Sir Walter Raleigh

Sir Walter Raleigh

Male 1552 - 1618  (66 years)

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Generation: 1

  1. 1.  Sir Walter RaleighSir Walter Raleigh was born 22 Jan 1552, Hayes Barton, Devon, England (son of Walter Raleigh and Katherine Campernon); died 29 Oct 1618, Westminster, London, England.

    Notes:

    Sir Walter Raleigh (/'r??li/, /'r΅li/, or /'r??li/;[2] circa 1554 – 29 October 1618) was an English landed gentleman, writer, poet, soldier, politician, courtier, spy and explorer. He was cousin to Sir Richard Grenville and younger half-brother of Sir Humphrey Gilbert. He is also well known for popularising tobacco in England.

    Raleigh was born to a Protestant family in Devon, the son of Walter Raleigh and Catherine Champernowne. Little is known of his early life, though he spent some time in Ireland, in Killua Castle, Clonmellon, County Westmeath, taking part in the suppression of rebellions and participating in the Siege of Smerwick. Later, he became a landlord of property confiscated from the native Irish. He rose rapidly in the favour of Queen Elizabeth I and was knighted in 1585. Raleigh was instrumental in the English colonisation of North America and was granted a royal patent to explore Virginia, which paved the way for future English settlements. In 1591, he secretly married Elizabeth Throckmorton, one of the Queen's ladies-in-waiting, without the Queen's permission, for which he and his wife were sent to the Tower of London. After his release, they retired to his estate at Sherborne, Dorset.

    In 1594, Raleigh heard of a "City of Gold" in South America and sailed to find it, publishing an exaggerated account of his experiences in a book that contributed to the legend of "El Dorado". After Queen Elizabeth died in 1603, Raleigh was again imprisoned in the Tower, this time for being involved in the Main Plot against King James I, who was not favourably disposed towards him. In 1616, he was released to lead a second expedition in search of El Dorado. During the expedition, men led by his top commander ransacked a Spanish outpost, in violation of both the terms of his pardon and a peace treaty with Spain. He returned to England and, to appease the Spanish, was arrested and executed in 1618.

    Raleigh was one of the most notable figures of the Elizabethan era. In 2002, he was featured in the BBC poll of the 100 Greatest Britons.

    end

    Sir Walter Raleigh
    Born 1552 in Hayes Barton, Devon, Englandmap
    Son of Walter Raleigh MP and Katherine (Champernon) Raleigh
    Brother of Margaret (Raleigh) Ralegh of Fardell [half], George Raleigh [half], John Gilbert [half], Humphrey Gilbert [half], Mary Rawleigh [half], Adrian Gilbert [half], Wymund Rawleigh [half], John Raleigh [half], George Raleigh [half], Adam Rawleigh [half] and Carew Raleigh
    Husband of Elizabeth (Throckmorton) Raleigh — married 1593 [location unknown]
    Father of Damerei Raleigh Infant, Walter Raleigh and Carew Raleigh
    Died 29 Oct 1618 in Westminster, London, England


    Biography

    Sir Walter Raleigh (c. 1554 – 29 October 1618) was an English aristocrat, writer, poet, soldier, courtier, spy, and explorer. He is also well known for popularizing tobacco in England.[1]

    Little is known about Raleigh's birth.Some historians believe that he was born on 22 January 1552, although the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography currently favours a date of 1554. He grew up in the house of Hayes Barton, a farmhouse near the village of East Budleigh, not far from Budleigh Salterton in Devon. He was the youngest of five sons born to Catherine Champernowne in two successive marriages. His half-brothers John Gilbert, Humphrey Gilbert, and Adrian Gilbert, and his full brother Carew Raleigh were also prominent during the reigns of Elizabeth I and James I. Catherine Champernowne was a niece of Kat Ashley, Elizabeth's governess, who introduced the young men at court.[2]

    Family and Education

    b. 1554, yr. s. of Walter Ralegh† of Fardel, Devon by his 3rd w. Katherine, da. of Philip Champernown, wid. of Otho Gilbert; bro. of Carew Ralegh and half-bro. of Adrian and Sir Humphrey Gilbert. educ. local g.s.; Oriel, Oxf. c.1572; Lyon’s Inn; travelled in France c.1573; M. Temple by 1576. m. Nov. 1591, Elizabeth, da. of Sir Nicholas Throckmorton, 3s. Kntd. 1585.[3]
    Sir Walter Raleigh Gender: Male Birth: 1552 - Hayes Barton, Devon, England Death: Oct 29 1618 - Middlesex, London, England Father: Walter Raleigh, Sr/Elder Mother: Katherine Champernon Wife: Elizabeth Raleigh (born Throckmorton) Children: John Small Son Raleigh Carew Raleigh Damerei Raleigh Edward Smalley Walter Raleigh

