Sir John Dinham, Knight, Lord Dinham

Sir John Dinham, Knight, Lord Dinham

Male 1359 - 1428  (~ 69 years)

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Generation: 1

  1. 1.  Sir John Dinham, Knight, Lord DinhamSir John Dinham, Knight, Lord Dinham was born ~ 1359, Devonshire, England (son of John Dinham, Knight and Muriel Courtenay); died 25 Dec 1428, Hartland, Devon, England.

    Notes:

    Sir John Dinham (1359–1428) was a knight from Devonshire, England. His principal seats were at Hartland in North Devon, Kingskerswell and Nutwell in South Devon, Buckland Dinham in Somerset and Cardinham in Cornwall.[2] He killed one of the murderers of his father in Exeter Cathedral, for which he was pardoned by the king. He later broke into Hartland Abbey and assaulted the Abbot over a long-standing disagreement, and also performed other acts of violence. He married three times; his heir was John Dinham (1406–1458). His monument survives in Kingskerswell parish church.

    Origins and inheritance

    The Dynham family took its name from its ancient manor of Dinan in Brittany.[3] They had been at Nutwell since about 1122 and were one of the leading gentry families in Devon. They founded Hartland Abbey in 1169 on their manor of Hartland.[4]

    John Dinham was the son and heir of Sir John Dinham (1318–1383) by his wife Muriel Courtenay, the elder daughter and co-heiress of Sir Thomas Courtenay (1312–1362) of Wootton Courtenay in Somerset. Thomas Courtenay was the fourth son of Hugh de Courtenay, 9th Earl of Devon (1276–1340)) by his wife Muriel de Moels (died before 1369), the elder daughter and co-heiress of Sir John de Moels (died 1337), feudal baron of North Cadbury[5] in Somerset.[6]

    Dinham's father was murdered by robbers on 7 January 1383,[6] when John was aged 24. He inherited his father's estates including Hartland and Nutwell in Devon, Buckland Dinham in Somerset and Cardinham in Cornwall. He also inherited from his mother 3 1/2 knight's fees, including the former de Moels estate of Kingskerswell in Devon, which he made his seat, and also Woodhuish, Dunterton in Devon and Cricket Malherbe and Northome in Somerset and Over Worton with a moiety of North Stoke in Oxfordshire and Over Wallop in Hampshire together with 4 advowsons.[7]

    On his mother's death and following her burial in Hartland Abbey, Bishop of Exeter Thomas Brantingham granted an indulgence for 40 days to any of his parishioners who should say for the soul of Lady Muriell Dynham and for the souls of all the faithful departed, with pious mind a prayer Oracio Dominica with a Salutacio Angelica.[8]

    Biography

    Dinham was a violent man. The two thieves, Robert Tuwyng and John Broun, who had murdered his father were convicted of robbery and murder and incarcerated in Ilchester prison. After apparently having escaped, John Broun was tracked down by Dinham and fled for sanctuary into Exeter Cathedral. On 18 February 1383 Dinham broke down the door and killed him after a fierce struggle, thus avenging his father's murder. On 16 March 1383 he received the king's pardon for his action,[9][a] but was ordered by the Bishop Brantingham to perform penance for having violated the right of sanctuary. The penance mandated by the bishop on 21 March 1383 was:[11]

    "that on a Sunday before this Pentecost he should stand at the small altar between the choir and the high altar on the south side, with head uncovered with a lit candle of 2 lbs weight in his hand from the start of the high mass, that is to say the Confession (Confiteor) until the end of the same mass and then if he should so wish to make gift at the offertory of the same candle into the hand of the celebrant at the high mass".

    There had been a long history of quarrelling between the abbots of Hartland Abbey and the Dinham family, founders of the abbey, mainly concerning patronage and occupation of the abbey during a vacancy.[12] In 1397 Abbot Philip Tone claimed as abbot the lordship of the manor of Stoke St Nectan, near the parish church of St Nectan, Hartland, and claimed thereby view of frankpledge from the residents of that manor. In August that year Dinham was accused by the Abbot of Hartland of "breaking into his houses, assaulting him and chasing him to his chamber and ill-treating his servants".[13] Dinham with his armed supporters appeared at the abbey, "and so ill-used him that his life was despaired of, took timber and goods to the value of Ή20, killed 22 sheep, carried off 2 cows, depastured corn and grass, imprisoned his servant, assaulted and ill-used his men, servants and bondsmen".[14]

    This action prevented the abbot from cultivating his land for a long period and frightened away his tenants and the lucrative flow of visitors come either to pray at the holy sites or to buy the tithes.[14] On 27 February 1398 Dinham was bound over to keep the peace for 1,000 marks,[13] levied on his lands and chattels in England, with Sir John de la Pomeray, Sir John Prideaux, Giles Aysse and John Stantorre each standing as surety for Ή200.[14]

    Dinham was later found guilty of committing assaults on others in January 1402 and in December 1404.[13] In September 1402 he was amongst those accused by the Abbot of Torre Abbey of digging up a road at Kingkerswell and assaulting the abbot's men. He also committed acts of violence at Nutwell and at Littleham.[15]

    On 28 April 1407, having paid 700 of his 1,000 marks surety he and his mainpernors were pardoned.[13][16]

    Family

    Dinham married three times. His first marriage, some time before 3 February 1380, was to a lady named Eleanor or Ellen (died after 22 Sept 1387[17]). Her parentage has not been directly evidenced,[18] but she has been shown to have been Eleanor de Montagu, daughter of John de Montacute, 1st Baron Montacute and his wife Margaret de Monthermer.[19] Eleanor was granted licence by Bishop Brantingham in 1382 to hold divine service during one year in her chapel situated within her manor of Kytone,[20] and John and "Elianora" were also granted by the bishop on 3 January 1384, licence to celebrate divine mass in their chapel within their manor of Kingskerswell.[21]

    By Eleanor, Dinham had a daughter Muriel, who married Sir Edward Hastings of Elsing and Gressenhall.

