny or Abergavenny (a form which appeared in the sixteenth century and was not definitely adopted until 1730), was the sixth and youngest son of Ralph Neville, first earl of Westmoreland [q. v.], by his second wife, Joan Beaufort, daughter of John of Gaunt, duke of Lancaster. His father had arranged, before his death in 1425, the match which made his youngest son the founder of the house which alone among the Neville branches has been continued in the male line to our own day, and is now represented by the Marquis of Abergavenny (Wills and Inventories, Surtees Soc. i. 71). The lady was Elizabeth Beauchamp, only child and heiress of Richard, earl of Worcester, who died in April 1422 of wounds received at the siege of Meaux. Worcester's father, William Beauchamp, fourth son of Thomas Beauchamp, earl of Warwick (d. 1369), by Catherine, daughter of Roger Mortimer, first earl of March [q. v.], inherited the castle and lands of Bergavenny or Abergavenny on Usk on the death of the last Hastings, earl of Pembroke, whose father, being on the maternal side a nephew of William Beauchamp's mother, had (15 April 1372) placed his cousin next in the entail (Nicolas, Historic Peerage, ed. Courthope; Complete Peerage, ed. G. E. C. p. 14). In 1392 he was summoned to parliament as a baron, under the title either of Lord Bergavenny or (perhaps more probably) of Lord Beauchamp of Bergavenny. Elizabeth Beauchamp's mother was Isabel le Despenser, daughter, and eventually sole heir, of Thomas, sixth baron le Despenser, lord of Glamorgan and Morgannoc, and for a moment earl of Gloucester, whose dignities were forfeited by rebellion in 1400. Worcester married her in July 1411, two months after his father's death, when he was still simply Richard Beauchamp, lord Bergavenny or Beauchamp of Bergavenny, and Elizabeth was born at Hanley Castle, Worcestershire, on 16 Dec. 1415 (Dugdale, Baronage, i. 242). On the death of her mother, who held them in jointure, Edward Neville in 1436 obtained possession of her father's lands, with the exception of the castle and lordship of Abergavenny, which was occupied, under an entail created in 1396 by Worcester's father, by his cousin Richard, earl of Warwick (d. 1439), who also by papal dispensation married his cousin's widow, Isabel. But Neville was known as lord of Bergavenny, and when, after the death of Henry, duke of Warwick, son of Richard, earl of Warwick, and Isabel le Despenser in 1445, the Warwick inheritance devolved upon his infant daughter, Anne Beauchamp, who was a ward of the crown, Neville and his wife forcibly entered on the castles and lands, but were driven out (Complete Peerage, p. 16). It was not until after the death of Anne Beauchamp on 3 June 1449 that Neville obtained the royal license (14 July 1449) to enter on the lands, &c., of Abergavenny (Doyle, Official Baronage; Ord. Privy Council, v. 283; Dugdale, i. 309). Nevertheless he did not get possession of them, for they passed into the hands of his nephew, Richard Neville, who succeeded to the Warwick estates in right of his wife, Anne Beauchamp, sister of Henry, duke of Warwick, and called himself Lord of Bergavenny (Dugdale, i. 307). Edward Neville was summoned to parliament as baron of Bergavenny in September 1450, but it was not until the time of his grandson that the castle and lord- ship were definitely acquired by the holder of the title (Swallow, De Nova Villa, pp. 229–30; Historic Peerage, p. 16; Inq. post mortem, iv. 406). Henry VIII restored them to George Neville, third baron Bergavenny. The history of the barony of Abergavenny is marked by more than one anomaly, but, if those were right who have maintained that it was held by the tenure of the castle, this would be the greatest.

    Edward Neville was the first person who was undoubtedly summoned to parliament under the express style of ‘Lord of Bergavenny,’ and Sir Harris Nicolas was inclined to think that he ought to be considered the first holder of the Abergavenny barony (Historic Peerage). He made very little figure in the stormy times in which some of his brothers and nephews were so prominent. In 1449 he had seen some military service in Normandy, and his son had been one of the hostages for the performance of the conditions on which the English were allowed to march out of Rouen in October of that year (Stevenson, Wars in France, ii. 611–12, 628). In the civil strife he followed the lead of the heads of his family. When, in 1454, his brother-in-law, the Duke of York, became protector of the kingdom, and his eldest brother, the Earl of Salisbury, chancellor, Abergavenny, with other Neville peers, sat pretty regularly in the privy council (Ord. Privy Council, vol. v.). Northampton is the only battle of the civil war in which his presence is mentioned (Chron. ed. Davies). When Edward IV became king, Abergavenny served in the north under his nephews against the Lancastrians in the autumn of 1462, and more than once occurs as a commissioner of array in Kent, where he probably resided at his first wife's manor of Birling, close to Maidstone (Doyle; Swallow, p. 287). Abergavenny did not change his king with his nephew Warwick, died on 18 Oct. 1476, and apparently was buried in the priory church at Abergavenny, where there is a monument of a warrior, at whose feet is a bull, the crest of Neville (ib. p. 230). By his first wife, Elizabeth Beauchamp, he had two sons and three daughters. The eldest son, Richard, died during his father's lifetime, and was buried in Staindrop Church, the ancient Neville mausoleum by the gates of Raby Castle (Surtees, iv. 130; cf. Dugdale, i. 309). Raby was now in the hands of the elder family of Ralph, earl of Westmorland, which was, by 1440, on the worst of terms with the younger. But George, the second son who succeeded his father as baron of Abergavenny, is said to have been born at Raby. The direct male line of Edward Neville ended with his great-grandson, Henry Neville, who died in 1587, leaving only a daughter, married to Sir Thomas Fane. Henry Neville's cousin, Edward Neville (d. 1589), obtained the castle and lordship of Abergavenny under an entail created by Henry's father. Edward Neville's son and namesake claimed the barony in 1598 as heir male, but a counter-claim was raised by Lady Fane as heir-general. The matter was settled by a compromise in 1604, when Lady Fane was allowed the barony of Le Despenser and the barony of Abergavenny was confirmed to Edward Neville, whose male descendant in the ninth generation now holds the dignity. The arrangement was a most anomalous one. According to all modern peerage law the writ of 1604 must have created a new barony. The four subsequent occasions on which the barony has been allowed to go to heirs male would in strictness equally constitute new creations (Complete Peerage, pp. 20–4). The present Marquis of Abergavenny is the fourteenth holder of the barony (which has twice gone to cousins) from Edward Neville, who died in 1622 (Historic Peerage). He also represents an unbroken Neville descent in the male line of twenty-one generations, from Geoffrey de Neville in the reign of Henry III, and a still longer one through Geoffrey's father, Robert Fitz-Maldred, a pedigree without parallel among English noble families [see under Neville, Robert de, d. 1282].

    Abergavenny's second wife was Catherine Howard, daughter of Sir Robert Howard, and sister of John Howard, first duke of Norfolk. His first wife is said to have died on 18 June 1448 (Doyle; Swallow, p. 231), and he then married Catherine Howard. But he was excommunicated for doing so on the ground that they had had illicit relations during his wife's lifetime, and were within the third degree of consanguinity. Pope Nicholas V was, however, persuaded to grant a dispensation for the marriage. Dugdale gives 15 Oct. 1448 as the date of the bull, which, supposing the date of Elizabeth Beauchamp's death to be correct, does not leave much time for the intermediate proceedings. Both dates are irreconcileable with the age (twenty-six) which Dugdale (from the Escheat Roll) gives to her second son at his father's death in 1476. Sir Harris Nicolas gives thirty-six as his age, and, if this is a correction and not an error, it will remove the worst difficulty. It is certainly most unlikely that George Neville should have been born at Raby Castle in 1450 (cf. Paston Letters, i. 397).

    The children of the second marriage were two sons, Ralph and Edward, who died without issue, and three daughters: Margaret, who married John Brooke, baron Cobham (d. 1506); Anne, who married Lord Strange (d. 1497), father of the second Earl of Derby; and Catherine, who married Robert Tanfield. Besides his manors in Kent, Abergavenny left lands in Sussex, Norfolk, Suffolk, and other counties. The family now own about fifteen thousand acres in Sussex, about six thousand in Kent, and about seven thousand in Worcestershire, Warwickshire, Monmouthshire, and Herefordshire (Complete Peerage).

    [Inquisitiones post mortem, ed. Record Commission; Proceedings and Ordinances of the Privy Council, ed. Nicolas; Stevenson's Wars of the English in France (Rolls Ser.); English Chron. 1377–1461, ed. Davies for Camd. Soc.; Mathieu d'Escouchy, ed. Beaucourt for Sociâetâe de l'Histoire de France; Dugdale's Baronage; Harris Nicolas's Historic Peerage, ed. Courthope; Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, &c., ed. by G. E. C[ockayne]; Doyle's Official Baronage; Rowland's Account of the Family of Nevill, 1830; Surtees's History of Durham; Swallow's De Nova Villa, Newcastle, 1885.]

    end

    Career:

    Neville was knighted sometime after 1426.[6]

    In 1438, Bergavenny, as he was now styled, was a justice of the peace for Durham .[6]
    He was a captain in the embattled Duchy of Normandy in 1449.[6] His eldest son Richard was one of the hostages given to the French when the English surrendered the city of Rouen in that year.

    After the death of his first wife, he was summoned to Parliament in 1450 as "Edwardo Nevyll de Bergavenny", by which he is held to have become Baron Bergavenny. At the time, however, this was considered to be a summons by right of his wife, and so he was considered the 3rd, rather than the 1st, Baron.

    In 1454, he was appointed to the Privy Council assembled by the Duke of York as Lord Protector, along with his more prominent Neville kinsmen. He was a commissioner of array in Kent in 1461, and was a captain in Edward IV 's army in the North the following year. He was again a commissioner of array in 1470, remaining loyal to Edward IV, unlike his nephew, the Earl of Warwick [6

    end

    Family

    He was the 7th. son [2] of Ralph de Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland, and Joan Beaufort, Countess of Westmorland, daughter of John of Gaunt and Katherine Swynford).

    In 1436 he married Lady Elizabeth de Beauchamp (d. 18 June 1448), daughter of Richard de Beauchamp, 1st Earl of Worcester, and the former Lady Isabel le Despenser, who later succeeded as de jure 3rd Baroness Bergavenny. They had four children. Their two sons were Richard Nevill bef. (1439 – bef. 1476) and Sir George Nevill (c.1440–1492), who would become 4th and 2nd Baron Bergavenny upon his father's death. Through George Nevill, Edward Neville is an ancestor to Mary Ball, mother of George Washington.[3] His daughters Alice and Catherine (b.c. 1444) married Sir Thomas Grey and John Iwardby respectively.

    Shortly after his first wife's death, in the summer or fall of 1448, he married Katherine Howard, daughter of Robert Howard and sister of John Howard, 1st Duke of Norfolk. His second wife bore him three additional daughters. Catherine Nevill (b. c. 1452/bef. 1473) married Robert Tanfield (b. 1461), son of Robert Tanfield and Elizabeth Brooke, daughter of Edward Brooke, 6th Baron Cobham, and Elizabeth Touchet, born c. 1433, and had children. Their son William was ancestor of Thomas Jefferson.[4][5] His daughter Margaret (b.bef. 1476-1506), married John Brooke, 7th Baron Cobham. John and Margaret are the grandparents of Elizabeth Brooke, Lady Wyatt. Daughter Anne (b.bef 1476-1480/81) did not long survive her father.

    Career

    Neville was knighted sometime after 1426.[6]

    In 1438, Bergavenny, as he was now styled, was a justice of the peace for Durham.[6]

    He was a captain in the embattled Duchy of Normandy in 1449.[6] His eldest son Richard was one of the hostages given to the French when the English surrendered the city of Rouen in that year.

    After the death of his first wife, he was summoned to Parliament in 1450 as "Edwardo Nevyll de Bergavenny", by which he is held to have become Baron Bergavenny. At the time, however, this was considered to be a summons by right of his wife, and so he was considered the 3rd, rather than the 1st, Baron.

    In 1454, he was appointed to the Privy Council assembled by the Duke of York as Lord Protector, along with his more prominent Neville kinsmen. He was a commissioner of array in Kent in 1461, and was a captain in Edward IV's army in the North the following year. He was again a commissioner of array in 1470, remaining loyal to Edward IV, unlike his nephew, the Earl of Warwick[6]

    end

    Edward married Catherine Howard, Baroness of Abergavenny 15 Oct 1448, Raby, Staindrop, Durham, England. Catherine (daughter of Robert Howard, Duke of Norfolk and Margaret Mowbray, Duchess of Norfolk) was born Abt 1414, Norfolk, England; died Aft 29 Jun 1478, Raby Castle, Staindrop, Durham, England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 43.  Catherine Howard, Baroness of Abergavenny was born Abt 1414, Norfolk, England (daughter of Robert Howard, Duke of Norfolk and Margaret Mowbray, Duchess of Norfolk); died Aft 29 Jun 1478, Raby Castle, Staindrop, Durham, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Katherine Howard

    Notes:

    Katherine Howard, daughter of Robert Howard and sister of John Howard, 1st Duke of Norfolk...

    Katherine Howard, daughter of Robert Howard and sister of John Howard, 1st Duke of Norfolk .

    His second wife bore him three additional daughters. Catherine Nevill (b. c. 1452/bef. 1473) married Robert Tanfield (b. 1461), son of Robert Tanfield and Elizabeth Brooke, daughter of Edward Brooke, 6th Baron Cobham , and Elizabeth Touchet, born c. 1433, and had children.

    Their son William was ancestor of Thomas Jefferson .[4][5]

    His daughter Margaret (b.bef. 1476-1506), married John Brooke, 7th Baron Cobham .

    John and Margaret are the grandparents of Elizabeth Brooke, Lady Wyatt . Daughter Anne (b.bef 1476-1480/81) did not long survive her father.

    he married Katherine Howard, daughter of Robert Howard and sister of John Howard, 1st Duke of Norfolk. His second wife bore him three additional daughters. Catherine Nevill (b. c. 1452/bef. 1473) married Robert Tanfield (b. 1461), son of Robert Tanfield and Elizabeth Brooke, daughter of Edward Brooke, 6th Baron Cobham, and Elizabeth Touchet, born c. 1433, and had children. Their son William was ancestor of Thomas Jefferson.[4][5] His daughter Margaret (b.bef. 1476-1506), married John Brooke, 7th Baron Cobham. John and Margaret are the grandparents of Elizabeth Brooke, Lady Wyatt. Daughter Anne (b.bef 1476-1480/81) did not long survive her father.

    Children:
    1. Catherine Neville was born 1452-1459, Raby Castle, Staindrop, Durham, England; died Bef 1473, Gayton, Northamptonshire, England; was buried Ashby-de-La-Zouch, Leicestershire, England.
    2. 21. Margaret Neville was born ~ 1450, Raby Castle, Staindrop, Durham, England; died 30 Sep 1506.

  5. 44.  John Heydon was born (England) (son of William Heydon and Joan Longford).

    John — Eleanor Winter. [Group Sheet]


  6. 45.  Eleanor Winter (daughter of Edward Winter and Oliva Hampton).
    Children:
    1. 22. Henry Heydon was born (England).

  7. 46.  Geoffrey Boleyn was born 0___ 1406, Salle, Norfolk, England (son of Geoffrey Boleyn and Anne Bracton); died 0___ 1463; was buried London, England.

    Notes:

    Sir Geoffrey or Jeffery Boleyn (1406-1463) was a London merchant and Lord Mayor of London.

    Life[edit]

    Hever Castle.

    Blickling Hall as it is today.
    Geoffrey Boleyn was the son of Geoffrey Boleyn (d. 1440) yeoman of Salle, Norfolk, and Alice,[1] and grandson of Thomas Boleyn (d. 1411) of Salle and Anne, an heiress, daughter of Sir John Bracton, a Norfolk knight. He went to London, was apprenticed to a hatter, and became a freeman of the city through the Hatter’s Company in 1428. In 1429 he transferred to a grander livery company, the Mercers’ Company, of which he became master in 1454.[2] As a wealthy mercer he served as a Sheriff of London in 1447, as member of parliament for the city in 1449, as alderman in 1452, and Lord Mayor of London in 1457/8,[3] and was knighted[4] by King Henry VI.[5] He purchased the manor of Blickling in Norfolk from Sir John Fastolf in 1452, and Hever Castle in Kent in 1462.[5]

    He was buried in the church of St Lawrence Jewry in the City of London.[5]

    Siblings

    The brasses of five sons and four daughters were still in situ in Salle's parish church in 1730.[6][7]

    William Boleyn.[8][note 1]
    John Boleyn.[8]
    Thomas, prebendary of St. Stephen’s, Westminster, precentor and sub-dean of Wells, Master of Gonville Hall, Cambridge, and Master of the college at Maidstone,d.1472.[11](executor to Geoffrey's will).
    one unknown brother.
    Cecily (1408–26 June 1458[12]), died unmarried at Blickling.
    three unknown sisters.
    Relatives[edit]
    Simon, parochial chaplain of Salle, Norfolk died 3 August 1482.
    James of Gunthorpe, Norfolk, died 1493 (executor to Simon's will).
    Thomas of Gunthorpe, Norfolk (executor to Simon's will).
    Joan named in her brother's (Simon) will., married to Alan Roos[note 2] of Salle, died 1463, he was the receiver (responsible for collecting rents) to Margaret Paston's (nâee Mauteby d. 1484) properties in Salle.[15] Secondly she was married to Robert Aldrych, died 1474.
    According to British historian and author, Elizabeth Norton, Geoffrey Boleyn who died in 1440 was their great-uncle.[16]

    Marriage and issue

    Boleyn married Anne Hoo (1424 - 1484), the only child of Thomas Hoo, Baron Hoo and Hastings (d. 13 February 1455), by his first wife Elizabeth Wychingham, by whom he had two sons and five daughters:

    Sir Thomas Boleyn (d. 1471/2).
    Sir William Boleyn (d.1505), mercer, who married Margaret Butler, daughter and co-heiress of Thomas Butler, 7th Earl of Ormond.[17]
    Isabella (1434–85) who married Henry Aucher (1410–60).
    Alice Boleyn b.abt.1438 d. abt. 1480 m. Sir John Fortescue of Punsborne, Hatfield, Herts d. 1500.
    Anne Boleyn (born c.1440),[citation needed] second daughter, who married Sir Henry Heydon (d.1504), by whom she had eight children. She died c.1509.[18]
    Cecily Boleyn b.abt.1442.
    Elizabeth Boleyn b.abt.1459.
    Sir Geoffrey Boleyn died in 1471.[5] He and his wife Anne were the great-grandparents of Queen Anne Boleyn.[19]

    Arms of Geoffrey Boleyn

    The arms are Boleyn, Argent, a chevron gules,between three bulls heads couped Sable, quarterly with arms of Bracton, Azure, three mullets, a chief dauncette or.[note 3]

    end of biography

    Geoffrey — Anne Hastings. Anne (daughter of Thomas Hoo, Baron Hoo and Hastings and Elizabeth Wychingham) was born (England). [Group Sheet]


  8. 47.  Anne Hastings was born (England) (daughter of Thomas Hoo, Baron Hoo and Hastings and Elizabeth Wychingham).
    Children:
    1. 23. Anne Boleyn was born (Norfolkshire) England.
    2. William Boleyn was born 0___ 1451, Blickling Hall, Blickling, Norfolk, England; died 10 Oct 1505.


