Edward Wyatt

Male 1619 - 1670  (~ 51 years)


Generations:      Standard    |    Vertical    |    Compact    |    Box    |    Text    |    Ahnentafel    |    Media    |   Map

Generation: 1

  1. 1.  Edward Wyatt was born 0___ 1619, Boxley, Kent, England (son of Hawte Wyatt and Barbara Mitford); died ~ 1670, Gloucester County, Virginia, British Colonies of America.

    Edward — Jane Conquest. Jane was born 0___ 1622; died 0___ 1698, Boxley, Kent , England. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. Conquest Wyatt was born 0___ 1645, Gloucester County, Virginia, British Colonies of America; died 0___ 1748, Gloucester County, Virginia, British Colonies of America.
    2. Frances Wyatt
    3. Haute Wyatt
    4. Edward Wyatt

Generation: 2

  1. 2.  Hawte Wyatt was born ~ 4 Jun 1594, Allington Castle, Maidstone, Kent, England (son of George Wyatt and Jane Finch); died ~31 Jul 1638.

    Hawte — Barbara Mitford. Barbara was born Bef 1595; died 31 Oct 1626. [Group Sheet]


  2. 3.  Barbara Mitford was born Bef 1595; died 31 Oct 1626.
    Children:
    1. 1. Edward Wyatt was born 0___ 1619, Boxley, Kent, England; died ~ 1670, Gloucester County, Virginia, British Colonies of America.


Generation: 3

  1. 4.  George Wyatt was born 0___ 1550, Allington Castle, Maidstone, Kent, England (son of Thomas Wyatt and Jane Haute); died Bef 1625, Ireland; was buried Boxley, Kent, England.

    Notes:

    George Wyatt aka Wiat
    Born 1550 in Allington Castle, Maidstone, Kent County, England
    ANCESTORS ancestors
    Son of Thomas Wyatt and Jane (Haute) Wyatt
    Brother of Thomas Wyatt, Edward Wyatt, Carolus Wyatt, Richard Wyatt, Henry Wyatt, Charles Wyatt, Anne (Wyatt) Twisden, Arthur Wyatt, Jane Wyatt, Abb Wyatt, Ursula Wyatt, Frances Wyatt, Jocosa Wyatt, Henry Wyatt, Jethro Wyatt and Joan Wyatt
    Husband of Jane (Finch) Wyatt — married 8 Oct 1582 in Eastwell, Kent
    DESCENDANTS descendants
    Father of Joan Wyatt, Katherine Wyatt, Francis Wyatt, Eleanor Wyatt, Anne Wyatt, Hawte Wyatt, Margaret Wyatt, Henry Wyatt, George Wyatt, Thomas Wyatt, Isabel (Wyatt) Page and Jane Wyatt
    Died before 1 Sep 1624 in Ireland

    Biography

    Sir George Wyatt was born about 1550 in Allington Castle, Maidstone, Kent County, England, the son of Thomas Wyatt and Jane (Haute) Wyatt. [1] He was the brother of Thomas Wyatt, Edward Wyatt, Carolus Wyatt, Richard Wyatt, Henry Wyatt, Charles Wyatt, Anne Wyatt, Arthur Wyatt, Jane Wyatt, Abb Wyatt, Frances Wyatt, Joan Wyatt, Jethro Wyatt, Henry Wyatt, Jocosa Wyatt and Ursula Wyatt.[2] [3] George's father led the unsuccessful Wyatt's rebellion in 1554, was imprisoned in the Tower of London and was executed in 1554.

    George was admitted to Grays’ Inn when 17. At the age of 18, he married. Sir George married Jane Finch, the daughter of Sir Thomas Finch, on October 8, 1582 in Eastwell, Kent. They had the following children: [4]

    Francis Wyatt,
    Eleanor Wyatt,
    Hawte Wyatt,
    Henry Wyatt,
    George Wyatt,
    Thomas Wyatt[2]
    In 1571 George and his family were restored in blood and arms after having been deprived of them in consequence of Bill of Attainment and execution of his father.

    Sir George was a sixteenth-century writer. He was the first biographer of Henry VIII's second queen, Anne Boleyn. His grandfather, Thomas Wyatt the Elder, had been a cousin and early admirer of Anne's.[5]

    Sir George died September 16, 1623 in Ireland. He was buried at St Mary the Virgin and All Saints Churchyard, Boxley, Maidstone Borough, Kent, England[2]

    Sources

    ? Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families Vol IV, page 383 #16
    ? 2.0 2.1 2.2 Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families
    ? Faris, David. Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists. Baltimore, MD, USA: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1996
    ? Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families Vol IV, page 383 #16
    ? Wikipedia: George Wyatt
    See also:

    Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, (2011), Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, Royal Ancestry series, 2nd edition, 4 vols., ed. Kimball G. Everingham, (Salt Lake City, Utah: the author, 2011), volume IV, page 383, #16.
    Richardson, Douglas, and Kimball G. Everingham. Royal Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families. Vol. V. Salt Lake City, UT.: Douglas Richardson., 2013. Pages 412, 413.

    end of biography

    Buried:
    at St Mary the Virgin and All Saints Churchyard

    George married Jane Finch 8 Oct 1582, Eastwell, Kent, England. Jane was born 0___ 1555; died 27 Mar 1644. [Group Sheet]


  2. 5.  Jane Finch was born 0___ 1555; died 27 Mar 1644.
    Children:
    1. 2. Hawte Wyatt was born ~ 4 Jun 1594, Allington Castle, Maidstone, Kent, England; died ~31 Jul 1638.


Generation: 4

  1. 8.  Thomas WyattThomas Wyatt was born ~ 1522, Allington Castle, Maidstone, Kent, England (son of Thomas Wyatt, Knight and Elizabeth Brooke); died 11 Apr 1554, Tower Hill, London, England.

    Notes:

    Sir Thomas "Rebel, The Younger, Traitor" Wyatt
    Born about 1522 in Allington Castle, Maidstone, Kent County, Englandmap
    Son of Thomas Wyatt and Elizabeth (Brooke) Warner
    Brother of Ann Wyatt [half], Walter Wyatt [half], Charles Wyatt [half], Henry Warner [half] and Edward Warner [half]
    Husband of Jane (Haute) Wyatt — married 1537 [location unknown]
    Father of Edward Wyatt, Thomas Wyatt, Carolus Wyatt, Richard Wyatt, Henry Wyatt, Charles Wyatt, Anne (Wyatt) Twisden, Arthur Wyatt, Jane Wyatt, Abb Wyatt, George Wyatt, Frances Wyatt, Henry Wyatt, Jethro Wyatt, Joan Wyatt, Jocosa Wyatt and Ursula Wyatt
    Died 11 Apr 1554 in Tower Hill, London, Middlesex, Englandmap
    Profile managers: April Dauenhauer private message [send private message] and Lindsay Coleman private message [send private message]
    Wyatt-244 created 18 Feb 2011 | Last modified 6 Nov 2016


    Categories: Magna Carta | Malet-18 Descendants.

    Wikimedia image
    Thomas Wyatt is a descendant of a Magna Carta surety baron.
    Join: Magna Carta Project
    Discuss: MAGNA_CARTA
    Thomas Wyatt is a descendant of Magna Carta surety baron William Malet
    The Wyatt Rebellion of 1554

    The fear of England becoming re-Catholicised combined with the proposed marriage between Mary and Philip of Spain, led to the Wyatt Rebellion of 1554. This was a rebellion led by nobles – principally Sir Thomas Wyatt from Kent, Sir Peter Carew from Devon, Sir James Croft from Herefordshire and the Duke of Suffolk from Leicestershire. However, it had one major weakness – it did not have the popular support of the people across the land and was doomed to failure.

    There were those in England who opposed Mary’s staunch Catholicism and who feared the return of Papal authority in England and Wales. These men were equally alarmed by Mary’s proposed marriage to Philip of Spain, as they feared that this would lead to Spain having an undue influence on English politics. France who could not countenance a Habsburg king of England, with all that it might entail, shared this fear. With the Holy Roman Empire to the east and with Habsburg Spain on her southwest border, the last thing France wanted was an extension of Habsburg influence across the Channel.

    After her coronation on October 1st 1553, Mary quickly placed Catholics in posts of responsibility, including increasing the numbers in the Privy Council to 43. The Privy Council was the most important body in government and the senior nobles in it had easy access to the Queen.

    The plan itself involved too many ‘ifs’ and ‘buts’ if it was to succeed. The noble conspirators planned to remove Mary, instate Elizabeth as Queen and arrange for her to marry Edward Courtenay – a man Mary had already rejected as a husband.

    The plan was for three rebellions to take place in separate parts of the country. They would occur at the same time – in the Midlands, the West Country and Kent. The plan was that the government would not know which one to put down first and each would blossom as a result of their localised success and attract more and more supporters among the common people.

    The French Navy would blockade the English Channel with eighty ships so that the Habsburgs would not be able to help Mary.

    The plan failed miserably. The Imperial Ambassador, Simon Renard, had heard rumours that such a plot existed and informed the Lord Chancellor, Stephen Gardner, of his concerns. Gardner brought in Courtenay for questioning as Renard had mentioned his name. The records stated that Gardner’s questioning was ‘robust’ and Courtenay was not a man who could stand up to this. Edward Courtenay told Gardner all that he knew about the plot so that the government knew about the plot even before it had begun – even if Courtenay would not have known about the details.

    The ‘uprisings’ in the Midlands and the West Country were a failure as few of the people there gave Carew and the Duke of Suffolk the support they needed for success. It seems that though there was concern about Mary marrying a foreigner, loyalty to the Queen took precedence. Those in the Midlands did not want to commit treason (Suffolk raised a force of just 140 men) while many in the West were Catholic.

    Wyatt succeeded in raising an army in Kent of about 4,000 men and his proximity to London greatly worried the government there. A force led by the Duke of Norfolk was sent to deal with Wyatt but this collapsed when Wyatt was helped when 500 government troops deserted to his cause. Norfolk and what was left of his force retreated to London.

    There can be little doubt that there were those outside of noble circles who were gravely concerned by the thought of Mary marrying Philip and it was these people who joined Wyatt. At a trial held after the rebellion had failed, one rebel is recorded t have stated that the rebellion was “to prevent us from over-running with strangers”.

    However, Wyatt delayed his advance on London and gave the city time to organise its defences. His attempts to cross the River Thames near to the Tower were thwarted as the bridges had been deliberately damaged to stop this.