    Title

    Sir
    Birth

    1552 Hayes Barton, Devon, England.
    Marriage

    19 NOV 1591 Elizabeth Raleigh (born Throckmorton).
    Death

    29 OCT 1618 Middlesex, London, England.
    Legacy

    Raleigh County, West Virginia is named is his honor.
    Sources

    Foster, Joseph, Alumni Oxonienses (Parker and Co., 1892) Early Series 189 (1500-1714)
    Vol. 3, Page 1230: " of Oriel Coll. about 1568 (W. Rawley, 1572, in O.H.S.), a student of the Middle Temple 1574 (as son of Walter, of Budleigh, Devon), served in France, the Low Countries, and Ireland, discovered a new country which he called Virginia 1584, knighted 1 Jan., 1584-5, captain of Q. Elizabeth's guard, lord warden of the stannaries of Devon and Cornwall, governor of Jersey, took an active part against "the invincible Armada" 1588, M.P. Devon 1584-5, 1586-7, of St. Michael 1593, Dorset 1597-8, Cornwall 1601; in 1603 he was concerned in a plot against James I., Condemned to death but reprieved, with imprisonment in the Tower for lifew; in 1618 he set out with an expedition to Guiana, and for sacking St. Thomas was on his return beheaded on the former judgment in Old Palace Yard, Westminster, 29 Oct., 1618; buried in the chancel of St. Margaret's, Westminster; father of Carew, and of Walter 1607. See Ath. ii. 235; Foster's Parl. Dict.; & Lansdowne MS. 983. f. 331."
    http://www.thepeerage.com/p14661.htm#i146602
    Wikipedia:Walter_Raleigh
    Footnotes

    ? This is opening of article at Wikipedia
    ? Wikipedia:Walter_Raleigh
    ? The History of Parliament: the House of Commons 1558-1603, ed. P.W. Hasler, 1981 [1]

    end

    Died:
    Raleigh was beheaded in the Old Palace Yard at the Palace of Westminster on 29 October 1618. "Let us dispatch", he said to his executioner. "At this hour my ague comes upon me. I would not have my enemies think I quaked from fear." After he was allowed to see the axe that would be used to behead him, he mused: "This is a sharp Medicine, but it is a Physician for all diseases and miseries." According to biographers, Raleigh's last words (as he lay ready for the axe to fall) were: "Strike, man, strike!"

    Walter married Elizabeth "Bess" Throckmorton 0___ 1593. [Group Sheet]


Generation: 2

  1. 2.  Walter Raleigh was born ~ 1505, Fardle, Devon, England; died 0___ 1581.

    Walter — Katherine Campernon. Katherine (daughter of Philip Champernowne and Catherine Carew) was born Bef 1518; died Aft 1552, Modbury, Devon, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 3.  Katherine Campernon was born Bef 1518 (daughter of Philip Champernowne and Catherine Carew); died Aft 1552, Modbury, Devon, England.
    Children:
    1. 1. Walter Raleigh was born 22 Jan 1552, Hayes Barton, Devon, England; died 29 Oct 1618, Westminster, London, England.


Generation: 3

  1. 6.  Philip Champernowne was born 18 Jan 1479; died 2 Aug 1545, Modbury, Devon, England.

    Philip — Catherine Carew. Catherine (daughter of Edmund Carew and Catherine Huddesfield) was born ~ 1495; died 2 Feb 1546, Ottery Mohun, Devon, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 7.  Catherine Carew was born ~ 1495 (daughter of Edmund Carew and Catherine Huddesfield); died 2 Feb 1546, Ottery Mohun, Devon, England.
    Children:
    1. 3. Katherine Campernon was born Bef 1518; died Aft 1552, Modbury, Devon, England.


Generation: 4

  1. 14.  Edmund Carew was born 0___ 1464 (son of Nicholas Carew, Baron Carew and Margaret Dinham); died 24 Jun 1513, Luppitt, Devonshire, England.

    Edmund — Catherine Huddesfield. Catherine was born ~ 1463; died Aft 9 Jun 1528, Devonshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 15.  Catherine Huddesfield was born ~ 1463; died Aft 9 Jun 1528, Devonshire, England.
    Children:
    1. 7. Catherine Carew was born ~ 1495; died 2 Feb 1546, Ottery Mohun, Devon, England.


Generation: 5

  1. 28.  Nicholas Carew, Baron Carew was born ~ 1444 (son of Thomas Carew and Joan Carminow); died ~ 21 Nov 1470, Luppitt, Devonshire, England.