Generation: 7

  1. 82.  James Touchet, Knight, 5th Baron AudleyJames Touchet, Knight, 5th Baron Audley was born ~ 1398, of Heleigh Castle, Heleigh, Stafford, England (son of John Touchet, III, Knight, 4th Lord Audley and Elizabeth Stafford); died 23 Sep 1459, Blore Heath, Staffordshire, England; was buried Darley Abbey, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Lord Audley
    • Military: Battle of Blore Heath, Staffordshire, England

    Notes:

    James Tuchet, 5th Baron Audley, 2nd Baron Tuchet (c. 1398-1459) was an English peer.

    James Tuchet, 5th Baron Audley, son of John Tuchet, 4th Baron Audley and his wife Elizabeth, was a distinguished veteran of the Hundred Years' War. In the opening phase of the Wars of the Roses he raised troops from his estates in Cheshire, Shropshire, Staffordshire and Derbyshire and commanded the Lancastrian force that moved to block the Yorkist Earl of Salisbury's route to Ludlow where he intended linking up with the rest of the Yorkist army.

    The two forces clashed in the Battle of Blore Heath on 23 September 1459 and Audley was killed by Sir Roger Kynaston of Stocks near Ellesmere (Kynaston incorporated emblems of the Audley coat-of-arms into his own). He was beheaded after the battle. Audley's Cross still stands on the battlefield to this day, and marks the spot where he died.

    Audley was buried in Darley Abbey, north of Derby, about 40 miles away from Blore Heath. Unfortunately, the Abbey no longer stands, so his final resting place is no longer marked.

    Marriages and children

    Audley and Margaret de Ros (c. 1400 - before 14 February 1430), daughter of William de Ros, 6th Baron de Ros and Margaret FitzAlan (D'Arundel), obtained a marriage license on 24 February 1415. They were granted a Papal Dispensation for being related in the 3rd and 4th degrees of kindred.[1][2][3]

    They were parents to three children:[1][2][3]

    Elizabeth Touchet (c. 1420 - before 8 November 1464), married Edward Brooke, 6th Baron Cobham.[1][2][3]
    Anne Touchet (c. 1424 - 1503), married Sir Thomas Dutton, who died at Blore Heath along with his father-in-law.[1][2][3]
    John Tuchet, 6th Baron Audley (c. 1426 - 26 September 1490).[1][2][3]
    Audley was married second to Eleanor de Holland, an illegitimate daughter of Edmund Holland, 4th Earl of Kent by Constance of York, daughter of Edmund of Langley, 1st Duke of York and Infanta Isabella of Castile. Audley and Eleanor obtained a marriage license on 14 September 1430. They were also granted a Papal Dispensation, they being related in the 3rd and 3rd degrees of affinity.[1][2][3]

    They were parents to seven children:[1][2][3]

    Margaret Touchet (c. 1431 - before 2 February 1481), married Richard Grey, 3rd Earl of Tankerville, son of Sir Henry Grey, 2nd Earl of Tankerville and Antigone Plantagenet, before 12 January 1459.[1][2][3]
    Constance Touchet (c. 1432), who married in 1464 Sir Robert Whitney (born 1436 - aft. 1467), son of Eustace Whitney and Jennet Trussell.[1][2][3]
    Sir Humphrey Touchet (c. 1434 - 6 May 1471), who married Elizabeth Courtenay, widow of Sir James Luttrell.[1][2][3] Like his father, he supported the House of Lancaster. He was taken prisoner at the battle of Tewkesbury and tried before Richard, Duke of Gloucester and the Duke of Norfolk. Executed with other Lancastrian leaders in the Market Square he was buried under the pavement in the Chapel of St Nicolas, in the Abbey Church of St Mary the Virgin.
    Thomas Touchet (c. 1440 - June 1507),[1][2][3] who married Catherine.[citation needed]
    Eleanor Touchet (born circa 1442), married Humphrey Grey, son of Sir Henry Grey, 2nd Earl of Tankerville and Antigone Plantagenet, in 1460.[1][2][3]
    Edmund Audley (c. 1443 - 23 August 1524), who became successively Bishop of Rochester, Bishop of Hereford and Bishop of Salisbury.[1][2][3]
    Anne Touchet (born circa 1446), married Sir Richard Delabere.[1][2][3]

    Buried:
    Audley was buried in Darley Abbey, north of Derby, about 40 miles away from Blore Heath. Unfortunately, the Abbey no longer stands, so his final resting place is no longer marked.

    Died:
    died with son-in-law, Sir Thomas Dutton

    James married Margaret de Ros ~ 1415. Margaret (daughter of William de Ros, Knight, 6th Baron de Ros of Helmsley and Margaret FitzAlan) was born ~ 1400, of Hamlake, North Riding, Yorkshire, England; died Aft 1423, Heleigh Castle, Staffordshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 83.  Margaret de Ros was born ~ 1400, of Hamlake, North Riding, Yorkshire, England (daughter of William de Ros, Knight, 6th Baron de Ros of Helmsley and Margaret FitzAlan); died Aft 1423, Heleigh Castle, Staffordshire, England.
    Children:
    1. 41. Elizabeth Touchet was born ~ 1420-1433, Heleigh Castle, Madeley, Staffordshire, England; died 8 Nov 1464.
    2. Anne Touchet was born ~ 1424, Heleigh Castle, Madeley, Staffordshire, England; died 0___ 1503.

  3. 84.  Ralph Neville, Knight, 1st Earl of WestmorlandRalph Neville, Knight, 1st Earl of Westmorland was born 0___ 1364, Castle Raby, Raby-Keverstone, Durham, England (son of John Neville, 3rd Baron Neville de Raby and Maud Percy); died 21 Oct 1425, Castle Raby, Raby-Keverstone, Durham, England; was buried 0Oct 1425, St. Mary's Church, Staindrop, Durham, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: 4th Lord Neville of Raby
    • Also Known As: Earl of Westmorland
    • Also Known As: Lord of Richmond

    Notes:

    Ralph Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland, 4th Baron Neville de Raby,[a] Earl Marshal, KG, PC (c. 1364 – 21 October 1425), was an English nobleman of the House of Neville.

    Family

    Ralph Neville was born about 1364, the son of John Neville, 3rd Baron Neville de Raby, and The Hon Maud Percy (d. before 18 February 1379), daughter of Henry de Percy, 2nd Baron Percy of Alnwick, Northumberland, by Idoine de Clifford, daughter of Robert de Clifford, 1st Baron de Clifford.[1] Neville had a younger brother, and five sisters:[2]

    Thomas Neville, 5th Baron Furnivall, who married Joan Furnival.
    Lady Alice Neville, who married Sir Thomas Gray.
    Lady Maud Neville
    Lady Idoine Neville
    Lady Eleanor Neville, who married Ralph de Lumley, 1st Baron Lumley.
    Lady Elizabeth Neville, who became a nun.
    Neville's father married secondly, before 9 October 1381, Elizabeth Latimer (d. 5 November 1395), daughter of William Latimer, 4th Baron Latimer. By his father's second marriage Neville had a brother and sister of the half blood:[3]

    John Neville, 6th Baron Latimer (c.1382 – 10 December 1430), who married firstly, Maud Clifford (c. 26 August 1446), daughter of Thomas Clifford, 6th Baron Clifford, whom he divorced before 1413-17, and by whom he had no issue. She married secondly, Richard of Conisburgh, 3rd Earl of Cambridge, beheaded 5 August 1415 for his part in the Southampton Plot.[4]
    Lady Elizabeth Neville, who married Sir Thomas Willoughby.
    Career[edit]
    Neville's first military service was in Brittany under King Richard II's uncle, Thomas of Woodstock, who knighted him at Saint-Omer in July 1380. On 14 November 1381 he and his cousin, Henry 'Hotspur' Percy, were commissioned to preside over a duel between an Englishman and a Scot, and on 1 December 1383 he and his father were commissioned to receive from the Scots 24,000 marks for the ransom of King David. On 26 October 1385 he was appointed joint governor of Carlisle with Sir Thomas Clifford, and on 27 March 1386 was appointed, together with Clifford, joint Warden of the West March.[5]

    Neville inherited the title at the age of 24 after his father's death on 17 October 1388, and was summoned to Parliament from 6 December 1389 to 30 November 1396 by writs directed to Radulpho de Nevyll de Raby. On 25 October 1388 he was appointed, with others, to survey the fortifications on the Scottish border, and on 24 May 1389 was made keeper for life of the royal forests north of the Trent. In 1393 and 1394 he was employed in peace negotiations with Scotland.[6]

    In 1397 Neville supported King Richard's proceedings against Thomas of Woodstock and the Lords Appellant, and by way of reward was created Earl of Westmorland on 29 September of that year. However his loyalty to the King was tested shortly thereafter. His first wife, Margaret Stafford, had died on 9 June 1396, and Neville's second marriage to Joan Beaufort before 29 November 1396 made him the son-in-law of King Richard's uncle, John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster. Thus, when King Richard banished John of Gaunt's eldest son and heir, Henry Bolingbroke, on 16 September 1398, and confiscated Bolingbroke's estates after John of Gaunt's death on 3 February 1399, Westmorland was moved to support his brother-in-law. Bolingbroke landed with a small force at Ravenspur in July 1399. Westmorland and the Earl of Northumberland were in the deputation at the Tower which received King Richard's abdication, and Westmorland bore the small sceptre called the 'virge' at Bolingbroke's coronation as King Henry IV on 13 October 1399.[7]

    For his support of the new King, Westmorland was rewarded with a lifetime appointment as Earl Marshal on 30 September 1399 (although he resigned the office in 1412), a lifetime grant of the honour of Richmond on 20 October (although the grant was not accompanied by a grant of the title Earl of Richmond), and several wardships.[8] Before 4 December he was appointed to the King's council. In March 1401, Westmorland was one of the commissioners who conducted negotiations for a marriage between the King's eldest daughter, Blanche of England, and Louis, son of Rupert, King of the Romans, and in 1403 was made a Knight of the Garter, taking the place left vacant by the death of Edmund of Langley, 1st Duke of York.[8]

    According to Tuck, Westmorland had little influence on the Scottish borders in the first years of Henry IV's reign, where the wardenships of the marches were monopolised by the Percys, leading to a growing rivalry between the two families. However in 1403 the Percys, spurred on by various grievances, took up arms against the King, and suffered defeat at the Battle of Shrewsbury on 21 July 1403. Northumberland's son, Henry 'Hotspur' Percy, was slain at Shrewsbury, and Northumberland's brother, the Earl of Worcester, was beheaded two days later. After Shrewsbury, King Henry ordered Westmorland to raise troops and prevent Northumberland's army, which was still in the north, from advancing south. On 6 August 1403,as a reward for his service in driving Northumberland back to Warkworth Castle, Westmorland was granted the wardenship of the West March which Northumberland had held since 1399, the wardenship of the East March, formerly held by Henry 'Hotspur' Percy, being granted to the King's 14-year-old son, John of Lancaster, 1st Duke of Bedford.[8]

    Two years later Northumberland, joined by Lord Bardolf, again took up arms against the King. It had been Northumberland's plan to capture the earl by surprise at the outset, and in early May 1405, with 400 men, Northumberland made a surprise attack at the castle of Witton-le-Wear, where he had been staying. The attempt failed, as Westmorland had already fled. The earl speedily gathered an army, defeated a force of Percy allies at Topcliffe, and then marched towards York with Henry IV's son, John of Lancaster, to confront a force of some 8000 men gathered on Shipton Moor under the leadership of Archbishop Richard Scrope, Thomas de Mowbray, 4th Earl of Norfolk, and Scrope's nephew, Sir William Plumpton. Outnumbered by Scrope's forces, Westmorland resorted to trickery,[9] and led Scrope and his allies to believe that their demands would be accepted and their personal safety guaranteed. Once Scrope's army had been disbanded on 29 May, Scrope, Mowbray and Plumpton were arrested, summarily condemned to death for treason, and beheaded outside the walls of York on 8 June 1405. Although Westmorland handed Scrope and his allies over to the King at Pontefract, he played no role in their hasty and irregular trial and execution, having been sent north by the King on 4 June to seize Northumberland's castles. It is unclear whether Northumberland had initially planned to rebel openly in concert with Scrope, but in the event he gave Scrope no support, and fled to Scotland after his failed attempt to capture Westmorland. His estates were subsequently forfeited to the crown, and Ralph, earl of Westmorland, as a reward for his quelling of the 1405 rebellion without significant bloodshed, received a large grant of former Percy lands in Cumberland and Northumberland in June 1405.[10]

    After the death of Henry IV Westmorland was mainly engaged in the defence of the northern border in his capacity as Warden of the West March (1403–1414). In 1415 he decisively defeated an invading Scottish army at the Battle of Yeavering.[1] Westmorland played no part in King Henry V's French campaigns, and Tuck notes that his relationship with Henry V was not close, perhaps partly because of the involvement of Westmorland's son-in-law, Sir Thomas Grey of Heaton, in the Southampton Plot.[11] After Henry V's death, Westmorland was a member of the Council of Regency during the minority of King Henry VI.[12]

    According to Tait, Westmorland was 'no inconsiderable builder', citing his rebuilding of Sheriff Hutton Castle on a scale so magnificent that Leland saw 'no house in the north so like a princely lodging', his doubling of the entrance gateway of Raby Castle and the corresponding tower, and possibly his responsibility for the 'tall and striking tower' of Richmond parish church. On 1 November 1410 Westmorland was granted licence to found a college for a master, six clerks, six 'decayed gentlemen' and others at Staindrop, towards the completion of which he left a bequest in his will.[12] He was probably responsible for the building of Penrith castle in Cumberland c. 1412-13.[13]

    Marriages and issue

    Miniature of the Earl of Westmorland with twelve of his children by Pol de Limbourg. A second miniature (not pictured) features his second wife, Lady Joan, with the rest of his children.

    Effigy of Ralph Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland and his two wives, Staindrop Church

    Neville married firstly, Margaret Stafford (d. 9 June 1396), the eldest daughter of Hugh Stafford, 2nd Earl of Stafford, and Philippa Beauchamp, the daughter of Thomas Beauchamp, 11th Earl of Warwick, by Katherine Mortimer, the daughter of Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March.[14] They had two sons and six daughters:

    Sir John Neville (c.1387 – before 20 May 1420), who married Elizabeth Holland, fifth daughter of Thomas Holland, 2nd Earl of Kent, and Alice FitzAlan, and by her had three sons, Ralph Neville, 2nd Earl of Westmorland, John Neville, Baron Neville, and Sir Thomas Neville, and a daughter, Margaret Neville.[15]
    Sir Ralph Neville (d. 25 Feb 1458), who married, before 1411, his stepsister, Mary Ferrers, daughter of Robert Ferrers, 2nd Baron Ferrers, and Joan Beaufort.[16]
    Maud Neville (d. October 1438), who married Peter de Mauley, 5th Baron Mauley.[15]
    Alice Neville, who married firstly Sir Thomas Grey, beheaded 2 August 1415 for his part in the Southampton Plot, and secondly Sir Gilbert Lancaster.[17]
    Philippa Neville, who married, before 20 July 1399, Thomas Dacre, 6th Baron Dacre of Gilsland (d. 5 January 1458).[18]
    Elizabeth Neville, who became a nun.
    Anne Neville (b. circa 1384), who married, before 3 February 1413, Sir Gilbert Umfraville, son of Sir Thomas Umfreville (d. 12 February 1391) and Agnes Grey (d. 25 October 1420), daughter of Sir Thomas Grey of Heaton (d. before 22 October 1369). He was slain at the Battle of Baugâe in Anjou on 22 March 1421.[19]
    Margaret Neville (d. 1463/4), who married firstly, before 31 December 1413, Richard Scrope, 3rd Baron Scrope of Bolton, and secondly, William Cressener, esquire.[20]
    Neville married secondly, before 29 November 1396, at Chãateau de Beaufort, Maine-et-Loire, Anjou, Joan Beaufort, the widow of Robert Ferrers, 2nd Baron Ferrers.[21] Joan was the legitimated daughter of John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster, by his mistress and later third wife, Katherine Swynford.

    They had nine sons and five daughters:[22]

    Richard Neville, 5th Earl of Salisbury (1400–1460), married Alice Montacute, 5th Countess of Salisbury. Their son was Richard Neville, 16th Earl of Warwick (1428–1471), 'The Kingmaker'.
    Henry Neville.
    Thomas Neville.
    Cuthbert Neville.
    Robert Neville, Bishop of Salisbury and Durham.
    William Neville, 1st Earl of Kent.
    John Neville.
    George Neville, 1st Baron Latimer.
    Edward Neville, 3rd Baron Bergavenny.
    Joan Neville, who became a nun.
    Katherine Neville, married firstly, on 12 January 1411 to John Mowbray, 2nd Duke of Norfolk, secondly to Sir Thomas Strangways, thirdly to John Beaumont, 1st Viscount Beaumont, fourthly to Sir John Woodville (d. 12 August 1469).
    Eleanor Neville (1398–1472), married firstly to Richard le Despencer, 4th Baron Burghersh, secondly to Henry Percy, 2nd Earl of Northumberland.
    Anne Neville (1414–1480), married firstly to Humphrey Stafford, 1st Duke of Buckingham, secondly to Walter Blount, 1st Baron Mountjoy.
    Cecily Neville (1415–1495), married to Richard, 3rd Duke of York. She was the mother of King Edward IV and King Richard III.
    Death[edit]


    The two wives of Ralph Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland, from his monumental effigy, Staindrop Church. His first wife, left, on his right-hand side
    Westmorland died on 21 October 1425. He was buried in the choir of his collegiate church of St. Mary at Staindrop. The magnificent alabaster tomb with effigies of himself and his two wives there has been termed the finest sepulchral monument in the north of England.[1] Neither of his wives is buried with him. His first wife, Margaret Stafford, was buried at Brancepeth, Durham, while his second wife, Joan Beaufort, was buried with her mother under a carved stone canopy in the sanctuary of Lincoln Cathedral.[23]

    Westmorland was predeceased by his eldest son, Sir John Neville, and was succeeded in the title by his grandson, Ralph Neville, 2nd Earl of Westmorland.[24]

    Westmorland is portrayed in Shakespeare's Henry IV, Part 1, Henry IV, Part 2, and Henry V.

    In the opening scene of Henry IV, Part 1, Westmorland is presented historically as an ally of King Henry IV against the Percys, and in the final scenes of the play as being dispatched to the north of England by the King after the Battle of Shrewsbury to intercept the Earl of Northumberland.[25]

    In Act IV of Henry IV, Part 2, Westmorland is portrayed historically as having been principally responsible for quelling the Percy rebellion in 1405 by Archbishop Scrope almost without bloodshed by successfully parleying with the rebels on 29 May 1405 at Shipton Moor.[25]

    However in Henry V Westmorland is unhistorically alleged to have resisted the arguments made in favour of war with France by Archbishop Chichele in the Parliament which began at Leicester on 30 April 1414. Following Hall and Holinshed, Shakespeare attributes these arguments to Chichele[26] at a time when Chichele was not yet formally Archbishop, although he had been appointed by the King immediately following the death of Archbishop Arundel on 14 February 1414. Moreover, it is said that the Parliamentary rolls do not record Chichele's presence, and according to Tait the question of war with France was not discussed. In addition, Westmorland's speech urging the advantages of war against Scotland rather than France is said to be adapted from a work by the Scottish historian, John Major, who was not born until half a century after the 1414 Parliament.[12]

    The First Folio text of Henry V also unhistorically gives these lines to Westmorland on the eve of Agincourt:

    O that we now had here
    But one ten thousand of those men in England
    That do no work today. (Henry V, IV.iii)

    Westmorland was not with King Henry V on the 1415 campaign in France. On 17 April 1415 he was appointed to the Council of Regency which was to govern England under the King's brother, John of Lancaster, 1st Duke of Bedford, during the King's absence in France, with special responsibility for the Scottish Marches.[27] In the first quarto text of the play, the foregoing lines are assigned to the Earl of Warwick.[25]

    It has been claimed by Brenda James and Professor William Rubinstein that Neville's great-great-grandson Sir Henry Neville wrote the works of William Shakespeare.

