Sir John de Mowbray, Knight, 4th Baron Mowbray

Male 1340 - 1368  (28 years)


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Generation: 1

  1. 1.  Sir John de Mowbray, Knight, 4th Baron Mowbray was born 24 Jun 1340, Epworth, Lincolnshire, England (son of John de Mowbray, Knight, 3rd Baron Mowbray and Joan Plantagenet, Baroness Mowbray); died 19 Oct 1368, Thrace, Turkey.

    Other Events:

    • Probate: 17 May 1369, Lincoln, Lincolnshire, England

    Notes:

    John de Mowbray, 4th Baron Mowbray (24 June 1340 – 1368) was an English peer. He was slain near Constantinople while en route to the Holy Land.

    Family

    John de Mowbray, born 25 June 1340 at Epworth, Lincolnshire, was the son of John de Mowbray, 3rd Baron Mowbray, of Axholme, Lincolnshire, by his second wife, Joan of Lancaster, sixth and youngest daughter of Henry, 3rd Earl of Lancaster.[1][2][3] He had two sisters, Blanche and Eleanor (for details concerning his sisters see the article on his father, John de Mowbray, 3rd Baron Mowbray.[4]

    Career

    He and twenty-six others were knighted by Edward III in July 1355[3] while English forces were at the Downs before sailing to France. In 1356 he served in a campaign in Brittany.[2][3] He had livery of his lands on 14 November 1361; however his inheritance was subject to the dower which his father had settled on his stepmother, Elizabeth de Vere.[3] By 1369 she had married Sir William de Cossington, son and heir of Stephen de Cossington of Cossington in Aylesford, Kent; not long after the marriage she and her new husband surrendered themselves to the Fleet prison for debt.[2][4] According to Archer, the cause may have been Mowbray's prosecution of his stepmother for waste of his estates; he had been awarded damages against her of almost ą1000.[3]

    In about 1343 an agreement had been made for a double marriage between, on the one hand, Mowbray and Audrey Montagu, the granddaughter of Thomas of Brotherton, and on the other hand, Mowbray's sister, Blanche, and Audrey's brother, Edward Montagu. Neither marriage took place.[3] Instead, about 1349 a double marriage was solemnized between, on the one hand, Mowbray and Elizabeth Segrave, and on the other hand, Mowbray's sister Blanche, and Elizabeth Segrave's brother John, Pope Clement VI having granted dispensations for the marriages at the request of the Earl of Lancaster in order to prevent 'disputes between the parents', who were neighbours.[5][3] Mowbray had little financial benefit from his marriage during his lifetime as a result of the very large jointure which had been awarded to Elizabeth Segrave's mother, Margaret, Duchess of Norfolk, who lived until 1399.[6][3] However, when Elizabeth Segrave's father, John de Segrave, 4th Baron Segrave, died on 1 April 1353, Edward III allowed Mowbray to receive a small portion of his wife's eventual inheritance. Estate accounts for 1367 indicate that Mowbray enjoyed an annual income of almost ą800 at that time.[3]

    Mowbray was summoned to Parliament from 14 August 1362 to 20 January 1366.[2] On 10 October 1367 he appointed attorneys in preparation for travel beyond the seas; these appointments were confirmed in the following year.[7] He was slain by the Turks near Constantinople while en route to the Holy Land.[8] A letter from the priory of 'Peyn' written in 1396 suggests that he was initially buried at the convent at Pera opposite Constantinople;[9][10] according to the letter, 'at the instance of his son Thomas' his bones had now been gathered and were being sent to England for burial with his ancestors.[7]

    His will was proved at Lincoln on 17 May 1369.[11][5] His wife, Elizabeth, predeceased him in 1368 by only a few months.[5]

    Marriage and issue

    Mowbray married, by papal dispensation dated 25 March 1349,[5] Elizabeth de Segrave (born 25 October 1338 at Croxton Abbey),[5] suo jure Lady Segrave, daughter and heiress of John de Segrave, 4th Baron Segrave (d.1353),[3] by Margaret, daughter and heiress of Thomas of Brotherton, son of Edward I.[12]

    They had two sons and three daughters:[12]

    John de Mowbray, 1st Earl of Nottingham (1 August 1365 – before 12 February 1383), who died unmarried, and was buried at the Whitefriars, London.[13]
    Thomas de Mowbray, 1st Duke of Norfolk.[14]
    Eleanor Mowbray (born before 25 May 1364),[5] who married John de Welles, 5th Baron Welles.[13][15]
    Margaret Mowbray (d. before 11 July 1401), who married, by licence dated 1 July 1369, Sir Reginald Lucy (d. 9 November 1437) of Woodcroft in Luton, Bedfordshire.[16]
    Joan Mowbray, who married firstly Sir Thomas Grey (1359 – 26 November or 3 December 1400) of Heaton near Norham, Northumberland, son of the chronicler Sir Thomas Grey, and secondly Sir Thomas Tunstall of Thurland in Tunstall, Lancashire.[17][13]

    Died:
    while en route to the Holy Land...

    was slain by the Turks at Thrace on 17 June 1368.

    John married Elizabeth Segrave ~ 1343. Elizabeth (daughter of John Segrave, 4th Baron Segrave and Margaret Brotherton, Countess of Norfolk) was born 25 Oct 1338, Blaby, Leicestershire, England; died 24 May 1368, Leicestershire, England; was buried Croxton Abbey, Blaby, Leicestershire, England. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. Joan Mowbray was born ~ 1361; died Aft 30 Nov 1402.
    2. Thomas de Mowbray, Knight, 1st Duke of Norfolk was born 22 Mar 1366, Epworth, Isle of Axholme, Lincolnshire, England; died 22 Sep 1399, Venice, Itlaly.
    3. Eleanor de Mowbray was born Bef 1381; died 13 Aug 1417.

Generation: 2

  1. 2.  John de Mowbray, Knight, 3rd Baron Mowbray was born 29 Nov 1310, Hovingham, Yorkshire, England (son of John de Mowbray, I, 8th Baron Mowbray and Aline de Braose); died 4 Oct 1361, York, Yorkshire, England; was buried Bedford Greyfriars, Friars Minor, Bedford, Bedforshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Baron of Axholme
    • Also Known As: Baron of Bramber, Sussex
    • Also Known As: Keeper of Berwick-Upon-Tweed
    • Military: Battle of Neville's Cross

    Notes:

    Mowbray /'mo?bri/ is an Anglo-Norman baronial house, derived from Montbray in Normandy. From this village came Geoffrey de Montbray who came to be Bishop of Coutances and accompanied Duke William of Normandy at the Conquest of England in 1066.[1]

    For his support he was granted some 280 English manors (each about the size of a village). His nephew Robert de Montbrai became Earl of Northumberland in 1080, but he rebelled against William II (Rufus) and was captured and imprisoned in Windsor Castle for thirty years. His divorced wife, Matilda, married Nigel d'Aubigny (sometimes spelt d'Albini) whose family came from Saint-Martin-d'Aubigny, 16 km. west of Saint-Lăo and 15 km. north of Coutances. However, Robert was the maternal uncle of Nigel and although Nigel inherited Robert's vast landholdings, the marriage was annulled for consanguinity before any issue. By his second wife, Gundred, he had a son and heir Roger whose name was changed by royal command from d'Aubigny to de Montbray. The family flourished (Baronial Pedigree) and the name spelling evolved to Mowbray.[citation needed]

    The baronial line died out in England with a young heiress ca. 1475, although a son of an earlier generation had founded a dynasty in Scotland where issue has survived. The family was active up and down the east side of the country and settled predominantly in the counties of Durham, Lincolnshire and Leicestershire in historic times. Since then there has been the usual migration into other areas and overseas.[citation needed]

    As with any name, there are numerous spelling variations over time, but the major ones are Moubray, the Scottish version, and Mowberry which stemmed from a Leicestershire migration into Glinton, Northamptonshire, where the variant became established and eventually spread into a Lincolnshire branch. One of the many heraldic badges of the house was a mulberry tree.[citation needed]

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    John de Mowbray, 3rd Baron Mowbray (29 November 1310 - 4 October 1361) was the only son of John de Mowbray, 2nd Baron Mowbray, by his first wife, Aline de Brewes,[1] daughter of William de Braose, 2nd Baron Braose.

    He was born 29 November 1310 at Hovingham, Yorkshire.[1]

    Mowbray's father, the 2nd Baron, sided with Thomas, 2nd Earl of Lancaster, at the Battle of Boroughbridge on 16 March 1322 against Edward II, and was taken prisoner at the battle. He was hanged at York on 23 March 1322, and his estates forfeited.[1] His wife and son John were imprisoned in the Tower of London until Edward II was deposed by his wife, Queen Isabella, and Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March. The Mowbrays were released in 1327.

    The 3rd Baron de Mowbray was reportedly in Edward III's good graces, being present in France in the War of the Breton Succession for the sieges of Nantes and Aguillon. He was also on the English side at the Battle of Neville's Cross in the Second War of Scottish Independence.

    He died of the plague at York on 4 October 1361, and was buried at the Friars Minor in Bedford.[2]

    Marriages and issue

    He married firstly, before 26 February 1322, Maud de Holand, daughter of Robert de Holland, 1st Baron Holand, by Maud la Zouche, daughter and coheiress of Alan la Zouche, 1st Baron la Zouche of Ashby. The marriage was later declared void.[3]

    He married secondly, between 28 February 1327 and 4 June 1328, Joan of Lancaster, sixth and youngest daughter of Henry, 3rd Earl of Lancaster, by whom he had a son and two daughters:[3]

    Blanche Mowbray (d. 21 July 1409), who was contracted to marry Edward de Montagu (d. before February 1359), son and heir apparent of Edward de Montagu, 1st Baron Montagu (died 3 July 1461), by Alice of Norfolk, daughter and heiress of Thomas of Brotherton; however the marriage did not take place.

    She married firstly, by papal dispensation dated 21 March 1349, John de Segrave (d. before 1 April 1353), son and heir apparent of John Segrave, 4th Baron Segrave by Margaret, Duchess of Norfolk, daughter and heiress of Thomas of Brotherton;
    secondly, as his second wife, Sir Robert Bertam (d.1363);
    thirdly, before 5 June 1372, Thomas de Poynings, 2nd Baron Poynings (d. before 25 June 1375), son and heir of Michael de Poynings, 1st Baron Poynings;
    fourthly, before 21 March 1378, Sir John de Worth (d. before 1 June 1391); and
    fifthly, before 5 November 1394, Sir John Wiltshire. She had no issue by any of her husbands.[5]

    Eleanor Mowbray, who married firstly, as his second wife, Roger la Warr, 3rd Baron De La Warr (d. 27 August 1370),[6] by whom she had a daughter, Joan La Warr, who married Thomas West, 1st Baron West; and secondly Sir Lewis Clifford of Princes Risborough, Buckinghamshire, brother of Hugh de Clifford.[6][7][8][9]

    He married thirdly, by papal dispensation of 4 May 1351, Elizabeth de Vere (d. 14 or 16 August 1375), widow of Sir Hugh Courtenay (d. before 2 September 1349), and daughter of John de Vere, 7th Earl of Oxford, by Maud de Badlesmere, daughter of Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 1st Baron Badlesmere.[2]

    After Mowbray's death, his widow, Elizabeth de Vere, married, before 26 November 1368, Sir William de Cossington.[2]

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    3rd Lord Mowbray, Baron of Axholme, Lincolnshire, Baron of Bramber, Sussex, lord of Gower in Wales, Keeper of Berwick-Upon-Tweed.

    Only son and heir to Sir John de Mowbray and Aline de Brewes. grandson of Sir Roger de Mowbray and Rose de Clare, William de Brewse and Agnes.

    Husband of Joan of Lancaster Plantagenet, youngest daughter of Henry of Lancaster and Maud de Chaworth. They were married between 1327 and 1328 and had one son and two daughters:
    Sir John, 4th Lord Mowbray
    Blanche, who would marry John Seagrave, Sir Robert Bertram, Lord Thomas de Poynings, John de Worth and John Wiltshire.
    Eleanor, who married Roger de la Warre

    Secondly, husband of Elizabeth de Vere, daughter of John, Earl of Oxford and Maud Badlesmere, daughter of Lord Badlesmere. They married before 04 May 1351, the date of their papal dispensation as they were related in the 3rd and 4th degree. John and Elizabeth had no surviving children.

    John was baptized at Hoveringham, and betrothed to Maud de Holand, daughter of Sir Robert de Holand and Maud de la Zouche at an early age, but the marriage never took place. After his father's execution in 1322, John was twelve, he and his mother were imprisoned at the Tower of London by the Despensers. When Edward III became King, they were released, their lands and properties returned. John was summoned to Parliament 1327 to 160, and served in the Scottish and French wars.

    Sir John was one of the commanders of the English Army at the Battle of Neville's Cross, Durham in 1346, where Lanercost (one of the chroniclers of the times) loudly sang his praises: "He was full of grace and kindness - the conduct both of himself and his men was such as to resound to their perpetual honour." He was also present at the siege of Calais in 1347. In 1354 his title to Gower was contested by Thomas Beauchamp, the Earl of Warwick, and the Court of Common Pleas settled with Warwick. Sir John witnessed the surrender of Balliol of the Scottish crown in favor of Edward in 1356.

    John died of the pestilence at York, and was buried at the Church of Friars Minor at Bedford. Elizabeth would remarry to Sir William Cossington of Kent, and she died 16 August 1375.

    Military:
    The Battle of Neville's Cross took place to the west of Durham, England, on 17 October 1346. The culmination of a Scottish invasion of northern England, the battle ended with the rout of the Scots and the capture of their king, David II of Scotland.

    Died:
    He died of the plague at York...

    John married Joan Plantagenet, Baroness Mowbray 1326-1327, (Yorkshire, England). Joan (daughter of Henry Plantagenet, 3rd Earl of Lancaster and Leicester and Maud Chaworth) was born ~ 1312, Norfolk, England; died 7 Jul 1349, Yorkshire, England; was buried Byland Abbey, Coxwold, North Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 3.  Joan Plantagenet, Baroness Mowbray was born ~ 1312, Norfolk, England (daughter of Henry Plantagenet, 3rd Earl of Lancaster and Leicester and Maud Chaworth); died 7 Jul 1349, Yorkshire, England; was buried Byland Abbey, Coxwold, North Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Joan of Lancaster
    • Alt Birth: 0___ 1312, Monmouthshire, Wales

    Notes:

    Joan of Lancaster (c.1312-7 July 1349) sometimes called Joan Plantagenet after her dynasty's name, was the third daughter of Henry, 3rd Earl of Lancaster and Maud Chaworth.

    Marriage

    Joan of Lancaster was born circa 1312.[1] She married John de Mowbray, 3rd Baron Mowbray sometime between February and June 1327.[1][2] They had three children:[2]

    Blanche de Mowbray (died 1409), married firstly John Segrave, secondly Robert Bertram, thirdly Thomas Poynings, fourthly Sir John Worth, and fifthly Sir John Wiltshire.
    Eleanor de Mowbray, married firstly Roger La Warre, Lord La Warre and secondly Sir Lewis de Clifford.
    John de Mowbray, 4th Baron Mowbray (25 June 1340–1368), married Elizabeth de Segrave
    She died in Yorkshire, England of plague. Her husband remarried to Elizabeth de Vere, widow of Sir Hugh de Courtenay.

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    Joan was the fifth daughter of Henry Plantagenet, Earl of Lancaster and Maud de Chaworth, granddaughter of Edmund of England, the son of King Henry III, and Blanche of Artois, Sir Patrick de Chaworth and Isabel de Beauchamp.

    Joan was the wife of Sir John de Mowbray, the son of Sir John de Mowbray and Aline de Brewes. They were married between 1327 and 1329 and had one son and two daughters:
    Sir John, 4th Lord Mowbray
    Blanche, who would marry John Seagrave, Sir Robert Bertram, Lord Thomas de Poynings, John de Worth and John Wiltshire.
    Eleanor, who married Roger de la Warre.

    Buried:
    Byland Abbey is a ruined abbey and a small village in the Ryedale district of North Yorkshire, England, in the North York Moors National Park.

    Images ... https://www.google.com/search?q=byland+abbey&espv=2&biw=1440&bih=815&site=webhp&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&sqi=2&ved=0ahUKEwj6svLG7MLKAhUEFh4KHfJ4BGgQsAQILg&dpr=1

    Died:
    She died in Yorkshire, England of plague...

    Notes:

    Married:
    sometime between February and June 1327 and his 2nd marriage...

    Children:
    1. Blanche Mowbray died 21 Jul 1409.
    2. 1. John de Mowbray, Knight, 4th Baron Mowbray was born 24 Jun 1340, Epworth, Lincolnshire, England; died 19 Oct 1368, Thrace, Turkey.


Generation: 3

  1. 4.  John de Mowbray, I, 8th Baron Mowbray was born 4 Sep 1286, Thirsk, Yorkshire, England (son of Roger de Mowbray, III, Knight, 1st Baron of Mowbray and Rose de Clare); died 23 Mar 1322, York, Yorkshire, England.

    Notes:

    John de Mowbray, 2nd Baron Mowbray (4 September 1286 – 23 March 1322) was the son of Roger de Mowbray, 1st Baron Mowbray. Lord of the manors of Tanfield and Well, Yorkshire.

    De Mowbray served in the Scottish wars of Edward I. The baron held such offices as sheriff of Yorkshire, governor of the city of York, a warden of the Scottish marches, governor of Malton and Scarborough Castles.

    He took part in the rebellion of Thomas, Earl of Lancaster. He was captured at the battle of Boroughbridge and subsequently hanged at York.

    John de Mowbray married Aline de Braose, (b. 1291 d. ca 1331), daughter of William de Braose, 2nd Baron Braose and Lord of Gower.[1] They had at least two sons:

    John,(b. 29 November 1310, Yorkshire, England d.1361 who succeeded his father to the barony.
    Alexander, (c. 1314 – c. 1391.)

    References

    Jump up ^ Davies, John; Jenkins, Nigel; Baines, Menna; Lynch, Peredur, eds. (2008). The Welsh Academy Encyclopaedia of Wales. Cardiff: University of Wales Press. p. 577. ISBN 978-0-7083-1953-6.

    Bibliography

    Burke, Sir Bernard. "Mowbray-Earls of Nottingham, Dukes of Norfolk, Earls-Marshal, Earls of Warren and Surrey." A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages, of the British Empire. London: Wm Clowes and Sons, Ltd, 1962. p. 387.
    G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, "The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant" (1910–1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume 9, page 379.

    Died:
    He took part in the rebellion of Thomas, Earl of Lancaster. He was captured at the battle of Boroughbridge and subsequently hanged at York.

    John — Aline de Braose. Aline (daughter of William de Braose, VII, Knight, 2nd Baron de Braose and Agnes LNU) was born 0___ 1291; died ~ 1331. [Group Sheet]


  2. 5.  Aline de Braose was born 0___ 1291 (daughter of William de Braose, VII, Knight, 2nd Baron de Braose and Agnes LNU); died ~ 1331.
    Children:
    1. Christiana Mowbray was born ~ 1305, Kirklington, North Yorkshire, England; died 25 Dec 1362.
    2. 2. John de Mowbray, Knight, 3rd Baron Mowbray was born 29 Nov 1310, Hovingham, Yorkshire, England; died 4 Oct 1361, York, Yorkshire, England; was buried Bedford Greyfriars, Friars Minor, Bedford, Bedforshire, England.
    3. Alexander de Mowbray, Chief Justice of England was born ~ 1314, Kirklington, North Yorkshire, England; died ~ 1368, (Yorkshire) England; was buried Kirklington, North Yorkshire, England.

  3. 6.  Henry Plantagenet, 3rd Earl of Lancaster and LeicesterHenry Plantagenet, 3rd Earl of Lancaster and Leicester was born 0___ 1281, Grosmont Castle, Monmouth, England (son of Edmund "Crouchback" Plantagenet, Prince of England and Blanche de Capet d'Artois, Queen of Navarre, Princess of France); died 22 Sep 1345, Leicester, Leicestershire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Military: Appointed Captain-General of all The King's Forces in The Marches of Scotland.
    • Death: 25 Mar 1345

    Notes:

    Henry, 3rd Earl of Leicester and Lancaster (c. 1281 – 22 September 1345) was an English nobleman, one of the principals behind the deposition of Edward II of England.

    Origins

    He was the younger son of Edmund Crouchback, 1st Earl of Lancaster, Earl of Leicester,[1] who was a son of King Henry III by his wife Eleanor of Provence. Henry's mother was Blanche of Artois, Queen Dowager of Navarre.

    Henry's elder brother Thomas, 2nd Earl of Lancaster, succeeded their father in 1296, but Henry was summoned to Parliament on 6 February 1298/99 by writ directed to Henrico de Lancastre nepoti Regis ("Henry of Lancaster, nephew of the king", Edward I), by which he is held to have become Baron Lancaster. He took part in the Siege of Caerlaverock in July 1300.

    Petition for succession and inheritance

    After a period of longstanding opposition to King Edward II and his advisors, including joining two open rebellions, Henry's brother Thomas was convicted of treason, executed and had his lands and titles forfeited in 1322. Henry did not participate in his brother's rebellions; he later petitioned for his brother's lands and titles, and on 29 March 1324 he was invested as Earl of Leicester. A few years later, shortly after his accession in 1327, the young Edward III of England returned the earldom of Lancaster to him, along with other lordships such as that of Bowland.

    Revenge

    On the Queen's return to England in September 1326 with Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March, Henry joined her party against King Edward II, which led to a general desertion of the king's cause and overturned the power of Hugh le Despenser, 1st Earl of Winchester, and his namesake son Hugh the younger Despenser.

    He was sent in pursuit and captured the king at Neath in South Wales. He was appointed to take charge of the king and was responsible for his custody at Kenilworth Castle.

    Full restoration and reward[edit]
    Henry was appointed "chief advisor" for the new king Edward III of England,[2] and was also appointed captain-general of all the king's forces in the Scottish Marches.[3] He was appointed High Sheriff of Lancashire in 1327. He also helped the young king to put an end to Mortimer's regency and tyranny, also had him declared a traitor and executed in 1330.

    Loss of sight

    In about the year 1330, he became blind.

    Nickname

    According to Froissart, he was nicknamed Wryneck, or Tort-col in French, possibly due to a medical condition.[citation needed]

    Succession

    He was succeeded as Earl of Lancaster and Leicester by his eldest son, Henry of Grosmont, who subsequently became Duke of Lancaster.

    Issue[edit]


    He married Maud Chaworth, before 2 March 1296/1297.[4]

    Henry and Maud had seven children:

    Henry, Earl of Derby, (about 1300–1360/61)
    Blanche of Lancaster, (about 1305–1380) married Thomas Wake, 2nd Baron Wake of Liddell
    Matilda of Lancaster, (about 1310–1377); married William de Burgh, 3rd Earl of Ulster and had descendants.
    Joan of Lancaster, (about 1312–1345); married John de Mowbray, 3rd Baron Mowbray and had descendants
    Isabel of Lancaster, Abbess of Amesbury, (about 1317-after 1347)
    Eleanor of Lancaster, (about 1318–1371/72) married (1) John De Beaumont and (2) 5 Feb. 1344/5, Richard FitzAlan, 10th Earl of Arundel and had descendants
    Mary of Lancaster, (about 1320–1362), who married Henry de Percy, 3rd Baron Percy, and was the mother of Henry Percy, 1st Earl of Northumberland.

    In about the year 1330, he became blind.

    Buried:
    at the Monastery of Canons...

    Henry married Maud Chaworth Bef 2 Mar 1297. Maud (daughter of Patrick Chaworth, Knight, Lord of Kidwelly and Isabella Beauchamp) was born 2 Feb 1282, Kidwelly, Carmarthenshire, Wales; died 3 Dec 1322, Montisfort, Hampshire, England; was buried Montisfort, Hampshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 7.  Maud Chaworth was born 2 Feb 1282, Kidwelly, Carmarthenshire, Wales (daughter of Patrick Chaworth, Knight, Lord of Kidwelly and Isabella Beauchamp); died 3 Dec 1322, Montisfort, Hampshire, England; was buried Montisfort, Hampshire, England.

    Notes:

    Maud de Chaworth (2 February 1282-3 Dec 1322) was an English noblewoman and wealthy heiress. She was the only child of Patrick de Chaworth. Sometime before 2 March 1297, she married Henry, 3rd Earl of Lancaster, by whom she had seven children.

    Parents

    Maud was the daughter of Sir Patrick de Chaworth, Baron of Kidwelly, in Carmarthenshire, South Wales, and Isabella de Beauchamp. Her maternal grandfather was William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick. Her father, Patrick de Chaworth died on 7 July 1283. He was thought to be 30 years old. Three years later, in 1286, Isabella de Beauchamp married Hugh Despenser the Elder and had two sons and four daughters by him. This made Maud the half-sister of Hugh the younger Despenser. Her mother, Isabella de Beauchamp, died in 1306.

    Childhood

    Maud was only a year old when her father died, and his death left her a wealthy heiress. However, because she was an infant, she became a ward of Eleanor of Castile, Queen consort of King Edward I of England. Upon Queen Eleanor's death in 1290, her husband, King Edward I, granted Maud's marriage to his brother Edmund, Earl of Lancaster on 30 December 1292.
    Edmund Crouchback, 1st Earl of Lancaster, Earl of Leicester was the son of Eleanor of Provence and Henry III of England. He first married Aveline de Forz, Countess of Albemarle, in 1269. Later, in Paris on 3 February 1276, he married Blanche of Artois, who was a niece of Louis IX of France and Queen of Navarre by her first marriage. Blanche and Edmund had four children together, one of whom was Henry, who would later become 3rd Earl of Leicester and Maud Chaworth’s husband.

    Marriage and issue


    Edmund Crouchback betrothed Maud to his son Henry, 3rd Earl of Lancaster.[1] Henry and Maud were married sometime before 2 March 1297. Henry was probably born between the years 1280 and 1281, making him somewhat older than Maud, but not by much since they were either fourteen or fifteen-years-old.

    Since Maud inherited her father’s property, Henry also acquired this property through the rights of marriage. Some of that property was of the following: Hampshire, Glamorgan, Wiltshire, and Carmarthenshire. Henry was the nephew of the King of England, as well as being closely related to the French royal family line. Henry's half-sister Jeanne (or Juana) was Queen of Navarre in her own right and married Philip IV of France. Henry was the uncle of King Edward II's Queen Isabella and of three Kings of France. He was also the younger brother of Thomas (Earl of Lancaster) and first cousin of Edward II.

    Maud is often described as the "Countess of Leicester" or "Countess of Lancaster", but she never bore the titles as she died in 1322, before her husband received them. Henry was named "Earl of Leicester" in 1324 and "Earl of Lancaster" in 1327. Henry never remarried and died on 22 September 1345, when he would have been in his mid-sixties. All but one of his seven children with Maud outlived him.

    Maud and Henry had seven children:

    Blanche of Lancaster, (about 1302/05–1380); Maud’s eldest daughter was probably born between 1302 and 1305, and was named after her father’s mother Blanche of Artois. Around 9 October 1316, she married Thomas Wake, 2nd Baron Wake of Liddell. Blanch was about forty-five when Thomas died, and she lived as a widow for more than thirty years. She was one of the executers of her brother Henry’s will when he died in 1361. Blanche outlived all her siblings, dying shortly before 12 July 1380 in her seventies. Born in the reign of Edward I, she survived all the way into the reign of his great grandson Richard II.

    Henry of Grosmont, 1st Duke of Lancaster, (about 1310–1361); Maud’s only son Henry was usually called Henry of Grosmont to distinguish him from his father. He was one of the great magnates of the fourteenth century, well known and highly respected. He took after his father and was well-educated, literate, and pious; he was a soldier and a diplomat. Henry produced his own memoir "Le Livre de Seyntz Medicines", which was completed in 1354. At one point, Henry of Grosmont was considered to be the richest man in England aside from the Prince of Wales. He emerged as a political figure in his own right within England: he was knighted and represented his father in Parliament. He married Isabella, daughter of Henry, Lord Beaumont. His daughter Blanche was betrothed and eventually married to the son of Edward III, John of Gaunt. In 1361, Henry was killed by a new outbreak of the Black Death, leaving John of Gaunt his inheritance and eventually his title through his daughter Blanche.[2]

    Maud of Lancaster, Countess of Ulster, (c. 1310 – 5 May 1377). There is some discrepancy as to when Maud died.[3][4] She married William de Burgh, 3rd Earl of Ulster in 1327. They had one child, Elizabeth de Burgh, who was born 6 July 1332. Eleven months after the birth of their child, Earl William was murdered at “Le Ford” in Belfast, apparently by some of his own men. The countess Maud fled to England with her baby and stayed with the royal family. In 1337, Maud of Lancaster managed to ensure that the Justiciar of Ireland was forbidden to pardon her husband’s killers. She fought for her dower rights and exerted some influence there. She remarried in 1344 to Ralph Ufford and returned to Ireland, where she had another daughter, Maud. After her second husband fell ill in 1346, she again returned to England. Maud of Lancaster died on 5 May 1377.
    Joan of Lancaster, (about 1312–1345); married between 28 February and 4 June 1327 to John de Mowbray, 3rd Baron Mowbray. John’s father was executed for reasons unknown, and young John was imprisoned in the Tower of London along with his mother Alice de Braose until late 1326. A large part of his inheritance was granted to Hugh Despenser the Younger, who was his future wife’s uncle; however, he was set free in 1327 before the marriage. Joan of Lancaster probably died 7July 1349. Joan and John, 3rd Lord Mowbray had six children.

    Isabel of Lancaster, Prioress of Amesbury, (about 1317–after 1347); One of the youngest daughters of Maud and Henry, she lived quietly, going on pilgrimages and spending a lot of time alone. She also spent a great deal of time outside the cloister on non-spiritual matters. Her father had given her quite a bit of property, which she administered herself. She owned hunting dogs and had personal servants. She used her family connections to secure privileges and concessions.[5]

    Eleanor of Lancaster, (1318- Sept. 1372); married John Beaumont between September and November 1330. Eleanor bore John a son, Henry, who married Margaret de Vere, a sister of Elizabeth and Thomas de Vere, Earl of Oxford. John Beaumont was killed in a jousting tournament in Northampton on 14 April 1342. Eleanor then became the mistress of Richard FitzAlan, 10th Earl of Arundel, who was married to her first cousin Isabel, daughter of Hugh Despenser the Younger. Richard obtained a divorce from the Pope and married Eleanor on 5 February 1345 in the presence of Edward III. They had five children together, three sons and two daughters. Eleanor died on 11 January 1372.

    Mary of Lancaster, (about 1320–1362); married Henry, Lord Percy before 4 September 1334; he fought at the battle of Crecy in 1346, and served in Gascony under the command of his brother-in-law Henry of Grosmont. Their son was Henry Percy, 1st Earl of Northumberland. Mary of Lancaster died on 1 September 1362, the year after her brother Henry.

    Birth:
    Photo, map & history of Kidwelly ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kidwelly

    Children:
    1. Henry of Grosmont, Knight, 1st Duke of Lancaster was born ~ 1310, Grosmont Castle, Grosmont, Monmouthshire, Wales; died 23 Mar 1361, Leicester Castle, Leicester, Leicestershire, England.
    2. 3. Joan Plantagenet, Baroness Mowbray was born ~ 1312, Norfolk, England; died 7 Jul 1349, Yorkshire, England; was buried Byland Abbey, Coxwold, North Yorkshire, England.
    3. Eleanor Plantagenet, Countess of Arundel was born 11 Sep 1318, Castle, Grosmont, Monmouth, Wales; died 11 Jan 1372, Arundel, West Sussex, England; was buried Lewes Priory, Sussex, England.
    4. Mary Plantagenet, Baroness of Percy was born 1319-1320, Tutbury Castle, Staffordshire, England; died 1 Sep 1362, Alnwick, Northumberland, England; was buried Alnwick, Northumberland, England.


Generation: 4

  1. 8.  Roger de Mowbray, III, Knight, 1st Baron of MowbrayRoger de Mowbray, III, Knight, 1st Baron of Mowbray was born 0___ 1245, Lincolnshire, England (son of Roger de Mowbray, II, 6th Baron of Mowbray and Maud de Beauchamp); died 21 Nov 1297, Ghent, Belgium.

    Other Events:

    • Alt Birth: 1254-1266, (Lincolnshire, England)

    Notes:

    Roger de Mowbray, 1st Baron Mowbray (1254–21 November 1297), was an English peer and soldier.

    The son of another Roger de Mowbray, and grandson of William de Mowbray,[1] he served in the Welsh and Gascon Wars. He was summoned to the Parliament of Simon de Montfort in 1265, but such summonses have later been declared void. However, in 1283 he was summoned to Parliament by King Edward I as Lord Mowbray.[2]

    De Mowbray married Rose, a daughter of Richard de Clare, 6th Earl of Gloucester. They had at least two children:

    John, who would succeed his father to the barony
    Alexander, who apparently took up residence in Scotland.[2]

    References

    Jump up ^ Tait, James (1894). "Mowbray, William de". In Lee, Sidney. Dictionary of National Biography. 39. London: Smith, Elder & Co. p. 238.
    ^ Jump up to: a b Burke, Sir Bernard (1866). "Mowbray-Earls of Nottingham, Dukes of Norfolk, Earls-Marshal, Earls of Warren and Surrey". A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages, of the British Empire. London: Wm Clowes and Sons. p. 387. ISBN 9780806307893. Reprinted: 1985.

    end of biography

    About Roger de Mowbray, 1st Baron Mowbray
    Roger de Mowbray

    1st Lord Mowbray

    +1297 Ghent

    (DRGD) Considered to be the most senior Baron by Writ. Interred at Fountains Abbey.

    10995

    Roger de Mowbray, 1st Baron Mowbray (died 21 November 1297), was an English peer and soldier.

    The son of another Roger de Mowbray, served in the Welsh and Gascon Wars. He was summoned to the Parliament of Simon de Montfort in 1265, but such summons have later been declared void. However, in 1283 he was summoned to Parliament by the King as Lord Mowbray.

    De Mowbray married Rose, a descendant of Richard de Clare, Earl of Hertford. They had at least two children:

    John, who would succeed his father to the barony

    Alexander, who apparently took up residence in Scotland.

    References

    Burke, Sir Bernard. "Mowbray-Earls of Nottingham, Dukes of Norfolk, Earls-Marshal, Earls of WArren and Surrey." A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages, of the British Empire. London: Wm Clowes and Sons, Ltd., 1962. p. 387.

    source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_de_Mowbray,_1st_Baron_Mowbray

    Name: *Roger III De Mowbray

    Given Name: *Roger III

    Surname: De Mowbray

    Sex: M

    Birth: ABT 1250 in ,Axholme,Lincolnshire,England

    Death: in ,Ghent,Holland

    Ancestral File #: 8503-8D

    Reference Number: 6240

    Marriage 1 *Roese (Rohesia) De Clare b: 17 OCT 1252 in ,Tonbridge,Kent,England

    Married: 1270 in 14 Aug 1991 Ogden

    Children

    Alexander De Mowbray b: 1288 in Epworth,Lincolnshire,England
    *John , 2Nd Lord Mowbray De Mowbray b: 4 SEP 1286 in Thirsk,Chamb,Norfolk,England
    http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=afesmire&id=I19066

    Roger de Mowbray, 1st Baron Mowbray

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Jump to: navigation, search

    Roger de Mowbray, 1st Baron Mowbray (died 21 November 1297), was an English peer and soldier.

    The son of another Roger de Mowbray, served in the Welsh and Gascon Wars. He was summoned to the Parliament of Simon de Montfort in 1265, but such summons have later been declared void. However, in 1283 he was summoned to Parliament by the King as Lord Mowbray.

    De Mowbray married Rose, a descendant of Richard de Clare, Earl of Hertford. They had at least two children:

    * John, who would succeed his father to the barony
    * Alexander, who apparently took up residence in Scotland.
    [edit] References

    * Burke, Sir Bernard. "Mowbray-Earls of Nottingham, Dukes of Norfolk, Earls-Marshal, Earls of WArren and Surrey." A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages, of the British Empire. London: Wm Clowes and Sons, Ltd., 1962. p. 387.
    Roger de Mowbray, 1st Baron Mowbray (died 21 November 1297), was an English peer and soldier.

    The son of another Roger de Mowbray, served in the Welsh and Gascon Wars. He was summoned to the Parliament of Simon de Montfort in 1265, but such summons have later been declared void. However, in 1283 he was summoned to Parliament by the King as Lord Mowbray.

    De Mowbray married Rose, a descendant of Richard de Clare, Earl of Hertford. They had at least two children:

    * John, who would succeed his father to the barony
    * Alexander, who apparently took up residence in Scotland.
    [edit] References

    * Burke, Sir Bernard. "Mowbray-Earls of Nottingham, Dukes of Norfolk, Earls-Marshal, Earls of WArren and Surrey." A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages, of the British Empire. London: Wm Clowes and Sons, Ltd., 1962. p. 387.
    Peerage of England

    Preceded by

    New Creation Baron Mowbray

    1295–1298 Succeeded by

    John de Mowbray

    Knight, 1st Lord of Mowbray of Thirek and Hovingham, MP 1295-7

    Roger de Mowbray, 1st Baron Mowbray

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Roger de Mowbray, 1st Baron Mowbray (died 21 November 1297), was an English peer and soldier.

    The son of another Roger de Mowbray, served in the Welsh and Gascon Wars. He was summoned to the Parliament of Simon de Montfort in 1265, but such summons have later been declared void. However, in 1283 he was summoned to Parliament by the King as Lord Mowbray.

    De Mowbray married Rose, a descendant of Richard de Clare, Earl of Hertford. They had at least two children:

    John, who would succeed his father to the barony

    Alexander, who apparently took up residence in Scotland.

    [edit]References

    Burke, Sir Bernard. "Mowbray-Earls of Nottingham, Dukes of Norfolk, Earls-Marshal, Earls of WArren and Surrey." A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages, of the British Empire. London: Wm Clowes and Sons, Ltd., 1962. p. 387.

    the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia
    Roger de Mowbray, 1st Baron Mowbray (died 21 November 1297), was an English peer and soldier.

    The son of another Roger de Mowbray, served in the Welsh and Gascon Wars. He was summoned to the Parliament of Simon de Montfort in 1265, but such summons have later been declared void. However, in 1283 he was summoned to Parliament by the King as Lord Mowbray.

    De Mowbray married Rose, a descendant of Richard de Clare, 6th Earl of Gloucester. They had at least two children:

    John, who would succeed his father to the barony Alexander, who apparently took up residence in Scotland. Roger was born about 1257 and in 1278 (6EdwardI) he had livery of his lands. In1282 and 1283 he was summoned for military service against the Welsh. They had revolted against the Marcher Lords, who killed their leader, Llewellyn, at Ironbridge, Shropshire. In June 1283 Roger was at the Parliament at Shrewsbury and again in 1287 the King required his presence at a military council at Gloucester.

    In 1291 he was called into military service against the Scots, and again in 1296. There had been a Parliament with the Scots at Norham in the former year, and in the latter there was a savage sacking of Berwick with Earl Warrenne being made ruler of Scotland and the Stone of Scone removed to London.

    From 1278 to 1294 there were quo warrento enquiries challenging the jurisdictional rights of the magnates. Perhaps it was as an outcome of these that in 1295 Roger was created Lord Mowbray, Baron by Writ. As no previous barony had been created by writ, he became premier baron of England.

    In 1294 there was an outbreak of war with France when Philip IV confiscated Gascony. In September 1294 Roger was going there on the King's services. In 1297 Roger again attended Parliament, this time at Salisbury. A record from 1295 shows 53 magnates summoned to Parliament

    There is a record of Walter de Burnham agreeing to serve in Flanders under Roger de Mowbray in 1297. In that year and Edward I left for Flanders, and England was on the verge of civil war. Roger died at Ghent in 1297 and his body was brought back to be re-interred in Fountains Abbey where there is effigy in stone.

    His marriage to Rose de Clare, daughter of the Duke of Gloucester, had been arranged as early as his 13th. birthday by his and Rose's mothers. It took place in 1270 and produced a son and heir, John and perhaps a second son Geoffrey.

    The entry in Burke's Extinct Peerage makes reference to a son Alexander who went to Scotland, but in the Mowbray Journal, Stephen Goslin claims that Alexander was in fact one of the seven sons of Geoffrey de Mowbray of Scotland, descended from Philip de Mowbray.

    Inquisition Post Mortem This lists Roger's land in the following counties:

    Essex: at Doddinghurst and Easthorpe.

    Leicestershire: at Melton Mowbray, Kirkby on the Wreak, Frithby, Welby, Kettleby, Stathern, Eastwell, Goadby, Burton Lazars,

    Wyfordby, Little Dalby, Sysonby, Queeniborough, Cold Newton, Hoby, Pickwell, Leesthorpe, Bitteswell, Ullesthorpe, Ashton Flamville, Thrussington, Radcliffe.

    Lincolnshire: at Gainsborough, Scawby, Garthorpe, Blyborough, Burton by Lincoln, and the whole of the Isle of Axholme (including Haxey, Butterwick, Ouston, Beltoft and Belton)

    Northamptonshire: at Crich and Welford.

    Nottinghamshire: at Egmanton, Averham, Serlby in Harworth, Auckley (partially in Yorkshire), and Finningley.

    Rutland: at Empingham.

    Warwickshire: at Monks Kirkby, Little Harborough, Wappenbury, Brinklow, Hampton in Arden, Nuthurst, Over, Chadwick, Newham, Baddesley Clinton, Shustoke, Bentley, Hesilholt and Smyte.

    Yorkshire: too many places to list!

    end of biography

    Roger married Rose de Clare 0Jul 1270, Thirsk, Yorkshire, England. Rose (daughter of Richard de Clare, Knight, 6th Earl of Gloucester and Maud de Lacy) was born 17 Oct 1252, Tonbridge, Kent, England; died 0Jan 1316. [Group Sheet]


  2. 9.  Rose de Clare was born 17 Oct 1252, Tonbridge, Kent, England (daughter of Richard de Clare, Knight, 6th Earl of Gloucester and Maud de Lacy); died 0Jan 1316.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Roese de Clare
    • Also Known As: Rohese de Clare
    • Also Known As: Rohesia de Clare

    Children:
    1. 4. John de Mowbray, I, 8th Baron Mowbray was born 4 Sep 1286, Thirsk, Yorkshire, England; died 23 Mar 1322, York, Yorkshire, England.
    2. Alexander de Mowbray was born 0___ 1288, Epworth, Lincolnshire, England.

  3. 10.  William de Braose, VII, Knight, 2nd Baron de Braose was born ~ 1260, (Wales) (son of William de Braose, VI, Knight, 1st Baron Braose and Aline de Multon); died 0___ 1326.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Lord of Bramber
    • Also Known As: Lord of Gower

    Notes:

    William de Braose, (sometimes William de Briouze, William de Breuse, William de Brewes or William de Brewose; c. 1260–1326) was the second Baron Braose, as well as Lord of Gower and Lord of Bramber. He was held as a hostage after being captured in 1264 during the Second Barons' War and records of some of his childhood expenses survive from his time as a hostage. He first entered royal service in 1286 and, in 1291, he succeeded his father as baron. He continued in royal military service, serving in Scotland as well as in Wales. Protracted disputes over his lands embroiled him throughout his life and at the end of his life helped spark a revolt against King Edward II of England's favourites, the Despensers. He married twice, and his heirs were his daughter Aline and his grandson John de Bohun.

    Family and early life

    Braose was the son of William de Braose, 1st Baron Braose and his first wife, Aline, daughter of Thomas de Multon.[1] He was likely born around 1260, as his age was given as about 46 in 1307. Other events prove that he was born prior to 1264, as he was captured in that year. This came about during the Second Barons' War (1264–1267) during the reign of King Henry III of England, as the elder Braose had sided with the king during Simon de Montfort's rebellion. The younger Braose was a hostage in the custody of Montfort's wife, Eleanor. Her household accounts include expenses related to the younger William's care.[2]

    Sometime around 1285, Braose confirmed grants of land by his ancestors to the religious house of Sele Priory.[3][a] In 1286 Braose was in the king's service, for unspecified duties overseas. It is possible that these included accompanying the king, Edward I, to Paris where Edward performed homage to the new French king, Philip IV, for Edward's French lands.[2] Braose played a significant role in King Edward's Welsh wars. In the winter of 1287–8 he commanded the force blockading Emlyn castle. His men also provided the escort for the transport of a huge siege engine from Dryslwyn to Emlyn. The arrival of the engine, with 480 great stones as ammunition, persuaded the defenders of the castle to surrender peaceably.[5]

    Marcher Baron

    The younger Braose succeeded his father before 1 March 1291, when he did homage for his father's lands.[1] He received custody of his father's lands on 2 March 1291, which had been placed into the custody of Robert de Tibetot on 12 January 1291.[6] He was summoned a number of times to Parliament from 1291 until 1322 as Baron Braose. He was the second Baron Braose, as well as Lord of Gower and Lord of Bramber.[1]

    After his father's death, Braose continued to serve Edward. He contributed both money and personal military service in Edward's wars in Wales, Scotland, and France.[2] He saw service in Gascony in 1294.[3] In 1297 he took part in a military campaign in Flanders. As a reward for his service in Flanders, he received the wardship of John de Mowbray, who Braose eventually married to his daughter Aline.[2] From 1298 to 1306 he was involved in the Scottish wars, and was at the Battle of Falkirk on 22 July 1298.[3] Besides the military service, he served the king in 1301 by signing a letter from the leading barons of England to Pope Boniface VIII in which the barons decried papal interference in the royal rights of England.[2]

    Braose captured the Welsh rebel William Cragh in 1290, whose miraculous resurrection after being hanged was attributed to Thomas de Cantilupe.[7] This led in 1307 to Braose giving testimony to papal commissioners inquiring into the events surrounding Cragh's hanging and whether or not it would support the canonisation of Cantilupe.[8]

    It was most likely Braose who commissioned a condensed copy of Domesday Book, now Public Record Office manuscript E164/1. This copy has a marginal notation of "Br" next to the estates owned by Braose's ancestor, the first William de Braose.[9]

    Braose was embroiled in a dispute over his lordship of Gower in 1299 when the Bishop of Llandaff, John de Monmouth, brought a case against Braose to the king. Although the case was adjudicated in 1302, the resulting decision was overturned. In 1304 Braose secured King Edward's confirmation of earlier grants and charters granting Braose special rights and liberties in Gower. He managed this because he was serving the king in Scotland at the time, and thus had easy access to the king. In 1305, however, Braose miscalculated and insulted a royal judge,[10] using "gross and contumelious words" to describe the royal official.[11] This episode caused the case of Gower to be reopened in 1306, and Braose was only able to settle the issue again by the grant of rights to his men in Swansea and Gower.[10]

    In 1320 King Edward II of England confiscated the lordship of Gower on the grounds that Braose had given it to his son-in-law Mowbray without royal permission. Over the preceding years Braose had promised Gower to a number of persons,[12] including Humphrey de Bohun, the Earl of Hereford, Hugh Despenser the Younger, and Roger Mortimer of Wigmore. Mowbray then in late 1319 took custody of Gower to protect his rights. Despenser persuaded the king in 1320 to take Gower into royal hands in October, and was appointed keeper of the honour in November.[13] The other lords in the Welsh Marches resented this seizure, feeling that the king's excuse for it was not applicable. The seizure was one of the precipitating causes of the baronial rebellion that led to the exile of the Despensers in 1321.[12] In 1322 Gower was given to the younger Despenser again, who then traded it for the honours of Usk and Caerleon. Braose was then induced to sue the new holder of Gower for the return of the barony in April 1324, which action succeeded in June 1324. Braose then promptly gave Gower to the elder Despenser, returning the property to the Despenser family once more.[14] The lordship of Gower eventually ended up in the hands of the Beauchamp family, but it was not until the 1350s that the issue was decided.[15]

    Marriage, death, and legacy

    The name of Braose's first wife was Agnes,[16] but her family is not known. His second wife was Elizabeth, the daughter and heiress of Raymund de Sully. He had two daughters with his first wife, but no children with his second wife, who outlived him.[1] It appears that there was a son named William, who was the subject of a military summons from King Edward in 1311, but nothing further is mentioned of him after 1315. In 1316 a settlement of William the father's estates made no mention of this son making it likely that the son died before this date.[17]

    Braose died not long before 1 May 1326[1] and his heirs were his daughter Aline and his grandson John de Bohun.[18] Aline, the elder daughter,[13] married John de Mowbray and Richard de Peschale. The second daughter, Joan, married James de Bohun and Richard Foliot, son of Jordan Foliot. Mowbray received the lands of Gower and Bramber before Braose's death.[1]

    Braose was known as a man often in debt and as being unable to manage his cash flow well.[17] Thomas Walsingham stated in his chronicle that Braose was "very rich by descent but a dissipater of the property left to him".[19]

    William — Agnes LNU. [Group Sheet]


  4. 11.  Agnes LNU
    Children:
    1. Joan de Braose was born ~ 1283, Bramber, West Sussex, England; died 1321-1324, Gressenhall, Norfolk, England.
    2. 5. Aline de Braose was born 0___ 1291; died ~ 1331.

  5. 12.  Edmund "Crouchback" Plantagenet, Prince of England was born 16 Jan 1245, London, Middlesex, England (son of Henry III, King of England and Eleanor of Provence, Queen of England, Princess of Castile); died 5 Jun 1296, Bayonne, Pyrennes-Atlantiques, France; was buried 15 Jul 1296, Westminster Abbey, 20 Deans Yd, London SW1P 3PA, United Kingdom.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Earl of Lancaster
    • Also Known As: Earl of Leicester

    Notes:

    More on Sir Edmund ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edmund_Crouchback

    Edmund married Blanche de Capet d'Artois, Queen of Navarre, Princess of France Bef 29 Oct 1275-6, Paris, France. Blanche was born 0___ 1245, Arras, Pas-de-Calais, France; died 2 May 1302, Paris, France. [Group Sheet]


  6. 13.  Blanche de Capet d'Artois, Queen of Navarre, Princess of France was born 0___ 1245, Arras, Pas-de-Calais, France; died 2 May 1302, Paris, France.
    Children:
    1. 6. Henry Plantagenet, 3rd Earl of Lancaster and Leicester was born 0___ 1281, Grosmont Castle, Monmouth, England; died 22 Sep 1345, Leicester, Leicestershire, England.

  7. 14.  Patrick Chaworth, Knight, Lord of Kidwelly was born ~ 1250, Kempsford, Gloucestershire, England (son of Patrick de Chaworth and Hawise de Londres); died 0___ 1283.

    Patrick married Isabella Beauchamp ~ 1281, Carmarthenshire, Wales. Isabella (daughter of William de Beauchamp, Knight, 9th Earl of Warwick and Maud FitzGeoffrey) was born ~ 1263, Warwickshire, England; died Bef 30 May 1306. [Group Sheet]


  8. 15.  Isabella Beauchamp was born ~ 1263, Warwickshire, England (daughter of William de Beauchamp, Knight, 9th Earl of Warwick and Maud FitzGeoffrey); died Bef 30 May 1306.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Isabel de Beauchamp
    • Also Known As: Lady Despencer
    • Also Known As: Lady Kidwelly

    Notes:

    Isabella de Beauchamp, Lady Kidwelly, Lady Despenser (born c. 1263 - died before 30 May 1306), was an English noblewoman and wealthy heiress.

    Family

    Isabella was born in about 1263 in Warwickshire, England. She was the only daughter of William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick and Maud FitzJohn who appears to have married; two sisters who were nuns at Shouldham are mentioned in her father's will.[1] She had a brother, Guy de Beauchamp, 10th Earl of Warwick who married Alice de Toeni, by whom he had seven children. Her paternal grandparents were William de Beauchamp of Elmley Castle and Isabel Maudit, and her maternal grandparents were Sir John FitzGeoffrey, Lord of Shere, and Isabel Bigod.

    Marriages and issue

    Sometime before 1281, she married firstly Sir Patrick de Chaworth, Lord of Kidwelly in Carmarthenshire, South Wales. The marriage produced one daughter:

    Maud Chaworth (2 February 1282- 1322), married Henry, 3rd Earl of Lancaster, by whom she had seven children.
    Following Patrick's death in 1286, Isabella had in her possession four manors in Wiltshire and two manors in Berkshire, assigned to her until her dowry should be set forth along with the livery of Chedworth in Gloucestershire and the Hampshire manor of Hartley Mauditt which had been granted to her and Sir Patrick in frankmarriage by her father.[2]

    That same year 1286, she married secondly Sir Hugh le Despenser without the King's licence for which Hugh had to pay a fine of 2000 marks.[2] He was created Lord Despenser by writ of summons to Parliament in 1295, thereby making Isabella Lady Despenser.

    Together Hugh and Isabella had four children:

    Hugh le Depenser, Lord Despenser the Younger (1286- executed 24 November 1326), married Eleanor de Clare, by whom he had issue.
    Aline le Despenser (died before 28 November 1353), married Edward Burnell, Lord Burnell
    Isabella le Despenser (died 4/5 December 1334), married firstly as his second wife, John Hastings, 1st Baron Hastings, by whom she had three children. Their descendants became the Lords Hastings; she married secondly as his second wife, Sir Ralph de Monthermer, 1st Baron Monthermer.[4]
    Phillip le Despenser (died 1313), married as his first wife Margaret de Goushill, by whom he had issue.
    Isabella died sometime before 30 May 1306. Twenty years later, her husband and eldest son, favourites of King Edward II, were both executed by the orders of Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March and Queen Isabella. The couple were by that time the de facto rulers of England, and along with most of the people in the kingdom, they had resented the power both Despensers wielded over the King.

    As her husband had been made Earl of Winchester in 1322, Isabella was never styled as the Countess of Winchester.

    References

    Jump up ^ Testamenta Vestusta by Nicholas Harris Nicolas.
    ^ Jump up to: a b http://www.powernet.co.uk/barfield/chap1.htm.[dead link]
    Jump up ^ Charles Cawley, Medieval Lands, Earls of Winchester
    Jump up ^ Richardson, D. (2011) Magna Carta Ancestry 2nd Edition, pg 325 (via Google)
    Charles Cawley, Medieval Lands, Earls of Warwick
    Charles Cawley, Medieval Lands, Earls of Winchester

    Children:
    1. 7. Maud Chaworth was born 2 Feb 1282, Kidwelly, Carmarthenshire, Wales; died 3 Dec 1322, Montisfort, Hampshire, England; was buried Montisfort, Hampshire, England.


Generation: 5

  1. 16.  Roger de Mowbray, II, 6th Baron of Mowbray was born 0___ 1218, Thirsk, Yorkshire, England (son of William de Mowbray, Knight, 6th Baron of Thirsk and Avice d'Aubigny); died 18 Oct 1263, Pontefract Castle, Wakefield, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alt Birth: 0___ 1240, (Thirsk Castle, Thirsk, Yorkshire, England)
    • Alt Death: 0___ 1266

    Notes:

    About Roger de Mowbray
    Roger DE MOWBRAY

    * Father: William DE MOWBRAY
    * Mother: Agnes of ARUNDEL
    * Birth: 1210, Lincoln, England
    * Death: 1266, Epworth, England
    * Partnership with: Maud DE BEAUCHAMP
    o Child: Elizabeth DE MOWBRAY Birth: 1230, Lincolnshire, England
    o Child: Roger DE MOWBRAY Birth: 1245, Axholme, Lincolnshire, England
    o Child: John DE MOWBRAY
    o Child: Edmund DE MOWBRAY
    o Child: William DE MOWBRAY Birth: 1250
    o Child: Andrew DE MOWBRY
    o Child: Robert DE MOWBRY
    Roger de MOWBRAY (1230-1266) [Pedigree]

    Son of William de MOWBRAY Baron of Axholme (-1223) and Avice (Agnes)

    b. BEF 1230
    r. Thirsk and Slingsby
    d. ABT Nov 1266, Isle of Axholme, Eng.
    d. 1266
    Married Maud de BEAUCHAMP (-1273)

    Children:

    Roger de MOWBRAY 1st Lord Mowbray (-1296) m. Roese de CLARE (-1316)

    Roger married Maud de Beauchamp ~ 1247. Maud (daughter of William de Beauchamp, Knight, Baron of Bedford and Ida Longespee) was born ~ 1234; died Bef April 1273. [Group Sheet]


  2. 17.  Maud de Beauchamp was born ~ 1234 (daughter of William de Beauchamp, Knight, Baron of Bedford and Ida Longespee); died Bef April 1273.
    Children:
    1. 8. Roger de Mowbray, III, Knight, 1st Baron of Mowbray was born 0___ 1245, Lincolnshire, England; died 21 Nov 1297, Ghent, Belgium.