    Wyatt marched to the southwest of London and crossed the Thames there. He marched his men to what is now Hyde Park Corner and made for the City. To get into the City, Wyatt had planned to get in via Ludgate. However, the gate was heavily fortified and to get to it, the rebels had to move up narrow streets (via the Stand and Fleet Street). By using these narrow streets, Wyatt left his men open to being trapped by armed Londoners loyal to Mary. This is what happened and he was defeated.

    Wyatt was sent to the Tower of London, as were the other noblemen who were caught. Their guilt was obvious. Those rebels who were not killed were arrested. In fact, so many were caught that the authorities had nowhere to put them (in terms of prison space) and had to use local churches.

    Mary ordered that the offenders should be harshly dealt with. However, not all of her advisors shared this view. Mary listened to those advisors who suggested that leniency for the rebels would be the best way forward and would demonstrate her true Christian nature. She was told that this would raise her status still further in the eyes of the people.

    Only two of the leaders were executed for their treason – Wyatt and the Duke of Suffolk. Other minor nobles were also executed but some – guilty of treason – were spared. In total about 90 rebels were executed but many of the common people who had joined Wyatt and survived were spared. Two other casualties were Lady Jane Grey and her husband Guildford Dudley. Both had been in prison since the failed attempt to put Lady Jane on the throne and had nothing to do with Wyatt’s rebellion. However Mary felt that she could no longer risk anyone rallying to Lady Jane’s cause – hence her execution – especially as her father, the Duke of Suffolk, had been involved in this plot and had been executed for treason.

    It is thought that Wyatt was tortured so that he would admit that Princess Elizabeth was involved in the rebellion. This he refused to admit to and he made it clear on the scaffold just before he was executed that she was innocent of any involvement in the rebellion. When a government official at the execution tried to contradict Wyatt’s statement, the people who had gathered at Tower Hill greeted his comments with anger as the final words of a condemned man were always seen as being truthful.

    Princess Elizabeth was briefly imprisoned in the Tower but was quickly released.

    Did the rebellion have any chance of success? The rebellion started in the worst month in terms of weather – January – though it had been planned to start in March. The roads they planned to use to transport both men and equipment had become unusable due to the rain. Carriages carrying equipment from Kent to London lost their wheels on route to the city and the rebels had to leave behind equipment that might have helped them in London. Wyatt’s route into London was also fraught with difficulties for an attacking force. The roads in the City were narrow and made it very easy for a relatively small force to defend the imposing gates that surrounded the old City. If Wyatt and his men could not get through these gates, he would not have been able to get into the city itself. Therefore, the heart of government – capturing it was his goal – was safe. Another major weakness of the plot was the fact that it required all three uprisings to succeed if the authorities were going to be split in terms of where to deploy the military. If one failed, this became less of an issue for the government; if two failed, then the success of the rebellion rested on just one of the three uprisings. Secrecy was also a major issue in explaining the rebel’s failure. So many nobles were involved that leakages were almost certain – and this is what happened. While Gardner may not have been able to control events, he knew what was going to occur and could plan accordingly – hence the deliberate destruction of the bridges over the Thames near the City; hence the deployment of troops at Ludgate. The only thing Gardner failed to succeed in was his efforts to get Wyatt to admit that Elizabeth was involved.

    Marriage and Issue

    Sir Thomas Wyatt married Jane (or Joan) Haute in 1537.[1]

    They had six sons and four daughters.[2]

    Known sons:

    Richard[3]
    Charles[4]
    Arthur[5]
    Henry[6]
    Thomas[7]
    George[8]
    Known daughters:

    Joyce
    Ursula[9]
    Anne[10]
    Jane[11]
    Unproven Children of Sir Thomas Wyatt

    Edward
    Carolus
    Abb
    Frances
    Joan
    Jethro
    Henry
    Jocosa
    Sources

    ? 'Royal Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, vol. 5, p 412
    ? 'Royal Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, vol. 5, p 412
    ? 'Royal Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, vol. 5, p 412
    ? 'Royal Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, vol. 5, p 412
    ? 'Royal Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, vol. 5, p 412
    ? 'Royal Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, vol. 5, p 412
    ? 'Royal Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, vol. 5, p 412
    ? 'Royal Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, vol. 5, p 412
    ? 'Royal Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, vol. 5, p 412
    ? 'Royal Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, vol. 5, p 412
    ? 'Royal Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, vol. 5, p 412
    See also:
    Richardson, Douglas, and Kimball G. Everingham. Royal Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families. Vol. V. Salt Lake City, UT.: Douglas Richardson., 2013. Vol. V, Page 412.
    Magna Carta Ancestry: A study in Colonial and Medieval Families, Richardson, Douglas, (Kimball G. Everingham, editor. 2nd edition, 2011), vol. 4 p. 383 #15, record for Thomas Wyatt.
    Plantagenet Ancestry: A study in Colonial and Medieval Families, Richardson, Douglas, (Kimball G. Everingham, editor. 2nd edition, 2011), vol. 3 p. 531 #18, record for Thomas Wyatt.
    Complete Baronetage, 1611-1880 (1900-1906), Cokayne, George Edward, (5 volumes. Exeter [England]: W. Pollard, 1900-1906), FHL book 942 D22cg., vol. 1 p. 74.

    end

    Thomas — Jane Haute. Jane was born 0___ 1522; died Aft 1583, Maidstone, Kent, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 9.  Jane Haute was born 0___ 1522; died Aft 1583, Maidstone, Kent, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Joan Haute

    Children:
    1. 4. George Wyatt was born 0___ 1550, Allington Castle, Maidstone, Kent, England; died Bef 1625, Ireland; was buried Boxley, Kent, England.


Generation: 5

  1. 16.  Thomas Wyatt, KnightThomas Wyatt, Knight was born 0___ 1503, Allington Castle, Maidstone, Kent, England (son of Henry Wyatt and Anne Skinner); died 6 Oct 1542, Sherborne, Dorset, England; was buried Sherborne, Dorset, England.

    Notes:

    Sir Thomas "The elder, the poet" Wyatt
    Born 1503 in Allington Castle, Maidstone, Kent County, Englandmap
    Son of Henry Wyatt and Anne (Skinner) Wyatt
    Brother of Margaret (Wyatt) Lee
    Husband of Elizabeth (Brooke) Warner — married 1520 [location unknown]
    Father of Thomas Wyatt, Ann Wyatt, Walter Wyatt and Charles Wyatt
    Died 1542 in Clifton Maybank House, Dorset, Englandmap
    Profile managers: Katherine Patterson private message [send private message], Lindsay Coleman private message [send private message], Donald Gradeless private message [send private message], and Brian Williams private message [send private message]
    Wyatt-247 created 18 Feb 2011 | Last modified 11 Sep 2016

    Biography

    b. by 1504, 1st s. of Sir Henry Wyatt of Allington Castle by Anne, daughter of John Skinner of Reigate, Surrey.

    Education: St. John’s, Camb. BA 1518, MA 1520.

    married by 1521, Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Brooke, 8th Lord Cobham, 1s. Sir Thomas II; 2s. illegit. by Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Edward Darrell of Littlecote, Wilts.; 1 daughter (?illegit.). Knghted. ?28 Mar. 1535. suc. father 10 Nov. 1536.[1]

    Esquire of the body by 1524; clerk of the King’s jewels 21 Oct. 1524; marshal, Calais by Sept. 1529-24 Nov. 1530; sewer extraordinary by 1533; sheriff, Kent 1536-7; ambassador to the Emperor 1537-40; Councillor by 1540-d.; commr. sewers, Kent 1540; steward, manor of Maidstone, Kent Mar. 1542.[2]

    Lady Elizabeth was first married to Sir Edward WARNER. At twelve years of age Thomas was admitted of St. John's College, Cambridge. He graduated there B.A. in 1518, and M.A. in 1520. As a boy he had made the acquaintance of Anne Boleyn, and long after the date of his marriage Wyatt was regarded as her lover. [Anne Boleyn had begun an affair with Henry Percy. Cardinal Wolsey put a stop to the romance, which could be why Anne engendered such a hatred of him later in life. The romance between Anne and Percy ended in 1522 and the King didn't notice Anne until 1526. Somewhere in this time, Anne also had a relationship of some sort with the poet Sir Thomas Wyatt. Wyatt was married in 1520, so the timing of the supposed affair is uncertain. Wyatt was separated from his wife, but there could be little suggestion of his eventual marriage to Anne. Theirs appears to be more of a courtly love. However, on May 2, 1536, Queen Anne was arrested at Greenwich and was informed of the charges against her: adultery, incest and plotting to murder the King. There were several more arrests. Sir Francis Weston and William Brereton were charged with adultery with the Queen. Sir Thomas Wyatt was also arrested, but later released.] Sir Thomas d. 1542 at Sherborne in Dorset; buried 11 October 1542 in the great church of Sherborne.

    Name

    Thomas Wyatt[3][4][5][6][7]
    Thomas Wyatt, the Poet
    Thomas Wyatt Knight 1503-1542
    Title

    Sir
    Birth

    1503 Maidstone, Kent, England[4][5][6]
    1503 Allington Castle, Boxley, Kent, England
    Marriage

    1521
    Wife: Elizabeth Brooke
    Child: Thomas Wyatt
    Education

    BA, 1518, St John's College, Cambridge; MA, 1520
    Occupation

    Poet; knighted 18 Mar 1536/7; Sheriff of Kent, 1537; ambassador to Spain
    Residence

    Oxford, Oxfordshire, England[3]
    Death

    6 Oct 1542 Sherbourne, Devon, England[4][5]
    10 OCT 1542 Sherborne, Dorset, England
    11 OCT 1542 Sherbourne, Dorset, England
    Burial

    11 OCT 1544 Sherborne Abbey, Doset
    Notes

    Allington Castle Postcard
    thomaswyattelder
    Allington Castle Postcard
    Wikipedia entry for Sir Thomas Wyatt the Elder
    Sir Thomas Wyatt
    Wikipedia entry for Sir Thomas Wyatt the Elder
    Admitted St John's College Cambridge at age 12
    Received B.A. degree at age 16
    Ambassador to Emperor Charles V
    Introduced the sonnet to English Poetry
    Poems and Satire published after his death.
    Thomas Wyatt of Allington Castle, Kent
    Sources

