Joan de Braose

Female 1283 - 1324  (~ 41 years)


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Generation: 1

  1. 1.  Joan de Braose was born ~ 1283, Bramber, West Sussex, England (daughter of William de Braose, VII, Knight, 2nd Baron de Braose and Agnes LNU); died 1321-1324, Gressenhall, Norfolk, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Joan Braose
    • Also Known As: Joan de Brewes

    Notes:

    Joan de Brewes1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9
    F, #23939, b. circa 1283, d. between 8 December 1321 and 23 June 1324
    Father Sir William de Brewes, 2nd Lord Brewes, Lord Bramber & Gower10,11,4,5,12,7,8,9 b. c 1261, d. c 1 May 1326
    Mother Agnes11,12,9 d. b 24 Apr 1317

    Joan de Brewes was born circa 1283. She married James de Bohun, son of Sir John de Bohun and Joan de la Chapelle, circa 1301; They had 1 son (Sir John).13,14,2,3,6,9 Joan de Brewes and Sir Richard Foliot, 2nd Lord Filiot obtained a marriage license on 16 September 1310; They had 1 son (Richard) and 2 daughters (Margaret, wife of Sir John de Camoys; & Margery, wife of Sir Hugh de Hastings).10,3,4,5,6,7,8,9 Joan de Brewes died between 8 December 1321 and 23 June 1324 at of Gressenhall & Weasenham, Norfolk, England.2,10,3,9

    Family 1

    James de Bohun b. 3 Feb 1281, d. c 30 May 1306

    Child

    Sir John Bohun, 1st Lord Bohun+13,14,2,3,9 b. 14 Nov 1301, d. 5 Dec 1367

    Family 2

    Sir Richard Foliot, 2nd Lord Filiot b. 19 Apr 1284, d. bt 18 Apr 1317 - 23 Jul 1317

    Children

    Richard Foliot b. c 1311, d. 29 May 1325
    Margery Foliot+3,5,8,9 b. c 1313, d. 8 Aug 1349
    Margaret Foliot+3,4,7,9 b. c 1314, d. b 1351

    Citations

    [S7557] Unknown author, The Complete Peerage, by Cokayne, Vol. II, p. 304, Vol. V, p. 540/1, Vol. VI, p. 353; Some Early English Pedigrees, by Vernon M. Norr, p. 35; Wallop Family, p. 131.
    [S11569] Europaische Stammtafeln, by Wilhelm Karl, Prinz zu Isenburg, Vol. III, Tafel 688.
    [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. I, p. 321.
    [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. I, p. 397-398.
    [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. II, p. 111-112.
    [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. I, p. 534.
    [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. II, p. 69-70.
    [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. II, p. 494.
    [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. IV, p. 81-82.
    [S11569] Europaische Stammtafeln, by Wilhelm Karl, Prinz zu Isenburg, Vol. III, Tafel 666.
    [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. I, p. 320-321.
    [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. I, p. 533-534.
    [S11568] The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain, and the United Kingdom, by George Edward Cokayne, Vol. II, p. 200.
    [S11588] Some Early English Pedigrees, by Vernon M. Norr, p. 32.

    end of profile,

    Joan Foliot formerly Braose aka de Brewes, de Braose, de Bohun
    Born about 1283 in Bramber, Sussex, England
    ANCESTORS ancestors
    Daughter of William (Braose) de Brewes Knt and Agnes (Unknown) de Brewes
    Sister of Aline (Braose) de Peshale
    Wife of James (Bohun) de Bohun — married 1301 in Gower, Glamorganshire, Wales
    Wife of Richard Foliot — married after 16 Sep 1310 [location unknown]
    DESCENDANTS descendants
    Mother of John (Bohun) de Bohun, Margery (Foliot) de Hastings and Margaret (Foliot) de Camoys
    Died before 23 Jun 1324 in Gressenhall & Weasenham, Norfolk, England
    Profile manager: David Rentschler private message [send private message]
    Braose-91 created 21 Feb 2012 | Last modified 28 Mar 2016
    This page has been accessed 1,387 times.

    Biography

    Father Sir William de Brewes, 2nd Lord Brewes, Lord Bramber & Gower[1] b. c 1261, d. c 1 May 1326

    Mother Agnes[2] d. b 24 Apr 1317

    Joan de Brewes was born circa 1283.

    She married James de Bohun, son of Sir John de Bohun and Joan de la Chapelle, circa 1301; They had 1 son (Sir John).[3]

    Joan de Brewes and Sir Richard Foliot, 2nd Lord Filiot obtained a marriage license on 16 September 1310; They had 1 son (Richard) and 2 daughters (Margaret, wife of Sir John de Camoys; & Margery, wife of Sir Hugh de Hastings).[4]Joan de Brewes died between 8 December 1321 and 23 June 1324 at of Gressenhall & Weasenham, Norfolk, England.[5]

    Family 1

    James de Bohun b. 3 Feb 1281, d. c 30 May 1306
    Child

    Sir John Bohun, 1st Lord Bohun b. 14 Nov 1301, d. 5 Dec 1367
    Family 2

    Sir Richard Foliot, 2nd Lord Filiot b. 19 Apr 1284, d. bt 18 Apr 1317 - 23 Jul 1317
    Children

    Richard Foliot b. c 1311, d. 29 May 1325
    Margery Foliot b. c 1313, d. 8 Aug 1349
    Margaret Foliot b. c 1314, d. b 1351
    Sources

    Magna Carta Ancestry 2011 2nd ed. Vol. I p. 321-322
    ? Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. I, p. 320-321.
    ? Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. I, p. 533-534.
    ? Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. I, p. 321.
    ? Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. I, p. 397-398.
    ? Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. IV, p. 81-82.

    end of profile

    Joan married James de Bohun 1301, Gower, Glamorganshire, Wales. James (son of John de Bohun and Joan de la Chapelle) was born 3 Feb 1279, Ford, Sussex, England; died 0May 1304. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. John de Bohun, 1st Lord Bohun was born 6 Jan 1299, (England); died 5 Dec 1367, Midhurst, Sussex, England.

    Joan married Richard Foliot, 2nd Lord Foliot < 16 Sep 1310. Richard (son of Jordan Foliot and Margery Newmarch) was born 19 Apr 1284, Gressenhall, Norfolkshire, England; died >1317, Scotland. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. Margery Foliot was born ~ 1313, (England); died 8 Aug 1349.

Generation: 2

  1. 2.  William de Braose, VII, Knight, 2nd Baron de Braose was born ~ 1260, (Wales) (son of William de Braose, VI, Knight, 1st Baron Braose and Aline de Multon); died 0___ 1326.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Lord of Bramber
    • Also Known As: Lord of Gower

    Notes:

    William de Braose, (sometimes William de Briouze, William de Breuse, William de Brewes or William de Brewose; c. 1260–1326) was the second Baron Braose, as well as Lord of Gower and Lord of Bramber. He was held as a hostage after being captured in 1264 during the Second Barons' War and records of some of his childhood expenses survive from his time as a hostage. He first entered royal service in 1286 and, in 1291, he succeeded his father as baron. He continued in royal military service, serving in Scotland as well as in Wales. Protracted disputes over his lands embroiled him throughout his life and at the end of his life helped spark a revolt against King Edward II of England's favourites, the Despensers. He married twice, and his heirs were his daughter Aline and his grandson John de Bohun.

    Family and early life

    Braose was the son of William de Braose, 1st Baron Braose and his first wife, Aline, daughter of Thomas de Multon.[1] He was likely born around 1260, as his age was given as about 46 in 1307. Other events prove that he was born prior to 1264, as he was captured in that year. This came about during the Second Barons' War (1264–1267) during the reign of King Henry III of England, as the elder Braose had sided with the king during Simon de Montfort's rebellion. The younger Braose was a hostage in the custody of Montfort's wife, Eleanor. Her household accounts include expenses related to the younger William's care.[2]

    Sometime around 1285, Braose confirmed grants of land by his ancestors to the religious house of Sele Priory.[3][a] In 1286 Braose was in the king's service, for unspecified duties overseas. It is possible that these included accompanying the king, Edward I, to Paris where Edward performed homage to the new French king, Philip IV, for Edward's French lands.[2] Braose played a significant role in King Edward's Welsh wars. In the winter of 1287–8 he commanded the force blockading Emlyn castle. His men also provided the escort for the transport of a huge siege engine from Dryslwyn to Emlyn. The arrival of the engine, with 480 great stones as ammunition, persuaded the defenders of the castle to surrender peaceably.[5]

    Marcher Baron

    The younger Braose succeeded his father before 1 March 1291, when he did homage for his father's lands.[1] He received custody of his father's lands on 2 March 1291, which had been placed into the custody of Robert de Tibetot on 12 January 1291.[6] He was summoned a number of times to Parliament from 1291 until 1322 as Baron Braose. He was the second Baron Braose, as well as Lord of Gower and Lord of Bramber.[1]

    After his father's death, Braose continued to serve Edward. He contributed both money and personal military service in Edward's wars in Wales, Scotland, and France.[2] He saw service in Gascony in 1294.[3] In 1297 he took part in a military campaign in Flanders. As a reward for his service in Flanders, he received the wardship of John de Mowbray, who Braose eventually married to his daughter Aline.[2] From 1298 to 1306 he was involved in the Scottish wars, and was at the Battle of Falkirk on 22 July 1298.[3] Besides the military service, he served the king in 1301 by signing a letter from the leading barons of England to Pope Boniface VIII in which the barons decried papal interference in the royal rights of England.[2]

    Braose captured the Welsh rebel William Cragh in 1290, whose miraculous resurrection after being hanged was attributed to Thomas de Cantilupe.[7] This led in 1307 to Braose giving testimony to papal commissioners inquiring into the events surrounding Cragh's hanging and whether or not it would support the canonisation of Cantilupe.[8]

    It was most likely Braose who commissioned a condensed copy of Domesday Book, now Public Record Office manuscript E164/1. This copy has a marginal notation of "Br" next to the estates owned by Braose's ancestor, the first William de Braose.[9]

    Braose was embroiled in a dispute over his lordship of Gower in 1299 when the Bishop of Llandaff, John de Monmouth, brought a case against Braose to the king. Although the case was adjudicated in 1302, the resulting decision was overturned. In 1304 Braose secured King Edward's confirmation of earlier grants and charters granting Braose special rights and liberties in Gower. He managed this because he was serving the king in Scotland at the time, and thus had easy access to the king. In 1305, however, Braose miscalculated and insulted a royal judge,[10] using "gross and contumelious words" to describe the royal official.[11] This episode caused the case of Gower to be reopened in 1306, and Braose was only able to settle the issue again by the grant of rights to his men in Swansea and Gower.[10]

    In 1320 King Edward II of England confiscated the lordship of Gower on the grounds that Braose had given it to his son-in-law Mowbray without royal permission. Over the preceding years Braose had promised Gower to a number of persons,[12] including Humphrey de Bohun, the Earl of Hereford, Hugh Despenser the Younger, and Roger Mortimer of Wigmore. Mowbray then in late 1319 took custody of Gower to protect his rights. Despenser persuaded the king in 1320 to take Gower into royal hands in October, and was appointed keeper of the honour in November.[13] The other lords in the Welsh Marches resented this seizure, feeling that the king's excuse for it was not applicable. The seizure was one of the precipitating causes of the baronial rebellion that led to the exile of the Despensers in 1321.[12] In 1322 Gower was given to the younger Despenser again, who then traded it for the honours of Usk and Caerleon. Braose was then induced to sue the new holder of Gower for the return of the barony in April 1324, which action succeeded in June 1324. Braose then promptly gave Gower to the elder Despenser, returning the property to the Despenser family once more.[14] The lordship of Gower eventually ended up in the hands of the Beauchamp family, but it was not until the 1350s that the issue was decided.[15]

    Marriage, death, and legacy

    The name of Braose's first wife was Agnes,[16] but her family is not known. His second wife was Elizabeth, the daughter and heiress of Raymund de Sully. He had two daughters with his first wife, but no children with his second wife, who outlived him.[1] It appears that there was a son named William, who was the subject of a military summons from King Edward in 1311, but nothing further is mentioned of him after 1315. In 1316 a settlement of William the father's estates made no mention of this son making it likely that the son died before this date.[17]

    Braose died not long before 1 May 1326[1] and his heirs were his daughter Aline and his grandson John de Bohun.[18] Aline, the elder daughter,[13] married John de Mowbray and Richard de Peschale. The second daughter, Joan, married James de Bohun and Richard Foliot, son of Jordan Foliot. Mowbray received the lands of Gower and Bramber before Braose's death.[1]

    Braose was known as a man often in debt and as being unable to manage his cash flow well.[17] Thomas Walsingham stated in his chronicle that Braose was "very rich by descent but a dissipater of the property left to him".[19]

    William — Agnes LNU. [Group Sheet]


  2. 3.  Agnes LNU
    Children:
    1. 1. Joan de Braose was born ~ 1283, Bramber, West Sussex, England; died 1321-1324, Gressenhall, Norfolk, England.
    2. Aline de Braose was born 0___ 1291; died ~ 1331.


Generation: 3

  1. 4.  William de Braose, VI, Knight, 1st Baron Braose was born ~ 1224, (Wales) (son of John de Braose and Marared ferch Llywelyn); died 0___ 1291, Findon, Sussex, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Lord of Bramber
    • Also Known As: Lord of Gower
    • Also Known As: William Bruce
    • Also Known As: William de Breuse
    • Also Known As: William de Brewes
    • Also Known As: William de Brewose
    • Also Known As: William de Briouze

    Notes:

    William de Braose, (alias Breuse, Brewes, Brehuse,[1] Briouze, Brewose etc.; c. 1224–1291) was the first Baron Braose, as well as Lord of Gower and Lord of Bramber.[2]

    Family and early life

    Braose was the son of John de Braose, the Lord of Bramber and Gower and John's wife Margaret, the daughter of Llywelyn the Great, prince of Gwynedd.[2] These members of the Braose family were all descendants of William de Braose, who died around 1093 and was the Domesday tenant of Bramber.[3] His family had its origins at Briouze in Normandy.[4]

    Braose's father was dead in 1232, before 18 July, when William became lord of his father's properties. William came of age before 15 July 1245,[2] making his birth around 1224.[1]

    Lord and baron

    He served King Henry III of England and Henry's son Edward I as a councilor and in various councils.[2] He sided with King Henry against Simon de Montfort during the civil war in England in the later part of Henry's reign.[1] In April and May 1292, he was summoned to Parliament, as Lord Braose.[2]

    Braose was a benefactor of Sele Priory, with surviving charters recording the grant of a large estate in Crockhurst, Sussex to the priory in 1254.[5] The charter was dated 4 January 1254, and was in exchange for 10 marks as an annual rent from the priory.[6] Another charter records the gift of land near the road from Chichester to Bramber that was made at the urging of his mother Margaret.[5] Other benefactions included gifs of rents[7] and two small gifts of land.[8] Around 1280, Braose released the priory from performing certain customary services and rents that it had previously paid to him and his ancestors.[9][Notes 1]

    Marriages, death, and legacy

    Braose married three times. His first wife was Aline, daughter of Thomas de Multon. His second was Agnes, daughter of Nicholas de Moeles. His third wife was Mary, daughter of Robert de Ros.[10] He died at Findon in Sussex shortly before 6 January 1291.[2] He was buried at Sele Priory in Sussex on 15 January.[1]

    Braose's son, William de Braose, 2nd Baron Braose, by his first wife, succeeded him.[2] By his second wife, he had a son Giles, who was knighted and fought in Scotland in 1300.[11] By his third wife, William had at least three children – Richard, Peter, and Margaret (wife of Ralph de Camoys, 1st Baron Camoys) – and possibly a fourth – William.[1] Richard was dead before 9 February 1296, and Peter died before 7 February 1312.[12]

    See also

    House of Braose

    William — Aline de Multon. [Group Sheet]


  2. 5.  Aline de Multon (daughter of Thomas de Multon and unnamed spouse).
    Children:
    1. 2. William de Braose, VII, Knight, 2nd Baron de Braose was born ~ 1260, (Wales); died 0___ 1326.


Generation: 4

  1. 8.  John de Braose was born 1197-1198, (Bramber, Sussex, England) (son of William de Braose, III, Knight, 4th Lord of Bramber and Maud de St. Valery, Lady of the Haie); died 18 Jul 1232, Bramber, Sussex, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Lord of Bramber and Gower

    Notes:

    John de Braose (born 1197 or 1198 – 18 July 1232), known as Tadody to the Welsh, was the Lord of Bramber and Gower.

    Re-establishment of the de Braose dynasty

    John re-established the senior branch of the de Braose dynasty.

    His father was William de Braose, eldest son of William de Braose, 4th Lord of Bramber and Maud de St. Valery, and his mother was Maud de Clare, (born ca. 1184) daughter of Richard de Clare, 3rd Earl of Hertford of Tonbridge Castle in Kent. John was their eldest son and one of four brothers, the others being Giles, Phillip and Walter de Braose.

    Royal threat

    His grandfather had had his lands seized and his grandmother Maud de St. Valery had been captured by forces of King John of England in 1210. She was imprisoned, along with John's father William, in Corfe Castle and walled alive inside the dungeon. Both mother and son starved to death on the King's orders. This was probably due to John's grandfather's conflict with the monarch, open rebellion and subsequent alliance with Llewelyn the Great. John's nickname Tadody means "fatherless" in the Welsh.

    Hiding and imprisonment

    At his family's fall from Royal favour John de Braose was initially hidden on Gower and spent some time in the care of his uncle Giles de Braose, Bishop of Hereford, but finally in 1214 John and his younger brother Philip were taken into custody. They were imprisoned until after King John had died (in 1216), the throne passing to Henry III. John was released from custody in 1218.

    Welsh intermarriage

    photograph taken in 1999
    Swansea castle, the centre of power for the honour of Gower
    In 1219 he married Margaret Ferch Llywelyn, (born about 1202 in the Kingdom of Gwynedd), daughter of the leader of Wales Llywelyn Fawr and his English wife Joan Plantagenet also known as Joan, Lady of Wales, and he received the Lordship of Gower as her dowry with Llywelyn's blessing.

    In 1226 another surviving uncle Reginald de Braose sold him the honour of Bramber, and he inherited more lands and titles when this uncle died a few years later in 1228. Sometime in the 1220s, he established the deer park, Parc le Breos in the Gower Peninsula.

    He and Margaret, his Welsh wife, had three sons, his heir, William de Braose the eldest son, John and Richard (born about 1225 in Stinton, Norfolk) the youngest, (buried in Woodbridge Priory, Suffolk) having died before June 1292.

    Death and legacy

    In 1232 John was killed in a fall from his horse on his land in Bramber, Sussex at 34 years of age. His widow soon remarried to Walter III de Clifford. William de Braose (born about 1224; died 1291 in Findon, Sussex), his eldest son, succeeded him in the title of Lord of Bramber. John the younger son became Lord of the manor of Corsham in Wiltshire and also later Lord of Glasbury on Wye.

    William de Braose (c.1224–1291) also had a son named William de Braose who died "shortly before 1st May 1326".[1]

    Another William de Braose who became Bishop of Llandaff cannot be placed with certainty in this branch of the family.

    The de Braose name modified to de Brewes in the Middle Ages 1200 to 1400.

    See also

    House of Braose

    Notes

    Jump up ^ Richardson & Everingham, Magna Carta Ancestry, p137.
    References[edit]
    Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, By Douglas Richardson & Kimball G. Everingham, Published 2005, Genealogical Publishing Com
    Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis, Lines: 29A-28, 246-30.

    end of biography

    John married Marared ferch Llywelyn 0___ 1219. Marared (daughter of Llywelyn The Great and Joan Plantagenet, Lady of Wales) was born 0___ 1202, Gwynedd, Wales; died Aft 1268. [Group Sheet]


  2. 9.  Marared ferch Llywelyn was born 0___ 1202, Gwynedd, Wales (daughter of Llywelyn The Great and Joan Plantagenet, Lady of Wales); died Aft 1268.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Margaret
    • Also Known As: Margaret of Wales

    Children:
    1. 4. William de Braose, VI, Knight, 1st Baron Braose was born ~ 1224, (Wales); died 0___ 1291, Findon, Sussex, England.
    2. Richard de Braose was born 0___ 1232; died 0___ 1292.

  3. 10.  Thomas de Multon

    Thomas — unnamed spouse. [Group Sheet]


  4. 11.  unnamed spouse
    Children:
    1. 5. Aline de Multon


Generation: 5

  1. 16.  William de Braose, III, Knight, 4th Lord of BramberWilliam de Braose, III, Knight, 4th Lord of Bramber was born 0___ 1153, Bramber, Sussex, England (son of William de Braose, Knight, 3rd Lord of Bramber and Bertha of Hereford); died 9 Aug 1211, Corbeil, Marne, Champagne-Ardenne, France; was buried 0___ 1211, Seine-et-Marne, Île-de-France, France.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Lord of Bramber, Gower, Abergavenny, Brecknock, Builth, Radnor, Kington, Limerick

    Notes:

    William de Braose
    4th Lord of Bramber

    Grosmont Castle

    Born: probably 1140/50

    Died: 9th August 1211 at Corbeuil

    At his peak, William was Lord of Bramber, Gower, Abergavenny, Brecknock, Builth, Radnor, Kington, Limerick and the three castles of Skenfrith, Grosmont (right) and Whitecastle.

    He inherited Bramber, Builth and Radnor from his father; Brecknock and Abergavenny through his mother. He was the strongest of the Marcher Lords involved in constant war with the Welsh and other lords. He was particularly hated by the Welsh for the massacre of three Welsh princes, their families and their men, which took place during a feast at his castle of Abergavenny in 1175. He was sometimes known as the "Ogre of Abergavenny". One of the Normans' foremost warriors, he fought alongside King Richard at Chalus in 1199 (when Richard received his fatal wound).

    William immediately transferred his loyalty to Prince John and supported his claim to the throne. John's entry to England was via William's port of Shoreham in Sussex.

    John extended William's landholdings. He received Limerick, without the city, in 1201 and was also given custody of Glamorgan, Monmouth and Gwynllwg in return for large payments.

    William captured Arthur, Count of Brittany at Mirebeau in 1202 and was in charge of his imprisonment for King John. He was well rewarded in February 1203 with the grant of Gower. He may have had knowledge of the murder of Arthur and been bribed to silence by John with the city of Limerick in July. His honours reached their peak when he was made Sheriff of Herefordshire by John for 1206-7. He had held this office under Richard from 1192 to 1199.