  3. 18.  Richard de Clare, Knight, 6th Earl of GloucesterRichard de Clare, Knight, 6th Earl of Gloucester was born 4 Aug 1222, Clare Castle, Clare, Suffolk, England (son of Gilbert de Clare, Knight, 4th Earl of Hertford and Isabel Marshal, Countess Marshall); died 14 Jul 1262, Waltham, Canterbury, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Earl of Hertford

    Notes:

    Richard de Clare, 5th Earl of Hertford, 6th Earl of Gloucester (4 August 1222 – 14 July 1262) was son of Gilbert de Clare, 4th Earl of Hertford and Isabel Marshal.[1][2] On his father's death, when he became Earl of Gloucester (October 1230), he was entrusted first to the guardianship of Hubert de Burgh. On Hubert's fall, his guardianship was given to Peter des Roches (c. October 1232); and in 1235 to Gilbert, Earl Marshall.

    Marriage

    Richard's first marriage to Margaret or Megotta, as she was also called, ended with either an annulment or with her death in November 1237. They were both approximately fourteen or fifteen. The marriage of Hubert de Burgh's daughter Margaret to Richard de Clare, the young Earl of Gloucester, brought de Burgh into some trouble in 1236, for the earl was as yet a minor and in the wardship of King Henry III, and the marriage had been celebrated without the royal license. Hubert, however, protested that the match was not of his making, and promised to pay the king some money, so the matter passed by for the time.[4][5] Even before Margaret died, the Earl of Lincoln offered 5,000 marks to King Henry to secure Richard for his own daughter. This offer was accepted, and Richard was married secondly, on 2 February 1238 to Maud de Lacy, daughter of John de Lacy, 1st Earl of Lincoln [6]

    Military career

    He joined in the Barons' letter to the Pope in 1246 against the exactions of the Curia in England. He was among those in opposition to the King's half-brothers, who in 1247 visited England, where they were very unpopular, but afterwards he was reconciled to them.[7]

    In August 1252/3 the King crossed over to Gascony with his army, and to his great indignation the Earl refused to accompany him and went to Ireland instead. In August 1255 he and John Maunsel were sent to Edinburgh by the King to find out the truth regarding reports which had reached the King that his son-in-law, Alexander III, King of Scotland, was being coerced by Robert de Roos and John Balliol. If possible, they were to bring the young King and Queen to him. The Earl and his companion, pretending to be the two of Roos's knights, obtained entry to Edinburgh Castle, and gradually introduced their attendants, so that they had a force sufficient for their defense. They gained access to the Scottish Queen, who made her complaints to them that she and her husband had been kept apart. They threatened Roos with dire punishments, so that he promised to go to the King.[1][4][8]

    Meanwhile, the Scottish magnates, indignant at their Castle of Edinburgh's being in English hands, proposed to besiege it, but they desisted when they found they would be besieging their King and Queen. The King of Scotland apparently traveled South with the Earl, for on 24 September they were with King Henry III at Newminster, Northumberland. In July 1258 he fell ill, being poisoned with his brother William, as it was supposed, by his steward, Walter de Scotenay. He recovered but his brother died.[2]

    Death and legacy

    Richard died at John de Griol's Manor of Asbenfield in Waltham, near Canterbury, 14 July 1262 at the age of 39, it being rumored that he had been poisoned at the table of Piers of Savoy. On the following Monday he was carried to Canterbury where a mass for the dead was sung, after which his body was taken to the canon's church at Tonbridge and interred in the choir. Thence it was taken to Tewkesbury Abbey and buried 28 July 1262, with great solemnity in the presence of two bishops and eight abbots in the presbytery at his father's right hand. Richard's own arms were: Or, three chevronels gules.[9]

    Richard left extensive property, distributed across numerous counties. Details of these holdings were reported at a series of inquisitions post mortem that took place after his death.[10]

    Family

    Richard had no children by his first wife, Margaret (or "Megotta") de Burgh. By his second wife, Maud de Lacy, daughter of the Surety John de Lacy and Margaret de Quincy, he had:

    Isabel de Clare (c. 1240-1270); m. William VII of Montferrat.
    Gilbert de Clare, 6th Earl of Hertford, 7th Earl of Gloucester (2 September 1243 - 7 December 1295)
    Thomas de Clare (c. 1245-1287); seized control of Thomond in 1277; m. Juliana FitzGerald
    Bogo de Clare (c. 1248-1294)
    Margaret de Clare (c. 1250-1312); m. Edmund, 2nd Earl of Cornwall
    Rohese de Clare (c. 1252); m. Roger de Mowbray
    Eglentina de Clare (d. 1257); died in infancy.

    His widow Maud, who had the Manor of Clare and the Manor and Castle of Usk and other lands for her dower, erected a splendid tomb for her late husband at Tewkesbury. She arranged for the marriages of her children. She died before 10 March 1288/9.[11]

    Richard married Maud de Lacy 0___ 1238. Maud (daughter of John de Lacy, Knight, 2nd Earl of Lincoln and Margaret de Quincy, 2nd Countess of Lincoln) was born 25 Jan 1223; died 1287-1289. [Group Sheet]


  4. 19.  Maud de Lacy was born 25 Jan 1223 (daughter of John de Lacy, Knight, 2nd Earl of Lincoln and Margaret de Quincy, 2nd Countess of Lincoln); died 1287-1289.
    Children:
    1. Gilbert de Clare, Knight, Earl of Hertford was born 2 Sep 1243, Christchurch, Hampshire, England; died 7 Dec 1295, Monmouth Castle, Monmouth, Monmouthshire, Wales; was buried Tewkesbury Abbey, Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England GL20 5RZ.
    2. Thomas de Clare, Knight, Lord of Thomond was born ~ 1245, Tonbridge, Kent, England; died 29 Aug 1287, Ireland.
    3. 9. Rose de Clare was born 17 Oct 1252, Tonbridge, Kent, England; died 0Jan 1316.

  5. 20.  William de Braose, VI, Knight, 1st Baron Braose was born ~ 1224, (Wales) (son of John de Braose and Marared ferch Llywelyn); died 0___ 1291, Findon, Sussex, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Lord of Bramber
    • Also Known As: Lord of Gower
    • Also Known As: William Bruce
    • Also Known As: William de Breuse
    • Also Known As: William de Brewes
    • Also Known As: William de Brewose
    • Also Known As: William de Briouze

    Notes:

    William de Braose, (alias Breuse, Brewes, Brehuse,[1] Briouze, Brewose etc.; c. 1224–1291) was the first Baron Braose, as well as Lord of Gower and Lord of Bramber.[2]

    Family and early life

    Braose was the son of John de Braose, the Lord of Bramber and Gower and John's wife Margaret, the daughter of Llywelyn the Great, prince of Gwynedd.[2] These members of the Braose family were all descendants of William de Braose, who died around 1093 and was the Domesday tenant of Bramber.[3] His family had its origins at Briouze in Normandy.[4]

    Braose's father was dead in 1232, before 18 July, when William became lord of his father's properties. William came of age before 15 July 1245,[2] making his birth around 1224.[1]

    Lord and baron

    He served King Henry III of England and Henry's son Edward I as a councilor and in various councils.[2] He sided with King Henry against Simon de Montfort during the civil war in England in the later part of Henry's reign.[1] In April and May 1292, he was summoned to Parliament, as Lord Braose.[2]

    Braose was a benefactor of Sele Priory, with surviving charters recording the grant of a large estate in Crockhurst, Sussex to the priory in 1254.[5] The charter was dated 4 January 1254, and was in exchange for 10 marks as an annual rent from the priory.[6] Another charter records the gift of land near the road from Chichester to Bramber that was made at the urging of his mother Margaret.[5] Other benefactions included gifs of rents[7] and two small gifts of land.[8] Around 1280, Braose released the priory from performing certain customary services and rents that it had previously paid to him and his ancestors.[9][Notes 1]

    Marriages, death, and legacy

    Braose married three times. His first wife was Aline, daughter of Thomas de Multon. His second was Agnes, daughter of Nicholas de Moeles. His third wife was Mary, daughter of Robert de Ros.[10] He died at Findon in Sussex shortly before 6 January 1291.[2] He was buried at Sele Priory in Sussex on 15 January.[1]

    Braose's son, William de Braose, 2nd Baron Braose, by his first wife, succeeded him.[2] By his second wife, he had a son Giles, who was knighted and fought in Scotland in 1300.[11] By his third wife, William had at least three children – Richard, Peter, and Margaret (wife of Ralph de Camoys, 1st Baron Camoys) – and possibly a fourth – William.[1] Richard was dead before 9 February 1296, and Peter died before 7 February 1312.[12]

    See also

    House of Braose

    William — Aline de Multon. [Group Sheet]


  6. 21.  Aline de Multon (daughter of Thomas de Multon and unnamed spouse).
    Children:
    1. 10. William de Braose, VII, Knight, 2nd Baron de Braose was born ~ 1260, (Wales); died 0___ 1326.

  7. 24.  Henry III, King of EnglandHenry III, King of England was born 1 Oct 1207, Winchester Castle, Hampshire, United Kingdom; was christened 0___ 1207, Bermondsey, London, Middlesex, England (son of John I, King of England and Isabelle of Angouleme, Queen of England); died 16 Nov 1272, Westminster Palace, Westminster, London, Middlesex, England; was buried 20 Nov 1272, Westminster Abbey, 20 Deans Yd, London SW1P 3PA, United Kingdom.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Duke of Aquitaine
    • Also Known As: Henry III, King of England
    • Also Known As: Henry of Winchester
    • Also Known As: Lord of Ireland

    Notes:

    King Henry III biography... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_III_of_England

    Henry married Eleanor of Provence, Queen of England, Princess of Castile 14 Jan 1236, Canterbury Cathedral, Canterbury, Kent, England. Eleanor was born 0___ 1222, Aix-En-Provence, Bouches-Du-Rhone, France; died 24 Jun 1291, Amesbury, Wiltshire, England; was buried 11 Sep 1291, Amesbury Abbey, Wiltshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  8. 25.  Eleanor of Provence, Queen of England, Princess of Castile was born 0___ 1222, Aix-En-Provence, Bouches-Du-Rhone, France; died 24 Jun 1291, Amesbury, Wiltshire, England; was buried 11 Sep 1291, Amesbury Abbey, Wiltshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Eleonore Berenger

    Notes:

    Eleanor of Provence (c. 1223 - 24/25 June 1291[1]) was Queen consort of England, as the spouse of King Henry III of England, from 1236 until his death in 1272.

    Although she was completely devoted to her husband, and staunchly defended him against the rebel Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester, she was very much hated by the Londoners. This was because she had brought a large number of relatives with her to England in her retinue; these were known as "the Savoyards", and they were given influential positions in the government and realm. On one occasion, Eleanor's barge was attacked by angry citizens who pelted her with stones, mud, pieces of paving, rotten eggs and vegetables.

    Eleanor was the mother of five children including the future King Edward I of England. She also was renowned for her cleverness, skill at writing poetry, and as a leader of fashion.

    Family[edit]
    Born in Aix-en-Provence, she was the second daughter of Ramon Berenguer IV, Count of Provence (1198–1245) and Beatrice of Savoy (1205–1267), the daughter of Thomas I of Savoy and his second wife Margaret of Geneva. She was well educated as a child, and developed a strong love of reading. Her three sisters also married kings.[2] After her elder sister Margaret married Louis IX of France, their uncle William corresponded with Henry III of England to persuade him to marry Eleanor. Henry sought a dowry of up to twenty thousand silver marks to help offset the dowry he had just paid for his sister Isabella, but Eleanor's father was able to negotiate this down to no dowry, just a promise to leave her ten thousand when he died.

    Like her mother, grandmother, and sisters, Eleanor was renowned for her beauty. She was a dark-haired brunette with fine eyes.[3] Piers Langtoft speaks of her as "The erle's daughter, the fairest may of life".[4] On 22 June 1235, Eleanor was betrothed to King Henry III (1207–1272).[1] Eleanor was probably born in 1223; Matthew Paris describes her as being "jamque duodennem" (already twelve) when she arrived in the Kingdom of England for her marriage.

    Marriage and issue

    13th century costume depicting Eleanor of Provence, Queen of Henry III of England - illustration by Percy Anderson for Costume Fanciful, Historical and Theatrical, 1906
    Eleanor was married to King Henry III of England on 14 January 1236.[5] She had never seen him prior to the wedding at Canterbury Cathedral and had never set foot in his kingdom.[6] Edmund Rich, Archbishop of Canterbury, officiated. She was dressed in a shimmering golden gown which was tightly-fitted to the waist, and then flared out in wide pleats to her feet. The sleeves were long and lined with ermine.[7] After riding to London the same day where a procession of citizens greeted the bridal pair, Eleanor was crowned queen consort of England in a ceremony at Westminster Abbey which was followed by a magnificent banquet with the entire nobility in full attendance.[8]

    Eleanor and Henry together had five children:

    Edward I (1239–1307), married Eleanor of Castile (1241–1290) in 1254, by whom he had issue, including his heir Edward II. His second wife was Margaret of France, by whom he had issue.
    Margaret (1240–1275), married King Alexander III of Scotland, by whom she had issue.
    Beatrice (1242–1275), married John II, Duke of Brittany, by whom she had issue.
    Edmund Crouchback, 1st Earl of Lancaster (1245–1296), married Aveline de Forz in 1269, who died four years later without issue; married Blanche of Artois in 1276, by whom he had issue.
    Katherine (25 November 1253 – 3 May 1257)
    Four others are listed, but their existence is in doubt as there is no contemporary record of them. These are:

    Richard (1247–1256)
    John (1250–1256)
    William (1251–1256)
    Henry (1256–1257)
    Eleanor seems to have been especially devoted to her eldest son, Edward; when he was deathly ill in 1246, she stayed with him at the abbey at Beaulieu in Hampshire for three weeks, long past the time allowed by monastic rules.[9] It was because of her influence that King Henry granted the duchy of Gascony to Edward in 1249.[citation needed] Her youngest child, Katherine, seems to have had a degenerative disease that rendered her deaf. When the little girl died at the age of three, both her royal parents suffered overwhelming grief.[10]

    Unpopularity

    Eleanor was a loyal and faithful consort to Henry, but she brought in her retinue a large number of uncles and cousins, "the Savoyards," and her influence with the King and her unpopularity with the English barons created friction during Henry's reign.[11] Her uncle William of Savoy became a close advisor of her husband, displacing and displeasing English barons.[12] Though Eleanor and Henry supported different factions at times, she was made regent of England when her husband left for Normandy in 1253. Eleanor was devoted to her husband's cause, stoutly contested Simon de Montfort, raising troops in France for Henry's cause. On 13 July 1263, she was sailing down the Thames when her barge was attacked by citizens of London.[13] Eleanor stoutly hated the Londoners who returned her hatred; in revenge for their dislike Eleanor had demanded from the city all the back payments due on the monetary tribute known as queen-gold, by which she received a tenth of all fines which came to the Crown. In addition to the queen-gold other such fines were levied on the citizens by the Queen on the thinnest of pretexts.[14] In fear for her life as she was pelted with stones, loose pieces of paving, dried mud, rotten eggs and vegetables, Eleanor was rescued by Thomas Fitzthomas, the Mayor of London, and took refuge at the bishop of London's home.

    Later life

    In 1272 Henry died, and her son Edward, who was 33 years old, became Edward I, King of England. She remained in England as queen dowager, and raised several of her grandchildren—Edward's son Henry and daughter Eleanor, and Beatrice's son John. When her grandson Henry died in her care in 1274, Eleanor went into mourning and gave orders for his heart to be buried at the priory at Guildford which she founded in his memory. In 1275 Eleanor's two remaining daughters died Margaret 26 February and Beatrice 24 March.

    She retired to a convent; however, she remained in contact with her son, King Edward, and her sister, Queen Margaret of France.

    Eleanor died on 24/25 June 1291 in Amesbury, eight miles north of Salisbury, England. She was buried on 11 September 1291 in the Abbey of St Mary and St Melor, Amesbury on 9 December. The exact site of her grave at the abbey is unknown making her the only English queen without a marked grave. Her heart was taken to London where it was buried at the Franciscan priory.[15]

    Cultural legacy

    Eleanor was renowned for her learning, cleverness, and skill at writing poetry,[6] as well as her beauty; she was also known as a leader of fashion, continually importing clothes from France.[4] She often wore parti-coloured cottes (a type of tunic), gold or silver girdles into which a dagger was casually thrust, she favoured red silk damask, and decorations of gilt quatrefoil, and to cover her dark hair she wore jaunty pillbox caps. Eleanor introduced a new type of wimple to England, which was high, "into which the head receded until the face seemed like a flower in an enveloping spathe".[4]

    She had developed a love for the songs of the troubadors as a child, and continued this interest. She bought many romantic and historical books, covering stories from ancient times to modern romances.

    Eleanor is the protagonist of The Queen From Provence, a historical romance by British novelist Jean Plaidy which was published in 1979. Eleanor is a main character in the novel Four Sisters, All Queens by author Sherry Jones, as well as in the novel The Sister Queens by Sophie Perinot. She is also the subject of Norwegian Symphonic metal band Leave's Eyes in their song "Eleonore De Provence" from their album Symphonies of the Night.

    Children:
    1. Edward I, King of England was born 17 Jun 1239, Westminster, London, Middlesex, England; was christened 22 Jun 1239, Westminster Abbey, 20 Deans Yd, London SW1P 3PA, United Kingdom; died 7 Jul 1307, Burgh by Sands, Carlisle, Cumbria, England; was buried 28 Oct 1307, Westminster Abbey, 20 Deans Yd, London SW1P 3PA, United Kingdom.
    2. 12. Edmund "Crouchback" Plantagenet, Prince of England was born 16 Jan 1245, London, Middlesex, England; died 5 Jun 1296, Bayonne, Pyrennes-Atlantiques, France; was buried 15 Jul 1296, Westminster Abbey, 20 Deans Yd, London SW1P 3PA, United Kingdom.
    3. Margaret of England, Queen of Scots was born 29 Sep 1251, Windsor Castle, Windsor, Berkshire, England; died 26 Feb 1275, Cupar Castle, Cupar, Fife, Scotland; was buried Dunfermline Abbey, Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland.
    4. Mary Elizabeth Plantagenet, Princess of England was born 1255, Elsenham Manor, Essex, England; died 16 Sep 1295, West Greenwich, London, England.

  9. 28.  Patrick de Chaworth

    Patrick — Hawise de Londres. [Group Sheet]


  10. 29.  Hawise de Londres
    Children:
    1. 14. Patrick Chaworth, Knight, Lord of Kidwelly was born ~ 1250, Kempsford, Gloucestershire, England; died 0___ 1283.

  11. 30.  William de Beauchamp, Knight, 9th Earl of WarwickWilliam de Beauchamp, Knight, 9th Earl of Warwick was born 0___ 1237, Elmley Castle, Worcestershire, England (son of William de Beauchamp and Isabel Mauduit); died 0___ 1298, (Elmley Castle, Worcestershire, England).

    Notes:

    William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick (1237-1298) was an English nobleman and soldier, described as a "vigorous and innovative military commander". He was active in the field against the Welsh for many years, and at the end of his life campaigned against the Scots.

    Career

    He became hereditary High Sheriff of Worcestershire for life on the death of his father in 1268.

    He was a close friend of Edward I of England, and was an important leader in Edward's invasion of Wales in 1277.[2][3] In 1294 he raised the siege of Conwy Castle, where the King had been penned in,[4] crossing the estuary.[5] He was victorious on 5 March 1295 at the battle of Maes Moydog, against the rebel prince of Wales, Madog ap Llywelyn.[6] In a night attack on the Welsh infantry he used cavalry to drive them into compact formations which were then shot up by his archers and charged.[7]R

    Family

    His father was William de Beauchamp (d.1268) of Elmley Castle and his mother Isabel Mauduit, sister and heiress of William Mauduit, 8th Earl of Warwick, from whom he inherited his title in 1268. He had a sister, Sarah, who married Richard Talbot.

    He married Maud FitzJohn. Their children included:

    Isabella de Beauchamp,[8] married firstly, Sir Patrick de Chaworth and, secondly, Hugh le Despenser, 1st Earl of Winchester
    Guy de Beauchamp, 10th Earl of Warwick, who married Alice de Toeni, widow of Thomas de Leyburne
    .

    Ancestry

    [show]Ancestors of William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick
    References[edit]
    Jump up ^ Barfield, Sebastian. "Chapter 1 - The Beauchamp family to 1369". The Beauchamp Earls of Warwick, 1298-1369. Retrieved 5 November 2011.
    Jump up ^ F. M. Powicke, The Thirteenth Century (1962 edition), p. 409.
    Jump up ^ Osprey Publishing - The Castles of Edward I in Wales 1277–1307
    Jump up ^ Welsh Castles - Conwy Castle
    Jump up ^ T. F. Tout, The History of England From the Accession of Henry III. to the Death of Edward III (1216-1377) ,online.
    Jump up ^ R. R. Davies, The Age of Conquest: Wales 1063-1415 (1991), p. 383.
    Jump up ^ Powicke, p. 442-3.
    Jump up ^ Lundy, Darryl. "p. 10687 § 106863 - Person Page 10687". The Peerage.[unreliable source]

    External links

    Lundy, Darryl. "p. 2648 § 26478 page". The Peerage.
    http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~mysouthernfamily/myff/d0041/g0000063.html

    Birth:
    The ruins of an important Norman and medieval castle, from which the village derives its name, are located in the deer park, just over half a mile south on Bredon Hill. The castle is supposed to have been built for Robert Despenser in the years following the Norman Conquest. After his death (post 1098) it descended to his heirs, the powerful Beauchamp family. It remained their chief seat until William de Beauchamp inherited the earldom and castle of Warwick from his maternal uncle, William Maudit, 8th Earl of Warwick, in 1268. Thereafter, Elmley Castle remained a secondary property of the Earls of Warwick until it was surrendered to the Crown in 1487. In 1528 the castle seems to have been still habitable, for Walter Walshe was then appointed constable and keeper, and ten years later Urian Brereton succeeded to the office. In 1544, however, prior to the grant to Christopher Savage (d.1545), who had been an Esquire of the Body of King Henry VIII, a survey was made of the manor and castle of Elmley, and it was found that the castle, strongly situated upon a hill surrounded by a ditch and wall, was completely uncovered and in decay.

    Map & Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elmley_Castle

    William married Maud FitzGeoffrey ~ 1261. Maud (daughter of John FitzGeoffrey, Justicar of Ireland and Isabelle Bigod, Countess of Essex) was born ~ 1238, Shere, Surrey, England; died 18 Apr 1301; was buried Friars Minor, Worcester, England. [Group Sheet]


  12. 31.  Maud FitzGeoffrey was born ~ 1238, Shere, Surrey, England (daughter of John FitzGeoffrey, Justicar of Ireland and Isabelle Bigod, Countess of Essex); died 18 Apr 1301; was buried Friars Minor, Worcester, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Maud FitzJohn

    Notes:

    Maud FitzJohn, Countess of Warwick (c. 1238 – 16/18 April 1301) was an English noblewoman and the eldest daughter of John FitzGeoffrey, Lord of Shere. Her second husband was William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick, a celebrated soldier. Through her daughter, Isabella, Maud was the maternal grandmother of Hugh the younger Despenser, the unpopular favourite of King Edward II of England, who was executed in 1326.

    Family

    Maud was born in Shere, Surrey, England in about 1238, the eldest daughter of John FitzGeoffrey, Lord of Shere, Justiciar of Ireland, and Isabel Bigod, a descendant of Strongbow and Aoife of Leinster. Maud had two brothers, Richard FitzJohn of Shere and John FitzJohn of Shere, and three younger sisters, Aveline FitzJohn, Joan FitzJohn, and Isabel FitzJohn. She also had a half-brother, Walter de Lacy, and two half-sisters, Margery de Lacy, and Maud de Lacy, Baroness Geneville, from her mother's first marriage to Gilbert de Lacy of Ewyas Lacy. The chronicle of Tintern Abbey in Monmouthshire names Matilda uxor Guidono comitis Warwici as the eldest daughter of Johanni Fitz-Geffrey and Isabella Bygod.[1] Her paternal grandparents were Geoffrey Fitzpeter, 1st Earl of Essex and Aveline de Clare, and her maternal grandparents were Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk and Maud Marshal.


    Guy de Beauchamp, 10th Earl of Warwick, the only son of Maud FitzJohn. Here he is shown with the decapitated body of Piers Gaveston

    Marriages and issue

    Maud married her first husband, Gerald de Furnivalle, Lord Hallamshire on an unknown date. Sometime after his death in 1261, Maud married her second husband, the celebrated soldier, William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick. Upon their marriage, Maud was styled as Countess of Warwick.

    Together William and Maud had at least two children:[2]

    Guy de Beauchamp, 10th Earl of Warwick (1270/1271- 28 July 1315), on 28 February 1310, he married as her second husband, heiress Alice de Toeni, by whom he had seven children.
    Isabella de Beauchamp (died before 30 May 1306), married firstly in 1281 Sir Patrick de Chaworth, Lord of Kidwelly, by whom she had a daughter, Maud Chaworth; she married secondly in 1286, Hugh le Despenser, Lord Despenser by whom she had four children including Hugh Despenser the younger, the unpopular favourite of King Edward II, who was executed in 1326, shortly after his father.
    Maud died between 16 and 18 April 1301. She was buried at the house of the Friars Minor in Worcester.

    end of biography

    Children of Maud FitzJohn and William de Beauchamp 9th Earl of Warwick are:

    i. Isabel Beauchamp was born ABT 1267 in Warwick Castle, Warwick, Warwickshire, England, and died BEF 30 MAY 1306 in Elmley Castle, Worcestershire, England. She married Patrick 5th Baron de Chaworth ABT 1281, son of Patrick de Chaworth of Kidwelly and Hawise de Londres. He was born ABT 1250 in Kidwelly, Carmarthenshire, Wales, and died BEF 7 JUL 1283. She married Hugh Baron le Despenser Earl of Winchester BEF 1286, son of Hugh 1st Baron le Despenser Sir and Aline Basset Countess of Norfolk. He was born 1 MAR 1260/61 in Loughborough, Leicestershire, England, and died 27 OCT 1326 in Bristol, Bristol, England.
    18. ii. Guy of Beauchamp 2nd Earl of Warwick was born 1271 in Warwick Castle, Warwick, Warwickshire, England, was christened 1257 in Elmley Castle, Worcestershire, England, and died 12 AUG 1315 in Warwick Castle, Warwick, Warwickshire, England. He married Alice de Toeni Countess of Warwick 1303 in Warwick Castle, Warwick, Warwickshire, England, daughter of Ralph VI de Toeni Lord of Flamstead and Mary Clarissa de Brus. She was born 8 JAN 1282/83 in Castle Maud, Flamstead, Hertfordshire, England, was christened 1264 in Flamstead, Hertfordshire, England, and died 1 JAN 1324/25 in Warwick Castle, Warwick, Warwickshire, England. He married Isabella de Clare Lady BEF 11 MAY 1297 in Worcester, Worcestershire, England, daughter of Gilbert de Clare 7th Earl of Hertford and Alice de Lusignan Countess of Surrey. She was born 10 MAR 1262/63 in Monmouth Castle, Monmourth, Monmouthshire, Wales, and died 1338 in Elmley Castle, Worcestershire, England.
    iii. Robert de Beauchamp was born ABT 1271 in Warwick, Warwickshire, England.
    iv. John de Beauchamp was born ABT 1273 in Warwick, Warwickshire, England.
    v. Anne Beauchamp was born ABT 1274 in Warwick, Warwickshire, England, and died AFT 1296.
    vi. Amy Beauchamp was born ABT 1276 in Warwick, Warwickshire, England, and died AFT 1296.
    vii. Margaret Beauchamp was born ABT 1278 in Warwick, Warwickshire, England. She married John Sudley.
    viii. Maud Beauchamp was born ABT 1282 in Warwick, Warwickshire, England, and died 1360. She married HusbandofMaudBeauchamp Rithco.

    Children:
    1. 15. Isabella Beauchamp was born ~ 1263, Warwickshire, England; died Bef 30 May 1306.


Generation: 6

  1. 32.  William de Mowbray, Knight, 6th Baron of Thirsk was born 1172-1173, Thirsk Castle, Thirsk, Yorkshire, England (son of Nigel de Mowbray and Mabel de Braose); died 1223-1224, Epworth, Lincolnshire, England; was buried Furness Abbey, Cumbria, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: 4th Baron Mowbray

    Notes:

    William de Mowbray, 6th Baron of Thirsk, 4th Baron Mowbray (c.?1173–c.?1222) was an Norman Lord and English noble who was one of the twenty five executors of the Magna Carta. He was described as being as small as a dwarf but very generous and valiant.[1]

    Family and early life

    William was the eldest of the one daughter and three or four sons of Nigel de Mowbray, by Mabel, thought to be daughter of William de Patri, and grandson of Roger de Mowbray.[2]

    Career under Richard I

    William appears to have been in the company of Richard I in Speyer, Germany, on 20 November 1193 during Richard's period of captivity on his return from Palestine.[3] In 1194 he had livery of his lands. paying a relief of ą100. He was immediately called upon to pay a sum nearly as large as his share of the scutage levied towards Richard's ransom, for the payment of which he was one of the hostages.[4] William was later a witness to Richard's treaty with Baldwin of Flanders in 1197.[3]

    Career under John

    In 1215 Mowbray was prominent with other north-country barons in opposing King John. He was appointed one of the twenty-five executors of the Magna Carta, and as such was specially named among those excommunicated by Pope Innocent III. His youngest brother, Roger, has sometimes been reckoned as one of the twenty-five, apparently by confusion with, or as a substitute for, Roger de Mumbezon. Roger died without heirs about 1218, and William received his lands.[4][5]

    Career under Henry III

    In the First Barons' War, Mowbray supported Louis. Mowbray was taken prisoner in the Battle of Lincoln (1217), and his estates bestowed upon William Marshal the younger; but he redeemed them by the surrender of the lordship of Bensted in Surrey to Hubert de Burgh, before the general restoration in September of that year.[4]

    In January 1221, Mowbray assisted Hubert in driving his former co-executor, William of Aumăale, from his last stronghold at Bytham in Lincolnshire.[4]

    Benefactor, marriage and succession

    William de Mowbray founded the chapel of St. Nicholas, with a chantry, at Thirsk, and was a benefactor of his grandfather's foundations at Furness Abbey and Newburgh, where, on his death in Axholme about 1224, he was buried.[4][3]

    He married Avice, a daughter of William d'Aubigny, 3rd Earl of Arundel, of the elder branch of the d'Aubignys. By her he had two sons, Nigel and Roger. The ‘Progenies Moubraiorum’ makes Nigel predecease his father, and Nicolas and Courthope accept this date; but Dugdale adduces documentary evidence showing that he had livery of his lands in 1223, and did not die (at Nantes) until 1228. As Nigel left no issue by his wife Mathilda or Maud, daughter of Roger de Camvile, he was succeeded as sixth baron by his brother Roger II, who only came of age in 1240, and died in 1266. This Roger's son, Roger III, was seventh baron (1266-1298) and father of John I de Mowbray, eighth baron.[4]

    There has been some speculation that de Mowbray was the inspiration for the character of Tyrion Lannister in Game of Thrones.[citation needed]

    References

    Jump up ^ Michel, Francique, ed. (1840). Histoire des Ducs de Normandie et des Rois d'Angleterre (in French). Paris. p. 145. Guillaumes de Moubray, qui estoit autresi petis comme uns nains; mais moult estoit larges et vaillans.
    Jump up ^ Tait, James; Thomas, Hugh M. "William de Mowbray". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/19461. (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
    ^ Jump up to: a b c Richardson, Douglas. Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families (2 ed.). p. 198. ISBN 978-0806317595.
    ^ Jump up to: a b c d e f Tait 1894.
    Jump up ^ Browning, Charles H. (1898). The Magna Charta Barons and Their American Descendants. p. 114. ISBN 0806300558. LCCN 73077634. reprinted 1969

    Attribution

    This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Tait, James (1894). "Mowbray, William de". In Lee, Sidney. Dictionary of National Biography. 39. London: Smith, Elder & Co.

    View The House of Mowbray ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_of_Mowbray

    end

    Birth:
    View map, photo & history of Thirsk ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thirsk

    Thirsk Castle's description ... http://www.gatehouse-gazetteer.info/English%20sites/2180.html

    Buried:
    Photos, History, Map & Source of Furness Abbey: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Furness_Abbey

    Died:
    Isle of Axholme

    William — Avice d'Aubigny. Avice (daughter of William d'Aubigny, Knight, 3rd Earl of Arundel and Mabel of Chester) was born 0___ 1196; died 0___ 1214. [Group Sheet]


  2. 33.  Avice d'Aubigny was born 0___ 1196 (daughter of William d'Aubigny, Knight, 3rd Earl of Arundel and Mabel of Chester); died 0___ 1214.
    Children:
    1. Nigel de Mowbray
    2. 16. Roger de Mowbray, II, 6th Baron of Mowbray was born 0___ 1218, Thirsk, Yorkshire, England; died 18 Oct 1263, Pontefract Castle, Wakefield, Yorkshire, England.

  3. 34.  William de Beauchamp, Knight, Baron of Bedford was born ~ 1185, Essex, England; died 0___ 1260, Bedford, Bedfordshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: "Walcheline (Walter) De /Beauchamp/"

    Notes:

    About William de Beauchamp, Lord of Bedford

    William de Beauchamp (1185) From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia William de Beauchamp (c.1185–1260) was a British judge and High Sheriff. He took part in the 1210 expedition to Ireland and the 1214 expedition to Poitiers before joining the rebellious barons in 1215 at the beginning of the First Barons' War, entertaining them at his seat of Bedford Castle; as such Beauchamp was one of the rebels excommunicated by Pope Innocent III. He was captured at the Battle of Lincoln on 20 May 1217 but made his peace with the government; by this point he had already lost Bedford Castle to Falkes de Breautâe in 1215, leading to an odd situation; Breautâe was granted the castle, while Beauchamp held the barony. When Breatâe fell from power Bedford Castle was sieged and partially destroyed on royal orders, but Beauchamp was granted licence to build a residence within its Bailey. He was part of a royal expedition ambushed by Richard Marshal in 1233, and was appointed a Baron of the Exchequer in 1234 and 1237. Between 1234 and 1237 he also served as High Sheriff of Buckinghamshire and Bedfordshire, and when Eleanor of Provence was crowned queen in 1236 he served as an Almoner. He died in 1260, leaving a son, also called William. [1]

    Sir William de Beauchamp, Lord of Bedford, b abt 1189, Essex, England, d 1260. He md Ida Longespee abt 1232, daughter of Sir William I Longespee and Ela Fitz Patrick of Salisbury.

    Children of William de Beauchamp and Ida Longespee were: Maud de Beauchamp b abt 1234, d bef Apr 1273. She md Roger de Mowbray abt 1247, son of William de Mowbray and Avice. Ela de Beauchamp b abt 1240, Essex, England, d 1266. She md Baldwin Wake abt 1254, son of Hugh Wake and Joan de Stuteville. Beatrice de Beauchamp b abt 1245, prob Bedford, Bedfordshire, England, d 1280-1281. She md Sir Thomas Fitz Otho bef 1264. Their daughter, Maud/Matilda Fitz Thomas md Sir John de Botetourte abt 1284.

    William married Ida Longespee ~ 1232. Ida (daughter of William (Plantagenet) Longespee, 3rd Earl of Salisbury and Ela FitzPatrick, 3rd Countess of Salisbury) was born 1205-1210, Salisbury, Wiltshire, England; died 0___ 1269, England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 35.  Ida Longespee was born 1205-1210, Salisbury, Wiltshire, England (daughter of William (Plantagenet) Longespee, 3rd Earl of Salisbury and Ela FitzPatrick, 3rd Countess of Salisbury); died 0___ 1269, England.

    Notes:

    About Ida de Longespâee of Salisbury

    Ida de Longespee daughter of William de Longespee and Ela de Salisbury married Ralph de Somery and William de Beauchamp. NOT to be confused with Ida de Longespee who married Walter FitzRobert de Clare of Dunmow.

    Marriage to Ralph de Somery was arranged in her childhood and may never have been consummated.

    Children:
    1. 17. Maud de Beauchamp was born ~ 1234; died Bef April 1273.

  5. 36.  Gilbert de Clare, Knight, 4th Earl of HertfordGilbert de Clare, Knight, 4th Earl of Hertford was born 0___ 1180, Hertford, Hertfordshire, England (son of Richard de Clare, Knight, 3rd Earl of Hertford and Amice FitzWilliam, 4th Countess of Gloucester); died 25 Oct 1230, Brittany, France; was buried Tewkesbury Abbey, Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England GL20 5RZ.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: 5th Earl of Gloucester

    Notes:

    Gilbert de Clare, 4th Earl of Hertford, 5th Earl of Gloucester (1180 - 25 October 1230) was the son of Richard de Clare, 3rd Earl of Hertford (c.?1153–1217), from whom he inherited the Clare estates. He also inherited from his mother, Amice Fitz William, the estates of Gloucester and the honour of St. Hilary, and from Rohese, an ancestor, the moiety of the Giffard estates. In June 1202, he was entrusted with the lands of Harfleur and Montrevillers.[1]

    In 1215 Gilbert and his father were two of the barons made Magna Carta sureties and championed Louis "le Dauphin" of France in the First Barons' War, fighting at Lincoln under the baronial banner. He was taken prisoner in 1217 by William Marshal, whose daughter Isabel he later married on 9 October, her 17th birthday.

    In 1223 he accompanied his brother-in-law, Earl Marshal, in an expedition into Wales. In 1225 he was present at the confirmation of the Magna Carta by Henry III. In 1228 he led an army against the Welsh, capturing Morgan Gam, who was released the next year. He then joined in an expedition to Brittany, but died on his way back to Penrose in that duchy. His body was conveyed home by way of Plymouth and Cranborne to Tewkesbury. His widow Isabel later married Richard Plantagenet, Earl of Cornwall & King of the Romans. His own arms were: Or, three chevronels gules.

    Issue

    Gilbert de Clare had six children by his wife Isabel, nâee Marshal:[2]

    Agnes de Clare (b. 1218)
    Amice de Clare (1220–1287), who married Baldwin de Redvers, 6th Earl of Devon
    Richard de Clare, 6th Earl of Gloucester (1222–1262)
    Isabel de Clare (1226–1264), who married Robert de Brus, 5th Lord of Annandale
    William de Clare (1228–1258)
    Gilbert de Clare (b. 1229)

    Gilbert married Isabel Marshal, Countess Marshall 9 Oct 1217, Tewkesbury Abbey, Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England GL20 5RZ. Isabel (daughter of William Marshal, Templar Knight, 1st Earl Pembroke and Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke) was born 9 Oct 1200, Pembroke Castle, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales; died 17 Jan 1240, Berkhamsted Castle, Berkhamsted, Hertforshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  6. 37.  Isabel Marshal, Countess Marshall was born 9 Oct 1200, Pembroke Castle, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales (daughter of William Marshal, Templar Knight, 1st Earl Pembroke and Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke); died 17 Jan 1240, Berkhamsted Castle, Berkhamsted, Hertforshire, England.

    Notes:

    Isabel Marshal (9 October 1200 - 17 January 1240) was a medieval English countess. She was the wife of both Gilbert de Clare, 4th Earl of Hertford and 5th Earl of Gloucester and Richard, 1st Earl of Cornwall (son of King John of England). With the former, she was a great grandparent of King Robert the Bruce of Scotland.

    Family

    Born at Pembroke Castle, Isabel was the seventh child, and second daughter, of William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke and Isabel de Clare. She had 10 siblings, who included the 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th and 6th Earls of Pembroke; each of her brothers dying without a legitimate male heir, thus passing the title on to the next brother in line. Her last brother to hold the title of Earl of Pembroke died without legitimate issue, and the title was passed down through the family of Isabel's younger sister Joan. Her sisters married, respectively, the Earls of Norfolk, Surrey, and Derby; the Lord of Abergavenny and the Lord of Swanscombe.

    First marriage

    On her 17th birthday, Isabel was married to Gilbert de Clare, 4th Earl of Hertford and 5th Earl of Gloucester, who was 20 years her senior, at Tewkesbury Abbey. The marriage was an extremely happy one, despite the age difference, and the couple had six children:

    Agnes de Clare (b. 1218)
    Amice de Clare (1220–1287), who married the 6th Earl of Devon
    Richard de Clare, 6th Earl of Hertford (1222–1262)
    Isabel de Clare (2 November 1226– 10 July 1264), who married the 5th Lord of Annandale; through this daughter, Isabel would be the great grandmother of Robert the Bruce
    William de Clare (1228–1258)
    Gilbert de Clare (b. 1229), a priest
    Isabel's husband Gilbert joined in an expedition to Brittany in 1229, but died 25 October 1230 on his way back to Penrose, in that duchy. His body was conveyed home by way of Plymouth and Cranborne, to Tewkesbury, where he was buried at the abbey.

    Second marriage

    Isabel was a young widow, only 30 years old. She had proven childbearing ability and the ability to bear healthy sons; as evidenced by her six young children, three of whom were sons. These were most likely the reasons for both the proposal of marriage from Richard, 1st Earl of Cornwall, and Isabel's acceptance of it, despite the fact that her husband had just died five months previously. The two were married on 30 March 1231 at Fawley Church, much to the displeasure of Richard's brother King Henry, who had been arranging a more advantageous match for Richard. Isabel and Richard got along well enough, though Richard had a reputation as a womanizer and is known to have had mistresses during the marriage. They were the parents of four children, three of whom died in the cradle.

    John of Cornwall (31 January 1232 – 22 September 1233), born and died at Marlow, Buckinghamshire, buried at Reading Abbey
    Isabella of Cornwall (9 September 1233 – 10 October 1234), born and died at Marlow, Buckinghamshire, buried at Reading Abbey
    Henry of Almain (2 November 1235 – 13 March 1271), murdered by his cousins Guy and Simon de Montfort, buried at Hailes Abbey.
    Nicholas of Cornwall (b. & d. 17 January 1240 Berkhamsted Castle), died shortly after birth, buried at Beaulieu Abbey with his mother
    Death and burial[edit]
    Isabel died of liver failure, contracted while in childbirth, on 17 January 1240, at Berkhamsted Castle. She was 39 years old.

    When Isabel was dying she asked to be buried next to her first husband at Tewkesbury Abbey, but Richard had her interred at Beaulieu Abbey, with her infant son, instead. As a pious gesture, however, he sent her heart, in a silver-gilt casket,[1] to Tewkesbury.

    Birth:
    Pembroke Castle (Welsh: Castell Penfro) is a medieval castle in Pembroke, West Wales. Standing beside the River Cleddau, it underwent major restoration work in the early 20th century. The castle was the original seat of the Earldom of Pembroke.

    In 1093 Roger of Montgomery built the first castle at the site when he fortified the promontory during the Norman invasion of Wales. A century later this castle was given to William Marshal by Richard I. Marshall, who would become one of the most powerful men in 12th-Century Britain, rebuilt Pembroke in stone creating most of the structure that remains today.

    Photos, history & source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pembroke_Castle

    Died:
    Berkhamsted Castle is a Norman motte-and-bailey castle in Berkhamsted, Hertfordshire. The castle was built to obtain control of a key route between London and the Midlands during the Norman conquest of England in the 11th century. Robert of Mortain, William the Conqueror's half brother, was probably responsible for managing its construction, after which he became the castle's owner. The castle was surrounded by protective earthworks and a deer park for hunting. The castle became a new administrative centre, and the former Anglo-Saxon settlement of Berkhamsted reorganised around it. Subsequent kings granted the castle to their chancellors. The castle was substantially expanded in the mid-12th century, probably by Thomas Becket.

    Photos, map, history & source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berkhamsted_Castle

    Children:
    1. 18. Richard de Clare, Knight, 6th Earl of Gloucester was born 4 Aug 1222, Clare Castle, Clare, Suffolk, England; died 14 Jul 1262, Waltham, Canterbury, England.
    2. Isabel de Clare was born 2 Nov 1226, Hertford, Hertfordshire, England; died 10 Jul 1264.

  7. 38.  John de Lacy, Knight, 2nd Earl of Lincoln was born ~ 1192 (son of Roger de Lacy, 6th Baron of Pontefrac and Maud de Clare); died 22 Jul 1240; was buried Cistercian Abbey of Stanlaw, in County Chester, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Constable of Cheshire
    • Also Known As: 5th Lord of Bowland
    • Also Known As: 7th Baron of Halton Castle
    • Also Known As: Baron of Pontefract

    Notes:

    He was the eldest son and heir of Roger de Lacy and his wife, Maud or Matilda de Clere (not of the de Clare family).[1]

    Public life

    He was hereditary constable of Chester and, in the 15th year of King John, undertook the payment of 7,000 marks to the crown, in the space of four years, for livery of the lands of his inheritance, and to be discharged of all his father's debts due to the exchequer, further obligating himself by oath, that in case he should ever swerve from his allegiance, and adhere to the king's enemies, all of his possessions should devolve upon the crown, promising also, that he would not marry without the king's licence. By this agreement it was arranged that the king should retain the castles of Pontefract and Dunnington, still in his own hands; and that he, the said John, should allow 40 pounds per year, for the custody of those fortresses. But the next year he had Dunnington restored to him, upon hostages.

    John de Lacy, 7th Baron of Halton Castle, 5th Lord of Bowland and hereditary constable of Chester, was one of the earliest who took up arms at the time of the Magna Charta, and was appointed to see that the new statutes were properly carried into effect and observed in the counties of York and Nottingham. He was one of twenty-five barons charged with overseeing the observance of Magna Carta in 1215.[2]

    He was excommunicated by the Pope. Upon the accession of King Henry III, he joined a party of noblemen and made a pilgrimage to the Holy Land, and did good service at the siege of Damietta. In 1232 he was made Earl of Lincoln and in 1240, governor of Chester and Beeston Castles. In 1237, his lordship was one of those appointed to prohibit Oto, the pope's prelate, from establishing anything derogatory to the king's crown and dignity, in the council of prelates then assembled; and the same year he was appointed High Sheriff of Cheshire, being likewise constituted Governor of the castle of Chester.

    Private life

    He married firstly Alice in 1214 in Pontefract, daughter of Gilbert de Aquila, who gave him one daughter Joan.[3] Alice died in 1216 in Pontefract and, after his marked gallantry at the siege of Damietta.

    He married secondly in 1221 Margaret de Quincy, only daughter and heiress of Robert de Quincy, son of Saer de Quincy, 1st Earl of Winchester, by Hawyse, 4th sister and co-heir of Ranulph de Mechines, Earl of Chester and Lincoln, which Ranulph, by a formal charter under his seal, granted the Earldom of Lincoln, that is, so much as he could grant thereof, to the said Hawyse, "to the end that she might be countess, and that her heirs might also enjoy the earldom;" which grant was confirmed by the king, and at the especial request of the countess, this John de Lacy, constable of Chester, through his marriage was allowed to succeed de Blondeville and was created by charter, dated Northampton, 23 November 1232, Earl of Lincoln, with remainder to the heirs of his body, by his wife, the above-mentioned Margaret.[1] In the contest which occurred during the same year, between the king and Richard Marshal, 3rd Earl of Pembroke, Earl Marshal, Matthew Paris states that the Earl of Lincoln was brought over to the king's party, with John of Scotland, 7th Earl of Chester, by Peter de Rupibus, Bishop of Winchester, for a bribe of 1,000 marks.
    By this marriage he had one son, Edmund de Lacy, Baron of Pontefract, and two daughters, of one, Maud, married Richard de Clare, 6th Earl of Gloucester.[4]

    Later life

    He died on 22 July 1240 and was buried at the Cisterian Abbey of Stanlaw, in County Chester. The monk Matthew Paris, records: "On the 22nd day of July, in the year 1240, which was St. Magdalen's Day, John, Earl of Lincoln, after suffering from a long illness went the way of all flesh". Margaret, his wife, survived him and remarried Walter Marshal, 5th Earl of Pembroke.

    John married Margaret de Quincy, 2nd Countess of Lincoln Bef 21 June 1221. Margaret (daughter of Robert de Quincy and Hawise of Chester, 1st Countess of Chester) was born ~ 1206, England; died 0Mar 1266, Hampstead, England; was buried Church of The Hospitallers, Clerkenwell, England. [Group Sheet]


  8. 39.  Margaret de Quincy, 2nd Countess of Lincoln was born ~ 1206, England (daughter of Robert de Quincy and Hawise of Chester, 1st Countess of Chester); died 0Mar 1266, Hampstead, England; was buried Church of The Hospitallers, Clerkenwell, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Countess of Pembroke

    Notes:

    Margaret de Quincy, 2nd Countess of Lincoln suo jure (c. 1206 – March 1266) was a wealthy English noblewoman and heiress having inherited in her own right the Earldom of Lincoln and honours of Bolingbroke from her mother Hawise of Chester, received a dower from the estates of her first husband, and acquired a dower third from the extensive earldom of Pembroke following the death of her second husband, Walter Marshal, 5th Earl of Pembroke. Her first husband was John de Lacy, 2nd Earl of Lincoln, by whom she had two children. He was created 2nd Earl of Lincoln by right of his marriage to Margaret. Margaret has been described as "one of the two towering female figures of the mid-13th century".[1]

    Family

    Margaret was born in about 1206, the daughter and only child of Robert de Quincy and Hawise of Chester, herself the co-heiress of her uncle Ranulf de Blondeville, 6th Earl of Chester. Hawise became suo jure Countess of Chester in April 1231 when her brother resigned the title in her favour.

    Her paternal grandfather, Saer de Quincy, 1st Earl of Winchester was one of the 25 sureties of the Magna Carta; as a result he was excommunicated by the Church in December 1215. Two years later her father died after having been accidentally poisoned through medicine prepared by a Cistercian monk.[2]

    Life

    On 23 November 1232, Margaret and her husband John de Lacy, Baron of Pontefract were formally invested by King Henry III as Countess and Earl of Lincoln. In April 1231 her maternal uncle Ranulf de Blondeville, 1st Earl of Lincoln had made an inter vivos gift, after receiving dispensation from the crown, of the Earldom of Lincoln to her mother Hawise. Her uncle granted her mother the title by a formal charter under his seal which was confirmed by King Henry III. Her mother was formally invested as suo jure 1st Countess of Lincoln on 27 October 1232 the day after her uncle's death. Likewise her mother Hawise of Chester received permission from King Henry III to grant the Earldom of Lincoln jointly to Margaret and her husband John, and less than a month later a second formal investiture took place, but this time for Margaret and her husband John de Lacy. Margaret became 2nd Countess of Lincoln suo jure (in her own right) and John de Lacy became 2nd Earl of Lincoln by right of his wife. (John de Lacy is mistakenly called the 1st Earl of Lincoln in many references.)

    In 1238, Margaret and her husband paid King Henry the large sum of 5,000 pounds to obtain his agreement to the marriage of their daughter Maud to Richard de Clare, 6th Earl of Hertford, 2nd Earl of Gloucester.

    On 22 July 1240 her first husband John de Lacy died. Although he was nominally succeeded by their only son Edmund de Lacy (c.1227-1258) for titles and lands that included Baron of Pontefract, Baron of Halton, and Constable of Chester, Margaret at first controlled the estates in lieu of her son who was still in his minority and being brought up at the court of Henry III and Eleanor of Provence. Edmund was allowed to succeed to his titles and estates at the age of 18. Edmund was also Margaret's heir to the Earldom of Lincoln and also her other extensive estates that included the third of the Earldom of Pembroke that she had inherited from her second husband in 1248. Edmund was never able to become Earl of Lincoln, however, as he predeceased his mother by eight years.

    As the widowed Countess of Lincoln suo jure, Margaret was brought into contact with some of the most important people in the county of Lincolnshire. Among these included Robert Grosseteste, Bishop of Lincoln, the most significant intellectual in England at the time who recognised Margaret's position as Countess of Lincoln to be legitimate and important, and he viewed Margaret as both patron and peer. He dedicated Les Reules Seynt Robert, his treatise on estate and household management, to her.[3]

    Marriages and issue

    Sometime before 21 June 1221, Margaret married as his second wife, her first husband John de Lacy of Pontefract. The purpose of the alliance was to bring the rich Lincoln and Bolingbroke inheritance of her mother to the de Lacy family.[4] John's first marriage to Alice de l'Aigle had not produced issue; although John and Margaret together had two children:

    Maud de Lacy (25 January 1223- 1287/10 March 1289), married in 1238 Richard de Clare, 6th Earl of Hertford, 2nd Earl of Gloucester, by whom she had seven children.
    Edmund de Lacy, Baron of Pontefract (died 2 June 1258), married in 1247 Alasia of Saluzzo, daughter of Manfredo III of Saluzzo, by whom he had three children, including Henry de Lacy, 3rd Earl of Lincoln.
    She married secondly on 6 January 1242, Walter Marshal, 5th Earl of Pembroke, Lord of Striguil, Lord of Leinster, Earl Marshal of England, one of the ten children of William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke and Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke. This marriage, like those of his four brothers, did not produce any children; therefore when he died at Goodrich Castle on 24 November 1245, Margaret inherited a third of the Earldom of Pembroke as well as the properties and lordship of Kildare. Her dower third outweighed any of the individual holdings of the 13 different co-heirs of the five Marshal sisters which meant she would end up controlling more of the earldom of Pembroke and lordship of Leinster than any of the other co-heirs; this brought her into direct conflict with her own daughter, Maud, whose husband was by virtue of his mother Isabel Marshal one of the co-heirs of the Pembroke earldom.[5] As a result of her quarrels with her daughter, Margaret preferred her grandson Henry de Lacy who would become the 3rd Earl of Lincoln on reaching majority (21) in 1272. She and her Italian daughter-in-law Alasia of Saluzzo shared in the wardship of Henry who was Margaret's heir, and the relationship between the two women appeared to have been cordial.[6]

    Death and legacy

    Margaret was a careful overseer of her property and tenants, and gracious in her dealings with her son's children, neighbours and tenants.[7] She received two papal dispensations in 1251, the first to erect a portable altar; the other so that she could hear mass in the Cistercian monastery.[8] Margaret died in March 1266[9][10] at Hampstead. Her death was recorded in the Annals of Worcester and in the Annals of Winchester.[9] She was buried in the Church of the Hospitallers in Clerkenwell.[9]

    Margaret was described as "one of the two towering female figures of the mid-13th century"; the other being Ela, Countess of Salisbury.[11]

    Peerage of England
    Preceded by
    Hawise of Chester
    Countess of Lincoln suo jure from 1232-1240 together with her spouse
    John de Lacy, 2nd Earl of Lincoln
    jure uxoris
    Countess of Lincoln suo jure
    1232–c.1266 Succeeded by
    Henry de Lacy
    3rd Earl of Lincoln

    Notes

    Jump up ^ Mitchell p.42
    Jump up ^ Cawley, Charles, Earls of Chester, Medieval Lands database, Foundation for Medieval Genealogy,[better source needed]
    Jump up ^ Mitchell, p.32
    Jump up ^ Carpenter, p.421
    Jump up ^ Mitchell, p.33
    Jump up ^ Mitchell, p.34-35
    Jump up ^ Mitchell, p.39
    Jump up ^ Mitchell, p.40
    ^ Jump up to: a b c Cawley, Charles, Earls of Lincoln, Medieval Lands database, Foundation for Medieval Genealogy,[better source needed]
    Jump up ^ Wilkinson, p. 65, at Google Books
    Jump up ^ Mitchell, p.42

    References

    Carpenter (2003), David A., The Struggle For Mastery: Britain 1066-1284, OUP Google Books accessed 28 September 2009
    Cawley. C, Earls of Chester and Earls of Lincoln Foundation for Medieval Genealogy
    Mitchell (2003), Linda Elizabeth, Portraits of Medieval Women: Family, Marriage, and Politics in England 1225-1350, Palgrave Macmillan Google Books accessed 28 September 2009.
    Wilkinson, Louise J. (2007): Women in Thirteenth-Century Lincolnshire. Boydell Press, Woodbridge. ISBN 978-0-86193-285-6 (Women in Thirteenth-Century Lincolnshire at Google Books)

    Notes:

    Married:
    The purpose of the alliance was to bring the rich Lincoln and Bolingbroke inheritance of her mother to the de Lacy family.[4] John's first marriage to Alice de l'Aigle had not produced issue; although John and Margaret together had two children:

    Children:
    1. 19. Maud de Lacy was born 25 Jan 1223; died 1287-1289.

