Elizabeth Bradley

Female 1683 - 1711  (28 years)


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Generation: 1

  1. 1.  Elizabeth Bradley was born 1681-1683, Richmond County, Virginia (daughter of Thomas Bradley, III, The Immigrant and Alice Damton); died 0___ 1711, (Richmond County) Virginia.

    Notes:

    3145.[Elizabeth Bradley], born Abt. 1683; died Unknown.She was the daughter of 6290. [Thomas Bradley, III] and 6291. ?.

    Children of [John] Chisum and [Elizabeth Bradley] are:

    [John] Chisum, [II], born Abt. 1704 in St. John's Par., Amelia Co., VA; died October 09, 1792 in Amelia Co., VA; married [Ellender Gillington] Abt. 1730 in Amelia Co., VA.
    ii. William Chisum, born in [Amelia Co.], VA; died Unknown.

    end

    Elizabeth Chisum (Bradley)
    Birthdate: 1681 (30)
    Birthplace: Richmond County, Virginia, Colonial America
    Death: Died 1711 in Virginia, Colonial America

    Immediate Family:

    Daughter of Thomas Johannes Bradley, III and Alice Bradley
    Wife of John Chisum, I
    Mother of John Chisum, II and William Chisholm
    Sister of Lawrence Bradley, I; John Bradley; Thomas Bradley and Mary Bradley
    Managed by: Jukka Tapani Salakari
    Last Updated: November 27, 2016

    end

    Elizabeth married John Chisum, Sr. ~ 1704, Richmond County, Virginia. John (son of James Chisam and Anne Carter) was born 0___ 1681, Lancaster County, Virginia; died 0___ 1734, Caroline County, Virginia. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. John Chisum, III was born ~ 1704, Amelia County, Virginia; died 9 Oct 1792, Amelia County, Virginia.
    2. William Chisum was born (Amelia County, Virginia).

Generation: 2

  1. 2.  Thomas Bradley, III, The Immigrant was born 0___ 1633, Pontefract, West Riding, Yorkshire, England (son of Thomas Bradley, II, D. D. and Frances Savile); died 0___ 1665, Virginia, British Colonies of North America.

    Notes:

    Thomas Bradley pedigree ... http://newsgroups.derkeiler.com/Archive/Soc/soc.genealogy.medieval/2007-04/msg00258.html

    end

    Bradley, Thomas, (born 1633) a merchant in Virginia inn 1665, eldest son of Thomas Bradley, D. D., chaplain to Charles I., prebend of York, rector of Ackworth, a great royalist and his wife Frances, daughter of Joh Lord Saveille of Pontrefact.

    Birth:
    Pontefract is a historic market town in West Yorkshire, England, near the A1 .... In Elizabethan times the castle, and Pontefract itself, was referred to as "Pomfret".

    Thomas married Alice Damton (Yorkshire) England. Alice was born 0___ 1636, Broseley, Shropshire, England; died 30 Jan 1665, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 3.  Alice Damton was born 0___ 1636, Broseley, Shropshire, England; died 30 Jan 1665, England.
    Children:
    1. 1. Elizabeth Bradley was born 1681-1683, Richmond County, Virginia; died 0___ 1711, (Richmond County) Virginia.


Generation: 3

  1. 4.  Thomas Bradley, II, D. D. was born 0___ 1594, Pontefract, West Riding, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1636, (Yorkshire) England.

    Other Events:

    • Graduation:
    • Occupation: prebend of York
    • Occupation: Rector at Castleford, Yorkshire, England
    • Occupation: rector of Ackworth (west Yorkshire)

    Notes:

    Though Dr. Bradley's father was seated in Berkshire, his grandfather was a Yorkshireman who served in Henry VIII's army on the Boulogne expedition (per the pedigree of the family in Dugdale's 1665 Visitation). It was no doubt Dr. Bradley's office as chaplain to the King that warranted him a marriage in 1631 (the year after her father's death) to Frances, youngest daughter of John Savile, 1st Baron of Pomfret (Pontefract).

    Birth:
    Pontefract is a historic market town in West Yorkshire, England, near the A1 .... In Elizabethan times the castle, and Pontefract itself, was referred to as "Pomfret".

    Graduation:
    with a Doctor of Divinity (D.D.)

    Occupation:
    1. a stipend allotted from the revenues of a cathedral or a collegiate church to a canon or member of the chapter.
    2. the land yielding such a stipend.
    3. a prebendary.

    Occupation:
    a member of the clergy in charge of a parish in the Protestant Episcopal Church.