    Source: Richardson, Douglas; Everingham, Kimball G., Editor. Royal Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families. Vol. V, pg 411. Salt Lake City, Utah. 2013.
    Brydges, Samuel. The British Bibliographer (London, 1810) Vol. 1, Page 405
    Ancestry Family Trees (Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com) Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members. http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=15024057&pid=2466
    Library of Congress Photo Collection, 1840-2000 Various photo collections from the Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Washington D.C.
    http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=sse&db=locphotos&h=251277&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt
    Residence: USA
    Venn, John Alumni Cantabrigienses (Cambridge University Press, 1922)
    http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=sse&db=alumni6&h=78283&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt
    Birth: 1503
    Chalmers, Alexander. The General Biographical Dictionary (J. Nichols and Son, London, 1812-1)
    http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=sse&db=chalmersbiogdict&h=8955&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt
    Birth: 1503. Death: 1541
    Foster, Joseph, Alumni Oxonienses (Parker and Co., 1892)
    http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=sse&db=oxfordalum&h=259341&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt
    Residence: Oxford, Oxfordshire, England
    The Millennium File (Heritage Consulting, Salt Lake City, UT, USA)
    http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=sse&db=millind&h=10074382&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt
    Birth: 1503 Maidstone, Kent, England.
    Death: 6 Oct 1542 Sherbourne, Devon, England.
    Sir Thomas Wyatt, I (by 1504-42), of Allington Castle, Kent. Published in The History of Parliament: the House of Commons 1509-1558, ed. S.T. Bindoff, 1982; Available from Boydell and Brewer

    end

    Buried:
    at Sherbourne Abbey

    Died:
    in Clifton Maybank House, Dorset, England

    Thomas married Elizabeth Brooke 0___ 1520. Elizabeth (daughter of Thomas Brooke and Dorothy Heydon) was born 0___ 1503; died 0Aug 1560, Cobham, Kent, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 17.  Elizabeth Brooke was born 0___ 1503 (daughter of Thomas Brooke and Dorothy Heydon); died 0Aug 1560, Cobham, Kent, England.

    Notes:

    Elizabeth Brooke (1503–1560) was the wife of Thomas Wyatt, the poet, and the mother of Thomas Wyatt the younger who led Wyatt's Rebellion against Mary I. Her parents were Thomas Brooke, 8th Baron Cobham and Dorothy Heydon, the daughter of Sir Henry Heydon.[1] She was the sister of George Brooke, 9th Baron Cobham and was considered a possible candidate for the sixth wife of Henry VIII of England.

    Marriage and issue
    Elizabeth married twice.

    First Marriage

    Sir Thomas Wyatt, (1503–1542) Hans Holbein the Younger
    In 1520, Elizabeth married Sir Thomas Wyatt (1503-6 Oct 1542) and a year later, bore him a son:[1][3]

    Sir Thomas (1521–1554), who led an unsuccessful rebellion against Mary I in 1554. The aim of the rebellion was to replace the Catholic Queen Mary with her Protestant half-sister, Elizabeth.[4]

    Sir Thomas Wyatt (1521–1554)
    Early in the marriage, marital difficulties arose, with Wyatt claiming they were 'chiefly' her fault. He repudiated her as an adulteress, although there is no record linking her with any specific man. Elizabeth separated from Thomas Wyatt in 1526 and he supported her until around 1537, when he refused to do so any longer and sent her to live with her brother, Lord Cobham. In that same year, Lord Cobham attempted to force Wyatt to continue his financial support. He refused.[5] It wasn't until 1541, when Wyatt, accused of treason, was arrested and his properties confiscated, that the Brooke family was able to force a reconciliation as a condition for Wyatt’s pardon.[6]

    In a letter to Charles V, the imperial ambassador, Eustace Chapuys wrote that Wyatt had been released from the Tower at the request of Catherine Howard. Chapuys noted that the king had imposed two conditions; that Wyatt 'confess his guilt' and that 'he should take back his wife from whom he had been separated upwards of 15 years, on pain of death if he be untrue to her henceforth.' [7][8] It is unclear, however, whether this provision was ever enforced. After pursuing Anne Boleyn, before her relationship with the King, Wyatt had begun a long-term affair with Elizabeth Darrell and he continued his association with his mistress.[6]

    On February 14, 1542 the night after Catherine Howard had been condemned to death for adultery, Henry VIII held a dinner for many men and women. The king was said to pay great attention to Elizabeth and to Anne Bassett and both were thought to be possible choices for his sixth wife.[2] In early 1542, more than a year before Wyatt’s death, Elizabeth Brooke's name appeared in Spanish dispatches as one of three ladies in whom Henry VIII was said to be interested as a possible sixth wife.[2]

    The imperial ambassador, Chapuys, wrote that the lady for whom the king 'showed the greatest regard was a sister of Lord Cobham, whom Wyatt, some time ago, divorced for adultery. She is a pretty young creature, with wit enough to do as badly as the others if she were to try.' It would appear that the ambassador was mistaken, as at the time, Elizabeth Brooke was nearly forty years old. It is probable that Elizabeth Brooke had been confused with her beautiful young niece, Elisabeth Brooke, the eldest daughter of George Brooke, 9th Baron Cobham, who married William Parr, 1st Marquess of Northampton. Elisabeth Brooke, Lord Cobham’s daughter, may have been at court on this occasion, since she was definitely there the following year. She would have been nearly sixteen in January 1542 and in later years was accounted one of the most beautiful women of her time. More important to a king who had just rid himself of a wife (Catherine Howard) who had committed adultery, this second Elisabeth had a spotless reputation.[6]

    Second marriage

    Following Wyatt’s death, Elizabeth Brooke married Sir Edward Warner (1511–1565), of Polstead Hall and Plumstead, Norfolk, Lord Lieutenant of the Tower. The couple had three sons:[9]

    Edward, who died in infancy
    Thomas
    Henry
    Warner was removed from his position on July 28, 1553, at the start of the reign of Mary I, and was arrested on suspicion of treason the following January at his house in Carter Lane when Thomas Wyatt the younger rebelled against the Crown. Warner was held for nearly a year. Elizabeth’s son was executed. Edward, the son she had with Warner, died young. Two other sons died in infancy. The family fortunes were restored under Elizabeth I and Warner reclaimed his post at the Tower of London. His wife died there in August 1560 and was buried within its precincts.[6]

    Ancestry[edit]
    [hide]Ancestors of Elizabeth Brooke (1503–1560)


    end of biography

    Children:
    1. 8. Thomas Wyatt was born ~ 1522, Allington Castle, Maidstone, Kent, England; died 11 Apr 1554, Tower Hill, London, England.


Generation: 6

  1. 32.  Henry Wyatt was born ~ 1460; died 10 Nov 1537; was buried Milton, Kent, England.

    Notes:

    Sir Henry Wyatt (1460-1537) was an English courtier.

    Early life to 1485

    A younger son of a Yorkshire family, little is known of Henry Wyatt before he adopted the cause of Henry Tudor, later to become king Henry VII. Many myths and assumptions have been woven around his privations in prison as a supporter of the Tudor party’s opposition to Richard III in the years 1483-85, and are still to be found recounted as facts. Some of them occur in the widely cited entry in the Dictionary of National Biography (c.1900, available online), s.v. Thomas Wyatt (poet), although the entry has since been modified by the 2004 Oxford Dictionary of National Biography.

    The Wyatt family papers in the British Library[1] contain material which provides the nearest that can be found to an authentic account of this period of his life. Recently transcribed and published in full, the relevant documents, although collated and written up in the 18th century, incorporate a self-contained narrative about Wyatt which can be dated to the mid 17th century. At this date the family was intent on reclaiming its former status after falling into disgrace with the execution and attainder of his grandson. The aim was to play up the glory days of Henry’s adherence to the Tudor cause, describing him inter alia as ‘his Country’s martyr’.[2]

    It is unknown why and in what precise capacity he came to act on behalf of the exiled Tudor, or how he came to be imprisoned. He appears to have had contacts among those close to the Scots king James III and may have been an intermediary in attempts to secure Scottish support for Henry Tudor’s invasion. Possibly he fell into the hands of ‘some Scottish baron with Yorkist sympathies, only to be released when Henry VII was securely on the throne, after a considerable period of cruel imprisonment, and on the promise of a huge ransom’.[3]

    His exploits in the Wyatt family papers include being ‘imprisoned often, once in a cold and narrow Tower’, where he would have starved but for the ministrations of a kindly cat who befriended him and brought him food. During his incarceration he suffered tortures involving the use of horse-barnacles and being force-fed mustard and vinegar. On one occasion ‘the Tyrant himself examined him’, trying unsuccessfully to persuade Wyatt to change sides. Eventually in 1485 he was released from imprisonment in Scotland and received the thanks of the newly crowned Henry VII. His first recorded grant was on 11 October 1485 when he was appointed keeper of Norwich castle and gaol.[2] A grant of Henry VIII on 22 August 1515 confirms that Wyatt still needed money to pay off his remaining Scottish ransom.[4]

    In a surviving letter[5] written a few months after Wyatt’s death, his son Thomas wrote that God had preserved his father ‘in prison from the handes of the tirant that could find in his hart to see him rakkid, from two yeres and more prisonment in Scotland in Irons and Stoks,’ and from other tribulations.