  9. 40.  John de Braose was born 1197-1198, (Bramber, Sussex, England) (son of William de Braose, III, Knight, 4th Lord of Bramber and Maud de St. Valery, Lady of the Haie); died 18 Jul 1232, Bramber, Sussex, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Lord of Bramber and Gower

    Notes:

    John de Braose (born 1197 or 1198 – 18 July 1232), known as Tadody to the Welsh, was the Lord of Bramber and Gower.

    Re-establishment of the de Braose dynasty

    John re-established the senior branch of the de Braose dynasty.

    His father was William de Braose, eldest son of William de Braose, 4th Lord of Bramber and Maud de St. Valery, and his mother was Maud de Clare, (born ca. 1184) daughter of Richard de Clare, 3rd Earl of Hertford of Tonbridge Castle in Kent. John was their eldest son and one of four brothers, the others being Giles, Phillip and Walter de Braose.

    Royal threat

    His grandfather had had his lands seized and his grandmother Maud de St. Valery had been captured by forces of King John of England in 1210. She was imprisoned, along with John's father William, in Corfe Castle and walled alive inside the dungeon. Both mother and son starved to death on the King's orders. This was probably due to John's grandfather's conflict with the monarch, open rebellion and subsequent alliance with Llewelyn the Great. John's nickname Tadody means "fatherless" in the Welsh.

    Hiding and imprisonment

    At his family's fall from Royal favour John de Braose was initially hidden on Gower and spent some time in the care of his uncle Giles de Braose, Bishop of Hereford, but finally in 1214 John and his younger brother Philip were taken into custody. They were imprisoned until after King John had died (in 1216), the throne passing to Henry III. John was released from custody in 1218.

    Welsh intermarriage

    photograph taken in 1999
    Swansea castle, the centre of power for the honour of Gower
    In 1219 he married Margaret Ferch Llywelyn, (born about 1202 in the Kingdom of Gwynedd), daughter of the leader of Wales Llywelyn Fawr and his English wife Joan Plantagenet also known as Joan, Lady of Wales, and he received the Lordship of Gower as her dowry with Llywelyn's blessing.

    In 1226 another surviving uncle Reginald de Braose sold him the honour of Bramber, and he inherited more lands and titles when this uncle died a few years later in 1228. Sometime in the 1220s, he established the deer park, Parc le Breos in the Gower Peninsula.

    He and Margaret, his Welsh wife, had three sons, his heir, William de Braose the eldest son, John and Richard (born about 1225 in Stinton, Norfolk) the youngest, (buried in Woodbridge Priory, Suffolk) having died before June 1292.

    Death and legacy

    In 1232 John was killed in a fall from his horse on his land in Bramber, Sussex at 34 years of age. His widow soon remarried to Walter III de Clifford. William de Braose (born about 1224; died 1291 in Findon, Sussex), his eldest son, succeeded him in the title of Lord of Bramber. John the younger son became Lord of the manor of Corsham in Wiltshire and also later Lord of Glasbury on Wye.

    William de Braose (c.1224–1291) also had a son named William de Braose who died "shortly before 1st May 1326".[1]

    Another William de Braose who became Bishop of Llandaff cannot be placed with certainty in this branch of the family.

    The de Braose name modified to de Brewes in the Middle Ages 1200 to 1400.

    See also

    House of Braose

    Notes

    Jump up ^ Richardson & Everingham, Magna Carta Ancestry, p137.
    References[edit]
    Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, By Douglas Richardson & Kimball G. Everingham, Published 2005, Genealogical Publishing Com
    Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis, Lines: 29A-28, 246-30.

    end of biography

    John married Marared ferch Llywelyn 0___ 1219. Marared (daughter of Llywelyn The Great and Joan Plantagenet, Lady of Wales) was born 0___ 1202, Gwynedd, Wales; died Aft 1268. [Group Sheet]


  10. 41.  Marared ferch Llywelyn was born 0___ 1202, Gwynedd, Wales (daughter of Llywelyn The Great and Joan Plantagenet, Lady of Wales); died Aft 1268.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Margaret
    • Also Known As: Margaret of Wales

    Children:
    1. 20. William de Braose, VI, Knight, 1st Baron Braose was born ~ 1224, (Wales); died 0___ 1291, Findon, Sussex, England.
    2. Richard de Braose was born 0___ 1232; died 0___ 1292.

  11. 42.  Thomas de Multon

    Thomas — unnamed spouse. [Group Sheet]


  12. 43.  unnamed spouse
    Children:
    1. 21. Aline de Multon

  13. 48.  John I, King of EnglandJohn I, King of England was born 24 Dec 1166, Beaumont Palace, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England (son of Henry II, King of England and Eleanore de Aquitaine, Queen of England); died 19 Oct 1216, Newark Castle, Nottinghamshire, England; was buried 19 Oct 1216, Worcester Cathedral, Worcester, Warwickshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Johan sanz Terre
    • Also Known As: John de Normandie, King of England
    • Also Known As: John I, King of England
    • Also Known As: John Lackland
    • Also Known As: John Plantagenet, King of England

    Notes:

    John (24 December 1166 - 19 October 1216), also known as John Lackland (Norman French: Johan sanz Terre),[1] was King of England from 6 April 1199 until his death in 1216.

    Following the battle of Bouvines, John lost the duchy of Normandy to King Philip II of France, which resulted in the collapse of most of the Angevin Empire and contributed to the subsequent growth in power of the Capetian dynasty during the 13th century.

    The baronial revolt at the end of John's reign led to the sealing of the Magna Carta, a document sometimes considered to be an early step in the evolution of the constitution of the United Kingdom.

    more on King John ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John,_King_of_England

    More images of King John ...

    https://www.google.com/search?q=john+lackland+coat+of+arms&rlz=1C1KMZB_enUS591US591&espv=2&biw=1440&bih=810&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiNnKWp6aPPAhULXB4KHb1qCnQQsAQIKw&dpr=1#imgrc=F8SAOkDV1jsAEM%3A

    *

    Baronial Order of Magna Charta:

    The Baronial Order of Magna Charta ("BOMC") is a scholarly, charitable, and lineage society founded in 1898. The BOMC was originally named the Baronial Order of Runnemede, but the name was subsequently changed to better reflect the organization's purposes relating to the Magna Charta and the promulgation of "freedom of man under the rule of law." view its membership list: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baronial_Order_of_Magna_Charta

    These 25 barons were Sureties for the concessions made by John, King of England, d. 18 Oct 1216.

    1. William d'Albini, Lord of Belvoir Castle, d. 1236.
    ((26th, 27th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Vernia Swindell "Ma" Byars;
    24th, 25th & 26th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Jesse D Hennessee: http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=&secondpersonID=I3&maxrels=12&disallowspouses=0&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I46884

    2. Roger Bigod, (43132) Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk, d. 1220.
    (26th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Perry Green "Pop" Byars: http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=&secondpersonID=I3&maxrels=6&disallowspouses=1&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I43132

    3. Hugh Bigod, (43271) heir to the earldoms of Norfolk and Suffolk, d. 1225.
    (25th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Perry Green "Pop" Byars: http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=I3&secondpersonID=&maxrels=6&disallowspouses=1&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I43271

    4. Henry de Bohun, Earl of Hereford, (46127) d. 1220.
    (26th, 27th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Vernia Swindell "Ma" Byars;
    25th & 26th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Jesse D Hennessee: http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=&secondpersonID=I3&maxrels=6&disallowspouses=1&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I46127


    5. Richard de Clare, Earl of Hertford, (46129) d. 1217.
    (25th, 26th & 27th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Vernia Swindell "Ma" Byars: http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=I3&secondpersonID=&maxrels=6&disallowspouses=1&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I46129

    6. Gilbert de Clare, heir to the earldom of Hertford, (45550) d. 1230.
    (24th, 26th & 27th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Vernia Swindell "Ma" Byars;
    25th & 27th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Perry Green "Pop" Byars;
    24th & 25th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Jesse D Hennessee: http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=I3&secondpersonID=&maxrels=16&disallowspouses=1&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I45550

    John FitzRobert, Lord of Warkworth Castle, Northumberland, d. 1240.

    7. Robert FitzWalter, Lord of Dunmow Castle, Essex, d. 1234.
    (28th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Perry Green "Pop" Byars)

    William de Fortibus, Earl of Albemarle, d. 1241, no great-grandchildren.
    William Hardell, Mayor of the City of London, d. after 1216, no known issue.
    William de Huntingfield, Sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk, d. 1220.
    John de Lacie, Lord of Pontefract Castle, d. 1240.
    William de Lanvallei, Lord of Standway Castle, Essex, d. 1217.
    William Malet, Sheriff of Somerset and Dorset, d. about 1217.
    Geoffrey de Mandeville, Earl of Essex and Gloucester, d. 1216, d.s.p..

    William Marshall jr, heir to the earldom of Pembroke, d. 1231, (43947) d.s.p..
    A cousin to the grandchildren of Vernia Swindell "Ma" Byars & Perry Green "Pop" Byars: http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=I3&secondpersonID=&maxrels=6&disallowspouses=1&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I43947

    Roger de Montbegon, Lord of Hornby Castle, Lancashire, d. 1226, d.s.p..
    Richard de Montfichet, Baron, d. after 1258, d.s.p..

    8.. William de Mowbray, Lord of Axholme Castle, Lincolnshire, (46138) d. 1223
    (24th & 26th great grandfather to the grandchildren of Vernia Swindell "Ma" Byars: http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=&secondpersonID=I3&maxrels=6&disallowspouses=1&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I46138

    Richard de Percy, Baron, Yorkshire, d. 1244, d.s.p..

    9.Saire de Quincey, Earl of Winchester, (46162) d. 1219.
    (25th & 27th great grandfather to the grandchildren of Vernia Swindell "Ma" Byars;
    25th & 26th great grandfather to the grandchildren of Jesse D Hennessee;
    27th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Perry Green "Pop" Byars: http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=I3&secondpersonID=&maxrels=6&disallowspouses=1&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I46162

    10. Robert de Roos, Lord of Hamlake Castle, Yorkshire, (46148)d. 1226.
    (25th, 26th & 27th great grandfather to the grandchildren of Vernia Swindell "Ma" Byars: http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=&secondpersonID=I3&maxrels=12&disallowspouses=1&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I46148

    Geoffrey de Saye, Baron, d. 1230.

    11. Robert de Vere, heir to the earldom of Oxford, d. 1221.
    (25th, 27th great grandfather to the grandchildren of Vernia Swindell "Ma" Byars;
    25th, 26th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Jesse D Hennessee;
    27th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Perry Green "Pop" Byars; http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=&secondpersonID=I3&maxrels=12&disallowspouses=1&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I46155

    Eustace de Vesci, Lord of Alnwick Castle, Northumberland, d. 1216 d.s.p..

    Birth:
    Beaumont Palace, built outside the north gate of Oxford, was intended by Henry I about 1130 to serve as a royal palace conveniently close to the royal hunting-lodge at Woodstock (now part of the park of Blenheim Palace). Its former presence is recorded in Beaumont Street, Oxford. Set into a pillar on the north side of the street, near Walton Street, is a stone with the inscription: "Near to this site stood the King's Houses later known as Beaumont Palace. King Richard I was born here in 1157 and King John in 1167". The "King's House" was the range of the palace that contained the king's lodgings.

    Henry passed Easter 1133 in the nova aula, his "new hall" at Beaumont in great pomp, celebrating the birth of his grandson, the future Henry II.[1] Edward I was the last king to sojourn in Beaumont officially as a palace, and in 1275 he granted it to an Italian lawyer, Francesco Accorsi, who had undertaken diplomatic missions for him.[2] When Edward II was put to flight at the battle of Bannockburn in 1314, he is said to have invoked the Virgin Mary and vowed to found a monastery for the Carmelites (the White Friars) if he might escape safely. In fulfilment of his vow he remanded Beaumont Palace to the Carmelites in 1318.

    In 1318, the Palace was the scene for the beginnings of the John Deydras affair, in which a royal pretender, arguing that he was the rightful king of England, claimed the Palace for his own. John Deydras was ultimately executed for sedition.[3]


    When the White Friars were disbanded at the Reformation, most of the structure was dismantled and the building stone reused in Christ Church and St John's College.[4] An engraving of 1785[5] shows the remains of Beaumont Palace, the last of which were destroyed in the laying out of Beaumont Street in 1829.[6]

    Drawings, Sketches & Source ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beaumont_Palace

    Buried:
    Worcester Cathedral, before the English Reformation known as Worcester Priory, is an Anglican cathedral in Worcester, England; situated on a bank overlooking the River Severn. It is the seat of the Bishop of Worcester. Its official name is The Cathedral Church of Christ and the Blessed Mary the Virgin of Worcester. Built between 1084 and 1504, Worcester Cathedral represents every style of English architecture from Norman to Perpendicular Gothic.

    It is famous for its Norman crypt and unique chapter house, its unusual Transitional Gothic bays, its fine woodwork and its "exquisite" central tower,[1] which is of particularly fine proportions.

    Images, History & Source ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Worcester_Cathedral

    Died:
    Newark Castle, in Newark, in the English county of Nottinghamshire was founded in the mid 12th century by Alexander, Bishop of Lincoln. Originally a timber castle, it was rebuilt in stone towards the end of the century. Dismantled in the 17th century after the English Civil War, the castle was restored in the 19th century, first by Anthony Salvin in the 1840s and then by the corporation of Newark who bought the site in 1889. The Gilstrap Heritage Centre is a free-admission museum in the castle grounds about the history of the town of Newark.

    Images & Source ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newark_Castle,_Nottinghamshire

    John married Isabelle of Angouleme, Queen of England 26 Aug 1200, Cathedral of Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France. Isabelle was born 0___ 1188, Angouleme, France; died 31 May 1246, Fontevrault L'abbe, Maine-Ete-Loire, France; was buried 31 May 1246, Fontevrault L'abbe, Maine-Ete-Loire, France. [Group Sheet]


  14. 49.  Isabelle of Angouleme, Queen of EnglandIsabelle of Angouleme, Queen of England was born 0___ 1188, Angouleme, France; died 31 May 1246, Fontevrault L'abbe, Maine-Ete-Loire, France; was buried 31 May 1246, Fontevrault L'abbe, Maine-Ete-Loire, France.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Countess of Angouleme
    • Also Known As: Isabella de Taillefer, Queen of England
    • Alt Birth: Abt 1173
    • Alt Death: 14 Oct 1217
    • Alt Death: 4 Jun 1246

    Notes:

    Isabel of Gloucester (c. 1173 - 14 October 1217) was the first wife of John of England . She is known by an exceptionally large number of alternative names: Hadwisa, Hawisia, Hawise, Joan, Eleanor, Avise and Avisa.

    *

    Isabella of Angoulăeme (French: Isabelle d'Angoulăeme, IPA: [izab?l d?~gul?m]; c.1188 – 4 June 1246) was queen consort of England as the second wife of King John from 1200 until John's death in 1216. She was also reigning Countess of Angoulăeme from 1202 until 1246.

    She had five children by the king including his heir, later Henry III. In 1220, Isabella married Hugh X of Lusignan, Count of La Marche, by whom she had another nine children.

    Some of her contemporaries, as well as later writers, claim that Isabella formed a conspiracy against King Louis IX of France in 1241, after being publicly snubbed by his mother, Blanche of Castile for whom she had a deep-seated hatred.[1] In 1244, after the plot had failed, Isabella was accused of attempting to poison the king. To avoid arrest, she sought refuge in Fontevraud Abbey where she died two years later, but none of this can be confirmed.

    Queen of England

    She was the only daughter and heir of Aymer Taillefer, Count of Angoulăeme, by Alice of Courtenay, who was sister of Peter II of Courtenay, Latin Emperor of Constantinople and granddaughter of King Louis VI of France.

    Isabella became Countess of Angoulăeme in her own right on 16 June 1202, by which time she was already queen of England. Her marriage to King John took place on 24 August 1200, in Angoulăeme,[2] a year after he annulled his first marriage to Isabel of Gloucester. She was crowned queen in an elaborate ceremony on 8 October at Westminster Abbey in London. Isabella was originally betrothed to Hugh IX le Brun, Count of Lusignan,[3] son of the then Count of La Marche. As a result of John's temerity in taking her as his second wife, King Philip II of France confiscated all of their French lands, and armed conflict ensued.

    At the time of her marriage to John, the blonde and blue-eyed 12-year-old Isabella was already renowned by some for her beauty[4] and has sometimes been called the Helen of the Middle Ages by historians.[5] Isabella was much younger than her husband and possessed a volatile temper similar to his own. King John was infatuated with his young, beautiful wife; however, his acquisition of her had as much, if not more to do with spiting his enemies, than romantic love. She was already engaged to Hugh IX le Brun, when she was taken by John. It had been said that he neglected his state affairs to spend time with Isabella, often remaining in bed with her until noon. However, these were rumors, ignited by John's enemies to discredit him as being a weak and grossly irresponsible ruler. Given that at the time they were made John was engaging in a desperate war with King Phillip of France to hold on to the remaining Plantagenet dukedoms. The common people began to term her a "siren" or "Messalina", which spoke volumes as to common opinion .[6] Her mother-in-law, Eleanor of Aquitaine readily accepted her as John's wife.[7]

    On 1 October 1207 at Winchester Castle, Isabella gave birth to a son and heir who was named Henry after the King's father, Henry II. He was quickly followed by another son, Richard, and three daughters, Joan, Isabel, and Eleanor. All five children survived into adulthood, and would make illustrious marriages; all but Joan would produce offspring of their own.

    Second marriage

    When King John died in October 1216, Isabella's first act was to arrange the speedy coronation of her nine-year-old son at the city of Gloucester on 28 October. As the royal crown had recently been lost in The Wash, along with the rest of King John's treasure, she supplied her own golden circlet to be used in lieu of a crown.[8] The following July, less than a year after his crowning as King Henry III of England, she left him in the care of his regent, William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke and returned to France to assume control of her inheritance of Angoulăeme.

    In the spring of 1220, she married Hugh X of Lusignan, "le Brun", Seigneur de Luisignan, Count of La Marche, the son of her former fiancâe, Hugh IX, to whom she had been betrothed before her marriage to King John. It had been previously arranged that her eldest daughter Joan should marry Hugh, and the little girl was being brought up at the Lusignan court in preparation for her marriage. Hugh, however, upon seeing Isabella, whose beauty had not diminished,[9] preferred the girl's mother. Princess Joan was provided with another husband, King Alexander II of Scotland, whom she wed in 1221.

    Isabella had married Hugh without waiting to receive the consent of the King's council in England, which was the required procedure for a former Queen of England, as the Council had the power to not only choose the Queen Dowager's second husband, but to decide whether or not she should be allowed to marry at all. Isabella's flouting of this law caused the Council to confiscate her dower lands and stop the payment of her pension.[10] Isabella and her husband retaliated by threatening to keep Princess Joan, who had been promised in marriage to the King of Scotland, in France. The council first responded by sending furious letters, signed in the name of young King Henry, to the Pope, urging him to excommunicate Isabella and her husband, but then decided to come to terms with Isabella, as to avoid conflict with the Scottish king, who was eager to receive his bride. Isabella was granted, in compensation for her dower lands in Normandy, the stannaries in Devon and the revenue of Aylesbury for a period of four years. She also received ą3000 as payment for arrears in her pension.[11]

    By Hugh X, Isabella had nine more children. Their eldest son Hugh XI of Lusignan succeeded his father as Count of La Marche and Count of Angoulăeme in 1249.

    Isabella's children from her past marriage continued their lives in England.

    Rebellion and death[edit]
    Described by some contemporaries as "vain, capricious, and troublesome,"[12] Isabella could not reconcile herself with her less prominent position in France. Though Queen dowager of England, Isabella was now mostly regarded as a mere Countess of La Marche and had to give precedence to other women.[13] In 1241, when Isabella and Hugh were summoned to the French court to swear fealty to King Louis IX of France's brother, Alphonse, who had been invested as Count of Poitou, their mother, the Queen Dowager Blanche openly snubbed her. This so infuriated Isabella, who had a deep-seated hatred of Blanche due to the latter having fervently supported the French invasion of England during the First Barons' War in May 1216, that she began to actively conspire against King Louis. Isabella and her husband, along with other disgruntled nobles, including her son-in-law Raymond VII of Toulouse, sought to create an English-backed confederacy which united the provinces of the south and west against the French king.[14] She encouraged her son Henry in his invasion of Normandy in 1230, but then did not provide him the support she had promised.[15]

    In 1244, after the confederacy had failed and Hugh had made peace with King Louis, two royal cooks were arrested for attempting to poison the King; upon questioning they confessed to having been in Isabella's pay.[16] Before Isabella could be taken into custody, she fled to Fontevraud Abbey, where she died on 4 June 1246.[17]

    By her own prior arrangement, she was first buried in the Abbey's churchyard, as an act of repentance for her many misdeeds. On a visit to Fontevraud, her son King Henry III of England was shocked to find her buried outside the Abbey and ordered her immediately moved inside. She was finally placed beside Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine. Afterwards, most of her many Lusignan children, having few prospects in France, set sail for England and the court of Henry, their half-brother.

    Issue

    With King John of England: 5 children, all of whom survived into adulthood, including:
    King Henry III of England (1 October 1207 – 16 November 1272). Married Eleanor of Provence, by whom he had issue, including his heir, King Edward I of England.
    Richard, Earl of Cornwall and King of the Romans (5 January 1209 – 2 April 1272). Married firstly Isabel Marshal, secondly Sanchia of Provence, and thirdly Beatrice of Falkenburg. Had issue.
    Joan (22 July 1210 – 1238), the wife of King Alexander II of Scotland. Her marriage was childless.
    Isabella (1214–1241), the wife of Emperor Frederick II, by whom she had issue.
    Eleanor (1215–1275), who would marry firstly William Marshal, 2nd Earl of Pembroke; and secondly Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester, by whom she had issue.

    With Hugh X of Lusignan, Count of La Marche: nine children, all of whom survived into adulthood, including:

    Hugh XI of Lusignan (1221–1250), Count of La Marche and Count of Angoulăeme. Married Yolande de Dreux, Countess of Penthiáevre and of Porhoet, by whom he had issue.
    Aymer of Lusignan (1222–1260), Bishop of Winchester
    Agnáes de Lusignan (1223–1269). Married William II de Chauvigny (d. 1270), and had issue.
    Alice of Lusignan (1224 – 9 February 1256). Married John de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey, by whom she had issue.
    Guy of Lusignan (c. 1225 – 1264), killed at the Battle of Lewes. (Tufton Beamish maintains that he escaped to France after the Battle of Lewes and died there in 1269).
    Geoffrey of Lusignan (c. 1226 – 1274). Married in 1259 Jeanne, Viscountess of Chăatellerault, by whom he had issue.
    Isabella of Lusignan (c.1226/1227 14 January 1299). Married firstly before 1244 Maurice IV, seigneur de Craon (1224–1250),[18] by whom she had issue; she married secondly, Geoffrey de Rancon.[19]
    William of Lusignan (c. 1228 – 1296). 1st Earl of Pembroke. Married Joan de Munchensi, by whom he had issue.
    Marguerite de Lusignan (c. 1229 – 1288). Married firstly in 1243 Raymond VII of Toulouse; secondly c. 1246 Aimery IX de Thouars, Viscount of Thouars and had issue

    Birth:
    Aquitaine, Charente department...

    Notes:

    Married:
    Bordeaux Cathedral (Cathâedrale Saint-Andrâe de Bordeaux) is a Roman Catholic cathedral, seat of the Archbishop of Bordeaux-Bazas, located in Bordeaux.

    The cathedral was consecrated by Pope Urban II in 1096. Of the original Romanesque edifice, only a wall in the nave remains. The Royal Gate is from the early 13th century, while the rest of the construction is mostly from the 14th-15th centuries. The building is a national monument of France.

    In this church in 1137 the 13-year-old Eleanor of Aquitaine married the future Louis VII, a few months before she became Queen.


    Images, History & Source ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bordeaux_Cathedral

    Children:
    1. 24. Henry III, King of England was born 1 Oct 1207, Winchester Castle, Hampshire, United Kingdom; was christened 0___ 1207, Bermondsey, London, Middlesex, England; died 16 Nov 1272, Westminster Palace, Westminster, London, Middlesex, England; was buried 20 Nov 1272, Westminster Abbey, 20 Deans Yd, London SW1P 3PA, United Kingdom.
    2. Richard Plantagenet, Knight, 1st Earl of Cornwall was born 5 Jan 1209, Winchester Castle, Castle Ave, Winchester, Hampshire SO23 8PJ, United Kingdom; was christened 0___ 1214, Winchester Castle, Castle Ave, Winchester, Hampshire SO23 8PJ, United Kingdom; died 2 Apr 1272, Berkhamsted Castle, Hertfordshire, England; was buried 13 Apr 1272, Hailes Abbey, Winchcombe, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire - GL54 5PB, England.
    3. Isabella Plantagenet was born 0___ 1214; died 0___ 1241.
    4. Eleanor of Leicester was born 0___ 1215, Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England; died 13 Apr 1275, Montargis Abbey, France; was buried Montargis Abbey, France.

  15. 60.  William de Beauchamp was born ~ 1215, Elmley Castle, Worcestershire, England (son of Walter de Beauchamp and Joan Mortimer); died 0___ 1268, Elmley Castle, Worcestershire, England.

    Notes:

    William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick (1237-1298) was an English nobleman and soldier, described as a “vigorous and innovative military commander."[1] He was active in the field against the Welsh for many years, and at the end of his life campaigned against the Scots.

    Career

    He became hereditary High Sheriff of Worcestershire for life on the death of his father in 1268.

    He was a close friend of Edward I of England, and was an important leader in Edward's invasion of Wales in 1277.[2][3] In 1294 he raised the siege of Conwy Castle, where the King had been penned in,[4] crossing the estuary.[5] He was victorious on 5 March 1295 at the battle of Maes Moydog, against the rebel prince of Wales, Madog ap Llywelyn.[6] In a night attack on the Welsh infantry he used cavalry to drive them into compact formations which were then shot up by his archers and charged.[7]R

    Family

    His father was William de Beauchamp (d.1268) of Elmley Castle and his mother Isabel Mauduit, sister and heiress of William Mauduit, 8th Earl of Warwick, from whom he inherited his title in 1268. He had a sister, Sarah, who married Richard Talbot.

    He married Maud FitzJohn. Their children included:

    Isabella de Beauchamp,[8] married firstly, Sir Patrick de Chaworth and, secondly, Hugh le Despenser, 1st Earl of Winchester
    Guy de Beauchamp, 10th Earl of Warwick, who married Alice de Toeni, widow of Thomas de Leyburne

    *

    Birth:
    The ruins of an important Norman and medieval castle, from which the village derives its name, are located in the deer park, just over half a mile south on Bredon Hill. The castle is supposed to have been built for Robert Despenser in the years following the Norman Conquest. After his death (post 1098) it descended to his heirs, the powerful Beauchamp family. It remained their chief seat until William de Beauchamp inherited the earldom and castle of Warwick from his maternal uncle, William Maudit, 8th Earl of Warwick, in 1268. Thereafter, Elmley Castle remained a secondary property of the Earls of Warwick until it was surrendered to the Crown in 1487. In 1528 the castle seems to have been still habitable, for Walter Walshe was then appointed constable and keeper, and ten years later Urian Brereton succeeded to the office. In 1544, however, prior to the grant to Christopher Savage (d.1545), who had been an Esquire of the Body of King Henry VIII, a survey was made of the manor and castle of Elmley, and it was found that the castle, strongly situated upon a hill surrounded by a ditch and wall, was completely uncovered and in decay.

    Map & Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elmley_Castle

    William — Isabel Mauduit. Isabel (daughter of William de Maudit, IV, Knight, Baron of Hanslape & Hartley and Alice de Newburgh) was born ~ 1214, Hanslope, Buckinghamshire, England; died 7 Jan 1268, Elmley Castle, Worcestershire, England. [Group Sheet]


  16. 61.  Isabel Mauduit was born ~ 1214, Hanslope, Buckinghamshire, England (daughter of William de Maudit, IV, Knight, Baron of Hanslape & Hartley and Alice de Newburgh); died 7 Jan 1268, Elmley Castle, Worcestershire, England.
    Children:
    1. 30. William de Beauchamp, Knight, 9th Earl of Warwick was born 0___ 1237, Elmley Castle, Worcestershire, England; died 0___ 1298, (Elmley Castle, Worcestershire, England).
    2. Guy de Beauchamp, Knight, 10th Earl of Warwick was born 0___ 1262, Elmley Castle, Worcester, England; died 12 Aug 1315, Warwick Castle, Warwickshire, England; was buried Bordesley Abbey, Worcester, England.

  17. 62.  John FitzGeoffrey, Justicar of Ireland was born ~ 1213, Shere, Surrey, England (son of Geoffrey FitzPiers, Knight, Earl of Essex and Aveline de Clare); died 23 Nov 1253, (Surrey) England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Lord of Kirtling
    • Also Known As: Sheriff of Yorkshire
    • Alt Birth: ~ 1205, Shere, Surrey, England

    Notes:

    John FitzGeoffrey, Lord of Shere and Justiciar of Ireland (1205? in Shere, Surrey, England – 23 November 1258) was an English nobleman.

    John Fitz Geoffrey was the son of Geoffrey Fitz Peter, 1st Earl of Essex and Aveline de Clare, daughter of Roger de Clare, 2nd Earl of Hertford and his wife Maud de Saint-Hilaire.

    He was appointed Justiciar of Ireland, serving from 1245 to 1255.[1]

    He was not entitled to succeed his half-brother as Earl of Essex in 1227, the Earldom having devolved from his father's first wife. He was the second husband of Isabel Bigod, daughter of Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk and his wife Maud Marshal of Pembroke. They had six children, one being Maud who married William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick.

    Children

    Note: The males took the FitzJohn surname ("fitz" mean "son of").

    John FitzJohn of Shere (?–1275). Married Margary, daughter of Philip Basset of Wycombe (?–1271).
    Richard FitzJohn of Shere (?–1297). Lord FitzJohn 1290. Married as her first husband, Emma (?-1332).
    Maud FitzJohn (? – 16/18 April 1301). Married firstly to Gerard de Furnivalle, Lord of Hallamshire (?–1261). Married secondly to William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick, son of William de Beauchamp of Elmley, Worcestershire and his wife Isabel Mauduit. Had issue.
    Isabel. Married Robert de Vespont, Lord of Westmoreland (?–1264). Had issue.
    Aveline (1229–1274). Married Walter de Burgh, Earl of Ulster (1230–1271). Had issue, including Richard Óg de Burgh, 2nd Earl of Ulster who in turn married Margaret de Burgh, by whom he had ten children.
    Joan (? – 4 April 1303). Married Theobald le Botiller. Had issue, from whom descend the Butler Earls of Ormond.

    John FitzGeoffrey
    Spouse(s) Isabel Bigod
    Father Geoffrey Fitz Peter, 1st Earl of Essex
    Mother Aveline de Clare
    Born 1205?
    Shere, Surrey,
    Kingdom of England
    Died 23 November 1258

    *

    John — Isabelle Bigod, Countess of Essex. Isabelle (daughter of Hugh Bigod, Knight, 3rd Earl of Norfolk and Maud Marshal, Countess of Norfolk) was born ~ 1211, Thetford, Norfolk, England; died 0___ 1239. [Group Sheet]


  18. 63.  Isabelle Bigod, Countess of Essex was born ~ 1211, Thetford, Norfolk, England (daughter of Hugh Bigod, Knight, 3rd Earl of Norfolk and Maud Marshal, Countess of Norfolk); died 0___ 1239.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Isabel Bigod
    • Alt Birth: ~ 1212
    • Alt Death: 0___ 1250

    Children:
    1. Aveline FitzJohn was born 0___ 1236, Shere, Surrey, England; died 20 May 1274.
    2. Joan FitzJohn died 4 Apr 1303.
    3. 31. Maud FitzGeoffrey was born ~ 1238, Shere, Surrey, England; died 18 Apr 1301; was buried Friars Minor, Worcester, England.


Generation: 7

  1. 64.  Nigel de Mowbray was born 1146, Thirsk, Yorkshire, England (son of Roger de Mowbray, Knight Templar and Alice de Gand); died 0___ 1191, Acre, Palestine.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Neel de Mowbray
    • Alt Birth: 0___ 1146, Axholme, Lincolnshire, England

    Notes:

    Died:
    in a Crusade...

    Nigel married Mabel de Braose 0___ 1170, Axholme, Lincolnshire, England. Mabel (daughter of William de Braose, Knight, 3rd Lord of Bramber and Bertha of Hereford) was born 0___ 1151, Bramber, Sussex, England; died 0___ 1203, (Axholme, Lincolnshire, England). [Group Sheet]


  2. 65.  Mabel de Braose was born 0___ 1151, Bramber, Sussex, England (daughter of William de Braose, Knight, 3rd Lord of Bramber and Bertha of Hereford); died 0___ 1203, (Axholme, Lincolnshire, England).
    Children:
    1. 32. William de Mowbray, Knight, 6th Baron of Thirsk was born 1172-1173, Thirsk Castle, Thirsk, Yorkshire, England; died 1223-1224, Epworth, Lincolnshire, England; was buried Furness Abbey, Cumbria, England.

  3. 66.  William d'Aubigny, Knight, 3rd Earl of Arundel was born Bef 1180, Arundel, Sussex, England (son of William d'Aubigny, Knight, 2nd Earl of Arundel and Matilda St. Hilary); died 1 Feb 1221, Rome, Italy; was buried Wymondham Abbey, Norfolk, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: 5th Crusader
    • Residence: Israel
    • Also Known As: William de Albini IV

    Notes:

    William d'Aubigny, 3rd Earl of Arundel, also called William de Albini IV,[1] (before 1180 – 1 February 1221) was an English nobleman, a favourite of King John, and a participant in the Fifth Crusade.

    A royal favourite

    William was a favourite of King John. He witnessed King John's concession of the kingdom to the Pope on 15 May 1213. On 14 June 1216 he joined Prince Louis (later Louis VIII of France) after King John abandoned Winchester. He returned to the allegiance of the King Henry III after the Royalist victory at Lincoln, on 14 July 1217.

    Death returning from the Fifth Crusade

    He joined in the Fifth Crusade (1217–1221), in 1218. He died on his journey home, in Caneill, Italy, near Rome, on 1 February 1221. News of his death reached England on 30 March 1221. He was brought home and buried at Wymondham Abbey.[2]

    His title was held by his son William, until he died, childless, in 1224, when it was passed to William's youngest son Hugh.

    Marriage and issue

    After 1196 and before 1200 William married Mabel of Chester (born c. 1173), daughter of Hugh de Kevelioc, 5th Earl of Chester, and Bertrade de Montfort. They were the parents of eight children.

    Avice de Aubigny (1196–1214), the wife of William Mowbray
    Maud d'Aubigny, (d.aft 1210), the wife of 1. Robert de Tateshal, 2. Gille Brigte, Earl of Strathearn
    Cicely d'Aubigny married Roger de Mahaut of Elford (d.1260)
    Colette d'Aubigny (d.aft 1233)
    William d'Aubigny, 4th Earl of Arundel (d. 1224); buried Wymondham Abbey
    Hugh d'Aubigny, 5th Earl of Arundel (d. 7 May 1243); buried Wymondham Abbey
    Isabel d'Aubigny; married John Fitzalan, Lord of Oswestry
    Nicole or Nichole d'Aubigny (d.abt 1240); married Roger de Somery, Baron Somery of Dudley Castle (died 26 August 1273), son of Ralph de Somery (died 1211).
    Lady Mabel d'Albini(1240-1330)married Robert de Tattershall

    References

    Jump up ^ Brown, R. Allen (1988). Castle Rising Castle. London, UK: English Heritage. p. 15. ISBN 185074159X.
    Jump up ^ Harley MS 6700, London: British Library, Harley MS 6700

    Secondary Sources[edit]

    Wikisource has the text of the 1885–1900 Dictionary of National Biography's article about William de Albini.

    Lewis Weis, Frederick. Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700.
    Remfry, P.M. Buckenham Castles, 1066 to 1649. ISBN 1-899376-28-3.
    Cokayne, George .E.; Gibbs, Vicary; Doubleday, Harry.A.; White, Geoffrey H.; Warrand, Duncan; de Walden, Lord Howard (2000) [1910–1959]. The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant. vol. I (new ed., 13 volumes in 14 ed.). Gloucester: Alan Sutton Publishing.

    Residence:
    He joined in the Fifth Crusade (1217-1221)

    Buried:
    Images, History & Source ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wymondham_Abbey

    William married Mabel of Chester 1196-1200, (Chester, England). Mabel (daughter of Hugh de Kevelioc, Knight, 5th Earl of Chester and Bertrade de Montfort, Comtess d'Evreux) was born ~ 1173, (Monmouthshire, Wales). [Group Sheet]


  4. 67.  Mabel of Chester was born ~ 1173, (Monmouthshire, Wales) (daughter of Hugh de Kevelioc, Knight, 5th Earl of Chester and Bertrade de Montfort, Comtess d'Evreux).
    Children:
    1. Jean d'Aubigny was born ~ 1188, (England).
    2. 33. Avice d'Aubigny was born 0___ 1196; died 0___ 1214.
    3. Isabel d'Aubigny was born ~ 1196; died Bef 1240.

  5. 70.  William (Plantagenet) Longespee, 3rd Earl of SalisburyWilliam (Plantagenet) Longespee, 3rd Earl of Salisbury was born ~ 1176, (Salisbury, Wiltshire) England (son of Henry II, King of England and Ida de Tosny, Countess of Norfolk); died 7 Mar 1226, Salisbury Castle, Salisbury, Wiltshire, England; was buried Salisbury Cathedral, Salisbury, Wiltshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: William Longsword

    Notes:

    William Longespâee, 3rd Earl of Salisbury (c. 1176 – 7 March 1226) ("Long Sword", Latinised to de Longa Spatha) was an English noble, primarily remembered for his command of the English forces at the Battle of Damme and for remaining loyal to his half-brother, King John. His nickname "Longespâee" is generally taken as a reference to his great size and the outsize weapons he wielded.

    Early life

    He was an illegitimate son of Henry II, King of England. His mother was unknown for many years until the discovery of a charter William made that mentions "Comitissa Ida, mater mea" (Countess Ida, my mother).[1][2] This referred to Ida de Tosny, a member of the prominent Tosny (or Toesny) family, who had married Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk[3] in 1181.

    Prior to the discovery of the charter mentioning Countes Ida, speculation and folklore gave Rosamond Clifford, another misress of Henry II, as William's mother. URL https://www.genealogieonline.nl/en/family-tree-fountaine-fontaine-fountain-lafontaine/P2800.php

    King Henry acknowledged William as his son and gave him the honour of Appleby, Lincolnshire, in 1188. Eight years later, his half brother King Richard I married him to a great heiress, Ela of Salisbury, 3rd Countess of Salisbury.

    During the reign of King John, Salisbury was at court on several important ceremonial occasions and held various offices: sheriff of Wiltshire; lieutenant of Gascony; constable of Dover; and Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports; and later warden of the Welsh Marches. He was appointed sheriff of Cambridgeshire and Huntingdonshire about 1213.

    Military career

    He was a commander in the king's Welsh and Irish expeditions of 1210–1212 and was appointed Viceroy of Ireland, jointly with John de Gray, Bishop of Norwich, when the king left for England in 1210.[4] The king also granted him the honour of Eye in Suffolk.

    In 1213, Salisbury led a large fleet to Flanders, where he seized or destroyed a good part of a French invasion fleet anchored at or near Damme. This ended the invasion threat but not the conflicts between England and France. In 1214, Salisbury was sent to help Otto IV of Germany, an English ally, who was invading France. Salisbury commanded the right wing of the army at their disastrous defeat in that year at the Battle of Bouvines, where he was captured.

    By the time he returned to England, revolt was brewing amongst the barons. Salisbury was one of the few who remained loyal to John. In the civil war that took place the year after the signing of the Magna Carta, Salisbury was one of the leaders of the king's army in the south. He was made High Sheriff of Wiltshire again, this time for life. After raising the siege of Lincoln with William Marshall he was also appointed High Sheriff of Lincolnshire (in addition to his current post as High Sheriff of Somerset) and governor of Lincoln castle. However, after the French prince Louis (later Louis VIII) landed as an ally of the rebels, Salisbury went over to his side. Presumably, he thought John's cause was lost.


    Tomb of William Longespâee in Salisbury Cathedral
    After John's death and the departure of Louis, Salisbury, along with many other barons, joined the cause of John's young son, now Henry III of England. He held an influential place in the government during the king's minority and fought in Gascony to help secure the remaining part of the English continental possessions. He was appointed High Sheriff of Devon in 1217 and High Sheriff of Staffordshire and Shropshire in 1224. Salisbury's ship was nearly lost in a storm while returning to England in 1225, and he spent some months in refuge at a monastery on the French island of Râe.

    Death

    He died not long after his return to England at Salisbury Castle. Roger of Wendover alleged that he was poisoned by Hubert de Burgh. He was buried at Salisbury Cathedral in Salisbury, Wiltshire, England.

    William Longespâee's tomb was opened in 1791. Bizarrely, the well-preserved corpse of a rat which carried traces of arsenic, was found inside his skull.[5] The rat is now on display in a case at the Salisbury and South Wiltshire Museum.[5]

    Likeness

    A terracotta statue of Longespâee, dating from 1756, is located in the Great Hall of Lacock Abbey in Lacock, Wiltshire, England. A likeness of his wife Ela is also on display, while several other statues are believed to show their children.

    Family

    By his wife Ela, Countess of Salisbury, he had four sons and six daughters:[6]

    William II Longespâee (1212?–1250), who was sometimes called Earl of Salisbury but never legally bore the title because he died before his mother, Countess Ela, who held the earldom until her death in 1261.
    Richard, a canon of Salisbury.
    Stephen (d. 1260), who was seneschal of Gascony and married Emeline de Ridelsford, widow of Hugh de Lacy, 1st Earl of Ulster. Their two daughters were Eleanor Longspee, who married Sir Roger La Zouche and Emeline Longspee, who married Sir Maurice FitzMaurice, Justiciar of Ireland.
    Nicholas (d. 1297), bishop of Salisbury.
    Isabella Longespâee, who married Sir William de Vesci.
    Ela Longespâee, who first married Thomas de Beaumont, 6th Earl of Warwick, and then married Philip Basset. No issue.[7]
    Ida Longespâee, married firstly Ralph who was son of Ralph de Somery, Baron of Dudley, and Margaret, daughter of John Marshal;[7] she married secondly William de Beauchamp, Baron of Bedford, by whom she had six children, including Maud de Beauchamp, wife of Roger de Mowbray.[8]
    Ida II de Longespâee (she is alternatively listed as William and Ela's granddaughter: see notes below), married Sir Walter FitzRobert, son of Robert Fitzwalter, by whom she had issue including Ela FitzWalter, wife of William de Odyngsells. Ela's and Williams's grandsons include William de Clinton and John de Grey.[7]
    Mary Longespâee, married. No issue.[7]
    Pernel Longespâee.

    *

    William Longespâee was the illegitimate son of the first Plantagenet king, Henry II and Ida de Tosny, a member of the Tosny (or Toesny) family. The epithet "Longespâee" ,or Longsword is a reference to his great size and the huge weapons he wielded.

    Ida de Tosny was a royal ward who became the mistress of King Henry II. The first evidence of contemporary information about Ida came to light in 1979 with the publication in the of two charters found in the Bradenstoke Priory Cartulary where he mentions "Comitissa Ida, mater mea" (Countess Ida, my mother), until then, it was assumed that Rosamund Clifford, a previous and more famous mistress of King Henry II's, was William's mother. Four years after William's birth, in 1181, Ida de Tosny was married to Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk, by whom she had a number of children.

    King Henry II readily acknowledged William as his son and in 1188 granted him the honour of Appleby in Lincolnshire. Following the death of his father in 1189, his half brother King Richard I 'the Lionheart' succeeded to the throne, William began his successful military career by fighting alongside his half brother in Normandy.

    King Richard arranged for the marriage of his half brother to the young heiress, Ela FitzPatrick, who was Countess of Salisbury in her own right, the daughter of William FitzPatrick, 2nd Earl of Salisbury and Elâeonore de Vitrâe.

    Richard died of a crossbow wound at Chalus, near Limoges in 1199 to be succeeded by his younger brother, King John, William held various offices during John's reign, sheriff of Wiltshire; lieutenant of Gascony; constable of Dover; and Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports; and later warden of the Welsh Marches. He was appointed sheriff of Cambridgeshire and Huntingdonshire about 1213.

    William LongswordWilliam took part in John's Welsh and Irish expeditions of 1210-1212. In 1213, Salisbury led a large fleet to Flanders, where he seized or destroyed a good part of a French invasion fleet anchored at or near Damme, then the port of Bruges, thus temporarily ending the French invasion threat.

    In 1214, Salisbury was dispatched to aid John's nephew and ally, Otto IV of Germany, in his invasion of France. Salisbury commanded the right wing of Otto's army at their disastrous and decisive defeat in that year at the Battle of Bouvines, where he was taken prisoner by the French.

    William returned to England to find the barons in revolt against John, he was one of the few who remained loyal to his unpopular half brother. In the civil war that broke out the year after the signing of the Magna Carta, William served as one of the leaders of the king's army in the south. Along with William Marshall he raised the siege of Lincoln, but after Prince Louis of France, son and heir of the John's arch enemy French King Philip II 'Augustus' landed in England in alliance with the rebels, Salisbury, assuming John's cause now lost, deserted him and went over to the rebels.

    William LongswordWhile retreating before this incursion, King John died of dysentry at Newark on the wild stormy night of 18th October, 1216, leaving England in a state of anarchy and civil war. His nine year old son Henry was crowned King Henry III of England at the Abbey Church of Gloucester with a circlet belonging to his mother Isabella of Angouleme, since his father had previously lost the royal treasure in the Wash.

    After the defeat of Louis, Salisbury joined the cause of John's young son Henry. By 1218, the English and French signed the Treaty of Lambeth, which agreed that the French prince Louis would surrender his claims to the English throne.

    William held an influential place in the government during the young king's minority and fought in Gascony to help secure the remaining remnant of the once great Angevin Empire in France. He fell sick after campaigning in Gascony in 1226. Salisbury's ship was nearly lost in a storm while returning to England, and he spent some months in refuge at a monastery on the French island of Râe.

    William Longespâee died on 7 March 1226 at Salisbury Castle soon after his return to England. Roger of Wendover alleged that he had been poisoned by Hubert de Burgh. He was buried at Salisbury Cathedral of which he had been a benefactor. His eldest son William succeeded to the title Earl of Salisbury, His widow, Ela, Countess of Salisbury lived on until 1261 and was buried in Lacock Abbey.

    The tomb of William Longespâee was opened in 1791, inside his skull was found the remains of a rat which carried traces of arsenic. The rat is now on display at the Salisbury and South Wiltshire Museum.

    *

    Sir William is the 24th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Jesse D Hennessee (1880-1952)

    Click on this link to view their lineage ... http://bit.ly/1AJ6pEc

    More history and images for Sir William ... http://bit.ly/1FlUhIj

    More history and images for Salisbury Cathedral ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salisbury_Cathedral

    *

    Buried:
    The cathedral has the tallest church spire in the United Kingdom (123m/404 ft).

    The tomb of William Longespâee was opened in 1791, inside his skull was found the remains of a rat which carried traces of arsenic. The rat is now on display at the Salisbury and South Wiltshire Museum.

    More history and images for Salisbury Cathedral ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salisbury_Cathedral

    Died:
    Roger of Wendover alleged that he had been poisoned by Hubert de Burgh.

    William married Ela FitzPatrick, 3rd Countess of Salisbury 0___ 1196, Salisbury, Wiltshire, England. Ela (daughter of William of Salisbury, Knight, 2nd Earl of Salisbury and Eleonore de Vitre, Countess of Salisbury) was born 0___ 1187, Amesbury, Wiltshire, England; died 24 Aug 1261, Lacock Abbey, Wiltshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  6. 71.  Ela FitzPatrick, 3rd Countess of Salisbury was born 0___ 1187, Amesbury, Wiltshire, England (daughter of William of Salisbury, Knight, 2nd Earl of Salisbury and Eleonore de Vitre, Countess of Salisbury); died 24 Aug 1261, Lacock Abbey, Wiltshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Ela d'Evreux
    • Also Known As: Ela of Salisbury

    Notes:

    Ela of Salisbury, 3rd Countess of Salisbury (1187 - 24 August 1261) was a wealthy English heiress and the suo jure Countess of Salisbury, having succeeded to the title in 1196 upon the death of her father, William FitzPatrick, 2nd Earl of Salisbury.[1] Her husband William Longespâee, an illegitimate half-brother of kings Richard I of England and John of England assumed the title of 3rd Earl of Salisbury by right of his marriage to Ela, which took place in 1196 when she was nine years old.

    Ela held the post of High Sheriff of Wiltshire for two years after William's death, then became a nun, and eventually Abbess of Lacock Abbey in Wiltshire, which she had founded in 1229.

    Family

    Ela was born in Amesbury, Wiltshire in 1187, the only child and heiress of William FitzPatrick, 2nd Earl of Salisbury, Sheriff of Wiltshire and Elâeonore de Vitrâe (c.1164- 1232/1233).[2] In 1196, she succeeded her father as suo jure 3rd Countess of Salisbury. There is a story that immediately following her father's death she was imprisoned in a castle in Normandy by one of her paternal uncles who wished to take her title and enormous wealth for himself. According to the legend, Ela was eventually rescued by William Talbot, a knight who had gone to France where he sang ballads under windows in all the castles of Normandy until he received a response from Ela.[3]

    In 1198, Ela's mother married her fourth husband, Gilbert de Malesmains.

    Marriage and issue

    In 1196, the same year she became countess and inherited her father's numerous estates, Ela married William Longespâee, an illegitimate son of King Henry II of England, by his mistress Ida de Tosny, who later married Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk. Longespee became 3rd Earl of Salisbury by right of his wife. The Continuator of Florence recorded that their marriage had been arranged by King Richard I of England, who was William's legitimate half-brother.[1]

    Together William and Ela had at least eight or possibly nine children:

    William II Longespâee, titular Earl of Salisbury (c.1209- 7 February 1250), married in 1216 Idoine de Camville, daughter of Richard de Camville and Eustache Basset, by whom he had four children. William was killed while on crusade at the Battle of Mansurah.

    Richard Longespâee, clerk and canon of Salisbury.

    Stephen Longespâee, Seneschal of Gascony and Justiciar of Ireland (1216–1260), married as her second husband 1243/1244 Emmeline de Ridelsford, daughter of Walter de Ridelsford and Annora Vitrâe, by whom he had two daughters: Ela, wife of Sir Roger La Zouche, and Emmeline (1252–1291), the second wife of Maurice FitzGerald, 3rd Lord of Offaly.

    Nicholas Longespâee, Bishop of Salisbury (died 28 May 1297)

    Isabella Longespâee (died before 1244), married as his first wife shortly after 16 May 1226, William de Vescy, Lord of Alnwick, by whom she had issue.

    Petronilla Longespâee, died unmarried

    Ela Longespâee, who first married Thomas de Beaumont, 6th Earl of Warwick, and then married Philip Basset. No issue.[4]

    Ida Longespâee, married firstly Ralph who was son of Ralph de Somery, Baron of Dudley, and Margaret, daughter of John Marshal;[4] she married secondly William de Beauchamp, Baron of Bedford, by whom she had six children, including Maud de Beauchamp, wife of Roger de Mowbray.[5]

    Ida II de Longespâee (she is alternatively listed as William and Ela's granddaughter: see notes below), married Sir Walter FitzRobert, son of Robert Fitzwalter, by whom she had issue including Ela FitzWalter, wife of William de Odyngsells. Ela's and Williams's grandsons include William de Clinton and John de Grey.[4]

    Mary Longespâee, married. No issue.[4]

    Pernel Longespâee.

    Lacock Abbey, founded in 1229 by Ela, Countess of Salisbury

    Later life

    In 1225, Ela's husband William was shipwrecked off the coast of Brittany, upon returning from Gascony. He spent months recovering at a monastery on the Island of Râe in France. He died at Salisbury Castle on 7 March 1226 just several days after arriving in England. Ela held the post of Sheriff of Wiltshire for two years following her husband's death.

    Three years later in 1229, Ela founded Lacock Abbey in Wiltshire as a nunnery of the Augustinian order. In 1238, she entered the abbey as a nun; she was made Abbess of Lacock in 1240, and held the post until 1257. The Book of Lacock recorded that Ela founded the monasteries at Lacock and Henton.[1] During her tenure as abbess, Ela obtained many rights for the abbey and village of Lacock.

    Ela, Countess of Salisbury died on 24 August 1261 and was buried in Lacock Abbey. The inscription on her tombstone, originally written in Latin, reads:

    Below lie buried the bones of the venerable Ela, who gave this sacred house as a home for the nuns. She also had lived here as holy abbess and Countess of Salisbury, full of good works[6]

    Her numerous descendants included English kings Edward IV and Richard III, Mary, Queen of Scots, Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex, Sir Winston Churchill, Diana, Princess of Wales, the Dukes of Norfolk, and the English queen consorts of King Henry VIII: Anne Boleyn, Jane Seymour, Catherine Howard, and Catherine Parr.

    Ela has been described as having been "one of the two towering female figures of the mid-13th century", the other one being Margaret de Quincy, Countess of Lincoln.[7]

    Died:
    Lacock Abbey in the village of Lacock, Wiltshire, England, was founded in the early 13th century by Ela, Countess of Salisbury, as a nunnery of the Augustinian order. The Abbey remained a nunnery until the suppression of Catholic institutions in England in the 16th century.