    His fall began almost immediately. William was stripped of his office as bailiff of Glamorgan and other custodies by King John in 1206/7. Later he was deprived of all his lands and, sought by John in Ireland, he returned to Wales and joined the Welsh Prince Llywelyn in rebellion. He fled to France in 1210 via Shoreham "in the habit of a beggar" and died in exile near Paris. Despite his stated intention to be interred at St. John's, Brecon, he was buried in the Abbey of St. Victoire, Paris by Stephen Langton, the Archbishop of Canterbury, another of John's chief opponents who was also taking refuge there. His wife and son William were starved to death in captivity at either Windsor or Corfe Castle.

    Note: The arms shown above are attributed to this William by Matthew Paris (see Aspilogia II , MP IV No7)

    Father: William de Braose, 3rd Lord of Bramber, Sheriff of Herefordshire

    Mother: Bertha de Pãitres

    Married to Maud de St Valery ("before 1170" - Powicke's Loretta)

    Child 1: William de Braose
    Child 2: Maud (Susan) = Gruffyd ap Rhys
    Child 3: Giles, Bishop of Hereford
    Child 4: Roger
    Child 5: Philip
    Child 6: Bertha = William de Beauchamp
    Child 7: Thomas
    Child 8: Walter
    Child 9: John = Amabil de Limesi
    Child 10: Margaret = Walter de Lacy
    Child 11: Henry
    Child 12: Annora = Hugh de Mortimer
    Child 13: Loretta = Robert de Beaumont, 4th Earl of Leicester
    Child 14: Reginald de Braose
    Child 15: Flandrina, Abbess of Godstow
    Child 16: Bernard

    This ordering of the children follows the Braose genealogy given in the 13th century MS
    (British Library, Cotton Julius D, x) on the history of the Lords of Brecon.

    Matthew Boulter has written a dissertation on the career of this William de Braose which he has kindly made available to readers of this site.

    end of biography

    M William (de Braose) BRUCEPrint Family Tree
    Born in 1153 - Bramber, Sussex, England
    Deceased 9 August 1211 - Corbeil, Marne, Champagne-Ardenne, France , age at death: 58 years old
    Buried in 1211 - Seine-et-Marne, Île-de-France, France

    Parents
    William (de Braose) BRUCE, born in 1100 - Bramber, Sussex, England, Deceased 21 October 1190 - London, England age at death: 90 years old
    Married in 1148, Herefordshire, England, to
    Bertha De PITRES, born in 1107 - Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England, Deceased - Bramber, Sussex, England

    Spouses, children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren
    Married in 1174, Bramber, Sussex, England, to Maud (Matilda) De St VALERY, born in 1155 - Bramber, Sussex, England, Deceased in 1210 - Windsor, Berkshire, England age at death: 55 years old (Parents : M Bernard De St VALERY 1117-1190 & F Alanor (Eleanor) De DOMMART 1128-) with
    F Matilda Maud (de Braose) 1160-1209 married in 1189 to Gruffydd Ap (Prince of South Wales) RHYS 1148-1201 with
    M Owain Ap GRUFFYDD ca 1176-1235 married in 1212 to Angharad Verch MAREDYDD 1190-1230 with :
    M Maredydd Ap (Lord Cardigan Uch Ayron) OWAIN ca 1204-1265
    F Lleucu Verch GRUFFYDD 1202-1250 married in 1232, Carmarthenshire, Wales, to Madog (Foel - Ap Cadwgon) GRIFFITH 1206-1250 with :
    F Elen (Verch Madog) GRIFFITH 1236-1280
    M Dafydd (Ap Madog) GRIFFITH 1240-1309
    M Cadwgon (Ddu - Ap Madog) GRIFFITH ca 1245-
    M William (The Younger) de Braose) BRUCE 1175-1210 married in 1196, Kent, England, to Matilda De CLARE 1175-1213 with
    F Matilda (de Braose) BRUCE ca 1195-1274 married before 1215, England, to Henry De TRACY 1197-1274 with :
    F Eva De TRACY ca 1222-1274
    M John (de Braose) (Lord of Bramber) BRUCE 1197-1232 married in 1219, Bramber, Sussex, England, to Margaret (Verch Llywelyn) (Lady) TUDOR 1202-1264 with :
    M William BRUCE 1224-1290
    M Richard (de Braose) BRUCE 1232-1292
    F Laurette (de Braose) BRUCE ca 1176-1266 married to Robert "Fitz-Parnell" HARCOURT ca 1156- with
    M X Harcourt ca 1190- married to ? ? with :
    M X Harcourt 1220-

    Siblings
    F Bertha (de Braose) BRUCE ca 1145- Married before 1180, Wales, to Gilbert De (Baron) MONMOUTH 1140-1190
    Bertha (de Braose) BRUCE ca 1145- Married before 1182, Bramber, Sussex, England, to Walter De BEAUCHAMP ca 1160-1235
    F Matilda Maud (de Braose) ca 1146- Married in 1168, England, to John De BRAMPTON ca 1136-1179
    F Margaret (de Braose) (Lady Meath) BRUCE ca 1149- Married 19 November 1200, Ewyas Harold, Herefordshire, England, to Walter De (Sir - Lord Meath) LACY ca 1150-1241
    F Sybil (de Braose) BRUCE /1151-1227 Married to Philip (le Boteler) BUTLER 1157-1174
    M Reginald (de Braose) BRUCE 1182-1227 Married 19 March 1202, Bramber, Sussex, England, to Grecian Alice De BRIWERE 1186-1226

    Paternal grand-parents, uncles and aunts
    M Philip (de Braose) BRUCE 1073-1134 married (1104)
    F Aenor De TOTNES 1084-1102
    M William (de Braose) BRUCE 1100-1190
    married (1148)
    6 children
    F Maud (de Braose) BRUCE 1109-1200
    married (1130)
    2 children



    Maternal grand-parents, uncles and aunts
    M Miles (Fitzwalter) De (1st Earl of Hereford) PITRES 1092-1143 married (1121)
    F Sybil (de Neufmarche) NEWMARCH 1092-1142
    F Bertha De PITRES 1107-
    married (1148)
    6 children
    M Roger De (Sheriff of Gloucestershire) PITRES ca 1115-1155
    married (1138)
    1 child
    F Margaret De PITRES ca 1126-1187
    married
    1 child
    F Lucy De PITRES 1136-1219/
    married (1157)
    1 child



    Notes
    Individual Note
    Source: Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - Millennium File - Heritage Consulting - Ancestry.com Operations Inc - 1,7249::0 1,7249::10774604
    Source: Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Dictionary of National Biography, Volumes 1-20, 22 - Ancestry.com - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. This collection was indexed by Ancestry World Archives Project contributors.Original data - Stephen, Sir Leslie, ed. Dictionary of National Biography, 1921–1922. London, England: Oxf - 1,1981::0 1,1981::11096
    Source: Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - Web: International, Find A Grave Index - Ancestry.com - Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. - 1,70699::0 1,70699::994752
    Source: Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - International, Find A Grave Index for Select Locations, 1300s-Current - Ancestry.com - Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. - 1,60541::0 1,60541::10270

    Death
    Age: 58


    Sources
    Individual: Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Ancestry Family Trees - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members. - This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created. - Ancestry Family Trees - http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=18829447&pid=9164
    Birth:
    - Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - Millennium File - Heritage Consulting - Ancestry.com Operations Inc - 1,7249::0 - 1,7249::10774604
    - Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - Web: International, Find A Grave Index - Ancestry.com - Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. - 1,70699::0 - 1,70699::994752
    - Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - International, Find A Grave Index for Select Locations, 1300s-Current - Ancestry.com - Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. - 1,60541::0 - 1,60541::10270
    Death:
    - Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - Millennium File - Heritage Consulting - Ancestry.com Operations Inc - 1,7249::0 - 1,7249::10774604
    - Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Dictionary of National Biography, Volumes 1-20, 22 - Ancestry.com - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. This collection was indexed by Ancestry World Archives Project contributors.Original data - Stephen, Sir Leslie, ed. Dictionary of National Biography, 1921–1922. London, England: Oxf - 1,1981::0 - 1,1981::11096
    - Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - Web: International, Find A Grave Index - Ancestry.com - Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. - 1,70699::0 - 1,70699::994752
    - Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - International, Find A Grave Index for Select Locations, 1300s-Current - Ancestry.com - Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. - 1,60541::0 - 1,60541::10270
    Burial:
    - Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - Web: International, Find A Grave Index - Ancestry.com - Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. - 1,70699::0 - 1,70699::994752
    - Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - International, Find A Grave Index for Select Locations, 1300s-Current - Ancestry.com - Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. - 1,60541::0 - 1,60541::10270
    Search the matching civil records

    Family Tree Preview
    Ancestry Chart Descendancy Chart Printable Family Tree
    _____| 16_ Robert BRUCE 1030-1094
    _____| 8_ William de (Braose) BRUCE 1049-1093
    _____| 4_ Philip (de Braose) BRUCE 1073-1134
    / \ _____| 18_ Waldron De St CLARE 1015-1047
    |2_ William (de Braose) BRUCE 1100-1190
    | \ _____| 20_ Alured De TOTNES 1015-1080
    | \ _____| 10_ Juhel De TOTNES 1049-1123
    | \ _____| 22_ Arnoul De PICQUIGNY 1020-1055
    |--1_ William (de Braose) BRUCE 1153-1211
    | _____| 24_ Roger De PITRES 1036-1080
    | _____| 12_ Walter de (Fitzroger) (High Sheriff of Gloucestershre) PÎTRES 1055-1129
    | _____| 6_ Miles (Fitzwalter) De (1st Earl of Hereford) PITRES 1092-1143
    | / \ _____| 26_ Drugo (Dru) de (Baalun) BALLON 1037-
    |3_ Bertha De PITRES 1107-
    \ _____| 28_ Geoffrey (de Neufmarche) NEWMARCH 1025-1072
    \ _____| 14_ Bernard (de Neufmarche) (Lord of Brecknockshire) NEWMARCH 1050-1093
    \ _____| 30_ Osborn (Fitzrichard) le SCROPE /1054-1100

    end of report

    William married Maud de St. Valery, Lady of the Haie Bef 1170, Bramber, Sussex, England. Maud was born ~ 1155; died 0___ 1210, Corfe Castle, Dorset, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 17.  Maud de St. Valery, Lady of the Haie was born ~ 1155; died 0___ 1210, Corfe Castle, Dorset, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Lady of Bramber

    Notes:

    Died: 1210 in Windsor castle.

    Maud (Matilda) de Braose was also known as the Lady of la Haie and to the Welsh as Moll Walbee. Married to William de Braose, the "Ogre of Abergavenny", she was a significant warrior in her own right. Her long defence of Pain's Castle when it was besieged by the Welsh earned it the name "Matilda's Castle". The local people saw her as a supernatural character. She was said to have built Hay Castle (above) single handed in one night, carrying the stones in her apron.
    Maud's stoneWhen one fell out and lodged in her slipper she picked it out and flung it to land in St Meilig's churchyard, three miles away across the River Wye at Llowes. The nine foot high standing stone (left) can still be seen inside the church.

    The final fall of her husband may owe a lot to her hasty reply to King John when he requested her son William as a hostage in 1208. She refused on the grounds that John had murdered his nephew Arthur whom he should have protected. The dispute between John and the de Braoses led to Maud dying of starvation in one of the King's castles along with her son, while her husband, stripped of all his lands, died the following year in exile in France.

    Father: Bernard de St Valery (d.ca. 1190) (see note)

    Mother: ???

    Married to William de Braose, Lord of Brecknock, Bergavenny etc.

    Child 1: William de Braose
    Child 2: Maud (Susan) = Gruffyd ap Rhys
    Child 3: Giles, Bishop of Hereford
    Child 4: Roger
    Child 5: Philip
    Child 6: Bertha = William de Beauchamp
    Child 7: Thomas
    Child 8: Walter
    Child 9: John = Amabil de Limesi
    Child 10: Margaret = Walter de Lacy
    Child 11: Henry
    Child 12: Annora = Hugh de Mortimer
    Child 13: Loretta = Robert de Beaumont, 4th Earl of Leicester
    Child 14: Reginald de Braose
    Child 15: Flandrina, Abbess of Godstow
    Child 16: Bernard

    This ordering of the children follows the Braose genealogy given in the 13th century MS
    (British Library, Cotton Julius D, x) on the history of the Lords of Brecon.

    Note.
    Matilda's parentage was uncertain for a long time. Many writers have suggested that she may have been a daughter of Reginald de St Valery. I recently discovered a reference to her in L'Histoire des Ducs de Normandie et des Rois d'Angleterre, ed. Francisque Michel (Paris, 1840), written in the 13th century which describes her as a "daughter of Bernard de St Valery". This appears to have finally settled the matter.

    (See a copy of the post to soc.genealogy.medieval which gives more detail.)

    end of biography

    Maud de Braose, Lady of Bramber (c. 1155 – 1210) was an English noble, the spouse of William de Braose, 4th Lord of Bramber, a powerful Marcher baron and court favourite of King John of England. She would later incur the wrath and enmity of the King who caused her to be starved to death in the dungeon of Corfe Castle along with her eldest son.[1]

    She features in many Welsh myths and legends; and is also known to history as Matilda de Braose, Moll Wallbee, and Lady of La Haie.

    Family and marriage[edit]
    She was born Maud de St. Valery (Maud de Saint-Valâery) in France in about 1155, the child of Bernard de St. Valâery[2][3] of Hinton Waldrist in Berkshire (now Oxfordshire)[4] and his first wife, Matilda. Her paternal grandfather was Reginald de St. Valâery (died c.1162).

    She had many siblings and half-siblings, including Thomas de St. Valâery (died 1219), who was a son of Bernard by his second wife Eleanor de Domnart. Thomas married Adele de Ponthieu, by whom he had a daughter, Annora, who in her turn married Robert III, Count of Dreux, by whom she had issue. Thomas fought on the French side, at the Battle of Bouvines on 27 July 1214.[5]

    Sometime around 1166, Maud married William de Braose, 4th Lord of Bramber, son of William de Braose, 3rd Lord of Bramber and Bertha of Hereford de Pitres. He also held the lordships of Gower, Hay, Brecon, Radnor, Builth, Abergavenny, Kington, Painscastle, Skenfrith, Grosmont, White Castle and Briouze in Normandy. When King John of England ascended the throne in 1199, Braose became a court favourite and was also awarded the lordship of Limerick, Ireland. Maud had a marriage portion, Tetbury from her father's estate.

    Maud supported her husband's military ambitions and he put her in charge of Hay Castle and surrounding territory. She is often referred to in history as the Lady of Hay. In 1198, Maud defended Painscastle in Elfael against a massive Welsh attack led by Gwenwynwyn, Prince of Powys. She successfully held off Gwenwynwyn's forces for three weeks until English reinforcements arrived. Over three thousand Welsh were killed. Painscastle was known as Matilda's Castle by the locals.[6]

    Maud and William are reputed to have had 16 children.[7] The best documented of these are listed below.

    Issue[edit]
    Maud de Braose (died 29 December 1210), married Gruffydd ap Rhys II, by whom she had two sons, Rhys and Owain.[8]
    William de Braose (died 1210). Starved to death with his mother in either Windsor or Corfe Castle. He married Maud de Clare, daughter of Richard de Clare, 3rd Earl of Hertford, by whom he had issue, including John de Braose.[9]
    Margaret de Braose (died after 1255), married Walter de Lacy, Lord of Meath, son of Hugh de Lacy, Lord of Meath and Rohese of Monmouth.[9]
    Reginald de Braose (died between 5 May 1227 and 9 June 1228), married firstly, Grace, daughter of William Briwere, and secondly, in 1215, Gwladus Ddu, daughter of Welsh Prince Llewelyn the Great. He had issue by his first wife, including William de Braose, who married Eva Marshal.[1]
    Giles de Braose, Bishop of Hereford (died 13 November 1215)[1]
    John de Braose[7] (died before 27 May 1205), married Amabil de Limesi.[9]
    Loretta de Braose, married Robert de Beaumont, 4th Earl of Leicester. She died without issue.[7]
    Annora de Braose, married Hugh de Mortimer and later became a recluse at Iffley.[7]
    Flandrina de Braose, Abbess of Godstow,[10] (elected 1242, deposed 1248).[11]
    Enmity of King John[edit]

    King John of England:
    A fanciful illustration from 1902 of Maud de Braose's enemy
    In 1208, William de Braose quarrelled with his friend and patron King John. The reason is not known but it is alleged that Maud made indiscreet comments regarding the murder of King John's nephew Arthur of Brittany. There was also a large sum of money (five thousand marks) de Braose owed the King. Whatever the reason, John demanded Maud's son William be sent to him as a hostage for her husband's loyalty. Maud refused, and stated loudly within earshot of the King's officers that "she would not deliver her children to a king who had murdered his own nephew."[12] The King quickly led troops to the Welsh border and seized all of the castles that belonged to William de Braose. Maud and her eldest son William fled to Ireland, where they found refuge at Trim Castle with the de Lacys, the family of her daughter Margaret. In 1210, King John sent an expedition to Ireland. Maud and her son escaped but were apprehended in Galloway by Donnchadh, Earl of Carrick.[13] After being briefly held at Carrickfergus Castle,[14] they were dispatched to England.

    Imprisonment at Corfe Castle[edit]
    Maud and her son William were first imprisoned at Windsor Castle, but were shortly afterwards transferred to Corfe Castle in Dorset where they were placed inside the dungeon. Maud and William both starved to death.[14] Her husband died a year later in exile in France where he had gone disguised as a beggar to escape King John's wrath after the latter had declared him an outlaw, following his alliance with Llywelyn the Great, whom he had assisted in open rebellion against the King, an act which John regarded as treason. He was buried in the Abbey of St. Victor, Paris.


    Corfe Castle; within whose dungeon Maud de Braose and her son William were starved to death
    Maud's daughter Margaret de Lacy founded a religious house, the Hospital of St. John, in Aconbury, Herefordshire in her memory.[15] On 10 October 1216, eight days before his death, King John conceded three carucates of land in the royal forest of Aconbury to Margaret for the construction of the religious house. He sent the instructions to her husband Walter de Lacy, who held the post of Sheriff of Hereford, by letters patent.[16]

    Maud de Braose features in many Welsh folklore myths and legends. There is one legend which says that Maud built the castle of Hay-on-Wye single handed in one night, carrying the stones in her apron.[17] She was also said to have been extremely tall and often donned armour while leading troops into battle.[18]

    The legend about her building Hay Castle probably derives from the time she added the gateway arch to a tower which was built in the 1180s.[19]

    In contemporary records, she was described as beautiful, very wise, doughty, and vigorous. She kept up the war against the Welsh and conquered much from them.[15]

    The manner in which Maud and her son William met their deaths so outraged the English nobility that Magna Carta, which King John was forced to sign in 1215, contains clause 39; it reads:

    No man shall be taken, imprisoned, outlawed, banished or in any way destroyed, nor will we proceed against or prosecute him, except by the lawful judgement of his peers or by the law of the land.

    end of biography


    Died:
    The dispute between John and the de Braoses led to Maud dying of starvation in one of the King's castles along with her son, while her husband, stripped of all his lands, died the following year in exile in France.

    Children:
    1. Maud de Braose was born 0___ 1160, (Bramber, Sussex, England); died 29 Dec 1210.
    2. Eleanor de Braose was born (Bramber, Sussex, England).
    3. Margaret de Braose, Lady of Trim was born ~ 1149, (Bramber, Sussex, England); died Aft 1255, Corfe Castle, Dorset, England.
    4. 8. John de Braose was born 1197-1198, (Bramber, Sussex, England); died 18 Jul 1232, Bramber, Sussex, England.

  3. 18.  Llywelyn The GreatLlywelyn The Great was born ~ 1172, Dolwyddelan, Wales; died 11 Apr 1240, Aberconwy Abbey, Wales; was buried Aberconwy Abbey, Wales.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Llywelyn ap Iorwerth
    • Also Known As: Llywelyn Fawr
    • Also Known As: Prince of Aberffraw and Lord of Snowdon
    • Also Known As: Prince of Gwynedd, and Powys Wenwynwyn

    Notes:

    Llywelyn the Great (Welsh: Llywelyn Fawr, [??'w?l?n va??r]), full name Llywelyn ap Iorwerth, (c. 1172 – 11 April 1240) was a Prince of Gwynedd in north Wales and eventually de facto ruler over most of Wales. By a combination of war and diplomacy he dominated Wales for 40 years.

    During Llywelyn's boyhood, Gwynedd was ruled by two of his uncles, who split the kingdom between them, following the death of Llywelyn's grandfather, Owain Gwynedd, in 1170. Llywelyn had a strong claim to be the legitimate ruler and began a campaign to win power at an early age. He was sole ruler of Gwynedd by 1200 and made a treaty with King John of England that year. Llywelyn's relations with John remained good for the next ten years. He married John's natural daughter Joan in 1205, and when John arrested Gwenwynwyn ab Owain of Powys in 1208, Llywelyn took the opportunity to annex southern Powys. In 1210, relations deteriorated, and John invaded Gwynedd in 1211. Llywelyn was forced to seek terms and to give up all lands west of the River Conwy, but was able to recover them the following year in alliance with the other Welsh princes. He allied himself with the barons who forced John to sign Magna Carta in 1215. By 1216, he was the dominant power in Wales, holding a council at Aberdyfi that year to apportion lands to the other princes.

    Following King John's death, Llywelyn concluded the Treaty of Worcester with his successor, Henry III, in 1218. During the next fifteen years, Llywelyn was frequently involved in fights with Marcher lords and sometimes with the king, but also made alliances with several major powers in the Marches. The Peace of Middle in 1234 marked the end of Llywelyn's military career, as the agreed truce of two years was extended year by year for the remainder of his reign. He maintained his position in Wales until his death in 1240 and was succeeded by his son Dafydd ap Llywelyn.

    Children

    Llywelyn married Joan, natural daughter of King John of England, in 1205. Llywelyn and Joan had three identified children in the records but in all probability had more as Llywelyn's children were fully recognised during his marriage to Joan whilst his father-in-law, King John, was alive. The identity of the mother of some of Llywelyn's children before this union is uncertain, but the following are recorded in contemporary or near-contemporary records.

    Dafydd ap Llywelyn (c. 1212–1246), son by Joan, wife of Llywelyn.

    Elen (Helen) ferch Llywelyn (c. 1206–1253), daughter by Joan. M. John Earl of Huntington m. 2nd Robert de Quincy 3rd Donald Malcolm Mar Earl of Mar.

    Susanna ferch Llywelyn, died after November 1228, daughter by Joan. Henry III King of England granted the upbringing of "L. princeps Norwallie et Johanna uxor sua et…soror nostra Susannam filiam suam" to "Nicholao de Verdun et Clementie uxori sue" by order dated 24 Nov 1228[273]. Her birth date is estimated on the assumption that Susanna was under marriageable age, but older than an infant, at the time.