    Notes:

    Died:
    Mohuns Ottery or Mohun's Ottery, pronounced /mu?nz'?t?ri/,[1] is a house and historic manor in the parish of Luppitt, 1 mile south-east of the village of Luppitt and 4 miles north-east of Honiton in east Devon, England. From the 14th to the 16th centuries it was a seat of the Carew family. Several manorial court rolls survive at the Somerset Heritage Centre, Taunton, Somerset.[2]

    The old manor house burnt down in 1868 and was completely rebuilt as a farmhouse that has been a grade II listed building since 1955.[3] The ruins of a mid-16th century gatehouse lie to the south of the house; these and the adjoining garden walls, probably built in the mid-19th century at the same time as the farmhouse, are grade II* listed.[4][5] The house now has six reception rooms and six bedrooms. Around the courtyard are a cottage, stables and farm buildings. The River Otter forms part of the eastern boundary of the estate. In January 2014 the house with 228 acres was offered for sale for Ή3.5 million.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mohuns_Ottery

    Nicholas — Margaret Dinham. Margaret (daughter of John Dinham and Joan Arches) was born ~ 1441; died 13 Dec 1470, Hartland, Devon, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 29.  Margaret Dinham was born ~ 1441 (daughter of John Dinham and Joan Arches); died 13 Dec 1470, Hartland, Devon, England.
    Children:
    1. 14. Edmund Carew was born 0___ 1464; died 24 Jun 1513, Luppitt, Devonshire, England.


Generation: 6

  1. 56.  Thomas Carew was born ~ 1427 (son of Nicholas Carew and Joan Courtenay); died Bef 10 Nov 1461, Luppitt, Devonshire, England.

    Thomas — Joan Carminow. Joan was born ~ 1424; died Bef 1502, Boconnoc, Cornwall, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 57.  Joan Carminow was born ~ 1424; died Bef 1502, Boconnoc, Cornwall, England.
    Children:
    1. 28. Nicholas Carew, Baron Carew was born ~ 1444; died ~ 21 Nov 1470, Luppitt, Devonshire, England.

  3. 58.  John Dinham was born Bef 1406 (son of John Dinham, Knight, Lord Dinham and Eleanor Montagu); died 25 Jan 1457, Hartland, Devon, England.

    John — Joan Arches. Joan was born Bef 1410; died 20 Apr 1497, Steeple Ashton, Oxfordshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 59.  Joan Arches was born Bef 1410; died 20 Apr 1497, Steeple Ashton, Oxfordshire, England.
    Children:
    1. 29. Margaret Dinham was born ~ 1441; died 13 Dec 1470, Hartland, Devon, England.


Generation: 7

  1. 112.  Nicholas Carew was born ~ 1409 (son of Thomas Carew and Elizabeth Bonville); died 3 May 1447, Moulsford, Berkshire, England.

    Nicholas — Joan Courtenay. Joan (daughter of Hugh Courtenay and Philippa L'Arcedekne) was born 0___ 1411, Haccombe, Devonshire, England; died Bef 3 Aug 1465; was buried St. Blaise's Church, Haccombe, Devonshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 113.  Joan Courtenay was born 0___ 1411, Haccombe, Devonshire, England (daughter of Hugh Courtenay and Philippa L'Arcedekne); died Bef 3 Aug 1465; was buried St. Blaise's Church, Haccombe, Devonshire, England.

    Notes:

    Joan Courtenay (born 1411/14 – d. before 3 August 1465), who eventually became her mother's sole heiress.

    She married twice, firstly to Sir Nicholas Carew (d. before 20 April 1448), Baron Carew, of Mohuns Ottery in Devon, of Carew Castle in Pembrokeshire and of Moulesford in Berkshire, by whom she had five sons and three daughters. She was the heiress of 16 manors, which she divided amongst her younger sons.[16] She gave Haccombe to her second son Nicholas Carew, founder of the Carew family of Haccombe (see Carew baronets (1661) of Haccombe).[17]

    Secondly, by royal licence dated 5 October 1450, she married Sir Robert Vere, second son of Richard de Vere, 11th Earl of Oxford, by whom she had a son, John Vere,[18] father of John de Vere, 15th Earl of Oxford.

    Children:
    1. 56. Thomas Carew was born ~ 1427; died Bef 10 Nov 1461, Luppitt, Devonshire, England.

  3. 116.  John Dinham, Knight, Lord DinhamJohn Dinham, Knight, Lord Dinham was born ~ 1359, Devonshire, England (son of John Dinham, Knight and Muriel Courtenay); died 25 Dec 1428, Hartland, Devon, England.

    Notes:

    Sir John Dinham (1359–1428) was a knight from Devonshire, England. His principal seats were at Hartland in North Devon, Kingskerswell and Nutwell in South Devon, Buckland Dinham in Somerset and Cardinham in Cornwall.[2] He killed one of the murderers of his father in Exeter Cathedral, for which he was pardoned by the king. He later broke into Hartland Abbey and assaulted the Abbot over a long-standing disagreement, and also performed other acts of violence. He married three times; his heir was John Dinham (1406–1458). His monument survives in Kingskerswell parish church.