    Some interior sequences in Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets were filmed at Lacock, including the cloister walk (illustrated, left) where Harry comes out from Professor Lockhart's room after serving detention and hears the basilisk. During four days in October 2007 Lacock was also used to film some scenes for the sixth Harry Potter film, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince.

    The Abbey was one of two major locations for the 2008 film version of the historical novel The Other Boleyn Girl.

    Lacock appears in the "Robin Hood and the Sorcerer", "Cromm Cruac" and "The Pretender" episodes of Robin of Sherwood. It was also used in the 1995 BBC/A&E production of Pride and Prejudice.

    In the Spring of 2012, it was a filming location of the fantasy adventure movie Mariah Mundi and the Midas Box, which is scheduled for release in 2013.

    Scenes for the BBC's historical TV serial Wolf Hall were filmed there in 2014.

    Photos, history & source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lacock_Abbey

    Notes:

    Married:
    King Richard arranged for the marriage of his half brother to the young heiress, Ela FitzPatrick, who was Countess of Salisbury in her own right, the daughter of William FitzPatrick, 2nd Earl of Salisbury and Elâeonore de Vitrâe.

    Children:
    1. William Longespee, II, Knight, Earl of Salisbury, Crusader was born 0___ 1212, (Salisbury, Wiltshire) England; died 8 Feb 1250, Al-Mansurah, Egypt.
    2. Richard Longespee was born (Salisbury, Wiltshire) England.
    3. Ida Longespee, II was born (Salisbury, Wiltshire) England.
    4. Stephen Longespee was born ~ 1216, (Salisbury, Wiltshire) England; died ~ 1260.
    5. 35. Ida Longespee was born 1205-1210, Salisbury, Wiltshire, England; died 0___ 1269, England.

  7. 72.  Richard de Clare, Knight, 3rd Earl of Hertford was born ~ 1153, Tonbridge Castle, Kent, England (son of Richard de Clare, Knight, 2nd Earl Pembroke and Eva Aoife Mac Murchada, Countess Pembroke); died 28 Nov 1217.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: 6th Lord of Cardigan
    • Also Known As: 6th Lord of Clare
    • Also Known As: 6th Lord of Tonbridge

    Notes:

    Richard de Clare, 3rd Earl of Hertford, 6th Lord of Clare, 6th lord of Tonbridge, 5th Lord of Cardigan (c.?1153–1217), was a powerful Norman nobleman with vast lands in England and Wales.

    Career

    Richard was the son of Roger de Clare, 2nd Earl of Hertford and Maud, daughter of James de St. Hillary.[1] More commonly known as the Earl of Clare, he had the majority of the Giffard estates from his ancestor, Rohese.[2] He was present at the coronations of King Richard I at Westminster, 3 September 1189, and King John on 27 May 1199. He was also present at the homage of King William of Scotland as English Earl of Huntingdon at Lincoln.[citation needed]

    Marriage

    He married (c. 1172) Amice FitzWilliam, 4th Countess of Gloucester (c. 1160–1220), second daughter, and co-heiress, of William Fitz Robert, 2nd Earl of Gloucester, and Hawise de Beaumont. Sometime before 1198, Earl Richard and his wife Amice were ordered to separate by the Pope on grounds of consanguinity. They separated for a time because of this order but apparently reconciled their marriage with the Pope later on.[citation needed]

    Magna Carta

    He sided with the Barons against King John, even though he had previously sworn peace with the King at Northampton, and his castle of Tonbridge was taken. He played a leading part in the negotiations for Magna Carta, being one of the twenty five sureties. On 9 November 1215, he was one of the commissioners on the part of the Barons to negotiate the peace with the King. In 1215, his lands in counties Cambridge, Norfolk, Suffolk and Essex were granted to Robert de Betun. He and his son were among the Barons excommunicated by the Pope in 1215. His own arms were: Or, three chevronels gules.[citation needed]

    Family

    Richard and Amice had children:

    Gilbert de Clare (ca. 1180 – 25 October 1230), 4th Earl of Hertford and 5th Earl of Gloucester, (or 1st Earl of Gloucester of new creation). Married in 1217 Isabel Marshal.
    Maud de Clare (ca. 1184–1213), married in 1206,[citation needed] Sir William de Braose, son of William de Braose and Maud de St. Valery.
    Richard de Clare (ca. 1184 – 4 Mar 1228, London)[citation needed]
    Mathilde, married Rhys Gryg son of Rhys ap Gruffydd, ruler of the kingdom of Deheubarth.

    References

    icon Normandy portal
    Jump up ^ George Edward Cokayne, The Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant Extinct or Dormant, eds. H. A. Doubleday; Howard de Walden, Vol. V (London: The St. Catherine Press, Ltd., 1926), p. 736
    Jump up ^ I. J. Sanders, English Baronies: A Study of Their Origin and Descent 1086–1327) (Oxford: The Clarendon Press, 1963), pp. 34, 62

    end of biography

    Birth:
    Hsitory, Images, Drawing, Map & Source for Tonbridge Castle ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tonbridge_Castle

    Richard married Amice FitzWilliam, 4th Countess of Gloucester 0___ 1180, England. Amice (daughter of William FitzRobert, Knight, 2nd Earl of Gloucester and Hawise de Beaumont) was born 0___ 1160, Gloucestershire, England; died 1220-1225. [Group Sheet]


  8. 73.  Amice FitzWilliam, 4th Countess of Gloucester was born 0___ 1160, Gloucestershire, England (daughter of William FitzRobert, Knight, 2nd Earl of Gloucester and Hawise de Beaumont); died 1220-1225.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Amice de Caen

    Children:
    1. 36. Gilbert de Clare, Knight, 4th Earl of Hertford was born 0___ 1180, Hertford, Hertfordshire, England; died 25 Oct 1230, Brittany, France; was buried Tewkesbury Abbey, Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England GL20 5RZ.
    2. Mathilde de Clare was born (Hertford, Hertfordshire, England).
    3. Hawise de Clare

  9. 74.  William Marshal, Templar Knight, 1st Earl PembrokeWilliam Marshal, Templar Knight, 1st Earl Pembroke was born 1146-1147, (Berkshire, England) (son of John FitzGilbert and Sibyl of Salisbury); died 14 Apr 1219, Caversham, Berkshire, England; was buried Temple Church, London, Middlesex, England.

    Notes:

    William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke (1146 or 1147 - 14 May 1219), also called William the Marshal (Norman French: Williame le Mareschal), was an Anglo-Norman soldier and statesman.[1] He served five English kings – The "Young King" Henry, Henry II, Richard I, John, and Henry III.

    Knighted in 1166, he spent his younger years as a knight errant and a successful tournament fighter; Stephen Langton eulogized him as the "best knight that ever lived."[2] In 1189, he received the title of Earl of Pembroke through marriage during the second creation of the Pembroke Earldom. In 1216, he was appointed protector for the nine-year-old Henry III, and regent of the kingdom.

    Before him, his father's family held an hereditary title of Marshal to the king, which by his father's time had become recognized as a chief or master Marshalcy, involving management over other Marshals and functionaries. William became known as 'the Marshal', although by his time much of the function was actually delegated to more specialized representatives (as happened with other functions in the King's household). Because he was an Earl, and also known as the Marshal, the term "Earl Marshal" was commonly used and this later became an established hereditary title in the English Peerage.


    Early life

    Tomb effigy of William Marshal in Temple Church, London
    William's father, John Marshal, supported King Stephen when he took the throne in 1135, but in about 1139 he changed sides to back the Empress Matilda in the civil war of succession between her and Stephen which led to the collapse of England into "the Anarchy".[4]

    When King Stephen besieged Newbury Castle in 1152, according to William's biographer, he used the young William as a hostage to ensure that John kept his promise to surrender the castle. John, however, used the time allotted to reinforce the castle and alert Matilda's forces. When Stephen ordered John to surrender immediately or William would be hanged, John replied that he should go ahead saying, "I still have the hammer and the anvil with which to forge still more and better sons!" Subsequently there was a bluff made to launch William from a pierriáere, a type of trebuchet towards the castle. Fortunately for the child, Stephen could not bring himself to harm young William.[5] William remained a crown hostage for many months, only being released following the peace that resulted from the terms agreed at Winchester on 6 November 1153 that ended the civil war.

    Knight-Errant

    As a younger son of a minor nobleman, William had no lands or fortune to inherit, and had to make his own way in life. Around the age of twelve, when his father's career was faltering, he was sent to Normandy to be brought up in the household of William de Tancarville, a great magnate and cousin of young William's mother. Here he began his training as a knight. This would have included basic biblical stories and prayers written in Latin, as well as exposure to French romances, which conferred the basic precepts of chivalry to the budding knight.[6] In addition, while in Tancarville’s household, it is likely that Marshal also learned important and lasting practical lessons concerning the politics of courtly life. According to his thirteenth-century biography, L'Histoire de Guillaume le Marechal, Marshal had a number of adversaries in court who machinated to his disadvantage—these individuals likely would have been threatened by the boy’s close relationship with the magnate.[7] He was knighted in 1166 on campaign in Upper Normandy, then being invaded from Flanders. His first experience in battle came with mixed reviews. According to L'Histoire, everyone who witnessed the young knight in action agreed that he had acquitted himself well in combat. However, as medieval historian David Crouch explains, “War in the twelfth century was not fought wholly for honour. Profit was there to be made…”[8] On this front, Marshal was not so successful, as he was unable to parlay his combat victories into profit from either ransom or seized booty. As described in L'Histoire, the Earl of Essex, who was expecting the customary tribute from his valorous knight following battle, jokingly remarked: “Oh? But Marshal, what are you saying? You had forty or sixty of them — yet you refuse me so small a thing!”[9] In 1167 he was taken by William de Tancarville to his first tournament where he found his true mâetier. Quitting the Tancarville household he then served in the household of his mother's brother, Patrick, Earl of Salisbury. In 1168 his uncle was killed in an ambush by Guy de Lusignan. William was injured and captured in the same skirmish. It is known that William received a wound to his thigh and that someone in his captor's household took pity on the young knight. He received a loaf of bread in which were concealed several lengths of clean linen bandages with which he could dress his wounds. This act of kindness by an unknown person perhaps saved Marshal's life as infection setting into the wound could have killed him. After a period of time, he was ransomed by Eleanor of Aquitaine, who was apparently impressed by tales of his bravery.

    Thereafter he found he could make a good living out of winning tournaments, dangerous, often deadly, staged battles in which money and valuable prizes could be won by capturing and ransoming opponents, their horses and armour. His record is legendary: on his deathbed he recalled besting 500 knights during his tourneying career.[10]

    Royal favour

    13th-century depiction by Matthew Paris of the Earl of Pembroke's coat of arms[11]
    Upon his return during the course of 1185 William rejoined the court of King Henry II, and now served the father as a loyal captain through the many difficulties of his final years. The returns of royal favour were almost immediate. The king gave William the large royal estate of Cartmel in Cumbria, and the keeping of Heloise, the heiress of the northern barony of Lancaster. It may be that the king expected him to take the opportunity to marry her and become a northern baron, but William seems to have had grander ambitions for his marriage. In 1188 faced with an attempt by Philip II to seize the disputed region of Berry, Henry II summoned the Marshal to his side. The letter by which he did this survives, and makes some sarcastic comments about William's complaints that he had not been properly rewarded to date for his service to the king. Henry therefore promised him the marriage and lands of Dionisia, lady of Chăateauroux in Berry. In the resulting campaign, the king fell out with his heir Richard, count of Poitou, who consequently allied with Philip II against his father. In 1189, while covering the flight of Henry II from Le Mans to Chinon, William unhorsed the undutiful Richard in a skirmish. William could have killed the prince but killed his horse instead, to make that point clear. He is said to have been the only man ever to unhorse Richard. Nonetheless after Henry's death, Marshal was welcomed at court by his former adversary, now King Richard I, who was wise to include a man whose legendary loyalty and military accomplishments were too useful to ignore, especially in a king who was intending to go on Crusade.[1]

    During the old king's last days he had promised the Marshal the hand and estates of Isabel de Clare (c.1172–1220), but had not completed the arrangements. King Richard however, confirmed the offer and so in August 1189, at the age of 43, the Marshal married the 17-year-old daughter of Richard de Clare (Strongbow). Her father had been Earl of Pembroke, and Marshal acquired large estates and claims in England, Wales, Normandy and Ireland. Some estates however were excluded from the deal. Marshal did not obtain Pembroke and the title of earl, which his father-in-law had enjoyed, until 1199, as it had been taken into the king's hand in 1154. However, the marriage transformed the landless knight from a minor family into one of the richest men in the kingdom, a sign of his power and prestige at court. They had five sons and five daughters, and have numerous descendants.[1] William made numerous improvements to his wife's lands, including extensive additions to Pembroke Castle and Chepstow Castle.[citation needed]

    William was included in the council of regency which the King appointed on his departure for the Third Crusade in 1190. He took the side of John, the king's brother, when the latter expelled the justiciar, William Longchamp, from the kingdom, but he soon discovered that the interests of John were different from those of Richard. Hence in 1193 he joined with the loyalists in making war upon him. In spring 1194, during the course of the hostilities in England and before King Richard's return, William Marshal's elder brother John Marshal (who was serving as seneschal) was killed while defending Marlborough for the king's brother John. Richard allowed Marshal to succeed his brother in the hereditary marshalship, and his paternal honour of Hamstead Marshall. The Marshal served the king in his wars in Normandy against Philip II. On Richard's death-bed the king designated Marshal as custodian of Rouen and of the royal treasure during the interregnum.[1]

    King John and Magna Carta

    A 13th-century depiction of the Second Battle of Lincoln, which occurred at Lincoln Castle on 20 May 1217; the illustration shows the death of Thomas du Perche, the Comte de la Perche

    William supported King John when he became king in 1199, arguing against those who maintained the claims of Arthur of Brittany, the teenage son of John's elder brother Geoffrey Plantagenet. William was heavily engaged with the defence of Normandy against the growing pressure of the Capetian armies between 1200 and 1203. He sailed with King John when he abandoned the duchy in December 1203. He and the king had a falling out in the aftermath of the loss of the duchy, when he was sent with the earl of Leicester as ambassadors to negotiate a truce with King Philip II of France in 1204. The Marshal took the opportunity to negotiate the continued possession of his Norman lands.

    Before commencing negotiations with King Philip, William had been generously permitted to do homage to the King of France by King John so he might keep his possessions in Normandy; land which must have been of sentimental value due to the time spent there in his youth and adolescence. However, once official negotiations began, Philip demanded that such homage be paid exclusively to him, which King John had not consented to.[12] When William paid homage to King Philip, John took offence and there was a major row at court which led to cool relations between the two men. This became outright hostility in 1207 when John began to move against several major Irish magnates, including William. Though he left for Leinster in 1207 William was recalled and humiliated at court in the autumn of 1208, while John's justiciar in Ireland Meilyr fitz Henry invaded his lands, burning the town of New Ross.

    Meilyr's defeat by Countess Isabel led to her husband's return to Leinster. He was once again in conflict with King John in his war with the Braose and Lacy families in 1210, but managed to survive. He stayed in Ireland until 1213, during which time he had Carlow Castle erected[13] and restructured his honour of Leinster. Taken back into favour in 1212, he was summoned in 1213 to return to the English court. Despite their differences, William remained loyal throughout the hostilities between John and his barons which culminated on 15 June 1215 at Runnymede with the sealing of Magna Carta. William was one of the few English earls to remain loyal to the king through the First Barons' War. It was William whom King John trusted on his deathbed to make sure John's nine-year-old son Henry would get the throne. It was William who took responsibility for the king's funeral and burial at Worcester Cathedral.[1]

    On 11 November 1216 at Gloucester, upon the death of King John, William Marshal was named by the king's council (the chief barons who had remained loyal to King John in the First Barons' War) to serve as protector of the nine-year-old King Henry III, and regent of the kingdom. In spite of his advanced age (around 70) he prosecuted the war against Prince Louis and the rebel barons with remarkable energy. In the battle of Lincoln he charged and fought at the head of the young King's army, leading them to victory. He was preparing to besiege Louis in London when the war was terminated by the naval victory of Hubert de Burgh in the straits of Dover. [1]

    William was criticised for the generosity of the terms he accorded to Louis and the rebels in September 1217; but his desire for an expeditious settlement was dictated by sound statesmanship. Self-restraint and compromise were the keynote of Marshal's policy, hoping to secure peace and stability for his young liege. Both before and after the peace of 1217 he reissued Magna Carta, in which he is a signatory as one of the witnessing barons.

    Death and legacy

    William Marshal was interred in Temple Church, London
    Marshal's health finally failed him early in 1219. In March 1219 he realised that he was dying, so he summoned his eldest son, also William, and his household knights, and left the Tower of London for his estate at Caversham in Berkshire, near Reading, where he called a meeting of the barons, Henry III, the Papal legate Pandulf Verraccio, the royal justiciar (Hubert de Burgh), and Peter des Roches (Bishop of Winchester and the young King's guardian). William rejected the Bishop's claim to the regency and entrusted the regency to the care of the papal legate; he apparently did not trust the Bishop or any of the other magnates that he had gathered to this meeting. Fulfilling the vow he had made while on crusade, he was invested into the order of the Knights Templar on his deathbed. He died on 14 May 1219 at Caversham, and was buried in the Temple Church in London, where his tomb can still be seen.[1]

    Descendants of William Marshal and Isabel de Clare

    William Marshal, 2nd Earl of Pembroke (1190–6 April 1231), married (1) Alice de Bâethune, daughter of Earl of Albemarle; (2) 23 April 1224 Eleanor Plantagenet, daughter of King John of England. They had no children.
    Richard Marshal, 3rd Earl of Pembroke (1191–16 April 1234), married Gervase le Dinant. He died in captivity. They had no children.
    Maud Marshal (1194–27 March 1248), married (1) Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk, they had four children; (2) William de Warenne, 5th Earl of Surrey, they had two children; (3) Walter de Dunstanville.
    Gilbert Marshal, 4th Earl of Pembroke (1197–27 June 1241), married (1) Marjorie of Scotland, youngest daughter of King William I of Scotland; by an unknown mistress he had one illegitimate daughter:
    Isabel Marshal, married to Rhys ap Maeldon Fychan.
    Walter Marshal, 5th Earl of Pembroke (c. 1199 – November 1245), married Margaret de Quincy, Countess of Lincoln, granddaughter of Hugh de Kevelioc, 3rd Earl of Chester. No children.
    Isabel Marshal (9 October 1200 – 17 January 1240), married (1) Gilbert de Clare, 5th Earl of Hertford, whose daughter Isabel de Clare married Robert Bruce, 5th Lord of Annandale, the grandfather of Robert the Bruce; (2) Richard Plantagenet, Earl of Cornwall
    Sibyl Marshal (c. 1201–27 April 1245), married William de Ferrers, 5th Earl of Derby–they had seven daughters.
    Agnes Ferrers (died 11 May 1290), married William de Vesci.

    Isabel Ferrers (died before 26 November 1260)
    Maud Ferrers (died 12 March 1298), married (1) Simon de Kyme, and (2) William de Vivonia (de Forz), and (3) Amaury IX of Rochechouart.
    Sibyl Ferrers, married Sir Francis or Franco de Bohun.
    Joan Ferrers (died 1267)
    Agatha Ferrers (died May 1306), married Hugh Mortimer, of Chelmarsh.
    Eleanor Ferrers (died 16 October 1274), married to:

    Eva Marshal (1203–1246), married William de Braose, Lord of Abergavenny

    Isabella de Braose (b.1222), married Prince Dafydd ap Llywelyn. She died childless.
    Maud de Braose (1224–1301), in 1247, she married Roger Mortimer, 1st Baron Mortimer and they had descendants.
    Eva de Braose (1227 – 28 July 1255), married Sir William de Cantelou and had descendants.
    Eleanor de Braose (c.1228–1251). On an unknown date after August 1241, she married Sir Humphrey de Bohun and had descendants.

    Anselm Marshal, 6th Earl of Pembroke (c. 1208–22 December 1245), married Maud de Bohun, daughter of Humphrey de Bohun, 2nd Earl of Hereford. They had no children.
    Joan Marshal (1210–1234), married Warin de Munchensi (d. 1255), Lord of Swanscombe
    Joan de Munchensi (1230–20 September 1307) married William of Valence, the fourth son of King John's widow, Isabella of Angoulăeme, and her second husband, Hugh X of Lusignan, Count of La Marche. Valence was half-brother to Henry III and Edward I's uncle.

    The fate of the Marshal family

    During the civil wars in Ireland, William had taken two manors that the Bishop of Ferns claimed but could not get back. Some years after William's death, that bishop is said[14] to have laid a curse on the family that William's sons would have no children, and the great Marshal estates would be scattered. Each of William's sons did become earl of Pembroke and marshal of England, and each died without legitimate issue. William's vast holdings were then divided among the husbands of his five daughters. The title of "Marshal" went to the husband of the oldest daughter, Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk, and later passed to the Mowbray dukes of Norfolk and then to the Howard dukes of Norfolk, becoming "Earl Marshal" along the way. The title of "Earl of Pembroke" passed to William of Valence, the husband of Joan Marshal's daughter, Joan de Munchensi; he became the first of the de Valence line of earls of Pembroke.

    Through his daughter Isabel, William is ancestor to the both the Bruce and Stewart kings of Scots. Through his granddaughter Maud de Braose, William is ancestor to the last Plantagenet kings, Edward IV through Richard III, and all English monarchs from Henry VIII and afterward.

    Buried:
    at Temple Church...

    The Temple Church is a late 12th-century church in the City of London located between Fleet Street and the River Thames, built by the Knights Templar as their English headquarters. During the reign of King John (1199-1216) it served as the royal treasury, supported by the role of the Knights Templars as proto-international bankers. It is jointly owned by the Inner Temple and Middle Temple[1] Inns of Court, bases of the English legal profession. It is famous for being a round church, a common design feature for Knights Templar churches, and for its 13th and 14th century stone effigies. It was heavily damaged by German bombing during World War II and has since been greatly restored and rebuilt. The area around the Temple Church is known as the Temple and nearby formerly in the middle of Fleet Street stood the Temple Bar, an ornamental processional gateway. Nearby is the Temple Underground station.

    Photo, history & source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Temple_Church

    Died:
    Caversham is a suburb in the Borough of Reading...

    Map, history & source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caversham,_Berkshire

    William married Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke 0Aug 1189, London, England. Isabel (daughter of Richard de Clare, Knight, 2nd Earl Pembroke and Eva Aoife Mac Murchada, Countess Pembroke) was born 0___ 1172, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales; died 14 Oct 1217, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales; was buried Tintern Abbey, Tintern, Monmouthshire, Wales. [Group Sheet]


  10. 75.  Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke was born 0___ 1172, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales (daughter of Richard de Clare, Knight, 2nd Earl Pembroke and Eva Aoife Mac Murchada, Countess Pembroke); died 14 Oct 1217, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales; was buried Tintern Abbey, Tintern, Monmouthshire, Wales.

    Other Events:

    • Alt Death: 0___ 1220, Pembrokeshire, Wales

    Notes:

    F Isabel De CLAREPrint Family Tree
    Born in 1172 - Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales
    Deceased 14 October 1217 - Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales , age at death: 45 years old
    Buried in 1217 - Monmouth, Monmouthshire, Wales

    Parents
    Richard (Strongbow) De ( 2nd Earl Pembroke, Lord Marshall) CLARE, born in 1125 - Tonbridge, Kent, England, Deceased 20 April 1176 - Dublin, Ireland age at death: 51 years old , buried in 1176 - Dublin, Ireland
    Married 26 August 1171, Waterford, Waterford, Ireland, to
    Eva Aoife Mac (Countess Pembroke) MURCHADA, born 26 April 1141 - Dublin, Ireland, Deceased in 1188 - Waterford, Ireland age at death: 47 years old , buried - Tintern, Monmouthshire, Wales

    Spouses, children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren
    Married in August 1189, London, England, to William (SIR - Knight Templar)(Earl Pembroke) MARSHALL, born 12 May 1146 - Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales, Deceased 14 May 1219 - Reading, Berkshire, England age at death: 73 years old , buried in 1219 - London, England (Parents : M John (Fitzgilbert) (Earl of Pembroke, Marshall of England) MARSHALL 1105-1165 & F Sibilla De SALISBURY 1109-1155) with
    F Maud (Countess of Norfolk Countess of Surrey) MARSHALL 1192-1248 married to William (de Warenne) WARREN 1166-1240 with
    M John De (SIR - Earl of Surrey) WARREN 1231-1304 married before 1244, England, to Alice (Le Brun) De (Countess of Surrey) LUSIGNAN 1224-1291 with :
    F Eleanor (Plantagenet) De WARREN 1244-1282
    M William De (SIR) WARREN 1256-1286

    John De (SIR - Earl of Surrey) WARREN 1231-1304 married in 1247, Surrey, England, to Isabel De Surrey 1234-
    Maud (Countess of Norfolk Countess of Surrey) MARSHALL 1192-1248 married to Hugh (Magna Charta Baron - EARL of NORFOLK) BIGOD 1175-1225 with
    F Isabel BIGOD ca 1215-1239 married before 1235, Shere, Surrey, England, to John (Fitzgeoffrey) (SIR - Lord of Shere) (Justiciar of England) FITZPIERS 1215-1258 with :
    F Aveline (Fitzjohn) FITZPIERS ca 1235-1274
    F Maud (Fitzjohn) (Countess of WARWICK) FITZPIERS 1237-1301
    F Eve (Baroness of Abergavenny) MARSHALL 1194-1246 married 2 May 1230, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales, to William "Black William" (de Braose) BRUCE 1204-1230 with
    M William (de Braose) BRUCE 1210-1292 married to Maud De Fay 1180-1249 with :
    F Eleanor (de Braose) BRUCE 1230-
    F Isabella (de Braose) BRUCE 1220/- married to Dafydd (Ap Llywelyn) (Prince of WALES) TUDOR 1208-1246
    F Eva (de Braose) BRUCE 1220-1255 married 25 July 1238, Calne, Wiltshire, England, to William De CANTILUPE 1216-1254 with :
    F Joane CANTILUPE 1240-1271
    F Sybilla De Cantilupe ca 1240-
    F Millicent (Cauntelo) De CANTILUPE ca 1250-/1299
    F Maud (de Braose) (BARONESS WIGMORE) BRUCE 1226-1300 married in 1247, King's Stanley, Gloucestershire, England, to Roger De (SIR) MORTIMER 1231-1282 with :
    F Isabella De MORTIMER 1248-1274
    M Edmund De (Sir - 7th Lord) MORTIMER 1252-1303
    F Isolde De MORTIMER 1267-1338
    Eve (Baroness of Abergavenny) MARSHALL 1194-1246 married in 1230, England, to Milo (de Saint Maur) (SIR) SEYMOUR ca 1200-1245 with
    M Richard SEYMOUR 1230-1271 married in 1250 to Isabel (Lady) MARSHALL 1238-1268 with :
    M Roger (de Saint Maur) SEYMOUR 1258-1300
    F Katherine SEYMOUR ca 1265-ca 1335
    M Gilbert MARSHALL 1196-1241 married to Marjorie Of SCOTLAND 1204-1244 with
    F Isabel (Lady) MARSHALL 1238-1268 married in 1250 to Richard SEYMOUR 1230-1271 with :
    M Roger (de Saint Maur) SEYMOUR 1258-1300
    F Katherine SEYMOUR ca 1265-ca 1335
    M William (4th Earl of Pembroke/ChiefJusticar of Ireland) MARSHALL 1198-1231 married 23 April 1224, Hampshire, England, to Eleanor (Princess of England) PLANTAGENET ca 1205-1275 with
    F Isabel Marshall 1225/-1239
    M X MARSHALL ca 1230- married to ? ? with :
    M X MARSHALL ca 1260-
    F Isabel (Fitzgilbert) (Countess MARSHALL) MARSHALL 1200-1239 married 9 October 1217, Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England, to Gilbert III De (Earl of Gloucester - Hertford) CLARE, MAGNA CARTA BARON ca 1180-1230 with
    M Richard De (Earl of Herts - Gloucs) CLARE 1222-1262 married 25 January 1238, Lincolnshire, England, to Maud De (Countess of Gloucester) LACY 1223-1289 with :
    M Gilbert IV De (Earl of Herts - Gloucs) CLARE 1243-1295
    M Thomas De (Lord of Thomand, Connaught, Chancellor of Ireland) CLARE 1245-1287
    F Rohesia De CLARE 1252-1316
    F Isabel De (Lady Annabelle - 3rd Countess of Pembroke) CLARE 1226-1264 married in May 1240, Scotland, to Robert "the Competitor" De (SIR - 5th Lord of Annandale) BRUCE 1210-1295 with :
    M Robert De (Lord Annadale) BRUCE 1243-1304
    F Mary Clarissa De BRUCE 1255-1283
    Isabel (Fitzgilbert) (Countess MARSHALL) MARSHALL 1200-1239 married 30 March 1231, Bucks, Pennsylvania, USA, to Richard (Earl of CORNWALL) CORNWALL 1209-1272 with
    M Richard (SIR) (PLANTAGENET) CORNWALL 1234-1272 married before 1280, Cornwall, England, to Joan SAINT OWEN 1234-1308 with :
    M Edmund De (PLANTAGENET) CORNWALL 1280-1354
    F Sibyl MARSHALL ca 1201-1245 married 14 May 1219, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales, to William De (SIR - 5th Earl of Derby,) (Sheriff of Leicester) FERRERS 1190-1254 with
    F Maud De FERRERS ca 1215-1298 married in 1248 to William (Fortibus) De (SIR) VIVONNE 1215-1259 with :
    F Joan de ** (Countess of Chewton) VIVONNE 1235-1314
    F Margaret (Joan) De (to Wynter) FERRERS ca 1220-1267 married 5 December 1242, England, to Roger De Quincy ca 1215-1242/
    Margaret (Joan) De (to Wynter) FERRERS ca 1220-1267 married before 1245, England, to John De MOHUN ca 1220-1255 with :
    M John De MOHUN ca 1243-1279

    Margaret (Joan) De (to Wynter) FERRERS ca 1220-1267 married about 1256, Derbyshire, England, to Roger (SIR ) (MIDLANDS) WYNTER ca 1220- with :
    M Robert ** (Bedfordshire) WYNTER /1260-
    M Roger de ** (Suffolk - ??) WYNTER /1267-ca 1327
    M ** (Connection speculative) WYNTER /1268-
    F Isabel De FERRERS 1223-1252 married after 1247, England, to Reginald De MOHUN 1202-1256 with :
    F Isabel De MOHUN 1248-1280
    F Agatha De FERRERS ca 1225- married to Hugh De MORTIMER 1219-1274 with :
    M Robert De MORTIMER 1251-1287
    F Mary De MORTIMER 1260-1290
    M William De (SIR) FERRERS 1235-1287 married in 1262, Wootton Bassett, Wiltshire, England, to Anne le De SPENCER 1240/-1280 with :
    M ? ?
    F Anne De (to GREY) FERRERS 1268-1324
    M William De (SIR - to Wynter via VERDON) FERRERS 1272-1325
    M Robert De (6th Earl of Derby) (to NEVILLE) FERRERS ca 1239-1279 married 26 June 1269, Staffordshire, England, to Alianore De BOHUN 1240-1314 with :
    M John De (SIR - Baron of Chartley) FERRERS 1271-1312
    F Joane MARSHALL 1202-1234 married to Warin Munchensy 1192-1255 with
    F Joan MUNCHENSY 1222-1307 married to William (de Lusignan) (Earl of Pembroke) VALENCE 1225-1296 with :
    F Margaret De (Baroness de la ROCHE) VALENCE 1254-1315
    F Isabel De VALENCE ca 1262-1305

    Siblings
    M Richard III De (SIR) CLARE, MAGNA CARTA BARON ca 1153-1217 Married in 1180, England, to Amicie De CAEN 1160-1225
    F Joan De ( Baroness of Gamage) CLARE 1175-1222/ Married in 1196, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales, to Godfrey De (Sir) ( Lord of Gamage) GAMAGE 1176-1253

    Paternal grand-parents, uncles and aunts
    M Gilbert De (1st Earl Pembroke) CLARE 1100-1148 married (1130)
    F Isabel De (Countess Pembroke and Buckingham) BEAUMONT 1086-1147
    M Richard (Strongbow) De ( 2nd Earl Pembroke, Lord Marshall) CLARE 1125-1176
    married (1171)
    3 children

    F Isabel De (Countess Pembroke and Buckingham) BEAUMONT 1086-1147
    married (1098)M Henry I (Beauclerc) (KING OF ENGLAND) NORMANDY 1068-1135
    F Constance Maude FITZROY 1098-
    married (1120)
    1 child



    Maternal grand-parents, uncles and aunts
    M Dermot Dairmait Mac (King of Leinster) MURCHADA 1110-1171 married (1140)
    F Mor Tauthail Moringen Murchertaig (Queen of Ireland) O'TOOLE 1114-1191
    F Eva Aoife Mac (Countess Pembroke) MURCHADA 1141-1188
    married (1171)
    3 children
    F Urlachen Mac MURCHADA 1154-1200
    married (1171)
    2 children



    Notes
    Individual Note
    Source: Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Millennium File - Heritage Consulting - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2003.Original data - Heritage Consulting. The Millennium File. Salt Lake City, UT, USA: Heritage Consulting.Original data: Heritage Consulting. The Millennium File. Salt Lake City, UT, USA: - 1,7249::0
    http://search.Ancestry.com.au/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=millind&h=10154284&ti=5544&indiv=try&gss=pt Birth date: 1172 Birth place: Pembroke, Wales Death date: 1220 Death place: Pembroke, Wales 1,7249::10154284
    Source: Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - Web: International, Find A Grave Index - Ancestry.com - Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. - 1,70699::0 1,70699::438790
    Source: Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - UK and Ireland, Find A Grave Index, 1300s-Current - Ancestry.com - Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. - 1,60526::0 1,60526::219175

    Death
    Age: 48


    Sources
    Individual:
    - Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Ancestry Family Trees - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members. - This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created. - Ancestry Family Trees - http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=18829447&pid=8010
    - Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Ancestry Family Trees - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members. - This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created. - Ancestry Family Trees - http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=18829447&pid=8010
    - Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Ancestry Family Trees - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members. - This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created. - Ancestry Family Trees - http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=18829447&pid=8010
    - Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Ancestry Family Trees - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members. - This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created. - Ancestry Family Trees - http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=18829447&pid=8010
    Birth, death:
    - Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Millennium File - Heritage Consulting - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2003.Original data - Heritage Consulting. The Millennium File. Salt Lake City, UT, USA: Heritage Consulting.Original data: Heritage Consulting. The Millennium File. Salt Lake City, UT, USA: - 1,7249::0
    Note http://search.Ancestry.com.au/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=millind&h=10154284&ti=5544&indiv=try&gss=pt - Birth date: 1172 Birth place: Pembroke, Wales Death date: 1220 Death place: Pembroke, Wales - 1,7249::10154284
    - Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - Web: International, Find A Grave Index - Ancestry.com - Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. - 1,70699::0 - 1,70699::438790
    - Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - UK and Ireland, Find A Grave Index, 1300s-Current - Ancestry.com - Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. - 1,60526::0 - 1,60526::219175
    Burial:
    - Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - Web: International, Find A Grave Index - Ancestry.com - Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. - 1,70699::0 - 1,70699::438790
    - Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - UK and Ireland, Find A Grave Index, 1300s-Current - Ancestry.com - Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. - 1,60526::0 - 1,60526::219175

    Family Tree Preview
    Ancestry Chart Descendancy Chart
    _____| 16_ Richard (Fitzgilbert) De CLARE 1030-1089
    _____| 8_ Gilbert (Fitzrichard) De (Some say - Lord of Chepstow) CLARE 1065-1114
    _____| 4_ Gilbert De (1st Earl Pembroke) CLARE 1100-1148
    / \ _____| 18_ Hugh De CLERMONT 1030-1101
    |2_ Richard (Strongbow) De ( 2nd Earl Pembroke, Lord Marshall) CLARE 1125-1176
    | \ _____| 20_ Roger De (SIR - Barbatus le Barber) BEAUMONT 1022-1094
    | \ _____| 10_ Robert De (SIR - 1st Earl Leics - Count Melun) BEAUMONT 1046-1118
    | \ _____| 22_ Hugh (The Great) (Count of Vermandois) CAPET 1053-1102
    |--1_ Isabel De CLARE 1172-1217
    | _____| 24_ Murchad Macdairmata MURCHADA 1032-1070
    | _____| 12_ Donnchad Enna Mac MURCHADA 1085-1115
    | _____| 6_ Dermot Dairmait Mac (King of Leinster) MURCHADA 1110-1171
    | / \ _____| 26_ Gilla Michil O'BRIEN 1055-1068
    |3_ Eva Aoife Mac (Countess Pembroke) MURCHADA 1141-1188
    \ _____| 28_ Gilla-Comgaill II (King of Ui Muriedaig) O'TOOLE 1055-1127
    \ _____| 14_ Mouirchertach (King of Ui Muiredaig) O'TOOLE 1089-1164
    \ _____| 30_ Loigsech (King of Loigsi) O'MORDA

    end of biography

    Isabel de Clare, suo jure Countess of Pembroke and Striguil (1172-1220) was a Cambro-Norman-Irish noblewoman, go to this link for further clarification ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cambro-Norman, and one of the wealthiest heiresses in Wales and Ireland. She was the wife of William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke, who served four successive kings as Lord Marshal of England. Her marriage had been arranged by King Richard I.

    Daniel Maclise's painting of the marriage of Isabel's parents, Strongbow and Aoife of Leinster in August 1170, the day after the capture of Waterford.
    Isabel was born in 1172 in Pembrokeshire, Wales, the eldest child of Richard de Clare, 2nd Earl of Pembroke (1130 – 20 April 1176), known to history as "Strongbow", and Aoife of Leinster, who was the daughter of Dermot MacMurrough, the deposed King of Leinster and Mor Ui Thuathail. The latter was a daughter of Muirchertach Ua Tuathail and Cacht Nâi Morda. The marriage of Strongbow and Aoife took place in August 1170, the day after the capture of Waterford by the Cambro-Norman forces led by Strongbow.

    Isabel's paternal grandparents were Gilbert de Clare, 1st Earl of Pembroke and Isabel de Beaumont. She had a younger brother Gilbert de Striguil who, being a minor, was not formally invested with either the earldom of Pembroke or of Striguil. It is unlikely that his father could have passed on the title to Pembroke as he himself did not possess it. When Gilbert died in 1185, Isabel became Countess of Pembroke in her own right (suo jure) until her death in 1220. In this way, she could be said to be the first successor to the earldom of Pembroke since her grandfather Gilbert, the first earl. By this reckoning, Isabel ought to be called the second countess, not the fourth countess of Pembroke. In any event, the title Earl was re-created for her husband. She also had an illegitimate half-sister Basile de Clare, who married three times. Basile's husbands were: Robert de Quincy; Raymond Fitzgerald, Constable of Leinster: Geoffrey FitzRobert, Baron of Kells.

    Isabel was described as having been "the good, the fair, the wise, the courteous lady of high degree".[2] She allegedly spoke French, Irish and Latin.[3] After her brother Gilbert's death, Isabel became one of the wealthiest heiresses in the kingdom, owning besides the titles of Pembroke and Striguil, much land in Wales and Ireland.[4] She inherited the numerous castles on the inlet of Milford Haven, guarding the South Channel, including Pembroke Castle.[5] She was a legal ward of King Henry II, who carefully watched over her inheritance.[6]

    Marriage

    The new King Richard I arranged her marriage in August 1189 to William Marshal, regarded by many as the greatest knight and soldier in the realm. Henry II had promised Marshal he would be given Isabel as his bride, and his son and successor Richard upheld the promise one month after his accession to the throne. At the time of her marriage, Isabel was residing in the Tower of London in the protective custody of the Justiciar of England, Ranulf de Glanville.[7] Following the wedding, which was celebrated in London "with due pomp and ceremony",[8] they spent their honeymoon at Stoke d'Abernon in Surrey which belonged to Enguerrand d'Abernon.[9]

    Marriage to Isabel elevated William Marshal from the status as a landless knight into one of the richest men in the kingdom. He would serve as Lord Marshal of England, four kings in all: Henry II, Richard I, John, and Henry III. Although Marshal did not become the jure uxoris 1st Earl of Pembroke, Earl of Striguil until 1199, he nevertheless assumed overlordship of Leinster in Ireland, Pembroke Castle, Chepstow Castle, as well as Isabel's other castles in Wales such as the keep of Haverford, Tenby, Lewhaden, Narberth, Stackpole.[10]

    Shortly after their marriage, Marshal and Isabel arrived in Ireland, at Old Ros, a settlement located in the territory which belonged to her grandfather, Dermot MacMurrough. A motte was hastily constructed, a medieval borough quickly grew around it, and afterwards the Marshals founded the port town by the river which subsequently became known as New Ross. The Chronicles of Ros, which are housed in the British Museum, described Isabel and Marshal's arrival in Ireland and records that Isabella set about building a lovely city on the banks of the Barrow.

    In 1192, Isabel and her husband assumed the task of managing their vast lands; starting with the rebuilding of Kilkenny Castle and the town, both of which had been damaged by the O'Brien clan in 1173. Later they commissioned the construction of several abbeys in the vicinity.[11]

    The marriage was happy, despite the vast difference in age between them. William Marshal and Isabel produced a total of five sons and five daughters.[12]

    end of biography

    Buried:
    Tintern Abbey (Welsh: Abaty Tyndyrn, About this sound pronunciation in Welsh (help·info)) was founded by Walter de Clare, Lord of Chepstow, on 9 May 1131. It is situated adjacent to the village of Tintern in Monmouthshire, on the Welsh bank of the River Wye, which forms the border between Monmouthshire in Wales and Gloucestershire in England. It was only the second Cistercian foundation in Britain, and the first in Wales. Falling into ruin after the Dissolution of the Monasteries in the 16th century, the remains were celebrated in poetry and often painted by visitors from the 18th century onwards. In 1984 Cadw took over responsibility for the site.

    Photos, history & source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tintern_Abbey

    Children:
    1. William Marshal, Knight, 2nd Earl of Pembroke was born 1190-1198, (Berkshire, England); died 6 Apr 1231, London, Middlesex, England.
    2. Maud Marshal, Countess of Norfolk was born ~ 1193, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales; died 27 Mar 1248, Tintern Abbey, Chapel Hill, Monmouthshire, Wales.
    3. 37. Isabel Marshal, Countess Marshall was born 9 Oct 1200, Pembroke Castle, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales; died 17 Jan 1240, Berkhamsted Castle, Berkhamsted, Hertforshire, England.
    4. Sybil Marshal was born ~ 1201, (Pembroke Castle, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales); died 0Apr 1245.
    5. Eva Marshal, Countess of Abergavenny was born 0___ 1203, Pembroke Castle, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales; died 0___ 1246.
    6. Joan Marshal was born 0___ 1210, (England); died 0___ 1234, (England).

  11. 76.  Roger de Lacy, 6th Baron of Pontefrac was born 0___ 1170; died 0___ 1211.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: 7th Baron of Halton
    • Also Known As: 7th Lord of Bowland
    • Also Known As: Constable of Chester
    • Also Known As: Roger le Constable

    Notes:

    Roger de Lacy (1170–1211), 6th Baron of Pontefract, 7th Lord of Bowland, Lord of Blackburnshire, 7th Baron of Halton and Constable of Chester (formerly Roger le Constable) was a notable English soldier, crusader and baron in the late 12th and early 13th centuries.

    Family and Provenance

    Roger de Lacy was also known as Roger FitzJohn (son of John, constable of Chester)[3] and during the time that he was hoping to inherit his grandmother's de Lisours lands as Roger de Lisours.[4] He was the son of John FitzRichard (son of Richard), Baron of Halton, Lord of Bowland, Lord of Flamborough and Constable of Chester. Roger became Baron of Pontefract on the death of his paternal grandmother Albreda de Lisours (-aft.1194) who had inherited the Barony in her own right as 1st-cousin and heir to Robert de Lacy (-1193), 4th Baron of Pontefract. In agreements with his grandmother Roger adopted the name of de Lacy, received the right to inherit the Barony of Pontefract and its lands, and the lands of Bowland, and Blackburnshire. He gave up all claims to his grandmother's de Lisours lands. He also gave his younger brother Robert le Constable the Flamborough lands that he had inherited from his father. He married Maud (or Matilda) de Clere (not of the de Clare family).

    Service to Kings Henry, Richard and John

    Robert de Lacy failed to support King Henry I during his power struggle with his brother and the King confiscated Pontefract Castle from the family during the 12th century.[5] Roger paid King Richard I 3,000 marks for the Honour of Pontefract, but the King retained possession of the castle. He joined King Richard for the Third Crusade.

    Accession of King John[edit]
    At the accession of King John of England, Roger was a person of great eminence, for we find him shortly after the coronation of that prince, deputed with the Sheriff of Northumberland, and other great men, to conduct William, King of Scotland, to Lincoln, where the English king had fixed to give him an interview. King John gave de Lacy Pontefract Castle in 1199, the year he ascended the throne.

    Military service

    Siege of Acre

    Roger was the Constable of Chester, and joined Richard the Lionheart for the Third Crusade. Roger assisted at the Siege of Acre, in 1192 and clearly earned the favour and the trust of King Richard as a soldier and loyal subject as judged by his subsequent service.

    Chăateau Gaillard

    King Richard reconquered some castles along his Norman border from Philip II of France in 1196 and de Lacy was likely in his retinue. In 1203, de Lacy was the commander of the Chăateau Gaillard in Normandy, when it was besieged and finally taken by Philip, marking the loss of mainland Normandy by the Plantagenăets. Under de Lacy's command the defence of the castle was lengthy, and it fell only after an eight-month siege on 8 March 1204. After the siege, de Lacy returned to England to begin work reinforcing Pontefract Castle.

    Siege of Rothelan

    In the time of this Roger, Ranulph, Earl of Chester, having entered Wales at the head of some forces, was compelled, by superior numbers, to shut himself up in the castle of Rothelan (Rhuddlan Castle), where, being closely besieged by the Welsh, he sent for aid to the Constable of Chester. Hugh Lupus, the 1st Earl of Chester, in his charter of foundation of the Abbey of St. Werberg, at Chester, had given a privilege to the frequenters of Chester fair, "That they should not be apprehended for theft, or any other offense during the time of the fair, unless the crime was committed therein."[6] This privilege made the fair, of course, the resort of thieves and vagabonds from all parts of the kingdom. Accordingly, the Constable, Roger de Lacy, forthwith marched to his relief, at the head of a concourse of people, then collected at the fair of Chester, consisting of minstrels, and loose characters of all description, forming altogether so numerous a body, that the besiegers, at their approach, mistaking them for soldiers, immediately raised the siege. For this timely service, the Earl of Chester conferred upon De Lacy and his heirs, the patronage of all the minstrels in those parts, which patronage the Constable transferred to his steward; and was enjoyed for many years afterwards.[6]

    High Sheriff

    He was appointed High Sheriff of Cumberland for the years 1204 to 1209.[7]

    Death and succession

    Roger died in 1211, and was succeeded by his son, John de Lacy, 2nd Earl of Lincoln.

    *

    Roger — Maud de Clare. [Group Sheet]


  12. 77.  Maud de Clare
    Children:
    1. 38. John de Lacy, Knight, 2nd Earl of Lincoln was born ~ 1192; died 22 Jul 1240; was buried Cistercian Abbey of Stanlaw, in County Chester, England.

  13. 78.  Robert de Quincy (son of Saer de Quincy, Knight, 1st Earl of Winchester and Margaret de Beaumont); died 0___ 1217, London, Middlesex, England.

    Notes:

    Died:
    He had been accidentally poisoned through medicine prepared by a Cistercian monk.

    Robert married Hawise of Chester, 1st Countess of Chester Bef 1206. Hawise (daughter of Hugh de Kevelioc, Knight, 5th Earl of Chester and Bertrade de Montfort, Comtess d'Evreux) was born 0___ 1180, Chester, Cheshire, England; died 6 Jun 1241, England. [Group Sheet]


  14. 79.  Hawise of Chester, 1st Countess of Chester was born 0___ 1180, Chester, Cheshire, England (daughter of Hugh de Kevelioc, Knight, 5th Earl of Chester and Bertrade de Montfort, Comtess d'Evreux); died 6 Jun 1241, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Countess of Lincoln
    • Also Known As: Hawise of Kevelioc

    Notes:

    Hawise of Chester, 1st Countess of Lincoln suo jure (1180- 6 June 1241/3 May 1243[1]), was an Anglo-Norman noblewoman and a wealthy heiress. Her father was Hugh de Kevelioc, 5th Earl of Chester. She was the sister and a co-heiress of Ranulf de Blondeville, 6th Earl of Chester. She was created suo jure 1st Countess of Lincoln in 1232.[2] She was the wife of Robert de Quincy, by whom she had one daughter, Margaret, who became heiress to her title and estates. She was also known as Hawise of Kevelioc.

    Family

    Hawise was born in 1180 in Chester, Cheshire, England, the youngest child of Hugh de Kevelioc, 5th Earl of Chester and Bertrade de Montfort of âEvreux, a cousin of King Henry II of England. Hawise had five siblings, including Maud of Chester, Countess of Huntingdon, Mabel of Chester, Countess of Arundel, Agnes of Chester, Countess of Derby, Beatrice de Keviloc and a brother Ranulf de Blondeville, 6th Earl of Chester.[3] She also had an illegitimate half-sister, Amice of Chester who married Ralph de Mainwaring, Justice of Chester by whom she had children.

    Her paternal grandparents were Ranulf de Gernon, 4th Earl of Chester, and Maud of Gloucester, the granddaughter of King Henry I of England, and her maternal grandparents were Simon III de Montfort (fr) and Mahaut.

    In 1181, when Hawise was a year old, her father died. He had served in Henry II's Irish campaigns after his estates had been restored to him in 1177. They had been confiscated by the King as a result of his having taken part in the baronial Revolt of 1173–1174. Her only brother Ranulf succeeded him as the 6th Earl of Chester.

    She inherited the castle and manor of Bolingbroke, and other large estates from her brother to whom she was co-heiress after his death on 26 October 1232. Hawise had already become 1st Countess of Lincoln in April 1231, when her brother Ranulf de Blondeville, 1st Earl of Lincoln resigned the title in her favour.[4] He granted her the title by a formal charter under his seal which was confirmed by King Henry III. She was formally invested as suo jure 1st Countess of Lincoln by King Henry III on 27 October 1232 the day after her brother's death.

    Less than a month later, in the same manner as her brother Ranulf de Blondeville, 1st Earl of Lincoln, she likewise made an inter vivos gift, after receiving dispensation from the crown, of the Earldom of Lincoln to her daughter Margaret de Quincy who then became 2nd Countess of Lincoln suo jureand her son-in-law John de Lacy, Baron of Pontefract who then became the 2nd Earl of Lincoln by right of his wife. (John de Lacy is mistakenly called the 1st Earl of Lincoln in many references.) They were formally invested by King Henry III as Countess and Earl of Lincoln on 23 November 1232.[5]

    Marriage and issue

    Sometime before 1206, she married Robert de Quincy, son of Saer de Quincy, 1st Earl of Winchester and Margaret de Beaumont of Leicester. The marriage produced one daughter:

    Margaret de Quincy, 2nd Countess of Lincoln suo jure (c.1206 – March 1266), married firstly in 1221 John de Lacy, 2nd Earl of Lincoln by whom she had two children, Edmund de Lacy, Baron of Pontefract, and Maud de Lacy; she married secondly on 6 January 1242 Walter Marshal, 5th Earl of Pembroke.
    Hawise's husband Robert died in 1217 in London. He had been accidentally poisoned through medicine prepared by a Cistercian monk.[6] Robert and his father had both been excommunicated in December 1215 as a result of the latter having been one of the 25 sureties of the Magna Carta six months before. Hawise died sometime between 6 June 1241 and 3 May 1243. She was more than sixty years of age.

    Hawisse was married a second time to Sir Warren de Bostoke; they had a son, Sir Henry de Bostoke.

    Sources

    Burke's Landed Gentry (1847), vol. 1, p. 81
    G. Ormerod, "History of the County Palatine and City of Chester" (1882), vol. 3, pp. 253, 259
    J. P. Rylands, "The Visitation of Cheshire in the Year 1580", Harliean Soc., vol. 18, p. 27.

    Children:
    1. 39. Margaret de Quincy, 2nd Countess of Lincoln was born ~ 1206, England; died 0Mar 1266, Hampstead, England; was buried Church of The Hospitallers, Clerkenwell, England.

  15. 80.  William de Braose, III, Knight, 4th Lord of BramberWilliam de Braose, III, Knight, 4th Lord of Bramber was born 0___ 1153, Bramber, Sussex, England (son of William de Braose, Knight, 3rd Lord of Bramber and Bertha of Hereford); died 9 Aug 1211, Corbeil, Marne, Champagne-Ardenne, France; was buried 0___ 1211, Seine-et-Marne, Île-de-France, France.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Lord of Bramber, Gower, Abergavenny, Brecknock, Builth, Radnor, Kington, Limerick

    Notes:

    William de Braose
    4th Lord of Bramber

    Grosmont Castle

    Born: probably 1140/50

    Died: 9th August 1211 at Corbeuil

    At his peak, William was Lord of Bramber, Gower, Abergavenny, Brecknock, Builth, Radnor, Kington, Limerick and the three castles of Skenfrith, Grosmont (right) and Whitecastle.

    He inherited Bramber, Builth and Radnor from his father; Brecknock and Abergavenny through his mother. He was the strongest of the Marcher Lords involved in constant war with the Welsh and other lords. He was particularly hated by the Welsh for the massacre of three Welsh princes, their families and their men, which took place during a feast at his castle of Abergavenny in 1175. He was sometimes known as the "Ogre of Abergavenny". One of the Normans' foremost warriors, he fought alongside King Richard at Chalus in 1199 (when Richard received his fatal wound).

    William immediately transferred his loyalty to Prince John and supported his claim to the throne. John's entry to England was via William's port of Shoreham in Sussex.

    John extended William's landholdings. He received Limerick, without the city, in 1201 and was also given custody of Glamorgan, Monmouth and Gwynllwg in return for large payments.

    William captured Arthur, Count of Brittany at Mirebeau in 1202 and was in charge of his imprisonment for King John. He was well rewarded in February 1203 with the grant of Gower. He may have had knowledge of the murder of Arthur and been bribed to silence by John with the city of Limerick in July. His honours reached their peak when he was made Sheriff of Herefordshire by John for 1206-7. He had held this office under Richard from 1192 to 1199.

    His fall began almost immediately. William was stripped of his office as bailiff of Glamorgan and other custodies by King John in 1206/7. Later he was deprived of all his lands and, sought by John in Ireland, he returned to Wales and joined the Welsh Prince Llywelyn in rebellion. He fled to France in 1210 via Shoreham "in the habit of a beggar" and died in exile near Paris. Despite his stated intention to be interred at St. John's, Brecon, he was buried in the Abbey of St. Victoire, Paris by Stephen Langton, the Archbishop of Canterbury, another of John's chief opponents who was also taking refuge there. His wife and son William were starved to death in captivity at either Windsor or Corfe Castle.