    Gruffydd ap Llywelyn (c. 1196–1244), a son by Tangwystl Goch (d. c. 1198).

    Gwladus Ddu (c. 1206–1251), probable daughter by Joan.

    Angharad ferch Llywelyn (c. 1212–1256), probable daughter of Joan; married Maelgwn Fychan.

    Marared ferch Llywelyn (died after 1268), married John de Braose and secondly (about 1232) Walter III de Clifford. Marared had issue by both husbands.[64]

    Elen the Younger ferch Llywelyn (before 1230-after 16 Feb 1295) who married firstly Mâael Coluim II, Earl of Fife, son of Duncan Macduff of Fife & his wife Alice Corbet. She married secondly (after 1266) Domhnall I, Earl of Mar, son of William, Earl of Mar & his first wife Elizabeth Comyn of Buchan.

    Elen and Domhall's daughter, Isabella of Mar, married Robert, the Bruce, King of Scots. Isabella had one child by the King of Scots, Marjorie Bruce, who was the mother of the first Stewart monarch, Robert II of Scotland.

    Tegwared y Baiswen ap Llywelyn (c. 1215), a son by a woman named as Crysten in some sources, a possible twin of Angharad[65]

    Little is known of Llywelyn's mistress, Tangwystl Goch, except that she was the daughter of Llywarch "Goch" of Rhos.[66] Gruffydd ap Llywelyn (c. 1196–1244) was Llywelyn's eldest son and known to be the son of Tangwystl. He married Senena, daughter of Caradoc ap Thomas of Anglesey. Their sons included Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, who for a period occupied a position in Wales comparable to that of his grandfather, and Dafydd ap Gruffydd who ruled Gwynedd briefly after his brother's death.

    end of biography

    Llywelyn Ap Iorwerth, byname Llywelyn The Great (died April 11, 1240, Aberconway, Gwynedd, Wales), Welsh prince, the most outstanding native ruler to appear in Wales before the region came under English rule in 1283.

    Llywelyn was the grandson of Owain Gwynedd (d. 1170), a powerful ruler of Gwynedd in northern Wales. While still a child, Llywelyn was exiled by his uncle, David. He deposed David in 1194 and by 1202 had brought most of northern Wales under his control. In 1205 he married Joan, the illegitimate daughter of England’s King John (reigned 1199–1216). Nevertheless, when Llywelyn’s attempts to extend his authority into southern Wales threatened English possessions, John invaded Wales (1211) and overran most of Gwynedd. The prince soon won back his lands. He secured his position by allying with John’s powerful baronial opponents, and his actions helped the barons influence the king’s signing of Magna Carta (1215).

    Two years after the accession of King Henry III (reigned 1216–72), the English acknowledged that Llywelyn controlled almost all of Wales, but by 1223 they had forced him to withdraw to the north behind a boundary between Cardigan, Dyfed, and Builth, Powys. Many Welsh princes in the south, however, still accepted his overlordship. In his last years the aged Llywelyn turned his government over to his son David (prince of Gwynedd). When Llywelyn died, a chronicler described him as prince of Wales, which he was in fact, if not in law.

    end of biography

    Buried:
    Aberconwy Abbey was a Cistercian foundation at Conwy, later transferred to Maenan near Llanrwst, and in the 13th century was the most important abbey in the north of Wales.

    A Cistercian house was founded at Rhedynog Felen near Caernarfon in 1186 by a group of monks from Strata Florida Abbey. About four or five years later they moved to Conwy, and in 1199 were given large grants of land by Llywelyn the Great who had recently become ruler of Gwynedd. Llywelyn was regarded as the founder of the house, and thanks to his support it came to hold more land than any other Welsh abbey, over 40,000 acres (160 km²). On Llywelyn's death in 1240 he was buried at the abbey, and his son and successor Dafydd ap Llywelyn was also buried here in 1246. In 1248 Llywelyn's other son, Gruffydd ap Llywelyn, who had died trying to escape from the Tower of London in 1244, was reburied at Aberconwy after the abbot of Aberconwy, together with the abbot of Strata Florida, had arranged for his body to be repatriated from London.

    The abbot of Aberconwy was an important figure in the negotiations between Llywelyn ap Gruffudd and the English crown later in the century, and in 1262 was entrusted with the task of being Llywelyn's sole representative in negotiations.

    In 1282, Edward I of England surrounded Snowdonia with a massive army. On 11 December Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, Tywysog Cymru, was lured into a trap and murdered.

    In 1283 King Edward I of England obliged the monks to move from Conwy to Maenan, further up the Conwy valley (53.1733°N 3.8123°W), so he could construct a castle and walled town at Conwy. The move had been completed by 1284, with Edward financing the building of a new abbey. In the 15th century the abbot, John ap Rhys, became involved in a dispute with Strata Florida Abbey and led some of his monks and some soldiers on a raid on that abbey. The abbey was valued at ¹162 in 1535 and was suppressed in 1537.

    Little remains of the Maenan Abbey buildings, but the original abbey church in Conwy was adapted to become the parish church of St Mary & All Saints and although much rebuilt over the centuries some parts of the original church remain. The other buildings of the abbey are thought to have been located north and east of the church.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aberconwy_Abbey

    Died:
    Gwynedd, county of northwestern Wales, extending from the Irish Sea in the west to the mountains of Snowdonia in the east. It encompasses most of the historic counties of Caernarvonshire and Merioneth. Caernarfon is the administrative centre of the county.

    https://www.britannica.com/place/Gwynedd

    Llywelyn married Joan Plantagenet, Lady of Wales 1203-1204. Joan (daughter of John I, King of England and Clemence Butler) was born ~ 1191, (France); died 2 Feb 1237. [Group Sheet]


  4. 19.  Joan Plantagenet, Lady of Wales was born ~ 1191, (France) (daughter of John I, King of England and Clemence Butler); died 2 Feb 1237.

    Other Events:

    • Residence: England
    • Also Known As: her Welsh name is Siwan
    • Also Known As: Lady of Snowdon

    Notes:

    Joan, Lady of Wales and Lady of Snowdon, also known by her Welsh name of Siwan, (c. 1191 – 2 February 1237) was the wife of Llywelyn the Great, Prince of Wales and Gwynedd, effective ruler of most of Wales.

    Early life

    Joan was a natural daughter of King John of England. She should not be confused with her half-sister, Joan, Queen consort of Scotland.

    Little is known about her early life. Her mother's name is known only from Joan's obituary in the Tewkesbury Annals, where she is called "Regina Clementina" (Queen Clemence); there is no evidence that her mother was in fact of royal blood. Joan may have been born in France, and probably spent part of her childhood there, as King John had her brought to the Kingdom of England from Normandy in December 1203 in preparation for her wedding to prince Llywelyn ab Iorwerth.

    Thomas Pennant, in "Tours in Wales", Volume 2, published London, 1810, writes : "It is said that Llewelyn the Great had near this place [Trefriw] a palace; ... The church of Trefriw was originally built by Llewelyn, for the ease of his princess, who before was obliged to go on foot to Llanrhychwyn, a long walk among the mountains."

    Marriage

    Joan married Llywelyn the Great between December 1203 and October 1204. The wedding was celebrated at St Werburgh's Abbey in Chester. She and Llywelyn had at least two children together:

    Elen ferch Llywelyn (Helen or Ellen) (1207–1253), married (1) John the Scot, Earl of Chester and (2) Robert II de Quincy
    Dafydd ap Llywelyn (c. 1212–1246) married Isabella de Braose, died at Abergwyngregyn.
    Some of Llywelyn's other recorded children may also have been Joan's:

    Gwladus Ddu (1206–1251), married (1) Reginald de Braose and (2) Ralph de Mortimer (had issue).
    Susanna, who was sent to England as a hostage in 1228.
    Angharad ferch Llywelyn
    Margaret, who married (1) Sir John de Braose (called 'Tadody'), the grandson of William de Braose, 4th Lord of Bramber. She married (2) Sir Walter de Clifford and had children by both husbands.[1]
    In April 1226 Joan obtained a papal decree from Pope Honorius III, declaring her legitimate on the basis that her parents had not been married to others at the time of her birth, but without giving her a claim to the English throne.[2]

    Adultery with William de Braose

    At Easter 1230, William de Braose, who was Llywelyn's prisoner at the time, was discovered with Joan in Llywelyn's bedchamber. William de Braose was hanged on 2 May 1230, according to local folklore at Abergwyngregyn; the place was known as 'Gwern y Grog'. A letter from Nicholas, Abbot of Vaudy, suggests that the execution took place at Crogen near Bala (crogi = to hang).[3]

    Joan was placed under house arrest for twelve months after the incident. She was then, according to the Chronicle of Chester, forgiven by Llywelyn, and restored to favour. She may have given birth to a daughter early in 1231.

    Joan was never called Princess of Wales, but, in Welsh, "Lady of Wales".

    Death and burial

    She died at the royal home at Abergwyngregyn, on the north coast of Gwynedd, in 1237. Llywelyn's great grief at her death is recorded; he founded a Franciscan friary on the seashore at Llanfaes, opposite the royal home, in her honour. The friary was consecrated in 1240, shortly before Llywelyn died. It was destroyed in 1537 by Henry VIII of England during the Dissolution of the Monasteries. A stone coffin originally identified as Joan's can be seen in St Mary's and St Nicholas's parish church, Beaumaris, Anglesey. Above the empty coffin is a slate panel inscribed: "This plain sarcophagus, (once dignified as having contained the remains of Joan, daughter of King John, and consort of Llewelyn ap Iowerth, Prince of North Wales, who died in the year 1237), having been conveyed from the Friary of Llanfaes, and alas, used for many years as a horsewatering trough, was rescued from such an indignity and placed here for preservation as well as to excite serious meditation on the transitory nature of all sublunary distinctions. By Thomas James Warren Bulkeley, Viscount Bulkeley, Oct 1808"


    The slate panel at Beaumaris
    In recent years, doubt has been cast on the identity of the woman depicted on the coffin lid, which is not thought to belong to the coffin on which it now rests. Experts have suggested that the costume and style of carving belong to a much later decade than the 1230s when Joan died, although the coronet suggests a member of the royal family. Eleanor de Montfort is considered the most likely alternative

    Children:
    1. 9. Marared ferch Llywelyn was born 0___ 1202, Gwynedd, Wales; died Aft 1268.
    2. Gwladus Ddu was born 0___ 1206, (Kingdom of Gwynedd, Wales); died 0___ 1251, Windsor, Berkshire, England.
    3. Dafydd ap Llywelyn, Prince of Wales was born 0Mar 1212, Castell Hen Blas, Coleshill, Bagillt in Flintshire, Wales; died 25 Feb 1246, Abergwyngregyn, Wales.
    4. Elen ferch Llywelyn was born 1212-1218, (Wales); died 0___ 1253.
    5. Angharad ferch Llywelyn was born ~ 1212, (Wales); died 0___ 1251.


Generation: 6

  1. 32.  William de Braose, Knight, 3rd Lord of Bramber was born 0___ 1135, (Bramber, Sussex, England) (son of Philip de Braose, Knight, 2nd Lord Bramber and Aanor de Totnes); died > 1179.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Sheriff of Hereford
    • Also Known As: William Bruce
    • Alt Birth: 0___ 1100, Bramber, Sussex, England
    • Alt Death: 21 Oct 1190, London, England

    Notes:

    William de Braose, 3rd Lord of Bramber (fl. 1135–1179) was a 12th-century Marcher lord who secured a foundation for the dominant position later held by the Braose family in the Welsh Marches. In addition to the family's English holdings in Sussex and Devon, William had inherited Radnor and Builth, in Wales, from his father Philip. By his marriage he increased the Braose Welsh holdings to include Brecon and Abergavenny.

    William remained loyal to King Stephen during the 12th-century period of civil war. He became a trusted royal servant during the subsequent reign of Henry II, accompanying the king on campaigns in France and Ireland. He served as sheriff of Herefordshire from 1173 until 1175. The family's power reached its peak under his son William during the reigns of King Richard I and King John.

    William de Braose, 3rd Lord of Bramber
    Lord of Bramber
    Died after 1179
    Noble family House of Braose
    Spouse(s) Bertha, daughter of Miles of Gloucester and Sibyl de Neufmarchâe
    Issue
    William de Braose, 4th Lord of Bramber
    Father Philip de Braose
    Mother Aenor de Totnes, daughter of Juhel of Totnes

    Lands and family

    William was the eldest son of Philip de Braose, lord of Bramber.[1] His mother was Aenor, daughter of Juhel of Totnes.[1] He was the third in the line of the Anglo-Norman Braose family founded by his grandfather, the first William de Braose.[1] After his father died in the 1130s William inherited lordships, land and castles in Sussex, with his caput at Bramber. He also held Totnes in Devon and Radnor and Builth in the Welsh Marches.[2] He confirmed the grants of his father and grandfather to the abbey of St Florent in Anjou and made further grants to the abbey's dependent priory at Sele in Sussex.[3] In about 1155, he also inherited through his mother's family one half of the honour of Barnstaple in Devon, paying a fee of 1000 marks for the privilege.[2] William became an internationally recognised figure. When Archbishop Theobald of Canterbury was asked by Pope Adrian IV to inquire into the background of a certain Walter, canon of St Ruf, his reply, dated to 1154/9 read:

    The facts which you demand need but little enquiry; for they shine so brightly in themselves that they cannot be hid; so great is the brilliance of his noble birth and the glory of all his kin. For Walter, as we know for a fact, was the son of a distinguished knight and born of a noble mother in lawful wedlock, and he is closely related by blood to the noble William de Braose.[4]

    William had married Bertha, daughter of Miles of Gloucester and Sibyl de Neufmarchâe, by 1150.[1] When each of Bertha's four brothers (Walter de Hereford, Henry FitzMiles (or Henry de Hereford), Mahel de Hereford and William de Hereford) died leaving no issue, William's marriage became unexpectedly valuable. He gained control of the lordships of Brecon and Abergavenny after 1166 when the last brother died.[1] These additional land holdings greatly expanded the territorial power and income of the Braose family. They now held a vast block of territory in the Welsh Marches as well as their extensive interests in Sussex and Devon. William's daughters were able to make good marriages, notably Sibyl to William de Ferrers, Earl of Derby.[5] Maud was married to John de Brompton of Shropshire.[6] William's son and heir, another William de Braose, became a major player in national politics under King John.[7]

    Royal service

    Empress Maud, the only legitimate living child of Henry I, landed in England in 1139 in an attempt to press her claim to the monarchy. She was soon besieged by King Stephen's forces at Arundel castle. Stephen allowed Maud a safe conduct to Bristol and provided her with an escort, which included William de Braose,[8] suggesting that he was an adherent of King Stephen. William was present as a witness when three charters were issued by Stephen at Lewes dated to the years 1148–53,[9] therefore it appears that he remained loyal to the king until the Treaty of Wallingford ended the hostilities.

    William was in Sussex in 1153,[nb 1] but he followed Duke Henry, soon to become King Henry II, to Normandy in 1154.[nb 2] William was frequently with the new king. He was one of the military leaders who supported Henry at Rhuddlan in 1157.[12] He witnessed one of the king's charters at Romsey in 1158,[13] and he is recorded at the king's court in Wiltshire in 1164 when the Constitutions of Clarendon were enacted.[14] He accompanied the king on expedition to France, witnessing at Leons[nb 3] in 1161 and Chinon in 1162. William is also documented on the Irish campaign at Dublin in 1171 and Wexford 1172.[15] William's younger brother, Philip, also accompanied the king to Ireland, and remained with the garrison at Wexford. In 1177 Philip was granted the kingdom of Limerick by Henry but failed to take possession after the citizens set fire to the town.[16]

    When Henry was facing war with his sons in 1173, William was appointed as sheriff of Herefordshire at Easter. He maintained the King's interests in Herefordshire until 1175.[1]

    Later life and death

    King Henry withdrew his favour from the family after William's son organised the murder of Seisyll ap Dyfnwal and other Welsh princes at Abergavenny in 1176.[17] There is little subsequent record of William in public life, and it is likely that he retired to his estates in Sussex. William died after 1179 and was succeeded by his son, William de Braose, 4th Lord of Bramber,[1] who gained the favour of both King Richard I and King John and became a dominant force in the Welsh Marches during their reigns.[18]

    end of biography

    William de Braose, 3rd lord of Bramber was a Marcher lord, active during the 12th century period of anarchy and the subsequent reign of Henry II. He served as sheriff of Herefordshire from 1173 to 1175.

    William was the eldest son of Philip de Braose, lord of Bramber. His mother was Aenor, daughter of Juhel of Totnes. He was the third in the line of the Anglo-Norman Braose family. After his father died in the 1130s William held lordships, land and castles in Sussex, with his caput at Bramber, also at Totnes in Devon and Radnor and Builth in the Welsh Marches. He confirmed the grants of his father and grandfather to the abbey of St Florent in Anjou and made further grants to the abbey's dependent priory at Sele in Sussex. About 1155, he also inherited through his mother's family one half of the honour of Barnstaple in Devon, paying a fee of 1000 marks for the privilege.

    William became an internationally recognised figure. When Archbishop Theobald of Canterbury was asked by Pope Adrian IV to inquire into the background of a certain Walter, canon of St Ruf, his reply, dated to 1154/9 read:

    "The facts which you demand need but little enquiry; for they shine so brightly in themselves that they cannot be hid; so great is the brilliance of his noble birth and the glory of all his kin. For Walter, as we know for a fact, was the son of a distinguished knight and born of a noble mother in lawful wedlock, and he is closely related by blood to the noble William de Braose."

    William had married Bertha, daughter of Miles of Gloucester by 1150. When each of Bertha's four brothers died leaving no issue William's marriage became unexpectedly valuable. He gained control of the lordships of Brecon and Abergavenny after 1166 when the last brother died. These additional land holdings greatly expanded the territorial power and income of the Braose family. They now held a vast block of territory in the Middle March as well as their extensive interests in Sussex and Devon. William's daughters were able to make good marriages, notably Sibyl to William de Ferrers, Earl of Derby. William's son and heir, became a major player in national politics under King John.

    Empress Maud landed in England in 1139 in an attempt to press her claim to the monarchy. She was soon besieged by King Stephen's forces at Arundel castle. Stephen allowed Maud a safe conduct to Bristol, and provided her with an escort which included William de Braose. Thus, at the start of this conflict, William was an adherent of King Stephen. He witnessed three charters with Stephen at Lewes dated by Davis as 1148/53 so it appears that he remained loyal to the king until the Treaty of Wallingford which ended the hostilities.

    William was in Sussex in 1153, but he followed Duke Henry, soon to become King Henry II, across to Normandy in 1154. William was frequently with the new king. He was one of the great men in the army at Rhuddlan in 1157. He witnessed one of the king's charters at Romsey in 1158 and he is recorded at the king's court in Wiltshire in 1164 when the Constitutions of Clarendon were enacted. He accompanied the king on expedition to France, witnessing at Leons, in 1161 and Chinon in 1162. William is also documented on the Irish campaign at Dublin in 1171 and Wexford 1172.

    When Henry was facing war with his sons in 1173, William was appointed as sheriff of Hereford at Easter. He maintained the King's interests in Herefordshire until 1175. King Henry withdrew his favour from the family after William's son organised the murder of Seisyll ap Dyfnwal and other Welsh princes at Abergavenny in 1175. There is little record of William in public life after this and it is likely that he retired to his estates in Sussex. It is at this time that the extensions were made to St. Mary's, Shoreham. (Pictured at top)

    (The above is an adaptation of the article I wrote for Wikipedia. Sources for the information given can be found there.)