    Origins and inheritance

    The Dynham family took its name from its ancient manor of Dinan in Brittany.[3] They had been at Nutwell since about 1122 and were one of the leading gentry families in Devon. They founded Hartland Abbey in 1169 on their manor of Hartland.[4]

    John Dinham was the son and heir of Sir John Dinham (1318–1383) by his wife Muriel Courtenay, the elder daughter and co-heiress of Sir Thomas Courtenay (1312–1362) of Wootton Courtenay in Somerset. Thomas Courtenay was the fourth son of Hugh de Courtenay, 9th Earl of Devon (1276–1340)) by his wife Muriel de Moels (died before 1369), the elder daughter and co-heiress of Sir John de Moels (died 1337), feudal baron of North Cadbury[5] in Somerset.[6]

    Dinham's father was murdered by robbers on 7 January 1383,[6] when John was aged 24. He inherited his father's estates including Hartland and Nutwell in Devon, Buckland Dinham in Somerset and Cardinham in Cornwall. He also inherited from his mother 3 1/2 knight's fees, including the former de Moels estate of Kingskerswell in Devon, which he made his seat, and also Woodhuish, Dunterton in Devon and Cricket Malherbe and Northome in Somerset and Over Worton with a moiety of North Stoke in Oxfordshire and Over Wallop in Hampshire together with 4 advowsons.[7]

    On his mother's death and following her burial in Hartland Abbey, Bishop of Exeter Thomas Brantingham granted an indulgence for 40 days to any of his parishioners who should say for the soul of Lady Muriell Dynham and for the souls of all the faithful departed, with pious mind a prayer Oracio Dominica with a Salutacio Angelica.[8]

    Biography

    Dinham was a violent man. The two thieves, Robert Tuwyng and John Broun, who had murdered his father were convicted of robbery and murder and incarcerated in Ilchester prison. After apparently having escaped, John Broun was tracked down by Dinham and fled for sanctuary into Exeter Cathedral. On 18 February 1383 Dinham broke down the door and killed him after a fierce struggle, thus avenging his father's murder. On 16 March 1383 he received the king's pardon for his action,[9][a] but was ordered by the Bishop Brantingham to perform penance for having violated the right of sanctuary. The penance mandated by the bishop on 21 March 1383 was:[11]

    "that on a Sunday before this Pentecost he should stand at the small altar between the choir and the high altar on the south side, with head uncovered with a lit candle of 2 lbs weight in his hand from the start of the high mass, that is to say the Confession (Confiteor) until the end of the same mass and then if he should so wish to make gift at the offertory of the same candle into the hand of the celebrant at the high mass".

    There had been a long history of quarrelling between the abbots of Hartland Abbey and the Dinham family, founders of the abbey, mainly concerning patronage and occupation of the abbey during a vacancy.[12] In 1397 Abbot Philip Tone claimed as abbot the lordship of the manor of Stoke St Nectan, near the parish church of St Nectan, Hartland, and claimed thereby view of frankpledge from the residents of that manor. In August that year Dinham was accused by the Abbot of Hartland of "breaking into his houses, assaulting him and chasing him to his chamber and ill-treating his servants".[13] Dinham with his armed supporters appeared at the abbey, "and so ill-used him that his life was despaired of, took timber and goods to the value of Ή20, killed 22 sheep, carried off 2 cows, depastured corn and grass, imprisoned his servant, assaulted and ill-used his men, servants and bondsmen".[14]

    This action prevented the abbot from cultivating his land for a long period and frightened away his tenants and the lucrative flow of visitors come either to pray at the holy sites or to buy the tithes.[14] On 27 February 1398 Dinham was bound over to keep the peace for 1,000 marks,[13] levied on his lands and chattels in England, with Sir John de la Pomeray, Sir John Prideaux, Giles Aysse and John Stantorre each standing as surety for Ή200.[14]

    Dinham was later found guilty of committing assaults on others in January 1402 and in December 1404.[13] In September 1402 he was amongst those accused by the Abbot of Torre Abbey of digging up a road at Kingkerswell and assaulting the abbot's men. He also committed acts of violence at Nutwell and at Littleham.[15]

    On 28 April 1407, having paid 700 of his 1,000 marks surety he and his mainpernors were pardoned.[13][16]

    Family

    Dinham married three times. His first marriage, some time before 3 February 1380, was to a lady named Eleanor or Ellen (died after 22 Sept 1387[17]). Her parentage has not been directly evidenced,[18] but she has been shown to have been Eleanor de Montagu, daughter of John de Montacute, 1st Baron Montacute and his wife Margaret de Monthermer.[19] Eleanor was granted licence by Bishop Brantingham in 1382 to hold divine service during one year in her chapel situated within her manor of Kytone,[20] and John and "Elianora" were also granted by the bishop on 3 January 1384, licence to celebrate divine mass in their chapel within their manor of Kingskerswell.[21]

    By Eleanor, Dinham had a daughter Muriel, who married Sir Edward Hastings of Elsing and Gressenhall.

    Dinham's second marriage, before 26 November 1396, was to Maud Mautravers (died c. 1402), a daughter and co-heiress of Sir John Mautravers of Hooke, Dorset (a cousin of John Maltravers, 1st Baron Maltravers (1290?–1365) of Lytchett Matravers, Dorset[22]) and widow of Piers de la Mare of Offley, Hertfordshire.