    Note: The arms shown above are attributed to this William by Matthew Paris (see Aspilogia II , MP IV No7)

    Father: William de Braose, 3rd Lord of Bramber, Sheriff of Herefordshire

    Mother: Bertha de Păitres

    Married to Maud de St Valery ("before 1170" - Powicke's Loretta)

    Child 1: William de Braose
    Child 2: Maud (Susan) = Gruffyd ap Rhys
    Child 3: Giles, Bishop of Hereford
    Child 4: Roger
    Child 5: Philip
    Child 6: Bertha = William de Beauchamp
    Child 7: Thomas
    Child 8: Walter
    Child 9: John = Amabil de Limesi
    Child 10: Margaret = Walter de Lacy
    Child 11: Henry
    Child 12: Annora = Hugh de Mortimer
    Child 13: Loretta = Robert de Beaumont, 4th Earl of Leicester
    Child 14: Reginald de Braose
    Child 15: Flandrina, Abbess of Godstow
    Child 16: Bernard

    This ordering of the children follows the Braose genealogy given in the 13th century MS
    (British Library, Cotton Julius D, x) on the history of the Lords of Brecon.

    Matthew Boulter has written a dissertation on the career of this William de Braose which he has kindly made available to readers of this site.

    end of biography

    M William (de Braose) BRUCEPrint Family Tree
    Born in 1153 - Bramber, Sussex, England
    Deceased 9 August 1211 - Corbeil, Marne, Champagne-Ardenne, France , age at death: 58 years old
    Buried in 1211 - Seine-et-Marne, Île-de-France, France

    Parents
    William (de Braose) BRUCE, born in 1100 - Bramber, Sussex, England, Deceased 21 October 1190 - London, England age at death: 90 years old
    Married in 1148, Herefordshire, England, to
    Bertha De PITRES, born in 1107 - Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England, Deceased - Bramber, Sussex, England

    Spouses, children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren
    Married in 1174, Bramber, Sussex, England, to Maud (Matilda) De St VALERY, born in 1155 - Bramber, Sussex, England, Deceased in 1210 - Windsor, Berkshire, England age at death: 55 years old (Parents : M Bernard De St VALERY 1117-1190 & F Alanor (Eleanor) De DOMMART 1128-) with
    F Matilda Maud (de Braose) 1160-1209 married in 1189 to Gruffydd Ap (Prince of South Wales) RHYS 1148-1201 with
    M Owain Ap GRUFFYDD ca 1176-1235 married in 1212 to Angharad Verch MAREDYDD 1190-1230 with :
    M Maredydd Ap (Lord Cardigan Uch Ayron) OWAIN ca 1204-1265
    F Lleucu Verch GRUFFYDD 1202-1250 married in 1232, Carmarthenshire, Wales, to Madog (Foel - Ap Cadwgon) GRIFFITH 1206-1250 with :
    F Elen (Verch Madog) GRIFFITH 1236-1280
    M Dafydd (Ap Madog) GRIFFITH 1240-1309
    M Cadwgon (Ddu - Ap Madog) GRIFFITH ca 1245-
    M William (The Younger) de Braose) BRUCE 1175-1210 married in 1196, Kent, England, to Matilda De CLARE 1175-1213 with
    F Matilda (de Braose) BRUCE ca 1195-1274 married before 1215, England, to Henry De TRACY 1197-1274 with :
    F Eva De TRACY ca 1222-1274
    M John (de Braose) (Lord of Bramber) BRUCE 1197-1232 married in 1219, Bramber, Sussex, England, to Margaret (Verch Llywelyn) (Lady) TUDOR 1202-1264 with :
    M William BRUCE 1224-1290
    M Richard (de Braose) BRUCE 1232-1292
    F Laurette (de Braose) BRUCE ca 1176-1266 married to Robert "Fitz-Parnell" HARCOURT ca 1156- with
    M X Harcourt ca 1190- married to ? ? with :
    M X Harcourt 1220-

    Siblings
    F Bertha (de Braose) BRUCE ca 1145- Married before 1180, Wales, to Gilbert De (Baron) MONMOUTH 1140-1190
    Bertha (de Braose) BRUCE ca 1145- Married before 1182, Bramber, Sussex, England, to Walter De BEAUCHAMP ca 1160-1235
    F Matilda Maud (de Braose) ca 1146- Married in 1168, England, to John De BRAMPTON ca 1136-1179
    F Margaret (de Braose) (Lady Meath) BRUCE ca 1149- Married 19 November 1200, Ewyas Harold, Herefordshire, England, to Walter De (Sir - Lord Meath) LACY ca 1150-1241
    F Sybil (de Braose) BRUCE /1151-1227 Married to Philip (le Boteler) BUTLER 1157-1174
    M Reginald (de Braose) BRUCE 1182-1227 Married 19 March 1202, Bramber, Sussex, England, to Grecian Alice De BRIWERE 1186-1226

    Paternal grand-parents, uncles and aunts
    M Philip (de Braose) BRUCE 1073-1134 married (1104)
    F Aenor De TOTNES 1084-1102
    M William (de Braose) BRUCE 1100-1190
    married (1148)
    6 children
    F Maud (de Braose) BRUCE 1109-1200
    married (1130)
    2 children



    Maternal grand-parents, uncles and aunts
    M Miles (Fitzwalter) De (1st Earl of Hereford) PITRES 1092-1143 married (1121)
    F Sybil (de Neufmarche) NEWMARCH 1092-1142
    F Bertha De PITRES 1107-
    married (1148)
    6 children
    M Roger De (Sheriff of Gloucestershire) PITRES ca 1115-1155
    married (1138)
    1 child
    F Margaret De PITRES ca 1126-1187
    married
    1 child
    F Lucy De PITRES 1136-1219/
    married (1157)
    1 child



    Notes
    Individual Note
    Source: Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - Millennium File - Heritage Consulting - Ancestry.com Operations Inc - 1,7249::0 1,7249::10774604
    Source: Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Dictionary of National Biography, Volumes 1-20, 22 - Ancestry.com - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. This collection was indexed by Ancestry World Archives Project contributors.Original data - Stephen, Sir Leslie, ed. Dictionary of National Biography, 1921–1922. London, England: Oxf - 1,1981::0 1,1981::11096
    Source: Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - Web: International, Find A Grave Index - Ancestry.com - Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. - 1,70699::0 1,70699::994752
    Source: Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - International, Find A Grave Index for Select Locations, 1300s-Current - Ancestry.com - Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. - 1,60541::0 1,60541::10270

    Death
    Age: 58


    Sources
    Individual: Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Ancestry Family Trees - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members. - This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created. - Ancestry Family Trees - http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=18829447&pid=9164
    Birth:
    - Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - Millennium File - Heritage Consulting - Ancestry.com Operations Inc - 1,7249::0 - 1,7249::10774604
    - Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - Web: International, Find A Grave Index - Ancestry.com - Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. - 1,70699::0 - 1,70699::994752
    - Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - International, Find A Grave Index for Select Locations, 1300s-Current - Ancestry.com - Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. - 1,60541::0 - 1,60541::10270
    Death:
    - Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - Millennium File - Heritage Consulting - Ancestry.com Operations Inc - 1,7249::0 - 1,7249::10774604
    - Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Dictionary of National Biography, Volumes 1-20, 22 - Ancestry.com - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. This collection was indexed by Ancestry World Archives Project contributors.Original data - Stephen, Sir Leslie, ed. Dictionary of National Biography, 1921–1922. London, England: Oxf - 1,1981::0 - 1,1981::11096
    - Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - Web: International, Find A Grave Index - Ancestry.com - Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. - 1,70699::0 - 1,70699::994752
    - Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - International, Find A Grave Index for Select Locations, 1300s-Current - Ancestry.com - Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. - 1,60541::0 - 1,60541::10270
    Burial:
    - Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - Web: International, Find A Grave Index - Ancestry.com - Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. - 1,70699::0 - 1,70699::994752
    - Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - International, Find A Grave Index for Select Locations, 1300s-Current - Ancestry.com - Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. - 1,60541::0 - 1,60541::10270
    Search the matching civil records

    Family Tree Preview
    Ancestry Chart Descendancy Chart Printable Family Tree
    _____| 16_ Robert BRUCE 1030-1094
    _____| 8_ William de (Braose) BRUCE 1049-1093
    _____| 4_ Philip (de Braose) BRUCE 1073-1134
    / \ _____| 18_ Waldron De St CLARE 1015-1047
    |2_ William (de Braose) BRUCE 1100-1190
    | \ _____| 20_ Alured De TOTNES 1015-1080
    | \ _____| 10_ Juhel De TOTNES 1049-1123
    | \ _____| 22_ Arnoul De PICQUIGNY 1020-1055
    |--1_ William (de Braose) BRUCE 1153-1211
    | _____| 24_ Roger De PITRES 1036-1080
    | _____| 12_ Walter de (Fitzroger) (High Sheriff of Gloucestershre) PÎTRES 1055-1129
    | _____| 6_ Miles (Fitzwalter) De (1st Earl of Hereford) PITRES 1092-1143
    | / \ _____| 26_ Drugo (Dru) de (Baalun) BALLON 1037-
    |3_ Bertha De PITRES 1107-
    \ _____| 28_ Geoffrey (de Neufmarche) NEWMARCH 1025-1072
    \ _____| 14_ Bernard (de Neufmarche) (Lord of Brecknockshire) NEWMARCH 1050-1093
    \ _____| 30_ Osborn (Fitzrichard) le SCROPE /1054-1100

    end of report

    William married Maud de St. Valery, Lady of the Haie Bef 1170, Bramber, Sussex, England. Maud was born ~ 1155; died 0___ 1210, Corfe Castle, Dorset, England. [Group Sheet]


  16. 81.  Maud de St. Valery, Lady of the Haie was born ~ 1155; died 0___ 1210, Corfe Castle, Dorset, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Lady of Bramber

    Notes:

    Died: 1210 in Windsor castle.

    Maud (Matilda) de Braose was also known as the Lady of la Haie and to the Welsh as Moll Walbee. Married to William de Braose, the "Ogre of Abergavenny", she was a significant warrior in her own right. Her long defence of Pain's Castle when it was besieged by the Welsh earned it the name "Matilda's Castle". The local people saw her as a supernatural character. She was said to have built Hay Castle (above) single handed in one night, carrying the stones in her apron.
    Maud's stoneWhen one fell out and lodged in her slipper she picked it out and flung it to land in St Meilig's churchyard, three miles away across the River Wye at Llowes. The nine foot high standing stone (left) can still be seen inside the church.

    The final fall of her husband may owe a lot to her hasty reply to King John when he requested her son William as a hostage in 1208. She refused on the grounds that John had murdered his nephew Arthur whom he should have protected. The dispute between John and the de Braoses led to Maud dying of starvation in one of the King's castles along with her son, while her husband, stripped of all his lands, died the following year in exile in France.

    Father: Bernard de St Valery (d.ca. 1190) (see note)

    Mother: ???

    Married to William de Braose, Lord of Brecknock, Bergavenny etc.

    Child 1: William de Braose
    Child 2: Maud (Susan) = Gruffyd ap Rhys
    Child 3: Giles, Bishop of Hereford
    Child 4: Roger
    Child 5: Philip
    Child 6: Bertha = William de Beauchamp
    Child 7: Thomas
    Child 8: Walter
    Child 9: John = Amabil de Limesi
    Child 10: Margaret = Walter de Lacy
    Child 11: Henry
    Child 12: Annora = Hugh de Mortimer
    Child 13: Loretta = Robert de Beaumont, 4th Earl of Leicester
    Child 14: Reginald de Braose
    Child 15: Flandrina, Abbess of Godstow
    Child 16: Bernard

    This ordering of the children follows the Braose genealogy given in the 13th century MS
    (British Library, Cotton Julius D, x) on the history of the Lords of Brecon.

    Note.
    Matilda's parentage was uncertain for a long time. Many writers have suggested that she may have been a daughter of Reginald de St Valery. I recently discovered a reference to her in L'Histoire des Ducs de Normandie et des Rois d'Angleterre, ed. Francisque Michel (Paris, 1840), written in the 13th century which describes her as a "daughter of Bernard de St Valery". This appears to have finally settled the matter.

    (See a copy of the post to soc.genealogy.medieval which gives more detail.)

    end of biography

    Maud de Braose, Lady of Bramber (c. 1155 – 1210) was an English noble, the spouse of William de Braose, 4th Lord of Bramber, a powerful Marcher baron and court favourite of King John of England. She would later incur the wrath and enmity of the King who caused her to be starved to death in the dungeon of Corfe Castle along with her eldest son.[1]

    She features in many Welsh myths and legends; and is also known to history as Matilda de Braose, Moll Wallbee, and Lady of La Haie.

    Family and marriage[edit]
    She was born Maud de St. Valery (Maud de Saint-Valâery) in France in about 1155, the child of Bernard de St. Valâery[2][3] of Hinton Waldrist in Berkshire (now Oxfordshire)[4] and his first wife, Matilda. Her paternal grandfather was Reginald de St. Valâery (died c.1162).

    She had many siblings and half-siblings, including Thomas de St. Valâery (died 1219), who was a son of Bernard by his second wife Eleanor de Domnart. Thomas married Adele de Ponthieu, by whom he had a daughter, Annora, who in her turn married Robert III, Count of Dreux, by whom she had issue. Thomas fought on the French side, at the Battle of Bouvines on 27 July 1214.[5]

    Sometime around 1166, Maud married William de Braose, 4th Lord of Bramber, son of William de Braose, 3rd Lord of Bramber and Bertha of Hereford de Pitres. He also held the lordships of Gower, Hay, Brecon, Radnor, Builth, Abergavenny, Kington, Painscastle, Skenfrith, Grosmont, White Castle and Briouze in Normandy. When King John of England ascended the throne in 1199, Braose became a court favourite and was also awarded the lordship of Limerick, Ireland. Maud had a marriage portion, Tetbury from her father's estate.

    Maud supported her husband's military ambitions and he put her in charge of Hay Castle and surrounding territory. She is often referred to in history as the Lady of Hay. In 1198, Maud defended Painscastle in Elfael against a massive Welsh attack led by Gwenwynwyn, Prince of Powys. She successfully held off Gwenwynwyn's forces for three weeks until English reinforcements arrived. Over three thousand Welsh were killed. Painscastle was known as Matilda's Castle by the locals.[6]

    Maud and William are reputed to have had 16 children.[7] The best documented of these are listed below.

    Issue[edit]
    Maud de Braose (died 29 December 1210), married Gruffydd ap Rhys II, by whom she had two sons, Rhys and Owain.[8]
    William de Braose (died 1210). Starved to death with his mother in either Windsor or Corfe Castle. He married Maud de Clare, daughter of Richard de Clare, 3rd Earl of Hertford, by whom he had issue, including John de Braose.[9]
    Margaret de Braose (died after 1255), married Walter de Lacy, Lord of Meath, son of Hugh de Lacy, Lord of Meath and Rohese of Monmouth.[9]
    Reginald de Braose (died between 5 May 1227 and 9 June 1228), married firstly, Grace, daughter of William Briwere, and secondly, in 1215, Gwladus Ddu, daughter of Welsh Prince Llewelyn the Great. He had issue by his first wife, including William de Braose, who married Eva Marshal.[1]
    Giles de Braose, Bishop of Hereford (died 13 November 1215)[1]
    John de Braose[7] (died before 27 May 1205), married Amabil de Limesi.[9]
    Loretta de Braose, married Robert de Beaumont, 4th Earl of Leicester. She died without issue.[7]
    Annora de Braose, married Hugh de Mortimer and later became a recluse at Iffley.[7]
    Flandrina de Braose, Abbess of Godstow,[10] (elected 1242, deposed 1248).[11]
    Enmity of King John[edit]

    King John of England:
    A fanciful illustration from 1902 of Maud de Braose's enemy
    In 1208, William de Braose quarrelled with his friend and patron King John. The reason is not known but it is alleged that Maud made indiscreet comments regarding the murder of King John's nephew Arthur of Brittany. There was also a large sum of money (five thousand marks) de Braose owed the King. Whatever the reason, John demanded Maud's son William be sent to him as a hostage for her husband's loyalty. Maud refused, and stated loudly within earshot of the King's officers that "she would not deliver her children to a king who had murdered his own nephew."[12] The King quickly led troops to the Welsh border and seized all of the castles that belonged to William de Braose. Maud and her eldest son William fled to Ireland, where they found refuge at Trim Castle with the de Lacys, the family of her daughter Margaret. In 1210, King John sent an expedition to Ireland. Maud and her son escaped but were apprehended in Galloway by Donnchadh, Earl of Carrick.[13] After being briefly held at Carrickfergus Castle,[14] they were dispatched to England.

    Imprisonment at Corfe Castle[edit]
    Maud and her son William were first imprisoned at Windsor Castle, but were shortly afterwards transferred to Corfe Castle in Dorset where they were placed inside the dungeon. Maud and William both starved to death.[14] Her husband died a year later in exile in France where he had gone disguised as a beggar to escape King John's wrath after the latter had declared him an outlaw, following his alliance with Llywelyn the Great, whom he had assisted in open rebellion against the King, an act which John regarded as treason. He was buried in the Abbey of St. Victor, Paris.


    Corfe Castle; within whose dungeon Maud de Braose and her son William were starved to death
    Maud's daughter Margaret de Lacy founded a religious house, the Hospital of St. John, in Aconbury, Herefordshire in her memory.[15] On 10 October 1216, eight days before his death, King John conceded three carucates of land in the royal forest of Aconbury to Margaret for the construction of the religious house. He sent the instructions to her husband Walter de Lacy, who held the post of Sheriff of Hereford, by letters patent.[16]

    Maud de Braose features in many Welsh folklore myths and legends. There is one legend which says that Maud built the castle of Hay-on-Wye single handed in one night, carrying the stones in her apron.[17] She was also said to have been extremely tall and often donned armour while leading troops into battle.[18]

    The legend about her building Hay Castle probably derives from the time she added the gateway arch to a tower which was built in the 1180s.[19]

    In contemporary records, she was described as beautiful, very wise, doughty, and vigorous. She kept up the war against the Welsh and conquered much from them.[15]

    The manner in which Maud and her son William met their deaths so outraged the English nobility that Magna Carta, which King John was forced to sign in 1215, contains clause 39; it reads:

    No man shall be taken, imprisoned, outlawed, banished or in any way destroyed, nor will we proceed against or prosecute him, except by the lawful judgement of his peers or by the law of the land.

    end of biography


    Died:
    The dispute between John and the de Braoses led to Maud dying of starvation in one of the King's castles along with her son, while her husband, stripped of all his lands, died the following year in exile in France.

    Children:
    1. Maud de Braose was born 0___ 1160, (Bramber, Sussex, England); died 29 Dec 1210.
    2. Eleanor de Braose was born (Bramber, Sussex, England).
    3. Margaret de Braose, Lady of Trim was born ~ 1149, (Bramber, Sussex, England); died Aft 1255, Corfe Castle, Dorset, England.
    4. 40. John de Braose was born 1197-1198, (Bramber, Sussex, England); died 18 Jul 1232, Bramber, Sussex, England.

  17. 82.  Llywelyn The GreatLlywelyn The Great was born ~ 1172, Dolwyddelan, Wales; died 11 Apr 1240, Aberconwy Abbey, Wales; was buried Aberconwy Abbey, Wales.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Llywelyn ap Iorwerth
    • Also Known As: Llywelyn Fawr
    • Also Known As: Prince of Aberffraw and Lord of Snowdon
    • Also Known As: Prince of Gwynedd, and Powys Wenwynwyn

    Notes:

    Llywelyn the Great (Welsh: Llywelyn Fawr, [??'w?l?n va??r]), full name Llywelyn ap Iorwerth, (c. 1172 – 11 April 1240) was a Prince of Gwynedd in north Wales and eventually de facto ruler over most of Wales. By a combination of war and diplomacy he dominated Wales for 40 years.

    During Llywelyn's boyhood, Gwynedd was ruled by two of his uncles, who split the kingdom between them, following the death of Llywelyn's grandfather, Owain Gwynedd, in 1170. Llywelyn had a strong claim to be the legitimate ruler and began a campaign to win power at an early age. He was sole ruler of Gwynedd by 1200 and made a treaty with King John of England that year. Llywelyn's relations with John remained good for the next ten years. He married John's natural daughter Joan in 1205, and when John arrested Gwenwynwyn ab Owain of Powys in 1208, Llywelyn took the opportunity to annex southern Powys. In 1210, relations deteriorated, and John invaded Gwynedd in 1211. Llywelyn was forced to seek terms and to give up all lands west of the River Conwy, but was able to recover them the following year in alliance with the other Welsh princes. He allied himself with the barons who forced John to sign Magna Carta in 1215. By 1216, he was the dominant power in Wales, holding a council at Aberdyfi that year to apportion lands to the other princes.

    Following King John's death, Llywelyn concluded the Treaty of Worcester with his successor, Henry III, in 1218. During the next fifteen years, Llywelyn was frequently involved in fights with Marcher lords and sometimes with the king, but also made alliances with several major powers in the Marches. The Peace of Middle in 1234 marked the end of Llywelyn's military career, as the agreed truce of two years was extended year by year for the remainder of his reign. He maintained his position in Wales until his death in 1240 and was succeeded by his son Dafydd ap Llywelyn.

    Children

    Llywelyn married Joan, natural daughter of King John of England, in 1205. Llywelyn and Joan had three identified children in the records but in all probability had more as Llywelyn's children were fully recognised during his marriage to Joan whilst his father-in-law, King John, was alive. The identity of the mother of some of Llywelyn's children before this union is uncertain, but the following are recorded in contemporary or near-contemporary records.

    Dafydd ap Llywelyn (c. 1212–1246), son by Joan, wife of Llywelyn.

    Elen (Helen) ferch Llywelyn (c. 1206–1253), daughter by Joan. M. John Earl of Huntington m. 2nd Robert de Quincy 3rd Donald Malcolm Mar Earl of Mar.

    Susanna ferch Llywelyn, died after November 1228, daughter by Joan. Henry III King of England granted the upbringing of "L. princeps Norwallie et Johanna uxor sua et…soror nostra Susannam filiam suam" to "Nicholao de Verdun et Clementie uxori sue" by order dated 24 Nov 1228[273]. Her birth date is estimated on the assumption that Susanna was under marriageable age, but older than an infant, at the time.

    Gruffydd ap Llywelyn (c. 1196–1244), a son by Tangwystl Goch (d. c. 1198).

    Gwladus Ddu (c. 1206–1251), probable daughter by Joan.

    Angharad ferch Llywelyn (c. 1212–1256), probable daughter of Joan; married Maelgwn Fychan.

    Marared ferch Llywelyn (died after 1268), married John de Braose and secondly (about 1232) Walter III de Clifford. Marared had issue by both husbands.[64]

    Elen the Younger ferch Llywelyn (before 1230-after 16 Feb 1295) who married firstly Mâael Coluim II, Earl of Fife, son of Duncan Macduff of Fife & his wife Alice Corbet. She married secondly (after 1266) Domhnall I, Earl of Mar, son of William, Earl of Mar & his first wife Elizabeth Comyn of Buchan.

    Elen and Domhall's daughter, Isabella of Mar, married Robert, the Bruce, King of Scots. Isabella had one child by the King of Scots, Marjorie Bruce, who was the mother of the first Stewart monarch, Robert II of Scotland.

    Tegwared y Baiswen ap Llywelyn (c. 1215), a son by a woman named as Crysten in some sources, a possible twin of Angharad[65]

    Little is known of Llywelyn's mistress, Tangwystl Goch, except that she was the daughter of Llywarch "Goch" of Rhos.[66] Gruffydd ap Llywelyn (c. 1196–1244) was Llywelyn's eldest son and known to be the son of Tangwystl. He married Senena, daughter of Caradoc ap Thomas of Anglesey. Their sons included Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, who for a period occupied a position in Wales comparable to that of his grandfather, and Dafydd ap Gruffydd who ruled Gwynedd briefly after his brother's death.

    end of biography

    Llywelyn Ap Iorwerth, byname Llywelyn The Great (died April 11, 1240, Aberconway, Gwynedd, Wales), Welsh prince, the most outstanding native ruler to appear in Wales before the region came under English rule in 1283.

    Llywelyn was the grandson of Owain Gwynedd (d. 1170), a powerful ruler of Gwynedd in northern Wales. While still a child, Llywelyn was exiled by his uncle, David. He deposed David in 1194 and by 1202 had brought most of northern Wales under his control. In 1205 he married Joan, the illegitimate daughter of England’s King John (reigned 1199–1216). Nevertheless, when Llywelyn’s attempts to extend his authority into southern Wales threatened English possessions, John invaded Wales (1211) and overran most of Gwynedd. The prince soon won back his lands. He secured his position by allying with John’s powerful baronial opponents, and his actions helped the barons influence the king’s signing of Magna Carta (1215).

    Two years after the accession of King Henry III (reigned 1216–72), the English acknowledged that Llywelyn controlled almost all of Wales, but by 1223 they had forced him to withdraw to the north behind a boundary between Cardigan, Dyfed, and Builth, Powys. Many Welsh princes in the south, however, still accepted his overlordship. In his last years the aged Llywelyn turned his government over to his son David (prince of Gwynedd). When Llywelyn died, a chronicler described him as prince of Wales, which he was in fact, if not in law.

    end of biography

    Buried:
    Aberconwy Abbey was a Cistercian foundation at Conwy, later transferred to Maenan near Llanrwst, and in the 13th century was the most important abbey in the north of Wales.

    A Cistercian house was founded at Rhedynog Felen near Caernarfon in 1186 by a group of monks from Strata Florida Abbey. About four or five years later they moved to Conwy, and in 1199 were given large grants of land by Llywelyn the Great who had recently become ruler of Gwynedd. Llywelyn was regarded as the founder of the house, and thanks to his support it came to hold more land than any other Welsh abbey, over 40,000 acres (160 km˛). On Llywelyn's death in 1240 he was buried at the abbey, and his son and successor Dafydd ap Llywelyn was also buried here in 1246. In 1248 Llywelyn's other son, Gruffydd ap Llywelyn, who had died trying to escape from the Tower of London in 1244, was reburied at Aberconwy after the abbot of Aberconwy, together with the abbot of Strata Florida, had arranged for his body to be repatriated from London.

    The abbot of Aberconwy was an important figure in the negotiations between Llywelyn ap Gruffudd and the English crown later in the century, and in 1262 was entrusted with the task of being Llywelyn's sole representative in negotiations.

    In 1282, Edward I of England surrounded Snowdonia with a massive army. On 11 December Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, Tywysog Cymru, was lured into a trap and murdered.

    In 1283 King Edward I of England obliged the monks to move from Conwy to Maenan, further up the Conwy valley (53.1733°N 3.8123°W), so he could construct a castle and walled town at Conwy. The move had been completed by 1284, with Edward financing the building of a new abbey. In the 15th century the abbot, John ap Rhys, became involved in a dispute with Strata Florida Abbey and led some of his monks and some soldiers on a raid on that abbey. The abbey was valued at ą162 in 1535 and was suppressed in 1537.

    Little remains of the Maenan Abbey buildings, but the original abbey church in Conwy was adapted to become the parish church of St Mary & All Saints and although much rebuilt over the centuries some parts of the original church remain. The other buildings of the abbey are thought to have been located north and east of the church.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aberconwy_Abbey

    Died:
    Gwynedd, county of northwestern Wales, extending from the Irish Sea in the west to the mountains of Snowdonia in the east. It encompasses most of the historic counties of Caernarvonshire and Merioneth. Caernarfon is the administrative centre of the county.

    https://www.britannica.com/place/Gwynedd

    Llywelyn married Joan Plantagenet, Lady of Wales 1203-1204. Joan (daughter of John I, King of England and Clemence Butler) was born ~ 1191, (France); died 2 Feb 1237. [Group Sheet]


  18. 83.  Joan Plantagenet, Lady of Wales was born ~ 1191, (France) (daughter of John I, King of England and Clemence Butler); died 2 Feb 1237.

    Other Events:

    • Residence: England
    • Also Known As: her Welsh name is Siwan
    • Also Known As: Lady of Snowdon

    Notes:

    Joan, Lady of Wales and Lady of Snowdon, also known by her Welsh name of Siwan, (c. 1191 – 2 February 1237) was the wife of Llywelyn the Great, Prince of Wales and Gwynedd, effective ruler of most of Wales.

    Early life

    Joan was a natural daughter of King John of England. She should not be confused with her half-sister, Joan, Queen consort of Scotland.

    Little is known about her early life. Her mother's name is known only from Joan's obituary in the Tewkesbury Annals, where she is called "Regina Clementina" (Queen Clemence); there is no evidence that her mother was in fact of royal blood. Joan may have been born in France, and probably spent part of her childhood there, as King John had her brought to the Kingdom of England from Normandy in December 1203 in preparation for her wedding to prince Llywelyn ab Iorwerth.

    Thomas Pennant, in "Tours in Wales", Volume 2, published London, 1810, writes : "It is said that Llewelyn the Great had near this place [Trefriw] a palace; ... The church of Trefriw was originally built by Llewelyn, for the ease of his princess, who before was obliged to go on foot to Llanrhychwyn, a long walk among the mountains."

    Marriage

    Joan married Llywelyn the Great between December 1203 and October 1204. The wedding was celebrated at St Werburgh's Abbey in Chester. She and Llywelyn had at least two children together:

    Elen ferch Llywelyn (Helen or Ellen) (1207–1253), married (1) John the Scot, Earl of Chester and (2) Robert II de Quincy
    Dafydd ap Llywelyn (c. 1212–1246) married Isabella de Braose, died at Abergwyngregyn.
    Some of Llywelyn's other recorded children may also have been Joan's:

    Gwladus Ddu (1206–1251), married (1) Reginald de Braose and (2) Ralph de Mortimer (had issue).
    Susanna, who was sent to England as a hostage in 1228.
    Angharad ferch Llywelyn
    Margaret, who married (1) Sir John de Braose (called 'Tadody'), the grandson of William de Braose, 4th Lord of Bramber. She married (2) Sir Walter de Clifford and had children by both husbands.[1]
    In April 1226 Joan obtained a papal decree from Pope Honorius III, declaring her legitimate on the basis that her parents had not been married to others at the time of her birth, but without giving her a claim to the English throne.[2]

    Adultery with William de Braose

    At Easter 1230, William de Braose, who was Llywelyn's prisoner at the time, was discovered with Joan in Llywelyn's bedchamber. William de Braose was hanged on 2 May 1230, according to local folklore at Abergwyngregyn; the place was known as 'Gwern y Grog'. A letter from Nicholas, Abbot of Vaudy, suggests that the execution took place at Crogen near Bala (crogi = to hang).[3]

    Joan was placed under house arrest for twelve months after the incident. She was then, according to the Chronicle of Chester, forgiven by Llywelyn, and restored to favour. She may have given birth to a daughter early in 1231.

    Joan was never called Princess of Wales, but, in Welsh, "Lady of Wales".

    Death and burial

    She died at the royal home at Abergwyngregyn, on the north coast of Gwynedd, in 1237. Llywelyn's great grief at her death is recorded; he founded a Franciscan friary on the seashore at Llanfaes, opposite the royal home, in her honour. The friary was consecrated in 1240, shortly before Llywelyn died. It was destroyed in 1537 by Henry VIII of England during the Dissolution of the Monasteries. A stone coffin originally identified as Joan's can be seen in St Mary's and St Nicholas's parish church, Beaumaris, Anglesey. Above the empty coffin is a slate panel inscribed: "This plain sarcophagus, (once dignified as having contained the remains of Joan, daughter of King John, and consort of Llewelyn ap Iowerth, Prince of North Wales, who died in the year 1237), having been conveyed from the Friary of Llanfaes, and alas, used for many years as a horsewatering trough, was rescued from such an indignity and placed here for preservation as well as to excite serious meditation on the transitory nature of all sublunary distinctions. By Thomas James Warren Bulkeley, Viscount Bulkeley, Oct 1808"


    The slate panel at Beaumaris
    In recent years, doubt has been cast on the identity of the woman depicted on the coffin lid, which is not thought to belong to the coffin on which it now rests. Experts have suggested that the costume and style of carving belong to a much later decade than the 1230s when Joan died, although the coronet suggests a member of the royal family. Eleanor de Montfort is considered the most likely alternative

    Children:
    1. 41. Marared ferch Llywelyn was born 0___ 1202, Gwynedd, Wales; died Aft 1268.
    2. Gwladus Ddu was born 0___ 1206, (Kingdom of Gwynedd, Wales); died 0___ 1251, Windsor, Berkshire, England.
    3. Dafydd ap Llywelyn, Prince of Wales was born 0Mar 1212, Castell Hen Blas, Coleshill, Bagillt in Flintshire, Wales; died 25 Feb 1246, Abergwyngregyn, Wales.
    4. Elen ferch Llywelyn was born 1212-1218, (Wales); died 0___ 1253.
    5. Angharad ferch Llywelyn was born ~ 1212, (Wales); died 0___ 1251.

  19. 96.  Henry II, King of EnglandHenry II, King of England was born 5 Mar 1133, Le Mans, France; was christened 25 Mar 1133, Le Mans, France (son of Geoffrey "Le Bon" Plantagenet, Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy and Matilda of England, Queen of England); died 6 Jul 1189, Chinon Castle, France; was buried 7 Jul 1189, Fontevraud Abbey, France.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Count of Anjou
    • Also Known As: Count of Nantes
    • Also Known As: Curt Mantel
    • Also Known As: Duke of Aquitaine
    • Also Known As: Duke of Normandy
    • Also Known As: Henry Curtmantle
    • Also Known As: Henry FitzEmpress
    • Also Known As: Henry II, King of England

    Notes:

    Henry founded the Plantagenet Dynasty... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_II_of_England

    Henry II is the 27th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Jesse D Hennessee (1880-1952) through his 12th great granddaughter,

    Catherine Mountfort Booth (1450-1483) ...

    http://www.thehennesseefamily.com/getperson.php?personID=I32450&tree=hennessee

    Henry II (1133-1189) is the great-grandson of William the Conqueror (1024-1087) ergo

    William the Conqueror (1024-1087) is the 30th great-grandfather of all the grandchildren of Jesse D Hennessee (1880-1952)

    Who could forget Peter O'Toole's magnificient protrayal of Henry II in the 1968 movie production of "The Lion in Winter" and Katherine Hepburn's Eleanor of Aquitaine? ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Lion_in_Winter_(1968_film)

    History of Henry II and his reign... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_II_of_England

    Source: 'The World Book Encyclopedia', 1968, p H178. 'Royalty for Commoners', Roderick W. Stuart, 1993, p 37-38. Reigned 1154-1189.

    He ruled an empire that stretched from the Tweed to the Pyrenees. In spite of frequent hostitilties with the French King his own family and rebellious Barons (culminating in the great revolt of 1173-74) and his quarrel with Thomas Becket, Henry maintained control over his possessions until shortly before his death. His judicial and administrative reforms which increased Royal control and influence at the expense of the Barons were of great constitutional importance. Introduced trial by Jury. Duke of Normandy. Henry II 'Curt Mantel,' Duke of Normandy, Count of Maine and Anjou, King Of England became king in 1154.

    At the height of his power, Henry ruled England and almost all western France. His marriage to Eleanor of Aquitaine, the most famous woman of the age, brought the duchy of Aquitaine under his control. Henry also claimed to rule Scotland, Wales, and eastern Ireland. Henry II carried on his grandfather's policy of limiting the power of the nobles. He also tried to make the Roman Catholic Church in England submit to his authority. This policy brought him into conflict with Thomas a Becket, Achbishop of Canterbury. Four of the king's knights murdered Becket while he was at vespers in his cathedral. Henry made Anglo-Saxon common law, rather than the revised Roman law, the supreme law of the land. He introduced trial by jury and circuit courts. In his later years, Henry's sons often rebelled against him. Two of them, Richard the Lion-Hearted and John, became the next two kings of England.

    REF: "Falls the Shadow" Sharon Kay Penman: William the Conqueror requested a large number of Jews to move to England after his conquest. They spoke Norman & did well under his reign. They continued to thrive under William's grandson Henry II.

    REF: British Monarchy Official Website: Henry II (reigned 1154-89)

    ruled over an empire which stretched from the Scottish border to the Pyrenees. Married to Eleanor, the heiress of Aquitaine, the king spent only 13 years of his reign in England; the other 21 years were spent on the continent in his territories in what is now France. By 1158, Henry had restored to the crown some of the lands and royal power lost by Stephen. For example, locally chosen sheriffs were changed into royally appointed agents charged with enforcing the law and collecting taxes in the counties. Personally interested in government and law, Henry strengthened royal justice, making use of juries and re-introduced the sending of justices (judges) on regular tours of the country to try cases for the Crown. His legal reforms have led him to be seen as the founder of English Common Law. Henry's disagreements with his Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Becket, over Church/State relations ended in Becket's murder in 1170. Family disputes almost wrecked the king's achievements and he died in 1189 at war with his sons.

    Reigned 25 Oct 1154-1189. Invested As Duke Of Nomandy By His Parents In 1150.

    Ruled An Empire That Stretched From The Tweed To The Pyrenees.

    Numerous Quarrels With French King, & His Own Family.

    Quarreled With Thomas Becket.

    Beat Rebellious Barons (Culminating In The Great Revolt Of 1173-74).

    Retained Control Of His Possessions Until Shortly Before His Death.

    Important Judicial & Admin. Reforms Incr. Power Of King At The Expense Of Barons

    Introduced Trial By Jury.

    Count Of Anjou & Aquitaine.

    Buried:
    Click on this link to view images of Fontevraud Abbey ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fontevraud_Abbey

    Died:
    Images and commentary for Chinon Castle ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ch%C3%A2teau_de_Chinon

    Henry married Eleanore de Aquitaine, Queen of England 18 May 1152, Bordeaux, Aquitaine, France. Eleanore was born 0___ 1123, Chateau de Belin, Bordeaux, Aquitaine, France; died 31 Mar 1204, Poitiers, France; was buried 1 Apr 1204, Fontevraud Abbey, France. [Group Sheet]


  20. 97.  Eleanore de Aquitaine, Queen of EnglandEleanore de Aquitaine, Queen of England was born 0___ 1123, Chateau de Belin, Bordeaux, Aquitaine, France; died 31 Mar 1204, Poitiers, France; was buried 1 Apr 1204, Fontevraud Abbey, France.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Duchess of Aquitaine
    • Also Known As: Queen Consort of the Franks

    Notes:

    Eleanor of Aquitaine (French: Aliâenor, âElâeonore, Latin: Alienora; 1122 – 1 April 1204) was one of the wealthiest and most powerful women in western Europe during the High Middle Ages and a member of the Ramnulfid dynasty of rulers in southwestern France. She inherited the Duchy of Aquitaine from her father, William X, in 1137, and later became queen consort of France (1137–1152) and of England (1154–1189). She was the patron of literary figures such as Wace, Benoăit de Sainte-Maure, and Bernart de Ventadorn. She was a leader of the Second Crusade and of armies several times in her life.

    As Duchess of Aquitaine, Eleanor was the most eligible bride in Europe. Three months after she became duchess, she married King Louis VII of France, son of her guardian, King Louis VI. As Queen of France, she participated in the unsuccessful Second Crusade. Soon after, Eleanor sought an annulment of her marriage,[1] but her request was rejected by Pope Eugene III.[2] However, after the birth of her second daughter Alix, Louis agreed to an annulment given that their union had not produced a son after fifteen years of marriage.[3] The marriage was annulled on 11 March 1152 on the grounds of consanguinity within the fourth degree. Their daughters were declared legitimate and custody was awarded to Louis, while Eleanor's lands were restored to her.

    As soon as the annulment was granted, Eleanor became engaged to Henry, Duke of Normandy and Count of Anjou, who became King Henry II of England in 1154. Henry was her third cousin (cousin of the third degree), and eleven years younger. The couple married on 18 May 1152 (Whit Sunday), eight weeks after the annulment of Eleanor's first marriage, in a cathedral in Poitiers, France. Over the next thirteen years, she bore Henry eight children: five sons, three of whom would become kings; and three daughters. However, Henry and Eleanor eventually became estranged. Henry imprisoned her in 1173 for supporting her son Henry's revolt against her husband. She was not released until 6 July 1189, when Henry died and their son ascended the English throne as Richard I.

    Now queen dowager, Eleanor acted as regent while Richard went on the Third Crusade, where on his return he was captured and held prisoner. Eleanor lived well into the reign of her youngest son, John. By the time of her death, she had outlived all her children except for John and Eleanor.

    Film, radio and television

    Eleanor has featured in a number of screen versions of the Ivanhoe and Robin Hood stories. She has been played by Martita Hunt in The Story of Robin Hood and His Merrie Men (1952), Jill Esmond in the British TV adventure series The Adventures of Robin Hood (1955–1960), Phyllis Neilson-Terry in the British TV adventure series Ivanhoe (1958), Yvonne Mitchell in the BBC TV drama series The Legend of Robin Hood (1975), Siăan Phillips in the TV series Ivanhoe (1997), and Tusse Silberg in the TV series The New Adventures of Robin Hood (1997). She was portrayed by Lynda Bellingham in the BBC series Robin Hood. Most recently, she was portrayed by Eileen Atkins in Robin Hood (2010).

    In the 1964 film, "Becket" (1964), Eleanor is briefly played by Pamela Brown to Peter O'Toole's first performance as a young Henry II.

    In the 1968 film, The Lion in Winter, Eleanor is played by Katharine Hepburn, while Henry is again portrayed by O'Toole. The film is about the difficult relationship between them and the struggle of their three sons Richard, Geoffrey, and John for their father's favour and the succession. A 2003 TV film, The Lion in Winter (2003 film), starred Glenn Close as Eleanor and Patrick Stewart as Henry.

    She was portrayed by Mary Clare in the silent film, Becket (1923), by Prudence Hyman in Richard the Lionheart (1962), and twice by Jane Lapotaire; in the BBC TV drama series, The Devil's Crown (1978), and again in Mike Walker's BBC Radio 4 series, Plantagenet (2010). In the 2010 film, Robin Hood, starring Russell Crowe, Eleanor is played by Eileen Atkins. In the 2014 film, Richard the Lionheart: Rebellion, Eleanor is played by Debbie Rochon.

    More on Queen Eleanor ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eleanor_of_Aquitaine

    Click this link to view an image collage of Mirabell Castle ... http://bit.ly/1p8kovL

    Click on this link to view images of Fontevraud Abbey ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fontevraud_Abbey

    Henry II held his wife, Eleanor of Aquitaine , prisoner at Old Sarum. In the 1190s, the plain between Old Sarum and Wilton was one of five specially designated by Richard I for the holding of English tournaments

    Old Sarum is the site of the earliest settlement of Salisbury in England. Located on a hill about 2 miles (3 km) north of modern Salisbury near the A345 road , the settlement appears in some of the earliest records in the country.

    Buried:
    The abbey was originally the site of the graves of King Henry II of England, his wife Eleanor of Aquitaine, their son King Richard I of England, their daughter Joan, their grandson Raymond VII of Toulouse, and Isabella of Angoulăeme, wife of Henry and Eleanor's son King John. However, there is no remaining corporal presence of Henry, Eleanor, Richard, or the others on the site. Their remains were possibly destroyed during the French Revolution.

    Click on this link to view images of Fontevraud Abbey ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fontevraud_Abbey

    Notes:

    Married:
    thier marriage turned sour after Henry's affair with Rosamund Clifford...

    Children:
    1. Richard Plantagenet, I, King of England was born 8 Sep 1157, Beaumont Palace, Oxford, England; died 6 Apr 1199, Limousin, France; was buried Fontevraud Abbey, France.
    2. Eleanor of England, Queen of Castile was born 13 Oct 1162, Domfront Castle, Normandy, France; died 31 Oct 1214, Burgos, Spain; was buried Burgos, Spain.
    3. 48. John I, King of England was born 24 Dec 1166, Beaumont Palace, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England; died 19 Oct 1216, Newark Castle, Nottinghamshire, England; was buried 19 Oct 1216, Worcester Cathedral, Worcester, Warwickshire, England.

  21. 120.  Walter de Beauchamp was born 1195-1197, Worcestershire, England; died 0___ 1236.

    Notes:

    Walter de Beauchamp (1195/97–1236) was an English judge, son and heir of William de Beauchamp and Amice de Beauchamp, lord of Elmley, Worcester, and hereditary castellan of Worcester and sheriff of the county.

    A minor at his father's death, he did not obtain his shrievalty till February 1216. Declaring for Louis of France on his arrival (May 1216), he was excommunicated by the legate at Whitsuntide, and his lands seized by the Marchers. But hastening to make his peace, on the accession of Henry, he was one of the witnesses to his reissue of the charter, and was restored to his shrievalty and castellanship.

    He also Attested Henry's 'Third Charter,' on 11 February 1225. In May 1226 and in January 1227 he was appointed an itinerant justice, and 14 April 1236 he died, leaving by his wife Joane Mortimer, daughter of his guardian, Roger de Mortimer, whom he had married in 1212, and who died in 1225, a son and heir, William, who married the eventual heiress of the earls of Warwick, and was grandfather of Guy de Beauchamp, 10th Earl of Warwick.

    *

    Walter married Joan Mortimer 0May 1212. Joan (daughter of Roger de Mortimer and Isabel de Ferrers) was born (Wigmore Castle, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England); died 0___ 1225. [Group Sheet]


  22. 121.  Joan Mortimer was born (Wigmore Castle, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England) (daughter of Roger de Mortimer and Isabel de Ferrers); died 0___ 1225.
    Children:
    1. 60. William de Beauchamp was born ~ 1215, Elmley Castle, Worcestershire, England; died 0___ 1268, Elmley Castle, Worcestershire, England.
    2. Sarah de Beauchamp was born 0___ 1255, Elmley Castle, Worcester, England; died Aft 1316.

  23. 122.  William de Maudit, IV, Knight, Baron of Hanslape & Hartley was born ~ 1196, Hanslape, Borough of Milton Keynes, Buckinghamshire, England; died 15 Apr 1257, Hertley Mauduit, Hampshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Chamberlain of the Exchequer
    • Also Known As: 8th Earl of Warwick

    Notes:

    About William Mauduit, IV, Baron of Hanslape and Hartley, Chamberlain of the Exchequer
    William de Maudit, Baron of Hanslape, Chamberlain to the King. They children were:

    1. William Maudit, 8th Earl of Warwick; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Maudit,_8th_Earl_of_Warwick 2. Isabel de Maudit, married William de Beauchamp, Baron Emley. Their son was William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick.
    http://www.thepeerage.com/p25498.htm#i254979 William Mauduit1 M, #254979

    Last Edited=15 Jun 2009

    William Mauduit married Alice de Newburgh, daughter of Waleran de Newburgh, 4th Earl of Warwick and Alice de Harcourt.2 William Mauduit gained the title of Baron of Hanslape [feudal barony].2
    Child of William Mauduit William Mauduit, 8th Earl of Warwick3 Child of William Mauduit and Alice de Newburgh Isabel Mauduit+1

    Citations [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume XII/1, page 610. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage. [S22] Sir Bernard Burke, C.B. LL.D., A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire, new edition (1883; reprint, Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1978), page 399. Hereinafter cited as Burkes Extinct Peerage. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume XII/2, page 367.

    http://thepeerage.com/p25498.htm#i254979 William Mauduit1 M, #254979
    Last Edited=15 Jun 2009

    William Mauduit married Alice de Newburgh, daughter of Waleran de Newburgh, 4th Earl of Warwick and Alice de Harcourt.2 William Mauduit gained the title of Baron of Hanslape [feudal barony].2
    Child of William Mauduit William Mauduit, 8th Earl of Warwick3 Child of William Mauduit and Alice de Newburgh Isabel Mauduit+1

    Citations [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume XII/1, page 610. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage. [S22] Sir Bernard Burke, C.B. LL.D., A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire, new edition (1883; reprint, Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1978), page 399. Hereinafter cited as Burkes Extinct Peerage. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume XII/2, page 367.

    Waleran de Beaumont, 4th Earl of Warwick From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    His second wife was Alice de Harcourt, widow of John de Limesy, Lord of Cavendish, daughter of Robert de Harcourt and had one child: Alice de Beaumont (died before 1263), married William de Maudit, Baron of Hanslape, Chamberlain to the King. They children were: William Maudit, 8th Earl of Warwick; Isabel de Maudit, married William de Beauchamp, Baron Emley. Their son was William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick.

    William — Alice de Newburgh. Alice (daughter of Waleran de Newburgh, Knight, 4th Earl of Warwick and Alice de Harcourt) died Bef 1263. [Group Sheet]


  24. 123.  Alice de Newburgh (daughter of Waleran de Newburgh, Knight, 4th Earl of Warwick and Alice de Harcourt); died Bef 1263.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Alice de Beaumont

    Children:
    1. 61. Isabel Mauduit was born ~ 1214, Hanslope, Buckinghamshire, England; died 7 Jan 1268, Elmley Castle, Worcestershire, England.
    2. William Mauduit, Knight, 8th Earl of Warwick was born ~ 1220; died 8 Jan 1267.

  25. 124.  Geoffrey FitzPiers, Knight, Earl of Essex was born 0___ 1162, Walden, Essex, England; died 14 Oct 1213.

    Other Events:

    • Baptism: Cherhill, Wiltshire, England
    • Occupation: Chief Justiciar
    • Occupation: High Sheriff of Bedfordshire and Buckinghamshire
    • Occupation: High Sheriff of Northamptonshire
    • Occupation: High Sheriff of Yorkshire
    • Also Known As: Geoffrey Fitz Peter
    • Also Known As: Geoffrey Fitzpiers de Mandeville Earl of Essex

    Notes:

    Geoffrey Fitz Peter, Earl of Essex (c. 1162–1213) was a prominent member of the government of England during the reigns of Richard I and John. The patronymic is sometimes rendered Fitz Piers, for he was the son of Piers de Lutegareshale, forester of Ludgershall.

    Life

    He was from a modest landowning family that had a tradition of service in mid-ranking posts under Henry II. Geoffrey's elder brother Simon Fitz Peter was at various times High Sheriff of Northamptonshire, Buckinghamshire, and Bedfordshire. Geoffrey, too, got his start in this way, as High Sheriff of Northamptonshire for the last five years of Henry II's reign.

    Around this time Geoffrey married Beatrice de Say, daughter and eventual co-heiress of William de Say II. This William was the elder son of William de Say I and Beatrice, sister of Geoffrey de Mandeville, 1st Earl of Essex. This connection with the Mandeville family was later to prove unexpectedly important. In 1184 Geoffrey's father-in-law died, and he received a share of the de Say inheritance by right of his wife, co-heiress to her father. He also eventually gained the title of earl of Essex by right of his wife, becoming the 4th earl.

    When Richard I left on crusade, he appointed Geoffrey one of the five judges of the king's court, and thus a principal advisor to Hugh de Puiset, Bishop of Durham, who, as Chief Justiciar, was one of the regents during the king's absence. Late in 1189, Geoffrey's wife's cousin William de Mandeville, 3rd Earl of Essex died, leaving no direct heirs. His wife's inheritance was disputed between Geoffrey and Beatrice's uncle, Geoffrey de Say, but Geoffrey Fitz Peter used his political influence to eventually obtain the Mandeville lands (although not the earldom, which was left open) for himself.

    He served as Constable of the Tower of London from 1198 to 1205.

    He served as High Sheriff of Yorkshire from 1198 to 1201 and again in 1203 and as High Sheriff of Bedfordshire and Buckinghamshire from 1200 to 1205.[1] On 11 July 1198, King Richard appointed Geoffrey Chief Justiciar, which at that time effectively made him the king's principal minister. On his coronation day the new king ennobled Geoffrey as Earl of Essex.

    King John granted Berkhamsted Castle to Geoffrey; the castle had previously been granted as a jointure palace to Queen Isabel prior to the annulment of the royal marriage. Geoffrey founded two hospitals in Berkhamsted, one dedicated to St John the Baptist and one to St John the Evangelist; the latter is still commemorated in the town with the name St John's Well Lane.[2]

    After the accession of King John, Geoffrey continued in his capacity as the king's principal minister until his death on 14 October 1213.[3]

    Marriage and issue

    Spouses

    m1. Beatrice de Say, daughter of William de Say and heiress of the Mandeville Earls of Essex.
    m2. Aveline, daughter of Roger de Clare, 2nd Earl of Hertford.

    Children of Beatrice

    Note that his sons by this marriage took the de Mandeville surname.

    Geoffrey FitzGeoffrey de Mandeville, 2nd Earl of Essex.
    William FitzGeoffrey de Mandeville, 3rd Earl of Essex.
    Henry, Dean of Wolverhampton.
    Maud Fitzgeoffrey, who married Henry de Bohun, 1st Earl of Hereford.

    Children of Aveline

    John Fitzgeoffrey, Lord of Shere and Justiciar of Ireland.
    Cecily Fitzgeoffrey.
    Hawise Fitzgeoffrey.
    Geoffrey's first two sons died without issue. The earldom had been associated with their mother's Mandeville heritage, and the earldom was next granted to the son of their sister Maud and her husband Henry De Bohun instead of their half-brother John.

    Notes

    Jump up ^ "Sheriffs of Buckinghamshire". Retrieved 2011-05-20.
    Jump up ^ Cobb, John Wolstenholme (1988) [originally published by Nichols & Sons, 1855 & 1883]. Two Lectures on the History and Antiquities of Berkhamsted. Biling & Sons. pp. 14, 72. ISBN 1-871372-03-8.
    Jump up ^ Powicke Handbook of British Chronology p. 70

    References

    Powicke, F. Maurice and E. B. Fryde Handbook of British Chronology 2nd. ed. London:Royal Historical Society 1961

    Geoffrey — Aveline de Clare. Aveline (daughter of Roger de Clare, Knight, 3rd Earl of Hertford and Maud de St. Hilary) was born ~1166, (Tonbridge Castle, Kent, England); died 4 Jun 1225. [Group Sheet]


  26. 125.  Aveline de Clare was born ~1166, (Tonbridge Castle, Kent, England) (daughter of Roger de Clare, Knight, 3rd Earl of Hertford and Maud de St. Hilary); died 4 Jun 1225.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Eveline de Clare

    Children:
    1. 62. John FitzGeoffrey, Justicar of Ireland was born ~ 1213, Shere, Surrey, England; died 23 Nov 1253, (Surrey) England.

  27. 126.  Hugh Bigod, Knight, 3rd Earl of NorfolkHugh Bigod, Knight, 3rd Earl of Norfolk was born ~ 1182, Thetford, Norfolk, England (son of Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk and Ida de Tosny, Countess of Norfolk); died 18 Feb 1225, (Norfolk, England); was buried Thetford Priory, Thetford, Norfolk, England.

    Notes:

    Hugh Bigod (c.?1182 - 1225) was a member of the powerful early Norman Bigod family and was for a short time the 3rd Earl of Norfolk.

    He was born c. 1182, the eldest son of Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk by his wife Ida de Tosny.

    Career

    In 1215 he was one of the twenty-five sureties of Magna Carta of King John. He succeeded to his father’s estates (including Framlingham Castle) in 1221.

    Marriage & progeny

    In late 1206 or early 1207, Hugh married Maud Marshal (1192 - 27 March 1248), daughter of William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke (1147–1219), Marshal of England, by his wife Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke. They had four, or possibly five, children:

    Roger Bigod, 4th Earl of Norfolk (c.?1209-1270), died without progeny.
    Hugh Bigod (1211–1266), Justiciar of England. Married Joan de Stuteville, by whom he had issue.
    Isabel Bigod (c. 1212- 1250), married twice: Firstly to Gilbert de Lacy, by whom she had issue; Secondly to John FitzGeoffrey, Lord of Shere, by whom she had issue, including Maud FitzJohn, and Joan FitzJohn who married Theobald le Botiller, and from whom descended the Irish Earls of Ormond.
    Ralph Bigod (born c. 1215)
    Contrary to the assertion of Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots, there is no evidence for a fourth son called Simon Bigod. A man of that name appears as a witness to one of Earl Hugh's charters (Morris, HBII 2), but as the eighteenth name in a list of twenty, suggesting no close connection to the main branch of the family. He is also named among the knights who surrendered to King John at Framlingham Castle in 1216. He was a probably a descendant of Hugh or William Bigod, half-brothers to Earl Roger II Bigod.