    Father: Philip de Braose

    Mother: Aanor

    Married to Bertha, daughter of Miles of Gloucester, Earl of Hereford

    Child 1: William de Braose, 4th Lord of Bramber

    Child 2: Maud = John de Brompton

    Child 3: Sibilla = (1)William de Ferrers =(2)Adam de Port

    Child 4: John

    Child 5: Roger

    Roger is a witness to a charter of his brother William. (Dugdales "Monasticon" iv, p616)

    (Some sources give a daughter Bertha who married a Beauchamp. I believe this Bertha is a daughter of William de Braose, 4th Lord of Bramber. See her page for references.)

    end of biography

    William (de Braose) BRUCEPrint Family Tree William de /Braose/ , William de /Braose/


    Born in 1100 - Bramber, Sussex, England
    Deceased 21 October 1190 - London, England , age at death: 90 years old

    Parents

    Philip (de Braose) BRUCE, born in 1073 - Bramber, Sussex, England, Deceased in 1134 - Bramber, Sussex, England age at death: 61 years old
    Married in 1104, Barnstaple, Devon, England, to
    Aenor De TOTNES, born in 1084 - Barnstaple, Devon, England, Deceased in 1102 - Bramber, Sussex, England age at death: 18 years old

    Spouses, children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren

    Married in 1148, Herefordshire, England, to Bertha De PITRES, born in 1107 - Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England, Deceased - Bramber, Sussex, England (Parents : M Miles (Fitzwalter) De (1st Earl of Hereford) PITRES 1092-1143 & F Sybil (de Neufmarche) NEWMARCH 1092-1142) with
    F Bertha (de Braose) BRUCE ca 1145- married before 1180, Wales, to Gilbert De (Baron) MONMOUTH 1140-1190 with
    M John De (SIR - Lord of Monmouth) MONMOUTH ca 1180- married in 1202, Monmouth, Monmouthshire, Wales, to Cecily Waleran FitzWalter 1182-1222 with :
    F Joan Margaret De MONMOUTH ca 1201-1247
    M William De Monmouth

    John De (SIR - Lord of Monmouth) MONMOUTH ca 1180- married in April 1223, Monmouthshire, Wales, to Agnes de ** MUSCEGROS ca 1190- with :
    M Richard (de Wyesham) De MONMOUTH 1223/-
    M Walter De MONMOUTH 1223/-
    M John De (5th Lord of Monmouth) MONMOUTH 1225-1274

    Bertha (de Braose) BRUCE ca 1145- married before 1182, Bramber, Sussex, England, to Walter De BEAUCHAMP ca 1160-1235 with
    M James De BEAUCHAMP 1182-1233
    M Watchline De BEAUCHAMP 1184-1236 married to Joane De MORTIMER 1194-1268 with :
    M William De BEAUCHAMP 1210-1267
    F Matilda Maud (de Braose) ca 1146- married in 1168, England, to John De BRAMPTON ca 1136-1179 with
    M Brian De BRAMPTON 1168-1197 married in 1195, England, to Alice De Neufmenell 1172- with :
    M Brian De Brampton 1194-1262
    F Margaret (de Braose) (Lady Meath) BRUCE ca 1149- married 19 November 1200, Ewyas Harold, Herefordshire, England, to Walter De (Sir - Lord Meath) LACY ca 1150-1241 with
    F Petronilla De LACY 1195-1288 married to Ralph VI De (Lord Flamstead) TOENI 1190-1239 with :
    F Constance De TOENI ca 1220-1263
    M Roger Michaelmas De (Lord of Flamstead) TOENI 1235-1264
    F Gille Egidia De LACY 1202-1239 married 21 April 1225 to Richard Mor "The Great", De (1st Earl of Ulster) BURGH 1202-1242 with :
    M Walter De ( 1st Earl of Ulster, 2nd Lord of Cornaught) BURGH 1232-1271
    M Gilbert (Of Meath) De LACY 1206-1230 married in 1225, Norfolk, England, to Isabel BIGOD 1212-1250 with :
    F Margery De LACY ca 1232-1256
    F Sybil (de Braose) BRUCE /1151-1227 married to Philip (le Boteler) BUTLER 1157-1174 with
    F Clemence (le Boteler) BUTLER 1175-1231 married in 1188, England, to John (Lackland) (KING OF ENGLAND) PLANTAGENET 1166-1216 with :
    F Joan (Princess of WALES) PLANTAGENET 1190-1236

    Clemence (le Boteler) BUTLER 1175-1231 married in 1205 to Nicholas De (SIR - Baron of Alton, Lord of Farnham) VERDUN 1175- with :
    F Rohese De VERDUN 1204-1246
    M William (de Braose) BRUCE 1153-1211 married in 1174, Bramber, Sussex, England, to Maud (Matilda) De St VALERY 1155-1210 with
    F Matilda Maud (de Braose) 1160-1209 married in 1189 to Gruffydd Ap (Prince of South Wales) RHYS 1148-1201 with :
    M Owain Ap GRUFFYDD ca 1176-1235
    F Lleucu Verch GRUFFYDD 1202-1250
    M William (The Younger) de Braose) BRUCE 1175-1210 married in 1196, Kent, England, to Matilda De CLARE 1175-1213 with :
    F Matilda (de Braose) BRUCE ca 1195-1274
    M John (de Braose) (Lord of Bramber) BRUCE 1197-1232
    F Laurette (de Braose) BRUCE ca 1176-1266 married to Robert "Fitz-Parnell" HARCOURT ca 1156- with :
    M X Harcourt ca 1190-
    M Reginald (de Braose) BRUCE 1182-1227 married 19 March 1202, Bramber, Sussex, England, to Grecian Alice De BRIWERE 1186-1226 with
    F Matilda (de Braose) BRUCE ca 1200-1249 married in 1219, Carmarthenshire, Wales, to Rhys (Mechyll) Ap (Gryg ) RHYS 1174-1244 with :
    M Ieuan Ap RHYS ca 1220-
    F Gwenllian Verch RHYS ca 1225-1268
    M William "Black William" (de Braose) BRUCE 1204-1230 married 2 May 1230, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales, to Eve (Baroness of Abergavenny) MARSHALL 1194-1246 with :
    M William (de Braose) BRUCE 1210-1292
    F Isabella (de Braose) BRUCE 1220/-
    F Eva (de Braose) BRUCE 1220-1255
    F Maud (de Braose) (BARONESS WIGMORE) BRUCE 1226-1300

    Siblings
    F Maud (de Braose) BRUCE 1109-1200 Married about 1130, Wales, to William De BEAUCHAMP 1105-1170

    Paternal grand-parents, uncles and aunts
    M William de (Braose) BRUCE 1049-1093 married (1072)
    F Agnes De SAINT CLARE 1034-1080
    M Philip (de Braose) BRUCE 1073-1134
    married (1104)
    2 children

    Maternal grand-parents, uncles and aunts
    M Juhel De TOTNES 1049-1123 married (1083)
    F ** De PICQUIGNY 1060-1145
    F Aenor De TOTNES 1084-1102
    married (1104)
    2 children


    Timeline
    1100 : Birth - Bramber, Sussex, England
    1112 : Birth - Bramber, Sussex, England

    Sources: Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Millennium File - Heritage Consulting - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2003.Original data - Heritage Consulting. The Millennium File. Salt Lake City, UT, USA: Heritage Consulting.Original data: Heritage Consulting. The Millennium File. Salt Lake City, UT, USA: - 1,7249::0
    Note http://search.Ancestry.com.au/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=millind&h=1077681&ti=5544&indiv=try&gss=pt - Birth date: 1126 Birth place: Briouze, Normandy, France Death date: 1192-3 Death place: - 1,7249::1077681
    1126 : Birth - Briouze, Orne, Basse-Normandie, France
    Sources: Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - Millennium File - Heritage Consulting - Ancestry.com Operations Inc - 1,7249::0 - 1,7249::1077681
    1148 : Marriage (with Bertha De PITRES) - Herefordshire, England
    before 1190 : LORD of BRAMBER
    21 October 1190 : Death - London, England
    1192 : Death - England
    Sources: Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Millennium File - Heritage Consulting - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2003.Original data - Heritage Consulting. The Millennium File. Salt Lake City, UT, USA: Heritage Consulting.Original data: Heritage Consulting. The Millennium File. Salt Lake City, UT, USA: - 1,7249::0
    Note http://search.Ancestry.com.au/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=millind&h=1077681&ti=5544&indiv=try&gss=pt - Birth date: 1126 Birth place: Briouze, Normandy, France Death date: 1192-3 Death place: - 1,7249::1077681
    1192 : Death
    Age: 66
    Sources: Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - Millennium File - Heritage Consulting - Ancestry.com Operations Inc - 1,7249::0 - 1,7249::1077681


    Notes
    Individual Note
    Source: Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Millennium File - Heritage Consulting - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2003.Original data - Heritage Consulting. The Millennium File. Salt Lake City, UT, USA: Heritage Consulting.Original data: Heritage Consulting. The Millennium File. Salt Lake City, UT, USA: - 1,7249::0
    http://search.Ancestry.com.au/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=millind&h=1077681&ti=5544&indiv=try&gss=pt Birth date: 1126 Birth place: Briouze, Normandy, France Death date: 1192-3 Death place: 1,7249::1077681
    Source: Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - Millennium File - Heritage Consulting - Ancestry.com Operations Inc - 1,7249::0 1,7249::1077681


    Sources
    Individual: Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Ancestry Family Trees - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members. - This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created. - Ancestry Family Trees - http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=18829447&pid=8845

    Family Tree Preview
    Ancestry Chart Descendancy Chart Printable Family Tree
    _____| 16_ Rognvald Wolfs (of Orkey) BRUCE /1000-1046
    _____| 8_ Robert BRUCE 1030-1094
    _____| 4_ William de (Braose) BRUCE 1049-1093
    / \ _____| 18_ Alan III De (Count of Brittany) RENNES 1000-1040
    |2_ Philip (de Braose) BRUCE 1073-1134
    | \ _____| 20_ Mauger (de St Claire) (Seigneur) NORMANDY ca 990-1017
    | \ _____| 10_ Waldron De St CLARE 1015-1047
    | \ _____| 22_ Richard De NORMANDY 1001-1028
    |--1_ William (de Braose) BRUCE 1100-1190
    | _____| 12_ Alured De TOTNES 1015-1080
    | /
    | _____| 6_ Juhel De TOTNES 1049-1123
    | / \
    |3_ Aenor De TOTNES 1084-1102
    \
    \ _____| 14_ Arnoul De PICQUIGNY 1020-1055
    \ /
    \

    end of profile

    Name: William DE BRAOSE
    Sex: M
    Birth: 1105 in Bramber, Sussex, England
    ALIA: William de BRAOSE Lord of Bramber
    Title: Lord of Bramber
    Death: BET 1192 AND 1193 in Bramber, Sussex, England
    Note:
    Dec 08 from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_de_Braose,_3rd_Lord_of_Bramber -

    William de Braose, Third Lord of Bramber (born 1112 in Brecon) (d. ca. 1192) was the eldest son of Philip de Braose, Second Lord of Bramber.

    Family and early career
    William was born into a second generation English Norman dynasty holding Lordships and land in Sussex at Bramber, also at Totnes in Devon and Radnor and Builth in the Welsh Marches of Wales. He maintained his Sussex lands and titles and extended St Mary's, Shoreham and contributed to a priory at Sele, West Sussex. His mother was Aenor Fitz Judhel of Totnes.

    He also inherited one half of the honour of Barnstaple in Devon, paying a fee of 1000 marks for the privilege.

    William married Bertha de Pitres, also known as Bertha de Hereford, daughter of Miles of Gloucester, Earl of Hereford. Through this marriage, William acquired lordships of Brecon and Abergavenny in 1166 because Bertha's four brothers all died young without heirs.

    These vast land holdings greatly expanded the territorial power and income of the de Braose dynasty. They now held the Middle March with extensive interests in Sussex and Devon.

    William's younger brother Phillip accompanied King Henry II to Ireland, receiving in 1172 the honour of Limerick.

    Marcher titles
    In 1174, William became sheriff of Hereford. He died in about 1192 and was succeeded as Lord of Bramber by his son, William. He had also fathered two daughters, Maud and Sibilla, who married well and possibly a later son, named John.

    Nov 09 from http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~hwbradley/aqwg825.htm#13602 -

    William de BRAOSE Lord of Bramber [Parents] 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 was born 1105 in Bramber, Sussex, England. He died 8 1192/1193 in Bramber, Sussex, England. William married Bertha of HEREFORD on 1146 in Bramber, Sussex, England.

    Bertha of HEREFORD [Parents] 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 was born 1128 in Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England. She married William de BRAOSE Lord of Bramber on 1146 in Bramber, Sussex, England.

    They had the following children:

    F i Bertha de BRAOSE was born 1147.
    M ii William de BRAOSE Baron de Braose was born 1149 and died 9 Aug 1211.
    F iii Mabel de BRAOSE was born 1151 and died 1203.
    F iv Sybil de BRAOSE was born 1153 and died after 5 Feb 1228.
    M v John de BRAOSE 1 was born 1160 in Bramber, Sussex, England.

    1Weis, Frederick Lewis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (7th ed., Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1992.), 177-5, 194-5, 222-28, Los Angeles Public Library, Gen 974 W426 1992.

    2Cokayne, George Edward, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct, or Dormant (London: St. Catherine Press, 1910.), 11:321, Los Angeles Public Library, 929.721 C682.

    3Cokayne, G., CP, 1:21-22, 14:6.

    4Sanders, Ivor John, English Baronies: A Study of Their Origin and Descent, 1086-1327 (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1960.), pp. 7, 21, 105, Los Angeles Public Library, 929.722 S215.

    5Keats-Rohan, K.S.B., Domesday Descendants: A Prosopography of Persons Occurring in English Documents 1066-1166 (Rochester, New York: The Boydell Press, 2002.), pp. 346-7, Library of Congress, DA177 .K4 2002.

    6Cokayne, G., CP, 1:21e.

    7Curfman, Robert Joseph, "The Yale Descent from Braiose & Clare through Pigott of Buckinghamshire," The American Genealogist 56:1 (Jan 1980), pp. 1-2, Los Angeles Public Library.

    8Sanders, I., English Baronies, p. 7.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Bertha of HEREFORD

    1Weis, Frederick Lewis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (7th ed., Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1992.), 177-5, 194-5, 222-28, Los Angeles Public Library, Gen 974 W426 1992.

    2Cokayne, George Edward, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct, or Dormant (London: St. Catherine Press, 1910.), 1:21-2, 11:321, Los Angeles Public Library, 929.721 C682.

    3Sanders, Ivor John, English Baronies: A Study of Their Origin and Descent, 1086-1327 (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1960.), pp. 7, 21, Los Angeles Public Library, 929.722 S215.

    4Keats-Rohan, K.S.B., Domesday Descendants: A Prosopography of Persons Occurring in English Documents 1066-1166 (Rochester, New York: The Boydell Press, 2002.), pp. 346-7, Library of Congress, DA177 .K4 2002.

    5Curfman, Robert Joseph, "The Yale Descent from Braiose & Clare through Pigott of Buckinghamshire," The American Genealogist 56:1 (Jan 1980), p. 2, Los Angeles Public Library.




    Father: Philip DE BRAOSE b: 1074 in Briouze-Saint-Gervais, Orne, Basse-Nomandie, France
    Mother: Aenor DE TOTENEIS b: 1084 in Totnes, Devon, England

    Marriage 1 BERTHA b: 1128 in Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England
    Married: 1146 in Bramber, Sussex, England
    Children
    Has Children William DE BRAOSE b: 1149 in Bramber, Sussex, England
    Has Children Mabel DE BRAOSE b: 1151 in Bramber, Sussex, England
    Has Children Sybil DE BRAOSE b: 1153 in Bramber, Sussex, England
    Has Children Bertha DE BRAOSE b: 1147 in Bramber, Sussex, England

    end of biography

    William married Bertha of Hereford 0___ 1148, Herefordshire, England. Bertha (daughter of Miles of Gloucester, Knight, 1st Earl of Hereford and Sibyl de Neufmarche, Countess of Hereford, daughter of Bernard de Neufmarche, Lord of Brecknockshire and Nest Verch Osborn le Scrope) was born 0___ 1107, Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England; died ~ 1180, Bramber, Sussex, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 33.  Bertha of Hereford was born 0___ 1107, Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England (daughter of Miles of Gloucester, Knight, 1st Earl of Hereford and Sibyl de Neufmarche, Countess of Hereford, daughter of Bernard de Neufmarche, Lord of Brecknockshire and Nest Verch Osborn le Scrope); died ~ 1180, Bramber, Sussex, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Bertha de Pitres
    • Also Known As: Lady of Abergavenny
    • Also Known As: Lady of Bramber
    • Also Known As: Lady of Hay

    Notes:

    Bertha of Hereford, also known as Bertha de Pitres (born c.1130), was the daughter of Miles de Gloucester, 1st Earl of Hereford, and a wealthy heiress, Sibyl de Neufmarchâe. She was the wife of William de Braose, 3rd Lord of Bramber to whom she brought many castles and Lordships, including Brecknock, Abergavenny, and Hay.

    Family

    Bertha was born in England in about 1130. She was a daughter of Miles, Earl of Hereford (1097- 24 December 1143) and Sibyl de Neufmarchâe.[1] She had two sisters, Margaret of Hereford,[2] who married Humphrey II de Bohun, by whom she had issue,[3] and Lucy of Hereford, who married Herbert FitzHerbert of Winchester, by whom she had issue.[citation needed] Her brothers, included Roger Fitzmiles, 2nd Earl of Hereford, Walter de Hereford, Henry Fitzmiles, William de Hereford, and Mahel de Hereford.[4]

    Her paternal grandparents were Walter FitzRoger de Pitres,Sheriff of Gloucester and Bertha de Balun of Bateden,[5] a descendant of Hamelin de Balun,[citation needed] and her maternal grandparents were Bernard de Neufmarchâe, Lord of Brecon, and Nesta ferch Osbern.[6] The latter was a daughter of Osbern FitzRichard of Richard's Castle, and Nesta ferch Gruffydd.[7] Bertha was a direct descendant, in the maternal line, of Gruffydd ap Llywelyn (1007- 5 August 1063) and Edith (Aldgyth), daughter of Elfgar, Earl of Mercia.[citation needed]

    Her father Miles served as Constable to King Stephen of England. He later served in the same capacity to Empress Matilda after he'd transferred his allegiance. In 1141, she made him Earl of Hereford in gratitude for his loyalty. On 24 December 1143, he was killed whilst on a hunting expedition in the Forest of Dean.[8]

    Marriage and issue

    Abergavenny Castle in Monmouthshire, Wales, was one of the castles Bertha of Hereford brought to her husband William de Braose, 3rd Lord of Bramber
    In 1150, she married William de Braose, 3rd Lord of Bramber (1112–1192), son of Philip de Braose, 2nd Lord of Bramber and Aenor, daughter of Judael of Totnes. William and Bertha had three daughters and two sons, including William de Braose, 4th Lord of Bramber.

    In 1173, her brothers all having died without issue, she brought the Lordships and castles of Brecknock and Abergavenny, to her husband.[8] Hay Castle had already passed to her from her mother, Sibyl of Neufmarche in 1165, whence it became part of the de Braose holdings.

    In 1174, her husband became Sheriff of Hereford.

    Her children include

    William de Braose, 4th Lord of Bramber, (1144/1153- 11 August 1211, Corbeil),[9][10] married Maud de St. Valery, daughter of Bernard de St. Valery, by whom he had 16 children.
    Roger de Braose[11]
    Bertha de Braose[12] (born 1151), married c.1175, Walter de Beauchamp (died 1235), son of William de Beauchamp and Joan de Walerie, by whom she had issue, including Walcherine de Beauchamp who married Joan Mortimer.
    Sibyl de Braose (died after 5 February 1227),[13] married William de Ferrers, 3rd Earl of Derby (1136- 21 October 1190 at Acre on crusade), son of Robert de Ferrers, 2nd Earl of Derby and Margaret Peverel, by whom she had issue.
    Maud de Braose, married John de Brompton, by whom she had issue.[citation needed]

    Legacy

    Bertha died on an unknown date. She was the ancestress of many noble English families which included the de Braoses, de Beauchamps, de Bohuns and de Ferrers; as well as the Irish families of de Lacy and de Burgh.[14][not in citation given]

    end of biography

    Children:
    1. Sybil de Braose was born Bef 1151, Bramber, Sussex, England; died 5 Feb 1227, Derbyshire, England.
    2. Mabel de Braose was born 0___ 1151, Bramber, Sussex, England; died 0___ 1203, (Axholme, Lincolnshire, England).
    3. 16. William de Braose, III, Knight, 4th Lord of Bramber was born 0___ 1153, Bramber, Sussex, England; died 9 Aug 1211, Corbeil, Marne, Champagne-Ardenne, France; was buried 0___ 1211, Seine-et-Marne, Île-de-France, France.
    4. Reginald de Braose, Knight was born 0___ 1162, (Bramber, West Sussex, England); died BY 1228; was buried Saint John's, Brecon, Wales.

  3. 38.  John I, King of EnglandJohn I, King of England was born 24 Dec 1166, Beaumont Palace, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England (son of Henry II, King of England and Eleanore de Aquitaine, Queen of England); died 19 Oct 1216, Newark Castle, Nottinghamshire, England; was buried 19 Oct 1216, Worcester Cathedral, Worcester, Warwickshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Johan sanz Terre
    • Also Known As: John de Normandie, King of England
    • Also Known As: John I, King of England
    • Also Known As: John Lackland
    • Also Known As: John Plantagenet, King of England

    Notes:

    John (24 December 1166 - 19 October 1216), also known as John Lackland (Norman French: Johan sanz Terre),[1] was King of England from 6 April 1199 until his death in 1216.

    Following the battle of Bouvines, John lost the duchy of Normandy to King Philip II of France, which resulted in the collapse of most of the Angevin Empire and contributed to the subsequent growth in power of the Capetian dynasty during the 13th century.

    The baronial revolt at the end of John's reign led to the sealing of the Magna Carta, a document sometimes considered to be an early step in the evolution of the constitution of the United Kingdom.

    more on King John ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John,_King_of_England

    More images of King John ...

    https://www.google.com/search?q=john+lackland+coat+of+arms&rlz=1C1KMZB_enUS591US591&espv=2&biw=1440&bih=810&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiNnKWp6aPPAhULXB4KHb1qCnQQsAQIKw&dpr=1#imgrc=F8SAOkDV1jsAEM%3A

    *

    Baronial Order of Magna Charta:

    The Baronial Order of Magna Charta ("BOMC") is a scholarly, charitable, and lineage society founded in 1898. The BOMC was originally named the Baronial Order of Runnemede, but the name was subsequently changed to better reflect the organization's purposes relating to the Magna Charta and the promulgation of "freedom of man under the rule of law." view its membership list: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baronial_Order_of_Magna_Charta

    These 25 barons were Sureties for the concessions made by John, King of England, d. 18 Oct 1216.

    1. William d'Albini, Lord of Belvoir Castle, d. 1236.
    ((26th, 27th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Vernia Swindell "Ma" Byars;
    24th, 25th & 26th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Jesse D Hennessee: http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=&secondpersonID=I3&maxrels=12&disallowspouses=0&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I46884

    2. Roger Bigod, (43132) Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk, d. 1220.
    (26th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Perry Green "Pop" Byars: http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=&secondpersonID=I3&maxrels=6&disallowspouses=1&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I43132

    3. Hugh Bigod, (43271) heir to the earldoms of Norfolk and Suffolk, d. 1225.
    (25th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Perry Green "Pop" Byars: http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=I3&secondpersonID=&maxrels=6&disallowspouses=1&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I43271

    4. Henry de Bohun, Earl of Hereford, (46127) d. 1220.
    (26th, 27th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Vernia Swindell "Ma" Byars;
    25th & 26th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Jesse D Hennessee: http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=&secondpersonID=I3&maxrels=6&disallowspouses=1&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I46127


    5. Richard de Clare, Earl of Hertford, (46129) d. 1217.
    (25th, 26th & 27th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Vernia Swindell "Ma" Byars: http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=I3&secondpersonID=&maxrels=6&disallowspouses=1&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I46129

    6. Gilbert de Clare, heir to the earldom of Hertford, (45550) d. 1230.
    (24th, 26th & 27th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Vernia Swindell "Ma" Byars;
    25th & 27th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Perry Green "Pop" Byars;
    24th & 25th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Jesse D Hennessee: http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=I3&secondpersonID=&maxrels=16&disallowspouses=1&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I45550

    John FitzRobert, Lord of Warkworth Castle, Northumberland, d. 1240.

    7. Robert FitzWalter, Lord of Dunmow Castle, Essex, d. 1234.
    (28th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Perry Green "Pop" Byars)

    William de Fortibus, Earl of Albemarle, d. 1241, no great-grandchildren.
    William Hardell, Mayor of the City of London, d. after 1216, no known issue.
    William de Huntingfield, Sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk, d. 1220.
    John de Lacie, Lord of Pontefract Castle, d. 1240.
    William de Lanvallei, Lord of Standway Castle, Essex, d. 1217.
    William Malet, Sheriff of Somerset and Dorset, d. about 1217.
    Geoffrey de Mandeville, Earl of Essex and Gloucester, d. 1216, d.s.p..

    William Marshall jr, heir to the earldom of Pembroke, d. 1231, (43947) d.s.p..
    A cousin to the grandchildren of Vernia Swindell "Ma" Byars & Perry Green "Pop" Byars: http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=I3&secondpersonID=&maxrels=6&disallowspouses=1&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I43947

    Roger de Montbegon, Lord of Hornby Castle, Lancashire, d. 1226, d.s.p..
    Richard de Montfichet, Baron, d. after 1258, d.s.p..