    His third wife was Philippa Lovel (died 15 May 1465), daughter of Sir John Lovell of Titchmarsh, Northamptonshire and Minster Lovell, Oxfordshire, by his wife Alianore la Zouche, daughter of Sir William la Zouche of Harringworth, Northamptonshire. Philippa survived her husband and some time before 24 March 1429 remarried to Nicholas Broughton.[23] By Philippa Lovel, Dynham had a son and heir, Sir John Dinham (1406–1458).

    Dinham died on 25 December 1428 at the age of about 69.

    Monument

    Dinham's chest tomb with his effigy and the effigies of two of his wives survive in St Mary's Church, Kingskerswell,[24] which is adjacent to the ruins of the Dinham manor house and seat. All the monuments been moved from their original unknown positions[citation needed] to occupy each one a separate window ledge in the north aisle. The effigy of Dinham himself retains one front of its chest-tomb base, decorated with angels holding heraldic escutcheons. The arms of Dinham, four fusils in fess, are still visible sculpted in low-relief on the chest of his surcoat.

    end

    Sir John "Lord Dinham" Dinham
    Born about 1359 in Devonshire, Englandmap
    Son of John Dinham and Muriel (Courtenay) Dinham
    Brother of Muriel (Dinham) de Dinham and Johanna (Dinham) Berkeley
    Husband of Eleanor (Montagu) Dinham — married 3 Feb 1380 in Hartland, Devonshire, Englandmap
    Husband of Maud (Mautravers) Dinham — married 26 Nov 1396 in Hook, Devonshire, Englandmap
    Husband of Philippa (Lovel) Dinham — married 1406 in Titchmarsh, Northamptonshire, Englandmap
    Father of Muriel (Dinham) Hastings, Catherine Dinham, Otes Dinham, Jane Dinham, John Dinham, Emma Dinham, Alice Dinham and Elizabeth Dinham
    Died 25 Dec 1428 in Hartland, Bideford, Devon, Englandmap

    Biography

    From Royal Ancestry, cited below: Married 1) ELEANOR (or ELLEN) MONTAGU. They had one daughter, Muriel. Married 2) MAUD MAUTRAVERS, widow of Peter de la Mare, Knt. They had no issue. Married 3) PHILIPPE LOVEL, daughter of JOHN LOVEL, KG, 5th Lord Lovel. They had one son, John, Knt., and two daughters, Maud (wife of Thomas Brooke, Esq.), and Philippe (wife of Thomas Beaumont, Knt.).

    Sources

    Magna Carta Ancestry 2011 2nd ed. Vol. II p. 85-87
    Ancestral Roots 8th Ed. Line 214-34
    Richardson, Royal Ancestry (2013) Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 5 vols., ed. Kimball G. Everingham, (Salt Lake City, Utah: the author, 2013), volume II, pages 457 and 458, DINHAM 7, entry for JOHN DINHAM.
    Magna Carta Ancestry: A study in Colonial and Medieval Families, Richardson, Douglas, (Kimball G. Everingham, editor. 2nd edition, 2011), vol. 2 p. 85.
    Wikipedia page for John Dinham (1359-1428)
    Marlyn Lewis.

    end

    John married Eleanor Montagu 3 Feb 1380, Hartland, Devon, England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 117.  Eleanor Montagu (daughter of John Montacute, 1st Baron Montacute and Margaret Monthermer).
    Children:
    1. Muriel Dinham was born ~ 1390, Hartland, Devon, England; died Bef 1427.
    2. 58. John Dinham was born Bef 1406; died 25 Jan 1457, Hartland, Devon, England.


Generation: 8

  1. 224.  Thomas Carew was born ~ 1368 (son of Leonard Carew and Elizabeth FitzAlan); died 25 Jan 1431, Luppitt, Devonshire, England.

    Thomas — Elizabeth Bonville. Elizabeth was born ~ 1362; died 0___ 1451, Chewton, Devonshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 225.  Elizabeth Bonville was born ~ 1362; died 0___ 1451, Chewton, Devonshire, England.
    Children:
    1. 112. Nicholas Carew was born ~ 1409; died 3 May 1447, Moulsford, Berkshire, England.

  3. 226.  Hugh Courtenay was born 0___ 1358, Haccombe, Devonshire, England (son of Edward Courtenay and Emeline Dawney); died 6 Mar 1425, (England).

    Notes:

    Sir Hugh I Courtenay (after 1358 – 5 or 6 March 1425), of Boconnoc in Cornwall and of Haccombe in Devon,[1] was Sheriff of Devon for 1418/19 and was thrice elected knight of the shire for Devon in 1395, 1397 and 1421.[2] He was a grandson of Hugh de Courtenay, 2nd/10th Earl of Devon (1303–1377), was the younger brother of Edward de Courtenay, 3rd/11th Earl of Devon (1357–1419), "The Blind Earl", and was the grandfather of Edward Courtenay, 1st Earl of Devon (d.1509), KG, created Earl of Devon in 1485 by King Henry VII. He was the link between the senior line of the Courtenay Earls of Devon made extinct following the Battle of Tewkesbury in 1471 (his elder brother's line) and the post-Wars of the Roses creation of a new Earldom for his grandson made in 1485 by King Henry VII.