    The myth that he was imprisoned in the Tower of London finds its first appearance in 1702 on a stone tablet in Boxley church erected by Edwin Wyatt, Henry’s great-great-great-grandson. The claim is unlikely and finds no support in any records including those of the Tower of London authorities. Two reasons may account for the error. First, the association with Henry’s son and grandson, each of whom was thrown into the Tower under the Tudors. The second lies in the letter’s oblique reference to being racked, which may however be figurative rather than literal. Certainly the Wyatt family papers never mention the rack, as one would have expected them to, when describing the privations he suffered.[2]

    The 2004 Oxford DNB states that his support for Henry Tudor began before 1483, and that he probably participated in Buckingham's Rebellion. No evidentiary support is available for either statement. The entry continues, ‘Family legend has it that he was imprisoned and interrogated by Richard III himself.’[6] However, Richard III is never named by the Wyatt family. The assumption is derived from two instances of the word ‘tyrant’ applied to Wyatt’s captor, a term which in the 16th century could refer to ‘Anyone who acts in a cruel, violent, or wicked manner’.[7] More likely it referred to the Scottish baron postulated by Conway (above). Records show that Richard III never set foot in Scotland during his reign.[8]

    Life under the Tudors[edit]
    Wyatt’s close connections with Scotland came to the fore in his later career as Henry VII’s agent in that country,[9] for which there is ample evidence of his employment on secret and sensitive missions.[3]

    He assumed high places at court,[10] being admitted to the privy council, and remained high in the royal favour. He was one of Henry VII's executors, and one of Henry VIII's guardians. He was admitted to the privy council of the new king in April 1509, and became a knight of the Bath on 23 July of the same year. In 1511 he was made jointly with Sir Thomas Boleyn constable of Norwich Castle, and on 29 July of the same year was granted an estate, Maidencote, at Estgarstone in Berkshire. At the battle of the Spurs he served in the vanguard (16 August 1513).[10]

    Allington Castle[edit]
    He purchased in 1492 Allington Castle and its estate, near Maidstone in Kent, and made the place his principal residence. Henry VIII visited him there in 1527 to meet Wolsey on his return from the continent. Wyatt remained on good terms with Sir Thomas Boleyn, who resided at Hever Castle.[10] The proximity (about 20 miles) accounts for the meeting in a family setting of Sir Henry's poet son Thomas, and Sir Thomas's daughter Anne, the future queen, and the poetry in the courtly love tradition that resulted.[11]

    Marriage and issue[edit]
    About 1502 Wyatt married Anne Skinner, the daughter of John Skinner of Reigate, Surrey, by whom he had two sons and a daughter:[12]

    Sir Thomas Wyatt, who married Elizabeth Brooke, the daughter of Thomas Brooke, 8th Baron Cobham, by Dorothy Heydon, daughter of Sir Henry Heydon and Elizabeth or Anne Boleyn, daughter of Sir Geoffrey Boleyn[13]
    Henry Wyatt, assumed to have died an infant.[14]
    Margaret Wyatt, who married Sir Anthony Lee (d.1549), by whom she was the mother of Queen Elizabeth's champion, Sir Henry Lee[15]
    Death[edit]
    Wyatt died on 10 November 1537, and, in accordance with the directions in his will, was buried at Milton, near Gravesend.[10]

    end of biography

    Henry married Anne Skinner ~ 1502. Anne was born ~ 1475, (Reigate, Surrey, England); died Aft 1504. [Group Sheet]


  2. 33.  Anne Skinner was born ~ 1475, (Reigate, Surrey, England); died Aft 1504.

    Notes:

    Residence (Family):
    Photo, map & history of Allington Castle: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allington_Castle

    Children:
    1. 16. Thomas Wyatt, Knight was born 0___ 1503, Allington Castle, Maidstone, Kent, England; died 6 Oct 1542, Sherborne, Dorset, England; was buried Sherborne, Dorset, England.
    2. Margaret Wyatt

  3. 34.  Thomas Brooke was born 0___ 1465, (Cowling, Kent, England) (son of John Brooke, 7th Baron Cobham and Margaret Neville); died 19 Jul 1529, Cowling, Kent, England.

    Thomas — Dorothy Heydon. Dorothy (daughter of Henry Heydon and Anne Boleyn) was born 0___ 1470; died 29 Mar 1566, Norfolk, Norfolkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 35.  Dorothy Heydon was born 0___ 1470 (daughter of Henry Heydon and Anne Boleyn); died 29 Mar 1566, Norfolk, Norfolkshire, England.
    Children:
    1. 17. Elizabeth Brooke was born 0___ 1503; died 0Aug 1560, Cobham, Kent, England.


Generation: 7

  1. 68.  John Brooke, 7th Baron Cobham was born 10 Dec 1447, Cowling, Kent, England (son of Edward Brooke, 6th Baron Cobham and Elizabeth Touchet); died 9 Mar 1512, Cowling, Kent, England; was buried Colegiate Church, Cobham, Kent, England.

    Notes:

    About John Brooke 7th Lord Cobham of Kent
    8th Lord of Cobham -------------------- 7th Ld Cobham. Of Weycroft, Devon and Cooling, Kent. Succeeded to the title on 19 Aug 1472. From 1491 to 1492 he was in an expedition to Flanders with King Henry VII. He fought in the Cornish insurrection at Blackheath on 24 Jun 1497, with Lord Abergavenny. There exists reasonably strong evidence of a special relationship between Thomas Phelips and the Brooke-Cobham family, seated at Cooling, Kent. The Brooke family has West Country origins and, if Thomas Phelips had been the administator or surveyor of at least some of the Booke-Cobham estates, his migration from Kent to Somerset is easily explained. Such a relationship would also explain the presence of Brooke estate documents among the Phelips family papers in the Somerset County Record Office. Further, such an influencial connection, could explain his rise in rank form yeoman in 1460 to gentleman by 1466 and his appointment to the office of Escheator fro Somerset & Dorset in 1471 and 1478. [Ref.: Ibid, p. 3-4}. Further evidence of a relationship derives from a lease extant in the Kent County Record Office in which John, Lord Cobham leased his manor of Brooke Montacute to "Jane Phillip , widow." [ Ref.: Ibid p. 3, citing Kent County Record Office ref. U601 T202].

    ______________________
    http://our-royal-titled-noble-and-commoner-ancestors.com/p2148.htm#i64565
    'Sir John Brooke, 7th Lord Cobham1,2,3
    'M, b. circa 1450, d. 9 March 1512
    Father Sir Edward Brooke, 6th Lord Cobham4,2,3 b. c 1415, d. c 7 Jul 1464
    Mother Elizabeth Touchet4,2,3 b. c 1420, d. a 8 Nov 1464
    ' Sir John Brooke, 7th Lord Cobham was born circa 1450 at of Cooling & Cobham, Kent, England; Still a minor in 1467.2,3 He married Margaret Neville, daughter of Sir Edward Neville, 1st Baron Abergavenny and Katherine Howard, circa 1475; They had 8 sons (including Thomas, Edward, George, & Leonard) and 10 daughters (including Mary & Faith).1,5,6,2,3 Sir John Brooke, 7th Lord Cobham died on 9 March 1512; Buried at Cobham, Kent.1,2,3
    'Family Margaret Neville b. c 1450, d. 30 Sep 1506
    Child
    ?Sir Thomas Brooke, 8th Lord Cobham+7,8,2 d. 19 Jul 1529
    Citations
    1.[S11568] The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain, and the United Kingdom, by George Edward Cokayne, Vol. III, p. 346-347.
    2.[S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 777.
    3.[S15] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, p. 904.
    4.[S11568] The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain, and the United Kingdom, by George Edward Cokayne, Vol. III, p. 346.
    5.[S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 93.
    6.[S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 235.
    7.[S15] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, p. 904-905.
    8.[S11568] The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain, and the United Kingdom, by George Edward Cokayne, Vol. III, p. 347.
    ____________________
    http://www.tudorplace.com.ar/BROOKE1.htm#John BROOKE (2° B. Cobham)
    'John BROOKE (2° B. Cobham)
    'Born: 10 Dec 1447, Cowling, Kent, England
    'Died: 9 Mar 1511/12
    'Buried: 9 Mar 1511, Colegiate Church, Cobham, Kent, England
    'Notes: 7th Ld Cobham. Of Weycroft, Devon and Cooling, Kent. Succeeded to the title on 19 Aug 1472. From 1491 to 1492 he was in an expedition to Flanders with King Henry VII. He fought in the Cornish insurrection at Blackheath on 24 Jun 1497, with Lord Abergavenny. There exists reasonably strong evidence of a special relationship between Thomas Phelips and the Brooke-Cobham family, seated at Cooling, Kent. The Brooke family has West Country origins and, if Thomas Phelips had been the administator or surveyor of at least some of the Booke-Cobham estates, his migration from Kent to Somerset is easily explained. Such a relationship would also explain the presence of Brooke estate documents among the Phelips family papers in the Somerset County Record Office. Further, such an influencial connection, could explain his rise in rank form yeoman in 1460 to gentleman by 1466 and his appointment to the office of Escheator fro Somerset & Dorset in 1471 and 1478. [Ref.: Ibid, p. 3-4}. Further evidence of a relationship derives from a lease extant in the Kent County Record Office in which John, Lord Cobham leased his manor of Brooke Montacute to "Jane Phillip , widow." [ Ref.: Ibid p. 3, citing Kent County Record Office ref. U601 T202].
    Father: Edward BROOKE (1° B. Cobham)
    Mother: Elizabeth TOUCHET (B. Cobham)
    'Married 1: Margaret NEVILLE (B. Cobham)
    Children:
    1. Thomas BROOKE (3° B. Cobham)
    2. Mary BROOKE
    3. Edward BROOKE (Sir)
    4. Richard BROOKE
    5. Alelye BROOKE
    6. Edward BROOKE
    7. Peter BROOKE
    8. Faith BROOKE
    9. George BROOKE
    10. Dorothy BROOKE
    'Married 2: Eleanor AUSTELL (B. Cobham) AFT Sep 1506
    ________________________
    http://www.thepeerage.com/p1181.htm#i11808
    'John Brooke, 7th Lord Cobham (of Kent)1
    'M, #11808, b. after 1446, d. 9 March 1511/12
    Last Edited=9 Sep 2007
    Consanguinity Index=0.02%
    ' John Brooke, 7th Lord Cobham (of Kent) was born after 1446.2 He was the son of Edward Brooke, 6th Lord Cobham (of Kent) and Elizabeth Tuchet.1 He married, firstly, Eleanor Austell.2 He married, secondly, Margaret Neville, daughter of Sir Edward Neville, 1st Lord Abergavenny and Katherine Howard, before 1481.3 He died on 9 March 1511/12.
    ' John Brooke, 7th Lord Cobham (of Kent) succeeded to the title of 7th Lord Cobham [E., 1313] on 19 August 1472.1 From 1491 to 1492 he was in an expedition to Flanders with King Henry VII.2 He fought in the Cornish insurrection at Blackheath on 24 June 1497, with Lord Abergavenny.2
    'Child of John Brooke, 7th Lord Cobham (of Kent) and Margaret Neville
    1.Thomas Brooke, 8th Lord Cobham (of Kent)+1 d. 19 Jul 1529
    Citations
    1.[S21] L. G. Pine, The New Extinct Peerage 1884-1971: Containing Extinct, Abeyant, Dormant and Suspended Peerages With Genealogies and Arms (London, U.K.: Heraldry Today, 1972), page 78. Hereinafter cited as The New Extinct Peerage.
    2.[S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume III, page 346. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
    3.[S8] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, 106th edition, 2 volumes (Crans, Switzerland: Burke's Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 1999), volume 1, page 17. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, 106th edition.
    _____________________
    JOHN BROOKE 7th Baron of Cobham 10 Dec 1447 - 9 Mar 1511 ID Number: I74199 RESIDENCE: ENG BIRTH: 10 Dec 1447 DEATH: 9 Mar 1511 BURIAL: Colegiate Church, Cobham, Kent, England RESOURCES: See: [S1877] Family 1 : MARGARET NEVILLE +THOMAS BROOKE Baron of Cobham

    http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~mysouthernfamily/myff/d0067/g0000049.html -------------------- John Brooke, 7th Baron Cobham (of Kent) (after 1446 - 9 March 1511/1512) was an English aristocrat. His parents were Edward Brooke, 6th Baron Cobham, who he succeeded on 19 August 1472, and Elizabeth Tuchet. From 1491 to 1492 he was in an expedition to Flanders with King Henry VII and fought in the Cornish insurrection at Blackheath on 24 June 1497, with his half-brother-in-law's son and son-in-law Lord Bergavenny, who was married firstly to his daughter Mary Brooke. He married firstly Eleanor Austell, from Suffolk, who died without issue. He married secondly before 1481 Margaret Nevill, who died on 30 September 1506 and was buried at Cobham, Kent, daughter of Sir Edward Nevill, 3rd Baron Bergavenny and second wife Katherine Howard. He was succeeded by their son Thomas Brooke, 8th Baron Cobham.