    Dinham's second marriage, before 26 November 1396, was to Maud Mautravers (died c. 1402), a daughter and co-heiress of Sir John Mautravers of Hooke, Dorset (a cousin of John Maltravers, 1st Baron Maltravers (1290?–1365) of Lytchett Matravers, Dorset[22]) and widow of Piers de la Mare of Offley, Hertfordshire.

    His third wife was Philippa Lovel (died 15 May 1465), daughter of Sir John Lovell of Titchmarsh, Northamptonshire and Minster Lovell, Oxfordshire, by his wife Alianore la Zouche, daughter of Sir William la Zouche of Harringworth, Northamptonshire. Philippa survived her husband and some time before 24 March 1429 remarried to Nicholas Broughton.[23] By Philippa Lovel, Dynham had a son and heir, Sir John Dinham (1406–1458).

    Dinham died on 25 December 1428 at the age of about 69.

    Monument

    Dinham's chest tomb with his effigy and the effigies of two of his wives survive in St Mary's Church, Kingskerswell,[24] which is adjacent to the ruins of the Dinham manor house and seat. All the monuments been moved from their original unknown positions[citation needed] to occupy each one a separate window ledge in the north aisle. The effigy of Dinham himself retains one front of its chest-tomb base, decorated with angels holding heraldic escutcheons. The arms of Dinham, four fusils in fess, are still visible sculpted in low-relief on the chest of his surcoat.

    end

    Sir John "Lord Dinham" Dinham
    Born about 1359 in Devonshire, Englandmap
    Son of John Dinham and Muriel (Courtenay) Dinham
    Brother of Muriel (Dinham) de Dinham and Johanna (Dinham) Berkeley
    Husband of Eleanor (Montagu) Dinham — married 3 Feb 1380 in Hartland, Devonshire, Englandmap
    Husband of Maud (Mautravers) Dinham — married 26 Nov 1396 in Hook, Devonshire, Englandmap
    Husband of Philippa (Lovel) Dinham — married 1406 in Titchmarsh, Northamptonshire, Englandmap
    Father of Muriel (Dinham) Hastings, Catherine Dinham, Otes Dinham, Jane Dinham, John Dinham, Emma Dinham, Alice Dinham and Elizabeth Dinham
    Died 25 Dec 1428 in Hartland, Bideford, Devon, Englandmap

    Biography

    From Royal Ancestry, cited below: Married 1) ELEANOR (or ELLEN) MONTAGU. They had one daughter, Muriel. Married 2) MAUD MAUTRAVERS, widow of Peter de la Mare, Knt. They had no issue. Married 3) PHILIPPE LOVEL, daughter of JOHN LOVEL, KG, 5th Lord Lovel. They had one son, John, Knt., and two daughters, Maud (wife of Thomas Brooke, Esq.), and Philippe (wife of Thomas Beaumont, Knt.).

    Sources

    Magna Carta Ancestry 2011 2nd ed. Vol. II p. 85-87
    Ancestral Roots 8th Ed. Line 214-34
    Richardson, Royal Ancestry (2013) Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 5 vols., ed. Kimball G. Everingham, (Salt Lake City, Utah: the author, 2013), volume II, pages 457 and 458, DINHAM 7, entry for JOHN DINHAM.
    Magna Carta Ancestry: A study in Colonial and Medieval Families, Richardson, Douglas, (Kimball G. Everingham, editor. 2nd edition, 2011), vol. 2 p. 85.
    Wikipedia page for John Dinham (1359-1428)
    Marlyn Lewis.

    end

    John married Eleanor Montagu 3 Feb 1380, Hartland, Devon, England. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. Muriel Dinham was born ~ 1390, Hartland, Devon, England; died Bef 1427.
    2. John Dinham was born Bef 1406; died 25 Jan 1457, Hartland, Devon, England.

    John — Phillippa Lovel. Phillippa was born ~ 1391; died 15 May 1465, Titchmarsh, Northamptonshire, England. [Group Sheet]


Generation: 2

  1. 2.  John Dinham, Knight was born 0___ 1318; died 7 Jan 1383.

    Notes:

    Died:
    ...was murdered by robbers...

    John — Muriel Courtenay. [Group Sheet]


  2. 3.  Muriel Courtenay (daughter of Thomas Courtenay and Muriel de Moels).
    Children:
    1. 1. John Dinham, Knight, Lord Dinham was born ~ 1359, Devonshire, England; died 25 Dec 1428, Hartland, Devon, England.


Generation: 3

  1. 6.  Thomas Courtenay was born 0___ 1312, (Okehampton, Devon, England) (son of Hugh Courtenay, 1st Earl of Devon and Agnes St. John); died 0___ 1362.

    Thomas — Muriel de Moels. Muriel (daughter of John de Moels and unnamed spouse) died Bef 1369. [Group Sheet]


  2. 7.  Muriel de Moels (daughter of John de Moels and unnamed spouse); died Bef 1369.
    Children:
    1. 3. Muriel Courtenay


Generation: 4

  1. 12.  Hugh Courtenay, 1st Earl of DevonHugh Courtenay, 1st Earl of Devon was born 14 Sep 1276, (Okehampton, Devon, England) (son of Hugh Courtenay and Eleanor Despencer); died 23 Dec 1340, Tiverton, Devon, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: 9th Earl of Devon

    Notes:

    Hugh de Courtenay, 1st/9th Earl of Devon (14 September 1276 – 23 December 1340)[1] was the son of Sir Hugh de Courtenay (died 1292), feudal baron of Okehampton in Devon, by his wife Eleanor le Despenser (died 1328), sister of Hugh le Despenser, 1st Earl of Winchester. Forty-one years after the death of his cousin, Isabel de Forz, suo jure 8th Countess of Devon (1237–1293) (nβee de Redvers, eldest daughter of Baldwin de Redvers, 6th Earl of Devon (1217-1245)), letters patent were granted by King Edward III, dated 22 February 1335, declaring him Earl of Devon, and stating that he 'should assume such title and style as his ancestors, Earls of Devon, had wont to do'.[2] This thus made him 1st Earl of Devon, if the letters patent are deemed to have created a new peerage, otherwise 9th Earl of Devon if it is deemed a restitution of the old dignity of the de Redvers family and he is deemed to have succeeded the suo jure 8th Countess. Authorities differ in their opinions[3] and thus alternative ordinal numbers exist for this Courtenay earldom.