    *

    NEVILLE, RALPH, sixth Baron Neville of Raby and first Earl of Westmorland (1364-1425), was the eldest son of John de Neville, fifth baron Neville of Raby [q. v.], by his first wife, Maud, daughter of Henry, lord Percy (d. 1352) [q. v.], and aunt of the first earl of Northumberland (Swallow, De Nova Villa, p. 34; Dugdale, Baronage, i. 297).

    He first saw service in the French expedition of July 1380 under the king's uncle Thomas of Woodstock, earl of Buckingham, afterwards duke of Gloucester, who knighted him (Froissart, vii. 321, ed. Lettenhove). Doubtless spending the winter with the earl in Brittany, and returning with him in the spring of 1381, Ralph Neville, towards the close of the year, presided with his cousin Henry Percy, the famous Hotspur (whose mother was a Neville), over a duel between a Scot and an Englishman (Fœdera, xi. 334–5). In 1383 or 1384 he was associated with his father in receiving payment of the final instalments of David Bruce's ransom (Dugdale, i. 297). In the autumn of 1385 (26 Oct.), after the king's invasion of Scotland, he was appointed joint governor of Carlisle with the eldest son of his relative, Lord Clifford of Skipton in Craven, and on 27 March 1386 warden of the west march with the same colleague (Doyle, Official Baronage; Fœdera, vii. 538). On the death of his father (who made him one of his executors) at Newcastle, on 17 Oct. 1388, Ralph Neville at the age of twenty-four became Baron Neville of Raby, and was summoned to parliament under that title from 6 Dec. 1389 (Wills and Inventories, Surtees Soc. i. 42; Nicolas, Historic Peerage).

    A few days afterwards the new baron was appointed, with others, to survey the border fortifications, and in the spring of the next year his command in the west march was renewed for a further term (Doyle). He was made warden for life of the royal forests north of Trent (24 May 1389), and got leave to empark his woods at Raskelf, close to York and his castle of Sheriff-Hutton. The king also gave him a charter for a weekly market at Middleham, and a yearly fair on the day of St. Alkelda, the patron saint of the church (Dugdale). In July 1389, and again in June 1390, he was employed in negotiations with Scotland (Doyle); Fœdera, vii. 672). In June 1391 he obtained a license, along with Sir Thomas Colville of the Dale and other northern gentlemen, to perform feats of arms with certain Scots (Fœdera, vii. 703). The Duke of Gloucester taking the cross in this year, commissioners, headed by Lord Neville, were appointed (4 Dec.) to perform the duties of constable of England (Doyle)). In the summers of 1393 and 1394 he was once more engaged in negotiations for peace with Scotland, and rather later (20 Richard II, 1396–1397) he got possession of the strong castle of Wark on Tweed by exchange with Sir John de Montacute [q. v.], afterwards third earl of Salisbury.

    Neville's power was great in the North country, where he, as lord of Raby and Brancepeth in the bishopric of Durham, and Middleham and Sheriff-Hutton in Yorkshire, was fully the equal, simple baron though he was, of his cousin the head of the Percies. His support was therefore worth securing by King Richard when, in 1397, he took his revenge upon the Duke of Gloucester and other lords appellant of nine years before. The lord of Raby was already closely connected with the crown and the court party by marriage alliances. He had secured for his eldest son, John, the hand of Elizabeth, daughter of the king's stepbrother, Thomas Holland, earl of Kent, who was deep in Richard's counsels, and he himself had taken for his second wife Joan Beaufort, daughter of John of Gaunt, duke of Lancaster, the king's uncle (Dugdale, i. 297; Doyle). When the Earl of Arundel, one of the leading lords appellant, was put on his trial before parliament on Friday, 21 Sept. 1397, Neville, at the command of his father-in-law Lancaster, who presided as seneschal of England, removed the accused's belt and scarlet hood (Adam of Usk, p. 13; Ann. Ricardi II, p. 214). He was no doubt acting as constable, an office of Gloucester's. The Earl of Warwick was also in his custody (Ann. Hen. IV, p. 307). In the distribution of rewards among the king's supporters on 29 Sept., Neville was made Earl of Westmorland (Rot. Parl. iii. 355). He held no land in that county, but it was the nearest county to his estates not yet titularly appropriated, and the grant of the royal honour of Penrith gave him a footing on its borders (Dugdale). He took an oath before the shrine of Edward the Confessor in Westminster Abbey on Sunday, 30 Sept., to maintain what had been done in this ‘parliamentum ferale’ (Rot. Parl. iii. 355).

    But when Richard drove his brother-in-law Henry, earl of Derby, out of the realm, and refused him possession of the Lancaster estates on John of Gaunt's death, Westmorland took sides against the king, and was one of the first to join Henry when he landed in Yorkshire in July 1399 (Adam of Usk, p. 24). He and his relative Northumberland, who had joined Henry at the same time, represented the superior lords temporal in the parliamentary deputation which on 29 Sept. received in the Tower the unfortunate Richard's renunciation of the crown, and next day he was granted for life the office of marshal of England, which had been held by the banished Duke of Norfolk (Rot. Parl. iii. 416; Fœdera, viii. 89, 115). With Northumberland he conveyed Richard's message to convocation on 7 Oct. (Ann. Hen. IV, p. 289). At Henry IV's coronation (13 Oct.) Westmorland bore the small sceptre called the virge, or rod with the dove, his younger half-brother, John Neville, lord Latimer, who was still a minor, carrying the great sceptre royal (Adam of Usk, p. 33; Taylor, Glory of Regality, p. 66) [see under Neville, John, fifth Baron of Raby]. The grant a week later (20 Oct.) of the great honour and lordship of Richmond, forfeited in the late reign by John, duke of Brittany, united his Teesdale and his Wensleydale lands into a solid block of territory, and gave him besides a vast number of manors and fees scattered over great part of England (Doyle; Rot. Parl. iii. 427). The grant, however, was only made for his life, and clearly did not carry with it the title of Earl of Richmond, which was never borne by him, and was granted during his lifetime (1414) to John, duke of Bedford, with the reversion of the castle and lands on Westmorland's death (Third Report of the Lords on the Dignity of a Peer, pp. 96 et seq.). When the earl was in London he sat in the privy council, but as a great northern magnate he was chiefly employed upon the Scottish border (Ord. Privy Council, i. 100 et seq.; Fœdera, viii. 133). In March 1401, however, he was one of the royal commissioners who concluded with the ambassadors of Rupert, king of the Romans, a marriage between Henry's eldest daughter and Rupert's son Louis (ib. pp. 176, 178), and spent the summer in London (Ord. Privy Council, i. 144, 157). But in September he was employed on another Scottish mission, and in the March following was appointed captain of Roxburgh Castle (ib. p. 168; Fœdera, viii. 251; Doyle).

    The garter vacated by the death of Edmund, duke of York, in August 1402 was bestowed upon him. In July 1403 his relatives, the Percies, revolted, and Westmorland found an opportunity of weakening the great rival house in the north. One of Hotspur's grievances was the transference of his captaincy of Roxburgh Castle to Westmorland in the previous March (Rot. Scot. ii. 161). The day after the battle of Shrewsbury, in which Hotspur was slain, Henry wrote to Westmorland and other Yorkshire magnates charging them to levy troops and intercept the Earl of Northumberland, who was marching southward (Fœdera, viii. 319). Westmorland drove the old earl back to Warkworth, and sent an urgent message to Henry, advising him to come into the north, where reports of his death were being circulated by the Percies (Ann. Hen. IV, p. 371). The king arrived at Pontefract on 3 Aug., and three days later transferred the wardenship of the west marches, which Northumberland had held since 1399, to Westmorland (Doyle). Hotspur was replaced as warden of the east march by the king's second son, John, a lad of fourteen, who must necessarily have been much under the influence of the experienced earl. On his return south, Henry directed Westmorland and his brother Lord Furnival to secure the surrender of the Percy castles (Ord. Privy Council, i. 213). But the order was more easily given than executed, and in the parliament of the following February Northumberland was pardoned by the king and publicly reconciled to Westmorland (Rot. Parl. iii. 525). Westmorland and Somerset were the only earls in the council of twenty-two whom the king was induced by the urgency of the commons to designate in parliament (1 March 1404) as his regular advisers (ib. p. 530).

    Northumberland's reconciliation was a hollow one, and in the spring of 1405 he was again in revolt. Remembering how his plans had been foiled by Westmorland two years before, he began with an attempt to get his redoubtable cousin into his power by surprise. In April or May Westmorland happened to be staying in a castle which Mr. Wylie identifies with that of Witton-le-Wear, belonging to Sir Ralph Eure. It was suddenly beset one night by Northumberland at the head of four hundred men. But Westmorland had received timely warning, and was already flown (Ann. Hen. IV p. 400). Towards the close of May the flame of rebellion had broken out at three distinct points. Northumberland was moving southwards to effect a junction with Sir John Fauconberg, Sir John Colville of the Dale, and other Cleveland connections of the Percies and Mowbrays who were in arms near Thirsk, and with the youthful Thomas Mowbray, earl marshal [q. v.], and Archbishop Scrope, who raised a large force in York and advanced northwards. One of Mowbray's grievances was that the office of marshal of England had been given to Westmorland, leaving him only the barren title. Westmorland therefore had an additional spur to prompt action against this threatening combination. Taking with him the young prince John and the forces of the marches, he threw himself by a rapid march between the two main bodies of rebels, routed the Cleveland force at Topcliffe by Thirsk, capturing their leaders, and intercepted the archbishop and Mowbray at Shipton Moor, little more than five miles north of York (Rot. Parl. iii. 604; Eulogium, iii. 405; Ann. Hen. IV, p. 405). Westmorland, finding himself the weaker in numbers, had recourse to guile. Explanations were exchanged between the two camps, and Westmorland, professing approval of the articles of grievance submitted to him by Scrope, invited the archbishop and the earl marshal to a personal conference (ib. p. 406). They met, with equal retinues, between the two camps. Westmorland again declared their demands most reasonable, and promised to use his influence with the king. They then joyfully shook hands over the understanding, and, at Westmorland's suggestion, ratified it with a friendly cup of wine. The unsuspecting archbishop was now easily induced to send and dismiss his followers with the cheerful news. As soon as they had dispersed Westmorland laid hands upon Scrope and Mowbray, and carried them off to Pontefract Castle, where he handed them over to the king a few days later. Unless the consensus of contemporary writers does injustice to Westmorland, he was guilty of a very ugly piece of treachery (ib. p. 407; Chron. ed. Giles, p. 45; Eulogium, iii. 406). Their account is not indeed free from improbabilities, and Otterbourne (i. 256) maintained that Scrope and Mowbray voluntarily surrendered. Their forces were perhaps not wholly trustworthy, and they might have been discouraged by the fate of the Cleveland knights; but the authority of Otterbourne, who wrote under Henry V, can hardly be allowed to outweigh the agreement of more strictly contemporary writers. Westmorland, at all events, had no hand in the hasty and irregular execution of the two unhappy men, for he was despatched northwards from Pontefract on 4 June to seize Northumberland's castles and lands, and his brother-in-law, Thomas Beaufort, was appointed his deputy as marshal for the trial (Fœdera, viii. 399).

    This crisis over, Westmorland returned to his usual employments as warden of the march (in which his eldest son, John, was presently associated with him), and during the rest of the reign was pretty constantly occupied in negotiations with Scotland, whose sympathy with France and reception of Northumberland were counterbalanced by the capture of the heir to the throne (Fœdera, viii. 418, 514, 520, 678, 686, 737). He had made himself one of the great props of his brother-in-law's throne. Two of his brothers—Lord Furnival, who for a time was war treasurer, and Lord Latimer—were peers, and towards the close of the reign he began to make those fortunate marriages for his numerous family by his second wife which enabled the younger branch of Neville to play so decisive a part in after years. One of the earliest of these marriages was that of his daughter Catherine in 1412 to the young John Mowbray, brother and heir of the unfortunate earl marshal who had been entrusted to his guardianship by the king (Testamenta Eboracensia, iii. 321). Shortly after Henry V's accession Westmorland must have resigned the office of marshal of England into the hands of his son-in-law, in whose family it was hereditary (Fœdera, ix. 300).

    Thanks to Shakespeare, Westmorland is best known as the cautious old statesman who is alleged to have resisted the interested incitements of Archbishop Chichele and the clergy to war with France in the parliament at Leicester in April 1414, and was chidden by Henry for expressing a de- spondent wish the night before Agincourt that they had there

    But one ten thousand of those men in England

    That do no work to-day.

    But neither episode has any good historical warrant. They are first met with in Hall (d. 1547), from whom Shakespeare got them through Holinshed (Hall, Chronicle, p. 50). Chichele was not yet archbishop at the time of the Leicester parliament; the question of war was certainly not discussed there, and the speeches ascribed to Chichele and Westmorland are obviously of later composition. Westmorland, in urging the superior advantages of war upon Scotland, if war there must be, is made to quote from the Scottish historian John Major [q. v.], who was not born until 1469. The famous ejaculation before Agincourt was not made by Westmorland, for he did not go to France with the king. He was left behind to guard the Scottish marches and assist the regent Bedford as a member of his council (Ord. Privy Council, ii. 157). Henry had also appointed him one of the executors of the will which he made (24 July) before leaving England (Fœdera, ix. 289). The author of the ‘Gesta Henrici’ (p. 47), who was with the army in France, tells us that it was Sir Walter Hungerford [q. v.] who was moved by the smallness of their numbers to long openly for ten thousand English archers. The attitude imputed to Westmorland in these anecdotes is, however, sufficiently in keeping with his advancing age and absorption in the relations of England to Scotland, and may just possibly preserve a genuine tradition of opposition on his part to the French war. In any case, he never went to France, devoting himself to his duties on the borders, and leaving the hardships and the glory of foreign service to his sons. He was one of the executors of Henry's last will, and a member of the council of regency appointed to rule in the name of his infant son (Rot. Parl. iv. 175, 399). As late as February 1424 he was engaged in his unending task of negotiating with Scotland (Ord. Privy Council, iii. 139). On 21 Oct. in the following year he died, at what, in those days, was the advanced age of sixty-two, and was buried in the choir of the Church of Staindrop, at the gates of Raby, in which he had founded three chantries in 1343 (Swallow, p. 314). His stately and finely sculptured tomb of alabaster, in spite of the injuries it has received since its removal to the west end to make way for the tombs of the Vanes, remains the finest sepulchral monument in the north of England. It has been figured by Gough in his ‘Sepulchral Monuments’ (1786), by Stothard in his ‘Monumental Effigies’ (1817), and by Surtees in his ‘History of Durham.’ It bears recumbent effigies of Westmorland and his two wives. His features, so far as they are revealed by the full armour in which he is represented, are too youthful and too regular to allow us to regard it as a portrait (Swallow, De Nova Villa, p. 311; Oman, Warwick the Kingmaker, p. 17). The skeleton of the earl, which was discovered during some excavations in the chancel, is said to have been that of a very tall man with a diseased leg ({{sc|Swallow}, p. 315).

    In his will, made at Raby, 18 Oct. 1424, besides bequests to his children and the friars, nuns, and anchorites of the dioceses of York and Durham, he left three hundred marks to complete the college of Staindrop, and a smaller sum towards the erection of bridges over the Ure, near Middleham, and the Tees at Winston, near Raby (Wills and Inventories, Surtees Soc., i. 68–74). Westmorland was, in fact, no inconsiderable builder. He rebuilt the castle of Sheriff-Hutton, twelve miles north-east of York, on the ridge between Ouse and Derwent, on a scale so magnificent that Leland saw ‘no house in the north so like a princely lodging,’ and the Neville saltire impaling the arms of England and France for his second wife may still be seen on its crumbling and neglected ruins. The church of Sheriff-Hutton has had inserted some of those curious flat-headed windows which are peculiar to the churches on the Neville manors, and they may very well be Westmorland's additions (Murray, Yorkshire, under Staindrop, Well, and Sheriff-Hutton). At Staindrop he added the chamber for the members of his new college on the north side of the choir, and the last bay of the nave in which his tomb now lies. The license to establish a college for a master or warden, six clerks, six decayed gentlemen, six poor officers, and other poor men, for whose support the advowson of the church was set aside with two messuages and twelve acres of land for their residence, was granted on 1 Nov. 1410 (Monasticon Anglicanum, vi. 1401; cf. {{sc|Swallow}, p. 314). Westmorland doubled the entrance gateway of Raby Castle, and threw forward the south-western tower, now called Joan's tower, to correspond (see Pritchett in the Reports and Journal of the British Archµological Association, 1886, 1887, 1889). He is also said to have been the builder of the tall and striking tower of Richmond parish church.

    Westmorland was twice married: first (before 1370) to Margaret, daughter of Hugh, second earl of Stafford (d. 1386); and, secondly (before 20 Feb. 1397), to Joan Beaufort, daughter of John of Gaunt, duke of Lancaster, by Catherine Swynford, and widow of Sir Robert Ferrers. She survived him, dying on 13 Nov. 1440 and being buried in Lincoln Cathedral, though her effigy is also on her husband's tomb at Staindrop. The inscription on her monument is quoted by Swallow (p. 137). Joan had some taste for literature. Thomas Hoccleve [q. v.] dedicated a volume of his works to her, and we hear of her lending the ‘Chronicles of Jerusalem’ and the ‘Voyage of Godfrey Bouillon’ to her nephew, Henry V (Fœdera, x. 317).

    The Nevilles were a prolific race, but Westmorland surpassed them all. He had no less than twenty-three children by his two wives—nine by the first, and fourteen by the second. The children of the first marriage, seven of whom were females, were thrown into the shade by the offspring of his more splendid second alliance which brought royal blood into the family. Westmorland devoted himself indefatigably to found the fortunes of his second family by a series of great matches, and a good half of the old Neville patrimony, the Yorkshire estates, was ultimately diverted to the younger branch.

    Thus the later earls of Westmorland had a landed position inferior to that of their ancestors, who were simple barons, and the real headship of the Neville house passed to the eldest son of the second family. Westmorland's children by his first wife were: (1) John, who fought in France and on the Scottish borders, and died before his father (1423); he married Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Holland, earl of Kent, and their son Ralph succeeded his grandfather as second Earl of Westmorland in 1425 (see below). (2) Ralph of Oversley, near Alcester, in Warwickshire, in right of his wife Mary (b. 1393), daughter and coheiress of Robert, baron Ferrers of Wem in Shropshire. (3) Mathilda married Peter, lord Mauley (d. 1414). (4) Philippa married Thomas, lord Dacre of Gillsland (d. 1457). (5) Alice married, first, Sir Thomas Grey of Heton; and, secondly, Sir Gilbert Lancaster. (6) Elizabeth, who became a nun in the Minories. (7) Anne, who married Sir Gilbert Umfreville of Kyme. (8) Margaret, who married, first, Richard, lord le Scrope of Bolton in Wensleydale (d. 1420), and, secondly, William Cressener, dying in 1463; and (9) Anastasia.