    John married Margaret Neville ~ 1475. Margaret (daughter of Edward Neville, 3rd Baron of Abergavenny and Catherine Howard, Baroness of Abergavenny) was born ~ 1450, Raby Castle, Staindrop, Durham, England; died 30 Sep 1506. [Group Sheet]


  2. 69.  Margaret Neville was born ~ 1450, Raby Castle, Staindrop, Durham, England (daughter of Edward Neville, 3rd Baron of Abergavenny and Catherine Howard, Baroness of Abergavenny); died 30 Sep 1506.
    Children:
    1. 34. Thomas Brooke was born 0___ 1465, (Cowling, Kent, England); died 19 Jul 1529, Cowling, Kent, England.

  3. 70.  Henry Heydon was born (England) (son of John Heydon and Eleanor Winter).

    Henry — Anne Boleyn. Anne (daughter of Geoffrey Boleyn and Anne Hastings) was born (Norfolkshire) England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 71.  Anne Boleyn was born (Norfolkshire) England (daughter of Geoffrey Boleyn and Anne Hastings).
    Children:
    1. 35. Dorothy Heydon was born 0___ 1470; died 29 Mar 1566, Norfolk, Norfolkshire, England.


Generation: 8

  1. 136.  Edward Brooke, 6th Baron Cobham was born ~ 1411-1415, Brooke, Somerset, England; died 6 Jun 1464, Cobham, Kent, England; was buried Cobham, Kent, England.

    Other Events:

    • Military:
    • Occupation: 0___ 1442; Member of Parliament

    Notes:

    About Edward Brooke, 6th Baron Cobham
    6º B. Cobham of Olditch. Succeeded to the title in 1442. Staunch Yorkist. He fought in the Battle of St. Albans on 23 May 1455. He fought in the Battle of Northampton on 10 Jul 1460.

    _____________________
    'Sir Edward Brooke, 6th Lord Cobham1,2,3
    'M, b. circa 1415, d. circa 7 July 1464
    Father Sir Thomas Brooke, Sheriff of Devonshire1,4,3 b. c 1392, d. 12 Aug 1439
    Mother Joan Braybrooke1,4,3 b. c 1396, d. 25 Nov 1442
    ' Sir Edward Brooke, 6th Lord Cobham was born circa 1415 at of Cobham, Kent, England; Age 24 in 1439.2,3 He married Elizabeth Touchet, daughter of Sir James Touchet, 5th Lord Audley and Margaret Roos, before 2 February 1437.1,5,2 Sir Edward Brooke, 6th Lord Cobham died circa 7 July 1464.1,2,3
    'Family Elizabeth Touchet b. c 1420, d. a 8 Nov 1464
    Children

    Elizabeth Brooke+2,3 b. c 1439, d. 26 Aug 1503
    Sir John Brooke, 7th Lord Cobham+1,2,3 b. c 1450, d. 9 Mar 1512

    Citations

    1.[S11568] The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain, and the United Kingdom, by George Edward Cokayne, Vol. III, p. 346.
    2.[S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 777.
    3.[S15] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, p. 904.
    4.[S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 776-777.
    5.[S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 722-723.
    http://our-royal-titled-noble-and-commoner-ancestors.com/p2696.htm#i81018
    ______
    'Edward Brooke, 6th Lord Cobham (of Kent)1
    'M, #11771, d. 6 June 1464
    Last Edited=20 Feb 2011
    ' Edward Brooke, 6th Lord Cobham (of Kent) was the son of Sir Thomas Brooke and Joan Braybroke, Baroness Cobham (of Kent).1 He married Elizabeth Tuchet, daughter of James Tuchet, 5th Lord Audley (of Heleigh) and Eleanor de Holland.1 He died on 6 June 1464.
    ' He held the office of Member of Parliament (M.P.) for Somerset in 1442.2 He succeeded to the title of 6th Lord Cobham [E., 1313] in 1442.1 He fought in the Battle of St. Albans on 23 May 1455, for the Yorkists.1,2 He fought in the Battle of Northampton on 10 July 1460.2
    'Child of Edward Brooke, 6th Lord Cobham (of Kent) and Elizabeth Tuchet
    1.John Brooke, 7th Lord Cobham (of Kent)+1 b. a 1446, d. 9 Mar 1511/12
    Citations
    1.[S21] L. G. Pine, The New Extinct Peerage 1884-1971: Containing Extinct, Abeyant, Dormant and Suspended Peerages With Genealogies and Arms (London, U.K.: Heraldry Today, 1972), page 78. Hereinafter cited as The New Extinct Peerage.
    2.[S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume III, page 346. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
    http://www.thepeerage.com/p1178.htm#i11771
    ______
    'Edward Brooke, 6th Baron Cobham (of Kent)[1] (died 6 June 1464) was a late medieval aristocrat.
    'His parents were Sir Thomas Brooke and Joan Braybroke, 5th Baroness Cobham[2].
    'He was a Member of Parliament for Somerset in 1442[3], the same year he succeeded to his mother's title[4]. An ardent supporter of Richard Duke of York, he fought on the Yorkist side at the First Battle of St Albans on 23 May 1455[5][6] and at the Battle of Northampton on 10 July 1460[7].
    'He married Elizabeth Touchet, born c. 1433, daughter of James Touchet, 5th Baron Audley and second wife Eleanor de Holland, and had at least two children, John Brooke, 7th Baron Cobham and Elizabeth Brooke, married to Robert Tanfield; their son, also named Robert Tanfield, born in 1461, married Catherine Nevill, born before 1473, daughter of Edward Nevill, 1st Baron Bergavenny and second wife Katherine Howard, and had issue. His widow remarried Christopher Worsley, before 8 November 1464.[8]
    References
    1.^ L. G. Pine, The New Extinct Peerage 1884-1971: Containing Extinct, Abeyant, Dormant and Suspended Peerages With Genealogies and Arms (London, U.K.: Heraldry Today, 1972), page 78.
    2.^ L. G. Pine, The New Extinct Peerage 1884-1971: Containing Extinct, Abeyant, Dormant and Suspended Peerages With Genealogies and Arms (London, U.K.: Heraldry Today, 1972), page 78.
    3.^ G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume III, page 346.
    4.^ L. G. Pine, The New Extinct Peerage 1884-1971: Containing Extinct, Abeyant, Dormant and Suspended Peerages With Genealogies and Arms (London, U.K.: Heraldry Today, 1972), page 78.
    5.^ L. G. Pine, The New Extinct Peerage 1884-1971: Containing Extinct, Abeyant, Dormant and Suspended Peerages With Genealogies and Arms (London, U.K.: Heraldry Today, 1972), page 78.
    6.^ G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume III, page 346.
    7.^ G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume III, page 346.
    8.^ L. G. Pine, The New Extinct Peerage 1884-1971: Containing Extinct, Abeyant, Dormant and Suspended Peerages With Genealogies and Arms (London, U.K.: Heraldry Today, 1972), page 78.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Brooke,_6th_Baron_Cobham
    ___________________
    QUANTOCK, later QUANTOCK DURBOROUGH, was held in 1066 by Alwig Banneson and in 1086 by Robert of Alfred d'Epaignes. (fn. 90) John Durburgh held it of Spaxton manor in 1328, probably in succession to his father Walter (d. by 1313), (fn. 91) and the land descended in the Durburgh family with Stogursey Hadley manor (fn. 92) until 1384 or later. (fn. 93) By 1412 and probably by 1399 it was held by Sir Thomas Brooke. (fn. 94) Sir Thomas died in 1418 and his widow Joan in 1437. Their son Sir Thomas (d. 1439) (fn. 95) was succeeded by his son 'Edward, Lord Cobham (d. 1464). Edward probably settled the manor on his daughter' Elizabeth for her marriage to Robert Tanfield. Elizabeth (d. 1502) (fn. 96) was followed in turn by her grandson William Tanfield (d. 1529) (fn. 97) and by her great-grandson Francis Tanfield (d. 1558). Francis left two young sons, John and Clement, both of whom probably died childless. Clement's widow Anne was in possession in 1588, (fn. 98) and there is no further reference to lordship. The land had become part of the Enmore estate by 1720 (fn. 99) and some was absorbed into Enmore park.
    In 1384 Sir Hugh Durburgh gave rents and reversions to William Taillour of Dunster. (fn. 1) The estate came to be called Little Quantock, and by 1476 it had been acquired by William Dodesham. (fn. 2) In 1560 it was held by one of his heirs, Joan Coombe, and from her passed to the Halswell family. They held it until 1754 (fn. 3) when it was sold to John Perceval, earl of Egmont, and was absorbed into the Enmore estate. (fn. 4) A small holding at Quantock Durborough formed part of Williton Hadley manor by 1542 (fn. 5) and descended like that manor in the Wyndham family. Before 1763 Charles Wyndham, earl of Egremont (d. 1763), sold it to the earl of Egmont. (fn. 6) There is no record of a manor house at Quantock Durborough.
    From: 'Spaxton: Manors and other estates', A History of the County of Somerset: Volume 6: Andersfield, Cannington, and North Petherton Hundreds (Bridgwater and neighbouring parishes) (1992), pp. 113-118. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=18589 Date accessed: 27 March 2011.
    ______________________
    'Proceedings ([n.d.])
    http://www.archive.org/details/proceedings43socigoog
    http://www.archive.org/stream/proceedings43socigoog#page/n128/mode/1up/search/Brook
    VI.— Thomas de Brook. He is included by Pole among "the men of best worth in Devon," during the reigns of Rich. II, Henry IV, and Henry V (1377-1413), and styles him Sir Thomas Brooke, de Holditch, Knt. In him we reach the most important member of the family while resident in the west, owing in large measure to his marriage with the wealthy widow of Robert Chedder, which gave him considerable influence in the counties of Somerset and Devon.
    Sir Thomas Brook married Johanna, second daughter and coheiress of Simon Hanap, or Hanham, of Gloucestershire (according to Hutchins so denominated from a place of that name, situate a short distance east of Bristol) and widow of Robert Chedder, Mayor of that city in 1360-1, who died 1382-4 ; and by whom she had four sons. She held in dower extensive landed possessions, and several advowsons, in Somerset, Gloucester, and Dorset, which passed at her death to Thomas Chedder, her only surviving son by this marriage. This family of Chedder will be further referred to.*
    http://www.archive.org/stream/proceedings43socigoog#page/n134/mode/1up/search/Brook
    VII.— Sir Thomas Brook, the son of Sir Thomas Brook and the Lady Johanna, was born about 1391, he being twenty- six years of age at the death of his father, 23rd January, 1417-8. He was Knight of the Shire for Dorset, 1 Henry V (1413-4) : for the county of Somerset, 8 Henry V (1420-1),
    http://www.archive.org/stream/proceedings43socigoog#page/n135/mode/1up/search/Brook
    His marriage with Joan, only surviving child and sole heiress of Joan de la Pole, Lady of Cobham, by her second husband Sir Reginald Braybroke, took place in 1409-10, and she proved a prolific mother, bringing him ten sons and four daughters. Of the sons '(1) Edward, eldest son and heir was summoned to Parliament as a Baron by writs from 13th January, 1444-5 (23 Henry VI), to 28th February, 1462-3 (2 Edw. IV), as Edward Broke de Cobham, Chivalier.' He was a strong adherent of the House of York, and as previously related, had his mansion at Olditch sacked by the Lancastrian Earl of Ormond ; was present at the first battle of St. Alban's, 23rd May, 1455 ; took part in the solemn procession to St. Paul's, London ; and commanded the left wing of the Yorkshire men at the battle of Northampton, 10th July, 1460, He married Elizabeth, daughter of James Touchet, Lord Audley, and died in 1464.' (2) Reginald, was of Aspall, in Suffolk, with descent still in existence. (3) Hugh : he married Petronel .... and his descendants settled in Somerset. John, his son, Sergeant-at-law to Henry VIII, married a daughter of Mericke, of Bristol, and had three sons : Thomas, married Joan Speke, and had issue ; Hugh, of Long Ashton ; Arthur, whose son Edward, was of Barrow-Gumey, and he had issue Hugh, who married Dorothy Preston, of Glastonbury, ; Thomas, also of Glastonbury Abbey (1623), who married Rebecca, daughter and co-heir of John Wyke, of Ninehead, ; and Sir Davy or David Brook, Lord Chief Baron of the Exchequer, Knighted 1 Mary (1553), who married Catherine, sister of John Bridges, Lord Chandois — this descent is given in the Somerset Visitation for 1623. (4) Thomas; (5) John; (6) Robert ; (7) Peter ; (8) Christopher ; (9) Henry ; (10) Morgan ; all died without issue. Of the daughters: (1) Margaret; (2) Christian, died without issue; (3) Joan, or query Isabel, married John Carrant ; (4) Elizabeth, John St, Maure, whose
    http://www.archive.org/stream/proceedings43socigoog#page/n136/mode/1up/search/Brook
    daughter Joan married John Blewitt, of Holcombe-Rogus, whose son Nicholas, ob. 22nd August, 1523.
    Although his wife styled herself Lady of Cobham, her husband was never summoned to Parliament as a Baron — the title remaining in abeyance thirty-two years, from 22nd March, 1413, temp. Sir John Oldcastle, until Sir Thomas Brook's son, Sir Edward Brook, had summons, 13th January, 1445. He survived his mother seven years, his mother-in-law five years only, and died in 1429. A continuation of the descent of Brook, will be given.
    ___________________
    -------------------- ' He held the office of Member of Parliament (M.P.) for Somerset in 1442. He succeeded to the title of 6th Lord Cobham [E., 1313] in 1442. He fought in the Battle of St. Albans on 23 May 1455, for the Yorkists. He fought in the Battle of Northampton on 10 July 1460.2 'Child of Edward Brooke, 6th Lord Cobham (of Kent) and Elizabeth Tuchet