    Early life

    Hugh de Courtenay was born 14 September 1276, the son of Sir Hugh de Courtenay (died 28 February 1292) feudal baron of Okehampton in Devon, by his wife Eleanor le Despenser (died 30 September 1328), sister of Hugh le Despenser, 1st Earl of Winchester, an important adviser to King Edward II. He was the grandson of John de Courtenay (died c. 3 May 1274)[4] of Okehampton by Isabel de Vere, daughter of Hugh de Vere, 4th Earl of Oxford. John's father, Robert de Courtenay (died 1242), the son of Reginald de Courtenay (died 1190) by Hawise de Curci (died 1219), the heiress of the feudal barony of Okehampton),[5] had married Mary de Redvers (sometimes called "de Vernon"), the daughter of William de Redvers, 5th Earl of Devon (died 1217).

    On 28 February 1292, about the time of his marriage, Hugh succeeded to the Okehampton estate and to those de Redvers estates that had not yet been alienated to the Crown. He may then have been styled Earl of Devon, the first of the Courtenay family, although was not recognised in the de facto Earldom until 1333.

    Campaign against Scotland, 1297–1300

    He did homage to Edward I on 20 June 1297 and was granted his own livery. At the time the King was with his army crossing the Tweed into Scotland. It is probable that the honour was in acknowledgement of Hugh's military achievements. That July the English defeated and humiliated the Scots at Irvine. However the following year the tables were turned on the advent of the remarkable campaign of William Wallace.

    The following February 6, 1298 he was summoned as a Lord in Parliament, and sat throughout the reign of Edward II and into the Mortimer Regency for Edward's son. He remained an important noble at Parliaments into the reign of Edward III. He was summoned as Hugoni de Curtenay with the confusing suffix of senior being known as Lord Courtenay.

    Courtenay joined King Edward at the long siege of Caerlaverock Castle, just over the Solway Firth for a fortnight in July 1300. He proved himself a fine soldier and loyal adherent to the English crown. He had not been present at the disastrous encounter outside Stirling Castle in 1298, during which half the English contingent were killed, including commander Hugh Cressingham. But Edward was determined to march into Ayrshire to devastate Robert Bruce's estates. Unfortunately the English army melted away into the forests as the army moved further northwards. Courtenay may have been with the English King when he sat down in Sweetheart Abbey to receive Robert Winchelsey, Archbishop of Canterbury who had travelled north with a demanding missive from Pope Boniface to cease hostilities. The King could not ignore this order. In September he disbanded troops and withdrew over the Solway Firth to Carlisle. The campaign had failed due to a shortage of money, so Parliament was recalled for January 1301. Before returning to London the English drew up a six months truce.

    Parliament of 1301

    Parliament met at Lincoln. The agenda included redrafting the Royal Forest Charter, which had no precedent since it was first introduced in the reign of Henry II, 150 years earlier. Local juries were expected to "perambulate the forests" to gather evidence. But the King needed money and was required by Parliament to surrender his absolute authority and ownership of what became community forests.

    Campaigns against Scotland, 1301–1308

    In 1306 the Prince of Wales was despatched into Scotland; the vanguard led by Aymer de Valence, the King's half uncle. On 22 May, Courtenay was knighted by the Prince, presumably for his efforts against the Scots. In June the English occupied Perth. On 19 June, Valence, who had cut a swathe through the Lowlands fell on the Scots army at Methven in the early dawn. The Bruce fled into the hills. Edward I was merciless as many prisoners were punished. That autumn the army returned to Hexham. The war was all but over: there were however sieges at Mull of Kintyre and Kildrummy Castle, Aberdeenshire. Edward I committed many atrocities rounding up the Scots aristocracy and their women.

    Then as Robert Bruce returned from exile in Ireland the English army started losing battles. The ailing King had one last campaign in which Courtenay played a major part. Struggling into the saddle to the Solway Firth, Edward I died at Burgh-on-Sands awaiting a crossing. In 1308 a new campaign was sent to quell Robert Bruce, and Courtenay was made a knight banneret, one of the King's elite household.[6]

    During the reign of Edward II he was made a Lord Ordainer, one of the ruling council in the Lords. He was appointed to the King's Council on 9 Augustus 1318. He was appointed the Warden of the coast of Devon and Cornwall in 1324 and then again in 1336, because his estates stretched across what is now Exmoor and Dartmoor. But he took the honours reluctantly and played a guarded game with King and Parliament. A veteran campaigner he aimed to ingratiate himself with the young Edward III, and so refused the Third Penny from the Exchequer. He was investigated; and on 22 February 1335 elevated to the Earldom of Devon, restored to his ancestral line.

    Forty-one years after the death of his cousin, Isabel de Fortibus, Countess of Devon, letters patent were issued dated 22 February 1335 declaring him Earl of Devon, and stating that he 'should assume such title and style as his ancestors, Earls of Devon, had wont to do'.[7] He was the 9th Earl of Devon, but the first in the Courtenay line.