    By his second wife Neville had nine sons and five daughters: (1) Richard Neville, earl of Salisbury [q. v.] (2) William, baron Fauconberg [q. v.] (3) George, summoned to parliament as Baron Latimer, 1432-69, his father having transferred to him that barony which he had bought from his childless half-brother John, who inherited it from his mother [see under Neville, John, d. 1388)]. George Neville's male descendants held the barony of Latimer till 1577, when it fell into abeyance [see Neville, John, third Baron Latimer]. (5) Robert [q. v.], bishop successively of Salisbury and Durham. (6) Edward, baron of Bergavenny [q. v.] (7–9) Three sons who died young. (10) Joan, a nun. (11) Catherine, married, first, John Mowbray, second duke of Norfolk [q. v.]; secondly, Thomas Strangways; thirdly, Viscount Beaumont (d. 1460); and, fourthly, John Wydeville, brother-in-law of Edward IV. (12) Anne, married, first, Humphrey, first duke of Buckingham (d. 1460) [q. v.]; and, secondly, Walter Blount, first baron Mountjoy (d. 1474). (13) Eleanor, married, first, Richard, lord le Despenser (d. 1414); and, secondly, Henry Percy, second earl of Northumberland (d. 1455). (14) Cicely, who married Richard Plantagenet, duke of York, and was mother of Edward IV.

    Ralph Neville, second Earl of Westmorland (d. 1484), son of John, the eldest son of the first earl by his first wife, married a daughter of Hotspur, and left active Lancastrian partisanship to his younger brothers. He died in 1484. His only son having perished at the battle of St. Albans in 1455, he was succeeded as third Earl of Westmorland by his nephew, Ralph (1456–1523), son of his brother John. This John Neville was a zealous Lancastrian. He took a prominent part in the struggle with the younger branch of the Nevilles for the Yorkshire lands of the first Earl of Westmorland, was summoned to parliament as Lord Neville after the Yorkist collapse in 1459, and was rewarded for his services at Wakefield in December 1460 with the custody of the Yorkshire castles of his uncle and enemy, Salisbury, who was slain there (see under Richard Neville, Earl of Salisbury;Nicolas, Historic Peerage, p. 345; Chron. ed. Davies, p. 106). A Yorkist chronicler accuses him of treacherously getting York's permission to raise troops, which he then used against him (ib.) A few months later he was slain at Towton (30 March 1461). When his son Ralph became third Earl of Westmorland, the barony of Neville merged in the earldom of Westmorland, which came to an end with the attainder of Charles Neville, sixth earl [q. v.], in 1571.

    [Rotuli Parliamentorum; Proceedings and Ordinances of the Privy Council, ed. Nicolas; Rymer's Fœdera, original edition; Lords' Report on the Dignity of a Peer; Adam of Usk. ed. Maunde Thompson; Annales Ricardi II et Hen- rici IV with Trokelowe in Rolls Ser.; Gesta Henrici V, ed. Williams for English Historical Society; Otterbourne's Chronicle, ed. Hearne; Testamenta Eboracensia and Wills and Inventories, published by the Surtees Soc.; Hall's Chronicle, ed. Ellis; Dugdale's Baronage and Monasticon Anglicanum, ed. Caley, Ellis, and Bandinel; Rowland's Account of the Noble Family of Nevill, 1830; Swallow, De Nova Villa, 1885; Nicolas's Historic Peerage, ed. Courthope; Wylie's Hist. of Henry IV; Ramsay's Lancaster and York; other authorities in the text.]

    *

    Westmorland was twice married: first (before 1370) to Margaret, daughter of Hugh, second earl of Stafford (d. 1386); and, secondly (before 20 Feb. 1397), to Joan Beaufort, daughter of John of Gaunt, duke of Lancaster, by Catherine Swynford, and widow of Sir Robert Ferrers. She survived him, dying on 13 Nov. 1440 and being buried in Lincoln Cathedral, though her effigy is also on her husband's tomb at Staindrop.

    The inscription on her monument is quoted by Swallow (p. 137). Joan had some taste for literature. Thomas Hoccleve [q. v.] dedicated a volume of his works to her, and we hear of her lending the 'Chronicles of Jerusalem' and the 'Voyage of Godfrey Bouillon' to her nephew, Henry V (Fœdera, x. 317).

    *

    Buried:
    Images of St. Mary's ... https://www.google.com/search?q=staindrop+church&rlz=1C1KMZB_enUS591US591&espv=2&biw=1440&bih=815&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjzxuiz6Z_LAhUKPCYKHQf1AA4QsAQIOA

    Died:
    Images and history of Raby Castle, Staindrop, Durham, England ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raby_Castle

    Ralph married Joan Beaufort, Countess of Westmorland Bef 29 Nov 1396, Chateau Beaufort, Anjou, France. Joan (daughter of John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster and Katherine de Roet, Duchess of Lancaster) was born ~ 1379, Chateau Beaufort, Anjou, France; died 13 Nov 1440, Howden, Yorkshire, England; was buried Lincoln Cathedral, Lincoln, Lincolnshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 85.  Joan Beaufort, Countess of Westmorland was born ~ 1379, Chateau Beaufort, Anjou, France (daughter of John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster and Katherine de Roet, Duchess of Lancaster); died 13 Nov 1440, Howden, Yorkshire, England; was buried Lincoln Cathedral, Lincoln, Lincolnshire, England.

    Notes:

    Joan Beaufort, Countess of Westmorland (c. 1379 - 13 November 1440), was the fourth of the four children (and only daughter) of John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster, and his mistress, later wife, Katherine Swynford. In her widowhood, she was a powerful landowner in the North of England.

    Early life and marriages

    She was probably born at the Swynford manor of Kettlethorpe in Lincolnshire. Her surname probably reflects her father's lordship of Beaufort in Champagne, France, where she might also have been born.[2] In 1391, at the age of twelve, Joan married at Beaufort-en-Vallâee, Anjou, Robert Ferrers, 5th Baron Boteler of Wem, and they had two daughters before he died in about 1395.

    Legitimation

    Along with her three brothers, Joan had been privately declared legitimate by their cousin Richard II of England in 1390. Her parents were married in Lincoln Cathedral in February 1396.[3] Joan was already an adult when she was legitimized by the marriage of her mother and father with papal approval. The Beauforts were later barred from inheriting the throne by a clause inserted into the legitimation act by their half-brother, Henry IV of England, although it is not clear that Henry IV possessed sufficient authority to alter an existing parliamentary statute by himself, without the further approval of Parliament. Soon after the legitimation, on 3 February 1397, when she was eighteen, Joan married Ralph de Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland, who had also been married once before.

    Inheritance

    When Ralph de Neville died in 1425, his lands and titles should, by law of rights, have passed on to his grandson through his first marriage, another Ralph Neville. Instead, while the title of Earl of Westmorland and several manors were passed to Ralph, the bulk of his rich estate went to his wife, Joan Beaufort. Although this may have been done to ensure that his widow was well provided for, by doing this Ralph essentially split his family into two and the result was years of bitter conflict between Joan and her stepchildren who fiercely contested her acquisition of their father's lands. Joan however, with her royal blood and connections, was far too powerful to be called to account, and the senior branch of the Nevilles received little redress for their grievances. Inevitably, when Joan died, the lands would be inherited by her own children.

    Death

    Joan died on 13 November 1440 at Howden in Yorkshire.[3] Rather than be buried with her husband Ralph (who was not buried with his first wife, though his monument has effigies of himself and his two wives) she was entombed next to her mother in the magnificent sanctuary of Lincoln Cathedral. Joan's is the smaller of the two tombs; both were decorated with brass plates – full-length representations of them on the tops, and small shields bearing coats of arms around the sides — but those were damaged or destroyed in 1644 by Roundheads during the English Civil War. A 1640 drawing of them survives, showing what the tombs looked like when they were intact, and side-by-side instead of end-to-end, as they are now.

    Descendants

    Joan Beaufort was mother to Cecily, Duchess of York and thus grandmother of Edward IV of England, and of Richard III of England, whom Henry VII defeated to take the throne. Henry then married Elizabeth of York, daughter of Edward IV, and their son became Henry VIII of England. Henry VIII's sixth wife, Catherine Parr, was also a descendant through Joan and Ralph's eldest son, Richard Neville, 5th Earl of Salisbury, and thus Henry's third cousin. The Earl of Salisbury was father to Richard Neville, 16th Earl of Warwick, "the Kingmaker" (father of Queen consort Anne Neville).

    Children of Joan Beaufort and Robert Ferrers

    In 1391, at the age of twelve, Joan married Robert Ferrers, 5th Baron Boteler of Wem, at Beaufort-en-Vallâee, Anjou. They had 2 children:

    Elizabeth Ferrers, 6th Baroness Boteler of Wem (1393–1474). She is buried at Black Friars Church, York. She married John de Greystoke, 4th Baron Greystoke (1389–1436), on 28 October 1407 in Greystoke Castle, Greystoke, Cumberland, and had issue.
    Margaret (or Mary) Ferrers (1394 – 25 January 1457/1458). She married her stepbrother, Sir Ralph Neville, son of Ralph Neville, 1st Earl of Westmoreland, c. 1413 in Oversley, Warwickshire, and had issue

    Children of Joan Beaufort and Ralph Neville

    They had 14 children:

    Lady Katherine Neville, married first on 12 January 1411 John Mowbray, 2nd Duke of Norfolk; married second Sir Thomas Strangways; married third John Beaumont, 1st Viscount Beaumont; married fourth Sir John Woodville (d. 12 August 1469).
    Lady Eleanor Neville (d. 1472), married first Richard le Despenser, 4th Baron Burghersh, married second Henry Percy, 2nd Earl of Northumberland
    Richard Neville, 5th Earl of Salisbury (1400–1460), married Alice Montacute, suo jure 5th Countess of Salisbury. Had issue. Their descendants include Richard Neville, 16th Earl of Warwick; queen consort Anne Neville, wife of Richard III; and queen consort Catherine Parr, sixth wife of King Henry VIII (great-grandson of Richard's sister, Cecily).
    Robert Neville (d. 1457), Bishop of Durham
    William Neville, 1st Earl of Kent (c.1410–1463)
    Lady Anne Neville (?1411–20 September 1480), married Humphrey Stafford, 1st Duke of Buckingham
    Edward Neville, 3rd Baron Bergavenny (d. 1476)
    Lady Cecily Neville (1415–1495) ("Proud Cis"), married Richard, 3rd Duke of York, and mothered Kings Edward IV of England and Richard III of England
    George Neville, 1st Baron Latimer (d. 1469)
    Joan Neville, became a nun
    John Neville, died young
    Cuthbert Neville, died young
    Thomas Neville, died young
    Henry Neville, died young

    Birth:
    She was probably born at the Swynford manor of Kettlethorpe in Lincolnshire. Her surname probably reflects her father's lordship of Beaufort in Champagne, France, where she might also have been born.[2] In 1391, at the age of twelve, Joan married Robert Ferrers, 5th Baron Boteler of Wem, at Beaufort-en-Vallâee, Anjou. They had two daughters before he died in about 1395.

    Buried:
    St Paul's Cathedral, London, is an Anglican cathedral, the seat of the Bishop of London and the mother church of the Diocese of London. It sits on Ludgate Hill at the highest point of the City of London. Its dedication to Paul the Apostle dates back to the original church on this site, founded in AD 604.[1] The present church, dating from the late 17th century, was designed in the English Baroque style by Sir Christopher Wren. Its construction, completed in Wren's lifetime, was part of a major rebuilding programme in the City after the Great Fire of London.[2]

    The cathedral is one of the most famous and most recognisable sights of London. Its dome, framed by the spires of Wren's City churches, dominated the skyline for 300 years.[3] At 365 feet (111 m) high, it was the tallest building in London from 1710 to 1962. The dome is among the highest in the world. St Paul's is the second largest church building in area in the United Kingdom after Liverpool Cathedral.

    St Paul's Cathedral occupies a significant place in the national identity.[4] It is the central subject of much promotional material, as well as of images of the dome surrounded by the smoke and fire of the Blitz.[4] Services held at St Paul's have included the funerals of Lord Nelson, the Duke of Wellington and Sir Winston Churchill; Jubilee celebrations for Queen Victoria; peace services marking the end of the First and Second World Wars; the wedding of Charles, Prince of Wales and Lady Diana Spencer, the launch of the Festival of Britain and the thanksgiving services for the Golden Jubilee, the 80th Birthday and the Diamond Jubilee of Elizabeth II.

    St Paul's Cathedral is a working church with hourly prayer and daily services.

    more ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Paul%27s_Cathedral

    Notes:

    Married:
    by Papal Dispensation...

    Children:
    1. Eleanor Neville, Countess of Northumberland was born 1397-1399, Raby, Staindrop, Durham, England; died 0___ 1472.
    2. Richard Neville, I, Knight, 5th Earl of Salisbury was born Abt 1400, Raby Castle, Staindrop, Durham, England; died 30 Dec 1460, Wakefield, St. John, West Riding, Yorkshire, England; was buried 15 Jan 1461.
    3. Katherine Neville was born ~ 1400; died Aft 1483.
    4. Robert Neville was born 0___ 1404, Raby Castle, Staindrop, Durham, England; died 8 Jul 1457.
    5. George Neville, 1st Baron Latimer was born 1407-1414, Raby Castle, Staindrop, Durham, England; died 30 Dec 1469; was buried 31 Dec 1469.
    6. 42. Edward Neville, 3rd Baron of Abergavenny was born 0___ 1414, Raby Castle, Staindrop, Durham, England; died 18 Oct 1476, (Raby-Keverstone Castle, Staindrop, Durham, England).
    7. Cecily Neville, Duchess of York was born 3 May 1415, Raby Castle, Staindrop, Durham, England; died 31 May 1495, Berkhamsted Castle, Berkhamsted, England; was buried Church of St Mary and All Saints, Fotheringhay, Northamptonshire, England.
    8. Ralph Neville
    9. Anne Neville died 0___ 1480.

  5. 86.  Robert Howard, Duke of Norfolk was born 0___ 1385, Tendring, Essex, England (son of John Howard, Knight, Duke of Norfolk and Alice Tendring); died 1 Apr 1437.

    Robert married Margaret Mowbray, Duchess of Norfolk Abt 1411, Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England. Margaret (daughter of Thomas de Mowbray, Knight, 1st Duke of Norfolk and Elizabeth FitzAlan, Duchess of Norfolk) was born Abt 1387, Axholme, Lincoln, England; died 8 Jul 1425. [Group Sheet]


  6. 87.  Margaret Mowbray, Duchess of Norfolk was born Abt 1387, Axholme, Lincoln, England (daughter of Thomas de Mowbray, Knight, 1st Duke of Norfolk and Elizabeth FitzAlan, Duchess of Norfolk); died 8 Jul 1425.

    Notes:

    Married:
    arranged marriage...

    Children:
    1. 43. Catherine Howard, Baroness of Abergavenny was born Abt 1414, Norfolk, England; died Aft 29 Jun 1478, Raby Castle, Staindrop, Durham, England.
    2. John Howard, 1st Duke of Norfolk was born ~ 1425, Tendring, Essex, England; died 22 Aug 1485, Market Bosworth, Leicestershire, England.

  7. 88.  William Heydon was born (England).

    William — Joan Longford. Joan was born (England). [Group Sheet]


  8. 89.  Joan Longford was born (England).
    Children:
    1. 44. John Heydon was born (England).

  9. 90.  Edward Winter was born (England).

    Edward — Oliva Hampton. Oliva was born (England). [Group Sheet]


  10. 91.  Oliva Hampton was born (England).
    Children:
    1. 45. Eleanor Winter

  11. 92.  Geoffrey Boleyn was born ~ 1380, Salle, Norfolk, England; died 0___ 1440.

    Geoffrey — Anne Bracton. Anne (daughter of John Bracton and Agnes LNU) was born 0___ 1390, (Norfolkshire, England). [Group Sheet]


  12. 93.  Anne Bracton was born 0___ 1390, (Norfolkshire, England) (daughter of John Bracton and Agnes LNU).
    Children:
    1. 46. Geoffrey Boleyn was born 0___ 1406, Salle, Norfolk, England; died 0___ 1463; was buried London, England.

  13. 94.  Thomas Hoo, Baron Hoo and Hastings was born (England).

    Thomas — Elizabeth Wychingham. Elizabeth was born (England). [Group Sheet]


  14. 95.  Elizabeth Wychingham was born (England).
    Children:
    1. 47. Anne Hastings was born (England).


Generation: 8

  1. 164.  John Touchet, III, Knight, 4th Lord AudleyJohn Touchet, III, Knight, 4th Lord Audley was born 23 Apr 1371, Heleigh, Staffordshire, England (son of John Touchet, Lord of Markeaton and Margery de Mortimer); died 19 Dec 1408, Heleigh, Staffordshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: 1st Baron Tuchet
    • Also Known As: John Touchet

    Notes:

    John Tuchet, 4th Lord Audley (of Heleigh)1

    M, #47278, b. 23 April 1371, d. 19 December 1408
    Last Edited=12 May 2007
    John Tuchet, 4th Lord Audley (of Heleigh) was born on 23 April 1371.1 He was the son of John Tuchet.1 He married Isabel (?).1 He died on 19 December 1408 at age 37.1
    He succeeded to the title of 4th Lord Audley, of Heleigh [E., 1313] on 20 October 1403, by writ.1,2
    Child of John Tuchet, 4th Lord Audley (of Heleigh) and Isabel (?)

    James Tuchet, 5th Lord Audley (of Heleigh)+1 b. c 1398, d. 23 Sep 1459
    Citations

    [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume I, page 340. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
    [S2] Peter W. Hammond, editor, The Complete Peerage or a History of the House of Lords and All its Members From the Earliest Times, Volume XIV: Addenda & Corrigenda (Stroud, Gloucestershire, U.K.: Sutton Publishing, 1998), page 50. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage, Volume XIV.
    John Tuchet1

    M, #47279
    Last Edited=22 May 2004
    John Tuchet is the son of Sir John Tuchet and Joan Audley.1
    Child of John Tuchet

    John Tuchet, 4th Lord Audley (of Heleigh)+1 b. 23 Apr 1371, d. 19 Dec 1408
    Citations

    [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume I, page 340. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.

    end

    John married Elizabeth Stafford ~ 1391, Heleigh, Staffordshire, England. Elizabeth (daughter of Humphrey Stafford and Alice Grenville) was born 0___ 1375, Stourbridge, Staffordshire, England; died Aft 1404, Heleigh, Staffordshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 165.  Elizabeth Stafford was born 0___ 1375, Stourbridge, Staffordshire, England (daughter of Humphrey Stafford and Alice Grenville); died Aft 1404, Heleigh, Staffordshire, England.
    Children:
    1. 82. James Touchet, Knight, 5th Baron Audley was born ~ 1398, of Heleigh Castle, Heleigh, Stafford, England; died 23 Sep 1459, Blore Heath, Staffordshire, England; was buried Darley Abbey, England.

  3. 166.  William de Ros, Knight, 6th Baron de Ros of Helmsley was born ~ 1370, Helmsley, Yorkshire, England (son of Thomas de Ros, Knight, 4th Baron de Ros and Beatrice Stafford); died 1 Sep 1414.

    Notes:

    William de Ros, 6th Baron de Ros of Helmsley, KG (c.1370 - 1 September 1414) was Lord Treasurer of England.

    He was a son of Thomas de Ros, 4th Baron de Ros and Beatrice Stafford, daughter of Ralph Stafford, 1st Earl of Stafford. He was also a younger brother of John de Ros, 5th Baron de Ros.

    His older brother died without issue in Paphos, Cyprus during 1394. William was already a Knight and inherited the rank and privileges of his deceased brother. He was first summoned to the Parliament of England on November 20 of the same year. He would regularly attend sessions till 1413.

    His first assignment from Richard II of England was to join Walter Skirlaw, Bishop of Durham, Henry Percy, 1st Earl of Northumberland and others in negotiating for a peace treaty with Robert III of Scotland.