    1.John Brooke, 7th Lord Cobham (of Kent)+1 b. a 1446, d. 9 Mar 1511/12
    -------------------- Edward Brooke Gender: Male Birth: Circa 1411 Brooke, Somerset Marriage: Heleigh, Staffordshire Death: Aug 12 1439 Cobham, Kent Father: Thomas Brooke Mother: Joan Brooke (born Braybrooke) Wife: Elizabeth Tuchet Siblings: Reginald Brooke Christian Brooke Elizabeth Brooke John Brooke Hugh Brooke Christopher Brooke Peter Brooke Robert Brooke Joan Brooke Henry Brooke Morgan Brooke Margaret Brooke Thomas Brooke Source: View full record on WikiTree website (wikitree.com)

    end of biography

    Military:
    An ardent supporter of Richard Duke of York, he fought on the Yorkist side at the First Battle of St Albans on 23 May 1455[ and at the Battle of Northampton on 10 July 1460

    Edward — Elizabeth Touchet. Elizabeth (daughter of James Touchet, Knight, 5th Baron Audley and Margaret de Ros) was born ~ 1420-1433, Heleigh Castle, Madeley, Staffordshire, England; died 8 Nov 1464. [Group Sheet]


  2. 137.  Elizabeth Touchet was born ~ 1420-1433, Heleigh Castle, Madeley, Staffordshire, England (daughter of James Touchet, Knight, 5th Baron Audley and Margaret de Ros); died 8 Nov 1464.

    Notes:

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Arms of Tuchet: Ermine, a chevron gules
    James Tuchet, 5th Baron Audley, 2nd Baron Tuchet (c. 1398–1459) was an English peer.

    James Tuchet, 5th Baron Audley, son of John Tuchet, 4th Baron Audley and his wife Elizabeth, was a distinguished veteran of the Hundred Years' War. In the opening phase of the Wars of the Roses he raised troops from his estates in Cheshire, Shropshire, Staffordshire and Derbyshire and commanded the Lancastrian force that moved to block the Yorkist Earl of Salisbury's route to Ludlow where he intended linking up with the rest of the Yorkist army.

    The two forces clashed in the Battle of Blore Heath on 23 September 1459 and Audley was killed by Sir Roger Kynaston of Stocks near Ellesmere (Kynaston incorporated emblems of the Audley coat-of-arms into his own). He was beheaded after the battle. Audley's Cross still stands on the battlefield to this day, and marks the spot where he died.

    Audley was buried in Darley Abbey, north of Derby, about 40 miles away from Blore Heath. Unfortunately, the Abbey no longer stands, so his final resting place is no longer marked.

    Marriages and children

    Audley and Margaret de Ros (c. 1400 - before 14 February 1430), daughter of William de Ros, 6th Baron de Ros and Margaret FitzAlan (D'Arundel), obtained a marriage license on 24 February 1415. They were granted a Papal Dispensation for being related in the 3rd and 4th degrees of kindred.[1][2][3]

    They were parents to three children:[1][2][3]

    Elizabeth Touchet (c. 1420 - before 8 November 1464), married Edward Brooke, 6th Baron Cobham.[1][2][3]
    Anne Touchet (c. 1424 - 1503), married Sir Thomas Dutton, who died at Blore Heath along with his father-in-law.[1][2][3]
    John Tuchet, 6th Baron Audley (c. 1426 - 26 September 1490).[1][2][3]
    Audley was married second to Eleanor de Holland, an illegitimate daughter of Edmund Holland, 4th Earl of Kent by Constance of York, daughter of Edmund of Langley, 1st Duke of York and Infanta Isabella of Castile. Audley and Eleanor obtained a marriage license on 14 September 1430. They were also granted a Papal Dispensation, they being related in the 3rd and 3rd degrees of affinity.[1][2][3]

    They were parents to seven children:[1][2][3]

    Margaret Touchet (c. 1431 - before 2 February 1481), married Richard Grey, 3rd Earl of Tankerville, son of Sir Henry Grey, 2nd Earl of Tankerville and Antigone Plantagenet, before 12 January 1459.[1][2][3]
    Constance Touchet (c. 1432), who married in 1464 Sir Robert Whitney (born 1436 - aft. 1467), son of Eustace Whitney and Jennet Trussell.[1][2][3]
    Sir Humphrey Touchet (c. 1434 - 6 May 1471), who married Elizabeth Courtenay, widow of Sir James Luttrell.[1][2][3] Like his father, he supported the House of Lancaster. He was taken prisoner at the battle of Tewkesbury and tried before Richard, Duke of Gloucester and the Duke of Norfolk. Executed with other Lancastrian leaders in the Market Square he was buried under the pavement in the Chapel of St Nicolas, in the Abbey Church of St Mary the Virgin.
    Thomas Touchet (c. 1440 - June 1507),[1][2][3] who married Catherine.[citation needed]
    Eleanor Touchet (born circa 1442), married Humphrey Grey, son of Sir Henry Grey, 2nd Earl of Tankerville and Antigone Plantagenet, in 1460.[1][2][3]
    Edmund Audley (c. 1443 - 23 August 1524), who became successively Bishop of Rochester, Bishop of Hereford and Bishop of Salisbury.[1][2][3]
    Anne Touchet (born circa 1446), married Sir Richard Delabere.[1][2][3]

    Birth:
    Heighley Castle (or Heleigh Castle) is a ruined medieval castle near Madeley, Staffordshire. The castle was completed by the Audley family in 1233 and for over 300 years was one of their ancestral homes. It was held for Charles I during the English Civil War and was destroyed by Parliamentary forces in the 1640s. The ruinous remains comprise masonry fragments, mostly overgrown by vegetation. The site is protected by Grade II listed building status and is a Scheduled Ancient Monument. The castle is privately owned and is not open to visitors.