    Family

    He married Agnes de Saint John, daughter of John de Saint John, Baron St John, of Basing, Hampshire, by Alice, daughter of Sir Reynold Fitz Peter.[8] They had four sons and two daughters:

    John Courtenay (1300–1349), Prior of Lewes and Abbot of Tavistock.
    Hugh de Courtenay, 2nd/10th Earl of Devon (1303-1377), second son, who married Margaret de Bohun, daughter of Humphrey de Bohun, 4th Earl of Hereford by Princess Elizabeth, daughter of King Edward I and Eleanor of Castile.
    Robert Courtenay (1309–1334), 3rd son, of Moreton Hampstead in Devon.
    Sir Thomas Courtenay (1315-1356), 4th son, of Wootton Courtenay in Somerset, and of Woodhuish, Brixham[9] in Devon, a military commander against the French, who died in 1356,[10] the date of the Battle of Poitiers. He married a great Somerset heiress, Muriel de Moels, the eldest of the two daughters and co-heiresses of John Moels, 4th Baron Moels, feudal baron of North Cadbury in Somerset. His wife's share of her paternal inheritance included the manors of Kings Carswell and Dunterton[11] in Devon, and Blackford, Holton and Lattiford in Somerset.[12]
    Eleanor Courtenay (c.1309 – c.1330), who married John de Grey, 3rd Baron Grey of Codnor.
    Elizabeth Courtenay (born c.1313), who married Bartholomew de Lisle.
    Courtenay died at Tiverton, Devon, 23 December 1340, and was buried at Cowick Priory near Exeter on 5 Feb 1341.[8]

    *

    Hugh COURTENAY (1° E. Devon)

    Born: 14 Sep 1273

    Died: 23 Dec 1340

    Father: Hugh COURTENAY (Sir)

    Mother: Eleanor DESPENCER

    Married 1: Elizabeth PLANTAGENET

    Married 2: Agnes St. JOHN 1292

    Children:

    1. Hugh COURTENAY (2° E. Devon)

    2. John COURTENAY

    3. Eleanor COURTENAY

    4. Robert COURTENAY

    5. Thomas COURTENAY

    6. Elizabeth COURTENAY (b. ABT 1313)

    *

    Hugh married Agnes St. John 0___ 1292. [Group Sheet]


  2. 13.  Agnes St. John
    Children:
    1. Hugh Courtenay, 2nd Earl of Devon was born 12 Jul 1303, Okehampton, Devon, England; died 3 May 1377, Exeter, Devonshire, England; was buried Exter Cathedral, Devonshire, England.
    2. John Courtenay was born (Okehampton, Devon, England).
    3. Eleanor Courtenay was born (Okehampton, Devon, England).
    4. Robert Courtenay was born (Okehampton, Devon, England).
    5. 6. Thomas Courtenay was born 0___ 1312, (Okehampton, Devon, England); died 0___ 1362.
    6. Elizabeth Courtenay was born ~ 1313, (Okehampton, Devon, England).

  3. 14.  John de Moels died 0___ 1337.

    John — unnamed spouse. [Group Sheet]


  4. 15.  unnamed spouse
    Children:
    1. 7. Muriel de Moels died Bef 1369.


Generation: 5

  1. 24.  Hugh Courtenay was born 25 Mar 1249, Oakhampton, Devonshire, England (son of John Courtenay, 2nd Baron Okehampton and Isabel de Vere); died 28 Feb 1292, Colcombe, Devonshire, England; was buried Cowick Priory, Exeter, Devonshire, England.

    Notes:

    Hugh COURTENAY (Sir)

    Born: 25 Mar 1249, Oakhampton, Devon, England

    Died: 28 Feb 1290/91, Cullicomb, Devon, England

    Buried: Cowick, Devonshire, England

    Father: John COURTENAY (2° B. Okehampton)

    Mother: Isabel De VERE

    Married: Eleanor DESPENCER (BET 1245/1260-30 Sep 1328) BEF 1273

    Children:

    1. Eleanor COURTENAY

    2. Phillip COURTENAY

    3. Thomas COURTENAY

    4. Avelina (Ada)COURTENAY

    5. John COURTENAY

    6. Robert COURTENAY

    7. Alice COURTENAY

    8. Hugh COURTENAY (1° E. Devon)

    9. Margaret COURTENAY

    10. Isabel COURTENAY

    11. Egeline COURTENAY

    *

    Sir Hugh de Courtenay (1251–1292) was the son and heir of John de Courtenay, feudal baron of Okehampton, Devon, by Isabel de Vere, daughter of Hugh de Vere, 4th Earl of Oxford. His son inherited the earldom of Devon.

    Early years

    Sir Hugh de Courtenay, born 25 March 1251,[1] was the son and heir of John de Courtenay of Okehampton, Devon, by Isabel de Vere, daughter of Hugh de Vere, 4th Earl of Oxford, and Hawise de Quincy.[2] John's father, Robert de Courtenay (d. 26 July 1242),[3] son of Reginald de Courtenay (d.1190) by Hawise de Curci (d.1219), heiress of the feudal barony of Okehampton,[4] married Mary de Redvers (sometimes called 'de Vernon'), daughter of William de Redvers, 5th Earl of Devon (d.1217).

    In order to avoid military service Courtenay paid a fine on 12 December 1276. He was called to arms on the emergency against the Welsh princes, fighting in the 1282 campaign. He attended upon the King at Shrewsbury on 28 June 1283. He again absented himself from the wars on 14 June 1287 by paying the King's justice a fine.[5]

    Marriage and issue

    Courtenay married Eleanor le Despenser (d.1328),[6] daughter of Hugh le Despencer, 1st Baron le Despencer, Justiciar of England, of Loughborough, Leicestershire and Ryhall, Rutland by his wife Aline Basset, daughter of Sir Philip Basset, Justiciar of England, of Wycombe, Buckinghamshire and Compton Bassett and Wootton Bassett, Wiltshire. By his wife he had four[6] sons and five[6] daughters:[7]

    Hugh de Courtenay, 1st/9th Earl of Devon (1276–1340) of Tiverton Castle, eldest son and heir.
    Sir Philip Courtenay (d.1314) of Moreton Hampstead in Devon, slain at Stirling on 24 June 1314, according to Vivian.[6] Died childless, when Moreton Hampstead was inherited by his elder brother the Earl of Devon.[8]
    John Courtenay, died young.[6]
    Robert Courtenay, died young.[6]
    Isabel de Courtenay, wife of John de Saint John, 1st Baron St John (died 1329) of Basing.[6]
    Aveline de Courtenay, wife of Sir John Giffard[6]
    Egeline (or Eleanor) de Courtenay, wife of John le Scales[6]
    Margaret (or Margery) de Courtenay, wife of John de Moels.[9] Other sources give her husband as Nicholas de Moels, 2nd Baron Moels (d.1316), feudal baron of North Cadbury, Somerset. Without progeny.
    Alice Courtenay, died young[6]

    Death

    Courtenay died at Colcombe, Devon, on 28 February 1292.[10] He was buried at Cowick Priory, near Exeter.