    Richard favored William with a position in his Privy council. In 1396, William accompanied the King to Calais for his marriage to his second Queen consort Isabella of Valois, daughter of Charles VI of France and Isabeau of Bavaria.

    When Henry of Bolingbroke started his revolt against Richard II, William was among the first to support him. He was present for the abdication of Richard II and the declaration of Henry IV as the new King. He retained his position in the Privy council for the rest of his life.

    He seems to have been a special favourite with the first monarch of the House of Lancaster and was employed him in various civil affairs of great importance. He served as Lord Treasurer of England from 1403 to 1404. He was created a Knight of the Garter in 1403 along with Edmund de Holand, 4th Earl of Kent and Richard Grey, 4th Baron Grey of Codnor.

    William was in charge of investigating the activities of Lollards in Derbyshire, Middlesex and Nottinghamshire from 1413 to his death.

    Marriage and issue

    William de Ros married, by licence dated 9 October 1394, Margaret Fitzalan (d. 3 July 1438), the daughter of John FitzAlan, 1st Baron Arundel, by Eleanor Maltravers (c.1345 – 12 January 1405), younger daughter and coheir of Sir John Maltravers (d. 22 January 1349) and his wife Gwenthlian, by whom he had five sons and four daughters:[2]

    John de Ros, 7th Baron de Ros.
    William de Ros.
    Thomas de Ros, 8th Baron de Ros.
    Sir Robert de Ros, who married Anne Halsham.
    Sir Richard de Ros.
    Alice de Ros.
    Margaret De Ros, who married James Tuchet, 5th Baron Audley about 1415.
    Beatrice de Ros (a nun).
    Elizabeth de Ros, who married Robert de Morley, 6th Baron Morley.

    William married Margaret FitzAlan 9 Oct 1394. Margaret (daughter of John FitzAlan, 1st Baron Arundel and Eleanor Maltravers, 2nd Baroness Maltravers) was born ~ 1370; died 3 Jul 1438. [Group Sheet]


  4. 167.  Margaret FitzAlan was born ~ 1370 (daughter of John FitzAlan, 1st Baron Arundel and Eleanor Maltravers, 2nd Baroness Maltravers); died 3 Jul 1438.
    Children:
    1. 83. Margaret de Ros was born ~ 1400, of Hamlake, North Riding, Yorkshire, England; died Aft 1423, Heleigh Castle, Staffordshire, England.

  5. 168.  John Neville, 3rd Baron Neville de RabyJohn Neville, 3rd Baron Neville de Raby was born 1337-1340, Raby Castle, Staindrop, Durham, England (son of Ralph Neville, 4th Baron Neville de Raby and Alice de Audley); died 17 Oct 1388, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Northumberland, England; was buried Durham Cathedral, Durham, Durhamshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: John de Neville

    Notes:

    John Neville, 3rd Baron Neville de Raby, KG c.1337 - 17 October 1388) was an English peer and soldier.[a]

    John Neville, born at Raby Castle, Durham, between 1337 and 1340, was the eldest son of Ralph Neville, 2nd Baron Neville de Raby, and Alice Audley. He had five brothers, including Alexander Neville, Archbishop of York, and four sisters.[1]

    Cokayne notes that Neville's public career was as active as his father's had been. He fought against the Scots at the Battle of Neville's Cross on 17 October 1346 as a captain under his father, was knighted about 1360 after a skirmish near Paris while serving under Sir Walter Manny , and fought in Aquitaine in 1366, and again in 1373-4.

    At his father's death on 5 August 1367 he succeeded to the title, and had livery of his lands in England and Scotland in October of that year.

    From 1367 on he had numerous commissions issued to him, and in 1368 served as joint ambassador to France.[2] He was made a Knight of the Garter in 1369.[3]

    In July 1370 he was Admiral of the North, and in November of that year a joint commissioner to treat with Genoa . He was Steward of the King's Household in 1372, and in July of that year was part of an expedition to Brittany . For the next several years he served in Scotland and the Scottish Marches . In 1378 he had licence to fortify Raby Castle, and in June of the same year was in Gascony, where he was appointed Keeper of Fronsac Castle and Seneschal of Gascony .

    He spent several years in Gascony, and was among the forces which raised the siege of Mortaigne in 1381. On his return to England he was again appointed Warden of the Marches. In May 1383 and March 1387 he was a joint commissioner to treat of peace with Scotland, and in July 1385 was to accompany the King to Scotland.[4]

    Neville died at Newcastle upon Tyne on 17 October 1388. In his will he requested burial in Durham Cathedral by his first wife, Maud. He was succeeded by his eldest son, Ralph Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland .[5]

    Marriages and issue

    Neville married, before 1362, firstly, Maud Percy (d. before 18 February 1379), daughter of Henry de Percy, 2nd Baron Percy of Alnwick, Northumberland, and Idoine de Clifford, daughter of Robert de Clifford, 1st Baron de Clifford, by whom he had two sons and five daughters:[6]

    Ralph Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland.
    Sir Thomas Neville of Brancepeth, who married Maud Stanhope.
    Alice Neville, who married William Deincourt, 3rd Baron Deincourt.
    Maud Nevile.
    Idoine Neville.
    Eleanor Neville, who married Ralph de Lumley, 1st Baron Lumley.
    Elizabeth Neville, who became a nun.
    After his first wife Maud's death in 1379 Neville married secondly, before 9 October 1381, Elizabeth Latimer (d. 5 November 1395), daughter of William Latimer, 4th Baron Latimer, by whom he had a son and a daughter:[7]

    John Neville, 6th Baron Latimer (c.1382 – 10 December 1430), who married firstly, Maud Clifford (c.26 August 1446), daughter of Thomas de Clifford, 6th Baron de Clifford, whom he divorced before 1413x17, and by whom he had no issue. She married secondly, Richard of Conisburgh, 3rd Earl of Cambridge.[8]
    Elizabeth Neville, who married, before 27 May 1396, Sir Thomas Willoughby (died shortly before 20 August 1417) son of Robert Willoughby, 4th Baron Willoughby de Eresby (c.1348-50 – 9 August 1396), by whom she had one child, Sir John Willoughby (c.1400 – 24 February 1437).[9]
    After Neville's death, his widow, Elizabeth, married, as his second wife, Robert Willoughby, 4th Baron Willoughby de Eresby (c.1348-50 – 9 August 1396), by whom she had a daughter, Margaret Willoughby.[10]

    Birth:
    Raby Castle - history & images of this Neville Family Home ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raby_Castle

    John married Maud Percy 0Jul 1357, Alnwick, Northumberland, England. Maud (daughter of Henry Percy, Knight, 2nd Baron Percy of Alnwick and Idonia Clifford) was born Abt 1335, Warkworth Castle, Alnwick, Northumberland, England; died 18 Feb 1378; was buried Durham Cathedral, Durham, Durhamshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  6. 169.  Maud Percy was born Abt 1335, Warkworth Castle, Alnwick, Northumberland, England (daughter of Henry Percy, Knight, 2nd Baron Percy of Alnwick and Idonia Clifford); died 18 Feb 1378; was buried Durham Cathedral, Durham, Durhamshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Maud de Percy

    Notes:

    Maud's ahnentafel: https://histfam.familysearch.org//ahnentafel.php?personID=I1058&tree=EuropeRoyalNobleHous&parentset=0&generations=4

    Children:
    1. 84. Ralph Neville, Knight, 1st Earl of Westmorland was born 0___ 1364, Castle Raby, Raby-Keverstone, Durham, England; died 21 Oct 1425, Castle Raby, Raby-Keverstone, Durham, England; was buried 0Oct 1425, St. Mary's Church, Staindrop, Durham, England.
    2. Eleanor de Neville, Baroness of Lumley was born ~ 1379, Raby Castle, Staindrop, Durham, England; died ~ 1441, Raby Castle, Staindrop, Durham, England.

  7. 170.  John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of LancasterJohn of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster was born 6 Mar 1340, St. Bavo's Abbey, Ghent, Belgium (son of Edward III, King of England and Phillipa d'Avesnes, Queen of England); died 3 Feb 1399, Leicester Castle, Leicester, Leicestershire, England; was buried 15 Mar 1399, St. Paul's Cathedral, London, Middlesex, England..

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Duke of Aquitaine
    • Also Known As: King of Castile

    Notes:

    John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster, KG (6 March 1340 – 3 February 1399) was a member of the House of Plantagenet, the third surviving son of King Edward III of England and Philippa of Hainault. He was called "John of Gaunt" because he was born in Ghent, then rendered in English as Gaunt. When he became unpopular later in life, scurrilous rumours and lampoons circulated that he was actually the son of a Ghent butcher, perhaps because Edward III was not present at the birth. This story always drove him to fury.[2]

    As a younger brother of Edward, Prince of Wales (Edward, the Black Prince), John exercised great influence over the English throne during the minority of Edward's son, who became King Richard II, and the ensuing periods of political strife. Due to some generous land grants, John was one of the richest men in his era. He made an abortive attempt to enforce a claim to the Crown of Castile that came courtesy of his second wife Constance, who was an heir to the Castillian Kingdom, and for a time styled himself as such.

    John of Gaunt's legitimate male heirs, the Lancasters, include Kings Henry IV, Henry V, and Henry VI. His other legitimate descendants include his daughters Queen Philippa of Portugal and Elizabeth, Duchess of Exeter (by his first wife Blanche of Lancaster), and Queen Catherine of Castile (by his second wife Constance of Castile). John fathered five children outside marriage, one early in life by a lady-in-waiting to his mother, and four by Katherine Swynford, Gaunt's long-term mistress and third wife. The children of Katherine Swynford, surnamed "Beaufort," were legitimised by royal and papal decrees after John and Katherine married in 1396. Descendants of this marriage include Joan Beaufort, Countess of Westmorland, a grandmother of Kings Edward IV and Richard III; John Beaufort, 1st Earl of Somerset, a great-grandfather of King Henry VII; and Joan Beaufort, Queen of Scots, from whom are descended all subsequent sovereigns of Scotland beginning in 1437 and all sovereigns of England, Great Britain and the United Kingdom from 1603 to the present day. The three houses of English sovereigns that succeeded the rule of Richard II in 1399 — the Houses of Lancaster, York and Tudor — were all descended from John's children Henry IV, Joan Beaufort and John Beaufort, respectively. In addition, John's daughter Catherine of Lancaster was married to King Henry III of Castile, which made him the grandfather of King John II of Castile and the ancestor of all subsequent monarchs of the Crown of Castile and united Spain. Through John II of Castile's great-granddaughter Joanna the Mad, John of Gaunt is also an ancestor of the Habsburg rulers who would reign in Spain and much of central Europe.

    John of Gaunt's eldest son and heir, Henry Bolingbroke, Duke of Hereford, the son of his first wife Blanche of Lancaster, was exiled for ten years by King Richard II in 1398 as resolution to a dispute between Henry and Thomas de Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk.[3] When John of Gaunt died in 1399, his estates and titles were declared forfeit to the crown, since King Richard II had named Henry a traitor and changed his sentence to exile for life.[3] Henry Bolingbroke returned from exile to reclaim his inheritance and depose Richard. Bolingbroke then reigned as King Henry IV of England (1399–1413), the first of the descendants of John of Gaunt to hold the throne of England.

    Duke of Lancaster

    Kenilworth Castle, a massive fortress extensively modernised and given a new Great Hall by John of Gaunt after 1350
    John was the fourth son of King Edward III of England. His first wife, Blanche of Lancaster, was also his third cousin, both as great-great-grandchildren of King Henry III. They married in 1359 at Reading Abbey as a part of the efforts of Edward III to arrange matches for his sons with wealthy heiresses. Upon the death of his father-in-law, the 1st Duke of Lancaster, in 1361, John received half his lands, the title "Earl of Lancaster", and distinction as the greatest landowner in the north of England as heir of the Palatinate of Lancaster. He also became the 14th Baron of Halton and 11th Lord of Bowland. John inherited the rest of the Lancaster property when Blanche's sister Maud, Countess of Leicester (married to William V, Count of Hainaut), died without issue on 10 April 1362.

    John received the title "Duke of Lancaster" from his father on 13 November 1362. By then well established, he owned at least thirty castles and estates across England and France and maintained a household comparable in scale and organisation to that of a monarch. He owned land in almost every county in England, a patrimony that produced a net income of between ¹8,000 and ¹10,000 a year.[4]

    After the death in 1376 of his older brother Edward of Woodstock (also known as the "Black Prince"), John of Gaunt contrived to protect the religious reformer John Wycliffe, possibly to counteract the growing secular power of the church.[5] However, John's ascendancy to political power coincided with widespread resentment of his influence. At a time when English forces encountered setbacks in the Hundred Years' War against France, and Edward III's rule was becoming unpopular due to high taxation and his affair with Alice Perrers, political opinion closely associated the Duke of Lancaster with the failing government of the 1370s. Furthermore, while King Edward and the Prince of Wales were popular heroes due to their successes on the battlefield, John of Gaunt had not won equivalent military renown that could have bolstered his reputation. Although he fought in the Battle of Nâajera (1367), for example, his later military projects proved unsuccessful.

    When Edward III died in 1377 and John's ten-year-old nephew succeeded as Richard II of England, John's influence strengthened. However, mistrust remained, and some[who?] suspected him of wanting to seize the throne himself. John took pains to ensure that he never became associated with the opposition to Richard's kingship. As de facto ruler during Richard's minority, he made unwise decisions on taxation that led to the Peasants' Revolt in 1381, when the rebels destroyed his home in London, the Savoy Palace. Unlike some of Richard's unpopular advisors, John was away from London at the time of the uprising and thus avoided the direct wrath of the rebels.

    In 1386 John left England to seek the throne of Castile, claimed in Jure uxoris by right of his second wife, Constance of Castile, whom he had married in 1371. However, crisis ensued almost immediately in his absence, and in 1387 King Richard's misrule brought England to the brink of civil war. Only John, on his return to England in 1389, succeeded in persuading the Lords Appellant and King Richard to compromise to usher in a period of relative stability. During the 1390s, John's reputation of devotion to the well-being of the kingdom was largely restored.

    Sometime after the death of Blanche of Lancaster in 1368 and the birth of their first son, John Beaufort, in 1373, John of Gaunt and Katherine Swynford, the daughter of an ordinary knight, entered into an extra-marital love affair that would produce four children for the couple. All of them were born out of wedlock, but legitimized upon their parents' eventual marriage. The adulterous relationship endured until 1381, when it was broken out of political necessity.[6] On 13 January 1396, two years after the death of Constance of Castile, Katherine and John of Gaunt married in Lincoln Cathedral. The children bore the surname "Beaufort" after a former French possession of the duke. The Beaufort children, three sons and a daughter, were legitimised by royal and papal decrees after John and Katherine married. A later proviso that they were specifically barred from inheriting the throne, the phrase excepta regali dignitate ("except royal status"), was inserted with dubious authority by their half-brother Henry IV.

    John died of natural causes on 3 February 1399 at Leicester Castle, with his third wife Katherine by his side.

    Military commander in France

    Because of his rank, John of Gaunt was one of England's principal military commanders in the 1370s and 1380s, though his enterprises were never rewarded with the kind of dazzling success that had made his elder brother Edward the Black Prince such a charismatic war leader.

    On the resumption of war with France in 1369, John was sent to Calais with the Earl of Hereford and a small English army with which he raided into northern France. On 23 August, he was confronted by a much larger French army under Philip the Bold, Duke of Burgundy. Exercising his first command, John dared not attack such a superior force and the two armies faced each other across a marsh for several weeks until the English were reinforced by the Earl of Warwick, at which the French withdrew without offering battle. John and Warwick then decided to strike Harfleur, the base of the French fleet on the Seine. Further reinforced by German mercenaries, they marched on Harfleur, but were delayed by French guerilla operations while the town prepared for a siege. John invested the town for four days in October, but he was losing so many men to dysentery and bubonic plague that he decided to abandon the siege and return to Calais. During this retreat, the army had to fight its way across the Somme at the ford of Blanchetaque against a French army led by Hugh de Chãatillon, who was captured and sold to Edward III. By the middle of November, the survivors of the sickly army returned to Calais, where the Earl of Warwick died of plague. Though it seemed an inglorious conclusion to the campaign, John had forced the French king, Charles V, to abandon his plans to invade England that autumn.[7]

    In the summer of 1370, John was sent with a small army to Aquitaine to reinforce his ailing elder brother, the Black Prince, and his younger brother Edmund of Langley, Earl of Cambridge. With them, he participated in the Siege of Limoges (September 1370). He took charge of the siege operations and at one point engaging in hand-to-hand fighting in the undermining tunnels.[8] After this event, the Black Prince surrendered his lordship of Aquitaine and sailed for England, leaving John in charge. Though he attempted to defend the duchy against French encroachment for nearly a year, lack of resources and money meant he could do little but husband what small territory the English still controlled, and he resigned the command in September 1371 and returned to England.[9] Just before leaving Aquitaine, he married the Infanta Constance of Castile on September 1371 at Roquefort, near Bordeaux, Guienne. The following year he took part with his father, Edward III, in an abortive attempt to invade France with a large army, which was frustrated by three months of unfavourable winds.

    Probably John's most notable feat of arms occurred in August–December 1373, when he attempted to relieve Aquitaine by the landward route, leading an army of some 9,000 mounted men from Calais on a great chevauchâee from north-eastern to south-western France on a 900 kilometre raid. This four-month ride through enemy territory, evading French armies on the way, was a bold stroke that impressed contemporaries but achieved virtually nothing. Beset on all sides by French ambushes and plagued by disease and starvation, John of Gaunt and his raiders battled their way through Champagne, east of Paris, into Burgundy, across the Massif Central, and finally down into Dordogne. Unable to attack any strongly fortified forts and cities, the raiders plundered the countryside, which weakened the French infrastructure, but the military value of the damage was only temporary. Marching in winter across the Limousin plateau, with stragglers being picked off by the French, huge numbers of the army, and even larger numbers of horses, died of cold, disease or starvation. The army reached English-occupied Bordeaux on 24 December 1373, severely weakened in numbers with the loss of least one-third of their force in action and another third to disease. Upon arrival in Bordeaux, many more succumbed to the bubonic plague that was raging in the city. Sick, demoralised and mutinous, the army was in no shape to defend Aquitaine, and soldiers began to desert. John had no funds with which to pay them, and despite his entreaties, none were sent from England, so in April 1374, he abandoned the enterprise and sailed for home.[10]

    John's final campaign in France took place in 1378. He planned a 'great expedition' of mounted men in a large armada of ships to land at Brest and take control of Brittany. Not enough ships could be found to transport the horses, and the expedition was tasked with the more limited objective of capturing St. Malo. The English destroyed the shipping in St. Malo harbour and began to assault the town by land on 14 August, but John was soon hampered by the size of his army, which was unable to forage because French armies under Olivier de Clisson and Bertrand du Guesclin occupied the surrounding countryside, harrying the edges of his force. In September, the siege was simply abandoned and the army returned ingloriously to England. John of Gaunt received most of the blame for the debãacle.[11]

    Partly as a result of these failures, and those of other English commanders at this period, John was one of the first important figures in England to conclude that the war with France was unwinnable because of France's greater resources of wealth and manpower. He began to advocate peace negotiations; indeed, as early as 1373, during his great raid through France, he made contact with Guillaume Roger, brother and political adviser of Pope Gregory XI, to let the pope know he would be interested in a diplomatic conference under papal auspices. This approach led indirectly to the Anglo-French Congress of Bruges in 1374–77, which resulted in the short-lived Truce of Bruges between the two sides.[12] John was himself a delegate to the various conferences that eventually resulted in the Truce of Leulinghem in 1389. The fact that he became identified with the attempts to make peace added to his unpopularity at a period when the majority of Englishmen believed victory would be in their grasp if only the French could be defeated decisively as they had been in the 1350s. Another motive was John's conviction that it was only by making peace with France would it be possible to release sufficient manpower to enforce his claim to the throne of Castile.