    Origins

    Hugh Courtenay was born in 1358, the younger of two sons of Sir Edward de Courtenay (d. between 2 February 1368 –1 April 1371) of Goodrington, Devon, by his wife Emeline (or Emme) Dawney (or Dauney, Daunay, etc.) (c.1329 – 28 February 1371/2), daughter and heiress of Sir John Dawnay (d.1346/7) of Sheviock in Cornwall, Mudford Terry and Hinton in Somerset[3] by his wife Sybil Treverbyn. Emmeline Dauney was a great heiress who brought to her husband several manors and estates, including Boconnoc.[4] Hugh Courtenay was the grandson of Hugh de Courtenay, 2nd/10th Earl of Devon (1303–1377). At the 2nd/10th Earl's death on 2 May 1377, Courtenay's elder brother, Edward, became the 3rd/11th Earl of Devon.[5]

    Maternal inheritance

    His elder brother was due to inherit the earldom and the vast Courtenay estates under primogeniture or entail, and thus as the second son with no prospective patrimony, Hugh Courtenay was given the estate of Boconnoc by his mother, the heiress Emmeline Dauney, which he made his seat.[6] The practice of raising up a younger son in this way was common in the case of a wealthy heiress who married an already wealthy husband, and frequently the younger son beneficiary was required to adopt the maternal surname and armorials.[7] Furthermore, his mother requested[6] his elder brother the Earl to give him the estates of "Goderington" (Goodrington), Stancombe (alias Slancomb (sic) Dawney) and South Allington, which he duly performed by deed of indenture dated 1414.[8]

    Career

    Courtenay's elder brother, Edward Courtenay, 11th Earl of Devon (c.1357 – 5 December 1419), succeeded to the earldom of Devon in 1377, and by 1384 Hugh was serving as one of his brother's esquires. Earlier, in 1378 Courtenay had taken part with his uncles, Sir Philip Courtenay and Sir Peter Courtenay, in an unsuccessful naval expedition against Spain at which Courtenay was captured, but quickly ransomed. He had been knighted by 1387, and in March of that year served at sea in his brother's retinue under the Lord Admiral, the Earl of Arundel.

    Little else is known of his career until he went to Ireland with King Richard II's expedition in April 1399, serving under the Duke of Aumale, who had earlier been granted custody of the lands of Courtenay's stepson, Fulk FitzWarin.

    Over the years Courtenay acquired considerable property, much of it by way of his marriages. At his death he held 14 manors, principally in the West Country, but also in Essex and Herefordshire.

    Courtenay served on commissions during the reigns of both Richard II and his successor, Henry IV, including commissions concerned with inquiry into the possessions of Richard II's former supporters, suggesting that he accommodated himself to both regimes.

    He was made Commissioner of Survey to Devon and Cornwall in 1388, and again by Lords Appellant to the two counties in October 1397. In 1395 he was elected as MP for Devon and again in September 1397. At the height of the Crisis, King Richard II betrayed his uncle, Earl of Arundel, and as a consequence he lost his main supporters.[citation needed]

    After the usurpation by King Henry IV Hugh was made Commissioner of Array for Devon in December 1399 - responsible for raising troops and bringing the south-west to the Lancastrian cause. He proved a successful recruiter for the wars in France, as he was made commissioner again in July 1402 to fight the Welsh Rebellion. The commission met again in August, September, and October 1403, after King Henry had defeated Harry Hotspur and the Mortimers at Shrewsbury.[citation needed]

    In February 1400, Sir Hugh was a Commissioner of oyer and terminer dispensing the king's justice in the south-west. There was also a Commission of Inquiry into waste lands. King Henry made Hugh a Commissioner in the region and in Hampshire, a traditional land area of Courtenay holdings, to look into the concealment of possessions owned by adherents of the late king. He was also on the commission for "concealment of alnage" in Devon from July 1401.

    The south-western counties disliked the new king and interference of parliament and in 1405 the Cornish rebelled with widespread rioting. In January a commission was set up to look into "unlawful assemblies" during 1406. Sir Hugh, however was a known Lancastrian: in May 1402 he had been forced to proclaim the intention of Henry IV to govern well. Also he was a JP for Devon, appointed on 16 February 1400 for the period until 1407; instructed to enforce the law and collect the king's taxes. He was appointed Tax Collector for Devon in March 1404.

    He was made High Sheriff of Devon on 4 November 1418, holding the office for the year until 23 November 1419. When his brother the Earl of Devon died the new earl was fighting the French abroad, and so Sir Hugh was the most senior member of the family at home and probably felt compelled to represent Devon in parliament again in May 1421.