    *

    Hugh married Eleanor Despencer Bef 1273. Eleanor died 30 Sep 1328. [Group Sheet]


  2. 25.  Eleanor Despencer died 30 Sep 1328.
    Children:
    1. 12. Hugh Courtenay, 1st Earl of Devon was born 14 Sep 1276, (Okehampton, Devon, England); died 23 Dec 1340, Tiverton, Devon, England.
    2. Isabel Courtenay was born ~ 1283.


Generation: 6

  1. 48.  John Courtenay, 2nd Baron Okehampton was born ~ 1218, Okehampton, Devon, England (son of Robert de Courtenay and Mary de Redvers); died 3 May 1274, Okehampton, Devon, England.

    John — Isabel de Vere. Isabel (daughter of Hugh de Vere, Knight, 4th Earl of Oxford and Hawise de Quincy) was born ~ 1222, (Essex, England); died Aft 11 Aug 1299. [Group Sheet]


  2. 49.  Isabel de Vere was born ~ 1222, (Essex, England) (daughter of Hugh de Vere, Knight, 4th Earl of Oxford and Hawise de Quincy); died Aft 11 Aug 1299.

    Notes:

    Isabel De VERE

    Born: ABT 1222

    Died: AFT 11 Aug 1299

    Father: Hugh De VERE (4° E. Oxford)

    Mother: Hawise QUINCY (C. Oxford)

    Married: John COURTENAY (2° B. Okehampton)

    Children:

    1. Hugh COURTENAY (Sir)

    *

    Children:
    1. 24. Hugh Courtenay was born 25 Mar 1249, Oakhampton, Devonshire, England; died 28 Feb 1292, Colcombe, Devonshire, England; was buried Cowick Priory, Exeter, Devonshire, England.


Generation: 7

  1. 96.  Robert de Courtenay (son of Reginald de Courtenay and Hawise de Curci); died 0___ 1219.

    Robert — Mary de Redvers. [Group Sheet]


  2. 97.  Mary de Redvers

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Mary de Vernon

    Children:
    1. 48. John Courtenay, 2nd Baron Okehampton was born ~ 1218, Okehampton, Devon, England; died 3 May 1274, Okehampton, Devon, England.

  3. 98.  Hugh de Vere, Knight, 4th Earl of Oxford was born ~ 1208, (Essex, England) (son of Robert de Vere, Knight, 3rd Earl of Oxford and Isabel de Bolebec, Countess of Oxford); died 0Dec 1263, (Essex, England).

    Notes:

    Hugh de Vere, 4th Earl of Oxford (c. 1208 – December 1263) was the only son and heir of Robert de Vere, 3rd Earl of Oxford and Isabel de Bolebec, daughter and eventual sole heiress of Hugh de Bolebec.

    Early life

    Hugh de Vere was born about 1208, soon after the marriage of his parents. He was a minor when his father died in autumn 1221. Hugh's mother, Isabel de Bolebec, Countess of Oxford, purchased her son's wardship from the crown for 6000 marks.[1] Hugh did homage to King Henry III in October 1231, and was knighted by the King at Gloucester on 22 May 1233.[2] Two days later the King 'girt him with the sword of the Earldom of Oxford and directed the sheriff to let him have what he ought to have in the name of the Earldom of Oxford as his predecessors had had'.[3]

    Career

    He inherited the office of Master Chamberlain of England which had been granted to his great-grandfather Aubrey de Vere II. By right of that office, he participated in the coronation of Queen Eleanor in 1236. Earl Hugh was a critic of King Henry from 1246, and in 1258 and 1259 was elected to serve on various baronial committees attempting to reform royal government.[4] The earl purchased the right to hold a market at the town on his primary estate, Castle Hedingham in Essex, and founded a chantry there.[5]

    Marriage and issue

    Hugh de Vere married Hawise de Quincy,[6] daughter of Saer de Quincy, 1st Earl of Winchester, and his wife, Margaret de Beaumont. They had a son and three daughters:[7]

    Robert de Vere, 5th Earl of Oxford.
    Isabel de Vere, who married firstly, Sir John de Courtenay of Okehampton, Devon, and secondly, Oliver de Dinham, Lord Dinham.
    Lora de Vere, who married Reynold d'Argentine of Melbourn, Cambridgeshire.
    Margaret de Vere, who married Hugh de Cressy (d. shortly before 24 April 1263).[8]
    Hugh de Vere died before 23 December 1263 and was buried at Earls Colne. His widow was living in 1273 and died on 3 February thereafter. She was buried at Earls Colne Priory.[9]

    Footnotes

    Jump up ^ Cokayne 1945, p. 213.
    Jump up ^ Richardson IV 2011, p. 262.
    Jump up ^ Cokayne 1945, p. 214.
    Jump up ^ Cokayne 1945, p. 214.
    Jump up ^ Victoria County History of Essex, vol. II, p. 184.
    Jump up ^ Richardson IV 2011, p. 262.
    Jump up ^ Complete Peerage, X, 215 note 'h'.
    Jump up ^ Richardson IV 2011, pp. 262-e.
    Jump up ^ Richardson IV 2011, p. 262.

    References

    Cokayne, George Edward (1945). The Complete Peerage, edited by H.A. Doubleday. X. London: St. Catherine Press.
    Richardson, Douglas (2011). Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, ed. Kimball G. Everingham. IV (2nd ed.). Salt Lake City. ISBN 1460992709

    Hugh married Hawise de Quincy (Essex, England). [Group Sheet]


  4. 99.  Hawise de Quincy (daughter of Saer de Quincy, Knight, 1st Earl of Winchester and Margaret de Beaumont).

    Notes:

    Residence (Family):
    Hedingham Castle, in the village of Castle Hedingham, Essex, is the best preserved Norman keep in England.