    Head of government

    On his return from France in 1374, John took a more decisive and persistent role in the direction of English foreign policy. From then until 1377, he was effectively the head of the English government due to the illness of his father and elder brother, who were unable to exercise authority. His vast estates made him the richest man in England, and his great wealth, ostentatious display of it, autocratic manner and attitudes, enormous London mansion (the Savoy Palace on the Strand) and association with the failed peace process at Bruges combined to make him the most visible target of social resentments. His time at the head of government was marked by the so-called Good Parliament of 1376 and the Bad Parliament of 1377. The first, called to grant massive war taxation to the Crown, turned into a parliamentary revolution, with the Commons (supported to some extent by the Lords) venting their grievances at decades of crippling taxation, misgovernment, and suspected endemic corruption among the ruling classes. John was left isolated (even the Black Prince supported the need for reform) and the Commons refused to grant money for the war unless most of the great officers of state were dismissed and the king's mistress Alice Perrers, another focus of popular resentment, was barred from any further association with him. But even after the government acceded to virtually all their demands, the Commons then refused to authorise any funds for the war, losing the sympathy of the Lords as a result.

    The death of the Black Prince on 8 June 1376 and the onset of Edward III's last illness at the closing of Parliament on 10 July left John with all the reins of power. He immediately had the ailing king grant pardons to all the officials impeached by the Parliament; Alice Perrers too was reinstated at the heart of the king's household. John impeached William of Wykeham and other leaders of the reform movement, and secured their conviction on old or trumped-up charges. The parliament of 1377 was John's counter-coup: crucially, the Lords no longer supported the Commons and John was able to have most of the acts of 1376 annulled. He also succeeded in forcing the Commons to agree to the imposition of the first Poll Tax in English history — a viciously regressive measure that bore hardest on the poorest members of society.[13] There was organised opposition to his measures and rioting in London; John of Gaunt's arms were reversed or defaced wherever they were displayed, and protestors pasted up lampoons on his supposedly dubious birth. At one point he was forced to take refuge across the Thames, while his Savoy Palace only just escaped looting.[14] It was rumoured (and believed by many people in England and France) that he intended to seize the throne for himself and supplant the rightful heir, his nephew Richard, the son of the Black Prince, but there seems to have been no truth in this and on the death of Edward III and the accession of the child Richard II, John sought no position of regency for himself and withdrew to his estates.[15]

    John's personal unpopularity persisted, however, and the failure of his expedition to Saint-Malo in 1378 did nothing for his reputation. By this time, too, some of his possessions were taken from him by the Crown. For example, his ship, the Dieulagarde, was seized and bundled with other royal ships to be sold (to pay off the debts of Sir Robert de Crull, who during the latter part of King Edward III's reign had been the Clerk of the King's Ships, and had advanced monies to pay for the king's ships .[16] During the Peasants' Revolt of 1381, John of Gaunt was far from the centre of events, on the March of Scotland, but he was among those named by the rebels as a traitor to be beheaded as soon as he could be found. The Savoy Palace was systematically destroyed by the mob and burned to the ground. Nominally friendly lords and even his own fortresses closed their gates to him, and John was forced to flee into Scotland with a handful of retainers and throw himself on the charity of King Robert II of Scotland until the crisis was over.[17]

    King of Castile

    Upon his marriage to the Infanta Constance of Castile in 1371, John assumed (officially from 29 January 1372) the title of King of Castile and Leâon in right of his wife, and insisted his fellow English nobles henceforth address him as 'my lord of Spain'.[18] He impaled his arms with those of the Spanish kingdom. From 1372, John gathered around himself a small court of refugee Castilian knights and ladies and set up a Castilian chancery that prepared documents in his name according to the style of Peter of Castile, dated by the Castilian era and signed by himself with the Spanish formula 'Yo El Rey' ("I, the King").[19] He hatched several schemes to make good his claim with an army, but for many years these were still-born due to lack of finance or the conflicting claims of war in France or with Scotland. It was only in 1386, after Portugal under its new King John I had entered into full alliance with England, that he was actually able to land with an army in Spain and mount a campaign for the throne of Castile (that ultimately failed). John sailed from England on 9 July 1386 with a huge Anglo-Portuguese fleet carrying an army of about 5,000 men plus an extensive 'royal' household and his wife and daughters. Pausing on the journey to use his army to drive off the French forces who were then besieging Brest, he landed at Corunna in northern Spain on 29 July.


    John of Gaunt dines with John I of Portugal, to discuss a joint Anglo-Portuguese invasion of Castile (from Jean de Wavrin's Chronique d'Angleterre).
    The Castilian king, John of Trastâamara, had expected John would land in Portugal and had concentrated his forces on the Portuguese border. He was wrong-footed by John's decision to invade Galicia, the most distant and disaffected of Castile's kingdoms. From August to October, John of Gaunt set up a rudimentary court and chancery at Ourense and received the submission of the Galician nobility and most of the towns of Galicia, though they made their homage to him conditional on his being recognised as king by the rest of Castile. While John of Gaunt had gambled on an early decisive battle, the Castilians were in no hurry to join battle, and he began to experience difficulties keeping his army together and paying it. In November, he met King John I of Portugal at Ponte do Mouro on the south side of the Minho River and concluded an agreement with him to make a joint Anglo-Portuguese invasion of central Castile early in 1387. The treaty was sealed by the marriage of John's eldest daughter Philippa to the Portuguese king. A large part of John's army had succumbed to sickness, however, and when the invasion was mounted, they were far outnumbered by their Portuguese allies. The campaign of April–June 1387 was an ignominious failure. The Castilians refused to offer battle and the Galician-Anglo-Portuguese troops, apart from time-wasting sieges of fortified towns, were reduced to foraging for food in the arid Spanish landscape. They were harried mainly by French mercenaries of the Castilian king. Many hundreds of English, including close friends and retainers of John of Gaunt, died of disease or exhaustion. Many deserted or abandoned the army to ride north under French safe-conducts. Shortly after the army returned to Portugal, John of Gaunt concluded a secret treaty with John of Trastâamara under which he and his wife renounced all claim to the Castilian throne in return for a large annual payment and the marriage of their daughter Catherine to John of Trastâamara's son Henry.

    Duke of Aquitaine

    John left Portugal for Aquitaine, and he remained in that province until he returned to England in November 1389. This effectively kept him off the scene while England endured the major political crisis of the conflict between Richard II and the Lords Appellant, who were led by John of Gaunt's younger brother Thomas of Woodstock, Duke of Gloucester. Only four months after his return to England, in March 1390, Richard II formally invested Gaunt with the Duchy of Aquitaine, thus providing him with the overseas territory he had long desired. However he did not immediately return to the province, but remained in England and mainly ruled through seneschals as an absentee duke. His administration of the province was a disappointment, and his appointment as duke was much resented by the Gascons, since Aquitaine had previously always been held directly by the king of England or his heir; it was not felt to be a fief that a king could bestow on a subordinate. In 1394–95, he was forced to spend nearly a year in Gascony to shore up his position in the face of threats of secession by the Gascon nobles. He was one of England's principal negotiators in the diplomatic exchanges with France that led to the Truce of Leulingham in 1396, and he initially agreed to join the French-led Crusade that ended in the disastrous Battle of Nicopolis, but withdrew due to ill-health and the political problems in Gascony and England.[20] For the remainder of his life, John of Gaunt occupied the role of valued counsellor of the king and loyal supporter of the Crown. He did not even protest, it seems, when his younger brother Thomas was murdered at Richard's behest. It may be that he felt he had to maintain this posture of loyalty to protect his son Henry Bolingbroke (the future Henry IV), who had also been one of the Lords Appellant, from Richard's wrath; but in 1398 Richard had Bolingbroke exiled, and on John of Gaunt's death the next year he disinherited Bolingbroke completely, seizing John's vast estates for the Crown.

    Relationship to Chaucer

    John of Gaunt was a patron and close friend of the poet Geoffrey Chaucer, most famously known for his work The Canterbury Tales. Near the end of their lives, Lancaster and Chaucer became brothers-in-law. Chaucer married Philippa (Pan) de Roet in 1366, and Lancaster took his mistress of nearly 30 years, Katherine Swynford (de Roet), who was Philippa Chaucer's sister, as his third wife in 1396. Although Philippa died c. 1387, the men were bound as brothers and Lancaster's children by Katherine – John, Henry, Thomas and Joan Beaufort – were Chaucer's nephews and niece.

    Chaucer's Book of the Duchess, also known as the Deeth of Blaunche the Duchesse,[21] was written in commemoration of Blanche of Lancaster, John of Gaunt's first wife. The poem refers to John and Blanche in allegory as the narrator relates the tale of "A long castel with walles white/Be Seynt Johan, on a ryche hil" (1318–1319) who is mourning grievously after the death of his love, "And goode faire White she het/That was my lady name ryght" (948–949). The phrase "long castel" is a reference to Lancaster (also called "Loncastel" and "Longcastell"), "walles white" is thought to likely be an oblique reference to Blanche, "Seynt Johan" was John of Gaunt's name-saint, and "ryche hil" is a reference to Richmond; these thinly veiled references reveal the identity of the grieving black knight of the poem as John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster and Earl of Richmond. "White" is the English translation of the French word "blanche", implying that the white lady was Blanche of Lancaster.[22]

    Believed to have been written in the 1390s, Chaucer's short poem Fortune, is also inferred to directly reference Lancaster.[23][24] "Chaucer as narrator" openly defies Fortune, proclaiming he has learned who his enemies are through her tyranny and deceit, and declares "my suffisaunce" (15) and that "over himself hath the maystrye" (14). Fortune, in turn, does not understand Chaucer's harsh words to her for she believes she has been kind to him, claims that he does not know what she has in store for him in the future, but most importantly, "And eek thou hast thy beste frend alyve" (32, 40, 48). Chaucer retorts that "My frend maystow nat reven, blind goddesse" (50) and orders her to take away those who merely pretend to be his friends. Fortune turns her attention to three princes whom she implores to relieve Chaucer of his pain and "Preyeth his beste frend of his noblesse/That to som beter estat he may atteyne" (78–79). The three princes are believed to represent the dukes of Lancaster, York, and Gloucester, and a portion of line 76, "as three of you or tweyne," to refer to the ordinance of 1390 which specified that no royal gift could be authorised without the consent of at least two of the three dukes.[23] Most conspicuous in this short poem is the number of references to Chaucer's "beste frend". Fortune states three times in her response to the plaintiff, "And also, you still have your best friend alive" (32, 40, 48); she also references his "beste frend" in the envoy when appealing to his "noblesse" to help Chaucer to a higher estate. A fifth reference is made by "Chaucer as narrator" who rails at Fortune that she shall not take his friend from him. While the envoy playfully hints to Lancaster that Chaucer would certainly appreciate a boost to his status or income, the poem Fortune distinctively shows his deep appreciation and affection for John of Gaunt.

    Marriages

    Coat of arms of John of Gaunt asserting his kingship over Castile and Leâon, combining the Castilian castle and lion with lilies of France, the lions of England and his heraldic difference

    On 19 May 1359 at Reading Abbey, John married his third cousin, Blanche of Lancaster, daughter of Henry of Grosmont, 1st Duke of Lancaster. The wealth she brought to the marriage was the foundation of John's fortune. Blanche died on 12 September 1368 at Tutbury Castle, while her husband was overseas. Their son Henry Bolingbroke became Henry IV of England, after the duchy of Lancaster was taken by Richard II upon John's death while Henry was in exile. Their daughter Philippa became Queen of Portugal by marrying King John I of Portugal in 1387. All subsequent kings of Portugal were thus descended from John of Gaunt.

    In 1371, John married Infanta Constance of Castile, daughter of King Peter of Castile, thus giving him a claim to the Crown of Castile, which he would pursue. Though John was never able to make good his claim, his daughter by Constance, Catherine of Lancaster, became Queen of Castile by marrying Henry III of Castile. Catherine of Aragon is descended from this line.

    During his marriage to Constance, John of Gaunt had fathered four children by a mistress, the widow Katherine Swynford (whose sister Philippa de Roet was married to Chaucer). Prior to her widowhood, Katherine had borne at least two, possibly three, children to Lancastrian knight Sir Hugh Swynford. The known names of these children are Blanche and Thomas. (There may have been a second Swynford daughter.) John of Gaunt was Blanche Swynford's godfather.[25]
    Constance died in 1394.

    John married Katherine in 1396, and their children, the Beauforts, were legitimised by King Richard II and the Church, but barred from inheriting the throne. From the eldest son, John, descended a granddaughter, Margaret Beaufort, whose son, later King Henry VII of England, would nevertheless claim the throne.

    Queen Elizabeth II and her predecessors since Henry IV are descended from John of Gaunt.

    Children

    1640 drawing of tombs of Katherine Swynford and daughter Joan Beaufort

    By Blanche of Lancaster:

    Philippa (1360–1415) married King John I of Portugal (1357–1433).
    John (1362–1365) was the first-born son of John and Blanche of Lancaster and lived possibly at least until after the birth of his brother Edward of Lancaster in 1365 and died before his second brother another short lived boy called John in 1366.[26] He was buried at the Church of St Mary de Castro, Leicester.
    Elizabeth (1364–1426), married (1) in 1380 John Hastings, 3rd Earl of Pembroke (1372–1389), annulled 1383; married (2) in 1386 John Holland, 1st Duke of Exeter (1350–1400); (3) Sir John Cornwall, 1st Baron Fanhope and Milbroke (d. 1443)
    Edward (1365) died within a year of his birth and was buried at the Church of St Mary de Castro, Leicester.
    John (1366–1367) most likely died after the birth of his younger brother Henry, the future Henry IV of England; he was buried at the Church of St Mary de Castro, Leicester
    Henry IV of England (1367–1413) married (1) Mary de Bohun (1369–1394); (2) Joanna of Navarre (1368–1437)
    Isabel (1368–1368)[27][28]

    By Constance of Castile:

    Catherine (1372–1418), married King Henry III of Castile (1379–1406)
    John (1374–1375)[28][29]

    By Katherine Swynford (nâee de Roet/Roelt), mistress and later wife (children legitimised 1397):

    John Beaufort, 1st Earl of Somerset (1373–1410)—married Margaret Holland.
    Henry Beaufort, Bishop of Winchester and Cardinal (1375–1447)
    Thomas Beaufort, Duke of Exeter (1377–1427), married Margaret Neville, daughter of Sir Thomas de Neville and Joan Furnivall.
    Joan Beaufort (1379–1440)—married first Robert Ferrers, 5th Baron Boteler of Wem and second Ralph Neville, 1st Earl of Westmoreland.

    By Marie de St. Hilaire of Hainaut, mistress:

    Blanche (1359–1388/89), illegitimate, married Sir Thomas Morieux (1355–1387) in 1381, without issue. Blanche was the daughter of John's mistress, Marie de St. Hilaire of Hainaut (1340-after 1399), who was a lady-in-waiting to his mother, Queen Philippa. The affair apparently took place before John's first marriage to Blanche of Lancaster. John's daughter, Blanche, married Sir Thomas Morieux in 1381. Morieux held several important posts, including Constable of the Tower the year he was married, and Master of Horse to King Richard II two years later. He died in 1387 after six years of marriage.

    Buried:
    St Paul's Cathedral, London, is an Anglican cathedral, the seat of the Bishop of London and the mother church of the Diocese of London. It sits on Ludgate Hill at the highest point of the City of London. Its dedication to Paul the Apostle dates back to the original church on this site, founded in AD 604.[1] The present church, dating from the late 17th century, was designed in the English Baroque style by Sir Christopher Wren. Its construction, completed in Wren's lifetime, was part of a major rebuilding programme in the City after the Great Fire of London.[2]

    The cathedral is one of the most famous and most recognisable sights of London. Its dome, framed by the spires of Wren's City churches, dominated the skyline for 300 years.[3] At 365 feet (111 m) high, it was the tallest building in London from 1710 to 1962. The dome is among the highest in the world. St Paul's is the second largest church building in area in the United Kingdom after Liverpool Cathedral.

    St Paul's Cathedral occupies a significant place in the national identity.[4] It is the central subject of much promotional material, as well as of images of the dome surrounded by the smoke and fire of the Blitz.[4] Services held at St Paul's have included the funerals of Lord Nelson, the Duke of Wellington and Sir Winston Churchill; Jubilee celebrations for Queen Victoria; peace services marking the end of the First and Second World Wars; the wedding of Charles, Prince of Wales and Lady Diana Spencer, the launch of the Festival of Britain and the thanksgiving services for the Golden Jubilee, the 80th Birthday and the Diamond Jubilee of Elizabeth II.

    St Paul's Cathedral is a working church with hourly prayer and daily services.

    more ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Paul%27s_Cathedral

    Died:
    Leicester Castle was built over the Roman town walls.

    According to Leicester Museums, the castle was probably built around 1070 (soon after the Norman Conquest in 1066)[2] under the governorship of Hugh de Grantmesnil. The remains now consist of a mound, along with ruins. Originally the mound was 40 ft (12.2 m) high. Kings sometimes stayed at the castle (Edward I in 1300, and Edward II in 1310 and 1311), and John of Gaunt and his second wife Constance of Castile both died here in 1399 and 1394 respectively.

    more ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leicester_Castle

    John married Katherine de Roet, Duchess of Lancaster 0___ 1396, Lincoln, Lincolnshire, England. Katherine (daughter of Paon de Roet, Knight and unnamed spouse) was born 25 Nov 1350, Picardie, France; died 10 May 1403, Lincoln, Lincolnshire, England; was buried Lincoln Cathedral, Lincoln, Lincolnshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  8. 171.  Katherine de Roet, Duchess of LancasterKatherine de Roet, Duchess of Lancaster was born 25 Nov 1350, Picardie, France (daughter of Paon de Roet, Knight and unnamed spouse); died 10 May 1403, Lincoln, Lincolnshire, England; was buried Lincoln Cathedral, Lincoln, Lincolnshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Katherine Swynford

    Notes:

    Katherine Swynford, Duchess of Lancaster (also spelled Katharine or Catherine[2]), was the third wife of John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster, a son of King Edward III. She had been the Duke's lover for many years before their marriage. The couple's children, born before the marriage, were later legitimated during the reign of the Duke's nephew, Richard II, although with the provision that neither they nor their descendants could ever claim the throne of England.

    Their descendants were members of the Beaufort family, which played a major role in the Wars of the Roses. Henry VII, who became King of England in 1485, derived his claim to the throne from his mother Margaret Beaufort, who was a great-granddaughter of Gaunt and Katherine Swynford. His legal claim to the throne, however, was through a matrilineal and previously illegitimate line and Henry's first action was to declare himself king "by right of conquest" retroactively from 21 August 1485, the day before his army defeated King Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth.[3]

    Family

    Katherine was the daughter of Paon de Roet, a herald, and later knight, who was "probably christened as Gilles".[4] She had two sisters, Philippa and Isabel (also called Elizabeth) de Roet, and a brother, Walter. Isabel later became Canoness of the convent of St. Waudru's, Mons, c. 1366. Katherine is generally held to have been his youngest child. However, Alison Weir argues that Philippa was the junior and that both were children of a second marriage.[4] Katherine's sister Philippa, a lady of Queen Philippa's household, married the poet Geoffrey Chaucer.