    Death

    Hugh died on 18 Feb 1225. Very soon after Hugh's death, his widow Maud remarried William de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey.

    Hugh Bigod in fiction[edit]
    Hugh Bigod and his wife [Mahelt] are the main characters in Elizabeth Chadwick's To Defy a King. They also appear as secondary characters in novels chronicling their parents such as The Time of Singing (UK: Sphere, 2008) published in the USA as For the King's Favor; The Greatest Knight; and The Scarlet Lion.

    Ancestry

    [show]Ancestors of Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk

    References

    M. Morris, The Bigod Earls of Norfolk in the Thirteenth Century (Woodbridge, 2005)

    External links

    Cawley, Charles, Medieval Lands on Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk, Medieval Lands database, Foundation for Medieval Genealogy
    Cawley, Charles, Medieval Lands on Isabel Bigod, Medieval Lands database, Foundation for Medieval Genealogy

    Hugh married Maud Marshal, Countess of Norfolk 1206-1207, (Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales). Maud (daughter of William Marshal, Templar Knight, 1st Earl Pembroke and Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke) was born ~ 1193, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales; died 27 Mar 1248, Tintern Abbey, Chapel Hill, Monmouthshire, Wales. [Group Sheet]


  28. 127.  Maud Marshal, Countess of Norfolk was born ~ 1193, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales (daughter of William Marshal, Templar Knight, 1st Earl Pembroke and Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke); died 27 Mar 1248, Tintern Abbey, Chapel Hill, Monmouthshire, Wales.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Countess of Surrey

    Notes:

    Maud Marshal, Countess of Norfolk, Countess of Surrey (1192 – 27 March 1248) was an Anglo-Norman noblewoman and a wealthy co-heiress of her father William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke, and her mother Isabel de Clare suo jure 4th Countess of Pembroke. Maud was their eldest daughter.[1] She had two husbands: Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk, and William de Warenne, 5th Earl of Surrey.

    Maud was also known as Matilda Marshal.

    Family

    Maud's birthdate is unknown other than being post 1191. She was the eldest daughter of William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke and Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke, herself one of the greatest heiresses in Wales and Ireland. Maud had five brothers and four younger sisters. She was a co-heiress to her parents' extensive rich estates.

    Her paternal grandparents were John FitzGilbert Marshal and Sybilla of Salisbury, and her maternal grandparents were Richard de Clare, 2nd Earl of Pembroke, known as "Strongbow", and Aoife of Leinster.

    Marriages and issue

    Sometime before Lent in 1207, Maud married her first husband, Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk. It was through this marriage between Maud and Hugh that the post of Earl Marshal of England came finally to the Howard (Dukes of Norfolk).[2] In 1215, Hugh was one of the twenty-five sureties of the Magna Carta. He came into his inheritance in 1221, thus Maud became the Countess of Norfolk at that time. Together they had five children:[3]

    Roger Bigod, 4th Earl of Norfolk (1209–1270) He died childless.
    Hugh Bigod (1212–1266), Justiciar of England. Married Joan de Stuteville, by whom he had issue.
    Isabel Bigod (c. 1215–1250), married firstly Gilbert de Lacy of Ewyas Lacy, by whom she had issue; she married secondly John Fitzgeoffrey, Lord of Shere, by whom she had issue.
    Ralph Bigod (born c. 1218, date of death unknown), married Bertha de Furnival, by whom he had one child.
    William Bigod
    Hugh Bigod died in 1225. Maud married her second husband, William de Warenne, 5th Earl of Surrey before 13 October that same year. Together they had two children:

    Isabella de Warenne (c. 1228 – before 20 September 1282), married Hugh d'Aubigny, 5th Earl of Arundel. She died childless.
    John de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey (August 1231 – c. 29 September 1304), in 1247 married Alice de Lusignan, a half-sister of King Henry III of England, by whom he had three children.
    Maud's second husband died in 1240. Her youngest son John succeeded his father as the 6th Earl of Surrey, but as he was a minor, Peter of Savoy, uncle of Queen consort Eleanor of Provence, was guardian of his estates.

    Death

    Maud died on 27 March 1248 at the age of about fifty-six years and was buried at Tintern Abbey with her mother, possibly her maternal grandmother, and two of her brothers.

    Maud Marshal in literature

    Maud Marshal is the subject of a novel by Elizabeth Chadwick, titled To Defy a King. In the book she is called Mahelt rather than Maud. She and her first husband Hugh Bigod appear as secondary characters in books chronicling their parents's lives: The Time of Singing (UK: Sphere, 2008) published in the USA as For the King's Favor; The Greatest Knight; and The Scarlet Lion.

    Ancestors[edit]
    [show]Ancestors of Maud Marshal

    References

    Jump up ^ Thomas B. Costain, The Magnificent Century, pp. 103-104
    Jump up ^ Costain, The Magnificent Century, pp. 103-104
    Jump up ^ Charles Cawley, Medieval Lands, Earls of Norfolk, Bigod
    Thomas B. Costain, The Magnificent Century, published by Doubleday and Company, Garden City, New York, 1959
    Charles Cawley, Medieval Lands, Earls of Pembroke
    thePeerage.com/p 10677.htm#106761

    Children:
    1. Ralph Bigod, Knight was born ~ 1215, Thetford, Norfolk, England; died Bef 28 Jul 1260, Thetford, Norfolk, England.
    2. Hugh Bigod, Knight was born ~ 1215, Thetford, Norfolk, England; died Bef 7 May 1266.
    3. 63. Isabelle Bigod, Countess of Essex was born ~ 1211, Thetford, Norfolk, England; died 0___ 1239.
    4. Isabel Bigod


Generation: 8

  1. 128.  Roger de Mowbray, Knight Templar was born 1120, Thirsk, Yorkshire, England (son of Nigel d'Aubigny, 3rd Baron of Thirsk and Gundred de Gournay); died 1188, Palestine.

    Notes:

    Died:
    during a Crusade...

    Roger — Alice de Gand. Alice (daughter of Walter de Gand, Lord of Folkingham and Maud "Matilda" le Bretagne) was born ~1120, Yorkshire, England; died <1176, Masham, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 129.  Alice de Gand was born ~1120, Yorkshire, England (daughter of Walter de Gand, Lord of Folkingham and Maud "Matilda" le Bretagne); died <1176, Masham, Yorkshire, England.
    Children:
    1. 64. Nigel de Mowbray was born 1146, Thirsk, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1191, Acre, Palestine.
    2. Robert de Mowbray was born 1154, Thirsk, Yorkshire, England; died 1185, Easby, Yorkshire, England.

  3. 130.  William de Braose, Knight, 3rd Lord of Bramber was born 0___ 1135, (Bramber, Sussex, England) (son of Philip de Braose, Knight, 2nd Lord Bramber and Aanor de Totnes); died > 1179.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Sheriff of Hereford
    • Also Known As: William Bruce
    • Alt Birth: 0___ 1100, Bramber, Sussex, England
    • Alt Death: 21 Oct 1190, London, England

    Notes:

    William de Braose, 3rd Lord of Bramber (fl. 1135–1179) was a 12th-century Marcher lord who secured a foundation for the dominant position later held by the Braose family in the Welsh Marches. In addition to the family's English holdings in Sussex and Devon, William had inherited Radnor and Builth, in Wales, from his father Philip. By his marriage he increased the Braose Welsh holdings to include Brecon and Abergavenny.

    William remained loyal to King Stephen during the 12th-century period of civil war. He became a trusted royal servant during the subsequent reign of Henry II, accompanying the king on campaigns in France and Ireland. He served as sheriff of Herefordshire from 1173 until 1175. The family's power reached its peak under his son William during the reigns of King Richard I and King John.

    William de Braose, 3rd Lord of Bramber
    Lord of Bramber
    Died after 1179
    Noble family House of Braose
    Spouse(s) Bertha, daughter of Miles of Gloucester and Sibyl de Neufmarchâe
    Issue
    William de Braose, 4th Lord of Bramber
    Father Philip de Braose
    Mother Aenor de Totnes, daughter of Juhel of Totnes

    Lands and family

    William was the eldest son of Philip de Braose, lord of Bramber.[1] His mother was Aenor, daughter of Juhel of Totnes.[1] He was the third in the line of the Anglo-Norman Braose family founded by his grandfather, the first William de Braose.[1] After his father died in the 1130s William inherited lordships, land and castles in Sussex, with his caput at Bramber. He also held Totnes in Devon and Radnor and Builth in the Welsh Marches.[2] He confirmed the grants of his father and grandfather to the abbey of St Florent in Anjou and made further grants to the abbey's dependent priory at Sele in Sussex.[3] In about 1155, he also inherited through his mother's family one half of the honour of Barnstaple in Devon, paying a fee of 1000 marks for the privilege.[2] William became an internationally recognised figure. When Archbishop Theobald of Canterbury was asked by Pope Adrian IV to inquire into the background of a certain Walter, canon of St Ruf, his reply, dated to 1154/9 read:

    The facts which you demand need but little enquiry; for they shine so brightly in themselves that they cannot be hid; so great is the brilliance of his noble birth and the glory of all his kin. For Walter, as we know for a fact, was the son of a distinguished knight and born of a noble mother in lawful wedlock, and he is closely related by blood to the noble William de Braose.[4]

    William had married Bertha, daughter of Miles of Gloucester and Sibyl de Neufmarchâe, by 1150.[1] When each of Bertha's four brothers (Walter de Hereford, Henry FitzMiles (or Henry de Hereford), Mahel de Hereford and William de Hereford) died leaving no issue, William's marriage became unexpectedly valuable. He gained control of the lordships of Brecon and Abergavenny after 1166 when the last brother died.[1] These additional land holdings greatly expanded the territorial power and income of the Braose family. They now held a vast block of territory in the Welsh Marches as well as their extensive interests in Sussex and Devon. William's daughters were able to make good marriages, notably Sibyl to William de Ferrers, Earl of Derby.[5] Maud was married to John de Brompton of Shropshire.[6] William's son and heir, another William de Braose, became a major player in national politics under King John.[7]

    Royal service

    Empress Maud, the only legitimate living child of Henry I, landed in England in 1139 in an attempt to press her claim to the monarchy. She was soon besieged by King Stephen's forces at Arundel castle. Stephen allowed Maud a safe conduct to Bristol and provided her with an escort, which included William de Braose,[8] suggesting that he was an adherent of King Stephen. William was present as a witness when three charters were issued by Stephen at Lewes dated to the years 1148–53,[9] therefore it appears that he remained loyal to the king until the Treaty of Wallingford ended the hostilities.

    William was in Sussex in 1153,[nb 1] but he followed Duke Henry, soon to become King Henry II, to Normandy in 1154.[nb 2] William was frequently with the new king. He was one of the military leaders who supported Henry at Rhuddlan in 1157.[12] He witnessed one of the king's charters at Romsey in 1158,[13] and he is recorded at the king's court in Wiltshire in 1164 when the Constitutions of Clarendon were enacted.[14] He accompanied the king on expedition to France, witnessing at Leons[nb 3] in 1161 and Chinon in 1162. William is also documented on the Irish campaign at Dublin in 1171 and Wexford 1172.[15] William's younger brother, Philip, also accompanied the king to Ireland, and remained with the garrison at Wexford. In 1177 Philip was granted the kingdom of Limerick by Henry but failed to take possession after the citizens set fire to the town.[16]

    When Henry was facing war with his sons in 1173, William was appointed as sheriff of Herefordshire at Easter. He maintained the King's interests in Herefordshire until 1175.[1]

    Later life and death

    King Henry withdrew his favour from the family after William's son organised the murder of Seisyll ap Dyfnwal and other Welsh princes at Abergavenny in 1176.[17] There is little subsequent record of William in public life, and it is likely that he retired to his estates in Sussex. William died after 1179 and was succeeded by his son, William de Braose, 4th Lord of Bramber,[1] who gained the favour of both King Richard I and King John and became a dominant force in the Welsh Marches during their reigns.[18]

    end of biography

    William de Braose, 3rd lord of Bramber was a Marcher lord, active during the 12th century period of anarchy and the subsequent reign of Henry II. He served as sheriff of Herefordshire from 1173 to 1175.

    William was the eldest son of Philip de Braose, lord of Bramber. His mother was Aenor, daughter of Juhel of Totnes. He was the third in the line of the Anglo-Norman Braose family. After his father died in the 1130s William held lordships, land and castles in Sussex, with his caput at Bramber, also at Totnes in Devon and Radnor and Builth in the Welsh Marches. He confirmed the grants of his father and grandfather to the abbey of St Florent in Anjou and made further grants to the abbey's dependent priory at Sele in Sussex. About 1155, he also inherited through his mother's family one half of the honour of Barnstaple in Devon, paying a fee of 1000 marks for the privilege.

    William became an internationally recognised figure. When Archbishop Theobald of Canterbury was asked by Pope Adrian IV to inquire into the background of a certain Walter, canon of St Ruf, his reply, dated to 1154/9 read:

    "The facts which you demand need but little enquiry; for they shine so brightly in themselves that they cannot be hid; so great is the brilliance of his noble birth and the glory of all his kin. For Walter, as we know for a fact, was the son of a distinguished knight and born of a noble mother in lawful wedlock, and he is closely related by blood to the noble William de Braose."

    William had married Bertha, daughter of Miles of Gloucester by 1150. When each of Bertha's four brothers died leaving no issue William's marriage became unexpectedly valuable. He gained control of the lordships of Brecon and Abergavenny after 1166 when the last brother died. These additional land holdings greatly expanded the territorial power and income of the Braose family. They now held a vast block of territory in the Middle March as well as their extensive interests in Sussex and Devon. William's daughters were able to make good marriages, notably Sibyl to William de Ferrers, Earl of Derby. William's son and heir, became a major player in national politics under King John.

    Empress Maud landed in England in 1139 in an attempt to press her claim to the monarchy. She was soon besieged by King Stephen's forces at Arundel castle. Stephen allowed Maud a safe conduct to Bristol, and provided her with an escort which included William de Braose. Thus, at the start of this conflict, William was an adherent of King Stephen. He witnessed three charters with Stephen at Lewes dated by Davis as 1148/53 so it appears that he remained loyal to the king until the Treaty of Wallingford which ended the hostilities.

    William was in Sussex in 1153, but he followed Duke Henry, soon to become King Henry II, across to Normandy in 1154. William was frequently with the new king. He was one of the great men in the army at Rhuddlan in 1157. He witnessed one of the king's charters at Romsey in 1158 and he is recorded at the king's court in Wiltshire in 1164 when the Constitutions of Clarendon were enacted. He accompanied the king on expedition to France, witnessing at Leons, in 1161 and Chinon in 1162. William is also documented on the Irish campaign at Dublin in 1171 and Wexford 1172.

    When Henry was facing war with his sons in 1173, William was appointed as sheriff of Hereford at Easter. He maintained the King's interests in Herefordshire until 1175. King Henry withdrew his favour from the family after William's son organised the murder of Seisyll ap Dyfnwal and other Welsh princes at Abergavenny in 1175. There is little record of William in public life after this and it is likely that he retired to his estates in Sussex. It is at this time that the extensions were made to St. Mary's, Shoreham. (Pictured at top)

    (The above is an adaptation of the article I wrote for Wikipedia. Sources for the information given can be found there.)

    Father: Philip de Braose

    Mother: Aanor

    Married to Bertha, daughter of Miles of Gloucester, Earl of Hereford

    Child 1: William de Braose, 4th Lord of Bramber

    Child 2: Maud = John de Brompton

    Child 3: Sibilla = (1)William de Ferrers =(2)Adam de Port

    Child 4: John

    Child 5: Roger

    Roger is a witness to a charter of his brother William. (Dugdales "Monasticon" iv, p616)

    (Some sources give a daughter Bertha who married a Beauchamp. I believe this Bertha is a daughter of William de Braose, 4th Lord of Bramber. See her page for references.)

    end of biography

    William (de Braose) BRUCEPrint Family Tree William de /Braose/ , William de /Braose/


    Born in 1100 - Bramber, Sussex, England
    Deceased 21 October 1190 - London, England , age at death: 90 years old

    Parents

    Philip (de Braose) BRUCE, born in 1073 - Bramber, Sussex, England, Deceased in 1134 - Bramber, Sussex, England age at death: 61 years old
    Married in 1104, Barnstaple, Devon, England, to
    Aenor De TOTNES, born in 1084 - Barnstaple, Devon, England, Deceased in 1102 - Bramber, Sussex, England age at death: 18 years old

    Spouses, children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren

    Married in 1148, Herefordshire, England, to Bertha De PITRES, born in 1107 - Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England, Deceased - Bramber, Sussex, England (Parents : M Miles (Fitzwalter) De (1st Earl of Hereford) PITRES 1092-1143 & F Sybil (de Neufmarche) NEWMARCH 1092-1142) with
    F Bertha (de Braose) BRUCE ca 1145- married before 1180, Wales, to Gilbert De (Baron) MONMOUTH 1140-1190 with
    M John De (SIR - Lord of Monmouth) MONMOUTH ca 1180- married in 1202, Monmouth, Monmouthshire, Wales, to Cecily Waleran FitzWalter 1182-1222 with :
    F Joan Margaret De MONMOUTH ca 1201-1247
    M William De Monmouth

    John De (SIR - Lord of Monmouth) MONMOUTH ca 1180- married in April 1223, Monmouthshire, Wales, to Agnes de ** MUSCEGROS ca 1190- with :
    M Richard (de Wyesham) De MONMOUTH 1223/-
    M Walter De MONMOUTH 1223/-
    M John De (5th Lord of Monmouth) MONMOUTH 1225-1274

    Bertha (de Braose) BRUCE ca 1145- married before 1182, Bramber, Sussex, England, to Walter De BEAUCHAMP ca 1160-1235 with
    M James De BEAUCHAMP 1182-1233
    M Watchline De BEAUCHAMP 1184-1236 married to Joane De MORTIMER 1194-1268 with :
    M William De BEAUCHAMP 1210-1267
    F Matilda Maud (de Braose) ca 1146- married in 1168, England, to John De BRAMPTON ca 1136-1179 with
    M Brian De BRAMPTON 1168-1197 married in 1195, England, to Alice De Neufmenell 1172- with :
    M Brian De Brampton 1194-1262
    F Margaret (de Braose) (Lady Meath) BRUCE ca 1149- married 19 November 1200, Ewyas Harold, Herefordshire, England, to Walter De (Sir - Lord Meath) LACY ca 1150-1241 with
    F Petronilla De LACY 1195-1288 married to Ralph VI De (Lord Flamstead) TOENI 1190-1239 with :
    F Constance De TOENI ca 1220-1263
    M Roger Michaelmas De (Lord of Flamstead) TOENI 1235-1264
    F Gille Egidia De LACY 1202-1239 married 21 April 1225 to Richard Mor "The Great", De (1st Earl of Ulster) BURGH 1202-1242 with :
    M Walter De ( 1st Earl of Ulster, 2nd Lord of Cornaught) BURGH 1232-1271
    M Gilbert (Of Meath) De LACY 1206-1230 married in 1225, Norfolk, England, to Isabel BIGOD 1212-1250 with :
    F Margery De LACY ca 1232-1256
    F Sybil (de Braose) BRUCE /1151-1227 married to Philip (le Boteler) BUTLER 1157-1174 with
    F Clemence (le Boteler) BUTLER 1175-1231 married in 1188, England, to John (Lackland) (KING OF ENGLAND) PLANTAGENET 1166-1216 with :
    F Joan (Princess of WALES) PLANTAGENET 1190-1236

    Clemence (le Boteler) BUTLER 1175-1231 married in 1205 to Nicholas De (SIR - Baron of Alton, Lord of Farnham) VERDUN 1175- with :
    F Rohese De VERDUN 1204-1246
    M William (de Braose) BRUCE 1153-1211 married in 1174, Bramber, Sussex, England, to Maud (Matilda) De St VALERY 1155-1210 with
    F Matilda Maud (de Braose) 1160-1209 married in 1189 to Gruffydd Ap (Prince of South Wales) RHYS 1148-1201 with :
    M Owain Ap GRUFFYDD ca 1176-1235
    F Lleucu Verch GRUFFYDD 1202-1250
    M William (The Younger) de Braose) BRUCE 1175-1210 married in 1196, Kent, England, to Matilda De CLARE 1175-1213 with :
    F Matilda (de Braose) BRUCE ca 1195-1274
    M John (de Braose) (Lord of Bramber) BRUCE 1197-1232
    F Laurette (de Braose) BRUCE ca 1176-1266 married to Robert "Fitz-Parnell" HARCOURT ca 1156- with :
    M X Harcourt ca 1190-
    M Reginald (de Braose) BRUCE 1182-1227 married 19 March 1202, Bramber, Sussex, England, to Grecian Alice De BRIWERE 1186-1226 with
    F Matilda (de Braose) BRUCE ca 1200-1249 married in 1219, Carmarthenshire, Wales, to Rhys (Mechyll) Ap (Gryg ) RHYS 1174-1244 with :
    M Ieuan Ap RHYS ca 1220-
    F Gwenllian Verch RHYS ca 1225-1268
    M William "Black William" (de Braose) BRUCE 1204-1230 married 2 May 1230, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales, to Eve (Baroness of Abergavenny) MARSHALL 1194-1246 with :
    M William (de Braose) BRUCE 1210-1292
    F Isabella (de Braose) BRUCE 1220/-
    F Eva (de Braose) BRUCE 1220-1255
    F Maud (de Braose) (BARONESS WIGMORE) BRUCE 1226-1300

    Siblings
    F Maud (de Braose) BRUCE 1109-1200 Married about 1130, Wales, to William De BEAUCHAMP 1105-1170

    Paternal grand-parents, uncles and aunts
    M William de (Braose) BRUCE 1049-1093 married (1072)
    F Agnes De SAINT CLARE 1034-1080
    M Philip (de Braose) BRUCE 1073-1134
    married (1104)
    2 children

    Maternal grand-parents, uncles and aunts
    M Juhel De TOTNES 1049-1123 married (1083)
    F ** De PICQUIGNY 1060-1145
    F Aenor De TOTNES 1084-1102
    married (1104)
    2 children


    Timeline
    1100 : Birth - Bramber, Sussex, England
    1112 : Birth - Bramber, Sussex, England

    Sources: Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Millennium File - Heritage Consulting - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2003.Original data - Heritage Consulting. The Millennium File. Salt Lake City, UT, USA: Heritage Consulting.Original data: Heritage Consulting. The Millennium File. Salt Lake City, UT, USA: - 1,7249::0
    Note http://search.Ancestry.com.au/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=millind&h=1077681&ti=5544&indiv=try&gss=pt - Birth date: 1126 Birth place: Briouze, Normandy, France Death date: 1192-3 Death place: - 1,7249::1077681
    1126 : Birth - Briouze, Orne, Basse-Normandie, France
    Sources: Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - Millennium File - Heritage Consulting - Ancestry.com Operations Inc - 1,7249::0 - 1,7249::1077681
    1148 : Marriage (with Bertha De PITRES) - Herefordshire, England
    before 1190 : LORD of BRAMBER
    21 October 1190 : Death - London, England
    1192 : Death - England
    Sources: Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Millennium File - Heritage Consulting - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2003.Original data - Heritage Consulting. The Millennium File. Salt Lake City, UT, USA: Heritage Consulting.Original data: Heritage Consulting. The Millennium File. Salt Lake City, UT, USA: - 1,7249::0
    Note http://search.Ancestry.com.au/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=millind&h=1077681&ti=5544&indiv=try&gss=pt - Birth date: 1126 Birth place: Briouze, Normandy, France Death date: 1192-3 Death place: - 1,7249::1077681
    1192 : Death
    Age: 66
    Sources: Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - Millennium File - Heritage Consulting - Ancestry.com Operations Inc - 1,7249::0 - 1,7249::1077681


    Notes
    Individual Note
    Source: Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Millennium File - Heritage Consulting - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2003.Original data - Heritage Consulting. The Millennium File. Salt Lake City, UT, USA: Heritage Consulting.Original data: Heritage Consulting. The Millennium File. Salt Lake City, UT, USA: - 1,7249::0
    http://search.Ancestry.com.au/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=millind&h=1077681&ti=5544&indiv=try&gss=pt Birth date: 1126 Birth place: Briouze, Normandy, France Death date: 1192-3 Death place: 1,7249::1077681
    Source: Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - Millennium File - Heritage Consulting - Ancestry.com Operations Inc - 1,7249::0 1,7249::1077681


    Sources
    Individual: Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Ancestry Family Trees - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members. - This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created. - Ancestry Family Trees - http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=18829447&pid=8845

    Family Tree Preview
    Ancestry Chart Descendancy Chart Printable Family Tree
    _____| 16_ Rognvald Wolfs (of Orkey) BRUCE /1000-1046
    _____| 8_ Robert BRUCE 1030-1094
    _____| 4_ William de (Braose) BRUCE 1049-1093
    / \ _____| 18_ Alan III De (Count of Brittany) RENNES 1000-1040
    |2_ Philip (de Braose) BRUCE 1073-1134
    | \ _____| 20_ Mauger (de St Claire) (Seigneur) NORMANDY ca 990-1017
    | \ _____| 10_ Waldron De St CLARE 1015-1047
    | \ _____| 22_ Richard De NORMANDY 1001-1028
    |--1_ William (de Braose) BRUCE 1100-1190
    | _____| 12_ Alured De TOTNES 1015-1080
    | /
    | _____| 6_ Juhel De TOTNES 1049-1123
    | / \
    |3_ Aenor De TOTNES 1084-1102
    \
    \ _____| 14_ Arnoul De PICQUIGNY 1020-1055
    \ /
    \

    end of profile

    Name: William DE BRAOSE
    Sex: M
    Birth: 1105 in Bramber, Sussex, England
    ALIA: William de BRAOSE Lord of Bramber
    Title: Lord of Bramber
    Death: BET 1192 AND 1193 in Bramber, Sussex, England
    Note:
    Dec 08 from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_de_Braose,_3rd_Lord_of_Bramber -

    William de Braose, Third Lord of Bramber (born 1112 in Brecon) (d. ca. 1192) was the eldest son of Philip de Braose, Second Lord of Bramber.

    Family and early career
    William was born into a second generation English Norman dynasty holding Lordships and land in Sussex at Bramber, also at Totnes in Devon and Radnor and Builth in the Welsh Marches of Wales. He maintained his Sussex lands and titles and extended St Mary's, Shoreham and contributed to a priory at Sele, West Sussex. His mother was Aenor Fitz Judhel of Totnes.

    He also inherited one half of the honour of Barnstaple in Devon, paying a fee of 1000 marks for the privilege.

    William married Bertha de Pitres, also known as Bertha de Hereford, daughter of Miles of Gloucester, Earl of Hereford. Through this marriage, William acquired lordships of Brecon and Abergavenny in 1166 because Bertha's four brothers all died young without heirs.

    These vast land holdings greatly expanded the territorial power and income of the de Braose dynasty. They now held the Middle March with extensive interests in Sussex and Devon.

    William's younger brother Phillip accompanied King Henry II to Ireland, receiving in 1172 the honour of Limerick.

    Marcher titles
    In 1174, William became sheriff of Hereford. He died in about 1192 and was succeeded as Lord of Bramber by his son, William. He had also fathered two daughters, Maud and Sibilla, who married well and possibly a later son, named John.

    Nov 09 from http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~hwbradley/aqwg825.htm#13602 -

    William de BRAOSE Lord of Bramber [Parents] 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 was born 1105 in Bramber, Sussex, England. He died 8 1192/1193 in Bramber, Sussex, England. William married Bertha of HEREFORD on 1146 in Bramber, Sussex, England.

    Bertha of HEREFORD [Parents] 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 was born 1128 in Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England. She married William de BRAOSE Lord of Bramber on 1146 in Bramber, Sussex, England.

    They had the following children:

    F i Bertha de BRAOSE was born 1147.
    M ii William de BRAOSE Baron de Braose was born 1149 and died 9 Aug 1211.
    F iii Mabel de BRAOSE was born 1151 and died 1203.
    F iv Sybil de BRAOSE was born 1153 and died after 5 Feb 1228.
    M v John de BRAOSE 1 was born 1160 in Bramber, Sussex, England.

    1Weis, Frederick Lewis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (7th ed., Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1992.), 177-5, 194-5, 222-28, Los Angeles Public Library, Gen 974 W426 1992.

    2Cokayne, George Edward, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct, or Dormant (London: St. Catherine Press, 1910.), 11:321, Los Angeles Public Library, 929.721 C682.

    3Cokayne, G., CP, 1:21-22, 14:6.

    4Sanders, Ivor John, English Baronies: A Study of Their Origin and Descent, 1086-1327 (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1960.), pp. 7, 21, 105, Los Angeles Public Library, 929.722 S215.

    5Keats-Rohan, K.S.B., Domesday Descendants: A Prosopography of Persons Occurring in English Documents 1066-1166 (Rochester, New York: The Boydell Press, 2002.), pp. 346-7, Library of Congress, DA177 .K4 2002.

    6Cokayne, G., CP, 1:21e.

    7Curfman, Robert Joseph, "The Yale Descent from Braiose & Clare through Pigott of Buckinghamshire," The American Genealogist 56:1 (Jan 1980), pp. 1-2, Los Angeles Public Library.

    8Sanders, I., English Baronies, p. 7.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Bertha of HEREFORD

    1Weis, Frederick Lewis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (7th ed., Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1992.), 177-5, 194-5, 222-28, Los Angeles Public Library, Gen 974 W426 1992.

    2Cokayne, George Edward, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct, or Dormant (London: St. Catherine Press, 1910.), 1:21-2, 11:321, Los Angeles Public Library, 929.721 C682.

    3Sanders, Ivor John, English Baronies: A Study of Their Origin and Descent, 1086-1327 (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1960.), pp. 7, 21, Los Angeles Public Library, 929.722 S215.

    4Keats-Rohan, K.S.B., Domesday Descendants: A Prosopography of Persons Occurring in English Documents 1066-1166 (Rochester, New York: The Boydell Press, 2002.), pp. 346-7, Library of Congress, DA177 .K4 2002.

    5Curfman, Robert Joseph, "The Yale Descent from Braiose & Clare through Pigott of Buckinghamshire," The American Genealogist 56:1 (Jan 1980), p. 2, Los Angeles Public Library.




    Father: Philip DE BRAOSE b: 1074 in Briouze-Saint-Gervais, Orne, Basse-Nomandie, France
    Mother: Aenor DE TOTENEIS b: 1084 in Totnes, Devon, England

    Marriage 1 BERTHA b: 1128 in Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England
    Married: 1146 in Bramber, Sussex, England
    Children
    Has Children William DE BRAOSE b: 1149 in Bramber, Sussex, England
    Has Children Mabel DE BRAOSE b: 1151 in Bramber, Sussex, England
    Has Children Sybil DE BRAOSE b: 1153 in Bramber, Sussex, England
    Has Children Bertha DE BRAOSE b: 1147 in Bramber, Sussex, England

    end of biography

    William married Bertha of Hereford 0___ 1148, Herefordshire, England. Bertha (daughter of Miles of Gloucester, Knight, 1st Earl of Hereford and Sibyl de Neufmarche, Countess of Hereford, daughter of Bernard de Neufmarche, Lord of Brecknockshire and Nest Verch Osborn le Scrope) was born 0___ 1107, Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England; died ~ 1180, Bramber, Sussex, England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 131.  Bertha of Hereford was born 0___ 1107, Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England (daughter of Miles of Gloucester, Knight, 1st Earl of Hereford and Sibyl de Neufmarche, Countess of Hereford, daughter of Bernard de Neufmarche, Lord of Brecknockshire and Nest Verch Osborn le Scrope); died ~ 1180, Bramber, Sussex, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Bertha de Pitres
    • Also Known As: Lady of Abergavenny
    • Also Known As: Lady of Bramber
    • Also Known As: Lady of Hay

    Notes:

    Bertha of Hereford, also known as Bertha de Pitres (born c.1130), was the daughter of Miles de Gloucester, 1st Earl of Hereford, and a wealthy heiress, Sibyl de Neufmarchâe. She was the wife of William de Braose, 3rd Lord of Bramber to whom she brought many castles and Lordships, including Brecknock, Abergavenny, and Hay.

    Family

    Bertha was born in England in about 1130. She was a daughter of Miles, Earl of Hereford (1097- 24 December 1143) and Sibyl de Neufmarchâe.[1] She had two sisters, Margaret of Hereford,[2] who married Humphrey II de Bohun, by whom she had issue,[3] and Lucy of Hereford, who married Herbert FitzHerbert of Winchester, by whom she had issue.[citation needed] Her brothers, included Roger Fitzmiles, 2nd Earl of Hereford, Walter de Hereford, Henry Fitzmiles, William de Hereford, and Mahel de Hereford.[4]

    Her paternal grandparents were Walter FitzRoger de Pitres,Sheriff of Gloucester and Bertha de Balun of Bateden,[5] a descendant of Hamelin de Balun,[citation needed] and her maternal grandparents were Bernard de Neufmarchâe, Lord of Brecon, and Nesta ferch Osbern.[6] The latter was a daughter of Osbern FitzRichard of Richard's Castle, and Nesta ferch Gruffydd.[7] Bertha was a direct descendant, in the maternal line, of Gruffydd ap Llywelyn (1007- 5 August 1063) and Edith (Aldgyth), daughter of Elfgar, Earl of Mercia.[citation needed]

    Her father Miles served as Constable to King Stephen of England. He later served in the same capacity to Empress Matilda after he'd transferred his allegiance. In 1141, she made him Earl of Hereford in gratitude for his loyalty. On 24 December 1143, he was killed whilst on a hunting expedition in the Forest of Dean.[8]

    Marriage and issue

    Abergavenny Castle in Monmouthshire, Wales, was one of the castles Bertha of Hereford brought to her husband William de Braose, 3rd Lord of Bramber
    In 1150, she married William de Braose, 3rd Lord of Bramber (1112–1192), son of Philip de Braose, 2nd Lord of Bramber and Aenor, daughter of Judael of Totnes. William and Bertha had three daughters and two sons, including William de Braose, 4th Lord of Bramber.

    In 1173, her brothers all having died without issue, she brought the Lordships and castles of Brecknock and Abergavenny, to her husband.[8] Hay Castle had already passed to her from her mother, Sibyl of Neufmarche in 1165, whence it became part of the de Braose holdings.

    In 1174, her husband became Sheriff of Hereford.

    Her children include

    William de Braose, 4th Lord of Bramber, (1144/1153- 11 August 1211, Corbeil),[9][10] married Maud de St. Valery, daughter of Bernard de St. Valery, by whom he had 16 children.
    Roger de Braose[11]
    Bertha de Braose[12] (born 1151), married c.1175, Walter de Beauchamp (died 1235), son of William de Beauchamp and Joan de Walerie, by whom she had issue, including Walcherine de Beauchamp who married Joan Mortimer.
    Sibyl de Braose (died after 5 February 1227),[13] married William de Ferrers, 3rd Earl of Derby (1136- 21 October 1190 at Acre on crusade), son of Robert de Ferrers, 2nd Earl of Derby and Margaret Peverel, by whom she had issue.
    Maud de Braose, married John de Brompton, by whom she had issue.[citation needed]

    Legacy

    Bertha died on an unknown date. She was the ancestress of many noble English families which included the de Braoses, de Beauchamps, de Bohuns and de Ferrers; as well as the Irish families of de Lacy and de Burgh.[14][not in citation given]

    end of biography

    Children:
    1. Sybil de Braose was born Bef 1151, Bramber, Sussex, England; died 5 Feb 1227, Derbyshire, England.
    2. 65. Mabel de Braose was born 0___ 1151, Bramber, Sussex, England; died 0___ 1203, (Axholme, Lincolnshire, England).
    3. 80. William de Braose, III, Knight, 4th Lord of Bramber was born 0___ 1153, Bramber, Sussex, England; died 9 Aug 1211, Corbeil, Marne, Champagne-Ardenne, France; was buried 0___ 1211, Seine-et-Marne, Île-de-France, France.
    4. Reginald de Braose, Knight was born 0___ 1162, (Bramber, West Sussex, England); died BY 1228; was buried Saint John's, Brecon, Wales.

  5. 132.  William d'Aubigny, Knight, 2nd Earl of Arundel was born 1138-1150 (son of William d'Aubigny, Knight, 1st Earl of Arundel and Adeliza of Louvain); died 24 Dec 1193; was buried Wymondham Abbey, Norfolk, England.

    Notes:

    William d'Aubigny, 2nd Earl of Arundel (b. [1138-1150], d. 24 December 1193), also called William de Albini III,[1] was the son of William d'Aubigny, 1st Earl of Arundel and Adeliza of Louvain, widow of Henry I of England.[2]

    He married Matilda St Hilary de Harcoučet and among their children was William d'Aubigny, 3rd Earl of Arundel. The Duke of Norfolk's Archives Assistant Librarian Sara Rodger wrote that William "did have three sons, William who succeeded him as Earl in 1196, and Alan and Geoffrey, of whom we know nothing." His daughter, Matilda d'Aubigny, married William de Warenne, 5th Earl of Surrey. In 1176/7 he was created Earl of Sussex and in 1190 he inherited the earldom of Arundel. He is buried at Wymondham Abbey, Norfolk, England.[3]

    References

    Jump up ^ Brown, R. Allen (1988). Castle Rising Castle. London, UK: English Heritage. p. 15. ISBN 185074159X.
    Jump up ^ Aubigny, William d' [William de Albini; known as William d'Aubigny Pincerna], first earl of Arundel (d. 1176), magnate by Graeme White, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography
    Jump up ^ http://thepeerage.com/p10676.htm#i106760

    end

    William — Matilda St. Hilary. Matilda was born (Normandy, France). [Group Sheet]


  6. 133.  Matilda St. Hilary was born (Normandy, France).
    Children:
    1. 66. William d'Aubigny, Knight, 3rd Earl of Arundel was born Bef 1180, Arundel, Sussex, England; died 1 Feb 1221, Rome, Italy; was buried Wymondham Abbey, Norfolk, England.
    2. Matilda d'Aubigny

  7. 134.  Hugh de Kevelioc, Knight, 5th Earl of ChesterHugh de Kevelioc, Knight, 5th Earl of Chester was born 0___ 1147, Kevelioc, Monmouth, Wales (son of Ranulf de Gernon, II, Knight, 4th Earl of Chester and Maud of Gloucester, Countess of Chester); died 30 Jun 1181, Leek, Staffordshire, England.

    Notes:

    Hugh de Kevelioc, 5th Earl of Chester (1147 – 30 June 1181) was the son of Ranulf de Gernon, 4th Earl of Chester and Maud of Gloucester, daughter of Robert, 1st Earl of Gloucester (otherwise known as Robert de Caen, the illegitimate son of Henry I of England, making her Henry's granddaughter).

    Early life

    He is thought to have been born in Kevelioc in Monmouth. But he may have taken the name of the cwmwd of Cyfeiliog (in modern Powys) in the southern part of the Kingdom of Powys, Wales.

    He was underage when his father's death in 1153 made him heir to his family's estates on both sides of the Channel. He joined the baronial Revolt of 1173–1174 against King Henry II of England, and was influential in convincing the Bretons to revolt. After being captured and imprisoned after the Battle of Alnwick, he finally got his estates restored in 1177, and served in King Henry's Irish campaigns.

    Marriage

    In 1169 he married Bertrade de Montfort of Evreux, daughter of Simon III de Montfort, who in turn was the son of Amaury III of Montfort. She was the cousin of King Henry, who gave her away in marriage. Their children were:[1][2]

    Ranulf de Blondeville, 6th Earl of Chester
    Matilda de Blondeville, aka Matilda (Maud) of Chester (1171–1233), married David of Scotland, 8th Earl of Huntingdon
    Mabel of Chester, married William d'Aubigny, 3rd Earl of Arundel
    Agnes of Chester (died 2 November 1247), married William de Ferrers, 4th Earl of Derby; ancestors of Joseph Priestley
    Hawise of Chester (1180–1242), married Robert II de Quincy
    Beatrix of Chester, married Lord William Belward of Malpas
    Hugh also had another daughter, Amice of Chester, who married Ralph de Mainwaring and was the ancestress of that family. There is no record of Amice's mother or whether she was Hugh's wife or mistress. The question of Amice's legitimacy has been subject to a longstanding dispute.[3]

    One letter from the Pope suggests that Llywelyn Fawr may have been married to an unnamed sister of Earl Ranulph of Chester in about 1192, but there appears to be no confirmation of this.[4] If this was the case it could have been either Mabel or Hawise, or perhaps Amice, and the marriage would have had to have been annulled before any subsequent marriages.

    Death and succession

    Hugh of Kevelioc died 30 June 1181 at Leek, Staffordshire, England. He was succeeded by his son, Ranulf.

    Hugh married Bertrade de Montfort, Comtess d'Evreux 0___ 1169. Bertrade (daughter of Simon de Montfort, III, Comte d'Evreux and Mathilde LNU, Comtesse d'Evreux) was born 0___ 1155, Chester, Cheshire, England; died 31 Mar 1227, Evreux, Normandy, France. [Group Sheet]


  8. 135.  Bertrade de Montfort, Comtess d'Evreux was born 0___ 1155, Chester, Cheshire, England (daughter of Simon de Montfort, III, Comte d'Evreux and Mathilde LNU, Comtesse d'Evreux); died 31 Mar 1227, Evreux, Normandy, France.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Bertrade de Montfort of Evreux
    • Also Known As: Countess of Chester
    • Also Known As: Lady of Campden

    Notes:

    Bertrade d'Everaux de Montfort, Comtess d'Evreux
    Also Known As: "Bertrade /De Evreux/", "Bertrade de âEvreux", "Bertrade II Montfort"
    Birthdate: 1155
    Birthplace: Chester, Cheshire, England
    Death: Died March 31, 1227 in âEvreux, Eure, Haute-Normandie, France
    Cause of death: after 31 March 1227
    Immediate Family:
    Daughter of Simon III "le Chauve" de Montfort, comte d'Evreux and Mathilde, comtesse d'Evreux
    Wife of Hugh de Kevelioc, 3rd Earl of Chester
    Mother of Beatrix Kevelioc Malpas; Matilda of Chester; Mabel of Chester; Ranulf de Blundeville, 4th Earl of Chester; Agnes de Meschines, Lady of Chartley and 4 others
    Sister of Amaury V de Montfort, comte d'Evreux; Simon IV de Montfort, Seigneur de Montfort et de Rochefort and Robert I de MONTFORT
    Occupation: Countess of Chester, Lady of Campden, Countess
    Managed by: James Fred Patin, Jr.
    Last Updated: September 7, 2016

    About Bertrade d'Everaux de Montfort, Comtess d'Evreux
    Bertrade was born in 1155 in Chester, England. Bertrade's father was Simon II Le Chauve De Montfort and her mother was Maud Countess Of Evreux . Her paternal grandparents were Amaury De Montfort and Agnes De Garlende. She had two brothers named Amauri and Simon. She was the youngest of the three children.

    --------------------

    She was married to Earl Hugh de Keveliock V (son of Ranulf de Guernan and Maud de Caen) in 1169. Earl Hugh de Keveliock V was born in 1147 in Kevelioc, Monmouth, England. He died on 30 Jun 1181 in Leeke, Stafford, England. Hugh II, 5th Earl of Chester, surnamed Keveliock or Cyveliok, because he was born 1147 at Kevelioc, Co. Merioneth, Wales. He succeeded his father in the Earldom of Chester. This nobleman joined in the rebellion with Robert, Earl of Leicester, and the King of Scots against King Henry II, and in support of that monarch's son, Prince Henry's pretentions to the crown. In which proceeding he was taken prisoner with the Earl of Leicester at Almwick, but obtained his freedom soon afterwards, upon the reconciliation of the king with the young prince. During troublesome times following his lands were taken from him, but they were restored when public tranquility was restored. He died at Leeks, Co. Stafford, in 1181, aged about 34. His lordship married Bertred, daughter of Simon de Montfort, Earl of Evereaux in Normandy. They were married 1169 when Bertred was just 14 years old. She died in 1227, aged about 71. They had a son, Randle III, who succeeded his father as Earl of Chester, but he died sine prole 1232. He had the Earldom of Lincoln from his great-grandmother Lucia, and he resigned this Earldom to his sister Hawise about 1230-1. She was the widow of Robert de Quincey, and their daughter Margaret married John de Lacy, to whom the Earldom of Lincoln was confirmed Nov. 22, 1232. He was Surety for Magna Charta and his daughter Maud married Richard de Clare, son of Gilbert son of Richard de Clare, last two Sureties, and from whom you descend through Robert Abell and John Whitney. Beside Randle III and Hawise, Hugh and Bertred had Mabil, married Hugh de Albini, died sine prole.He was the Earl of Chester. Also known as Hugh le Meschin; Earl of Chester, Vicomte d'Avranches in Normandy. He joined in the rebellion against King Henry II, was taken prisoner at Alnwick on July 13, 1174, and deprived of his Earldom. Though he was again in rebellion both in England and Normandy, his Earldom was restored January 1177 (Complete Peerage, Vol III:167).

    --------------------

    Post in soc.genealogy.medieval 13 September 2011 by Douglas Richardson on Bertrade de Montfort http://groups.google.com/group/soc.genealogy.medieval/browse_thread/thread/a0a635017b1391c2?hl=en

    Complete Peerage, 3 (1913): 167 (sub Chester) has a rather brief account of the life of Hugh, 6th Earl of Chester (died 1181). Regarding the history of his widow, Bertrade of Montfort, the following scant detail is given:

    "His widow died 1227, aged about 71." END OF QUOTE.

    The source given by Complete Peerage for Bertrade de Montfort's death date is Annales Cestrienses, edited 1887, by R.C. Christie. As we can see, no month or day are given for the countess' death. While I'm virtually certain that Google Books previously had a full view copy of this source available online, when I checked just now, I only found copies of this work that had "no preview." As such, I'm unable to see exactly what Annales Cestrienses says about the death of Countess Bertrade.

    [John Higgins adds, in a response: Look beyond Google Books, to the Internet Archive, where a full-view copy of Annales Cestrienses is available. The entry for the death of Countess Bertrada [sic] is on p. 55 (not 54 as indicated in the book's index). But all it says is that she died in 1227, giving no more specific date. So, it supports the information in CP but goes no further.]

    Checking various other sources, however, I've managed to piece together a few details of Countess Bertrade's life as widow not provided by Complete Peerage:

    Sometime in the period, 1188–99, she witnessed a charter of her son, Ranulph, Earl of Chester. In the period, 1190–1200, she reached agreement with the abbot and convent of Troarn in Normandy regarding the construction of a mill and fishpond on the boundary between her wood and theirs. Sometime before 1194–1203, she exchanged lands with the canons of Repton. Sometime in the period, 1200–10, she granted to Ralph Carbonel, of Halton, Lincolnshire, for his homage and service of half a knight’s fee which he held of the said countess in Halton. In 1223 Richard Duket and Simon de Sees brought a plea of novel disseisin against her touching a tenement in Harmston, Lincolnshire. In 1226 she presented to the church of Waddington, Lincolnshire. In 1227 she arraigned an assize of last presentation to the church of Waddington, Lincolnshire against the abbot of St. Sever.

    The last item comes from Farrer, Honors & Knights’ Fees, 2 (1924): 103, which may be seen in snippet view at the following weblink: http://books.google.com/books?ei=MPVvTt2dFKniiAKA4tH0Bg&ct=result&id=...

    The original source for this record is Calendar of the Patent Rolls, 1225–1232 (1903): 156, which may be viewed at the following weblink: http://sdrc.lib.uiowa.edu/patentrolls/h3v2/body/Henry3vol2page0156.pdf

    The item in question is dated 31 March 1227. Since the record indicates that Countess Bertrade was then alive, it may be assumed she died in 1227, sometime after 31 March.

    Best always, Douglas Richardson, Salt Lake City, Utah

    ---------------------

    Bertrade was our ancestor through two distinct descent lines--through her daughter Alice and through her daughter Mabel, each of whom was independently our ancestor.

    See "My Lines"

    ( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/p389.htm#i6747 )

    from Compiler: R. B. Stewart, Evans, GA

    ( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/index.htm )

    Bertrade de Montfort was cousin of King Henry II by her grandfather's sister, Bertrade de Montfort, wife of Fulk IV, being great-grandmother of King Henry [George Edward Cokayne The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain, and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct, or Dormant, I-XIII (in 6) (Thrupp, Stroud, Gloucestershire, GL5 2BU: Sutton Publishing Limited, 2000), III:167 - 14 when married in 1169 and in III:167, footnote (c)].
    Bertrade married Hugh De /Keveliock/, son of Ranulph Des /Gernons/ and Maud /Fitzrobert/, in 1164 in Montfort, Normandy, France. (Hugh De /Keveliock/ was born in 1122 in Kevelioc, Merionethshire, Wales, died on 30 Jun 1181 in Leeke, Stafford, England and was buried in 1181 in Chester, Cheshire, England.)
    Children: 1. Amicia Amice De Meschines b: 1177 in Monmouthshire, Wales 2. Beatrice De Kevieliock b: 1166 in Malpas, England 3. Mabel of Chester De Meschines b: ABT 1170 in Cheshire, England 4. Hawise of Chester De Kevelioc b: 1180 in Chester, Cheshire, England 5. Maud Matilda Kevelioc b: 1163 in Cheshire, England 6. Alice Of Chester b: 1180 in Chester, Cheshire, England 7. Agnes de Kevelioc De Meschines b: 1174 in Tutbury, Staffordshire, England
    Bertrade II Meschines formerly Montfort aka Evreux, Countess of Chester
    Born 1155 in Montfort Sur Risle, Eure, Normandy, Francemap Daughter of Simon III Montfort and Maud De Evreux Sister of Simon IV Montfort and Amauri de Montfort Wife of Hugh K. Meschines — married 1169 [location unknown] Mother of UNKNOWN Blundeville, UNKNOWN Chester, Unknown Chester, Maud Matilda Huntingdon, Amicia Mainwaring, Beatrix de Kevelioc de Malpas, Mabel FitzAlan, Ranulph Blondeville, Helga of Kevelioc De Meschin, Adeliz De Kevelioc, Agnes of Chester (Lady of Chartley) de Keveliock, Agnes Ferrers, Alice of Chester Meschines, Hawise Quincy, Lady de Meschines and Nichola de Meschines Died July 12, 1189 in âEvreux, Eure, Haute-Normandie, Francemap

    Marriage
    Husband: Hugh De Kevelioc Wife: Bertrade De Montfort Child: Amice Of Chester
    Relationship to Father: Natural Relationship to Mother: Natural
    Child: Agnes Of Chester
    Relationship to Father: Natural Relationship to Mother: Natural
    Child: Mabel Of Chester
    Relationship to Father: Natural Relationship to Mother: Natural
    Child: Ranulph De Blondeville
    Relationship to Father: Natural Relationship to Mother: Natural
    Child: Maud Of Chester
    Relationship to Father: Natural Relationship to Mother: Natural
    Child: Hawise Of Chester
    Relationship to Father: Natural Relationship to Mother: Natural
    Child: Unknown Of Chester
    Relationship to Father: Natural Relationship to Mother: Natural
    Marriage:
    Date: 1169 Note: #N00150
    Marriage:
    Date: 1169 Place: , Montfort, Normandy, France
    married Bertrade de Montfort of Evreux, daughter of Simon III de Montfort. She was the cousin of King Henry, who gave her away in marriage. Their children were:[1][2]
    Ranulf de Blondeville, 6th Earl of Chester Matilda de Blondeville, aka Matilda (Maud) of Chester (1171ăa€“1233), married David of Scotland, 8th Earl of Huntingdon Mabel of Chester, married William d'Aubigny, 3rd Earl of Arundel Agnes of Chester (died 2 November 1247), married William de Ferrers, 4th Earl of Derby Hawise of Chester (1180ăa€“1242), married Robert II de Quincy Beatrix of Chester, married Lord William Belward of Malpas

    Bertrade was born in 1155 in Chester, England. Bertrade's father was Simon II Le Chauve De Montfort and her mother was Maud Countess Of Evreux . Her paternal grandparents were Amaury De Montfort and Agnes De Garlende. She had two brothers named Amauri and Simon. She was the youngest of the three children.

    She was married to Earl Hugh de Keveliock V (son of Ranulf de Guernan and Maud de Caen) in 1169. Earl Hugh de Keveliock V was born in 1147 in Kevelioc, Monmouth, England. He died on 30 Jun 1181 in Leeke, Stafford, England. Hugh II, 5th Earl of Chester, surnamed Keveliock or Cyveliok, because he was born 1147 at Kevelioc, Co. Merioneth, Wales. He succeeded his father in the Earldom of Chester. This nobleman joined in the rebellion with Robert, Earl of Leicester, and the King of Scots against King Henry II, and in support of that monarch's son, Prince Henry's pretentions to the crown. In which proceeding he was taken prisoner with the Earl of Leicester at Almwick, but obtained his freedom soon afterwards, upon the reconciliation of the king with the young prince. During troublesome times following his lands were taken from him, but they were restored when public tranquility was restored. He died at Leeks, Co. Stafford, in 1181, aged about 34. His lordship married Bertred, daughter of Simon de Montfort, Earl of Evereaux in Normandy. They were married 1169 when Bertred was just 14 years old. She died in 1227, aged about 71. They had a son, Randle III, who succeeded his father as Earl of Chester, but he died sine prole 1232. He had the Earldom of Lincoln from his great-grandmother Lucia, and he resigned this Earldom to his sister Hawise about 1230-1. She was the widow of Robert de Quincey, and their daughter Margaret married John de Lacy, to whom the Earldom of Lincoln was confirmed Nov. 22, 1232. He was Surety for Magna Charta and his daughter Maud married Richard de Clare, son of Gilbert son of Richard de Clare, last two Sureties, and from whom you descend through Robert Abell and John Whitney. Beside Randle III and Hawise, Hugh and Bertred had Mabil, married Hugh de Albini, died sine prole.He was the Earl of Chester. Also known as Hugh le Meschin; Earl of Chester, Vicomte d'Avranches in Normandy. He joined in the rebellion against King Henry II, was taken prisoner at Alnwick on July 13, 1174, and deprived of his Earldom. Though he was again in rebellion both in England and Normandy, his Earldom was restored January 1177 (Complete Peerage, Vol III:167).

    Post in soc.genealogy.medieval 13 September 2011 by Douglas Richardson on Bertrade de Montfort http://groups.google.com/group/soc.genealogy.medieval/browse_thread/thread/a0a635017b1391c2?hl=en

    Complete Peerage, 3 (1913): 167 (sub Chester) has a rather brief account of the life of Hugh, 6th Earl of Chester (died 1181). Regarding the history of his widow, Bertrade of Montfort, the following scant detail is given:

    "His widow died 1227, aged about 71." END OF QUOTE.

    The source given by Complete Peerage for Bertrade de Montfort's death date is Annales Cestrienses, edited 1887, by R.C. Christie. As we can see, no month or day are given for the countess' death. While I'm virtually certain that Google Books previously had a full view copy of this source available online, when I checked just now, I only found copies of this work that had "no preview." As such, I'm unable to see exactly what Annales Cestrienses says about the death of Countess Bertrade.

    [John Higgins adds, in a response: Look beyond Google Books, to the Internet Archive, where a full-view copy of Annales Cestrienses is available. The entry for the death of Countess Bertrada [sic] is on p. 55 (not 54 as indicated in the book's index). But all it says is that she died in 1227, giving no more specific date. So, it supports the information in CP but goes no further.]