    Picture, history & source ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hedingham_Castle

    Children:
    1. Robert de Vere, Knight, 5th Earl of Oxford was born ~ 1240, Hedingham Castle, Essex, England; died Bef 7 SEPT 1296; was buried Earls Coine, Essex, England.
    2. 49. Isabel de Vere was born ~ 1222, (Essex, England); died Aft 11 Aug 1299.
    3. Lora De Vere was born (Essex, England).
    4. Margaret de Vere was born (Essex, England).


Generation: 8

  1. 192.  Reginald de Courtenay was born (Courtenay, France); died 27 Sep 1194.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Renaud de Courtenay

    Notes:

    Renaud de Courtenay (Anglicised to Reginald; died 27 September 1194), of Sutton, Berkshire, was a French nobleman of the House of Courtenay who came over to England and founded of the English Courtenay family which became Earls of Devon in 1335, which title is still held today by his direct male descendant.

    Origins

    He was the son of Miles (Milo) de Courtenay, Seigneur (lord of the manor) of Courtenay, in the Kingdom of France, today in the Loiret department in north-central France, by his wife Ermengard de Nevers.

    Career

    He succeeded his father as Seigneur of Courtenay. He fought in the Second Crusade, with King Louis VII of France. He quarrelled with King Louis VII, who seized Renaud's French possessions and gave them along with Renaud's daughter Elizabeth to his youngest brother, Pierre (Peter) of France, who thenceforth became known as Peter I of Courtenay (died 1183)). He was created Lord[clarification needed] of Sutton in 1161. In 1172 he accompanied King Henry II in the Irish Expedition to County Wexford.[1]

    Marriages

    Renaud married twice:

    (1) Helene du Donjon, daughter of Frederick du Donjon and Corbeil, sister of Guy du Donjon
    (2) alternatively given as Hawise de Courcy (d.1219) heiress of the feudal barony of Okehampton in Devon [2] ).
    (2) Maud FitzEdith, daughter of Robert FitzEdith, Lord Okehampton (d.1172) (illegitimate son of Henry I, King of England by Edith FitzForne).

    Progeny

    By his first marriage he had a daughter Elizabeth who was given in marriage by the French King Louis VII (d.1180) to his youngest brother Peter of France, who thenceforth became known as Peter I of Courtenay (d.1183).[3]

    He also had a son, Robert de Courtenay, who was the great-grandfather of Hugh de Courtenay, 1st Earl of Devon (d.1340).

    *

    Reginald — Hawise de Curci. Hawise died 0___ 1219. [Group Sheet]


  2. 193.  Hawise de Curci died 0___ 1219.

    Notes:

    Married:
    (1) Helene du Donjon, daughter of Frederick du Donjon and Corbeil, sister of Guy du Donjon
    (2) alternatively given as Hawise de Courcy (d.1219) heiress of the feudal barony of Okehampton in Devon [2] ).
    (2) Maud FitzEdith, daughter of Robert FitzEdith, Lord Okehampton (d.1172) (illegitimate son of Henry I, King of England by Edith FitzForne).

    Children:
    1. 96. Robert de Courtenay died 0___ 1219.

  3. 196.  Robert de Vere, Knight, 3rd Earl of OxfordRobert de Vere, Knight, 3rd Earl of Oxford was born Aft 1165 (son of Aubrey de Vere, III, Knight, 1st Earl of Oxford and Agnes of Essex, Countess of Oxford); died Bef 25 Oct 1221; was buried Hatfield Regis Priory, Hatfield Broad Oak, Essex, England.

    Notes:

    Robert de Vere (after c. 1165 – before 25 October 1221), hereditary Master Chamberlain of England,[1] was son of Aubrey de Vere, 1st Earl of Oxford, and Agnes of Essex. He succeeded his brother as the third Earl of Oxford, and was one of the twenty-five guarantors of Magna Carta.

    Arms of Robert de Vere

    de Vere effigy, St Mary's Church, Hatfield Broad Oak

    Robert de Vere was the second surviving son of Aubrey de Vere, 1st Earl of Oxford, and his third wife, Agnes of Essex. The date of his birth is not known, but he was likely born after 1164. Almost nothing is known of his life until 1207, when he married Isabel de Bolebec, the widow of Henry de Nonant (d.1206) of Totnes, Devon. In 1206-7 Isabel and her sister Constance were co-heiresses of their niece, another Isabel de Bolebec, the countess of Oxford by her marriage to Robert's brother, Aubrey de Vere, 2nd Earl of Oxford. They divided the barony of Whitchurch.[2] The fact that aunt and niece had identical names, Isabel de Bolbec, and were successively countesses of Oxford and heiresses of Whitchurch has led to confusion between the two women.

    When Robert's brother, Aubrey de Vere, 2nd Earl of Oxford, died in the latter half of 1214, Robert succeeded to his title and estates and the hereditary office of Master Chamberlain of England. The dower of Earl Aubrey's second wife, Alice (possibly his cousin, a daughter of Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk),[3] had not been formalized. In 1215 Oxford settled his sister-in-law's dower by lot, the earl drawing two knights' fees for every one drawn by Alice.[4] This is the only known instance of dower being settled in this manner.

    Oxford joined the disaffected barons who met at Stamford and forced King John to issue Magna Carta at Runnymede on 15 June 1215. The earl was elected one of the barons who were to guarantee the King's adherence to its terms. Together with other Magna Carta barons, he was excommunicated as a rebel by Pope Innocent III on 16 December 1215, and joined them in offering the crown to Prince Louis of France.[5]

    Oxford took up arms against King John, but pledged loyalty to him after the King had taken Castle Hedingham in March 1216. Later in the same year, however, he did homage to Prince Louis at Rochester.[6] Louis entered London and was proclaimed King. On 14 June 1216, he captured Winchester and soon controlled over half of England.[7]

    In the midst of this crisis, King John died, prompting many of the barons to desert Louis in favor of John's nine-year-old son, Henry III. In 1217 Prince Louis retook Castle Hedingham and restored it to Oxford, but despite this Oxford transferred his allegiance to the new King in October 1217. Although he did homage to Henry, he was not fully restored in his offices and lands until February 1218.