    Thomas married Frances Savile 0___ 1631, (Yorkshire, England). Frances (daughter of John Savile, Knight, 1st Baron Savile of Pontefract and Elizabeth Cary) was born 0___ 1604, Pontefract, Yorkshire, England; died 30 Jan 1663, Pontefract, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 5.  Frances Savile was born 0___ 1604, Pontefract, Yorkshire, England (daughter of John Savile, Knight, 1st Baron Savile of Pontefract and Elizabeth Cary); died 30 Jan 1663, Pontefract, Yorkshire, England.

    Notes:

    Frances Savile
    Birthdate: 1604
    Birthplace: Pomfert,,Yorkshire,England
    Death: Died January 30, 1663 in Pomfert,,Yorkshire,England

    Immediate Family:

    Daughter of John Savile, 1st Baron Savile of Pontefract and Elizabeth Carey

    Wife of Thomas Bradley, II

    Mother of Saville X. Bradley; Francis Bradley; Barbars Bradley; John Bradley and Thomas Johannes Bradley, III
    Sister of Thomas Saville and Anne Legh (Savile)

    Managed by: Gloria Jean Tate
    Last Updated: December 7, 2014

    *

    Children:
    1. 2. Thomas Bradley, III, The Immigrant was born 0___ 1633, Pontefract, West Riding, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1665, Virginia, British Colonies of North America.


Generation: 4

  1. 10.  John Savile, Knight, 1st Baron Savile of Pontefract was born 0___ 1556, Yorkshire, England (son of Robert Barkston Savile and Anne Hussey); died 31 Aug 1630, Garforth, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: High Sheriff of Lincolnshire
    • Occupation: Member of Parliament
    • Residence: Pontefract, Yorkshire, England
    • Alt Birth: 0___ 1556, Howley, Yorkshire, England
    • Alt Birth: ~ 1561, Howley, Yorkshire, England
    • Occupation: 0___ 1626; Privy Counsellor

    Notes:

    John Savile, 1st Baron Savile of Pontefract (1556-1630) was an English politician; M.P. for Lincoln, 1586: sheriff of Lincolnshire, 1590; knight of the shire for Yorkshire, 1597, 1614, 1624, and 1626; custos rotulorum of West Riding of Yorkshire; ejected from office in 1615, but reappointed in 1626. privy councillor, comptroller of house hold 1627-1630, and created Baron Savile in 1627.

    Political career

    He entered parliament as member for Lincoln in 1586, and he served as sheriff of that county in 1590. On 3 October 1597 he was elected knight of the shire for the county of York, for which he was again returned in 1614. In the latter Parliament he distinguished himself by his opposition to the king, and was consequently struck off the commission of the peace at the close of the session.[3] He was also custos rotulorum for the West Riding of Yorkshire, but is said to have made "use of his authority to satisfy his own ends". In 1615 he was removed from the office and Thomas Wentworth (afterwards Earl of Strafford) appointed in his place. There had long been bitter rivalry between the Saviles and the Wentworths, and they soon "imported their county quarrels into public affairs".[4] According to Clarendon, Wentworth's "first inclinations and addresses to the court were only to establish his greatness in the country where he apprehended some acts of power from the old Lord Savile, who had been his rival always there, and of late had strengthened himself by being made a privy councillor and an [?373? ] officer at court";[5] and he "rested not until he had bereaved him of all power and place in court, and so sent him down a most abject, disconsolate old man to his country".[5]

    Upon his ejection from the office of custos rotulorum, Savile began intriguing with the Duke of Buckingham, whom in September 1617 he induced to write to Wentworth demanding his resignation of the office. Wentworth, however, remonstrated, and, being powerfully supported in the county, carried his point. Buckingham acknowledged that he had been misled by Savile.[6] On 19 January 1624 Savile was again elected for Yorkshire, his colleague being his son Thomas; but in 1625 Wentworth and Lord Fairfax carried the election against him. This was the occasion of the famous dispute in parliament which first brought Wentworth and Eliot into collision. Savile accused the sheriff of having interrupted the polling when it was going against Wentworth, who was his friend. After a heated debate, in which Wentworth broke the rules of the house, and Eliot denounced him as Catiline, the election was declared void.[7] At the by-election Wentworth was again elected; but on 16 Jananuary 1625–6, in a new parliament, Savile once more carried the seat, Wentworth having been made sheriff to prevent his contesting it.[8]