    Henry IV died in 1413, and during the new reign Sir Hugh found favour with Henry V. King Henry V had travelled triumphantly through France, securing the future accession of his son as King of both England and France. Sir Hugh was thus present as knight of the shire for the County of Devon.[citation needed]

    Hugh's brother, the 11th Earl, died in 1419, and was succeeded by his son, Hugh Courtenay, 12th Earl of Devon (1389 — 16 June 1422). The 12th Earl spent considerable time abroad in service to the crown, leaving Hugh as the senior member of the family in England. After the death of his nephew in 1422, Courtenay was again the senior member of the family during the minority of Thomas Courtenay, 13th Earl of Devon.

    Courtenay died on 5 or 6 March 1425, leaving two daughters, Joan and Eleanor, by his third wife Philippa, and two sons and a daughter by his fourth wife, Maud. The lands which had belonged to Philippa were divided between their two daughters, Joan and Eleanor. Courtenay's heir was his elder son, Edward, who was eight years of age at his father's death. Courtenay's younger son, Hugh (d.1471) of Boconnoc, was the father of Edward Courtenay, 1st Earl of Devon of the 1485 creation.

    Courtenay was buried at Haccombe beside his third wife, Philippa.[9]

    Marriages and issue

    Sir Hugh Courtenay (& David A. Hennessee) married four times:[10]

    Firstly to Elizabeth FitzPayn (d. by 1392),[11] widow of Sir Thomas de Audley (d. pre-1386), slain in France in the Hundred Years' War, and daughter of Sir Robert FitzPayn by his wife Elizabeth Bryan, daughter of Guy de Bryan, Lord Bryan. Without issue.
    Secondly, before 11 February 1393, to Elizabeth Cogan (d. 29 October 1397), widow of Sir Fulk FitzWarin (d.1391), 5th Baron FitzWarin and daughter of Sir William Cogan Feudal baron of Bampton in Devon, by his wife Isabel Loring, the daughter of Sir Nigel Loring. Without surviving issue.

    Arms of Archdekne of Haccombe, Devon: Argent, three chevronels sable[12]
    Thirdly, before 1407, to Philippa Archdekne (alias Ercedecne), daughter and co-heiress of Sir Warin Archdekne, MP,[13] of Haccombe in Devon, by his wife Elizabeth Talbot, a "co-heiress"[14] of Sir John Talbot. By Philippa he had two daughters, co-heiresses of their mother:
    Elizabeth (or Alianore[15]) Courtenay (born c.1413), who died unmarried;
    Joan Courtenay (born 1411/14 – d. before 3 August 1465), who eventually became her mother's sole heiress. She married twice, firstly to Sir Nicholas Carew (d. before 20 April 1448), Baron Carew, of Mohuns Ottery in Devon, of Carew Castle in Pembrokeshire and of Moulesford in Berkshire, by whom she had five sons and three daughters. She was the heiress of 16 manors, which she divided amongst her younger sons.[16] She gave Haccombe to her second son Nicholas Carew, founder of the Carew family of Haccombe (see Carew baronets (1661) of Haccombe).[17] Secondly, by royal licence dated 5 October 1450, she married Sir Robert Vere, second son of Richard de Vere, 11th Earl of Oxford, by whom she had a son, John Vere,[18] father of John de Vere, 15th Earl of Oxford.

    Arms of Beaumont of Youlston, Shirwell: Barry of six vair and gules[19]
    Fourthly, by royal licence dated 16 October 1417, to Maud Beaumont (d. 3 July 1467), daughter of Sir William Beaumont of Shirwell by his wife Isabel Willington, daughter of Sir Henry Willington of Umberleigh in Devon. They had two sons as follows:
    Sir Edward Courtenay (b.1417), eldest son, who died without progeny[15]
    Sir Hugh II Courtenay (c.1427 – 6 May 1471) of Boconnoc, twice MP for Cornwall in 1446 and 1449,[15] who married Margaret Carminow, widow firstly of Sir John de Saint Looe and secondly of William Bottreaux,[15] and daughter and co-heiress of Thomas Carminow by his wife Joan Hill, the daughter of Robert Hill. He was beheaded after the Battle of Tewkesbury (1471), having fought for the defeated House of Lancaster. His eldest son was Edward Courtenay, 1st Earl of Devon (d.1509), KG, created Earl of Devon in 1485 by King Henry VII, following the ending of the Wars of the Roses.