    8.. William de Mowbray, Lord of Axholme Castle, Lincolnshire, (46138) d. 1223
    (24th & 26th great grandfather to the grandchildren of Vernia Swindell "Ma" Byars: http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=&secondpersonID=I3&maxrels=6&disallowspouses=1&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I46138

    Richard de Percy, Baron, Yorkshire, d. 1244, d.s.p..

    9.Saire de Quincey, Earl of Winchester, (46162) d. 1219.
    (25th & 27th great grandfather to the grandchildren of Vernia Swindell "Ma" Byars;
    25th & 26th great grandfather to the grandchildren of Jesse D Hennessee;
    27th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Perry Green "Pop" Byars: http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=I3&secondpersonID=&maxrels=6&disallowspouses=1&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I46162

    10. Robert de Roos, Lord of Hamlake Castle, Yorkshire, (46148)d. 1226.
    (25th, 26th & 27th great grandfather to the grandchildren of Vernia Swindell "Ma" Byars: http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=&secondpersonID=I3&maxrels=12&disallowspouses=1&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I46148

    Geoffrey de Saye, Baron, d. 1230.

    11. Robert de Vere, heir to the earldom of Oxford, d. 1221.
    (25th, 27th great grandfather to the grandchildren of Vernia Swindell "Ma" Byars;
    25th, 26th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Jesse D Hennessee;
    27th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Perry Green "Pop" Byars; http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=&secondpersonID=I3&maxrels=12&disallowspouses=1&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I46155

    Eustace de Vesci, Lord of Alnwick Castle, Northumberland, d. 1216 d.s.p..

    Birth:
    Beaumont Palace, built outside the north gate of Oxford, was intended by Henry I about 1130 to serve as a royal palace conveniently close to the royal hunting-lodge at Woodstock (now part of the park of Blenheim Palace). Its former presence is recorded in Beaumont Street, Oxford. Set into a pillar on the north side of the street, near Walton Street, is a stone with the inscription: "Near to this site stood the King's Houses later known as Beaumont Palace. King Richard I was born here in 1157 and King John in 1167". The "King's House" was the range of the palace that contained the king's lodgings.

    Henry passed Easter 1133 in the nova aula, his "new hall" at Beaumont in great pomp, celebrating the birth of his grandson, the future Henry II.[1] Edward I was the last king to sojourn in Beaumont officially as a palace, and in 1275 he granted it to an Italian lawyer, Francesco Accorsi, who had undertaken diplomatic missions for him.[2] When Edward II was put to flight at the battle of Bannockburn in 1314, he is said to have invoked the Virgin Mary and vowed to found a monastery for the Carmelites (the White Friars) if he might escape safely. In fulfilment of his vow he remanded Beaumont Palace to the Carmelites in 1318.

    In 1318, the Palace was the scene for the beginnings of the John Deydras affair, in which a royal pretender, arguing that he was the rightful king of England, claimed the Palace for his own. John Deydras was ultimately executed for sedition.[3]


    When the White Friars were disbanded at the Reformation, most of the structure was dismantled and the building stone reused in Christ Church and St John's College.[4] An engraving of 1785[5] shows the remains of Beaumont Palace, the last of which were destroyed in the laying out of Beaumont Street in 1829.[6]

    Drawings, Sketches & Source ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beaumont_Palace

    Buried:
    Worcester Cathedral, before the English Reformation known as Worcester Priory, is an Anglican cathedral in Worcester, England; situated on a bank overlooking the River Severn. It is the seat of the Bishop of Worcester. Its official name is The Cathedral Church of Christ and the Blessed Mary the Virgin of Worcester. Built between 1084 and 1504, Worcester Cathedral represents every style of English architecture from Norman to Perpendicular Gothic.

    It is famous for its Norman crypt and unique chapter house, its unusual Transitional Gothic bays, its fine woodwork and its "exquisite" central tower,[1] which is of particularly fine proportions.

    Images, History & Source ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Worcester_Cathedral

    Died:
    Newark Castle, in Newark, in the English county of Nottinghamshire was founded in the mid 12th century by Alexander, Bishop of Lincoln. Originally a timber castle, it was rebuilt in stone towards the end of the century. Dismantled in the 17th century after the English Civil War, the castle was restored in the 19th century, first by Anthony Salvin in the 1840s and then by the corporation of Newark who bought the site in 1889. The Gilstrap Heritage Centre is a free-admission museum in the castle grounds about the history of the town of Newark.

    Images & Source ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newark_Castle,_Nottinghamshire

    John married Clemence Butler 0___ 1188, England. Clemence (daughter of Philip Butler and Sybil de Braose) was born 0___ 1175; died 0___ 1231. [Group Sheet]


  4. 39.  Clemence Butler was born 0___ 1175 (daughter of Philip Butler and Sybil de Braose); died 0___ 1231.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Clemence Boteler

    Children:
    1. 19. Joan Plantagenet, Lady of Wales was born ~ 1191, (France); died 2 Feb 1237.


Generation: 7

  1. 64.  Philip de Braose, Knight, 2nd Lord Bramber was born 0___ 1073, Bramber, West Sussex, England (son of William de Braose, Knight, 1st Lord of Bramber and (Eve de Boissey)); died 1131-1139, Bramber, Sussex, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Lord of Builth and Radnor

    Notes:

    Born 1065 at the latest.
    Died between 1131 and 1139

    Philip is recorded as consenting to his father's gifts to his canons at St Nicholas church at Bramber in 1073. He confirmed those gifts to the abbey of St Florent in 1096 after the death of his father.

    Old Shoreham was part of Philip's demesne lands where St Nicolas church (right) had stood since Saxon times. Philip expanded trade in the area by founding the port of New Shoreham.

    He became the first Braose Lord of Builth and Radnor, the family's initial holding in the Welsh Marches.

    Orderic Vitalis (Ecclesiastical History of England and Normandy, Book IX, Chapter IV) relates that Philip submitted his fortress in Normandy to King William II in 1096 and supported the king against his brother Robert Curthose, Duke of Normandy. But, like Robert, Philip may have left Normandy at this time and joined the First Crusade to the Holy Land, returning in 1103. There is evidence in charters that Philip journeyed to the Holy Land but the date of his visit is uncertain.

    Philip's lands were confiscated by Henry I in 1110, due to his traitrous support of William, son of Robert Curthose, but they were returned in 1112.

    Father: William de Braose, 1st Lord of Bramber

    Mother: Eve de Boissey (probably)

    There are charters where Robert de Harcourt's sons, Philip and Richard, refer to Philip de Braose as "patruus" - paternal uncle. This lends weight to the theory that Robert de Harcourt and Philip de Braose were both sons of Eve de Boissey. In another record dated 1103 (Pipe Roll Soc. Vol 71 no 544) it is stated that Philip de Braose was represented by "his brother Robert, the son of Anketill".

    Philip's sealPhilip was married to Aanor, daughter of Judael (Johel) of Totnes.

    Child 1: William de Braose, 3rd Lord of Bramber

    Child 2: Philip

    Child 3: Basilia

    Child 4: Gillian

    Child 5: A daughter who married William de Tregoz, the father of Philip de Tregoz who was sheriff of Sussex in 1190. (see evidence here and here )

    Philip married Aanor de Totnes 0___ 1104, Barnstaple, Devonshire, England. Aanor was born 0___ 1084, Barnstaple, Devonshire, England; died Barnstaple, Devonshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 65.  Aanor de Totnes was born 0___ 1084, Barnstaple, Devonshire, England; died Barnstaple, Devonshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Aenor De TOTNES

    Children:
    1. 32. William de Braose, Knight, 3rd Lord of Bramber was born 0___ 1135, (Bramber, Sussex, England); died > 1179.

  3. 66.  Miles of Gloucester, Knight, 1st Earl of Hereford was born 1092-1100, Gloucestershire, England; died 24 Dec 1143.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Constable of England
    • Occupation: High Sheriff of Gloucester
    • Also Known As: Lord Brecknock
    • Also Known As: Miles FitzWalter de Pitres

    Notes:

    Miles FitzWalter of Gloucester, 1st Earl of Hereford, Lord of Brecknock (died 24 December 1143) was High Sheriff of Gloucester and Constable of England.[a]

    Biography

    Miles was the son and heir of Walter of Gloucester, hereditary castellan of Gloucester and sheriff of Gloucester, by Berta, his wife.[1] Miles' grandfather, Roger de Pitres, had been sheriff from about 1071, then was succeeded by his brother Durand, the Domesday sheriff, before 1083.[2] Durand was succeeded by his nephew Walter of Gloucester, c.?1096, who was sheriff in 1097 and in 1105–1106.[2] Walter was in favour with Henry I, three of whose charters to him are extant.[3] Walter held the post of a Constable of England. Early in 1121 his son Miles was given the hand of Sibyl, daughter of Bernard de Neufmarchâe, the conqueror of Brecknock, with the reversion of her father's possessions.[3] In the Pipe Roll of 1130 Walter is found to have been succeeded by his son,[4] having died in or around 1126.[5]

    Miles was (from 1128 at least) sheriff of Gloucestershire, a justice itinerant, and a justice of the forest,[6] and by 1130 was sheriff of Staffordshire.[5] He had also (though the fact has been doubted) been granted his father's office of constable by a special charter.[7] In conjunction with Pain Fitzjohn, sheriff of Herefordshire and Shropshire, he ruled the whole Welsh border "from the Severn to the sea".[8]

    On his accession, King Stephen set himself to secure the allegiance of these two lords-marchers, who at length, on receiving a safe-conduct and obtaining all they asked for, did him homage.[8] It was at Reading that they met the king early in 1136.[b] Miles is next found attending the Easter court at Westminster as one of the royal constables,[9] and, shortly after, the Oxford council in the same capacity.[10] He was then despatched to the aid of the widow of Richard fitz Gilbert de Clare, who was beleaguered in her castle by the Welsh and whom he gallantly rescued.[11]

    Meanwhile, Miles had married his son and heir, Roger, to Cecily, daughter of Pain Fitzjohn, who inherited the bulk of her father's possessions.[12] In the same year 1136 Miles transferred the original house of Augustinian canons at Llanthony Priory, Monmouthshire to a site on the south side of Gloucester, which they named Llanthony Secunda.[13][14]

    Two years later (1138) Miles received, in his official capacity, King Stephen at Gloucester in May.[15] He has been said to have renounced his allegiance a few weeks later,[16] but careful investigation will show that he was with Stephen in August (1138) at the siege of Shrewsbury, and that his defection did not take place till 1139.[17]

    In February 1139 Stephen gave Gloucester Abbey to Miles's kinsman Gilbert Foliot at his request.[18] In the summer of 1139, however, he joined his lord, Robert, Earl of Gloucester, in inviting Empress Matilda to England.[19] On her arrival Miles met her at Bristol, welcomed her to Gloucester, recognised her as his rightful sovereign, and became thenceforth her ardent supporter. She at once gave him St. Briavels Castle and the Forest of Dean.[17]

    Miles's first achievement on behalf of Matilda was to relieve Brian Fitz Count who was blockaded in Wallingford Castle.[20] In November (1139) he again advanced from Gloucester and attacked and burnt Worcester.[21] He also captured the castles of Winchcombe, Cerne, and Hereford.[22] Meanwhile, he was deprived by Stephen of his office of constable.[23] He took part in the victory at Lincoln (2 February 1141),[24] and on the consequent triumph of the empress he accompanied her in her progress, and was one of her three chief followers on her entry (2 March) into Winchester.[25] He was with her at Reading when she advanced on London,[26] and on reaching St. Albans Matilda bestowed on him a house at Westminster.[27] He was among those who fled with her from London shortly after, and it was on his advice, when they reached Gloucester, that she ventured back to Oxford.[28] There, on 25 July 1141, she bestowed on him the town and castle of Hereford and made him earl of that shire,[29] as well as the forests of the Hay of Hereford and Trinela[30] in avowed consideration of his faithful service. With singular unanimity hostile chroniclers testify to his devotion to her cause.[22] He even boasted that she had lived at his expense throughout her stay in England.[31]

    As "Earl Miles" he now accompanied her to Winchester,[32] and on the rout of her forces on 14 September 1141 he escaped, with the greatest difficulty, to Gloucester, where he arrived "exhausted, alone, and with scarcely a rag to his back".[33] Towards the end of the year he was in Bristol making a grant to Llanthony Priory in the presence of the Empress Matilda and the Robert, Earl of Gloucester.[34] In 1142 he is proved by charters to have been with the Empress at Oxford and to have received her permission to hold Abergavenny Castle of Brian Fitz Count.[35] It is probably to the summer of this year that he made a formal deed of alliance with the Earl of Gloucester, and as a hostage for the performance of which he gave the Earl his son Mahel.[17]

    In 1143 his pressing want of money wherewith to pay his troops led him to demand large sums from the church lands. Robert de Bethune, Bishop of Hereford, withstood his demands, and, on the Earl invading his lands, excommunicated him and his followers, and laid the diocese under interdict.[36] The Earl's kinsman, Gilbert Foliot (Abbot of Gloucester),[37] appealed to the legate on his behalf against the bishop's severity.[38] On Christmas-eve of this year (1143) the Earl was slain while hunting by an arrow shot at a deer.[39] A dispute at once arose for possession of his body between the canons of Llanthony and the monks of Gloucester. The case was heard before the bishops of Worcester, Hereford, and St. David's, and was terminated by a compromise on 28 December. The Earl was then buried in the chapter-house at Llanthony.[40]

    With his death in 1143, Miles was succeeded by his son and heir, Roger.[17] Roger died without an heir twelve years later in 1155 so the Earldom of Hereford became extinct, but the shrievalty of Hereford and Gloucester passed to his brother Walter. On the death of the latter and two other brothers without issue the family possessions passed to their sisters, Bertha through her marriage bringing Abergavenny to Braose, but Margaret, the eldest sister, taking the bulk (Liber Niger) to the Bohuns afterwards (1199), in recognition of their descent from Miles, earls of Hereford, and constables of England.[41]

    Assessment

    John of Salisbury classes him with Geoffrey de Mandeville and others who were non tam comites regni quam hostes publici. The charge is justified by his public policy; but the materials for appraising his personal character do not exist.[42]

    Family

    In 1121, Miles married Sibyl de Neufmarchâe, daughter of Bernard de Neufmarchâe, Lord of Brecon and Nest, granddaughter of Gruffydd ap Llywelyn.[43] Miles and Sybil's children where:

    Margaret of Hereford,[5][44] married Humphrey II de Bohun, by whom she had issue.
    Bertha of Hereford,[45] married William de Braose before 1150, by whom she had issue.
    Roger Fitzmiles, 2nd Earl of Hereford.[46] Hereditary Sheriff of Gloucestershire until 1155.
    Walter de Hereford[46] died after 1159 in the Holy Land. He was hereditary Sheriff of Gloucestershire in 1155–1157 and High Sheriff of Herefordshire in 1155–1159.
    Henry Fitzmiles Henry of Hereford,[44] died 12 April 1165. He succeeded to the title of Baron Abergavenny in 1141/42.
    William de Hereford.[44] He died before 1160 without issue.
    Mahel de Hereford,[44] died October 1165 at Bronllys Castle, Breconshire, Wales, mortally hurt when a stone dropped from the tower during a fire; died without issue. Buried at Llanthony Priory.
    Lucy of Gloucester,[47] married Herbert FitzHerbert of Winchester, Lord Chamberlain, by whom she had issue. Buried at Llanthony Priory.

    Notes

    Jump up ^ In some sources Miles's name is not translated from the Latin Milo
    Jump up ^ "[This is known] from two charters there tested, one of which was printed by Madox (History of the Exchequer, p. 135), by which Stephen confirms to Miles, 'sicut baroni et justiciario meo', the shrievalty of Gloucestershire, the constableship of Gloucester Castle, and the 'honour' of Brecknock" (Round 1890, p. 438).
    Jump up ^ Cokayne 1926, pp. 451–452.
    ^ Jump up to: a b Morris 1918, p. 154, n. 62.
    ^ Jump up to: a b Round 1890, p. 438 cites Duchy of Lancaster: Royal Charters.
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 438 cites Rot. Pip.. 31 Hen. I.
    ^ Jump up to: a b c Walker 2012, "Gloucester, Miles of".
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 438.
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 438 cites Dugdale MSS.
    ^ Jump up to: a b Round 1890, p. 438 cites Gesta Stephani, p. 17.
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 438 cites Rymer, Fœdera, new ed. i. 16.
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 438 cites Rich. Hexham, p. 149.
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 439 cites Gesta, p. 13.
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 439 cites Duchy Charters.
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 439 cites Mon. Angl. vi. (1), 127, 132.
    Jump up ^ Ward1995, p. 107.
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 439 cites Cont. Flor. Wig. ii. 105.
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 439; Norgate 1887, p. 295.
    ^ Jump up to: a b c d Round 1890, p. 439.
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 439; Norgate 1887, pp. 493, 494.
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 439; Norgate 1887, pp. 294, 295.
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 439 cites Gesta, p. 59.
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 439 cites Cont. Flor. Wig. p. 119.
    ^ Jump up to: a b Round 1890, p. 439 cites Gesta, p. 60.
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 439 cites Cont. Flor. Wig. p. 121.
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 439 cites Gesta, p. 69.
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 439 cites Cont. Flor. Wig. p. 130; Will. Malm. p. 743.
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 439 cites Add. Cart. pp. 19, 576.
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 439 cites Duchy Charters, No. 16.
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 439 cites Cont. Flor. Wig. p. 132.
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 439 cites Fœdera, i. 14.
    Jump up ^ Francis Beaufort Palmer (February 2007), Peerage Law in England, Lawbook Exchange, ISBN 9781584777489, 1584777486 See Appendix, p242; also Theophilus Jones (1805), A history of the county of Brecknock (A history of the county of Brecknock. ed.), Brecknock: Printed and sold by Wm. & Geo. North ... for the author; and sold by J. Booth ... London. p67
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 439 cites Cont. Flor. Wig. p. 133.
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 439 cites Gesta, p. 79
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 439 cites Cont. Flor. Wig. p. 135.
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 439 cites Mon. Angl. vi. 137.
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 439 cites Duchy Charters, No. 17.
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 439 cites Gesta, p. 102; Mon. Angl. vi. (1), 133.
    Jump up ^ Knowles, Brooke & London 1972, p. 52–53.
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 439 cites Foliot, Letters, No. 3.
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 439 cites Symeon of Durham ii. 315; Gervase, i. 126; Gesta, pp. 16, 95, 103.
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 439 cites Gloucester Cartulary, i. lxxv; Foliot, Letters, No. 65.
    Jump up ^ Round 1890, p. 440.
    Jump up ^ Chisholm 1911, pp. 479.
    Jump up ^ Roderick 1968, p. 5.
    ^ Jump up to: a b c d Lundy 2011, p. 10257 cite Cokayne 2000, p. 21
    Jump up ^ Lundy 2011, p. 10257 cite Cokayne 2000a, p. 457
    ^ Jump up to: a b Lundy 2011, p. 10257 cite Cokayne 2000, p. 20
    Jump up ^ Cawley 2012 cites Dugdale 1823, p. 615

    References

    Cawley, Charles (10 April 2012), English Earls 1067–1122: Miles of Gloucester (–1143), Medieval Lands database, Foundation for Medieval Genealogy
    Dugdale, William, Sir (1823), ""Priory of Bergavenny or Abergavenny in Monmouthshire, Cartµ I"", Monasticon Anglicanum, 4 (Revised ed.), London: Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme & Browne, p. 615
    Cokayne, George Edward (1926), Doubleday, H. A.; Walden, Howard de, eds., The Complete Peerage; or, a History of the House of Lords and all its members from the earliest times, 6, London: The St. Catherine Press
    Knowles, David; Brooke, Christopher; London, Veria (1972), The Heads of Religious Houses: England and Wales 940–1216, Cambridge University Press, pp. 52–53, ISBN 0-521-08367-2
    Lundy, Darryl (17 May 2011). "Miles of Gloucester". p. 10257 § 102564. Retrieved November 2012. Check date values in: |access-date= (help)
    Cokayne, George E (2000), The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, 1 (new, reprint in 6 volumes ed.), Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, pp. 20, 21
    Cokayne, George E (2000a), The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, 4 (new, reprint in 6 volumes ed.), Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, p. 457
    Morris, W.A (April 1918), "The Office of Sheriff in the Early Norman Period", The English Historical Review, 33 (130): 145–175, doi:10.1093/ehr/xxxiii.cxxx.145
    Norgate, Kate (1887), England under the Angevin Kings, 1, London: Macmillan
    Roderick, A. J. (June 1968), "Marriage and Politics in Wales, 1066–1282", The Welsh History Review, 4 (1): 1–20
    Ward, Jennifer C (1995), Women of the English nobility and gentry, 1066–1500, Manchester medieval sources series, Manchester: Manchester University Press, p. 107, ISBN 0-7190-4115-5, retrieved 25 October 2010
    Walker, David (May 2012) [2004]. "Gloucester, Miles of, earl of Hereford (d. 1143)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/10820. (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
    B Thorpe, 1848–1849) (ed.), Continuation of Florence of Worcester
    The Cartulary of Gloucester Abbey (Rolls series);
    Round, John Horace (1892), Geoffrey de Mandeville
    Domesday Book, (Record Commission);
    Rymer, Thomas, Fœdera, (Record Commission), i (new ed.);
    Pipe Roll, 31 Hen. I (Record Commission);
    Cartulary of St. Peter's, Gloucester, (Rolls Ser.);
    Symeon of Durham, Regum Historia, (Rolls Ser.);
    "Gesta Stephani", Chronicles of the Reigns of Stephen, &c, (Rolls Ser.), ii;
    Gervase of Canterbury, Chronica, (Rolls Ser.);
    Florence of Worcester (1848–49), Thorpe, Benjamin, ed., Florentii Wigorniensis monachi Chronicon ex chronicis (2 volumes ed.), English Historical Society
    William of Malmesbury, Chronicle of the Kings of England: From the Earliest Period to the Reign of King Stephen, English Historical Society;
    Dugdale, Sir William, Westrum Monasticum, Bodleian Library;
    Additional Charters, (British Museum);
    Duchy of Lancaster Charters, Public Record Office;
    Dugdale, William, Sir (1823), Monasticon Anglicanum
    Madox, Thomas, History of the Exchequer;
    Hearne, Thomas, ed. (1728), Liber Niger Scaccarii;
    Foliot, Gilbert, "Letters", in Giles, John Allen, Patres Ecclesiµ Anglicanµ;
    Crawley-Boevey, Arthur William, Cartulary of Flaxley Abbey;
    Ellis, A. S. (1879–1880). "On the Landholders of Gloucestershire named in Domesday Book". Bristol and Gloucestershire Archaeological Society. 4 vol.: 86–198.
    Walker, David (1958). "Miles of Gloucester, Earl of Hereford". Transactions of the Bristol and Gloucestershire Archaeological Society. 77: 66–84.