    Life

    She was probably born in Hainaut in 1349 or 1350. Katherine's birth date may have been 25 November, as that is the feast day of her patron, St. Catherine of Alexandria.[citation needed] The family returned to England in 1351, and it is likely that Katherine stayed there during her father's continued travels.

    In about 1366, at St Clement Danes Church, Westminster, Katherine, aged sixteen or seventeen, contracted an advantageous marriage with "Hugh" Ottes Swynford, a Knight from the manor of Kettlethorpe in Lincolnshire, the son of Thomas Swynford by his marriage to Nicole Druel. She had the following children by him: Blanche (born 1 May 1367), Thomas (21 September 1368 – 1432), and possibly Margaret Swynford (born about 1369), later recorded as a nun of the prestigious Barking Abbey nominated by command of King Richard II.

    Katherine became attached to the household of John of Gaunt as governess to his daughters Philippa of Lancaster and Elizabeth of Lancaster. The ailing duchess Blanche had Katherine's daughter Blanche (her namesake) placed within her own daughters' chambers and afforded the same luxuries as her daughters; additionally, John of Gaunt stood as godfather to the child.

    Some time after Blanche's death in 1368 and the birth of their first son in 1373, Katherine and John of Gaunt entered into a love affair that would produce four children for the couple, born out of wedlock but legitimized upon their parents' eventual marriage; the adulterous relationship endured until 1381 when it was truncated out of political necessity[5] and ruined Katherine's reputation. On 13 January 1396, two years after the death of the Duke's second wife, Infanta Constance of Castile, Katherine and John of Gaunt married in Lincoln Cathedral. Records of their marriage kept in the Tower and elsewhere list: 'John of Ghaunt, Duke of Lancaster, married Katharine daughter of Guyon King of Armes in the time of K. Edward the 3, and Geffrey Chaucer her sister'.

    On John of Gaunt's death, Katherine became known as dowager Duchess of Lancaster. She outlived him by four years, dying on 10 May 1403, in her early fifties, an age that most of the women in the 15th century did not reach.

    Tomb

    Katherine Swynford's tomb in 1809
    Katherine's tomb and that of her daughter, Joan Beaufort, are under a carved-stone canopy in the sanctuary of Lincoln Cathedral. Joan's is the smaller of the two tombs; both were decorated with brass plates — full-length representations of them on the tops, and small shields bearing coats of arms around the sides and on the top — but those were damaged or destroyed in 1644 during the English Civil War. A hurried drawing by William Dugdale records their appearance.

    Children and descendants

    Katherine's children by Hugh Swynford were:

    Margaret Swynford (born c. 1369), became a nun at the prestigious Barking Abbey in 1377 with help from her future stepfather John of Gaunt, where she lived the religious life with her cousin Elizabeth Chaucer, daughter of the famous Geoffrey Chaucer and Katherine's sister Philippa de Roet.[4]
    Sir Thomas Swynford (1367–1432), born in Lincoln while his father Sir Hugh Swynford was away on a campaign with the Duke of Lancaster in Castile fighting for Peter of Castile.[4][6]
    Blanche Swynford, named after the Duchess of Lancaster and a godchild of John of Gaunt. (If, as suggested, she was born after 1375, this date is too late for her to have been fathered by Hugh Swynford, who died in 1371/2. However, since John of Gaunt obtained a dispensation for his marriage to Katherine for being Blanche Swynford's godchild, this theory can be discarded).[4]
    In 1846 Thomas Stapleton suggested that there was a further daughter named Dorothy Swynford, born c. 1366, who married Thomas Thimelby of Poolham near Horncastle, Lincolnshire, Sheriff of Lincolnshire in 1380, but there is no current evidence to support this claim.[4]

    Katherine's children by John of Gaunt were:

    John Beaufort, 1st Earl of Somerset (1373–1410)
    Henry, Cardinal Beaufort (1375–1447)
    Thomas Beaufort, Duke of Exeter (1377–1426)
    Joan Beaufort, Countess of Westmorland (1379–1440)
    The descendants of Katherine Swynford and John of Gaunt are significant in English and Scottish history. Their four children had been given the surname "Beaufort" and with the approval of King Richard II and the Pope were legitimated as adults by their parents' marriage in 1396. Despite this, the Beauforts were barred from inheriting the throne of England by a clause in the legitimation act inserted by their half-brother, Henry IV, although modern scholarship disputes the authority of a monarch to alter an existing parliamentary statute on his own authority, without the further approval of Parliament. This provision was later revoked by Edward IV, placing Katherine's descendants (including himself) back within the legitimate line of inheritance; the Tudor dynasty was directly descended from John and Katherine's eldest child, John Beaufort, great-grandfather of Henry VII, who based his claim to the throne on his mother's descent from John of Gaunt, a son of Edward III. John Beaufort also had a daughter named Joan Beaufort, who married James I of Scotland and thus was an ancestress of the House of Stuart.[7] John and Katherine's daughter, Joan Beaufort, was grandmother of the English kings Edward IV and Richard III, the latter of whom Henry Tudor (thus becoming by conquest Henry VII) defeated at the Battle of Bosworth Field; Henry's claim was strengthened by marrying Elizabeth of York, eldest daughter of Edward IV. It was also through Joan Beaufort, Countess of Westmoreland that the sixth queen of Henry VIII, Catherine Parr, descended.[8] John of Gaunt's son — Katherine's stepson Henry of Bolingbroke — became Henry IV after deposing Richard II (who was imprisoned and died in Pontefract Castle, where Katherine's son, Thomas Swynford, was constable and is said to have starved Richard to death for his step-brother). John of Gaunt's daughter by his first marriage to Blanche of Lancaster, Philippa of Lancaster, was great-great-grandmother to Catherine of Aragon, first wife of Henry VIII and mother of Mary I of England. John of Gaunt's child by his second wife Constance, Catherine (or Catalina), was great-grandmother of Catherine of Aragon as well.

    In literature

    Katherine Swynford is the subject of Anya Seton's novel Katherine (published in 1954) and of Alison Weir's 2008 biography Katherine Swynford: The Story of John of Gaunt and his Scandalous Duchess (ISBN 0-224-06321-9). Swynford is also the subject of Jeannette Lucraft's historical biography Katherine Swynford: The History of a Medieval Mistress. This book seeks to establish Swynford as a powerful figure in the politics of 14th-century England and an example of a woman's ability to manipulate contemporary social mores for her own interests.

    Coat of arms of Katherine Swynford as Duchess of Lancaster, after her marriage to John of Gaunt : three gold Catherine wheels ("roet" means "little wheel" in Old French) on a red field. The wheel emblem shows Katherine's devotion to her patron saint, Catherine of Alexandria, also known as Saint Catherine of the Wheel.,[4] although there was once extant a copy of her seal's impression, ca. 1377, showing her arms of three Catherine wheels of gold on a field Gules, a molet in fess point empaling the arms of Swynford (Birch's Catalogue of Seals

    Buried:
    Lincoln Cathedral (in full The Cathedral Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary of Lincoln, or sometimes St. Mary's Cathedral) is a cathedral located in Lincoln in England and seat of the Bishop of Lincoln in the Church of England. Building commenced in 1088 and continued in several phases throughout the medieval period. It was reputedly the tallest building in the world for 238 years (1311–1549).[1][2][3] The central spire collapsed in 1549 and was not rebuilt. The cathedral is the third largest in Britain (in floor space) after St Paul's and York Minster, being 484 by 271 feet (148 by 83 m). It is highly regarded by architectural scholars; the eminent Victorian writer John Ruskin declared: "I have always held... that the cathedral of Lincoln is out and out the most precious piece of architecture in the British Isles and roughly speaking worth any two other cathedrals we have."

    more ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lincoln_Cathedral

    Notes:

    Married:
    formerly his mistress...

    Children:
    1. John Beaufort, III, Knight, 1st Earl of Somerset was born 1371-1373, Chateau de Beaufrot, Anjou, France; died 14 Mar 1410, Hospital of St. Katherine's by the Tower, London, England; was buried Canterbury Cathedral, Canterbury, Kent, England.
    2. Thomas Beaufort, Duke of Exeter was born 0___ 1377; died 0___ 1427.
    3. 85. Joan Beaufort, Countess of Westmorland was born ~ 1379, Chateau Beaufort, Anjou, France; died 13 Nov 1440, Howden, Yorkshire, England; was buried Lincoln Cathedral, Lincoln, Lincolnshire, England.

  9. 172.  John Howard, Knight, Duke of NorfolkJohn Howard, Knight, Duke of Norfolk was born ~ 1366, Wiggenhall, Norfolkshire, England (son of Robert Howard, I, Duke of Norfolk and Margaret de Scales); died 17 Nov 1437, Jerusalem, Israel; was buried Stoke-by-Nayland, Suffolk, England.

    Other Events:

    • Military: Crusader

    Notes:

    About Sir John Howard, MP 1365

    Sir John Howard, Sheriff of Essex, Hertfordshire, Cambridgeshire, & Huntingdonshire1,2,3,4,5,6

    M, #12722, b. circa 1365, d. 17 November 1436

    Father Sir Robert Howard7,8,9 b. c 1342, d. 18 Jul 1388

    Mother Margaret Scales7,8,9

    Sir John Howard, Sheriff of Essex, Hertfordshire, Cambridgeshire, & Huntingdonshire was born circa 1365 at of Wiggenhall, East Winch, Fersfield, & Terrington, Norfolk, England; Age 23 in 1388.3,4,6 He married Margaret de Playz, daughter of Sir John de Playz, 5th Lord Playz and Joan Stapleton, circa 22 June 1378; They had 1 son (Sir John, 7th Lord Plaiz).3,10,4,6 Sir John Howard, Sheriff of Essex, Hertfordshire, Cambridgeshire, & Huntingdonshire married Alice Tendring, daughter of Sir William de Tendring and Katherine Mylde, before June 1397; They had 2 sons (Sir Robert; & Henry, Esq.).3,4,5,6 Sir John Howard, Sheriff of Essex, Hertfordshire, Cambridgeshire, & Huntingdonshire left a will on 1 April 1435.4,6 He died on 17 November 1436 at Jerusalem, Israel; Buried beside his 2nd wife (Alice) at Stoke by Nayland, Suffolk.3,4,6 His estate was probated in 1437.4,6

    Family 1 Margaret de Playz b. c 1367, d. bt 7 Aug 1391 - 14 Aug 1391

    Child

    Sir John Howard, 7th Lord Plaiz+7,4,6 b. c 1385

    Family 2 Alice Tendring b. c 1385, d. 18 Oct 1426

    Children

    Henry Howard, Esq.+4,6 b. c 1400, d. b 1447
    Sir Robert Howard+11,4,6 b. c 1401, d. bt Jan 1436 - Apr 1436

    Citations

    1.[S3541] Unknown author, The Royal Descents of 500 Immigrants, by Gary Boyd Roberts, p. 317; Burke's Peerage, 1938, p. 1857; The Ancestry of Dorothea Poyntz, by Ronny O. Bodine, p. 68.
    2.[S11568] The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain, and the United Kingdom, by George Edward Cokayne, Vol. X, p. 542.
    3.[S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 234.
    4.[S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. II, p. 409.
    5.[S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. III, p. 72.
    6.[S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. III, p. 330-331.
    7.[S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 233-234.
    8.[S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. II, p. 407-408.
    9.[S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. III, p. 329-330.
    10.[S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 634.
    11.[S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 234-235.
    From: http://our-royal-titled-noble-and-commoner-ancestors.com/p424.htm#i12722
    --------------------
    John HOWARD (Sheriff of Essex)
    Born: 1366
    Died: 17 Nov 1436, Jerusalem

    Notes: Sheriff of Hertford
    Father: Robert HOWARD (Sir)
    Mother: Margery SCALES
    Married 1: Margaret PLAIZ (d. 1381) (dau. of Sir John Plaiz)

    Children:

    1. John HOWARD
    2. Margaret HOWARD

    Married 2: Alice TENDRING (d. 18 Oct 1426) (dau. of Sir William Tendring and Catherine Clopton)

    Children:

    3. Robert HOWARD of Stoke Neyland (Sir)
    4. Henry HOWARD of Teringhampton

    From: http://www.tudorplace.com.ar/HOWARD1.htm#John HOWARD (Sheriff of Essex)1
    _____________
    Sir John Howard1
    M, #274370, b. circa 1357, d. 17 November 1437
    Last Edited=13 Mar 2008
    Sir John Howard was born circa 1357.1 He died on 17 November 1437, while on a pilmgrimage to Jerusalem.1
    Children of Sir John Howard

    1.Sir John Howard+1 d. 1409

    2.Sir Robert Howard+1 b. c 1385, d. 1436

    Citations

    1.[S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke's Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke's Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 2, page 2906. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    From: http://www.thepeerage.com/p27437.htm#i274370
    ____________
    John Howard, 1st Duke of Norfolk, KG, Earl Marshal (c.1425 – 22 August 1485) was an English nobleman and soldier, and the first Howard Duke of Norfolk. ...
    John Howard, born about 1425, was the son of Sir Robert Howard of Tendring (1385–1436) and Margaret de Mowbray (1388–1459), eldest daughter of Thomas de Mowbray, 1st Duke of Norfolk (of the first creation) (1366–1399), by Elizabeth FitzAlan (1366–1425). His paternal grandparents were Sir John Howard of Wiggenhall, Norfolk, and Alice Tendring, daughter of Sir William Tendring.[1][2] Howard was a descendant of English royalty through both sides of his family. On his father's side,

    Howard was descended from Richard, 1st Earl of Cornwall, the second son of King John, who had an illegitimate son, named Richard (d.1296), whose daughter, Joan of Cornwall, married Sir John Howard (d. shortly before 23 July 1331).[3]

    On his mother's side, Howard was descended from Thomas of Brotherton, 1st Earl of Norfolk, the elder son of Edward I of England by his second wife, Margaret of France, and from Edward I's younger brother, Edmund Crouchback. ....
    From: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Howard,_1st_Duke_of_Norfolk

    HOWARD, Sir John (c.1366-1437), of Wiggenhall and East Winch, Norf., Stoke Nayland, Suff., Stansted Mountfichet, Essex, and Fowlmere, Cambs.

    Family and Education

    b.c.1366, s. and h. of Sir Robert Howard (d.1389) of Wiggenhall and East Winch by Margaret, da. of Robert, 3rd Lord Scales (d.1369), and Katherine, sis. and coh. of William de Ufford, 2nd earl of Suffolk. m. (1) c.1380, Margaret (c.1367-Aug. 1391), da. and h. of John, 5th Lord Plaiz, by his 2nd w. Joan, da. of Sir Miles Stapleton of Bedale, Yorks. and Ingham, Norf., 1s. d.v.p.; (2) bef. June 1397, Alice (d. 18 Oct. 1426), da. and h. of Sir William Tendring of Tendring Hall and Stoke Nayland by Katherine, wid. of Sir Thomas Clopton, 2s. Kntd. by Mar. 1387.
    ... etc. ...

    From: http://www.historyofparliamentonline.org/volume/1386-1421/member/howard-sir-john-1366-1437

    Links

    http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/j/o/s/Elizabeth-J-Joseph/WEBSITE-0001/UHP-0711.html


    HOWARD, Sir John (c.1366-1437), of Wiggenhall and East Winch, Norf., Stoke Nayland, Suff., Stansted Mountfichet, Essex, and Fowlmere, Cambs.

    Published in The History of Parliament: the House of Commons 1386-1421, ed. J.S. Roskell, L. Clark, C. Rawcliffe., 1993 ***

    ConstituencyDates ESSEX Sept. 1397 CAMBRIDGESHIRE 1407 SUFFOLK 1422 Family and Education b.c.1366, s. and h. of Sir Robert Howard (d.1389) of Wiggenhall and East Winch by Margaret, da. of Robert, 3rd Lord Scales (d.1369), and Katherine, sis. and coh. of William de Ufford, 2nd earl of Suffolk. m. (1) c.1380, Margaret (c.1367-Aug. 1391), da. and h. of John, 5th Lord Plaiz, by his 2nd w. Joan, da. of Sir Miles Stapleton of Bedale, Yorks. and Ingham, Norf., 1s. d.v.p.; (2) bef. June 1397, Alice (d. 18 Oct. 1426), da. and h. of Sir William Tendring of Tendring Hall and Stoke Nayland by Katherine, wid. of Sir Thomas Clopton, 2s. Kntd. by Mar. 1387.

    Offices Held Commr. of inquiry, Norf. May 1388 (collusion and maintenance in a lawsuit), Essex. Apr. 1405 (treasons and felonies), Suff. June 1422 (post mortem); sewers, Cambs., Norf. Apr., May 1392; array, Norf. Mar. 1392, Essex Dec. 1399, July 1402, Suff. Aug. 1403, Essex Aug.-Nov. 1403, July 1405, Suff. Apr. 1418, Mar. 1419, June 1421; to seize and supervise estates forfeited by the Appellants of 1387-8, Essex Oct. 1397; treat for payment of a communal fine of ¹2,000 Dec. 1397; make proclamation of Henry IV’s intention to govern well, Suff., Essex May 1402; raise royal loans, Suff. Nov. 1419, Suff., Norf. Mar. 1430, Mar. 1431; of oyer and terminer May 1431.

    J.p. Suff. 22 July 1397-May 1408, 14 Dec. 1417-July 1434, 16 Nov. 1436-d., Essex 12 Nov. 1397-Oct. 1399, 28 Nov. 1399-Dec. 1414.

    Steward of the franchise of Bury St. Edmund’s abbey, Suff. c. Oct. 1399-aft. May 1404.1

    Sheriff, Essex and Herts. 24 Nov. 1400-8 Nov. 1401, 10 Nov. 1414-1 Dec. 1415, 4 Nov. 1418-23 Nov. 1419, Cambs. and Hunts. Mich. 1401-4 Nov. 1403.

    Tax collector, Essex Mar. 1404.

    Biography John was a descendant of Sir William Howard, j.c.p. under Edward I, who possibly came of burgess stock from Bishop’s Lynn. His grandfather, Sir John Howard, served as admiral of the northern fleet (1335-7), and by the mid 14th century the family was of quasi-baronial importance with interests and connexions scattered throughout East Anglia. The Howard estates, accumulated through marriage and purchase, included five manors near Bishop’s Lynn and the property of John’s grandmother, the de Boys heiress, at Fersfield and Garboldisham in south Norfolk and Brook Hall near Dunwich in Suffolk.

    John’s father died in 1389, when he was about 23, but his mother lived on until 1416. Most of the inheritance passed to him at his father’s death, however, and that same year his landed holdings were augmented considerably following the demise of his father-in-law, Lord Plaiz.2

    Howard’s marriage to Lord Plaiz’s only daughter had been purchased nine years earlier for 300 marks, and now, besides the Plaiz manors at Toft, Weeting and Knapton in Norfolk, he acquired properties outside East Anglia, namely ‘Benetfield Bury’ in Stansted Mountfichet, Oakley and Moze (Essex), Chelsworth (Suffolk) and Fowlmere (Cambridgeshire). These estates, valued at over ¹117 a year when his wife died in 1391, he retained for life ‘by the courtesy’. Howard’s second wife brought him properties on the border of Essex and Suffolk, the most notable being the manor of Stoke Nayland. The estates thus acquired by marriage qualified Sir John for election to Parliament by three shires.