    Earl Robert served as a king's justice in 1220-21, and died before 21 October 1221. He was buried at Hatfield Regis Priory, where either his son, Hugh de Vere, 4th Earl of Oxford, or his grandson, Robert de Vere, 5th Earl of Oxford had an effigy erected in which he is depicted in chain mail, cross-legged, pulling his sword from its scabbard and holding a shield with the arms of the Veres.[8]

    Issue

    Robert de Vere and Isabel de Bolebec had a son, Hugh de Vere, 4th Earl of Oxford.[9]

    Ancestry

    [show] Ancestors of Robert de Vere, 3rd Earl of Oxford

    Footnotes

    Jump up ^ Richardson IV 2011, p. 261.
    Jump up ^ DeAragon, R. "Isabel de Bolebec, Countess of Oxford," Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, 56:278-9;
    Jump up ^ Cokayne 1945, p. 210.
    Jump up ^ Cokayne 1945, p. 210.
    Jump up ^ Cokayne 1945, p. 211; Richardson IV 2011, p. 261.
    Jump up ^ Cokayne 1945, pp. 211–212.
    Jump up ^ Alan Harding (1993), England in the Thirteenth Century (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press), p. 10.

    *

    Buried:
    Hatfield Broad Oak Priory, or Hatfield Regis Priory, is a former Benedictine priory in Hatfield Broad Oak, Essex, England. Founded by 1139, it was dissolved in 1536 as part of Henry VIII's dissolution of the monasteries.

    History & Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hatfield_Regis_Priory

    Robert — Isabel de Bolebec, Countess of Oxford. Isabel (daughter of Hugh de Bolebec, II, Lord of Whitchurch and Margaret de Montfichet) was born ~ 1164, Whitchurch, Buckinghamshire, England; died 2 Feb 1245; was buried Black Friars Church, Oxford, England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 197.  Isabel de Bolebec, Countess of Oxford was born ~ 1164, Whitchurch, Buckinghamshire, England (daughter of Hugh de Bolebec, II, Lord of Whitchurch and Margaret de Montfichet); died 2 Feb 1245; was buried Black Friars Church, Oxford, England.

    Notes:

    Isabel de Bolebec, Countess of Oxford (c. 1164 - 2 or 3 February 1245), was the eldest daughter and co-heiress of Hugh de Bolebec II, Lord of Whitchurch, Buckinghamshire, and his wife, Margaret de Montfichet. She married Robert de Vere, 3rd Earl of Oxford, and was a benefactress of the Order of Friars Preacher (Dominicans) in England.

    Isabel de Bolebec was the daughter and co-heiress of Hugh de Bolebec II (died c. 1165),[1] Lord of Whitchurch, Buckinghamshire, and his wife, Margaret de Montfichet. She had a brother, Walter,[2] and a sister, Constance, the wife of Ellis de Beauchamp.[3] In 1206-07 she and Constance were co-heirs to their niece, Isabel de Bolebec, daughter of their brother, Walter, and wife of Aubrey de Vere, 2nd Earl of Oxford.[4]

    Isabel's first husband was Henry de Nonant (Novaunt), Lord of Totnes, Devon, who died childless in 1206.[5] The widowed Isabel petitioned the Crown in 1207 for the right to marry whom she wished. That same year she married Robert de Vere, a younger brother of the earl of Oxford, by whom she had a son, Hugh de Vere. In the autumn of 1214 Robert inherited the earldom at the death of his brother, Aubrey de Vere, 2nd Earl of Oxford, without legitimate offspring, and Isabel became Countess of Oxford. The new earl joined barons and kinsmen whose dissatisfaction with King John prompted their rebellion. On 15 June 1215 the King agreed to Magna Carta, and Oxford was one of twenty-five barons elected to guarantee its observance, and was thus among those excommunicated by Pope Innocent III when he released the King from its terms. In 1216 King John besieged and took the Oxford's seat, Castle Hedingham, in Essex. Oxford made peace with the regents of John's son, Henry III the next year, and later served as a royal judge.[6] He died before 25 October 1221.[7]

    Isabel inherited the barony of Bolebec, and from her death in 1245 until 1703 the Earls of Oxford adopted the style of "Baron de Bolebec" in addition to their title of earl, and from 1462-1625 that of "Viscount Bolebec".[8]

    On the death of Earl Robert, the widowed Countess purchased the wardship of her minor son from the crown for the substantial sum of 6000 marks. In 1237, she and Hugh traveled together on a pilgrimage "beyond the seas".[9] In 1224-25 Isabel sued Woburn Abbey for the manor of Mendham.[10]

    Isabel was a benefactress of the Order of Friars Preacher (Dominicans) in England,[11] helping them to find quarters at Oxford, and contributing to the building of their oratory there about 1227. When the friars needed a larger priory, she and the Bishop of Carlisle bought land south of Oxford and contributed most of the funds and materials. She was buried in the new church in the friary there.[12]

    *

    Children:
    1. 98. Hugh de Vere, Knight, 4th Earl of Oxford was born ~ 1208, (Essex, England); died 0Dec 1263, (Essex, England).
    2. Eleanor de Vere was born (Essex, England).

  5. 198.  Saer de Quincy, Knight, 1st Earl of Winchester was born ~ 1170; died 3 Nov 1219, (Acre) Israel; was buried Acre, Israel.

    Other Events:

    • Burial: Garendon Abbey, Leicestershire, England
    • Residence: England
    • Also Known As: Earl Saer
    • Also Known As: Saleur di Quinci

    Notes:

    Saer de Quincy, 1st Earl of Winchester (c. 1170 – 3 November 1219) (or Saieur di Quinci[1]) was one of the leaders of the baronial rebellion against King John of England, and a major figure in both the kingdoms of Scotland and England in the decades around the turn of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries.

    Earl of Winchester

    Seal of Robert Fitzwalter (d.1235). So close was the alliance between both men that Robert's seal shows the arms of Saer on a separate shield before his horse
    Following his marriage, Winchester became a prominent military and diplomatic figure in England. There is no evidence of any close alliance with King John, however, and his rise to importance was probably due to his newly acquired magnate status and the family connections that underpinned it.