    Checking various other sources, however, I've managed to piece together a few details of Countess Bertrade's life as widow not provided by Complete Peerage:

    Sometime in the period, 1188–99, she witnessed a charter of her son, Ranulph, Earl of Chester. In the period, 1190–1200, she reached agreement with the abbot and convent of Troarn in Normandy regarding the construction of a mill and fishpond on the boundary between her wood and theirs. Sometime before 1194–1203, she exchanged lands with the canons of Repton. Sometime in the period, 1200–10, she granted to Ralph Carbonel, of Halton, Lincolnshire, for his homage and service of half a knight’s fee which he held of the said countess in Halton. In 1223 Richard Duket and Simon de Sees brought a plea of novel disseisin against her touching a tenement in Harmston, Lincolnshire. In 1226 she presented to the church of Waddington, Lincolnshire. In 1227 she arraigned an assize of last presentation to the church of Waddington, Lincolnshire against the abbot of St. Sever.

    The last item comes from Farrer, Honors & Knights’ Fees, 2 (1924): 103, which may be seen in snippet view at the following weblink: http://books.google.com/books?ei=MPVvTt2dFKniiAKA4tH0Bg&ct=result&id=...

    The original source for this record is Calendar of the Patent Rolls, 1225–1232 (1903): 156, which may be viewed at the following weblink: http://sdrc.lib.uiowa.edu/patentrolls/h3v2/body/Henry3vol2page0156.pdf

    The item in question is dated 31 March 1227. Since the record indicates that Countess Bertrade was then alive, it may be assumed she died in 1227, sometime after 31 March.

    Best always, Douglas Richardson, Salt Lake City, Utah

    Bertrade was our ancestor through two distinct descent lines--through her daughter Alice and through her daughter Mabel, each of whom was independently our ancestor.

    See "My Lines"

    ( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/p389.htm#i6747 )

    from Compiler: R. B. Stewart, Evans, GA

    ( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/index.htm ) -------------------- Bertrade de Montfort was cousin of King Henry II by her grandfather's sister, Bertrade de Montfort, wife of Fulk IV, being great-grandmother of King Henry [George Edward Cokayne The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain, and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct, or Dormant, I-XIII (in 6) (Thrupp, Stroud, Gloucestershire, GL5 2BU: Sutton Publishing Limited, 2000), III:167 - 14 when married in 1169 and in III:167, footnote (c)]. -------------------- Bertrade married Hugh De /Keveliock/, son of Ranulph Des /Gernons/ and Maud /Fitzrobert/, in 1164 in Montfort, Normandy, France. (Hugh De /Keveliock/ was born in 1122 in Kevelioc, Merionethshire, Wales, died on 30 Jun 1181 in Leeke, Stafford, England and was buried in 1181 in Chester, Cheshire, England.) -------------------- Children: 1. Amicia Amice De Meschines b: 1177 in Monmouthshire, Wales 2. Beatrice De Kevieliock b: 1166 in Malpas, England 3. Mabel of Chester De Meschines b: ABT 1170 in Cheshire, England 4. Hawise of Chester De Kevelioc b: 1180 in Chester, Cheshire, England 5. Maud Matilda Kevelioc b: 1163 in Cheshire, England 6. Alice Of Chester b: 1180 in Chester, Cheshire, England 7. Agnes de Kevelioc De Meschines b: 1174 in Tutbury, Staffordshire, England --------------------

    Bertrade II Meschines formerly Montfort aka Evreux, Countess of Chester Born 1155 in Montfort Sur Risle, Eure, Normandy, Francemap Daughter of Simon III Montfort and Maud De Evreux Sister of Simon IV Montfort and Amauri de Montfort Wife of Hugh K. Meschines — married 1169 [location unknown] Mother of UNKNOWN Blundeville, UNKNOWN Chester, Unknown Chester, Maud Matilda Huntingdon, Amicia Mainwaring, Beatrix de Kevelioc de Malpas, Mabel FitzAlan, Ranulph Blondeville, Helga of Kevelioc De Meschin, Adeliz De Kevelioc, Agnes of Chester (Lady of Chartley) de Keveliock, Agnes Ferrers, Alice of Chester Meschines, Hawise Quincy, Lady de Meschines and Nichola de Meschines Died July 12, 1189 in âEvreux, Eure, Haute-Normandie, Francemap

    Marriage Husband: Hugh De Kevelioc Wife: Bertrade De Montfort Child: Amice Of Chester Relationship to Father: Natural Relationship to Mother: Natural Child: Agnes Of Chester Relationship to Father: Natural Relationship to Mother: Natural Child: Mabel Of Chester Relationship to Father: Natural Relationship to Mother: Natural Child: Ranulph De Blondeville Relationship to Father: Natural Relationship to Mother: Natural Child: Maud Of Chester Relationship to Father: Natural Relationship to Mother: Natural Child: Hawise Of Chester Relationship to Father: Natural Relationship to Mother: Natural Child: Unknown Of Chester Relationship to Father: Natural Relationship to Mother: Natural Marriage: Date: 1169 Note: #N00150 Marriage: Date: 1169 Place: , Montfort, Normandy, France

    married Bertrade de Montfort of Evreux, daughter of Simon III de Montfort. She was the cousin of King Henry, who gave her away in marriage. Their children were:[1][2] Ranulf de Blondeville, 6th Earl of Chester Matilda de Blondeville, aka Matilda (Maud) of Chester (1171ăa€“1233), married David of Scotland, 8th Earl of Huntingdon Mabel of Chester, married William d'Aubigny, 3rd Earl of Arundel Agnes of Chester (died 2 November 1247), married William de Ferrers, 4th Earl of Derby Hawise of Chester (1180ăa€“1242), married Robert II de Quincy Beatrix of Chester, married Lord William Belward of Malpas

    *

    Bertrade de Montfort started out as a bargaining chip between Robert Curthose, Fulk IV, Count of Anjou, and William, Count of âEvreux. Fulk sought the beautiful Bertrade as his wife; he bargained with Duke Robert for control of Maine; in turn Robert bargained with William of âEvreux, her guardian, for lands he desired in exchange her hand in marriage.

    She married Fulk IV, became the mother of Fulk V; leaving him for King Philip I of France.

    She then convinced both to become friends.

    Later the cunning woman plotted to have one of her own sons by Philip become king instead of his oldest son, Louis IV, who she attempted to poison.

    Orderic Vitalis said of her ‘no good man praised [her] except for her beauty.’

    See: Ordericus Vitalis, Ecclesiastical History, Forester, II (1875), 475-77; Jim Bradbury, The Capetians (2007), 118; Hollister, Henry I (2003), pp. 131, 226.

    *

    Children:
    1. Matilda of Chester, Countess of Huntingdon was born 0___ 1171; died 6 Jan 1233, (Scotland).
    2. Agnes of Chester was born 0___ 1174; died 2 Nov 1247.
    3. 67. Mabel of Chester was born ~ 1173, (Monmouthshire, Wales).
    4. 79. Hawise of Chester, 1st Countess of Chester was born 0___ 1180, Chester, Cheshire, England; died 6 Jun 1241, England.

  9. 140.  Henry II, King of EnglandHenry II, King of England was born 5 Mar 1133, Le Mans, France; was christened 25 Mar 1133, Le Mans, France (son of Geoffrey "Le Bon" Plantagenet, Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy and Matilda of England, Queen of England); died 6 Jul 1189, Chinon Castle, France; was buried 7 Jul 1189, Fontevraud Abbey, France.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Count of Anjou
    • Also Known As: Count of Nantes
    • Also Known As: Curt Mantel
    • Also Known As: Duke of Aquitaine
    • Also Known As: Duke of Normandy
    • Also Known As: Henry Curtmantle
    • Also Known As: Henry FitzEmpress
    • Also Known As: Henry II, King of England

    Notes:

    Henry founded the Plantagenet Dynasty... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_II_of_England

    Henry II is the 27th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Jesse D Hennessee (1880-1952) through his 12th great granddaughter,

    Catherine Mountfort Booth (1450-1483) ...

    http://www.thehennesseefamily.com/getperson.php?personID=I32450&tree=hennessee

    Henry II (1133-1189) is the great-grandson of William the Conqueror (1024-1087) ergo

    William the Conqueror (1024-1087) is the 30th great-grandfather of all the grandchildren of Jesse D Hennessee (1880-1952)

    Who could forget Peter O'Toole's magnificient protrayal of Henry II in the 1968 movie production of "The Lion in Winter" and Katherine Hepburn's Eleanor of Aquitaine? ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Lion_in_Winter_(1968_film)

    History of Henry II and his reign... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_II_of_England

    Source: 'The World Book Encyclopedia', 1968, p H178. 'Royalty for Commoners', Roderick W. Stuart, 1993, p 37-38. Reigned 1154-1189.

    He ruled an empire that stretched from the Tweed to the Pyrenees. In spite of frequent hostitilties with the French King his own family and rebellious Barons (culminating in the great revolt of 1173-74) and his quarrel with Thomas Becket, Henry maintained control over his possessions until shortly before his death. His judicial and administrative reforms which increased Royal control and influence at the expense of the Barons were of great constitutional importance. Introduced trial by Jury. Duke of Normandy. Henry II 'Curt Mantel,' Duke of Normandy, Count of Maine and Anjou, King Of England became king in 1154.

    At the height of his power, Henry ruled England and almost all western France. His marriage to Eleanor of Aquitaine, the most famous woman of the age, brought the duchy of Aquitaine under his control. Henry also claimed to rule Scotland, Wales, and eastern Ireland. Henry II carried on his grandfather's policy of limiting the power of the nobles. He also tried to make the Roman Catholic Church in England submit to his authority. This policy brought him into conflict with Thomas a Becket, Achbishop of Canterbury. Four of the king's knights murdered Becket while he was at vespers in his cathedral. Henry made Anglo-Saxon common law, rather than the revised Roman law, the supreme law of the land. He introduced trial by jury and circuit courts. In his later years, Henry's sons often rebelled against him. Two of them, Richard the Lion-Hearted and John, became the next two kings of England.

    REF: "Falls the Shadow" Sharon Kay Penman: William the Conqueror requested a large number of Jews to move to England after his conquest. They spoke Norman & did well under his reign. They continued to thrive under William's grandson Henry II.

    REF: British Monarchy Official Website: Henry II (reigned 1154-89)

    ruled over an empire which stretched from the Scottish border to the Pyrenees. Married to Eleanor, the heiress of Aquitaine, the king spent only 13 years of his reign in England; the other 21 years were spent on the continent in his territories in what is now France. By 1158, Henry had restored to the crown some of the lands and royal power lost by Stephen. For example, locally chosen sheriffs were changed into royally appointed agents charged with enforcing the law and collecting taxes in the counties. Personally interested in government and law, Henry strengthened royal justice, making use of juries and re-introduced the sending of justices (judges) on regular tours of the country to try cases for the Crown. His legal reforms have led him to be seen as the founder of English Common Law. Henry's disagreements with his Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Becket, over Church/State relations ended in Becket's murder in 1170. Family disputes almost wrecked the king's achievements and he died in 1189 at war with his sons.

    Reigned 25 Oct 1154-1189. Invested As Duke Of Nomandy By His Parents In 1150.

    Ruled An Empire That Stretched From The Tweed To The Pyrenees.

    Numerous Quarrels With French King, & His Own Family.

    Quarreled With Thomas Becket.

    Beat Rebellious Barons (Culminating In The Great Revolt Of 1173-74).

    Retained Control Of His Possessions Until Shortly Before His Death.

    Important Judicial & Admin. Reforms Incr. Power Of King At The Expense Of Barons

    Introduced Trial By Jury.

    Count Of Anjou & Aquitaine.

    Buried:
    Click on this link to view images of Fontevraud Abbey ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fontevraud_Abbey

    Died:
    Images and commentary for Chinon Castle ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ch%C3%A2teau_de_Chinon

    Henry — Ida de Tosny, Countess of Norfolk. Ida (daughter of Ralph de Tosny, V, Knight, Earl and Margaret de Beaumont) died Aft 1185. [Group Sheet]


  10. 141.  Ida de Tosny, Countess of Norfolk (daughter of Ralph de Tosny, V, Knight, Earl and Margaret de Beaumont); died Aft 1185.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Ida de Toesny

    Notes:

    Ida de Tosny, Countess of Norfolk was very likely a daughter of Ralph V de Tosny (died 1162) and his wife Margaret (born circa 1125 and living in 1185), a daughter of Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester.[1]

    Relationship to Henry II

    Ida de Tosny was a royal ward and mistress of King Henry II, by whom she was mother of one of his illegitimate sons, William Longespâee, 3rd Earl of Salisbury, (b c. 1176-March 7, 1226). For many years, until the discovery of a charter of William mentioning "Comitissa Ida, mater mea" (Countess Ida, my mother),[2] it was assumed that Rosamund Clifford, a previous mistress of Henry's, was the mother, but painstaking genealogical detective work [3] has since shown otherwise. Ida was not the first English royal ward to be taken as a royal mistress. Isabel de Beaumont (Elizabeth de Beaumont), daughter of Robert de Beaumont, who fought at the Battle of Hastings with the Conqueror, was the ward of King Henry I and the mistress of one of his sons.[4]

    Marriage

    Around Christmas 1181, Ida de Tosny was given in marriage to Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk by Henry II, together with the manors of Acle, Halvergate and South Walsham, which had been confiscated from his inheritance after his father's death (Hugh Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk).[5] Ida and Roger had a number of children including:

    Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk who married in 1206 or 1207, Maud Marshal, a daughter of William Marshal
    William Bigod
    Ralph Bigod
    Roger Bigod
    Margery Bigod, married William de Hastings
    Mary Bigod, married Ralph fitz Robert

    Many historians, including Marc Morris have speculated that the couple had a third daughter, Alice, who married Aubrey de Vere IV, 2nd Earl of Oxford as his second wife. If so, the marriage would have been well within the bounds of consanguinity, for the couple would have been quite closely related, a daughter of the second earl of Norfolk being first cousin once removed to the second earl of Oxford.

    Ida de Tosney in fiction

    Ida de Tosny and her husband Roger are the main characters in Elizabeth Chadwick's The Time of Singing (Sphere, 2008), published in the USA as For the King's Favor. They appear as minor characters in other of her books set at the same time, notably To Defy a King, which concerns the marriage of their son Hugh to Maud, a daughter of William Marshal

    *

    more ...

    Ida de Tosny was a royal ward who became the mistress of King Henry II. The first evidence of contemporary information about Ida came to light in 1979 with the publication in the of two charters found in the Bradenstoke Priory Cartulary where he mentions "Comitissa Ida, mater mea" (Countess Ida, my mother), until then, it was assumed that Rosamund Clifford, a previous and more famous mistress of King Henry II's, was William's mother.

    Notes:

    Not married:
    she was mother of one of his illegitimate sons, William Longespâee, 3rd Earl of Salisbury, (b c. 1176-March 7, 1226)

    Children:
    1. 70. William (Plantagenet) Longespee, 3rd Earl of Salisbury was born ~ 1176, (Salisbury, Wiltshire) England; died 7 Mar 1226, Salisbury Castle, Salisbury, Wiltshire, England; was buried Salisbury Cathedral, Salisbury, Wiltshire, England.

  11. 142.  William of Salisbury, Knight, 2nd Earl of Salisbury was born ~ 1150, (Salisbury, Wiltshire, England) (son of Patrick of Salisbury, Knight, 1st Earl of Salisbury and Adelia de Talvaise, Countess of Montreuil); died 17 Apr 1196.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Sheriff of Wiltshire
    • Also Known As: Earl of Wiltshire
    • Also Known As: William D'Evereux
    • Also Known As: William FitzPatrick
    • Also Known As: William of Salisbury

    Notes:

    William of Salisbury, 2nd Earl of Salisbury (died 1196) was an Anglo-Norman peer. Though he is generally known as such, his proper title was Earl of Wiltshire, which title was conferred on his father by the Empress Maud around 1143. He was also called William FitzPatrick. (No relation to the Irish medieval dynasts who bore the surname "Fitzpatrick", which itself is a later anglicization of the Irish "Mac Giolla Phâadraig".)

    He was the son and heir of Patrick of Salisbury, Earl of Wiltshire, styled Earl of Salisbury, and of Ela Talvas.[1]

    Family

    He married Elâeonore, daughter of Robert III de Vitrâe of Tilliers. He died without male issue in 1196. Their only daughter and heiress, was Ela of Salisbury, 3rd Countess of Salisbury who married William Longespâee, 3rd Earl of Salisbury, who was half-brother to the king.

    Service to Richard

    William bore the golden sceptre at the coronation of King Richard I, but the next year when the king became a prisoner in Almaine, he was one of those who adhered to the then Count of Mortain, who later became King John of England. In 1194 he served as High Sheriff of Somerset and Dorset. In 1195, William was back with King Richard in the expedition into Normandy and upon his return to England was one of Richard's great council assembled at Nottingham. The Earl of Salisbury was one of the four earls who supported the canopy of state at the second coronation of Richard that same year [2]

    William — Eleonore de Vitre, Countess of Salisbury. Eleonore was born ~ 1158, Bretagne, France; died 0___ 1232, (Salisbury, Wiltshire, England). [Group Sheet]


  12. 143.  Eleonore de Vitre, Countess of Salisbury was born ~ 1158, Bretagne, France; died 0___ 1232, (Salisbury, Wiltshire, England).

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Alianore de Vitre

    Children:
    1. 71. Ela FitzPatrick, 3rd Countess of Salisbury was born 0___ 1187, Amesbury, Wiltshire, England; died 24 Aug 1261, Lacock Abbey, Wiltshire, England.

  13. 144.  Richard de Clare, Knight, 2nd Earl Pembroke was born 0___ 1125, Tonbridge, Kent, England (son of Gilbert de Clare, Knight, 1st Earl of Pembroke and Isabel de Beaumont); died 20 Apr 1176, Dublin, Leinster, Ireland.

    Richard married Eva Aoife Mac Murchada, Countess Pembroke 26 Aug 1171, Waterford, Ireland. Eva (daughter of Dermot Dairmait Mac Murchada, King of Leinster and Mor Tauthail Moringen Murchertaig O'Toole, Queen of Ireland) was born 26 Apr 1141, Dublin, Leinster, Ireland; died 0___ 1188, Waterford, Ireland; was buried Tintern, Monmouthshire, Wales. [Group Sheet]


  14. 145.  Eva Aoife Mac Murchada, Countess Pembroke was born 26 Apr 1141, Dublin, Leinster, Ireland (daughter of Dermot Dairmait Mac Murchada, King of Leinster and Mor Tauthail Moringen Murchertaig O'Toole, Queen of Ireland); died 0___ 1188, Waterford, Ireland; was buried Tintern, Monmouthshire, Wales.
    Children:
    1. 72. Richard de Clare, Knight, 3rd Earl of Hertford was born ~ 1153, Tonbridge Castle, Kent, England; died 28 Nov 1217.
    2. 75. Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke was born 0___ 1172, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales; died 14 Oct 1217, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales; was buried Tintern Abbey, Tintern, Monmouthshire, Wales.

  15. 146.  William FitzRobert, Knight, 2nd Earl of Gloucester was born 23 Nov 1116, (Wales) (son of Robert FitzRoy, Knight, 1st Earl of Gloucester and Mabel FitzHamon, Countess of Gloucester); died 23 Nov 1183, (Wales).

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: William Lord of Glamorgan

    Notes:

    William Fitz Robert, 2nd Earl of Gloucester (died 1183) was the son and heir of Sir Robert de Caen, 1st Earl of Gloucester, and Mabel FitzRobert of Gloucester, daughter of Robert Fitzhamon.

    Lineage

    William FitzRobert was the son of Robert, 1st Earl of Gloucester, an illegitimate son of King Henry I of England, during whose reign William was born. Thus William was a nephew of the Empress Maud and a cousin of King Stephen, the principal combatants of the English Anarchy period. It also meant that William is the great-grandson of the famed William the Conqueror.

    Early career[edit]
    In October 1141, William looked after the Baronial estates, when his father fell into the hands of partisans at Winchester. His father was exchanged for King Stephen, and during his father's absence in Normandy in 1144 he served as Governor of Wareham. In 1147, he overthrew Henry de Tracy at Castle Cary.

    In 1154 he made an alliance with Roger de Clare, 3rd Earl of Hertford, by which they agreed to aid each other against all men except Henry II of England.

    FitzRobert granted Neath, a town in Glamorgan, a charter. He was Lord of the manor of Glamorgan, as well as Caerleon, residing chiefly at Cardiff Castle. It was there that in 1158 he and his wife and son were captured by the Welsh Lord of Senghenydd, Ifor Bach ("Ivor the Little") and carried away into the woods, where they were held as prisoners until the Earl redressed Ivor's grievances.

    Relationship with King Henry II

    In 1173 the earl took the King's part against his sons, but thereafter he appears to have fallen under suspicion, for the following year he submitted to the King, and in 1175 surrendered to him Bristol Castle. Because his only son and heir Robert died in 1166, Earl William made John, the younger son of King Henry II, heir to his earldom, in conformity with the King's promise that John should marry one of the Earl's daughters, if the Church would allow it, they being related in the third degree.

    Earl William was present in March 1177 when the King arbitrated between the Kings of Castile and Navarre, and in 1178, he witnessed Henry's charter to Waltham Abbey. But during the King's struggles with his sons, when he imprisoned a number of magnates of whose loyalty he was doubtful, Earl William was among them.

    Family and children

    He was married to Hawise de Beaumont of Leicester, daughter of Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester and Amica de Gael and had children:

    Robert fitz William (1151, Cardiff, Glamorganshire – 1166, Cardiff, Glamorganshire).
    Mabel fitz William, married Amaury V de Montfort, her son Amaury briefly being Earl of Gloucester
    Amice fitz William, d. 1220. Married Richard de Clare, 3rd Earl of Hertford, their descendants eventually inherited the Earldom of Gloucester
    Isabel, Countess of Gloucester. She was married three times:
    Prince John
    Geoffrey FitzGeoffrey de Mandeville, 2nd Earl of Essex, Earl of Gloucester
    Hubert de Burgh, 1st Earl of Kent
    The earl died in 1183; his wife Hawise survived him. Since their only son, Robert, predeceased his father, their daughters became co-heirs to the feudal barony of Gloucester.

    Notes

    William Lord of Glamorgan was also known as Robert de Wintona according to records found in English historical ledgers.

    William — Hawise de Beaumont. Hawise (daughter of Robert de Beaumont, Knight, 2nd Earl of Leicester and Amice de Montfort, Countess of Leicester) was born Leicestershire, England. [Group Sheet]


  16. 147.  Hawise de Beaumont was born Leicestershire, England (daughter of Robert de Beaumont, Knight, 2nd Earl of Leicester and Amice de Montfort, Countess of Leicester).
    Children:
    1. 73. Amice FitzWilliam, 4th Countess of Gloucester was born 0___ 1160, Gloucestershire, England; died 1220-1225.

  17. 148.  John FitzGilbert was born 26 Nov 1105, (Wiltshire) England (son of Gilbert Giffard, Royal Serjeant and Mary Margarite De Venuz); died 29 Sep 1165, Rockley, Marlborough, Wiltshire, England; was buried Bradenstoke, Wiltshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: John Marshal
    • Also Known As: The Marshal of the Horses
    • Alt Birth: ~ 1105
    • Alt Death: 0___ 1165

    Notes:

    John FitzGilbert the Marshal of the Horses (c. 1105 – 1165) was a minor Anglo-Norman nobleman during the reign of King Stephen, and fought in the 12th century civil war on the side of Empress Matilda. Since at least 1130 and probably earlier, he had been the royal marshal to King Henry I. When Henry died, John FitzGilbert swore for Stephen and was granted the castles of Marlborough and Ludgershall, Wiltshire during this time. Along with Hamstead Marshal, this gave him control of the valley of the River Kennet in Wiltshire. Around 1139, John changed sides and swore for the Empress Matilda. In September 1141, Matilda fled the siege of Winchester and took refuge in the Marshal's castle at Ludgershall. While covering her retreat from Winchester, John Marshal was forced to take refuge at Wherwell Abbey. The attackers set fire to the building, and John lost an eye to dripping lead from the melting roof.

    In 1152, John had a celebrated confrontation with King Stephen, who had besieged him at Newbury Castle. After John had broken an agreement to surrender, Stephen threatened to kill his son, whom John had given as a hostage. John refused, saying he could make more sons, but Stephen apparently took pity on the young boy and did not kill him. The boy grew up to be William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke, a legendary figure in medieval lore, and one of the most powerful men in England.

    The office of Lord Marshal, which originally related to the keeping of the King's horses, and later, the head of his household troops, was won as a hereditary title by John, and was passed to his eldest son, and later claimed by William. John also had a daughter, Margaret Marshal, who married Ralph de Somery, son of John de Somery and Hawise de Paynell.

    Family

    John was the son of Gilbert, Royal Serjeant and Marshal to Henry I, and his wife Margaret. After his father died in 1129 John inherited the title of the king's marshal. John married Aline Pipard whose father Walter Pipard had been a friend of John's father. John arranged an annulment of his marriage to Aline Pipard in order to marry Sibyl of Salisbury, the sister of Patrick of Salisbury, who had been a local rival of his, and a supporter of King Stephen, up to that point. John had two sons by Aline - Gilbert (d. 1166) and Walter (d. bef.1165). Walter predeceased his father and Gilbert died shortly after inheriting his father's lands.

    John's eldest son by Sibyl of Salisbury, also called John Marshal (1145-1194), inherited the title of Marshal, which he held until his death. The title was then granted by King Richard the Lionheart to his second son by Sybilla, William (1147-1219), who made the name and title famous. Though he had started out as a younger son without inheritance, by the time he actually inherited the title his reputation as a soldier and statesman was unmatched across Western Europe. John Marshal had four sons in total by his second wife. As well as John and William, there was Henry (1150-1206), who went on to become Bishop of Exeter, and Ancel, who served as a knight in the household of his kinsman, Rotrou, Count of Perche. There were also two daughters Sybilla and Margaret.

    References

    Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis, Lines 55-28, 66-27, 81-28, 122A-29
    Barlow, Frank. The Feudal Kingdom of England 1042-1216 London: Longman Group Limited, 1961. ISBN 0-582-48237-2
    William Marshal, Knighthood, War and Chivalry 1147-1219 Longman 2002 ISBN 0-582-77222-2

    end of biography

    Biography

    John Fitz-Gilbert, also called John Marshal, was the son of Gilbert Giffard, who was like John an hereditary marshal of the household of King Henry I. John and his father Gilbert, it was noted several generations later by King John, had successfully claimed the right to being "chief" marshall against competing claims from Robert de Venoix and William de Hasings.[1] By the time of John's children, the surname was being used as an early example of a surname, not only by his son and heir, but also by his younger sons.

    John's career coincided with a dark 19-year period in Anglo-Norman history, called "The Anarchy" (1135-1164). It was an interregnum following King Henry I's death with no clear male heir (his legitimate son had been lost at sea in 1620). Henry I's illegitimate son, Stephen, seized the throne, opposed by Henry's daughter-in-law, Empress Matilda, fighting for her (legitimate) son's rights (he became King Henry II in 1164). The Anglo-Norman nobility nearly wrecked the country in a lengthy civil war.[2]

    John's marriage to Aline Pipard was a casualty of this conflict. From 1135 to 1140 John loyally served King Stephen as Marshal of England, managing the Army's supplies and accompanying the King when he secured Normandy to his cause. John received three important castles in Wiltshire as his reward. With Hamstead Marshal, this gave him control of Wiltshire's strategic Kennet River valley. He was bitterly opposed by Patrick de Salisbury (also in Wiltshire), who supported Empress Matilda.[3].

    In February 1141, Stephen's army was defeated at Lincoln and the King taken prisoner, temporarily. John, who may have opposed Stephen's questionable military strategy, decided to change sides. Later that year, with great bravery, he helped Empress Matilda escape an ambush in Wiltshire, loosing an eye and being left for dead in the process. At the same time he came to a political/family agreement with his local enemy, the Patrick of Salisbury, by arranging to annul his first marriage to his distant cousin Aline Pipard (for "consanguinity" an often-used excuse by Medieval nobles at a time when divorce was impossible) and marry Patrick's spinster sister, Sybil.[4]

    Aline's sons' rights were maintained but they both died within a year of their father, leaving John's lands, and the "Marshal of England" office, to John's third son (first son by Sibyl), John Marshal, who exercised it under King Henry II until his death in 1192. King Richard (Lionheart) then passed the office to his younger brother, William, who had gone to Normandy as squire to his cousin William de Tancarville, High Chamberlain of Normandy. Though William had started out as a fourth son without any inheritance, by the time he became the Marshal of England, his reputation as a soldier and statesman was unmatched. He expanded the powers of the Marshal's office and was later Regent for Henry III when he inherited the throne as a boy[5].

    John Fitz-Gilbert Marshal was a ruthless Anglo-Norman baron with considerable daring, energy, and ambition. His abilities as a soldier and his love of military stratagy were well recorded as was his political savvy. Despite what some detractors wrote, he was also quite loyal by contemporary standards. During the Anarchy he only changed sides once, remaining faithful to Matilda and her son after 1141 and defending them skillfully and at his own peril. His son William inherited his father's skills, reportedly rescuing Queen Eleanor (of Aquitaine), Henry II's wife, after an ambush near Lusignan Castle in France in 1167. After his brother's death without issue opened the way for him to become Marshal of England, he also showed great political skills, including helping implement the Magna Carta of 1215 between King John and the Barons. Between them, this father and son, from a relatively-minor Norman house, marked their century and influenced the course of English history.[6]

    Burial: Bradenstoke Priory, Wiltshire

    John FitzGilbert the Marshal (Marechal) (c. 1105 - 1165) was a minor Anglo-Norman nobleman during the reign of King Stephen, and fought in the 12th century civil war on the side of the Empress Matilda. Since at least 1130 and probably earlier, he had been the royal marshal to King Henry I. When Henry died, John FitzGilbert swore for Stephen and was granted the castles of Marlborough and Ludgershall, in Wiltshire. Along with Hamstead Marshal, this gave him control of the valley of the River Kennet in Wiltshire.

    Around 1139, John changed sides and swore for the Empress Matilda. In September 1141, Matilda fled the siege of Winchester and took refuge in the Marshal's castle at Ludgershall. While covering her retreat from Winchester, John Marshal was forced to take refuge at Wherwell Abbey. The attackers set fire to the building, and John lost an eye to dripping lead from the melting roof.

    In 1152, John had a legendary confrontation with King Stephen, who had besieged him at Newbury Castle. After John had broken an agreement to surrender, Stephen threatened to kill his son, whom John had given as a hostage. John refused, saying he could make more sons, but Stephen apparently took pity on the young boy and did not kill him. The boy grew up to be William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke, a legendary figure in medieval lore, and one of the most powerful men in England.

    The office of Lord Marshal, was an a hereditary title held by John's father, Gilbert Giffard, King's Marshal [7] and was passed to John, his eldest son, and then to John's eldest son also named John, who died in 1192. John's younger brother William (later Regent of England) then inherited the title.

    John the son of Gilbert, also had a daughter, Margaret Marshal, who married Ralph de Somery, son of John de Somery and Hawise de Paynell.

    John was the son of Gilbert Giffard (Royal Serjeant and Marshal to Henry I). In 1141, John arranged an annulment of his marriage to Aline Pipard in order to marry Sibyl of Salisbury, the sister of Patrick of Salisbury, [8] who had been a local rival of his, and a supporter of King Stephen, up to that point. John had two sons by Aline - Gilbert and Walter. Walter predeceased his father and Gilbert died shortly after inheriting his father's lands.

    John's eldest son by Sybilla of Salisbury, also called John Marshal (died 1194), inherited the title of Marshal, which he held until his death. The title was then granted by King Richard the Lionheart to John's second son by Sybilla, William, who made the name and title famous. Though William had started out as a younger son without inheritance, by the time he actually inherited the title of Marshal his reputation as a soldier and statesman was unmatched across Western Europe. John Marshal had four sons in total by his second wife. As well as John and William, there was Henry, who went on to become Bishop of Exeter, and Ancel, who served as a knight in the household of his kinsman, Rotrou, Count of Perche.
    Title of "Marshal"

    "Mareschal" is "Marshal" in from old French, the common language of the Anglo-Norman nobility of Medieval England. The title, which in Carolingian times had meant "horse servant". The position evolved into an official position and was imported from Normandy to England. John's father, Gilbert Fitz-Robert, was a marshal of King Henry I.

    Marshal was the title of the person in the king's household who maintained discipline at court; supplied receipts for payments, gifts and liveries from the king. He was over all servants of the court connected with the royal sports; over the king's bodyguard, and in charge of the horses. He was required to witness writs. It was an hereditary office. The Marshal took part in the ceremony of coronation. His sign of office was a baton bestowed by the king. [9]
    The Marshal, under the Royal Constable, was responsible for keeping order at the royal court, making billeting arrangements, tallying the household's expenditures, monitoring knights performing military service for the King, and insuring the imprisonment of debtors. Under John's son William, who was often simply called "The Marshal" the office became "Earl Marshal" and is still the seventh of the eight "great Officers of State" of the British monarchy, just below the Lord High Constable and above the Lord High Admiral.[10]


    Sources

    ? Round, J. H. (1911), The King's Serjeants & Officers of State with their Coronation Services. https://archive.org/stream/kingsserjeantsof00rounuoft#page/88/mode/2up
    ? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Anarchy
    ? http://www.geni.com/people/Aline-de-Pipard/6000000004382755262?through=6000000001353952871 and "John Fitz-Gilbert, the Marshal," © 1999 by Catherine Armstrong, at: http://www.castlewales.com/jf_gilbt.html
    ? See preceding note.
    ? "John Fitz-Gilbert, the Marshal," © 1999 by Catherine Armstrong, at: http://www.castlewales.com/jf_gilbt.html
    ? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Marshal,_1st_Earl_of_Pembroke and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Marshal_(Marshal_of_England)
    ? Medieval Lands
    ? Medieval Lands
    ? Dictionary of Medieval Knighthood and Chivalry page 326
    ? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earl_Marshal#Lords_Marshal_of_England.2C_1135.E2.80.931397
    http://www.castlewales.com/jf_gilbt.html - excellent narrative; well researched short biography, (c) 1999 by Catherine Armstrong.
    http://www.geni.com/people/John-FitzGilbert-The-Marshal-of-England/6000000006265484751?through=6000000002459854209
    Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis, Lines 55-28, 66-27, 81-28, 122A-29
    Barlow, Frank, The Feudal Kingdom of England 1042-1216 (London: Longman Group Limited, 1961). ISBN 0-582-48237-2
    William Marshal, Knighthood, War and Chivalry 1147-1219, Longman, 2002, ISBN 0 582 77222 2
    Richardson, Douglas, and Kimball G. Everingham. 2013. Royal ancestry: a study in colonial and medieval families. Salt Lake City, UT.: Douglas Richardson. Vol IV, page 34-35, cited by Mr. Marlyn Lewis, Our Royal, Titled, Noble, and Commoner Ancestors & Cousins, database online, Portland, Oregon.
    Medieval Lands, database online, author Charles Cawley, (Foundation for Medieval Genealogy, 2006-2013), England, earls created 1138-1143, Chapter 10, Pembroke: B. Earls of Pembroke 1189-1245 (MARSHAL), 1. John FitzGilbert "the Marshal"

    See also:

    Dictionary of Medieval Knighthood and Chivalry, Bradford B. Broughton, (Westport, Connecticut, Greenwood Press, Inc., 1986).

    end of biography

    Buried:
    Bradenstoke Priory is a medieval priory in the village of Bradenstoke, Wiltshire, England. It is noted today for some of its structures having been used by William Randolph Hearst for the renovation of St Donat's Castle, near Llantwit Major, Wales, in the 1930s. ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bradenstoke_Priory

    John married Sibyl of Salisbury 0___ 1142, Wooten Basset, Wiltshire, England. Sibyl (daughter of Walter of Salisbury and Sibilla de Chaworth) was born 27 Nov 1126; died 0___ 1176, Old Sarum (Salisbury), Wiltshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  18. 149.  Sibyl of Salisbury was born 27 Nov 1126 (daughter of Walter of Salisbury and Sibilla de Chaworth); died 0___ 1176, Old Sarum (Salisbury), Wiltshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Sybilla Evreux

    Children:
    1. 74. William Marshal, Templar Knight, 1st Earl Pembroke was born 1146-1147, (Berkshire, England); died 14 Apr 1219, Caversham, Berkshire, England; was buried Temple Church, London, Middlesex, England.
    2. FNU Marshal was born ~ 1150.

  19. 156.  Saer de Quincy, Knight, 1st Earl of Winchester was born ~ 1170; died 3 Nov 1219, (Acre) Israel; was buried Acre, Israel.

    Other Events:

    • Burial: Garendon Abbey, Leicestershire, England
    • Residence: England
    • Also Known As: Earl Saer
    • Also Known As: Saleur di Quinci

    Notes:

    Saer de Quincy, 1st Earl of Winchester (c. 1170 – 3 November 1219) (or Saieur di Quinci[1]) was one of the leaders of the baronial rebellion against King John of England, and a major figure in both the kingdoms of Scotland and England in the decades around the turn of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries.

    Earl of Winchester

    Seal of Robert Fitzwalter (d.1235). So close was the alliance between both men that Robert's seal shows the arms of Saer on a separate shield before his horse
    Following his marriage, Winchester became a prominent military and diplomatic figure in England. There is no evidence of any close alliance with King John, however, and his rise to importance was probably due to his newly acquired magnate status and the family connections that underpinned it.

    One man with whom he does seem to have developed a close personal relationship is his cousin, Robert Fitzwalter (d. 1235). In 1203, they served as co-commanders of the garrison at the major fortress of Vaudreuil in Normandy. They surrendered the castle without a fight to Philip II of France, fatally weakening the English position in northern France. Although popular opinion seems to have blamed them for the capitulation, a royal writ is extant stating that the castle was surrendered at King John's command, and both Winchester and Fitzwalter endured personal humiliation and heavy ransoms at the hands of the French.

    In Scotland, he was perhaps more successful. In 1211 to 1212, the Earl of Winchester commanded an imposing retinue of a hundred knights and a hundred serjeants in William the Lion's campaign against the Mac William rebels, a force which some historians have suggested may have been the mercenary force from Brabant lent to the campaign by John.

    Magna Carta

    Arms displayed by Earl Saire on his seal on Magna Carta. These differ from his arms used elsewhere but can also be seen in stained glass at Winchester Great Hall

    In 1215, when the baronial rebellion broke out, Robert Fitzwalter became the military commander, and the Earl of Winchester joined him, acting as one of the chief authors of Magna Carta and negotiators with John; both cousins were among the 25 guarantors of the Magna Carta. De Quincy fought against John in the troubles that followed the sealing of the Charter, and, again with Fitzwalter, travelled to France to invite Prince Louis of France to take the English throne. He and Fitzwalter were subsequently among the most committed and prominent supporters of Louis's candidature for the kingship, against both John and the infant Henry III.

    The Fifth Crusade

    When military defeat cleared the way for Henry III to take the throne, de Quincy went on crusade, perhaps in fulfillment of an earlier vow. In 1219 he left to join the Fifth Crusade, then besieging Damietta. While in the east, he fell sick and died. He was buried in Acre, the capital of the Kingdom of Jerusalem, rather than in Egypt, and his heart was brought back and interred at Garendon Abbey near Loughborough, a house endowed by his wife's family.

    Family

    The family of de Quincy had arrived in England after the Norman Conquest, and took their name from Cuinchy in the Arrondissement of Bâethune; the personal name "Saer" was used by them over several generations. Both names are variously spelled in primary sources and older modern works, the first name being sometimes rendered Saher or Seer, and the surname as Quency or Quenci.

    The first recorded Saer de Quincy (known to historians as "Saer I") was lord of the manor of Long Buckby in Northamptonshire in the earlier twelfth century, and second husband of Matilda of St Liz, stepdaughter of King David I of Scotland by Maud of Northumbria. This marriage produced two sons, Saer II and Robert de Quincy. It was Robert, the younger son, who was the father of the Saer de Quincy who eventually became Earl of Winchester. By her first husband Robert Fitz Richard, Matilda was also the paternal grandmother of Earl Saer's close ally, Robert Fitzwalter.

    Robert de Quincy seems to have inherited no English lands from his father, and pursued a knightly career in Scotland, where he is recorded from around 1160 as a close companion of his cousin, King William the Lion. By 1170 he had married Orabilis, heiress of the Scottish lordship of Leuchars and, through her, he became lord of an extensive complex of estates north of the border which included lands in Fife, Strathearn and Lothian.

    Saer de Quincy, the son of Robert de Quincy and Orabilis of Leuchars, was raised largely in Scotland. His absence from English records for the first decades of his life has led some modern historians and genealogists to confuse him with his uncle, Saer II, who took part in the rebellion of Henry the Young King in 1173, when the future Earl of Winchester can have been no more than a toddler. Saer II's line ended without direct heirs, and his nephew and namesake would eventually inherit his estate, uniting his primary Scottish holdings with the family's Northamptonshire patrimony, and possibly some lands in France.

    Issue

    By his wife Margaret de Beaumont, Earl Saire had three sons and three daughters:

    Lora who married Sir William de Valognes, Chamberlain of Scotland.
    Arabella who married Sir Richard Harcourt.
    Robert (d. 1217), before 1206 he married Hawise of Chester, Countess of Lincoln, sister and co-heiress of Ranulf de Blundeville, Earl of Chester.
    Roger, who succeeded his father as earl of Winchester (though he did not take formal possession of the earldom until after his mother's death).
    Robert de Quincy (second son of that name; d. 1257) who married Helen, daughter of the Welsh prince Llywelyn the Great.
    Hawise, who married Hugh de Vere, Earl of Oxford.

    Preceded by

    New Creation Earl of Winchester Succeeded by

    Roger de Quincy

    References

    Jump up ^ Leuchars St Athernase website
    Background Reading[edit]
    Medieval Lands Project on Saher de Quincy
    "Winchester", in The Complete Peerage, ed. G.E.C., xii. 745-751
    Sidney Painter, "The House of Quency, 1136-1264", Medievalia et Humanistica, 11 (1957) 3-9; reprinted in his book Feudalism and Liberty
    Grant G. Simpson, “An Anglo-Scottish Baron of the Thirteenth century: the Acts of Roger de Quincy Earl of Winchester and Constable of Scotland” (Unpublished PhD Thesis, Edinburgh 1963).
    Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 (7th Edition, 1992,), 58-60.

    Burial:
    He was buried in Acre, the capital of the Kingdom of Jerusalem, rather than in Egypt, and his heart was brought back and interred at Garendon Abbey near Loughborough, a house endowed by his wife's family.

    Maps & History ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Garendon_Abbey

    Saer — Margaret de Beaumont. Margaret (daughter of Robert de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester and Petronilla de Grandmesnil) died 0___ 1235. [Group Sheet]


  20. 157.  Margaret de Beaumont (daughter of Robert de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester and Petronilla de Grandmesnil); died 0___ 1235.
    Children:
    1. Hawise de Quincy
    2. Roger de Quincy, Knight, 2nd Earl of Winchester was born ~ 1195; died 25 Apr 1264.
    3. 78. Robert de Quincy died 0___ 1217, London, Middlesex, England.

  21. 166.  John I, King of EnglandJohn I, King of England was born 24 Dec 1166, Beaumont Palace, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England (son of Henry II, King of England and Eleanore de Aquitaine, Queen of England); died 19 Oct 1216, Newark Castle, Nottinghamshire, England; was buried 19 Oct 1216, Worcester Cathedral, Worcester, Warwickshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Johan sanz Terre
    • Also Known As: John de Normandie, King of England
    • Also Known As: John I, King of England
    • Also Known As: John Lackland
    • Also Known As: John Plantagenet, King of England

    Notes:

    John (24 December 1166 - 19 October 1216), also known as John Lackland (Norman French: Johan sanz Terre),[1] was King of England from 6 April 1199 until his death in 1216.

    Following the battle of Bouvines, John lost the duchy of Normandy to King Philip II of France, which resulted in the collapse of most of the Angevin Empire and contributed to the subsequent growth in power of the Capetian dynasty during the 13th century.

    The baronial revolt at the end of John's reign led to the sealing of the Magna Carta, a document sometimes considered to be an early step in the evolution of the constitution of the United Kingdom.

    more on King John ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John,_King_of_England

    More images of King John ...

    https://www.google.com/search?q=john+lackland+coat+of+arms&rlz=1C1KMZB_enUS591US591&espv=2&biw=1440&bih=810&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiNnKWp6aPPAhULXB4KHb1qCnQQsAQIKw&dpr=1#imgrc=F8SAOkDV1jsAEM%3A

    *

    Baronial Order of Magna Charta:

    The Baronial Order of Magna Charta ("BOMC") is a scholarly, charitable, and lineage society founded in 1898. The BOMC was originally named the Baronial Order of Runnemede, but the name was subsequently changed to better reflect the organization's purposes relating to the Magna Charta and the promulgation of "freedom of man under the rule of law." view its membership list: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baronial_Order_of_Magna_Charta

    These 25 barons were Sureties for the concessions made by John, King of England, d. 18 Oct 1216.

    1. William d'Albini, Lord of Belvoir Castle, d. 1236.
    ((26th, 27th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Vernia Swindell "Ma" Byars;
    24th, 25th & 26th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Jesse D Hennessee: http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=&secondpersonID=I3&maxrels=12&disallowspouses=0&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I46884

    2. Roger Bigod, (43132) Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk, d. 1220.
    (26th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Perry Green "Pop" Byars: http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=&secondpersonID=I3&maxrels=6&disallowspouses=1&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I43132

    3. Hugh Bigod, (43271) heir to the earldoms of Norfolk and Suffolk, d. 1225.
    (25th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Perry Green "Pop" Byars: http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=I3&secondpersonID=&maxrels=6&disallowspouses=1&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I43271

    4. Henry de Bohun, Earl of Hereford, (46127) d. 1220.
    (26th, 27th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Vernia Swindell "Ma" Byars;
    25th & 26th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Jesse D Hennessee: http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=&secondpersonID=I3&maxrels=6&disallowspouses=1&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I46127


    5. Richard de Clare, Earl of Hertford, (46129) d. 1217.
    (25th, 26th & 27th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Vernia Swindell "Ma" Byars: http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=I3&secondpersonID=&maxrels=6&disallowspouses=1&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I46129

    6. Gilbert de Clare, heir to the earldom of Hertford, (45550) d. 1230.
    (24th, 26th & 27th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Vernia Swindell "Ma" Byars;
    25th & 27th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Perry Green "Pop" Byars;
    24th & 25th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Jesse D Hennessee: http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=I3&secondpersonID=&maxrels=16&disallowspouses=1&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I45550

    John FitzRobert, Lord of Warkworth Castle, Northumberland, d. 1240.

    7. Robert FitzWalter, Lord of Dunmow Castle, Essex, d. 1234.
    (28th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Perry Green "Pop" Byars)

    William de Fortibus, Earl of Albemarle, d. 1241, no great-grandchildren.
    William Hardell, Mayor of the City of London, d. after 1216, no known issue.
    William de Huntingfield, Sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk, d. 1220.
    John de Lacie, Lord of Pontefract Castle, d. 1240.
    William de Lanvallei, Lord of Standway Castle, Essex, d. 1217.
    William Malet, Sheriff of Somerset and Dorset, d. about 1217.
    Geoffrey de Mandeville, Earl of Essex and Gloucester, d. 1216, d.s.p..

    William Marshall jr, heir to the earldom of Pembroke, d. 1231, (43947) d.s.p..
    A cousin to the grandchildren of Vernia Swindell "Ma" Byars & Perry Green "Pop" Byars: http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=I3&secondpersonID=&maxrels=6&disallowspouses=1&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I43947

    Roger de Montbegon, Lord of Hornby Castle, Lancashire, d. 1226, d.s.p..
    Richard de Montfichet, Baron, d. after 1258, d.s.p..

    8.. William de Mowbray, Lord of Axholme Castle, Lincolnshire, (46138) d. 1223
    (24th & 26th great grandfather to the grandchildren of Vernia Swindell "Ma" Byars: http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=&secondpersonID=I3&maxrels=6&disallowspouses=1&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I46138

    Richard de Percy, Baron, Yorkshire, d. 1244, d.s.p..

    9.Saire de Quincey, Earl of Winchester, (46162) d. 1219.
    (25th & 27th great grandfather to the grandchildren of Vernia Swindell "Ma" Byars;
    25th & 26th great grandfather to the grandchildren of Jesse D Hennessee;
    27th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Perry Green "Pop" Byars: http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=I3&secondpersonID=&maxrels=6&disallowspouses=1&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I46162

    10. Robert de Roos, Lord of Hamlake Castle, Yorkshire, (46148)d. 1226.
    (25th, 26th & 27th great grandfather to the grandchildren of Vernia Swindell "Ma" Byars: http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=&secondpersonID=I3&maxrels=12&disallowspouses=1&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I46148

    Geoffrey de Saye, Baron, d. 1230.

    11. Robert de Vere, heir to the earldom of Oxford, d. 1221.
    (25th, 27th great grandfather to the grandchildren of Vernia Swindell "Ma" Byars;
    25th, 26th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Jesse D Hennessee;
    27th great grandfather of the grandchildren of Perry Green "Pop" Byars; http://thehennesseefamily.com/relationship.php?altprimarypersonID=&savedpersonID=&secondpersonID=I3&maxrels=12&disallowspouses=1&generations=30&tree=hennessee&primarypersonID=I46155

    Eustace de Vesci, Lord of Alnwick Castle, Northumberland, d. 1216 d.s.p..

    Birth:
    Beaumont Palace, built outside the north gate of Oxford, was intended by Henry I about 1130 to serve as a royal palace conveniently close to the royal hunting-lodge at Woodstock (now part of the park of Blenheim Palace). Its former presence is recorded in Beaumont Street, Oxford. Set into a pillar on the north side of the street, near Walton Street, is a stone with the inscription: "Near to this site stood the King's Houses later known as Beaumont Palace. King Richard I was born here in 1157 and King John in 1167". The "King's House" was the range of the palace that contained the king's lodgings.

    Henry passed Easter 1133 in the nova aula, his "new hall" at Beaumont in great pomp, celebrating the birth of his grandson, the future Henry II.[1] Edward I was the last king to sojourn in Beaumont officially as a palace, and in 1275 he granted it to an Italian lawyer, Francesco Accorsi, who had undertaken diplomatic missions for him.[2] When Edward II was put to flight at the battle of Bannockburn in 1314, he is said to have invoked the Virgin Mary and vowed to found a monastery for the Carmelites (the White Friars) if he might escape safely. In fulfilment of his vow he remanded Beaumont Palace to the Carmelites in 1318.

    In 1318, the Palace was the scene for the beginnings of the John Deydras affair, in which a royal pretender, arguing that he was the rightful king of England, claimed the Palace for his own. John Deydras was ultimately executed for sedition.[3]


    When the White Friars were disbanded at the Reformation, most of the structure was dismantled and the building stone reused in Christ Church and St John's College.[4] An engraving of 1785[5] shows the remains of Beaumont Palace, the last of which were destroyed in the laying out of Beaumont Street in 1829.[6]

    Drawings, Sketches & Source ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beaumont_Palace

    Buried:
    Worcester Cathedral, before the English Reformation known as Worcester Priory, is an Anglican cathedral in Worcester, England; situated on a bank overlooking the River Severn. It is the seat of the Bishop of Worcester. Its official name is The Cathedral Church of Christ and the Blessed Mary the Virgin of Worcester. Built between 1084 and 1504, Worcester Cathedral represents every style of English architecture from Norman to Perpendicular Gothic.

    It is famous for its Norman crypt and unique chapter house, its unusual Transitional Gothic bays, its fine woodwork and its "exquisite" central tower,[1] which is of particularly fine proportions.

    Images, History & Source ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Worcester_Cathedral

    Died:
    Newark Castle, in Newark, in the English county of Nottinghamshire was founded in the mid 12th century by Alexander, Bishop of Lincoln. Originally a timber castle, it was rebuilt in stone towards the end of the century. Dismantled in the 17th century after the English Civil War, the castle was restored in the 19th century, first by Anthony Salvin in the 1840s and then by the corporation of Newark who bought the site in 1889. The Gilstrap Heritage Centre is a free-admission museum in the castle grounds about the history of the town of Newark.

    Images & Source ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newark_Castle,_Nottinghamshire

    John married Clemence Butler 0___ 1188, England. Clemence (daughter of Philip Butler and Sybil de Braose) was born 0___ 1175; died 0___ 1231. [Group Sheet]


  22. 167.  Clemence Butler was born 0___ 1175 (daughter of Philip Butler and Sybil de Braose); died 0___ 1231.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Clemence Boteler

    Children:
    1. 83. Joan Plantagenet, Lady of Wales was born ~ 1191, (France); died 2 Feb 1237.

  23. 192.  Geoffrey "Le Bon" Plantagenet, Count of Anjou, Duke of NormandyGeoffrey "Le Bon" Plantagenet, Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy was born 24 Sep 1113, Anjou, France; died 7 Sep 1151, Chateau-Du-Loir, Eure-Et-Loire, France; was buried Saint Julian Church, Le Mans, France.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Duke of Normandy

    Notes:

    More on Geoffrey's biography and history with photos ... http://bit.ly/1i49b9d

    Geoffrey married Matilda of England, Queen of England 3 Apr 1127, Le Massachusetts, Sarthe, France. Matilda (daughter of Henry I, King of England and Matilda of Scotland, Queen of England) was born 7 Feb 1102, London, Middlesex, England; was christened 7 Apr 1141; died 10 Sep 1167, Notre Dame, Rouen, Seine-Maritime, France; was buried 10 Sep 1169, Bec Abbey, Le Bec-Hellouin, Eure, France. [Group Sheet]


  24. 193.  Matilda of England, Queen of England was born 7 Feb 1102, London, Middlesex, England; was christened 7 Apr 1141 (daughter of Henry I, King of England and Matilda of Scotland, Queen of England); died 10 Sep 1167, Notre Dame, Rouen, Seine-Maritime, France; was buried 10 Sep 1169, Bec Abbey, Le Bec-Hellouin, Eure, France.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Empress Matilda
    • Also Known As: Empress Maude
    • Also Known As: Empress of Germany
    • Also Known As: Queen of Italy

    Notes:

    Empress Matilda (c. 7 February 1102 – 10 September 1167), also known as the Empress Maude,[nb 1] was the claimant to the English throne during the civil war known as the Anarchy. The daughter of King Henry I of England, she moved to Germany as a child when she married the future Holy Roman Emperor Henry V. She travelled with her husband into Italy in 1116, was controversially crowned in St. Peter's Basilica, and acted as the imperial regent in Italy. Matilda and Henry had no children, and when Henry died in 1125, the crown was claimed by Lothair II, one of his political enemies.

    Meanwhile, Matilda's younger brother, William Adelin, died in the White Ship disaster of 1120, leaving England facing a potential succession crisis. On Henry V's death, Matilda was recalled to Normandy by her father, who arranged for her to marry Geoffrey of Anjou to form an alliance to protect his southern borders. Henry I had no further legitimate children and nominated Matilda as his heir, making his court swear an oath of loyalty to her and her successors, but the decision was not popular in the Anglo-Norman court. Henry died in 1135 but Matilda and Geoffrey faced opposition from the Norman barons and were unable to pursue their claims. The throne was instead taken by Matilda's cousin Stephen of Blois, who enjoyed the backing of the English Church. Stephen took steps to solidify his new regime, but faced threats both from neighbouring powers and from opponents within his kingdom.