    Sources

    Cherry, Martin (1981). "'The Crown and the Political Community in Devonshire, 1377-1461'". Unpublished PhD Thesis, University of Wales. Swansea.
    Cherry, Martin (1986). "The Disintegration of a Dominant Medieval Affinity: the Courtenay family". Southern History.
    Cokayne, George Edward (1916). The Complete Peerage, edited by Vicary Gibbs. IV. London: St. Catherine Press.
    Richardson, Douglas (2011). Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, ed. Kimball G. Everingham. I (2nd ed.). Salt Lake City. ISBN 1449966373
    Richardson, Douglas (2011). Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, ed. Kimball G. Everingham. II (2nd ed.). Salt Lake City. ISBN 1449966381


    *

    Hugh COURTENAY of Haccombe (Sir)

    Born: BET 1358/60, probably Haccombe, Devonshire, England

    Died: 15 Mar 1424/25

    Father: Edward COURTENAY of Godlington

    Mother: Emeline DAUNEY

    Married 1: Elizabeth COGAN

    Married 2: Phillipa ARCHDEKNE (dau. of Sir Warren Archdekne of Haccombe)

    Children:

    1. Joan COURTENAY

    Married 3: Matilda BEAUMONT (d. 3 Jul 1467) (dau. of Sir John Beaumont of Sherwell) ABT 1372

    Children:

    2. Margaret COURTENAY

    3. Edward COURTENAY (Sir)

    4. Hugh COURTENAY of Boconnoc (Sir)

    *

    Hugh married Philippa L'Arcedekne Bef 1407, (Haccombe, Devonshire, England). Philippa (daughter of Warin L'Archdekne and Elizabeth Talbot, Baroness Arcedekne) was born (Haccombe, Devonshire, England); died (Devonshire, England); was buried Saint Blaise Church, Haccombe, Devonshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 227.  Philippa L'Arcedekne was born (Haccombe, Devonshire, England) (daughter of Warin L'Archdekne and Elizabeth Talbot, Baroness Arcedekne); died (Devonshire, England); was buried Saint Blaise Church, Haccombe, Devonshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alt Birth: 0___ 1386, Cornwall, England

    Notes:

    Birth: 1386
    Cornwall, England
    Death: unknown


    Family links:
    Parents:
    Warin L'Arcedekne (1355 - 1400)
    Elizabeth Talbot L'Arcedekne (1364 - 1407)

    Spouse:
    Hugh Courtenay (1351 - 1425)

    Siblings:
    Margery L'Arcedekne Arundell (____ - 1420)*
    Eleanor L'Arcedekne Lucy (1383 - 1447)*
    Philippa L'Arcedekne Courtenay (1386 - ____)

    *Calculated relationship

    Burial:
    Saint Blaise Church
    Haccombe
    Teignbridge District
    Devon, England

    Maintained by: Carol M.
    Originally Created by: Jerry Ferren
    Record added: Nov 14, 2010
    Find A Grave Memorial# 61595016

    end

    Children:
    1. 113. Joan Courtenay was born 0___ 1411, Haccombe, Devonshire, England; died Bef 3 Aug 1465; was buried St. Blaise's Church, Haccombe, Devonshire, England.

  5. 232.  John Dinham, Knight was born 0___ 1318; died 7 Jan 1383.

    Notes:

    Died:
    ...was murdered by robbers...

    John — Muriel Courtenay. [Group Sheet]


  6. 233.  Muriel Courtenay (daughter of Thomas Courtenay and Muriel de Moels).
    Children:
    1. 116. John Dinham, Knight, Lord Dinham was born ~ 1359, Devonshire, England; died 25 Dec 1428, Hartland, Devon, England.

  7. 234.  John Montacute, 1st Baron Montacute was born ~ 1330, (Cassington, Oxfordshire, England) (son of William Montagu, Knight, 1st Earl of Salisbury and Catherine Grandison, Countess of Salisbury); died ~ 1390.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Lord John Montacute
    • Also Known As: Sir John de Montagu

    Notes:

    John de Montacute (c. 1330 - c. 1390) was a 14th-century English nobleman and loyal servant of King Edward III of England.

    Origins

    He was the son of William Montagu, 1st Earl of Salisbury by his wife Catherine Grandison, and younger brother of William de Montacute, 2nd Earl of Salisbury (1328-1397). He also had several younger sisters.

    Career

    He was summoned to parliament in 1357.[1] Jean Froissart named "Lord John Mountacute" as one of the participants with King Edward III at the Siege of Calais in 1348.[2]

    Marriage & progeny

    He married Margaret de Monthermer, daughter and heiress of Thomas de Monthermer, 2nd Baron de Monthermer by his wife Margaret Teyes. His descendants thenceforth quartered the arms of Monthermer: Or, an eagle displayed vert beaked and membered gules. By his wife he had progeny:

    John Montacute, 3rd Earl of Salisbury, KG, (c.1350-1400).
    Eleanor Montacute, wife of John III Dinham (1359-1428).[3]
    Thomas Montagu, Dean of Salisbury Cathedral

    John — Margaret Monthermer. [Group Sheet]


  8. 235.  Margaret Monthermer
    Children:
    1. John Montacute, Knight, 3rd Earl of Salisbury was born ~ 1350, (Salisbury) England; died 5 Jan 1400, (England); was buried Bisham Priory, England.
    2. 117. Eleanor Montagu