    Miles married Sibyl de Neufmarche, Countess of Hereford 0___ 1121, Gloucestershire, England. Sibyl (daughter of Bernard de Neufmarche, Lord of Brecknockshire and Nest Verch Osborn le Scrope) was born ~ 1100, Brecon Castle, Brecon, Wales; died 24 Dec 1143, Llanthony Secunda, Gloucestershire, England; was buried Llanthony Secunda Priory, Gloucestershire, England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 67.  Sibyl de Neufmarche, Countess of Hereford was born ~ 1100, Brecon Castle, Brecon, Wales (daughter of Bernard de Neufmarche, Lord of Brecknockshire and Nest Verch Osborn le Scrope); died 24 Dec 1143, Llanthony Secunda, Gloucestershire, England; was buried Llanthony Secunda Priory, Gloucestershire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Burial: Hempsted, Gloucestershire, England
    • Also Known As: Lady of Brecknock
    • Also Known As: Sybil de Neufmarche NEWMARCH
    • Alt Birth: 0___ 1092, Aberhonddu, Breconshire, Wales

    Notes:

    Sibyl de Neufmarchâe, Countess of Hereford, suo jure Lady of Brecknock (c. 1100 – after 1143), was a Cambro-Norman noblewoman, heiress to one of the most substantial fiefs in the Welsh Marches. The great-granddaughter of Gruffydd ap Llywelyn, king of Wales, Sibyl was also connected to the nobility of England and Normandy. Sibyl inherited the titles and lands of her father, Bernard de Neufmarchâe, Lord of Brecon, after her mother, Nest ferch Osbern, had declared her brother Mahel to have been illegitimate. Most of these estates passed to Sibyl's husband, Miles de Gloucester, 1st Earl of Hereford, as her dowry. Their marriage had been arranged personally by King Henry I of England in the spring of 1121. Sibyl, with her extensive lands, was central to the King's plans of consolidating Anglo-Norman power in south-east Wales by the merging of her estates with those of Miles, his loyal subject on whom he relied to implement Crown policy.

    As an adult, Sibyl lived through King Stephen's turbulent reign, known to history as the Anarchy, in which her husband played a pivotal role. Following Miles' accidental death in 1143, Sibyl entered a religious life at Llanthony Secunda Priory, Gloucestershire, England, which she had endowed up to six years previously. Sibyl is buried at the priory, founded by Miles in 1136.

    Family

    Ancestry

    A small, ruined castle of rough stone comprising two connected, castellated towers, partly covered in ivy, surrounded by much vegetation. Numerous arrowslits indicate the walls to be three to four storeys tall. The upward direction of the image suggests that the castle is at the top of a hill
    Ruins of Brecon castle
    Sibyl's birthplace and a part of her vast inheritance
    Sibyl was born in about 1100 in Brecon Castle, Brecon, Wales, the only daughter of Marcher Lord Bernard de Neufmarchâe, Lord of Brecon, and Nest ferch Osbern.[1][2] Nest was the daughter of Osbern FitzRichard and Nest ferch Gruffydd.[2] Sybil's maternal great-grandparents were Gruffydd ap Llywelyn, king of Wales, and Ealdgyth (Edith of Mercia).[2][3] Ealdgyth, the daughter of ¥lfgar, Earl of Mercia, was briefly Queen consort of England by her second marriage to Harold Godwinson, the last Anglo-Saxon king of England, who was killed at the Battle of Hastings.[4]

    Sibyl's father, Bernard, was born at the castle of Le Neuf-Marchâe-en-Lions, on the frontier between Normandy and Beauvais.[5] Bernard was a knight who had fought under English kings William I, William Rufus and Henry I.[6] According to historian Lynn H Nelson, Bernard de Neufmarchâe was "the first of the original conquerors of Wales".[7] He led the Norman army at the Battle of Brecon in 1093, during which Rhys ap Tewdwr was killed.[6][8] Kingship in Wales ended with Rhys' death, and allowed Bernard to confirm his hold on Brycheiniog, becoming the first ruler of the lordship of Brecon.[8] The title and lands would remain in his family's possession until 1521.[9] The name Neufmarchâe, Novo Mercato in Latin, is anglicised into 'Newmarket' or 'Newmarch'.[10][a][11]

    Inheritance

    Sibyl had two brothers, Philip, who most likely died young, and Mahel. Nest had Mahel disinherited by swearing to King Henry I of England that Mahel had been fathered by another man. According to Giraldus Cambrensis, this was done out of vengeance when Mahel had multilated Nest's lover, a knight whose identity is not disclosed.[10] In the 19th century, Bernard Bolingbroke Woodward proposed that, after Bernard's death, Nest "disgraced herself with an intrigue" with one of his soldiers. Mahel, who had by this time inherited Bernard's estates, disapproved of the liaison to such an extent that he killed Nest's lover. Nest's revenge was to have Mahel disinherited by claiming that Bernard was not Mahel's father.[12] The maritagium (marriage charter) arranged by King Henry I in 1121 for the marriage between Sibyl and her future husband Miles, however, makes it clear that Bernard was still alive when it was written; showing Bernard Bolingbroke Woodward's version of the story to diverge from the known facts.[13] Author Jennifer C. Ward suggests that, although the marriage charter recorded that King Henry was acting at the request of Bernard, Nest, and the barons, it was probable he had put considerable pressure on the Neufmarchâes to disinherit Mahel in favour of Sibyl and, thereby, Miles.[14] Nevertheless, whatever the timing or reason, the outcome of Nest's declaration was that Sibyl (whom Nest acknowledged as Bernard's child) became the sole lawful heiress to the vast Lordship of Brecon, one of the most important and substantial fiefs in the Welsh Marches.[15] Henry's maritagium referred specifically to Sibyl's parents' lands as "comprising Talgarth, the forest of Ystradwy, the castle of Hay, the whole land of Brecknock, up to the boundaries of the land of Richard Fitz Pons,[b] namely up to Brecon and Much Cowarne, a vill in England";[16] the fees and services of several named individuals were also granted as part of the dowry.[16] This made her suo jure Lady of Brecknock on her father's death, and one of the wealthiest heiresses in south Wales.[17][18]

    Marriage

    Medieval illumination

    King Henry I of England who granted Sibyl in marriage to Miles de Gloucester Sometime in April or May 1121, Sibyl married Miles (or Milo) FitzWalter de Gloucester,[19] who on his father's death in 1129, became sheriff of Gloucester,[20] and Constable of England.[21][22] The marriage was personally arranged by King Henry I, to whom Miles was a trusted royal official.[13][23] A charter written in Latin (the maritagium), which dates to 10 April/29 May 1121, records the arrangements for the marriage of Sibyl and Miles.[13][24] Historian C. Warren Hollister found the charter's wording telling, noting that "the king gave the daughter as if he were making a grant of land": "Know that I [King Henry I] have given and firmly granted to Miles of Gloucester Sibyl, daughter of Bernard de Neufmarchâe, together with all the lands of Bernard her father and of her mother after their deaths … ".[13][25] Her parents' lands would be conveyed to Miles after their deaths or earlier during "their life if they so wish".[13] Henry also commanded that the fief's tenants were to pay Miles liege homage as their lord.[13]

    By arranging a series of matrimonial alliances, similar to that between Sibyl and Miles, King Henry I of England transformed "the map of territorial power in south-east Wales". Such arrangements were mutually advantageous. Hollister describes Miles' marriage to Sibyl as having been a "crucial breakthrough in his career". The new lords, in similar positions to Miles, were the King's own loyal vassals, on whom he could rely to implement royal policy.[25][26] Sibyl's father died sometime before 1128 (most probably in 1125), and Miles came into possession of her entire inheritance, which when merged with his own estates, formed one honour.[6][27]

    Children

    Together Sibyl and Miles had eight children:[original research?][28][not in citation given]

    Margaret of Hereford (1122/1123- 6 April 1197), married Humphrey II de Bohun, by whom she had children. She received the office of constable of England and exercised lordship of Herefordshire as a widow until her death.[29]

    Roger Fitzmiles, 2nd Earl of Hereford (before 1125- 22 September 1155). Roger's marriage settlement with Cecily FitzJohn (her first marriage), daughter of Payn FitzJohn and Sibyl de Lacy, was ratified by King Stephen in 1137.[18] The marriage was childless as were Cecily's subsequent marriages.

    Walter de Hereford (died 1159/60), whether he married is unknown; however, Walter departed for Palestine on Michaelmas 1159, and died shortly afterwards without leaving legitimate issue[30][31]

    Henry Fitzmiles (died c.1162), married a woman named Isabella, surname unknown; Henry died without legitimate issue.

    Mahel de Hereford (died 1164), no record of marriage; died without legitimate issue.

    William de Hereford (died 1166), no record of marriage; died without legitimate issue.

    Bertha of Hereford (c.1130-), married William de Braose, 3rd Lord of Bramber, by whom she had issue.

    Lucy of Hereford, Lady of Blaen Llyfni and Bwlch y Dinas (died 1219/20), married Herbert FitzHerbert of Winchester, by whom she had issue.

    The Anarchy

    Medieval illumination
    Stephen of Blois
    whose chaotic reign in England became known as the Anarchy
    After Henry I's death in 1135, the throne of England was seized by Stephen of Blois, a grandson of William I of England. Henry's daughter, Empress Matilda (Maud), also claimed the throne, and had the support of the Marcher Lords. On the death of her husband, the Holy Roman Emperor, Henry V, in 1125, Matilda had returned to England for the first time in 16 years. At the insistence of her father, the barons (including Stephen) swore to uphold Matilda's rights as his heir. Matilda married Geoffrey of Anjou in 1128. They lived together in France, having three sons; the eldest of whom was to become King Henry II of England.[32] Initially, Miles supported Stephen.[33] In about 1136, Stephen granted Sibyl's husband the entire honour of Gloucester and Brecknock, and appointed him Constable of Gloucester Castle,[34] whereby Miles became known as one of Stephen's "henchmen".[33]

    Llanthony Priory had been established near Crucorney, in the Vale of Ewyas, in 1118; Wales' earliest Augustine monastery. Miles' father, Walter de Gloucester, had retired there by 1126.[23] The unrest that had been simmering in Wales during the last years of Henry's reign, boiled over in 1135 on his death. The area around the priory returned to Welsh rule, coming under such “hostile mollestation” from the Welsh that the non-Welsh canons decided to leave.[18][35][36][37] Miles established a new Priory for them in Gloucester, England, which they called Llanthony Secunda, in 1136.[38] Sometime after 1137, Sibyl, together with her husband, made a further endowment to Llanthony Secunda.[34]

    Medieval illumination
    Empress Matilda
    whom Sibyl supported
    in opposition to King Stephen
    Miles transferred his allegiance to Empress Matilda, on her return to England in 1139.Matthew 2002, pp. 95, 96 According to Professor Edmund King, Miles' decision to support Matilda was guided by expediancy rather than principle, and the necessity of joining forces with Matilda's illegitimate half-brother, the powerful Robert, Earl of Gloucester, who was the overlord of some of Miles' fiefs.[17] Stephen stripped Miles of the title 'Constable of England' in punishment for having deserted him. On 25 July 1141, in gratitude for his support and military assistance and, according to historian R.H.C. Davis, possibly to compensate Miles for having appeared to have lost the constableship, Matilda invested him as 1st Earl of Hereford.[39] He also received St. Briavels Castle and the Forest of Dean. At the time Matilda was the de facto ruler of England, Stephen having been imprisoned at Bristol following his capture the previous February after the Battle of Lincoln. Sibyl was styled Countess of Hereford, until Miles' unexpected death over two years later. In 1141, Miles received the honour of Abergavenny from Brien FitzCount, the (likely illegitimate) son of Duke Alan IV of Brittany. This was in appreciation of the skilled military tactics Miles had deployed which had spared Brien's castle of Wallingford during King Stephen's besiegement in 1139/1140. Matilda gave her permission for the transfer.[40]

    During the Anarchy, which the period of Stephen's reign as King of England was to become known, life was greatly disrupted in her husband's lands. Sibyl would have doubtless suffered as a result, especially after Miles' decision to support Matilda's claim to the throne and to oppose Stephen.[33] When Matilda was defeated at Winchester in late 1141, Miles was compelled to return to Gloucester in disgrace: "weary, half-naked and alone".[41] In November of that same year, Stephen was released from prison and restored to the English throne.[18]

    Sibyl's distress would have been heightened in 1143 after the Bishop of Hereford, Robert de Bethune placed an interdict upon Hereford, blocked all the cathedral's entrances with thorns, and excommunicated Miles. In order to raise money to pay his troops and to assist Matilda financially, Miles had imposed a levy on all the churches in his earldom, an act which the bishop had regarded as unlawful.[23][42] When the bishop protested and threatened Miles with excommunication, Miles in response, sent his men to plunder the diocese of its resources.[23] In retaliation against Miles' earlier attacks on the royalist city of Worcester and the castles of Hereford and Wallingford, King Stephen bestowed the title "Earl of Hereford" on Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester; Miles, however, never surrendered the earldom nor the title to Robert de Beaumont.[42]

    Widowhood and death

    While on a deer-hunting expedition in his own Forest of Dean, Sibyl's husband was accidentally shot in the chest by an arrow which killed him on 24 December 1143.[41][43] He had been involved in legal proceedings against the bishop's jurisdiction when he died.[42] Their eldest son, Roger succeeded him in the earldom.[22] In protest against his father's excommunication, Roger remained an outspoken enemy of the Church until close to the end of his life when he entered a Gloucester monastery as a monk.[43][44] After her husband's death, Sibyl entered a religious life at Llanthony Secunda Priory, Gloucester,[38] which she had previously endowed.[34] Sibyl was buried in the same priory,[45] the dates of death and burial unrecorded.[citation needed]

    Sibyl's legacy

    Upon the childless death of Roger in 1155, the Earldom of Hereford fell into abeyance until 1199 when King John bestowed the title on Henry de Bohun, Sibyl's grandson through her eldest daughter, Margaret. As her sons all died without legitimate offspring, Sibyl's three daughters became co-heirs to the Brecon honour, with Bertha, the second daughter, passing Sibyl's inheritance on (through marriage) to the de Braoses, thereby making them one of the most powerful families in the Welsh Marches.[46][47]

    The Brecknock lordship would eventually go to the de Bohuns, by way of Eleanor de Braose. Eleanor, a descendant of Sibyl's through Bertha of Hereford,[c] married Humphrey de Bohun, son of the 2nd Earl of Hereford. Eleanor and Humphrey's son, Humphrey de Bohun, succeeded his grandfather to the titles in 1275.[48]

    Through the advantageous marriages of her daughters, Sibyl was an ancestress of many of England and Ireland's noblest families including among others, the de Bohun's, de Beauchamps, Mortimers, Fitzalans, de Burghs, de Lacy's, and Bonvilles. Four of her descendants, Humphrey de Bohun, 4th Earl of Hereford, Elizabeth de Burgh, 4th Countess of Ulster, Eleanor de Bohun, and Mary de Bohun married into the English royal family, while another, Anne Mortimer was the grandmother of Yorkist kings Edward IV and Richard III. By way of Edward's daughter, Elizabeth of York, every monarch of England and, subsequently, the United Kingdom, from Henry VIII up to and including Elizabeth II, descended from Sibyl de Neufmarchâe, as did the various royal sovereigns of Europe who shared a common descent from Mary, Queen of Scots.[49]

    Notes

    Jump up ^ According to Gerald of Wales, when Bernard witnessed a charter issued by William I in 1086-87, he signed his name in Latin as Bernardus de Novo Mercato (Gerald of Wales, p.88)
    Jump up ^ Richard Fitz Pons was Miles' brother-in-law, being the husband of his sister, Matilda (Cawley 2012a, "English Earls 1067-1122: Matilda"; Cawley 2012b, "Richard FitzPons" cites Round 1888, Part I, 12, p. 20).
    Jump up ^ Cawley 2012d gives the lineage as:
    Bertha daughter of Sibylle de Neufmarchâe married William [II] de Briouse (died after 1175))
    William [III] de Briouse (died 1211)
    Reynold de Briouse (died 1227)
    William de Briouse (hanged 1230)
    Eleanor de Briouse

    end of biography

    Children:
    1. 33. Bertha of Hereford was born 0___ 1107, Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England; died ~ 1180, Bramber, Sussex, England.
    2. Margaret of Hereford was born 1122-1123, England; died 6 Apr 1197; was buried Llanthony Secunda, Gloucestershire, England.

  5. 76.  Henry II, King of EnglandHenry II, King of England was born 5 Mar 1133, Le Mans, France; was christened 25 Mar 1133, Le Mans, France (son of Geoffrey "Le Bon" Plantagenet, Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy and Matilda of England, Queen of England); died 6 Jul 1189, Chinon Castle, France; was buried 7 Jul 1189, Fontevraud Abbey, France.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Count of Anjou
    • Also Known As: Count of Nantes
    • Also Known As: Curt Mantel
    • Also Known As: Duke of Aquitaine
    • Also Known As: Duke of Normandy
    • Also Known As: Henry Curtmantle
    • Also Known As: Henry FitzEmpress
    • Also Known As: Henry II, King of England

    Notes:

    Henry founded the Plantagenet Dynasty... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_II_of_England

    Henry II is the 27th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Jesse D Hennessee (1880-1952) through his 12th great granddaughter,

    Catherine Mountfort Booth (1450-1483) ...

    http://www.thehennesseefamily.com/getperson.php?personID=I32450&tree=hennessee

    Henry II (1133-1189) is the great-grandson of William the Conqueror (1024-1087) ergo

    William the Conqueror (1024-1087) is the 30th great-grandfather of all the grandchildren of Jesse D Hennessee (1880-1952)

    Who could forget Peter O'Toole's magnificient protrayal of Henry II in the 1968 movie production of "The Lion in Winter" and Katherine Hepburn's Eleanor of Aquitaine? ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Lion_in_Winter_(1968_film)

    History of Henry II and his reign... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_II_of_England

    Source: 'The World Book Encyclopedia', 1968, p H178. 'Royalty for Commoners', Roderick W. Stuart, 1993, p 37-38. Reigned 1154-1189.

    He ruled an empire that stretched from the Tweed to the Pyrenees. In spite of frequent hostitilties with the French King his own family and rebellious Barons (culminating in the great revolt of 1173-74) and his quarrel with Thomas Becket, Henry maintained control over his possessions until shortly before his death. His judicial and administrative reforms which increased Royal control and influence at the expense of the Barons were of great constitutional importance. Introduced trial by Jury. Duke of Normandy. Henry II 'Curt Mantel,' Duke of Normandy, Count of Maine and Anjou, King Of England became king in 1154.

    At the height of his power, Henry ruled England and almost all western France. His marriage to Eleanor of Aquitaine, the most famous woman of the age, brought the duchy of Aquitaine under his control. Henry also claimed to rule Scotland, Wales, and eastern Ireland. Henry II carried on his grandfather's policy of limiting the power of the nobles. He also tried to make the Roman Catholic Church in England submit to his authority. This policy brought him into conflict with Thomas a Becket, Achbishop of Canterbury. Four of the king's knights murdered Becket while he was at vespers in his cathedral. Henry made Anglo-Saxon common law, rather than the revised Roman law, the supreme law of the land. He introduced trial by jury and circuit courts. In his later years, Henry's sons often rebelled against him. Two of them, Richard the Lion-Hearted and John, became the next two kings of England.

    REF: "Falls the Shadow" Sharon Kay Penman: William the Conqueror requested a large number of Jews to move to England after his conquest. They spoke Norman & did well under his reign. They continued to thrive under William's grandson Henry II.

    REF: British Monarchy Official Website: Henry II (reigned 1154-89)

    ruled over an empire which stretched from the Scottish border to the Pyrenees. Married to Eleanor, the heiress of Aquitaine, the king spent only 13 years of his reign in England; the other 21 years were spent on the continent in his territories in what is now France. By 1158, Henry had restored to the crown some of the lands and royal power lost by Stephen. For example, locally chosen sheriffs were changed into royally appointed agents charged with enforcing the law and collecting taxes in the counties. Personally interested in government and law, Henry strengthened royal justice, making use of juries and re-introduced the sending of justices (judges) on regular tours of the country to try cases for the Crown. His legal reforms have led him to be seen as the founder of English Common Law. Henry's disagreements with his Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Becket, over Church/State relations ended in Becket's murder in 1170. Family disputes almost wrecked the king's achievements and he died in 1189 at war with his sons.

    Reigned 25 Oct 1154-1189. Invested As Duke Of Nomandy By His Parents In 1150.

    Ruled An Empire That Stretched From The Tweed To The Pyrenees.

    Numerous Quarrels With French King, & His Own Family.

    Quarreled With Thomas Becket.

    Beat Rebellious Barons (Culminating In The Great Revolt Of 1173-74).

    Retained Control Of His Possessions Until Shortly Before His Death.

    Important Judicial & Admin. Reforms Incr. Power Of King At The Expense Of Barons

    Introduced Trial By Jury.

    Count Of Anjou & Aquitaine.

    Buried:
    Click on this link to view images of Fontevraud Abbey ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fontevraud_Abbey

    Died:
    Images and commentary for Chinon Castle ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ch%C3%A2teau_de_Chinon

    Henry married Eleanore de Aquitaine, Queen of England 18 May 1152, Bordeaux, Aquitaine, France. Eleanore was born 0___ 1123, Chateau de Belin, Bordeaux, Aquitaine, France; died 31 Mar 1204, Poitiers, France; was buried 1 Apr 1204, Fontevraud Abbey, France. [Group Sheet]


  6. 77.  Eleanore de Aquitaine, Queen of EnglandEleanore de Aquitaine, Queen of England was born 0___ 1123, Chateau de Belin, Bordeaux, Aquitaine, France; died 31 Mar 1204, Poitiers, France; was buried 1 Apr 1204, Fontevraud Abbey, France.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Duchess of Aquitaine
    • Also Known As: Queen Consort of the Franks

    Notes:

    Eleanor of Aquitaine (French: Aliâenor, âElâeonore, Latin: Alienora; 1122 – 1 April 1204) was one of the wealthiest and most powerful women in western Europe during the High Middle Ages and a member of the Ramnulfid dynasty of rulers in southwestern France. She inherited the Duchy of Aquitaine from her father, William X, in 1137, and later became queen consort of France (1137–1152) and of England (1154–1189). She was the patron of literary figures such as Wace, Benoãit de Sainte-Maure, and Bernart de Ventadorn. She was a leader of the Second Crusade and of armies several times in her life.