    Children:
    1. 68. John Brooke, 7th Baron Cobham was born 10 Dec 1447, Cowling, Kent, England; died 9 Mar 1512, Cowling, Kent, England; was buried Colegiate Church, Cobham, Kent, England.
    2. Elizabeth Brooke was born ~ 1448, Cobham, Kent, England; died 26 Aug 1503.

  3. 138.  Edward Neville, 3rd Baron of AbergavennyEdward Neville, 3rd Baron of Abergavenny was born 0___ 1414, Raby Castle, Staindrop, Durham, England (son of Ralph Neville, Knight, 1st Earl of Westmorland and Joan Beaufort, Countess of Westmorland); died 18 Oct 1476, (Raby-Keverstone Castle, Staindrop, Durham, England).

    Other Events:

    • Military: a captain in Edward IV's army in the North

    Notes:

    NEVILLE, EDWARD (d. 1476), Baron of Bergavenny or Abergavenny (a form which appeared in the sixteenth century and was not definitely adopted until 1730), was the sixth and youngest son of Ralph Neville, first earl of Westmoreland [q. v.], by his second wife, Joan Beaufort, daughter of John of Gaunt, duke of Lancaster. His father had arranged, before his death in 1425, the match which made his youngest son the founder of the house which alone among the Neville branches has been continued in the male line to our own day, and is now represented by the Marquis of Abergavenny (Wills and Inventories, Surtees Soc. i. 71). The lady was Elizabeth Beauchamp, only child and heiress of Richard, earl of Worcester, who died in April 1422 of wounds received at the siege of Meaux. Worcester's father, William Beauchamp, fourth son of Thomas Beauchamp, earl of Warwick (d. 1369), by Catherine, daughter of Roger Mortimer, first earl of March [q. v.], inherited the castle and lands of Bergavenny or Abergavenny on Usk on the death of the last Hastings, earl of Pembroke, whose father, being on the maternal side a nephew of William Beauchamp's mother, had (15 April 1372) placed his cousin next in the entail (Nicolas, Historic Peerage, ed. Courthope; Complete Peerage, ed. G. E. C. p. 14). In 1392 he was summoned to parliament as a baron, under the title either of Lord Bergavenny or (perhaps more probably) of Lord Beauchamp of Bergavenny. Elizabeth Beauchamp's mother was Isabel le Despenser, daughter, and eventually sole heir, of Thomas, sixth baron le Despenser, lord of Glamorgan and Morgannoc, and for a moment earl of Gloucester, whose dignities were forfeited by rebellion in 1400. Worcester married her in July 1411, two months after his father's death, when he was still simply Richard Beauchamp, lord Bergavenny or Beauchamp of Bergavenny, and Elizabeth was born at Hanley Castle, Worcestershire, on 16 Dec. 1415 (Dugdale, Baronage, i. 242). On the death of her mother, who held them in jointure, Edward Neville in 1436 obtained possession of her father's lands, with the exception of the castle and lordship of Abergavenny, which was occupied, under an entail created in 1396 by Worcester's father, by his cousin Richard, earl of Warwick (d. 1439), who also by papal dispensation married his cousin's widow, Isabel. But Neville was known as lord of Bergavenny, and when, after the death of Henry, duke of Warwick, son of Richard, earl of Warwick, and Isabel le Despenser in 1445, the Warwick inheritance devolved upon his infant daughter, Anne Beauchamp, who was a ward of the crown, Neville and his wife forcibly entered on the castles and lands, but were driven out (Complete Peerage, p. 16). It was not until after the death of Anne Beauchamp on 3 June 1449 that Neville obtained the royal license (14 July 1449) to enter on the lands, &c., of Abergavenny (Doyle, Official Baronage; Ord. Privy Council, v. 283; Dugdale, i. 309). Nevertheless he did not get possession of them, for they passed into the hands of his nephew, Richard Neville, who succeeded to the Warwick estates in right of his wife, Anne Beauchamp, sister of Henry, duke of Warwick, and called himself Lord of Bergavenny (Dugdale, i. 307). Edward Neville was summoned to parliament as baron of Bergavenny in September 1450, but it was not until the time of his grandson that the castle and lord- ship were definitely acquired by the holder of the title (Swallow, De Nova Villa, pp. 229–30; Historic Peerage, p. 16; Inq. post mortem, iv. 406). Henry VIII restored them to George Neville, third baron Bergavenny. The history of the barony of Abergavenny is marked by more than one anomaly, but, if those were right who have maintained that it was held by the tenure of the castle, this would be the greatest.

    Edward Neville was the first person who was undoubtedly summoned to parliament under the express style of ‘Lord of Bergavenny,’ and Sir Harris Nicolas was inclined to think that he ought to be considered the first holder of the Abergavenny barony (Historic Peerage). He made very little figure in the stormy times in which some of his brothers and nephews were so prominent. In 1449 he had seen some military service in Normandy, and his son had been one of the hostages for the performance of the conditions on which the English were allowed to march out of Rouen in October of that year (Stevenson, Wars in France, ii. 611–12, 628). In the civil strife he followed the lead of the heads of his family. When, in 1454, his brother-in-law, the Duke of York, became protector of the kingdom, and his eldest brother, the Earl of Salisbury, chancellor, Abergavenny, with other Neville peers, sat pretty regularly in the privy council (Ord. Privy Council, vol. v.). Northampton is the only battle of the civil war in which his presence is mentioned (Chron. ed. Davies). When Edward IV became king, Abergavenny served in the north under his nephews against the Lancastrians in the autumn of 1462, and more than once occurs as a commissioner of array in Kent, where he probably resided at his first wife's manor of Birling, close to Maidstone (Doyle; Swallow, p. 287). Abergavenny did not change his king with his nephew Warwick, died on 18 Oct. 1476, and apparently was buried in the priory church at Abergavenny, where there is a monument of a warrior, at whose feet is a bull, the crest of Neville (ib. p. 230). By his first wife, Elizabeth Beauchamp, he had two sons and three daughters. The eldest son, Richard, died during his father's lifetime, and was buried in Staindrop Church, the ancient Neville mausoleum by the gates of Raby Castle (Surtees, iv. 130; cf. Dugdale, i. 309). Raby was now in the hands of the elder family of Ralph, earl of Westmorland, which was, by 1440, on the worst of terms with the younger. But George, the second son who succeeded his father as baron of Abergavenny, is said to have been born at Raby. The direct male line of Edward Neville ended with his great-grandson, Henry Neville, who died in 1587, leaving only a daughter, married to Sir Thomas Fane. Henry Neville's cousin, Edward Neville (d. 1589), obtained the castle and lordship of Abergavenny under an entail created by Henry's father. Edward Neville's son and namesake claimed the barony in 1598 as heir male, but a counter-claim was raised by Lady Fane as heir-general. The matter was settled by a compromise in 1604, when Lady Fane was allowed the barony of Le Despenser and the barony of Abergavenny was confirmed to Edward Neville, whose male descendant in the ninth generation now holds the dignity. The arrangement was a most anomalous one. According to all modern peerage law the writ of 1604 must have created a new barony. The four subsequent occasions on which the barony has been allowed to go to heirs male would in strictness equally constitute new creations (Complete Peerage, pp. 20–4). The present Marquis of Abergavenny is the fourteenth holder of the barony (which has twice gone to cousins) from Edward Neville, who died in 1622 (Historic Peerage). He also represents an unbroken Neville descent in the male line of twenty-one generations, from Geoffrey de Neville in the reign of Henry III, and a still longer one through Geoffrey's father, Robert Fitz-Maldred, a pedigree without parallel among English noble families [see under Neville, Robert de, d. 1282].

    Abergavenny's second wife was Catherine Howard, daughter of Sir Robert Howard, and sister of John Howard, first duke of Norfolk. His first wife is said to have died on 18 June 1448 (Doyle; Swallow, p. 231), and he then married Catherine Howard. But he was excommunicated for doing so on the ground that they had had illicit relations during his wife's lifetime, and were within the third degree of consanguinity. Pope Nicholas V was, however, persuaded to grant a dispensation for the marriage. Dugdale gives 15 Oct. 1448 as the date of the bull, which, supposing the date of Elizabeth Beauchamp's death to be correct, does not leave much time for the intermediate proceedings. Both dates are irreconcileable with the age (twenty-six) which Dugdale (from the Escheat Roll) gives to her second son at his father's death in 1476. Sir Harris Nicolas gives thirty-six as his age, and, if this is a correction and not an error, it will remove the worst difficulty. It is certainly most unlikely that George Neville should have been born at Raby Castle in 1450 (cf. Paston Letters, i. 397).

    The children of the second marriage were two sons, Ralph and Edward, who died without issue, and three daughters: Margaret, who married John Brooke, baron Cobham (d. 1506); Anne, who married Lord Strange (d. 1497), father of the second Earl of Derby; and Catherine, who married Robert Tanfield. Besides his manors in Kent, Abergavenny left lands in Sussex, Norfolk, Suffolk, and other counties. The family now own about fifteen thousand acres in Sussex, about six thousand in Kent, and about seven thousand in Worcestershire, Warwickshire, Monmouthshire, and Herefordshire (Complete Peerage).

    [Inquisitiones post mortem, ed. Record Commission; Proceedings and Ordinances of the Privy Council, ed. Nicolas; Stevenson's Wars of the English in France (Rolls Ser.); English Chron. 1377–1461, ed. Davies for Camd. Soc.; Mathieu d'Escouchy, ed. Beaucourt for Sociâetâe de l'Histoire de France; Dugdale's Baronage; Harris Nicolas's Historic Peerage, ed. Courthope; Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, &c., ed. by G. E. C[ockayne]; Doyle's Official Baronage; Rowland's Account of the Family of Nevill, 1830; Surtees's History of Durham; Swallow's De Nova Villa, Newcastle, 1885.]

    end

    Career:

    Neville was knighted sometime after 1426.[6]

    In 1438, Bergavenny, as he was now styled, was a justice of the peace for Durham .[6]
    He was a captain in the embattled Duchy of Normandy in 1449.[6] His eldest son Richard was one of the hostages given to the French when the English surrendered the city of Rouen in that year.