    One man with whom he does seem to have developed a close personal relationship is his cousin, Robert Fitzwalter (d. 1235). In 1203, they served as co-commanders of the garrison at the major fortress of Vaudreuil in Normandy. They surrendered the castle without a fight to Philip II of France, fatally weakening the English position in northern France. Although popular opinion seems to have blamed them for the capitulation, a royal writ is extant stating that the castle was surrendered at King John's command, and both Winchester and Fitzwalter endured personal humiliation and heavy ransoms at the hands of the French.

    In Scotland, he was perhaps more successful. In 1211 to 1212, the Earl of Winchester commanded an imposing retinue of a hundred knights and a hundred serjeants in William the Lion's campaign against the Mac William rebels, a force which some historians have suggested may have been the mercenary force from Brabant lent to the campaign by John.

    Magna Carta

    Arms displayed by Earl Saire on his seal on Magna Carta. These differ from his arms used elsewhere but can also be seen in stained glass at Winchester Great Hall

    In 1215, when the baronial rebellion broke out, Robert Fitzwalter became the military commander, and the Earl of Winchester joined him, acting as one of the chief authors of Magna Carta and negotiators with John; both cousins were among the 25 guarantors of the Magna Carta. De Quincy fought against John in the troubles that followed the sealing of the Charter, and, again with Fitzwalter, travelled to France to invite Prince Louis of France to take the English throne. He and Fitzwalter were subsequently among the most committed and prominent supporters of Louis's candidature for the kingship, against both John and the infant Henry III.

    The Fifth Crusade

    When military defeat cleared the way for Henry III to take the throne, de Quincy went on crusade, perhaps in fulfillment of an earlier vow. In 1219 he left to join the Fifth Crusade, then besieging Damietta. While in the east, he fell sick and died. He was buried in Acre, the capital of the Kingdom of Jerusalem, rather than in Egypt, and his heart was brought back and interred at Garendon Abbey near Loughborough, a house endowed by his wife's family.

    Family

    The family of de Quincy had arrived in England after the Norman Conquest, and took their name from Cuinchy in the Arrondissement of Bβethune; the personal name "Saer" was used by them over several generations. Both names are variously spelled in primary sources and older modern works, the first name being sometimes rendered Saher or Seer, and the surname as Quency or Quenci.

    The first recorded Saer de Quincy (known to historians as "Saer I") was lord of the manor of Long Buckby in Northamptonshire in the earlier twelfth century, and second husband of Matilda of St Liz, stepdaughter of King David I of Scotland by Maud of Northumbria. This marriage produced two sons, Saer II and Robert de Quincy. It was Robert, the younger son, who was the father of the Saer de Quincy who eventually became Earl of Winchester. By her first husband Robert Fitz Richard, Matilda was also the paternal grandmother of Earl Saer's close ally, Robert Fitzwalter.

    Robert de Quincy seems to have inherited no English lands from his father, and pursued a knightly career in Scotland, where he is recorded from around 1160 as a close companion of his cousin, King William the Lion. By 1170 he had married Orabilis, heiress of the Scottish lordship of Leuchars and, through her, he became lord of an extensive complex of estates north of the border which included lands in Fife, Strathearn and Lothian.

    Saer de Quincy, the son of Robert de Quincy and Orabilis of Leuchars, was raised largely in Scotland. His absence from English records for the first decades of his life has led some modern historians and genealogists to confuse him with his uncle, Saer II, who took part in the rebellion of Henry the Young King in 1173, when the future Earl of Winchester can have been no more than a toddler. Saer II's line ended without direct heirs, and his nephew and namesake would eventually inherit his estate, uniting his primary Scottish holdings with the family's Northamptonshire patrimony, and possibly some lands in France.

    Issue

    By his wife Margaret de Beaumont, Earl Saire had three sons and three daughters:

    Lora who married Sir William de Valognes, Chamberlain of Scotland.
    Arabella who married Sir Richard Harcourt.
    Robert (d. 1217), before 1206 he married Hawise of Chester, Countess of Lincoln, sister and co-heiress of Ranulf de Blundeville, Earl of Chester.
    Roger, who succeeded his father as earl of Winchester (though he did not take formal possession of the earldom until after his mother's death).
    Robert de Quincy (second son of that name; d. 1257) who married Helen, daughter of the Welsh prince Llywelyn the Great.
    Hawise, who married Hugh de Vere, Earl of Oxford.

    Preceded by

    New Creation Earl of Winchester Succeeded by

    Roger de Quincy

    References

    Jump up ^ Leuchars St Athernase website
    Background Reading[edit]
    Medieval Lands Project on Saher de Quincy
    "Winchester", in The Complete Peerage, ed. G.E.C., xii. 745-751
    Sidney Painter, "The House of Quency, 1136-1264", Medievalia et Humanistica, 11 (1957) 3-9; reprinted in his book Feudalism and Liberty
    Grant G. Simpson, “An Anglo-Scottish Baron of the Thirteenth century: the Acts of Roger de Quincy Earl of Winchester and Constable of Scotland” (Unpublished PhD Thesis, Edinburgh 1963).
    Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 (7th Edition, 1992,), 58-60.

    Burial:
    He was buried in Acre, the capital of the Kingdom of Jerusalem, rather than in Egypt, and his heart was brought back and interred at Garendon Abbey near Loughborough, a house endowed by his wife's family.

    Maps & History ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Garendon_Abbey

    Saer — Margaret de Beaumont. Margaret (daughter of Robert de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester and Petronilla de Grandmesnil) died 0___ 1235. [Group Sheet]


  6. 199.  Margaret de Beaumont (daughter of Robert de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester and Petronilla de Grandmesnil); died 0___ 1235.
    Children:
    1. 99. Hawise de Quincy
    2. Roger de Quincy, Knight, 2nd Earl of Winchester was born ~ 1195; died 25 Apr 1264.
    3. Robert de Quincy died 0___ 1217, London, Middlesex, England.