    In 1139 Matilda crossed to England to take the kingdom by force, supported by her half-brother, Robert of Gloucester, and her uncle, King David I of Scotland, while Geoffrey focused on conquering Normandy. Matilda's forces captured Stephen at the Battle of Lincoln in 1141, but the Empress's attempt to be crowned at Westminster collapsed in the face of bitter opposition from the London crowds. As a result of this retreat, Matilda was never formally declared Queen of England, and was instead titled the Lady of the English. Robert was captured following the Rout of Winchester in 1141, and Matilda agreed to exchange him for Stephen. Matilda became trapped in Oxford Castle by Stephen's forces that winter, and was forced to escape across the frozen River Isis at night to avoid capture. The war degenerated into a stalemate, with Matilda controlling much of the south-west of England, and Stephen the south-east and the Midlands. Large parts of the rest of the country were in the hands of local, independent barons.

    Matilda returned to Normandy, now in the hands of her husband, in 1148, leaving her eldest son to continue the campaign in England; he eventually succeeded to the throne as Henry II in 1154. She settled her court near Rouen and for the rest of her life concerned herself with the administration of Normandy, acting on Henry's behalf when necessary. Particularly in the early years of her son's reign, she provided political advice and attempted to mediate during the Becket controversy. She worked extensively with the Church, founding Cistercian monasteries, and was known for her piety. She was buried under the high altar at Bec Abbey after her death in 1167.

    Notes:

    Married:
    The marriage was meant to seal a peace between England/Normandy and Anjou. She was eleven years older than Geoffrey, and very proud of her status as an Empress (as opposed to being a mere Countess). Their marriage was a stormy one with frequent long separations, but she bore him three sons and survived him.

    Children:
    1. 96. Henry II, King of England was born 5 Mar 1133, Le Mans, France; was christened 25 Mar 1133, Le Mans, France; died 6 Jul 1189, Chinon Castle, France; was buried 7 Jul 1189, Fontevraud Abbey, France.

  25. 242.  Roger de Mortimer was born Bef 1153 (son of Hugh de Mortimer and Matilda Le Meschin); died Bef 1215.

    Other Events:

    • Residence: Wales
    • Also Known As: Roger Mortimer of Wigmore

    Notes:

    Roger de Mortimer (before 1153-before 8 July 1214) was a medieval marcher lord, residing at Wigmore Castle in the English county of Herefordshire. He was the son of Hugh de Mortimer (d. 26 February 1181) and Matilda Le Meschin.

    Early life

    Roger would appear to have been of age in 1174 when he fought for King Henry II against the rebellion of his son, Henry. In 1179 Roger was instrumental in the killing of Cadwallon ap Madog, the prince of Maelienydd and Elfael, both of which Mortimer coveted. He was imprisoned until June 1182 at Winchester for this killing.

    Children

    He had married Isabel (d. before 29 April 1252), the daughter of Walchelin de Ferriers of Oakham Castle in Rutland before 1196. With Isabel, Roger had three sons and a daughter:

    Hugh de Mortimer (d.1227) - married Annora (Eleanor) de Braose, daughter of William de Braose and his wife Maud.[1]
    Ralph de Mortimer (d.1246).
    Philip Mortimer
    Joan Mortimer (d.1225) - married May 1212 to Walter de Beauchamp[2]
    He is often wrongly stated to have been the father of Robert Mortimer of Richards Castle (died 1219) - married Margary de Say,[3] daughter of Hugh de Say. But this Robert was born before 1155 and therefore could not have been a son of Roger.

    Lord of Maelienydd

    In 1195 Roger, with the backing of troops sent by King Richard I invaded Maelienydd and rebuilt Cymaron Castle. In 1196 he joined forces with Hugh de Say of Richards Castle and fought and lost the battle of New Radnor against Rhys ap Gruffydd, allegedly losing some forty knights and an innumerable number of foot in the fight. By 1200 he had conquered Maelienydd and issued a new charter of rights to Cwmhir Abbey. In the summer of 1214 he became gravely ill and bought the right for his son to inherit his lands while he still lived from King John. He died before 8 July 1214.

    *

    Roger — Isabel de Ferrers. Isabel (daughter of Walchelin de Ferriers and unnamed spouse) was born Oakham Castle, Rutland, England. [Group Sheet]


  26. 243.  Isabel de Ferrers was born Oakham Castle, Rutland, England (daughter of Walchelin de Ferriers and unnamed spouse).

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Isabel de Ferriers

    Children:
    1. Ralph de Mortimer, Knight was born Bef 1198, Wigmore Castle, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England; died Bef 6 Aug 1246.
    2. Hugh de Mortimer was born (Wigmore Castle, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England); died 0___ 1227.
    3. Philip Mortimer was born (Wigmore Castle, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England).
    4. 121. Joan Mortimer was born (Wigmore Castle, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England); died 0___ 1225.

  27. 246.  Waleran de Newburgh, Knight, 4th Earl of Warwick was born 0___ 1153 (son of Roger de Beaumont and Gundred de Warenne); died 12 Dec 1204.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Waleran de Beaumont
    • Also Known As: Walerian de Newburg

    Notes:

    Waleran de Beaumont, 4th Earl of Warwick (1153 – 12 December 1204) was the younger son of Roger de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Warwick and Gundred de Warenne, daughter of William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey and Elizabeth de Vermandois. He was also known as Walerian de Newburg.

    After his brother's death an impostor arose, claiming to be the deceased Earl; he gave Waleran a great deal of trouble in maintaining his claim. He does not appear to have been a great soldier, for he paid scutage money to escape military service in Wales. His position in the Court is attested by his bearing the right hand Sword of State at the Coronation of King John, 27 May 1199.

    He liberally supported the hospital of St. Michael's Hospital, Warwick and gave to the nuns of Pinley land at Claverdon, and land at Brailes to the nuns at Wroxall, Warwickshire.

    Family and children[edit]
    He married first to Margery, daughter of Henry d'Oily and Maud de Bohun and had children:

    Henry de Beaumont, 5th Earl of Warwick, his heir.
    Waleran de Beaumont of Gretham and Cotismore.
    Gundred de Beaumont. She and her cousin Mabel became nuns at the Abbey of Pinley.
    His second wife was Alice de Harcourt, widow of John de Limesy, Lord of Cavendish, daughter of Robert de Harcourt and she had one child:

    Alice de Beaumont (died before 1263), married William de Maudit, Baron of Hanslape, Chamberlain to the King. Their children were:
    William Maudit, 8th Earl of Warwick;
    Isabel de Maudit, married William de Beauchamp, Baron Elmley. Their son was William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick.
    References[edit]

    This article includes a list of references, related reading or external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks inline citations. Please help to improve this article by introducing more precise citations. (July 2008) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)
    A Realignment of the 12th and 13th Century Pedigree of the Earls of Warwick by Rosie Bevan
    A Complete Peerge Correction in Foundations, Waleran v. 1 #3, Jan. 2440, pp. 194–197 (see Cawley, Charles, ENGLISH NOBILITY MEDIEVAL: Waleran Warwick died 1203, Medieval Lands database, Foundation for Medieval Genealogy,[better source needed])
    Edward T. Beaumont, J.P. The Beaumonts in History. A.D. 850-1850. Oxford.

    Waleran — Alice de Harcourt. [Group Sheet]


  28. 247.  Alice de Harcourt
    Children:
    1. 123. Alice de Newburgh died Bef 1263.

  29. 250.  Roger de Clare, Knight, 3rd Earl of Hertford was born 0___ 1116, Tonbridge Castle, Kent, England (son of Richard Fitz Gilbert de Clare and Alice de Gernon); died 0___ 1173, Oxfordshire, England.

    Notes:

    Roger de Clare, 2nd Earl of Hertford, 5th Lord of Clare, 5th lord of Tonbridge, 5th Lord of Cardigan (1116–1173) was a powerful Norman noble during the 12th century England. He succeeded to the Earldom of Hertford and Honor of Clare, Tonbridge and Cardigan when his brother Gilbert died without issue.[1]

    Life

    Roger was a son of Richard Fitz Gilbert de Clare and Alice de Gernon.[2] In 1153, he appears with his cousin, Richard Strongbow, Earl of Pembroke, as one of the signatories to the Treaty of Wallingford, in which Stephen recognises Prince Henry as his successor. He is found signing charters at Canterbury and Dover in 1156. Next year, according to Powell, he received from Henry II a grant of whatever lands he could conquer in South Wales. This is probably only an expansion of the statement of the Welsh chronicles that in this year (about 1 June) he entered Cardigan and 'stored' the castles of Humfrey, Aberdovey, Dineir, and Rhystud. Rhys ap Gruffydd, the prince of South Wales, appears to have complained to Henry II of these encroachments ; but being unable to obtain redress from the king of England sent his nephew Einion ab Anarawd to attack Humfirey and the other Norman fortresses. The 'Annales Cambriµ seem to assign these events to the year 1159 ; and the 'Brut' adds that Prince Rhys burnt all the French castles in Cardigan.[1]

    In 1158 or 1160, Clare advanced with an army to the relief of Carmarthen Castle, then besieged by Rhys, and pitched his camp at Dinweilir. Not daring to attack the Welsh prince, the English army offered peace and retired home. In 1163, Rhys again invaded the conquests of Clare, who, we learn incidentally, has at some earlier period caused Einion, the capturer of Humfrey Castle, to be murdered by domestic treachery.[1]In 1164 he assisted with the Constitutions of Clarendon. From his munificence to the Church and his numerous acts of piety, Roger was called the "Good Earl of Hertford".[a] He was the founder of Little Marcis Nunnery prior to 1163.[3]

    A second time all Cardigan was wrested from the Norman hands ; and things now wore so threatening an aspect that Henry II led an army into Wales in 1165, although, according to one Welsh account, Rhys had made his peace with the king in 1164, and had even visited him in England. The causes assigned by the Welsh chronicle for this fresh outbreak of hostility are that Henry failed to keep his promises — presumably of restitution — and secondly that Roger, earl of Clare, was honourably receiving Walter, the murderer of Rhys's nephew Einion. For the third time we now read that Cardigan was overrun and the Norman castles burnt; but it is possible that the events assigned by the 'Annales Cambrµ' to the year 1165 are the same as those assigned by the 'Brut y Tywysogion' to 1163.[1]

    In the intervening years, Clare had been abroad, and is found signing charters at Le Mans, probably about Christmas 1160, and again at Rouen in 1161 (Eyton, pp. 52, 53). In July 1163 he was summoned by Becket to do homage in his capacity of steward to the archbishops of Canterbury for the castle of Tunbridge. In his refusal, which he based on the grounds that he held the castle of the king and not of the archbishop, he was supported by Henry II (Ralph de Diceto, i. 311; Gervase of Canterbury, i. 174, ii. 391). Next year he was one of the ‘recognisers’ of the constitutions of Clarendon (Select Charters, p. 138). Early in 1170 he was appointed one of a band of commissioners for Kent, Surrey, and other arts of southern England (Gerv. Cant. i. 216). His last known signature seems to belong to June or July 1171, and is dated abroad from Chevaillâee.[1]He appears to have died in 1173, and certainly before July or August 1174, when we find Richard, earl of Clare, his son, coming to the king at Northampton.[1]

    Family

    Roger married Maud de St. Hilary, daughter of James de St. Hilary and Aveline.[4] Together they had seven children:

    Mabel de Clare, d. 1204, m. (c. 1175), Nigel de Mowbray.
    Richard de Clare, b. c. 1153, Tonbridge Castle, Kent, England, d. 28 November 1217, 3rd Earl of Hertford
    James de Clare
    Eveline (Aveline) de Clare, d. 4 June 1225, m. [1] (c. 1204), Geoffrey IV Fitz Piers (Fitz Peter), 1st Earl of Essex.[5] m. [2] Sir William Munchensy, (b. c. 1184), son of Warin de Munchensy and Agnes Fitz John.
    Roger de Clare, d. 1241, Middleton, Norfolk, England.
    John de Clare
    Henry de Clare

    Birth:
    Photos, map & history for Tonbridge Castle ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tonbridge_Castle

    Roger — Maud de St. Hilary. [Group Sheet]


  30. 251.  Maud de St. Hilary
    Children:
    1. 125. Aveline de Clare was born ~1166, (Tonbridge Castle, Kent, England); died 4 Jun 1225.

  31. 252.  Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of NorfolkRoger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk was born 1144-1150, Norfolk, England (son of Hugh Bigod, Knight, 1st Earl of Norfolk and Juliane de Vere, Countess of Norfolk); died 0___ 1221, (Norfolk, England); was buried Thetford, Norfolk, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Ambassador to France
    • Military: 17 Oct 1173; Battle of Fornham

    Notes:

    Roger Bigod (c.?1144/1150 - 1221) was the son of Hugh Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk and his first wife, Juliana de Vere. Although his father died 1176 or 1177, Roger did not succeed to the earldom of Norfolk until 1189 for his claim had been disputed by his stepmother for her sons by Earl Hugh in the reign of Henry II. Richard I confirmed him in his earldom and other honours, and also sent him as an ambassador to France in the same year. Roger inherited his father's office as royal steward. He took part in the negotiations for the release of Richard from prison, and after the king's return to England became a justiciar.

    During the Revolt of 1173-74, Roger remained loyal to the king while his father sided with the king's rebellious sons. Roger fought at the Battle of Fornham on 17 October 1173, where the royalist force defeated a rebel force led by Robert de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester.[1]

    In most of the years of the reign of King John, the earl was frequently with the king or on royal business. Yet Roger was to be one of the leaders of the baronial party which obtained John's assent to Magna Carta, and his name and that of his son and heir Hugh II appear among the twenty-five barons who were to ensure the king's adherence to the terms of that document. The pair were excommunicated by the pope in December 1215, and did not make peace with the regents of John's son Henry III until 1217.

    Around Christmas 1181, Roger married Ida, apparently Ida de Tosny (or Ida de Toesny),[2] and by her had a number of children including:

    Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk who married in 1206/ 1207, Maud, a daughter of William Marshal
    William Bigod
    Ralph Bigod
    Roger Bigod
    Margery, married William de Hastings
    Mary Bigod, married Ralph fitz Robert[3]
    Many historians, including Marc Morris have speculated that the couple had a third daughter, Alice, who married Aubrey de Vere IV, Earl of Oxford as his second wife. If so, the marriage would have been well within the bounds of consanguinity, for the couple would have been quite closely related, a daughter of the second earl of Norfolk being first cousin once removed to the second earl of Oxford.

    Roger Bigod in fiction

    Roger Bigod and his wife Ida de Tosny are the main characters in Elizabeth Chadwick's The Time of Singing (Sphere, 2008), published in the USA as For the King's Favor. They appear as minor characters in other of her books set at the same time, notably To Defy a King, which concerns the marriage of their son Hugh to Maud, a daughter of William Marshal

    References

    Jump up ^ Bartlett, Robert C. (2000). England Under the Norman and Angevin Kings: 1075–1225. Oxford: Clarendon Press. pp. 257–258. ISBN 0-19-822741-8.
    Jump up ^ For Ida's ancestry, see "Some corrections and additions to the Complete Peerage: Volume 9: Summary" and Marc Morris's The Bigod Earls of Norfolk in the Thirteenth Century
    Jump up ^ S. D. Church, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography
    Liber Vitae Ecclesiae Dunelmensis, Vol. 13
    Morris, Marc. The Bigod Earls of Norfolk in the Thirteenth Century (2005)
    Cawley, Charles, Medieval Lands Project on Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk, Foundation for Medieval Genealogy, retrieved August 2012,[better source needed]

    *

    more ...

    Four years after William's birth, in 1181, Ida de Tosny was married to Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk, by whom she had a number of children.

    Roger married Ida de Tosny, Countess of Norfolk 0___ 1181, (Norfolk, England). Ida (daughter of Ralph de Tosny, V, Knight, Earl and Margaret de Beaumont) died Aft 1185. [Group Sheet]


  32. 253.  Ida de Tosny, Countess of Norfolk (daughter of Ralph de Tosny, V, Knight, Earl and Margaret de Beaumont); died Aft 1185.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Ida de Toesny

    Notes:

    Ida de Tosny, Countess of Norfolk was very likely a daughter of Ralph V de Tosny (died 1162) and his wife Margaret (born circa 1125 and living in 1185), a daughter of Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester.[1]

    Relationship to Henry II

    Ida de Tosny was a royal ward and mistress of King Henry II, by whom she was mother of one of his illegitimate sons, William Longespâee, 3rd Earl of Salisbury, (b c. 1176-March 7, 1226). For many years, until the discovery of a charter of William mentioning "Comitissa Ida, mater mea" (Countess Ida, my mother),[2] it was assumed that Rosamund Clifford, a previous mistress of Henry's, was the mother, but painstaking genealogical detective work [3] has since shown otherwise. Ida was not the first English royal ward to be taken as a royal mistress. Isabel de Beaumont (Elizabeth de Beaumont), daughter of Robert de Beaumont, who fought at the Battle of Hastings with the Conqueror, was the ward of King Henry I and the mistress of one of his sons.[4]

    Marriage

    Around Christmas 1181, Ida de Tosny was given in marriage to Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk by Henry II, together with the manors of Acle, Halvergate and South Walsham, which had been confiscated from his inheritance after his father's death (Hugh Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk).[5] Ida and Roger had a number of children including:

    Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk who married in 1206 or 1207, Maud Marshal, a daughter of William Marshal
    William Bigod
    Ralph Bigod
    Roger Bigod
    Margery Bigod, married William de Hastings
    Mary Bigod, married Ralph fitz Robert

    Many historians, including Marc Morris have speculated that the couple had a third daughter, Alice, who married Aubrey de Vere IV, 2nd Earl of Oxford as his second wife. If so, the marriage would have been well within the bounds of consanguinity, for the couple would have been quite closely related, a daughter of the second earl of Norfolk being first cousin once removed to the second earl of Oxford.

    Ida de Tosney in fiction

    Ida de Tosny and her husband Roger are the main characters in Elizabeth Chadwick's The Time of Singing (Sphere, 2008), published in the USA as For the King's Favor. They appear as minor characters in other of her books set at the same time, notably To Defy a King, which concerns the marriage of their son Hugh to Maud, a daughter of William Marshal

    *

    more ...

    Ida de Tosny was a royal ward who became the mistress of King Henry II. The first evidence of contemporary information about Ida came to light in 1979 with the publication in the of two charters found in the Bradenstoke Priory Cartulary where he mentions "Comitissa Ida, mater mea" (Countess Ida, my mother), until then, it was assumed that Rosamund Clifford, a previous and more famous mistress of King Henry II's, was William's mother.

    Notes:

    Married:
    around Christmas...

    Children:
    1. 126. Hugh Bigod, Knight, 3rd Earl of Norfolk was born ~ 1182, Thetford, Norfolk, England; died 18 Feb 1225, (Norfolk, England); was buried Thetford Priory, Thetford, Norfolk, England.

  33. 74.  William Marshal, Templar Knight, 1st Earl PembrokeWilliam Marshal, Templar Knight, 1st Earl Pembroke was born 1146-1147, (Berkshire, England) (son of John FitzGilbert and Sibyl of Salisbury); died 14 Apr 1219, Caversham, Berkshire, England; was buried Temple Church, London, Middlesex, England.

    Notes:

    William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke (1146 or 1147 - 14 May 1219), also called William the Marshal (Norman French: Williame le Mareschal), was an Anglo-Norman soldier and statesman.[1] He served five English kings – The "Young King" Henry, Henry II, Richard I, John, and Henry III.

    Knighted in 1166, he spent his younger years as a knight errant and a successful tournament fighter; Stephen Langton eulogized him as the "best knight that ever lived."[2] In 1189, he received the title of Earl of Pembroke through marriage during the second creation of the Pembroke Earldom. In 1216, he was appointed protector for the nine-year-old Henry III, and regent of the kingdom.

    Before him, his father's family held an hereditary title of Marshal to the king, which by his father's time had become recognized as a chief or master Marshalcy, involving management over other Marshals and functionaries. William became known as 'the Marshal', although by his time much of the function was actually delegated to more specialized representatives (as happened with other functions in the King's household). Because he was an Earl, and also known as the Marshal, the term "Earl Marshal" was commonly used and this later became an established hereditary title in the English Peerage.


    Early life

    Tomb effigy of William Marshal in Temple Church, London
    William's father, John Marshal, supported King Stephen when he took the throne in 1135, but in about 1139 he changed sides to back the Empress Matilda in the civil war of succession between her and Stephen which led to the collapse of England into "the Anarchy".[4]

    When King Stephen besieged Newbury Castle in 1152, according to William's biographer, he used the young William as a hostage to ensure that John kept his promise to surrender the castle. John, however, used the time allotted to reinforce the castle and alert Matilda's forces. When Stephen ordered John to surrender immediately or William would be hanged, John replied that he should go ahead saying, "I still have the hammer and the anvil with which to forge still more and better sons!" Subsequently there was a bluff made to launch William from a pierriáere, a type of trebuchet towards the castle. Fortunately for the child, Stephen could not bring himself to harm young William.[5] William remained a crown hostage for many months, only being released following the peace that resulted from the terms agreed at Winchester on 6 November 1153 that ended the civil war.

    Knight-Errant

    As a younger son of a minor nobleman, William had no lands or fortune to inherit, and had to make his own way in life. Around the age of twelve, when his father's career was faltering, he was sent to Normandy to be brought up in the household of William de Tancarville, a great magnate and cousin of young William's mother. Here he began his training as a knight. This would have included basic biblical stories and prayers written in Latin, as well as exposure to French romances, which conferred the basic precepts of chivalry to the budding knight.[6] In addition, while in Tancarville’s household, it is likely that Marshal also learned important and lasting practical lessons concerning the politics of courtly life. According to his thirteenth-century biography, L'Histoire de Guillaume le Marechal, Marshal had a number of adversaries in court who machinated to his disadvantage—these individuals likely would have been threatened by the boy’s close relationship with the magnate.[7] He was knighted in 1166 on campaign in Upper Normandy, then being invaded from Flanders. His first experience in battle came with mixed reviews. According to L'Histoire, everyone who witnessed the young knight in action agreed that he had acquitted himself well in combat. However, as medieval historian David Crouch explains, “War in the twelfth century was not fought wholly for honour. Profit was there to be made…”[8] On this front, Marshal was not so successful, as he was unable to parlay his combat victories into profit from either ransom or seized booty. As described in L'Histoire, the Earl of Essex, who was expecting the customary tribute from his valorous knight following battle, jokingly remarked: “Oh? But Marshal, what are you saying? You had forty or sixty of them — yet you refuse me so small a thing!”[9] In 1167 he was taken by William de Tancarville to his first tournament where he found his true mâetier. Quitting the Tancarville household he then served in the household of his mother's brother, Patrick, Earl of Salisbury. In 1168 his uncle was killed in an ambush by Guy de Lusignan. William was injured and captured in the same skirmish. It is known that William received a wound to his thigh and that someone in his captor's household took pity on the young knight. He received a loaf of bread in which were concealed several lengths of clean linen bandages with which he could dress his wounds. This act of kindness by an unknown person perhaps saved Marshal's life as infection setting into the wound could have killed him. After a period of time, he was ransomed by Eleanor of Aquitaine, who was apparently impressed by tales of his bravery.

    Thereafter he found he could make a good living out of winning tournaments, dangerous, often deadly, staged battles in which money and valuable prizes could be won by capturing and ransoming opponents, their horses and armour. His record is legendary: on his deathbed he recalled besting 500 knights during his tourneying career.[10]

    Royal favour

    13th-century depiction by Matthew Paris of the Earl of Pembroke's coat of arms[11]
    Upon his return during the course of 1185 William rejoined the court of King Henry II, and now served the father as a loyal captain through the many difficulties of his final years. The returns of royal favour were almost immediate. The king gave William the large royal estate of Cartmel in Cumbria, and the keeping of Heloise, the heiress of the northern barony of Lancaster. It may be that the king expected him to take the opportunity to marry her and become a northern baron, but William seems to have had grander ambitions for his marriage. In 1188 faced with an attempt by Philip II to seize the disputed region of Berry, Henry II summoned the Marshal to his side. The letter by which he did this survives, and makes some sarcastic comments about William's complaints that he had not been properly rewarded to date for his service to the king. Henry therefore promised him the marriage and lands of Dionisia, lady of Chăateauroux in Berry. In the resulting campaign, the king fell out with his heir Richard, count of Poitou, who consequently allied with Philip II against his father. In 1189, while covering the flight of Henry II from Le Mans to Chinon, William unhorsed the undutiful Richard in a skirmish. William could have killed the prince but killed his horse instead, to make that point clear. He is said to have been the only man ever to unhorse Richard. Nonetheless after Henry's death, Marshal was welcomed at court by his former adversary, now King Richard I, who was wise to include a man whose legendary loyalty and military accomplishments were too useful to ignore, especially in a king who was intending to go on Crusade.[1]

    During the old king's last days he had promised the Marshal the hand and estates of Isabel de Clare (c.1172–1220), but had not completed the arrangements. King Richard however, confirmed the offer and so in August 1189, at the age of 43, the Marshal married the 17-year-old daughter of Richard de Clare (Strongbow). Her father had been Earl of Pembroke, and Marshal acquired large estates and claims in England, Wales, Normandy and Ireland. Some estates however were excluded from the deal. Marshal did not obtain Pembroke and the title of earl, which his father-in-law had enjoyed, until 1199, as it had been taken into the king's hand in 1154. However, the marriage transformed the landless knight from a minor family into one of the richest men in the kingdom, a sign of his power and prestige at court. They had five sons and five daughters, and have numerous descendants.[1] William made numerous improvements to his wife's lands, including extensive additions to Pembroke Castle and Chepstow Castle.[citation needed]

    William was included in the council of regency which the King appointed on his departure for the Third Crusade in 1190. He took the side of John, the king's brother, when the latter expelled the justiciar, William Longchamp, from the kingdom, but he soon discovered that the interests of John were different from those of Richard. Hence in 1193 he joined with the loyalists in making war upon him. In spring 1194, during the course of the hostilities in England and before King Richard's return, William Marshal's elder brother John Marshal (who was serving as seneschal) was killed while defending Marlborough for the king's brother John. Richard allowed Marshal to succeed his brother in the hereditary marshalship, and his paternal honour of Hamstead Marshall. The Marshal served the king in his wars in Normandy against Philip II. On Richard's death-bed the king designated Marshal as custodian of Rouen and of the royal treasure during the interregnum.[1]

    King John and Magna Carta

    A 13th-century depiction of the Second Battle of Lincoln, which occurred at Lincoln Castle on 20 May 1217; the illustration shows the death of Thomas du Perche, the Comte de la Perche

    William supported King John when he became king in 1199, arguing against those who maintained the claims of Arthur of Brittany, the teenage son of John's elder brother Geoffrey Plantagenet. William was heavily engaged with the defence of Normandy against the growing pressure of the Capetian armies between 1200 and 1203. He sailed with King John when he abandoned the duchy in December 1203. He and the king had a falling out in the aftermath of the loss of the duchy, when he was sent with the earl of Leicester as ambassadors to negotiate a truce with King Philip II of France in 1204. The Marshal took the opportunity to negotiate the continued possession of his Norman lands.

    Before commencing negotiations with King Philip, William had been generously permitted to do homage to the King of France by King John so he might keep his possessions in Normandy; land which must have been of sentimental value due to the time spent there in his youth and adolescence. However, once official negotiations began, Philip demanded that such homage be paid exclusively to him, which King John had not consented to.[12] When William paid homage to King Philip, John took offence and there was a major row at court which led to cool relations between the two men. This became outright hostility in 1207 when John began to move against several major Irish magnates, including William. Though he left for Leinster in 1207 William was recalled and humiliated at court in the autumn of 1208, while John's justiciar in Ireland Meilyr fitz Henry invaded his lands, burning the town of New Ross.

    Meilyr's defeat by Countess Isabel led to her husband's return to Leinster. He was once again in conflict with King John in his war with the Braose and Lacy families in 1210, but managed to survive. He stayed in Ireland until 1213, during which time he had Carlow Castle erected[13] and restructured his honour of Leinster. Taken back into favour in 1212, he was summoned in 1213 to return to the English court. Despite their differences, William remained loyal throughout the hostilities between John and his barons which culminated on 15 June 1215 at Runnymede with the sealing of Magna Carta. William was one of the few English earls to remain loyal to the king through the First Barons' War. It was William whom King John trusted on his deathbed to make sure John's nine-year-old son Henry would get the throne. It was William who took responsibility for the king's funeral and burial at Worcester Cathedral.[1]

    On 11 November 1216 at Gloucester, upon the death of King John, William Marshal was named by the king's council (the chief barons who had remained loyal to King John in the First Barons' War) to serve as protector of the nine-year-old King Henry III, and regent of the kingdom. In spite of his advanced age (around 70) he prosecuted the war against Prince Louis and the rebel barons with remarkable energy. In the battle of Lincoln he charged and fought at the head of the young King's army, leading them to victory. He was preparing to besiege Louis in London when the war was terminated by the naval victory of Hubert de Burgh in the straits of Dover. [1]

    William was criticised for the generosity of the terms he accorded to Louis and the rebels in September 1217; but his desire for an expeditious settlement was dictated by sound statesmanship. Self-restraint and compromise were the keynote of Marshal's policy, hoping to secure peace and stability for his young liege. Both before and after the peace of 1217 he reissued Magna Carta, in which he is a signatory as one of the witnessing barons.

    Death and legacy

    William Marshal was interred in Temple Church, London
    Marshal's health finally failed him early in 1219. In March 1219 he realised that he was dying, so he summoned his eldest son, also William, and his household knights, and left the Tower of London for his estate at Caversham in Berkshire, near Reading, where he called a meeting of the barons, Henry III, the Papal legate Pandulf Verraccio, the royal justiciar (Hubert de Burgh), and Peter des Roches (Bishop of Winchester and the young King's guardian). William rejected the Bishop's claim to the regency and entrusted the regency to the care of the papal legate; he apparently did not trust the Bishop or any of the other magnates that he had gathered to this meeting. Fulfilling the vow he had made while on crusade, he was invested into the order of the Knights Templar on his deathbed. He died on 14 May 1219 at Caversham, and was buried in the Temple Church in London, where his tomb can still be seen.[1]

    Descendants of William Marshal and Isabel de Clare

    William Marshal, 2nd Earl of Pembroke (1190–6 April 1231), married (1) Alice de Bâethune, daughter of Earl of Albemarle; (2) 23 April 1224 Eleanor Plantagenet, daughter of King John of England. They had no children.
    Richard Marshal, 3rd Earl of Pembroke (1191–16 April 1234), married Gervase le Dinant. He died in captivity. They had no children.
    Maud Marshal (1194–27 March 1248), married (1) Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk, they had four children; (2) William de Warenne, 5th Earl of Surrey, they had two children; (3) Walter de Dunstanville.
    Gilbert Marshal, 4th Earl of Pembroke (1197–27 June 1241), married (1) Marjorie of Scotland, youngest daughter of King William I of Scotland; by an unknown mistress he had one illegitimate daughter:
    Isabel Marshal, married to Rhys ap Maeldon Fychan.
    Walter Marshal, 5th Earl of Pembroke (c. 1199 – November 1245), married Margaret de Quincy, Countess of Lincoln, granddaughter of Hugh de Kevelioc, 3rd Earl of Chester. No children.
    Isabel Marshal (9 October 1200 – 17 January 1240), married (1) Gilbert de Clare, 5th Earl of Hertford, whose daughter Isabel de Clare married Robert Bruce, 5th Lord of Annandale, the grandfather of Robert the Bruce; (2) Richard Plantagenet, Earl of Cornwall
    Sibyl Marshal (c. 1201–27 April 1245), married William de Ferrers, 5th Earl of Derby–they had seven daughters.
    Agnes Ferrers (died 11 May 1290), married William de Vesci.

    Isabel Ferrers (died before 26 November 1260)
    Maud Ferrers (died 12 March 1298), married (1) Simon de Kyme, and (2) William de Vivonia (de Forz), and (3) Amaury IX of Rochechouart.
    Sibyl Ferrers, married Sir Francis or Franco de Bohun.
    Joan Ferrers (died 1267)
    Agatha Ferrers (died May 1306), married Hugh Mortimer, of Chelmarsh.
    Eleanor Ferrers (died 16 October 1274), married to:

    Eva Marshal (1203–1246), married William de Braose, Lord of Abergavenny

    Isabella de Braose (b.1222), married Prince Dafydd ap Llywelyn. She died childless.
    Maud de Braose (1224–1301), in 1247, she married Roger Mortimer, 1st Baron Mortimer and they had descendants.
    Eva de Braose (1227 – 28 July 1255), married Sir William de Cantelou and had descendants.
    Eleanor de Braose (c.1228–1251). On an unknown date after August 1241, she married Sir Humphrey de Bohun and had descendants.

    Anselm Marshal, 6th Earl of Pembroke (c. 1208–22 December 1245), married Maud de Bohun, daughter of Humphrey de Bohun, 2nd Earl of Hereford. They had no children.
    Joan Marshal (1210–1234), married Warin de Munchensi (d. 1255), Lord of Swanscombe
    Joan de Munchensi (1230–20 September 1307) married William of Valence, the fourth son of King John's widow, Isabella of Angoulăeme, and her second husband, Hugh X of Lusignan, Count of La Marche. Valence was half-brother to Henry III and Edward I's uncle.

    The fate of the Marshal family

    During the civil wars in Ireland, William had taken two manors that the Bishop of Ferns claimed but could not get back. Some years after William's death, that bishop is said[14] to have laid a curse on the family that William's sons would have no children, and the great Marshal estates would be scattered. Each of William's sons did become earl of Pembroke and marshal of England, and each died without legitimate issue. William's vast holdings were then divided among the husbands of his five daughters. The title of "Marshal" went to the husband of the oldest daughter, Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk, and later passed to the Mowbray dukes of Norfolk and then to the Howard dukes of Norfolk, becoming "Earl Marshal" along the way. The title of "Earl of Pembroke" passed to William of Valence, the husband of Joan Marshal's daughter, Joan de Munchensi; he became the first of the de Valence line of earls of Pembroke.

    Through his daughter Isabel, William is ancestor to the both the Bruce and Stewart kings of Scots. Through his granddaughter Maud de Braose, William is ancestor to the last Plantagenet kings, Edward IV through Richard III, and all English monarchs from Henry VIII and afterward.

    Buried:
    at Temple Church...

    The Temple Church is a late 12th-century church in the City of London located between Fleet Street and the River Thames, built by the Knights Templar as their English headquarters. During the reign of King John (1199-1216) it served as the royal treasury, supported by the role of the Knights Templars as proto-international bankers. It is jointly owned by the Inner Temple and Middle Temple[1] Inns of Court, bases of the English legal profession. It is famous for being a round church, a common design feature for Knights Templar churches, and for its 13th and 14th century stone effigies. It was heavily damaged by German bombing during World War II and has since been greatly restored and rebuilt. The area around the Temple Church is known as the Temple and nearby formerly in the middle of Fleet Street stood the Temple Bar, an ornamental processional gateway. Nearby is the Temple Underground station.

    Photo, history & source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Temple_Church

    Died:
    Caversham is a suburb in the Borough of Reading...

    Map, history & source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caversham,_Berkshire

    William married Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke 0Aug 1189, London, England. Isabel (daughter of Richard de Clare, Knight, 2nd Earl Pembroke and Eva Aoife Mac Murchada, Countess Pembroke) was born 0___ 1172, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales; died 14 Oct 1217, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales; was buried Tintern Abbey, Tintern, Monmouthshire, Wales. [Group Sheet]


  34. 75.  Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke was born 0___ 1172, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales (daughter of Richard de Clare, Knight, 2nd Earl Pembroke and Eva Aoife Mac Murchada, Countess Pembroke); died 14 Oct 1217, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales; was buried Tintern Abbey, Tintern, Monmouthshire, Wales.

    Other Events:

    • Alt Death: 0___ 1220, Pembrokeshire, Wales

    Notes:

    F Isabel De CLAREPrint Family Tree
    Born in 1172 - Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales
    Deceased 14 October 1217 - Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales , age at death: 45 years old
    Buried in 1217 - Monmouth, Monmouthshire, Wales

    Parents
    Richard (Strongbow) De ( 2nd Earl Pembroke, Lord Marshall) CLARE, born in 1125 - Tonbridge, Kent, England, Deceased 20 April 1176 - Dublin, Ireland age at death: 51 years old , buried in 1176 - Dublin, Ireland
    Married 26 August 1171, Waterford, Waterford, Ireland, to
    Eva Aoife Mac (Countess Pembroke) MURCHADA, born 26 April 1141 - Dublin, Ireland, Deceased in 1188 - Waterford, Ireland age at death: 47 years old , buried - Tintern, Monmouthshire, Wales

    Spouses, children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren
    Married in August 1189, London, England, to William (SIR - Knight Templar)(Earl Pembroke) MARSHALL, born 12 May 1146 - Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales, Deceased 14 May 1219 - Reading, Berkshire, England age at death: 73 years old , buried in 1219 - London, England (Parents : M John (Fitzgilbert) (Earl of Pembroke, Marshall of England) MARSHALL 1105-1165 & F Sibilla De SALISBURY 1109-1155) with
    F Maud (Countess of Norfolk Countess of Surrey) MARSHALL 1192-1248 married to William (de Warenne) WARREN 1166-1240 with
    M John De (SIR - Earl of Surrey) WARREN 1231-1304 married before 1244, England, to Alice (Le Brun) De (Countess of Surrey) LUSIGNAN 1224-1291 with :
    F Eleanor (Plantagenet) De WARREN 1244-1282
    M William De (SIR) WARREN 1256-1286

    John De (SIR - Earl of Surrey) WARREN 1231-1304 married in 1247, Surrey, England, to Isabel De Surrey 1234-
    Maud (Countess of Norfolk Countess of Surrey) MARSHALL 1192-1248 married to Hugh (Magna Charta Baron - EARL of NORFOLK) BIGOD 1175-1225 with
    F Isabel BIGOD ca 1215-1239 married before 1235, Shere, Surrey, England, to John (Fitzgeoffrey) (SIR - Lord of Shere) (Justiciar of England) FITZPIERS 1215-1258 with :
    F Aveline (Fitzjohn) FITZPIERS ca 1235-1274
    F Maud (Fitzjohn) (Countess of WARWICK) FITZPIERS 1237-1301
    F Eve (Baroness of Abergavenny) MARSHALL 1194-1246 married 2 May 1230, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales, to William "Black William" (de Braose) BRUCE 1204-1230 with
    M William (de Braose) BRUCE 1210-1292 married to Maud De Fay 1180-1249 with :
    F Eleanor (de Braose) BRUCE 1230-
    F Isabella (de Braose) BRUCE 1220/- married to Dafydd (Ap Llywelyn) (Prince of WALES) TUDOR 1208-1246
    F Eva (de Braose) BRUCE 1220-1255 married 25 July 1238, Calne, Wiltshire, England, to William De CANTILUPE 1216-1254 with :
    F Joane CANTILUPE 1240-1271
    F Sybilla De Cantilupe ca 1240-
    F Millicent (Cauntelo) De CANTILUPE ca 1250-/1299
    F Maud (de Braose) (BARONESS WIGMORE) BRUCE 1226-1300 married in 1247, King's Stanley, Gloucestershire, England, to Roger De (SIR) MORTIMER 1231-1282 with :
    F Isabella De MORTIMER 1248-1274
    M Edmund De (Sir - 7th Lord) MORTIMER 1252-1303
    F Isolde De MORTIMER 1267-1338
    Eve (Baroness of Abergavenny) MARSHALL 1194-1246 married in 1230, England, to Milo (de Saint Maur) (SIR) SEYMOUR ca 1200-1245 with
    M Richard SEYMOUR 1230-1271 married in 1250 to Isabel (Lady) MARSHALL 1238-1268 with :
    M Roger (de Saint Maur) SEYMOUR 1258-1300
    F Katherine SEYMOUR ca 1265-ca 1335
    M Gilbert MARSHALL 1196-1241 married to Marjorie Of SCOTLAND 1204-1244 with
    F Isabel (Lady) MARSHALL 1238-1268 married in 1250 to Richard SEYMOUR 1230-1271 with :
    M Roger (de Saint Maur) SEYMOUR 1258-1300
    F Katherine SEYMOUR ca 1265-ca 1335
    M William (4th Earl of Pembroke/ChiefJusticar of Ireland) MARSHALL 1198-1231 married 23 April 1224, Hampshire, England, to Eleanor (Princess of England) PLANTAGENET ca 1205-1275 with
    F Isabel Marshall 1225/-1239
    M X MARSHALL ca 1230- married to ? ? with :
    M X MARSHALL ca 1260-
    F Isabel (Fitzgilbert) (Countess MARSHALL) MARSHALL 1200-1239 married 9 October 1217, Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England, to Gilbert III De (Earl of Gloucester - Hertford) CLARE, MAGNA CARTA BARON ca 1180-1230 with
    M Richard De (Earl of Herts - Gloucs) CLARE 1222-1262 married 25 January 1238, Lincolnshire, England, to Maud De (Countess of Gloucester) LACY 1223-1289 with :
    M Gilbert IV De (Earl of Herts - Gloucs) CLARE 1243-1295
    M Thomas De (Lord of Thomand, Connaught, Chancellor of Ireland) CLARE 1245-1287
    F Rohesia De CLARE 1252-1316
    F Isabel De (Lady Annabelle - 3rd Countess of Pembroke) CLARE 1226-1264 married in May 1240, Scotland, to Robert "the Competitor" De (SIR - 5th Lord of Annandale) BRUCE 1210-1295 with :
    M Robert De (Lord Annadale) BRUCE 1243-1304
    F Mary Clarissa De BRUCE 1255-1283
    Isabel (Fitzgilbert) (Countess MARSHALL) MARSHALL 1200-1239 married 30 March 1231, Bucks, Pennsylvania, USA, to Richard (Earl of CORNWALL) CORNWALL 1209-1272 with
    M Richard (SIR) (PLANTAGENET) CORNWALL 1234-1272 married before 1280, Cornwall, England, to Joan SAINT OWEN 1234-1308 with :
    M Edmund De (PLANTAGENET) CORNWALL 1280-1354
    F Sibyl MARSHALL ca 1201-1245 married 14 May 1219, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales, to William De (SIR - 5th Earl of Derby,) (Sheriff of Leicester) FERRERS 1190-1254 with
    F Maud De FERRERS ca 1215-1298 married in 1248 to William (Fortibus) De (SIR) VIVONNE 1215-1259 with :
    F Joan de ** (Countess of Chewton) VIVONNE 1235-1314
    F Margaret (Joan) De (to Wynter) FERRERS ca 1220-1267 married 5 December 1242, England, to Roger De Quincy ca 1215-1242/
    Margaret (Joan) De (to Wynter) FERRERS ca 1220-1267 married before 1245, England, to John De MOHUN ca 1220-1255 with :
    M John De MOHUN ca 1243-1279

    Margaret (Joan) De (to Wynter) FERRERS ca 1220-1267 married about 1256, Derbyshire, England, to Roger (SIR ) (MIDLANDS) WYNTER ca 1220- with :
    M Robert ** (Bedfordshire) WYNTER /1260-
    M Roger de ** (Suffolk - ??) WYNTER /1267-ca 1327
    M ** (Connection speculative) WYNTER /1268-
    F Isabel De FERRERS 1223-1252 married after 1247, England, to Reginald De MOHUN 1202-1256 with :
    F Isabel De MOHUN 1248-1280
    F Agatha De FERRERS ca 1225- married to Hugh De MORTIMER 1219-1274 with :
    M Robert De MORTIMER 1251-1287
    F Mary De MORTIMER 1260-1290
    M William De (SIR) FERRERS 1235-1287 married in 1262, Wootton Bassett, Wiltshire, England, to Anne le De SPENCER 1240/-1280 with :
    M ? ?
    F Anne De (to GREY) FERRERS 1268-1324
    M William De (SIR - to Wynter via VERDON) FERRERS 1272-1325
    M Robert De (6th Earl of Derby) (to NEVILLE) FERRERS ca 1239-1279 married 26 June 1269, Staffordshire, England, to Alianore De BOHUN 1240-1314 with :
    M John De (SIR - Baron of Chartley) FERRERS 1271-1312
    F Joane MARSHALL 1202-1234 married to Warin Munchensy 1192-1255 with
    F Joan MUNCHENSY 1222-1307 married to William (de Lusignan) (Earl of Pembroke) VALENCE 1225-1296 with :
    F Margaret De (Baroness de la ROCHE) VALENCE 1254-1315
    F Isabel De VALENCE ca 1262-1305

    Siblings
    M Richard III De (SIR) CLARE, MAGNA CARTA BARON ca 1153-1217 Married in 1180, England, to Amicie De CAEN 1160-1225
    F Joan De ( Baroness of Gamage) CLARE 1175-1222/ Married in 1196, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales, to Godfrey De (Sir) ( Lord of Gamage) GAMAGE 1176-1253

    Paternal grand-parents, uncles and aunts
    M Gilbert De (1st Earl Pembroke) CLARE 1100-1148 married (1130)
    F Isabel De (Countess Pembroke and Buckingham) BEAUMONT 1086-1147
    M Richard (Strongbow) De ( 2nd Earl Pembroke, Lord Marshall) CLARE 1125-1176
    married (1171)
    3 children

    F Isabel De (Countess Pembroke and Buckingham) BEAUMONT 1086-1147
    married (1098)M Henry I (Beauclerc) (KING OF ENGLAND) NORMANDY 1068-1135
    F Constance Maude FITZROY 1098-
    married (1120)
    1 child



    Maternal grand-parents, uncles and aunts
    M Dermot Dairmait Mac (King of Leinster) MURCHADA 1110-1171 married (1140)
    F Mor Tauthail Moringen Murchertaig (Queen of Ireland) O'TOOLE 1114-1191
    F Eva Aoife Mac (Countess Pembroke) MURCHADA 1141-1188
    married (1171)
    3 children
    F Urlachen Mac MURCHADA 1154-1200
    married (1171)
    2 children



    Notes
    Individual Note
    Source: Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Millennium File - Heritage Consulting - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2003.Original data - Heritage Consulting. The Millennium File. Salt Lake City, UT, USA: Heritage Consulting.Original data: Heritage Consulting. The Millennium File. Salt Lake City, UT, USA: - 1,7249::0
    http://search.Ancestry.com.au/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=millind&h=10154284&ti=5544&indiv=try&gss=pt Birth date: 1172 Birth place: Pembroke, Wales Death date: 1220 Death place: Pembroke, Wales 1,7249::10154284
    Source: Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - Web: International, Find A Grave Index - Ancestry.com - Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. - 1,70699::0 1,70699::438790
    Source: Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - UK and Ireland, Find A Grave Index, 1300s-Current - Ancestry.com - Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. - 1,60526::0 1,60526::219175

    Death
    Age: 48


    Sources
    Individual:
    - Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Ancestry Family Trees - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members. - This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created. - Ancestry Family Trees - http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=18829447&pid=8010
    - Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Ancestry Family Trees - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members. - This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created. - Ancestry Family Trees - http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=18829447&pid=8010
    - Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Ancestry Family Trees - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members. - This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created. - Ancestry Family Trees - http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=18829447&pid=8010
    - Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Ancestry Family Trees - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members. - This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created. - Ancestry Family Trees - http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=18829447&pid=8010
    Birth, death:
    - Ancestry.com.au - http://www.Ancestry.com.au - Millennium File - Heritage Consulting - Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2003.Original data - Heritage Consulting. The Millennium File. Salt Lake City, UT, USA: Heritage Consulting.Original data: Heritage Consulting. The Millennium File. Salt Lake City, UT, USA: - 1,7249::0
    Note http://search.Ancestry.com.au/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=millind&h=10154284&ti=5544&indiv=try&gss=pt - Birth date: 1172 Birth place: Pembroke, Wales Death date: 1220 Death place: Pembroke, Wales - 1,7249::10154284
    - Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - Web: International, Find A Grave Index - Ancestry.com - Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. - 1,70699::0 - 1,70699::438790
    - Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - UK and Ireland, Find A Grave Index, 1300s-Current - Ancestry.com - Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. - 1,60526::0 - 1,60526::219175
    Burial:
    - Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - Web: International, Find A Grave Index - Ancestry.com - Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. - 1,70699::0 - 1,70699::438790
    - Ancestry.com - http://www.Ancestry.com - UK and Ireland, Find A Grave Index, 1300s-Current - Ancestry.com - Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. - 1,60526::0 - 1,60526::219175

    Family Tree Preview
    Ancestry Chart Descendancy Chart
    _____| 16_ Richard (Fitzgilbert) De CLARE 1030-1089
    _____| 8_ Gilbert (Fitzrichard) De (Some say - Lord of Chepstow) CLARE 1065-1114
    _____| 4_ Gilbert De (1st Earl Pembroke) CLARE 1100-1148
    / \ _____| 18_ Hugh De CLERMONT 1030-1101
    |2_ Richard (Strongbow) De ( 2nd Earl Pembroke, Lord Marshall) CLARE 1125-1176
    | \ _____| 20_ Roger De (SIR - Barbatus le Barber) BEAUMONT 1022-1094
    | \ _____| 10_ Robert De (SIR - 1st Earl Leics - Count Melun) BEAUMONT 1046-1118
    | \ _____| 22_ Hugh (The Great) (Count of Vermandois) CAPET 1053-1102
    |--1_ Isabel De CLARE 1172-1217
    | _____| 24_ Murchad Macdairmata MURCHADA 1032-1070
    | _____| 12_ Donnchad Enna Mac MURCHADA 1085-1115
    | _____| 6_ Dermot Dairmait Mac (King of Leinster) MURCHADA 1110-1171
    | / \ _____| 26_ Gilla Michil O'BRIEN 1055-1068
    |3_ Eva Aoife Mac (Countess Pembroke) MURCHADA 1141-1188
    \ _____| 28_ Gilla-Comgaill II (King of Ui Muriedaig) O'TOOLE 1055-1127
    \ _____| 14_ Mouirchertach (King of Ui Muiredaig) O'TOOLE 1089-1164
    \ _____| 30_ Loigsech (King of Loigsi) O'MORDA

    end of biography

    Isabel de Clare, suo jure Countess of Pembroke and Striguil (1172-1220) was a Cambro-Norman-Irish noblewoman, go to this link for further clarification ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cambro-Norman, and one of the wealthiest heiresses in Wales and Ireland. She was the wife of William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke, who served four successive kings as Lord Marshal of England. Her marriage had been arranged by King Richard I.

    Daniel Maclise's painting of the marriage of Isabel's parents, Strongbow and Aoife of Leinster in August 1170, the day after the capture of Waterford.
    Isabel was born in 1172 in Pembrokeshire, Wales, the eldest child of Richard de Clare, 2nd Earl of Pembroke (1130 – 20 April 1176), known to history as "Strongbow", and Aoife of Leinster, who was the daughter of Dermot MacMurrough, the deposed King of Leinster and Mor Ui Thuathail. The latter was a daughter of Muirchertach Ua Tuathail and Cacht Nâi Morda. The marriage of Strongbow and Aoife took place in August 1170, the day after the capture of Waterford by the Cambro-Norman forces led by Strongbow.

    Isabel's paternal grandparents were Gilbert de Clare, 1st Earl of Pembroke and Isabel de Beaumont. She had a younger brother Gilbert de Striguil who, being a minor, was not formally invested with either the earldom of Pembroke or of Striguil. It is unlikely that his father could have passed on the title to Pembroke as he himself did not possess it. When Gilbert died in 1185, Isabel became Countess of Pembroke in her own right (suo jure) until her death in 1220. In this way, she could be said to be the first successor to the earldom of Pembroke since her grandfather Gilbert, the first earl. By this reckoning, Isabel ought to be called the second countess, not the fourth countess of Pembroke. In any event, the title Earl was re-created for her husband. She also had an illegitimate half-sister Basile de Clare, who married three times. Basile's husbands were: Robert de Quincy; Raymond Fitzgerald, Constable of Leinster: Geoffrey FitzRobert, Baron of Kells.

    Isabel was described as having been "the good, the fair, the wise, the courteous lady of high degree".[2] She allegedly spoke French, Irish and Latin.[3] After her brother Gilbert's death, Isabel became one of the wealthiest heiresses in the kingdom, owning besides the titles of Pembroke and Striguil, much land in Wales and Ireland.[4] She inherited the numerous castles on the inlet of Milford Haven, guarding the South Channel, including Pembroke Castle.[5] She was a legal ward of King Henry II, who carefully watched over her inheritance.[6]

    Marriage

    The new King Richard I arranged her marriage in August 1189 to William Marshal, regarded by many as the greatest knight and soldier in the realm. Henry II had promised Marshal he would be given Isabel as his bride, and his son and successor Richard upheld the promise one month after his accession to the throne. At the time of her marriage, Isabel was residing in the Tower of London in the protective custody of the Justiciar of England, Ranulf de Glanville.[7] Following the wedding, which was celebrated in London "with due pomp and ceremony",[8] they spent their honeymoon at Stoke d'Abernon in Surrey which belonged to Enguerrand d'Abernon.[9]

    Marriage to Isabel elevated William Marshal from the status as a landless knight into one of the richest men in the kingdom. He would serve as Lord Marshal of England, four kings in all: Henry II, Richard I, John, and Henry III. Although Marshal did not become the jure uxoris 1st Earl of Pembroke, Earl of Striguil until 1199, he nevertheless assumed overlordship of Leinster in Ireland, Pembroke Castle, Chepstow Castle, as well as Isabel's other castles in Wales such as the keep of Haverford, Tenby, Lewhaden, Narberth, Stackpole.[10]

    Shortly after their marriage, Marshal and Isabel arrived in Ireland, at Old Ros, a settlement located in the territory which belonged to her grandfather, Dermot MacMurrough. A motte was hastily constructed, a medieval borough quickly grew around it, and afterwards the Marshals founded the port town by the river which subsequently became known as New Ross. The Chronicles of Ros, which are housed in the British Museum, described Isabel and Marshal's arrival in Ireland and records that Isabella set about building a lovely city on the banks of the Barrow.

    In 1192, Isabel and her husband assumed the task of managing their vast lands; starting with the rebuilding of Kilkenny Castle and the town, both of which had been damaged by the O'Brien clan in 1173. Later they commissioned the construction of several abbeys in the vicinity.[11]

    The marriage was happy, despite the vast difference in age between them. William Marshal and Isabel produced a total of five sons and five daughters.[12]

    end of biography

    Buried:
    Tintern Abbey (Welsh: Abaty Tyndyrn, About this sound pronunciation in Welsh (help·info)) was founded by Walter de Clare, Lord of Chepstow, on 9 May 1131. It is situated adjacent to the village of Tintern in Monmouthshire, on the Welsh bank of the River Wye, which forms the border between Monmouthshire in Wales and Gloucestershire in England. It was only the second Cistercian foundation in Britain, and the first in Wales. Falling into ruin after the Dissolution of the Monasteries in the 16th century, the remains were celebrated in poetry and often painted by visitors from the 18th century onwards. In 1984 Cadw took over responsibility for the site.

    Photos, history & source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tintern_Abbey

    Children:
    1. William Marshal, Knight, 2nd Earl of Pembroke was born 1190-1198, (Berkshire, England); died 6 Apr 1231, London, Middlesex, England.
    2. 127. Maud Marshal, Countess of Norfolk was born ~ 1193, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales; died 27 Mar 1248, Tintern Abbey, Chapel Hill, Monmouthshire, Wales.
    3. Isabel Marshal, Countess Marshall was born 9 Oct 1200, Pembroke Castle, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales; died 17 Jan 1240, Berkhamsted Castle, Berkhamsted, Hertforshire, England.
    4. Sybil Marshal was born ~ 1201, (Pembroke Castle, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales); died 0Apr 1245.
    5. Eva Marshal, Countess of Abergavenny was born 0___ 1203, Pembroke Castle, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales; died 0___ 1246.
    6. Joan Marshal was born 0___ 1210, (England); died 0___ 1234, (England).