    After the death of his first wife, he was summoned to Parliament in 1450 as "Edwardo Nevyll de Bergavenny", by which he is held to have become Baron Bergavenny. At the time, however, this was considered to be a summons by right of his wife, and so he was considered the 3rd, rather than the 1st, Baron.

    In 1454, he was appointed to the Privy Council assembled by the Duke of York as Lord Protector, along with his more prominent Neville kinsmen. He was a commissioner of array in Kent in 1461, and was a captain in Edward IV 's army in the North the following year. He was again a commissioner of array in 1470, remaining loyal to Edward IV, unlike his nephew, the Earl of Warwick [6

    end

    Family

    He was the 7th. son [2] of Ralph de Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland, and Joan Beaufort, Countess of Westmorland, daughter of John of Gaunt and Katherine Swynford).

    In 1436 he married Lady Elizabeth de Beauchamp (d. 18 June 1448), daughter of Richard de Beauchamp, 1st Earl of Worcester, and the former Lady Isabel le Despenser, who later succeeded as de jure 3rd Baroness Bergavenny. They had four children. Their two sons were Richard Nevill bef. (1439 – bef. 1476) and Sir George Nevill (c.1440–1492), who would become 4th and 2nd Baron Bergavenny upon his father's death. Through George Nevill, Edward Neville is an ancestor to Mary Ball, mother of George Washington.[3] His daughters Alice and Catherine (b.c. 1444) married Sir Thomas Grey and John Iwardby respectively.

    Shortly after his first wife's death, in the summer or fall of 1448, he married Katherine Howard, daughter of Robert Howard and sister of John Howard, 1st Duke of Norfolk. His second wife bore him three additional daughters. Catherine Nevill (b. c. 1452/bef. 1473) married Robert Tanfield (b. 1461), son of Robert Tanfield and Elizabeth Brooke, daughter of Edward Brooke, 6th Baron Cobham, and Elizabeth Touchet, born c. 1433, and had children. Their son William was ancestor of Thomas Jefferson.[4][5] His daughter Margaret (b.bef. 1476-1506), married John Brooke, 7th Baron Cobham. John and Margaret are the grandparents of Elizabeth Brooke, Lady Wyatt. Daughter Anne (b.bef 1476-1480/81) did not long survive her father.

    Career

    Neville was knighted sometime after 1426.[6]

    In 1438, Bergavenny, as he was now styled, was a justice of the peace for Durham.[6]

    He was a captain in the embattled Duchy of Normandy in 1449.[6] His eldest son Richard was one of the hostages given to the French when the English surrendered the city of Rouen in that year.

    After the death of his first wife, he was summoned to Parliament in 1450 as "Edwardo Nevyll de Bergavenny", by which he is held to have become Baron Bergavenny. At the time, however, this was considered to be a summons by right of his wife, and so he was considered the 3rd, rather than the 1st, Baron.

    In 1454, he was appointed to the Privy Council assembled by the Duke of York as Lord Protector, along with his more prominent Neville kinsmen. He was a commissioner of array in Kent in 1461, and was a captain in Edward IV's army in the North the following year. He was again a commissioner of array in 1470, remaining loyal to Edward IV, unlike his nephew, the Earl of Warwick[6]

    end

    Edward married Catherine Howard, Baroness of Abergavenny 15 Oct 1448, Raby, Staindrop, Durham, England. Catherine (daughter of Robert Howard, Duke of Norfolk and Margaret Mowbray, Duchess of Norfolk) was born Abt 1414, Norfolk, England; died Aft 29 Jun 1478, Raby Castle, Staindrop, Durham, England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 139.  Catherine Howard, Baroness of Abergavenny was born Abt 1414, Norfolk, England (daughter of Robert Howard, Duke of Norfolk and Margaret Mowbray, Duchess of Norfolk); died Aft 29 Jun 1478, Raby Castle, Staindrop, Durham, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Katherine Howard

    Notes:

    Katherine Howard, daughter of Robert Howard and sister of John Howard, 1st Duke of Norfolk...

    Katherine Howard, daughter of Robert Howard and sister of John Howard, 1st Duke of Norfolk .

    His second wife bore him three additional daughters. Catherine Nevill (b. c. 1452/bef. 1473) married Robert Tanfield (b. 1461), son of Robert Tanfield and Elizabeth Brooke, daughter of Edward Brooke, 6th Baron Cobham , and Elizabeth Touchet, born c. 1433, and had children.

    Their son William was ancestor of Thomas Jefferson .[4][5]

    His daughter Margaret (b.bef. 1476-1506), married John Brooke, 7th Baron Cobham .

    John and Margaret are the grandparents of Elizabeth Brooke, Lady Wyatt . Daughter Anne (b.bef 1476-1480/81) did not long survive her father.

    he married Katherine Howard, daughter of Robert Howard and sister of John Howard, 1st Duke of Norfolk. His second wife bore him three additional daughters. Catherine Nevill (b. c. 1452/bef. 1473) married Robert Tanfield (b. 1461), son of Robert Tanfield and Elizabeth Brooke, daughter of Edward Brooke, 6th Baron Cobham, and Elizabeth Touchet, born c. 1433, and had children. Their son William was ancestor of Thomas Jefferson.[4][5] His daughter Margaret (b.bef. 1476-1506), married John Brooke, 7th Baron Cobham. John and Margaret are the grandparents of Elizabeth Brooke, Lady Wyatt. Daughter Anne (b.bef 1476-1480/81) did not long survive her father.

    Children:
    1. Catherine Neville was born 1452-1459, Raby Castle, Staindrop, Durham, England; died Bef 1473, Gayton, Northamptonshire, England; was buried Ashby-de-La-Zouch, Leicestershire, England.
    2. 69. Margaret Neville was born ~ 1450, Raby Castle, Staindrop, Durham, England; died 30 Sep 1506.

  5. 140.  John Heydon was born (England) (son of William Heydon and Joan Longford).

    John — Eleanor Winter. [Group Sheet]


  6. 141.  Eleanor Winter (daughter of Edward Winter and Oliva Hampton).
    Children:
    1. 70. Henry Heydon was born (England).

  7. 142.  Geoffrey Boleyn was born 0___ 1406, Salle, Norfolk, England (son of Geoffrey Boleyn and Anne Bracton); died 0___ 1463; was buried London, England.

    Notes:

    Sir Geoffrey or Jeffery Boleyn (1406-1463) was a London merchant and Lord Mayor of London.

    Life[edit]

    Hever Castle.

    Blickling Hall as it is today.
    Geoffrey Boleyn was the son of Geoffrey Boleyn (d. 1440) yeoman of Salle, Norfolk, and Alice,[1] and grandson of Thomas Boleyn (d. 1411) of Salle and Anne, an heiress, daughter of Sir John Bracton, a Norfolk knight. He went to London, was apprenticed to a hatter, and became a freeman of the city through the Hatter’s Company in 1428. In 1429 he transferred to a grander livery company, the Mercers’ Company, of which he became master in 1454.[2] As a wealthy mercer he served as a Sheriff of London in 1447, as member of parliament for the city in 1449, as alderman in 1452, and Lord Mayor of London in 1457/8,[3] and was knighted[4] by King Henry VI.[5] He purchased the manor of Blickling in Norfolk from Sir John Fastolf in 1452, and Hever Castle in Kent in 1462.[5]

    He was buried in the church of St Lawrence Jewry in the City of London.[5]

    Siblings

    The brasses of five sons and four daughters were still in situ in Salle's parish church in 1730.[6][7]

    William Boleyn.[8][note 1]
    John Boleyn.[8]
    Thomas, prebendary of St. Stephen’s, Westminster, precentor and sub-dean of Wells, Master of Gonville Hall, Cambridge, and Master of the college at Maidstone,d.1472.[11](executor to Geoffrey's will).
    one unknown brother.
    Cecily (1408–26 June 1458[12]), died unmarried at Blickling.
    three unknown sisters.
    Relatives[edit]
    Simon, parochial chaplain of Salle, Norfolk died 3 August 1482.
    James of Gunthorpe, Norfolk, died 1493 (executor to Simon's will).
    Thomas of Gunthorpe, Norfolk (executor to Simon's will).
    Joan named in her brother's (Simon) will., married to Alan Roos[note 2] of Salle, died 1463, he was the receiver (responsible for collecting rents) to Margaret Paston's (nâee Mauteby d. 1484) properties in Salle.[15] Secondly she was married to Robert Aldrych, died 1474.
    According to British historian and author, Elizabeth Norton, Geoffrey Boleyn who died in 1440 was their great-uncle.[16]

    Marriage and issue

    Boleyn married Anne Hoo (1424 - 1484), the only child of Thomas Hoo, Baron Hoo and Hastings (d. 13 February 1455), by his first wife Elizabeth Wychingham, by whom he had two sons and five daughters:

    Sir Thomas Boleyn (d. 1471/2).
    Sir William Boleyn (d.1505), mercer, who married Margaret Butler, daughter and co-heiress of Thomas Butler, 7th Earl of Ormond.[17]
    Isabella (1434–85) who married Henry Aucher (1410–60).
    Alice Boleyn b.abt.1438 d. abt. 1480 m. Sir John Fortescue of Punsborne, Hatfield, Herts d. 1500.
    Anne Boleyn (born c.1440),[citation needed] second daughter, who married Sir Henry Heydon (d.1504), by whom she had eight children. She died c.1509.[18]
    Cecily Boleyn b.abt.1442.
    Elizabeth Boleyn b.abt.1459.
    Sir Geoffrey Boleyn died in 1471.[5] He and his wife Anne were the great-grandparents of Queen Anne Boleyn.[19]

    Arms of Geoffrey Boleyn

    The arms are Boleyn, Argent, a chevron gules,between three bulls heads couped Sable, quarterly with arms of Bracton, Azure, three mullets, a chief dauncette or.[note 3]

    end of biography

    Geoffrey — Anne Hastings. Anne (daughter of Thomas Hoo, Baron Hoo and Hastings and Elizabeth Wychingham) was born (England). [Group Sheet]


  8. 143.  Anne Hastings was born (England) (daughter of Thomas Hoo, Baron Hoo and Hastings and Elizabeth Wychingham).
    Children:
    1. 71. Anne Boleyn was born (Norfolkshire) England.
    2. William Boleyn was born 0___ 1451, Blickling Hall, Blickling, Norfolk, England; died 10 Oct 1505.