    In 1404 he was numbered among the few landowners of England whose net incomes amounted to over 500 marks a year.3

    Howard’s career had begun by March 1387 when he was already a knight and serving at sea in the fleet commanded by Richard, earl of Arundel. He was closely connected with Sir Simon Felbrigg, a cousin on his mother’s side, with whom he was associated in a religious foundation in 1392, and it may have been Felbrigg who introduced him to the royal household. (Sir Simon had married a kinswoman of Queen Anne and from 1395 appeared on ceremonial occasions as the King’s standard-bearer.) On 10 Mar. 1394 Howard was retained by Richard II for life with an annuity of ¹40. That September he joined the King’s expedition in Ireland, returning in the following spring. The cancellation of his appointment as sheriff of Essex and Hertfordshire in December 1396 was evidently of no lasting political significance, for he was nominated as a j.p. in Suffolk in the following July.

    Howard’s election to Parliament in the autumn of 1397 probably owed much to his position as one of the King’s retainers, for Richard required supporters in the Commons for the enforcement of his stringent measures against the Appellants of 1387-8. During the recess he was commissioned to seize and supervise estates forfeited by Gloucester, Arundel and Warwick, and in December he was instructed to treat with the men of Essex and Hertfordshire for payment of a communal fine of ¹2,000 and to return to Parliament when it re-assembled at Shrewsbury ready, in conjunction with his fellow shire knight, Robert Tey, to give a personal account to the King of that commission’s activities. When Richard set off on his second voyage to Ireland, in the spring of 1399, Sir John again accompanied him.4

    Howard’s royal annuity was not confirmed by Henry IV, but he soon accommodated himself to the new regime and his influence as a landed magnate remained unimpaired. He continued to serve on royal commissions and as a j.p. without interruption, and he now became steward of the liberty of Bury St. Edmunds. Sir John’s chief interests lay not with his hereditary estates bordering the Wash, but rather in the property acquired by his marriages. Thus, he officiated as sheriff of Essex and Hertfordshire in 1400-1 (during which term he was summoned to the great council of August 1401), and of Cambridgeshire and Huntingdonshire in 1401-3; and it was as knight of the shire for Cambridgeshire that he was returned to Parliament for the second time, in 1407.5 But his family holdings ensured that at least to some extent he would be active in Norfolk. Earlier in his career he had devoted some attention to Raveningham college, an important foundation with which his father and his father-in-law, Lord Plaiz, had been much concerned, and he assisted in the removal of the college first to Norton Subcourse (Norfolk) and then to Mettingham castle (Suffolk). Something of his standing in East Anglian society is suggested by that of his associates: for instance, his brother-in-law, Constantine, Lord Clifton, owned Buckenham castle and other substantial estates, of which he was a feoffee. He served as trustee of the properties of Joan, Lady Fitzwalter (d.1409); among those given a fiduciary interest in his own estates was another kinsman, Robert, 5th Lord Scales; and in 1413 he was named as supervisor of the will of Maud de Vere, dowager countess of Oxford. It is not known precisely when he joined the circle of Joan de Bohun, countess of Hereford, but he had evidently done so by 1402 and thereafter he became close to the countess by whom he was engaged as a councillor. It seems likely that his son John (the issue of his first marriage) was a member of Joan’s household, for when the young man made his will in 1409 he named her, along with his father, as overseer. Others connected with Countess Joan included Robert Tey, for whom Howard acted as a feoffee, and Sir William Marney*, who asked him to be godfather to one of his sons. It was in association with Marney that Howard became a trustee of the estates of the Essex lawyer, Richard Baynard*. Then, too, he was well known to Sir Thomas Erpingham, formerly chamberlain to Henry IV and steward of the household of Henry V, who after the death of Howard’s son John married his widow, Joan Walton.6

    As sheriff of Essex and Hertfordshire in 1414-15, Howard became involved in preparations for Henry V’s first expedition to France, and in January 1416 he was pardoned ¹180 charged on his account in consideration of the expenses incurred at that time.

    In the summer of 1420 there was grave danger of a breach of the peace at the Suffolk assizes between the followers of Howard and Sir Thomas Kerdeston†, a distant kinsman of his wife, and the prospect of a riot prompted Sir Thomas Erpingham to inform the King’s Council so that both men might be warned to cease ‘alle suche gederyng of strengthe and of meigntenance’. Both Howard and Kerdeston were described as ‘weel ykynde and of gret allyaunce’, able to gain support ‘as weel of lordys of estate as of othre gentilmen as knyghtis and squyers’.7 Howard naturally found no difficulty in securing marriages for his children and grandchild with important gentry families. Young John had been married to the Walton heiress, and now, in 1420, Howard obtained for Robert, his elder son by his second wife, the hand of Margaret Mowbray, daughter of Thomas, duke of Norfolk (d.1399), and sister to John, the Earl Marshal, who was to be acknowledged duke in 1425. One eventual outcome of this match was that part of the inheritance of the great comital houses of Mowbray and Fitzalan became vested in the Howard family in the person of Sir John’s grandson, John†, who was to be summoned to Parliament as Lord Howard in 1470 and created Earl Marshal and duke of Norfolk by Richard III. Meanwhile, in about 1425 Howard secured for his grand daughter Elizabeth (the only child of his son John) the hand of John de Vere, the young earl of Oxford, who had refused a marriage proposed to him by the King’s Council in order to wed her. The price was high: Sir John settled on Elizabeth many of the family properties near Lynn and all of the former de Boys manors; and he assured de Vere that she would inherit the Plaiz and Walton estates of her parents. These settlements were to lead, after his death, to bitter feuds between the earl of Oxford and Lord Howard, which influenced their fateful alignment in the civil wars.8

    After his third Parliament, in 1422, Howard became less active than before in local administration, although he continued to be a j.p. in Suffolk and to serve as a commissioner to raise royal loans. In February 1436 he himself was requested for a loan of 100 marks in aid of the duke of York’s expedition to France. A year or so later he set out on pilgrimage to the Holy Land, only to die at Jerusalem on 17 Nov. 1437. His body was apparently brought back for burial next to his second wife, at Stoke Nayland.9

    Ref Volumes: 1386-1421 Authors: J. S. Roskell / L. S. Woodger Notes 1. F. Blomefield, Norf. v. 243; CFR, xii. 245. 2. G. Brenan and E.P. Statham, House of Howard, 1-18, 32-33; CP, xi. 501-7; CIPM, xvi. 701; Reg. Chichele, iii. 417. 3.CP, x. 542; CIPM, xvi. 754; CCR, 1389-92, p. 407; Blomefield, ii. 161; v. 235-44; C136/71/4; CPL, v. 60; E179/81/54. 4. E101/40/33 m. 1, 402/20 f. 33d; CPR, 1391-6, pp. 105-6, 381, 507; 1396-9, pp. 525, 529; CCR, 1392-6, p. 485; CFR, xi. 195, 251. 5.PPC, i. 158. 6.VCH Norf. ii. 457; CPR, 1385-9, p. 344; 1391-6, pp. 135, 389; 1405-8, p. 173; 1408-13, p. 274; 1416-22, pp. 391-2; 1422-9, p. 64; CCR, 1399-1402, p. 396; 1402-5, p. 295; 1405-9, p. 446; 1422-9, p. 145; Add. Roll 41523; C139/13/55; Lambeth Pal. Lib. Reg. Arundel, ii. f. 161d; PCC 22 Marche; CFR, xiii. 154, 189. 7.CPR, 1413-16, p. 389; PPC, ii. 272-4; CP, vii. 197-9; Peds. Plea Rolls ed. Wrottesley, 386. 8.CP, ix. 610-12; x. 238; CCR, 1422-9, p. 172; CPR, 1416-22, p. 543; Peds. Plea Rolls, 414-15. 9.PPC, iv. 323; CFR, xvii. 1, 45; Blomefield, i. 80-81; PCC 6 Luffenham; Mon. Brasses ed. Mill Stephenson, 471; C139/88/56.

    John married Alice Tendring 0___ 1387, Wiggenhall, Norfolkshire, England. Alice was born 21 Oct 1365, Tendring Hall, Stoke-by-Nayland, Suffolk, England; died 18 Oct 1426, Wiggenhall, Norfolkshire, England; was buried Stoke-by-Nayland, Suffolk, England. [Group Sheet]


  10. 173.  Alice Tendring was born 21 Oct 1365, Tendring Hall, Stoke-by-Nayland, Suffolk, England; died 18 Oct 1426, Wiggenhall, Norfolkshire, England; was buried Stoke-by-Nayland, Suffolk, England.

    Notes:

    About Alice Howard

    Alice TENDRING7,191,1194,1195 was born about 1365 in Tendring Hall, Stoke By Nayland, Suffolk, England. 1194 She died on 18 Oct 1467 in Wiggenhall, Norfolk, England. 1194 She was buried in Stoke Neyland, Suffolk, England.1194 2 SOUR S2511686

    Spouse: Sheriff Of Essex John HOWARD. Sheriff Of Essex John HOWARD and Alice TENDRING were married in 1387 in Wiggenhall, Norfolk, England. Children were: Margaret HOWARD, Henry Esq. HOWARD, [Sir Knight] Robert HOWARD, Henry HOWARD.

    Children:
    1. 86. Robert Howard, Duke of Norfolk was born 0___ 1385, Tendring, Essex, England; died 1 Apr 1437.

  11. 174.  Thomas de Mowbray, Knight, 1st Duke of Norfolk was born 22 Mar 1366, Epworth, Isle of Axholme, Lincolnshire, England (son of John de Mowbray, Knight, 4th Baron Mowbray and Elizabeth Segrave); died 22 Sep 1399, Venice, Itlaly.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Earl of Nottingham

    Notes:

    Thomas de Mowbray, 1st Duke of Norfolk, KG, Earl Marshal (22 March 1367 or 1368 - 22 September 1399) was an English peer. As a result of his involvement in the power struggles which led up to the fall of Richard II, he was banished and died in exile in Venice.

    Family

    Mowbray was the second son of John de Mowbray, 4th Baron Mowbray, and Elizabeth de Segrave, suo jure Lady Segrave, daughter and heiress of John de Segrave, 4th Baron Segrave, by Margaret, daughter and heiress of Thomas of Brotherton, son of Edward I.[1] He had an elder brother, John de Mowbray, 1st Earl of Nottingham, and three sisters, Eleanor, Margaret and Joan (for details concerning his siblings see the article on his father, John de Mowbray, 4th Baron Mowbray)

    Career[

    Depiction of Mowbray, Arundel, Gloucester, Derby and Warwick demanding of Richard II that he let them prove by arms the justice of their rebellion
    In April 1372, custody of both Thomas and his elder brother, John, was granted to Blanche Wake, a sister of their grandmother, Joan of Lancaster.[2]

    On 10 February 1383, he succeeded his elder brother, John Mowbray, 1st Earl of Nottingham, as Baron Mowbray and Segrave, and was created Earl of Nottingham on 12 February 1383.[3] On 30 June 1385 he was created Earl Marshal for life, and on 12 January 1386 he was granted the office in tail male.[4] He fought against the Scots and then against the French. He was appointed Warden of the East March towards Scotland in 1389, a position he held until his death.

    He was one of the Lords Appellant to King Richard II who deposed some of the King's court favourites in 1387. The King's uncle, Thomas of Woodstock, 1st Duke of Gloucester, was imprisoned at Calais, where Nottingham was Captain. When Gloucester was killed in 1397, it was probably at the King's orders and probably with Nottingham's involvement. On 29 September 1397 he was created Duke of Norfolk.[4][3]

    In 1398, Norfolk quarrelled with Henry of Bolingbroke, 1st Duke of Hereford (later King Henry IV), apparently due to mutual suspicions stemming from their roles in the conspiracy against the Duke of Gloucester. Before a duel between them could take place, Richard II banished them both. Mowbray left England on 19 October 1398.[5] While in exile, he succeeded as Earl of Norfolk when his grandmother, Margaret, Duchess of Norfolk, died on 24 March 1399.[5]

    He died of the plague at Venice on 22 September 1399.[3] Bolingbroke returned to England in 1399 and usurped the crown on 30 September 1399; shortly afterward, on 6 October 1399, the creation of Mowbray as Duke of Norfolk was annulled by Parliament, although Mowbray's heir retained his other titles.[5][3]

    Arms of Mowbray[edit]

    Arms of Thomas de Mowbray as Earl Marshall, , ca.1395
    The traditional, and historic arms for the Mowbray family are "Gules, a lion rampant argent". Although it is certain that these arms are differenced by various devices, this primary blazon applies to all the family arms, including their peerages at Norfolk. They are never indicated to bear the arms of Thomas Brotherton, nor any other English Royal Arms.

    Sir Bernard Burkes, C.B., LL.D.,Ulster King of Arms, in his book 'A General Armory of England, Scotland, Wales, and Ireland', 1884, page 713, provides the following detailed listing of the Mowbray/Norfolk arms:

    "Mowbray (Duke of Norfolk, Earl of Nottingham, Earl of Warren and Surrey, Earl Marshal of England, and Baron Mowbray: dukedom and earldoms extinct 1475, when the barony fell into abeyance. The Mowbrays descended from Roger de Mowbray, son of Nigel d'Albini, who, possessing the lands of Mowbray [Montbray], assumed that surname by command of Henry I., his descendant, Roger de Mowbray, was summoned to Parliament 1295, the fifth baron was created Earl of Nottingham, 1377, d.s.p., his brother, the sixth Baron, was re-created Earl of Nottingham, 1383, constituted Earl Marshal, and created Duke of Norfolk, 139G, the fourth duke was created Earl of Warren and Surrey, vita patris, and d. without surviving issue, when all his honours became extinct except the barony, which fell into abeyance among the descendants of the daus. of the first Duke, of whom Lady Isabel is represented by the Earl of Berkeley, and Lady Margaret by the Lords Stourton and Pttre, as heirs general, and by the Duke of Norfolk, as heir male).

    Marriages and issue

    He married firstly, after 20 February 1383, Elizabeth le Strange (c. 6 December 1373 – 23 August 1383), suo jure Lady Strange of Blackmere, daughter and heiress of John le Strange, 5th Baron Strange of Blackmere, by Isabel Beauchamp, daughter of Thomas Beauchamp, 11th Earl of Warwick, by whom he had no issue.[3]

    He married secondly Elizabeth Arundel (c.1372 – 8 July 1425), widow of Sir William Montagu, and daughter of Richard FitzAlan, 11th Earl of Arundel, by Elizabeth Bohun, daughter of William de Bohun, 1st Earl of Northampton, by whom he had two sons and three daughters:[3]

    Thomas de Mowbray, 4th Earl of Norfolk.[6]
    John de Mowbray, 2nd Duke of Norfolk.[6]
    Elizabeth Mowbray, who married Michael de la Pole, 3rd Earl of Suffolk.[6]
    Margaret Mowbray, who married firstly Sir Robert Howard, by whom she was the mother of John Howard, 1st Duke of Norfolk, and secondly Sir John Grey of Ruthin, Derbyshire.[6]
    Isabel Mowbray; married firstly Sir Henry Ferrers, son of 5th Baron Ferrers of Groby, and secondly James Berkeley, 1st Baron Berkeley.[6]

    Shakespeare

    Mowbray's quarrel with Bolingbroke and subsequent banishment are depicted in the opening scene of Shakespeare's Richard II.[7] Thomas Mowbray (as he is called in the play) prophetically replies to King Richard's "Lions make leopards tame" with the retort, "Yea, but not change his spots." Mowbray's death in exile is announced later in the play by the Bishop of Carlisle.

    Died:
    As a result of his involvement in the power struggles which led up to the fall of Richard II, he was banished and died in exile in Venice.

    Thomas married Elizabeth FitzAlan, Duchess of Norfolk 0Jul 1384, Arundel Castle, Arundel, West Sussex, England. Elizabeth (daughter of Richard FitzAlan, Knight, 11th Earl of Arundel and Elizabeth de Bohun, Countess of Arundel, Countess of Surrey) was born 0___ 1366, Derbyshire, England; died 8 Jul 1425, Hoveringham, Nottinghamshire, England; was buried (St Michael's Church) Hoveringham, Nottinghamshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  12. 175.  Elizabeth FitzAlan, Duchess of Norfolk was born 0___ 1366, Derbyshire, England (daughter of Richard FitzAlan, Knight, 11th Earl of Arundel and Elizabeth de Bohun, Countess of Arundel, Countess of Surrey); died 8 Jul 1425, Hoveringham, Nottinghamshire, England; was buried (St Michael's Church) Hoveringham, Nottinghamshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Baroness Strange of Blackmere
    • Alt Birth: 0___ 1366, Arundel, Sussex, England
    • Alt Birth: ~ 1371, Arundel, Sussex, England

    Notes:

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    (Redirected from Lady Elizabeth FitzAlan)

    Lady Elizabeth Fitzalan, Duchess of Norfolk (1366 – 8 July 1425)[1] was an English noblewoman and the wife of Thomas Mowbray, 1st Duke of Norfolk.

    Through her eldest daughter, Lady Margaret Mowbray, Elizabeth was an ancestress of Queens consort Anne Boleyn and Catherine Howard, and the Howard Dukes of Norfolk. Her other notable descendants include Charles Brandon, 1st Duke of Suffolk; Thomas Stanley, 1st Earl of Derby; Sir Thomas Wyatt, the younger; and Lady Jane Grey (by both parents).[citation needed]

    Marriages and children

    Lady Elizabeth was born in Derbyshire, England, a daughter of Richard Fitzalan, 11th Earl of Arundel and his first wife Elizabeth de Bohun, daughter of William de Bohun, 1st Earl of Northampton and Elizabeth de Badlesmere.[citation needed]

    Elizabeth had four husbands and at least six children:

    William Montacute (before December 1378)
    Thomas de Mowbray, 1st Duke of Norfolk (1384)
    Thomas de Mowbray, 4th Earl of Norfolk (b. 17 September 1385)
    Margaret de Mowbray (b. 1388), married Sir Robert Howard (1385 - 1436), and from this marriage descended Queens consort Anne Boleyn and Catherine Howard, and the Howard Dukes of Norfolk.
    John de Mowbray, 2nd Duke of Norfolk (b. 1392)
    Isabel de Mowbray (b.1400), married James Berkeley, 1st Baron Berkeley
    Sir Robert Goushill or Gousell of Hoveringham, Nottinghamshire (before 18 August 1401)
    Elizabeth Goushill or Gousell (1404-1491), wife of Sir Robert Wingfield of Letheringham, Suffolk (1403-between 6 October 1452 and 21 November 1454), they were great-grandparents to Charles Brandon, 1st Duke of Suffolk.
    Joan or Jean Goushill or Gousell (b. 1409), wife of Thomas Stanley, 1st Baron Stanley, King of Mann, and parents of Thomas Stanley, 1st Earl of Derby.
    Sir Gerald or Gerard Afflete (before 1411)

    She died 8 July 1425 in Wighill, Yorkshire, England, and was buried with her third husband in the Goushill tomb in the church in Hoveringham, Thurgarton Hundred, Nottinghamshire, England.

    Notes:

    Married:
    arranged marriage...

    Children:
    1. 87. Margaret Mowbray, Duchess of Norfolk was born Abt 1387, Axholme, Lincoln, England; died 8 Jul 1425.
    2. John de Mowbray, Knight, 2nd Duke Norfolk was born 0___ 1390; died 0___ 1432.
    3. Isabel de Mowbray was born ~ 1396, Bristol, Gloucestershire, England; died 29 Sep 1452, Berkeley Castle, Berkeley, Gloucestershire, England.

  13. 186.  John Bracton was born Norfolkshire, England.

    John — Agnes LNU. [Group Sheet]


  14. 187.  Agnes LNU
    Children:
    1. 93. Anne Bracton was born 0___ 1390, (Norfolkshire, England).