    As Duchess of Aquitaine, Eleanor was the most eligible bride in Europe. Three months after she became duchess, she married King Louis VII of France, son of her guardian, King Louis VI. As Queen of France, she participated in the unsuccessful Second Crusade. Soon after, Eleanor sought an annulment of her marriage,[1] but her request was rejected by Pope Eugene III.[2] However, after the birth of her second daughter Alix, Louis agreed to an annulment given that their union had not produced a son after fifteen years of marriage.[3] The marriage was annulled on 11 March 1152 on the grounds of consanguinity within the fourth degree. Their daughters were declared legitimate and custody was awarded to Louis, while Eleanor's lands were restored to her.

    As soon as the annulment was granted, Eleanor became engaged to Henry, Duke of Normandy and Count of Anjou, who became King Henry II of England in 1154. Henry was her third cousin (cousin of the third degree), and eleven years younger. The couple married on 18 May 1152 (Whit Sunday), eight weeks after the annulment of Eleanor's first marriage, in a cathedral in Poitiers, France. Over the next thirteen years, she bore Henry eight children: five sons, three of whom would become kings; and three daughters. However, Henry and Eleanor eventually became estranged. Henry imprisoned her in 1173 for supporting her son Henry's revolt against her husband. She was not released until 6 July 1189, when Henry died and their son ascended the English throne as Richard I.

    Now queen dowager, Eleanor acted as regent while Richard went on the Third Crusade, where on his return he was captured and held prisoner. Eleanor lived well into the reign of her youngest son, John. By the time of her death, she had outlived all her children except for John and Eleanor.

    Film, radio and television

    Eleanor has featured in a number of screen versions of the Ivanhoe and Robin Hood stories. She has been played by Martita Hunt in The Story of Robin Hood and His Merrie Men (1952), Jill Esmond in the British TV adventure series The Adventures of Robin Hood (1955–1960), Phyllis Neilson-Terry in the British TV adventure series Ivanhoe (1958), Yvonne Mitchell in the BBC TV drama series The Legend of Robin Hood (1975), Siãan Phillips in the TV series Ivanhoe (1997), and Tusse Silberg in the TV series The New Adventures of Robin Hood (1997). She was portrayed by Lynda Bellingham in the BBC series Robin Hood. Most recently, she was portrayed by Eileen Atkins in Robin Hood (2010).

    In the 1964 film, "Becket" (1964), Eleanor is briefly played by Pamela Brown to Peter O'Toole's first performance as a young Henry II.

    In the 1968 film, The Lion in Winter, Eleanor is played by Katharine Hepburn, while Henry is again portrayed by O'Toole. The film is about the difficult relationship between them and the struggle of their three sons Richard, Geoffrey, and John for their father's favour and the succession. A 2003 TV film, The Lion in Winter (2003 film), starred Glenn Close as Eleanor and Patrick Stewart as Henry.

    She was portrayed by Mary Clare in the silent film, Becket (1923), by Prudence Hyman in Richard the Lionheart (1962), and twice by Jane Lapotaire; in the BBC TV drama series, The Devil's Crown (1978), and again in Mike Walker's BBC Radio 4 series, Plantagenet (2010). In the 2010 film, Robin Hood, starring Russell Crowe, Eleanor is played by Eileen Atkins. In the 2014 film, Richard the Lionheart: Rebellion, Eleanor is played by Debbie Rochon.

    More on Queen Eleanor ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eleanor_of_Aquitaine

    Click this link to view an image collage of Mirabell Castle ... http://bit.ly/1p8kovL

    Click on this link to view images of Fontevraud Abbey ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fontevraud_Abbey

    Henry II held his wife, Eleanor of Aquitaine , prisoner at Old Sarum. In the 1190s, the plain between Old Sarum and Wilton was one of five specially designated by Richard I for the holding of English tournaments

    Old Sarum is the site of the earliest settlement of Salisbury in England. Located on a hill about 2 miles (3 km) north of modern Salisbury near the A345 road , the settlement appears in some of the earliest records in the country.

    Buried:
    The abbey was originally the site of the graves of King Henry II of England, his wife Eleanor of Aquitaine, their son King Richard I of England, their daughter Joan, their grandson Raymond VII of Toulouse, and Isabella of Angoulãeme, wife of Henry and Eleanor's son King John. However, there is no remaining corporal presence of Henry, Eleanor, Richard, or the others on the site. Their remains were possibly destroyed during the French Revolution.

    Click on this link to view images of Fontevraud Abbey ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fontevraud_Abbey

    Notes:

    Married:
    thier marriage turned sour after Henry's affair with Rosamund Clifford...

    Children:
    1. Richard Plantagenet, I, King of England was born 8 Sep 1157, Beaumont Palace, Oxford, England; died 6 Apr 1199, Limousin, France; was buried Fontevraud Abbey, France.
    2. Eleanor of England, Queen of Castile was born 13 Oct 1162, Domfront Castle, Normandy, France; died 31 Oct 1214, Burgos, Spain; was buried Burgos, Spain.
    3. 38. John I, King of England was born 24 Dec 1166, Beaumont Palace, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England; died 19 Oct 1216, Newark Castle, Nottinghamshire, England; was buried 19 Oct 1216, Worcester Cathedral, Worcester, Warwickshire, England.

  7. 78.  Philip Butler was born 0___ 1157, Steeple Langford, Wiltshire, England; died 0___ 1174, Caernarvonshire, Wales.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Philip Boteler

    Philip — Sybil de Braose. Sybil (daughter of William de Braose, Knight, 3rd Lord of Bramber and Bertha of Hereford) was born Bef 1151, Bramber, Sussex, England; died 5 Feb 1227, Derbyshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  8. 79.  Sybil de Braose was born Bef 1151, Bramber, Sussex, England (daughter of William de Braose, Knight, 3rd Lord of Bramber and Bertha of Hereford); died 5 Feb 1227, Derbyshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Sybil Bruce
    • Alt Birth: 0___ 1157, East Sussex, England

    Notes:

    Birth: 1157
    East Sussex, England
    Death: 1228
    Derbyshire, England


    Family links:
    Parents:
    William De Braose (1135 - 1179)
    Bertha Hereford de Braose (1130 - ____)

    Spouse:
    William De Ferrers (1140 - 1190)

    Siblings:
    Bertha de Braose de Beauchamp (1151 - 1200)*
    William III de Braose (1153 - 1211)*
    Sybil de Braose de Ferrers (1157 - 1228)

    *Calculated relationship

    Burial:
    Unknown

    Created by: Deb
    Record added: Dec 11, 2016
    Find A Grave Memorial# 173766873

    *

    Children:
    1. 39. Clemence Butler was born 0___ 1175; died 0___ 1231.


Generation: 8

  1. 128.  William de Braose, Knight, 1st Lord of Bramber was born (Briouze, Normandy, France); died 1093-1096.

    Other Events:

    • Residence: Hastings, East Sussex, England
    • Also Known As: Guillaume de Briouze

    Notes:

    William de Braose arrived in England with William the Conqueror. His mother’s name was Gunnor. She became a nun at the Abbaye aux Dames in Caen, Normandy, which was established by the Conqueror’s queen, Matilda. Some of the property Gunnor gave to the abbey was associated with members of the the Ivry family - Albereda, Hugh and Roger. Emma d’Ivry was the mother of William the Conqueror’s most powerful favourite, William fitz Osbern.

    These are the best clues we have as to William de Braose’s parentage. He was entrusted with a key Sussex position at Bramber and land in other English counties, besides Briouze, a strategic location in Normandy. It seems likely that he came from the extended family of the Dukes of Normandy but for genealogists his ancestry is still a frustrating loose end. William probably married the widow of Anchetil de Harcourt, Eve de Boissey, but even this detail remains inconclusive.

    Images for Braose coats of arms:

    https://www.google.com/search?q=braose+coat+of+arms&rlz=1C1KMZB_enUS591US591&espv=2&biw=1440&bih=834&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjU4oegvMHQAhVFbSYKHTtHB1gQsAQILQ&dpr=1

    *

    Died 1093-6

    Guillaume de Briouze is recorded in lists of those present at the Battle of Hastings. He became the first Lord of Bramber Rape by 1073 and built Bramber Castle. (Right - remains of the gatehouse) William made considerable grants to the abbey of Saint Florent, Saumur to endow the foundation of Sele Priory near Bramber and a priory at Briouze. He continued to fight alongside King William in the campaigns in Britain, Normandy and Maine.

    The latest evidence for William is his presence at the consecration of his church at Briouze in 1093. In 1096 his son Philip was issuing charters. From this we can deduce that William died between 1093 and 1096.

    Father: Uncertain.

    Mother: Gunnor (See Round, Cal. Doc. Fra. p148)

    Brydges edition of Collins' Peerage claims he was first married to Agnes, dau of Waldron de Saint Clare but no evidence for this can be found. It may be an example of Bruce - Braose confusion.
    According to L C Perfect, a 13th century genealogy in the Bibliotháeque de Paris gives the name of his wife as Eve de Boissey, widow of Anchetil de Harcourt. There is a lot of evidence from contemporary charters which supports this view.

    Child 1: Philip

    *

    Birth:
    Briouze is a commune in the Orne department of Normandy in northwestern France. It is considered the capital of the pays d'Houlme at the western end of the Orne in the Norman bocage. The nearby Grand Hazâe marshland is a heritage-listed area (Natura 2000).

    William de Braose, First Lord of Bramber (Guillaume de Briouze) was granted lands in England after the Norman conquest and used his wealth to build a priory in his home town.

    The name Briouze probably comes from an older Norman form of the word "boue", or "mud".

    Map & commentary ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Briouze

    Residence:
    Images, maps & history of Hastings and the "Battle of 1066" ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hastings

    William — (Eve de Boissey). [Group Sheet]


  2. 129.  (Eve de Boissey)

    Notes:

    Residence (Family):
    Bramber Castle is a Norman motte-and-bailey castle formerly the caput of the large feudal barony of Bramber long held by the Braose family. It is situated in the village of Bramber, West Sussex overlooking the River Adur.

    Image, map and history of Bramber Castle ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bramber_Castle

    More images and history of Bramber Castle & the Braose family ... http://steyningmuseum.org.uk/braose.htm

    Children:
    1. 64. Philip de Braose, Knight, 2nd Lord Bramber was born 0___ 1073, Bramber, West Sussex, England; died 1131-1139, Bramber, Sussex, England.

  3. 134.  Bernard de Neufmarche, Lord of Brecknockshire was born 0___ 1050, Neufmarchâe, Seine-Maritime, Haute-Normandie, France; died 0___ 1093, Breconshire, Wales.

    Bernard married Nest Verch Osborn le Scrope ~ 1100, England. Nest was born 0___ 1079, Herefordshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 135.  Nest Verch Osborn le Scrope was born 0___ 1079, Herefordshire, England.
    Children:
    1. 67. Sibyl de Neufmarche, Countess of Hereford was born ~ 1100, Brecon Castle, Brecon, Wales; died 24 Dec 1143, Llanthony Secunda, Gloucestershire, England; was buried Llanthony Secunda Priory, Gloucestershire, England.
    2. Bertha of Hereford was born 0___ 1107, Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England; died ~ 1180, Bramber, Sussex, England.

  5. 152.  Geoffrey "Le Bon" Plantagenet, Count of Anjou, Duke of NormandyGeoffrey "Le Bon" Plantagenet, Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy was born 24 Sep 1113, Anjou, France; died 7 Sep 1151, Chateau-Du-Loir, Eure-Et-Loire, France; was buried Saint Julian Church, Le Mans, France.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Duke of Normandy

    Notes:

    More on Geoffrey's biography and history with photos ... http://bit.ly/1i49b9d

    Geoffrey married Matilda of England, Queen of England 3 Apr 1127, Le Massachusetts, Sarthe, France. Matilda (daughter of Henry I, King of England and Matilda of Scotland, Queen of England) was born 7 Feb 1102, London, Middlesex, England; was christened 7 Apr 1141; died 10 Sep 1167, Notre Dame, Rouen, Seine-Maritime, France; was buried 10 Sep 1169, Bec Abbey, Le Bec-Hellouin, Eure, France. [Group Sheet]


  6. 153.  Matilda of England, Queen of England was born 7 Feb 1102, London, Middlesex, England; was christened 7 Apr 1141 (daughter of Henry I, King of England and Matilda of Scotland, Queen of England); died 10 Sep 1167, Notre Dame, Rouen, Seine-Maritime, France; was buried 10 Sep 1169, Bec Abbey, Le Bec-Hellouin, Eure, France.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Empress Matilda
    • Also Known As: Empress Maude
    • Also Known As: Empress of Germany
    • Also Known As: Queen of Italy

    Notes:

    Empress Matilda (c. 7 February 1102 – 10 September 1167), also known as the Empress Maude,[nb 1] was the claimant to the English throne during the civil war known as the Anarchy. The daughter of King Henry I of England, she moved to Germany as a child when she married the future Holy Roman Emperor Henry V. She travelled with her husband into Italy in 1116, was controversially crowned in St. Peter's Basilica, and acted as the imperial regent in Italy. Matilda and Henry had no children, and when Henry died in 1125, the crown was claimed by Lothair II, one of his political enemies.

    Meanwhile, Matilda's younger brother, William Adelin, died in the White Ship disaster of 1120, leaving England facing a potential succession crisis. On Henry V's death, Matilda was recalled to Normandy by her father, who arranged for her to marry Geoffrey of Anjou to form an alliance to protect his southern borders. Henry I had no further legitimate children and nominated Matilda as his heir, making his court swear an oath of loyalty to her and her successors, but the decision was not popular in the Anglo-Norman court. Henry died in 1135 but Matilda and Geoffrey faced opposition from the Norman barons and were unable to pursue their claims. The throne was instead taken by Matilda's cousin Stephen of Blois, who enjoyed the backing of the English Church. Stephen took steps to solidify his new regime, but faced threats both from neighbouring powers and from opponents within his kingdom.

    In 1139 Matilda crossed to England to take the kingdom by force, supported by her half-brother, Robert of Gloucester, and her uncle, King David I of Scotland, while Geoffrey focused on conquering Normandy. Matilda's forces captured Stephen at the Battle of Lincoln in 1141, but the Empress's attempt to be crowned at Westminster collapsed in the face of bitter opposition from the London crowds. As a result of this retreat, Matilda was never formally declared Queen of England, and was instead titled the Lady of the English. Robert was captured following the Rout of Winchester in 1141, and Matilda agreed to exchange him for Stephen. Matilda became trapped in Oxford Castle by Stephen's forces that winter, and was forced to escape across the frozen River Isis at night to avoid capture. The war degenerated into a stalemate, with Matilda controlling much of the south-west of England, and Stephen the south-east and the Midlands. Large parts of the rest of the country were in the hands of local, independent barons.

    Matilda returned to Normandy, now in the hands of her husband, in 1148, leaving her eldest son to continue the campaign in England; he eventually succeeded to the throne as Henry II in 1154. She settled her court near Rouen and for the rest of her life concerned herself with the administration of Normandy, acting on Henry's behalf when necessary. Particularly in the early years of her son's reign, she provided political advice and attempted to mediate during the Becket controversy. She worked extensively with the Church, founding Cistercian monasteries, and was known for her piety. She was buried under the high altar at Bec Abbey after her death in 1167.

    Notes:

    Married:
    The marriage was meant to seal a peace between England/Normandy and Anjou. She was eleven years older than Geoffrey, and very proud of her status as an Empress (as opposed to being a mere Countess). Their marriage was a stormy one with frequent long separations, but she bore him three sons and survived him.

    Children:
    1. 76. Henry II, King of England was born 5 Mar 1133, Le Mans, France; was christened 25 Mar 1133, Le Mans, France; died 6 Jul 1189, Chinon Castle, France; was buried 7 Jul 1189, Fontevraud Abbey, France.

  7. 32.  William de Braose, Knight, 3rd Lord of Bramber was born 0___ 1135, (Bramber, Sussex, England) (son of Philip de Braose, Knight, 2nd Lord Bramber and Aanor de Totnes); died > 1179.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Sheriff of Hereford
    • Also Known As: William Bruce
    • Alt Birth: 0___ 1100, Bramber, Sussex, England
    • Alt Death: 21 Oct 1190, London, England

    Notes:

    William de Braose, 3rd Lord of Bramber (fl. 1135–1179) was a 12th-century Marcher lord who secured a foundation for the dominant position later held by the Braose family in the Welsh Marches. In addition to the family's English holdings in Sussex and Devon, William had inherited Radnor and Builth, in Wales, from his father Philip. By his marriage he increased the Braose Welsh holdings to include Brecon and Abergavenny.

    William remained loyal to King Stephen during the 12th-century period of civil war. He became a trusted royal servant during the subsequent reign of Henry II, accompanying the king on campaigns in France and Ireland. He served as sheriff of Herefordshire from 1173 until 1175. The family's power reached its peak under his son William during the reigns of King Richard I and King John.

    William de Braose, 3rd Lord of Bramber
    Lord of Bramber
    Died after 1179
    Noble family House of Braose
    Spouse(s) Bertha, daughter of Miles of Gloucester and Sibyl de Neufmarchâe
    Issue
    William de Braose, 4th Lord of Bramber
    Father Philip de Braose
    Mother Aenor de Totnes, daughter of Juhel of Totnes

    Lands and family

    William was the eldest son of Philip de Braose, lord of Bramber.[1] His mother was Aenor, daughter of Juhel of Totnes.[1] He was the third in the line of the Anglo-Norman Braose family founded by his grandfather, the first William de Braose.[1] After his father died in the 1130s William inherited lordships, land and castles in Sussex, with his caput at Bramber. He also held Totnes in Devon and Radnor and Builth in the Welsh Marches.[2] He confirmed the grants of his father and grandfather to the abbey of St Florent in Anjou and made further grants to the abbey's dependent priory at Sele in Sussex.[3] In about 1155, he also inherited through his mother's family one half of the honour of Barnstaple in Devon, paying a fee of 1000 marks for the privilege.[2] William became an internationally recognised figure. When Archbishop Theobald of Canterbury was asked by Pope Adrian IV to inquire into the background of a certain Walter, canon of St Ruf, his reply, dated to 1154/9 read:

    The facts which you demand need but little enquiry; for they shine so brightly in themselves that they cannot be hid; so great is the brilliance of his noble birth and the glory of all his kin. For Walter, as we know for a fact, was the son of a distinguished knight and born of a noble mother in lawful wedlock, and he is closely related by blood to the noble William de Braose.[4]

    William had married Bertha, daughter of Miles of Gloucester and Sibyl de Neufmarchâe, by 1150.[1] When each of Bertha's four brothers (Walter de Hereford, Henry FitzMiles (or Henry de Hereford), Mahel de Hereford and William de Hereford) died leaving no issue, William's marriage became unexpectedly valuable. He gained control of the lordships of Brecon and Abergavenny after 1166 when the last brother died.[1] These additional land holdings greatly expanded the territorial power and income of the Braose family. They now held a vast block of territory in the Welsh Marches as well as their extensive interests in Sussex and Devon. William's daughters were able to make good marriages, notably Sibyl to William de Ferrers, Earl of Derby.[5] Maud was married to John de Brompton of Shropshire.[6] William's son and heir, another William de Braose, became a major player in national politics under King John.[7]

    Royal service

    Empress Maud, the only legitimate living child of Henry I, landed in England in 1139 in an attempt to press her claim to the monarchy. She was soon besieged by King Stephen's forces at Arundel castle. Stephen allowed Maud a safe conduct to Bristol and provided her with an escort, which included William de Braose,[8] suggesting that he was an adherent of King Stephen. William was present as a witness when three charters were issued by Stephen at Lewes dated to the years 1148–53,[9] therefore it appears that he remained loyal to the king until the Treaty of Wallingford ended the hostilities.

    William was in Sussex in 1153,[nb 1] but he followed Duke Henry, soon to become King Henry II, to Normandy in 1154.[nb 2] William was frequently with the new king. He was one of the military leaders who supported Henry at Rhuddlan in 1157.[12] He witnessed one of the king's charters at Romsey in 1158,[13] and he is recorded at the king's court in Wiltshire in 1164 when the Constitutions of Clarendon were enacted.[14] He accompanied the king on expedition to France, witnessing at Leons[nb 3] in 1161 and Chinon in 1162. William is also documented on the Irish campaign at Dublin in 1171 and Wexford 1172.[15] William's younger brother, Philip, also accompanied the king to Ireland, and remained with the garrison at Wexford. In 1177 Philip was granted the kingdom of Limerick by Henry but failed to take possession after the citizens set fire to the town.[16]

    When Henry was facing war with his sons in 1173, William was appointed as sheriff of Herefordshire at Easter. He maintained the King's interests in Herefordshire until 1175.[1]

    Later life and death

    King Henry withdrew his favour from the family after William's son organised the murder of Seisyll ap Dyfnwal and other Welsh princes at Abergavenny in 1176.[17] There is little subsequent record of William in public life, and it is likely that he retired to his estates in Sussex. William died after 1179 and was succeeded by his son, William de Braose, 4th Lord of Bramber,[1] who gained the favour of both King Richard I and King John and became a dominant force in the Welsh Marches during their reigns.[18]

    end of biography

    William de Braose, 3rd lord of Bramber was a Marcher lord, active during the 12th century period of anarchy and the subsequent reign of Henry II. He served as sheriff of Herefordshire from 1173 to 1175.

    William was the eldest son of Philip de Braose, lord of Bramber. His mother was Aenor, daughter of Juhel of Totnes. He was the third in the line of the Anglo-Norman Braose family. After his father died in the 1130s William held lordships, land and castles in Sussex, with his caput at Bramber, also at Totnes in Devon and Radnor and Builth in the Welsh Marches. He confirmed the grants of his father and grandfather to the abbey of St Florent in Anjou and made further grants to the abbey's dependent priory at Sele in Sussex. About 1155, he also inherited through his mother's family one half of the honour of Barnstaple in Devon, paying a fee of 1000 marks for the privilege.

    William became an internationally recognised figure. When Archbishop Theobald of Canterbury was asked by Pope Adrian IV to inquire into the background of a certain Walter, canon of St Ruf, his reply, dated to 1154/9 read:

    "The facts which you demand need but little enquiry; for they shine so brightly in themselves that they cannot be hid; so great is the brilliance of his noble birth and the glory of all his kin. For Walter, as we know for a fact, was the son of a distinguished knight and born of a noble mother in lawful wedlock, and he is closely related by blood to the noble William de Braose."

    William had married Bertha, daughter of Miles of Gloucester by 1150. When each of Bertha's four brothers died leaving no issue William's marriage became unexpectedly valuable. He gained control of the lordships of Brecon and Abergavenny after 1166 when the last brother died. These additional land holdings greatly expanded the territorial power and income of the Braose family. They now held a vast block of territory in the Middle March as well as their extensive interests in Sussex and Devon. William's daughters were able to make good marriages, notably Sibyl to William de Ferrers, Earl of Derby. William's son and heir, became a major player in national politics under King John.

    Empress Maud landed in England in 1139 in an attempt to press her claim to the monarchy. She was soon besieged by King Stephen's forces at Arundel castle. Stephen allowed Maud a safe conduct to Bristol, and provided her with an escort which included William de Braose. Thus, at the start of this conflict, William was an adherent of King Stephen. He witnessed three charters with Stephen at Lewes dated by Davis as 1148/53 so it appears that he remained loyal to the king until the Treaty of Wallingford which ended the hostilities.

    William was in Sussex in 1153, but he followed Duke Henry, soon to become King Henry II, across to Normandy in 1154. William was frequently with the new king. He was one of the great men in the army at Rhuddlan in 1157. He witnessed one of the king's charters at Romsey in 1158 and he is recorded at the king's court in Wiltshire in 1164 when the Constitutions of Clarendon were enacted. He accompanied the king on expedition to France, witnessing at Leons, in 1161 and Chinon in 1162. William is also documented on the Irish campaign at Dublin in 1171 and Wexford 1172.

    When Henry was facing war with his sons in 1173, William was appointed as sheriff of Hereford at Easter. He maintained the King's interests in Herefordshire until 1175. King Henry withdrew his favour from the family after William's son organised the murder of Seisyll ap Dyfnwal and other Welsh princes at Abergavenny in 1175. There is little record of William in public life after this and it is likely that he retired to his estates in Sussex. It is at this time that the extensions were made to St. Mary's, Shoreham. (Pictured at top)

    (The above is an adaptation of the article I wrote for Wikipedia. Sources for the information given can be found there.)

    Father: Philip de Braose

    Mother: Aanor

    Married to Bertha, daughter of Miles of Gloucester, Earl of Hereford

    Child 1: William de Braose, 4th Lord of Bramber

    Child 2: Maud = John de Brompton

    Child 3: Sibilla = (1)William de Ferrers =(2)Adam de Port

    Child 4: John

    Child 5: Roger

    Roger is a witness to a charter of his brother William. (Dugdales "Monasticon" iv, p616)

    (Some sources give a daughter Bertha who married a Beauchamp. I believe this Bertha is a daughter of William de Braose, 4th Lord of Bramber. See her page for references.)

    end of biography

    William (de Braose) BRUCEPrint Family Tree William de /Braose/ , William de /Braose/


    Born in 1100 - Bramber, Sussex, England
    Deceased 21 October 1190 - London, England , age at death: 90 years old

    Parents

    Philip (de Braose) BRUCE, born in 1073 - Bramber, Sussex, England, Deceased in 1134 - Bramber, Sussex, England age at death: 61 years old
    Married in 1104, Barnstaple, Devon, England, to
    Aenor De TOTNES, born in 1084 - Barnstaple, Devon, England, Deceased in 1102 - Bramber, Sussex, England age at death: 18 years old

    Spouses, children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren

    Married in 1148, Herefordshire, England, to Bertha De PITRES, born in 1107 - Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England, Deceased - Bramber, Sussex, England (Parents : M Miles (Fitzwalter) De (1st Earl of Hereford) PITRES 1092-1143 & F Sybil (de Neufmarche) NEWMARCH 1092-1142) with
    F Bertha (de Braose) BRUCE ca 1145- married before 1180, Wales, to Gilbert De (Baron) MONMOUTH 1140-1190 with
    M John De (SIR - Lord of Monmouth) MONMOUTH ca 1180- married in 1202, Monmouth, Monmouthshire, Wales, to Cecily Waleran FitzWalter 1182-1222 with :
    F Joan Margaret De MONMOUTH ca 1201-1247
    M William De Monmouth

    John De (SIR - Lord of Monmouth) MONMOUTH ca 1180- married in April 1223, Monmouthshire, Wales, to Agnes de ** MUSCEGROS ca 1190- with :
    M Richard (de Wyesham) De MONMOUTH 1223/-
    M Walter De MONMOUTH 1223/-
    M John De (5th Lord of Monmouth) MONMOUTH 1225-1274

    Bertha (de Braose) BRUCE ca 1145- married before 1182, Bramber, Sussex, England, to Walter De BEAUCHAMP ca 1160-1235 with
    M James De BEAUCHAMP 1182-1233
    M Watchline De BEAUCHAMP 1184-1236 married to Joane De MORTIMER 1194-1268 with :
    M William De BEAUCHAMP 1210-1267
    F Matilda Maud (de Braose) ca 1146- married in 1168, England, to John De BRAMPTON ca 1136-1179 with
    M Brian De BRAMPTON 1168-1197 married in 1195, England, to Alice De Neufmenell 1172- with :
    M Brian De Brampton 1194-1262
    F Margaret (de Braose) (Lady Meath) BRUCE ca 1149- married 19 November 1200, Ewyas Harold, Herefordshire, England, to Walter De (Sir - Lord Meath) LACY ca 1150-1241 with
    F Petronilla De LACY 1195-1288 married to Ralph VI De (Lord Flamstead) TOENI 1190-1239 with :
    F Constance De TOENI ca 1220-1263
    M Roger Michaelmas De (Lord of Flamstead) TOENI 1235-1264
    F Gille Egidia De LACY 1202-1239 married 21 April 1225 to Richard Mor "The Great", De (1st Earl of Ulster) BURGH 1202-1242 with :
    M Walter De ( 1st Earl of Ulster, 2nd Lord of Cornaught) BURGH 1232-1271
    M Gilbert (Of Meath) De LACY 1206-1230 married in 1225, Norfolk, England, to Isabel BIGOD 1212-1250 with :
    F Margery De LACY ca 1232-1256
    F Sybil (de Braose) BRUCE /1151-1227 married to Philip (le Boteler) BUTLER 1157-1174 with
    F Clemence (le Boteler) BUTLER 1175-1231 married in 1188, England, to John (Lackland) (KING OF ENGLAND) PLANTAGENET 1166-1216 with :
    F Joan (Princess of WALES) PLANTAGENET 1190-1236

    Clemence (le Boteler) BUTLER 1175-1231 married in 1205 to Nicholas De (SIR - Baron of Alton, Lord of Farnham) VERDUN 1175- with :
    F Rohese De VERDUN 1204-1246
    M William (de Braose) BRUCE 1153-1211 married in 1174, Bramber, Sussex, England, to Maud (Matilda) De St VALERY 1155-1210 with
    F Matilda Maud (de Braose) 1160-1209 married in 1189 to Gruffydd Ap (Prince of South Wales) RHYS 1148-1201 with :
    M Owain Ap GRUFFYDD ca 1176-1235
    F Lleucu Verch GRUFFYDD 1202-1250
    M William (The Younger) de Braose) BRUCE 1175-1210 married in 1196, Kent, England, to Matilda De CLARE 1175-1213 with :
    F Matilda (de Braose) BRUCE ca 1195-1274
    M John (de Braose) (Lord of Bramber) BRUCE 1197-1232
    F Laurette (de Braose) BRUCE ca 1176-1266 married to Robert "Fitz-Parnell" HARCOURT ca 1156- with :
    M X Harcourt ca 1190-
    M Reginald (de Braose) BRUCE 1182-1227 married 19 March 1202, Bramber, Sussex, England, to Grecian Alice De BRIWERE 1186-1226 with
    F Matilda (de Braose) BRUCE ca 1200-1249 married in 1219, Carmarthenshire, Wales, to Rhys (Mechyll) Ap (Gryg ) RHYS 1174-1244 with :
    M Ieuan Ap RHYS ca 1220-
    F Gwenllian Verch RHYS ca 1225-1268
    M William "Black William" (de Braose) BRUCE 1204-1230 married 2 May 1230, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales, to Eve (Baroness of Abergavenny) MARSHALL 1194-1246 with :
    M William (de Braose) BRUCE 1210-1292
    F Isabella (de Braose) BRUCE 1220/-
    F Eva (de Braose) BRUCE 1220-1255
    F Maud (de Braose) (BARONESS WIGMORE) BRUCE 1226-1300

    Siblings
    F Maud (de Braose) BRUCE 1109-1200 Married about 1130, Wales, to William De BEAUCHAMP 1105-1170

    Paternal grand-parents, uncles and aunts
    M William de (Braose) BRUCE 1049-1093 married (1072)
    F Agnes De SAINT CLARE 1034-1080
    M Philip (de Braose) BRUCE 1073-1134
    married (1104)
    2 children

    Maternal grand-parents, uncles and aunts
    M Juhel De TOTNES 1049-1123 married (1083)
    F ** De PICQUIGNY 1060-1145
    F Aenor De TOTNES 1084-1102
    married (1104)
    2 children


    Timeline
    1100 : Birth - Bramber, Sussex, England
    1112 : Birth - Bramber, Sussex, England

    Sources: Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Millennium File - Heritage Consulting - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2003.Original data - Heritage Consulting. The Millennium File. Salt Lake City, UT, USA: Heritage Consulting.Original data: Heritage Consulting. The Millennium File. Salt Lake City, UT, USA: - 1,7249::0
    Note http://search.Ancestry.com.au/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=millind&h=1077681&ti=5544&indiv=try&gss=pt - Birth date: 1126 Birth place: Briouze, Normandy, France Death date: 1192-3 Death place: - 1,7249::1077681
    1126 : Birth - Briouze, Orne, Basse-Normandie, France
    Sources: Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - Millennium File - Heritage Consulting - Ancestry.com Operations Inc - 1,7249::0 - 1,7249::1077681
    1148 : Marriage (with Bertha De PITRES) - Herefordshire, England
    before 1190 : LORD of BRAMBER
    21 October 1190 : Death - London, England
    1192 : Death - England
    Sources: Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Millennium File - Heritage Consulting - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2003.Original data - Heritage Consulting. The Millennium File. Salt Lake City, UT, USA: Heritage Consulting.Original data: Heritage Consulting. The Millennium File. Salt Lake City, UT, USA: - 1,7249::0
    Note http://search.Ancestry.com.au/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=millind&h=1077681&ti=5544&indiv=try&gss=pt - Birth date: 1126 Birth place: Briouze, Normandy, France Death date: 1192-3 Death place: - 1,7249::1077681
    1192 : Death
    Age: 66
    Sources: Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - Millennium File - Heritage Consulting - Ancestry.com Operations Inc - 1,7249::0 - 1,7249::1077681


    Notes
    Individual Note
    Source: Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Millennium File - Heritage Consulting - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2003.Original data - Heritage Consulting. The Millennium File. Salt Lake City, UT, USA: Heritage Consulting.Original data: Heritage Consulting. The Millennium File. Salt Lake City, UT, USA: - 1,7249::0
    http://search.Ancestry.com.au/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=millind&h=1077681&ti=5544&indiv=try&gss=pt Birth date: 1126 Birth place: Briouze, Normandy, France Death date: 1192-3 Death place: 1,7249::1077681
    Source: Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - Millennium File - Heritage Consulting - Ancestry.com Operations Inc - 1,7249::0 1,7249::1077681


    Sources
    Individual: Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Ancestry Family Trees - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members. - This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created. - Ancestry Family Trees - http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=18829447&pid=8845

    Family Tree Preview
    Ancestry Chart Descendancy Chart Printable Family Tree
    _____| 16_ Rognvald Wolfs (of Orkey) BRUCE /1000-1046
    _____| 8_ Robert BRUCE 1030-1094
    _____| 4_ William de (Braose) BRUCE 1049-1093
    / \ _____| 18_ Alan III De (Count of Brittany) RENNES 1000-1040
    |2_ Philip (de Braose) BRUCE 1073-1134
    | \ _____| 20_ Mauger (de St Claire) (Seigneur) NORMANDY ca 990-1017
    | \ _____| 10_ Waldron De St CLARE 1015-1047
    | \ _____| 22_ Richard De NORMANDY 1001-1028
    |--1_ William (de Braose) BRUCE 1100-1190
    | _____| 12_ Alured De TOTNES 1015-1080
    | /
    | _____| 6_ Juhel De TOTNES 1049-1123
    | / \
    |3_ Aenor De TOTNES 1084-1102
    \
    \ _____| 14_ Arnoul De PICQUIGNY 1020-1055
    \ /
    \

    end of profile

    Name: William DE BRAOSE
    Sex: M
    Birth: 1105 in Bramber, Sussex, England
    ALIA: William de BRAOSE Lord of Bramber
    Title: Lord of Bramber
    Death: BET 1192 AND 1193 in Bramber, Sussex, England
    Note:
    Dec 08 from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_de_Braose,_3rd_Lord_of_Bramber -

    William de Braose, Third Lord of Bramber (born 1112 in Brecon) (d. ca. 1192) was the eldest son of Philip de Braose, Second Lord of Bramber.

    Family and early career
    William was born into a second generation English Norman dynasty holding Lordships and land in Sussex at Bramber, also at Totnes in Devon and Radnor and Builth in the Welsh Marches of Wales. He maintained his Sussex lands and titles and extended St Mary's, Shoreham and contributed to a priory at Sele, West Sussex. His mother was Aenor Fitz Judhel of Totnes.

    He also inherited one half of the honour of Barnstaple in Devon, paying a fee of 1000 marks for the privilege.

    William married Bertha de Pitres, also known as Bertha de Hereford, daughter of Miles of Gloucester, Earl of Hereford. Through this marriage, William acquired lordships of Brecon and Abergavenny in 1166 because Bertha's four brothers all died young without heirs.

    These vast land holdings greatly expanded the territorial power and income of the de Braose dynasty. They now held the Middle March with extensive interests in Sussex and Devon.

    William's younger brother Phillip accompanied King Henry II to Ireland, receiving in 1172 the honour of Limerick.

    Marcher titles
    In 1174, William became sheriff of Hereford. He died in about 1192 and was succeeded as Lord of Bramber by his son, William. He had also fathered two daughters, Maud and Sibilla, who married well and possibly a later son, named John.

    Nov 09 from http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~hwbradley/aqwg825.htm#13602 -

    William de BRAOSE Lord of Bramber [Parents] 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 was born 1105 in Bramber, Sussex, England. He died 8 1192/1193 in Bramber, Sussex, England. William married Bertha of HEREFORD on 1146 in Bramber, Sussex, England.

    Bertha of HEREFORD [Parents] 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 was born 1128 in Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England. She married William de BRAOSE Lord of Bramber on 1146 in Bramber, Sussex, England.

    They had the following children:

    F i Bertha de BRAOSE was born 1147.
    M ii William de BRAOSE Baron de Braose was born 1149 and died 9 Aug 1211.
    F iii Mabel de BRAOSE was born 1151 and died 1203.
    F iv Sybil de BRAOSE was born 1153 and died after 5 Feb 1228.
    M v John de BRAOSE 1 was born 1160 in Bramber, Sussex, England.

    1Weis, Frederick Lewis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (7th ed., Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1992.), 177-5, 194-5, 222-28, Los Angeles Public Library, Gen 974 W426 1992.

    2Cokayne, George Edward, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct, or Dormant (London: St. Catherine Press, 1910.), 11:321, Los Angeles Public Library, 929.721 C682.

    3Cokayne, G., CP, 1:21-22, 14:6.

    4Sanders, Ivor John, English Baronies: A Study of Their Origin and Descent, 1086-1327 (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1960.), pp. 7, 21, 105, Los Angeles Public Library, 929.722 S215.

    5Keats-Rohan, K.S.B., Domesday Descendants: A Prosopography of Persons Occurring in English Documents 1066-1166 (Rochester, New York: The Boydell Press, 2002.), pp. 346-7, Library of Congress, DA177 .K4 2002.

    6Cokayne, G., CP, 1:21e.

    7Curfman, Robert Joseph, "The Yale Descent from Braiose & Clare through Pigott of Buckinghamshire," The American Genealogist 56:1 (Jan 1980), pp. 1-2, Los Angeles Public Library.

    8Sanders, I., English Baronies, p. 7.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Bertha of HEREFORD

    1Weis, Frederick Lewis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (7th ed., Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1992.), 177-5, 194-5, 222-28, Los Angeles Public Library, Gen 974 W426 1992.

    2Cokayne, George Edward, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct, or Dormant (London: St. Catherine Press, 1910.), 1:21-2, 11:321, Los Angeles Public Library, 929.721 C682.

    3Sanders, Ivor John, English Baronies: A Study of Their Origin and Descent, 1086-1327 (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1960.), pp. 7, 21, Los Angeles Public Library, 929.722 S215.

    4Keats-Rohan, K.S.B., Domesday Descendants: A Prosopography of Persons Occurring in English Documents 1066-1166 (Rochester, New York: The Boydell Press, 2002.), pp. 346-7, Library of Congress, DA177 .K4 2002.

    5Curfman, Robert Joseph, "The Yale Descent from Braiose & Clare through Pigott of Buckinghamshire," The American Genealogist 56:1 (Jan 1980), p. 2, Los Angeles Public Library.




    Father: Philip DE BRAOSE b: 1074 in Briouze-Saint-Gervais, Orne, Basse-Nomandie, France
    Mother: Aenor DE TOTENEIS b: 1084 in Totnes, Devon, England

    Marriage 1 BERTHA b: 1128 in Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England
    Married: 1146 in Bramber, Sussex, England
    Children
    Has Children William DE BRAOSE b: 1149 in Bramber, Sussex, England
    Has Children Mabel DE BRAOSE b: 1151 in Bramber, Sussex, England
    Has Children Sybil DE BRAOSE b: 1153 in Bramber, Sussex, England
    Has Children Bertha DE BRAOSE b: 1147 in Bramber, Sussex, England

    end of biography

    William married Bertha of Hereford 0___ 1148, Herefordshire, England. Bertha (daughter of Miles of Gloucester, Knight, 1st Earl of Hereford and Sibyl de Neufmarche, Countess of Hereford, daughter of Bernard de Neufmarche, Lord of Brecknockshire and Nest Verch Osborn le Scrope) was born 0___ 1107, Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England; died ~ 1180, Bramber, Sussex, England. [Group Sheet]


  8. 33.  Bertha of Hereford was born 0___ 1107, Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England (daughter of Miles of Gloucester, Knight, 1st Earl of Hereford and Sibyl de Neufmarche, Countess of Hereford, daughter of Bernard de Neufmarche, Lord of Brecknockshire and Nest Verch Osborn le Scrope); died ~ 1180, Bramber, Sussex, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Bertha de Pitres
    • Also Known As: Lady of Abergavenny
    • Also Known As: Lady of Bramber
    • Also Known As: Lady of Hay

    Notes:

    Bertha of Hereford, also known as Bertha de Pitres (born c.1130), was the daughter of Miles de Gloucester, 1st Earl of Hereford, and a wealthy heiress, Sibyl de Neufmarchâe. She was the wife of William de Braose, 3rd Lord of Bramber to whom she brought many castles and Lordships, including Brecknock, Abergavenny, and Hay.

    Family

    Bertha was born in England in about 1130. She was a daughter of Miles, Earl of Hereford (1097- 24 December 1143) and Sibyl de Neufmarchâe.[1] She had two sisters, Margaret of Hereford,[2] who married Humphrey II de Bohun, by whom she had issue,[3] and Lucy of Hereford, who married Herbert FitzHerbert of Winchester, by whom she had issue.[citation needed] Her brothers, included Roger Fitzmiles, 2nd Earl of Hereford, Walter de Hereford, Henry Fitzmiles, William de Hereford, and Mahel de Hereford.[4]

    Her paternal grandparents were Walter FitzRoger de Pitres,Sheriff of Gloucester and Bertha de Balun of Bateden,[5] a descendant of Hamelin de Balun,[citation needed] and her maternal grandparents were Bernard de Neufmarchâe, Lord of Brecon, and Nesta ferch Osbern.[6] The latter was a daughter of Osbern FitzRichard of Richard's Castle, and Nesta ferch Gruffydd.[7] Bertha was a direct descendant, in the maternal line, of Gruffydd ap Llywelyn (1007- 5 August 1063) and Edith (Aldgyth), daughter of Elfgar, Earl of Mercia.[citation needed]

    Her father Miles served as Constable to King Stephen of England. He later served in the same capacity to Empress Matilda after he'd transferred his allegiance. In 1141, she made him Earl of Hereford in gratitude for his loyalty. On 24 December 1143, he was killed whilst on a hunting expedition in the Forest of Dean.[8]

    Marriage and issue

    Abergavenny Castle in Monmouthshire, Wales, was one of the castles Bertha of Hereford brought to her husband William de Braose, 3rd Lord of Bramber
    In 1150, she married William de Braose, 3rd Lord of Bramber (1112–1192), son of Philip de Braose, 2nd Lord of Bramber and Aenor, daughter of Judael of Totnes. William and Bertha had three daughters and two sons, including William de Braose, 4th Lord of Bramber.

    In 1173, her brothers all having died without issue, she brought the Lordships and castles of Brecknock and Abergavenny, to her husband.[8] Hay Castle had already passed to her from her mother, Sibyl of Neufmarche in 1165, whence it became part of the de Braose holdings.

    In 1174, her husband became Sheriff of Hereford.

    Her children include

    William de Braose, 4th Lord of Bramber, (1144/1153- 11 August 1211, Corbeil),[9][10] married Maud de St. Valery, daughter of Bernard de St. Valery, by whom he had 16 children.
    Roger de Braose[11]
    Bertha de Braose[12] (born 1151), married c.1175, Walter de Beauchamp (died 1235), son of William de Beauchamp and Joan de Walerie, by whom she had issue, including Walcherine de Beauchamp who married Joan Mortimer.
    Sibyl de Braose (died after 5 February 1227),[13] married William de Ferrers, 3rd Earl of Derby (1136- 21 October 1190 at Acre on crusade), son of Robert de Ferrers, 2nd Earl of Derby and Margaret Peverel, by whom she had issue.
    Maud de Braose, married John de Brompton, by whom she had issue.[citation needed]

    Legacy

    Bertha died on an unknown date. She was the ancestress of many noble English families which included the de Braoses, de Beauchamps, de Bohuns and de Ferrers; as well as the Irish families of de Lacy and de Burgh.[14][not in citation given]

    end of biography

    Children:
    1. 79. Sybil de Braose was born Bef 1151, Bramber, Sussex, England; died 5 Feb 1227, Derbyshire, England.
    2. Mabel de Braose was born 0___ 1151, Bramber, Sussex, England; died 0___ 1203, (Axholme, Lincolnshire, England).
    3. William de Braose, III, Knight, 4th Lord of Bramber was born 0___ 1153, Bramber, Sussex, England; died 9 Aug 1211, Corbeil, Marne, Champagne-Ardenne, France; was buried 0___ 1211, Seine-et-Marne, Île-de-France, France.
    4. Reginald de Braose, Knight was born 0___ 1162, (Bramber, West Sussex, England); died BY 1228; was buried Saint John's, Brecon, Wales.