    Savile was now high in Buckingham's favour; in July 1626 he was again appointed custos rotulorum in Wentworth's place. Soon afterwards he was sworn of the Privy Council for his services in parliament, and in December was placed on a commission to inquire into abuses in the navy. In the following April his exertions secured the success of the forced loan in Yorkshire,[9] and soon after, through Buckingham's influence, he succeeded Sir John Suckling as comptroller of the household. In May he was placed on a commission to inquire into offices existing and fees taken in Elizabeth's reign. In July he was appointed receiver of the revenues from recusants in the north, and a year later he was created Baron Savile of Pontefract, on the same day (21 July) that Wentworth was raised to the peerage. He held the office of comptroller till his death, aged 74, on 31 August 1630, so that Clarendon's reference to him as an "abject, disconsolate old man" is exaggerated. He was buried in Batley church, Yorkshire, where a monument, with an inflated inscription (printed by Whitaker), was raised to his memory by his daughter, Anne Leigh.[8]

    Domestic life

    About 1590 Savile built Howley Hall in Batley, which he made his seat; Camden described it as "µdes elegantissimas", and its ruins were still extant in 1900. Tradition says that Rubens visited him there, and painted for him a view of Pontefract. Savile married, first, Catherine, daughter of Charles, lord Willoughby of Parham, by whom he had no issue; secondly, on 20 November 1586, Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Edward, and sister of Sir Henry Cary, 1st Viscount Falkland. By her he had five sons and three daughters; he was succeeded by his eldest surviving son, Thomas Savile, Earl of Sussex.[8]

    *

    "Savile married, first, Catherine, daughter of Charles, lord Willoughby of Parham, by whom he had no issue..."

    *

    Baron John's 9-generation pedigree ... http://www.ourfamilyhistories.org/ahnentafel.php?personID=I147037&tree=00&parentset=0&generations=9

    *

    About John Savile, 1st Baron Savile of Pontefract

    John Savile, 1st Baron Savile of Pontefract (1556–1630) was an English politician; M.P. for Lincoln, 1586: sheriff of Lincolnshire, 1590; knight of the shire for Yorkshire, 1597, 1614, 1624, and 1626; custos rotulorum of West Riding of Yorkshire; ejected from office in 1615, but reappointed in 1626. privy councillor, comptroller of house hold 1627–1630, and created Baron Savile in 1627.[1]

    John Savile was born in 1556, the son of Sir Robert Savile of Barkston, Lincolnshire (d. 1585), by his wife Anne Hussey (d. 1562), sister of John Hussey, 1st Baron Hussey of Sleaford, and widow of Sir Richard Thimelby. His father was the illegitimate son of Sir Henry Savile of Thornhill in the West Riding of Yorkshire and had served as sheriff of Lincolnshire in 1573.[2]

    He entered parliament as member for Lincoln in 1586, and he served as sheriff of that county in 1590. On 3 October 1597 he was elected knight of the shire for the county of York, for which he was again returned in 1614. In the latter Parliament he distinguished himself by his opposition to the king, and was consequently struck off the commission of the peace at the close of the session.[3] He was also custos rotulorum for the West Riding of Yorkshire, but is said to have made "use of his authority to satisfy his own ends". In 1615 he was removed from the office and Thomas Wentworth (afterwards Earl of Strafford) appointed in his place. There had long been bitter rivalry between the Saviles and the Wentworths, and they soon "imported their county quarrels into public affairs".[4] According to Clarendon, Wentworth's "first inclinations and addresses to the court were only to establish his greatness in the country where he apprehended some acts of power from the old Lord Savile, who had been his rival always there, and of late had strengthened himself by being made a privy councillor and an [?373? ] officer at court";[5] and he "rested not until he had bereaved him of all power and place in court, and so sent him down a most abject, disconsolate old man to his country".[5]

    Upon his ejection from the office of custos rotulorum, Savile began intriguing with the Duke of Buckingham, whom in September 1617 he induced to write to Wentworth demanding his resignation of the office. Wentworth, however, remonstrated, and, being powerfully supported in the county, carried his point. Buckingham acknowledged that he had been misled by Savile.[6] On 19 January 1624 Savile was again elected for Yorkshire, his colleague being his son Thomas; but in 1625 Wentworth and Lord Fairfax carried the election against him. This was the occasion of the famous dispute in parliament which first brought Wentworth and Eliot into collision. Savile accused the sheriff of having interrupted the polling when it was going against Wentworth, who was his friend. After a heated debate, in which Wentworth broke the rules of the house, and Eliot denounced him as Catiline, the election was declared void.[7] At the by-election Wentworth was again elected; but on 16 Jananuary 1625–6, in a new parliament, Savile once more carried the seat, Wentworth having been made sheriff to prevent his contesting it.[8]

    Savile was now high in Buckingham's favour; in July 1626 he was again appointed custos rotulorum in Wentworth's place. Soon afterwards he was sworn of the Privy Council for his services in parliament, and in December was placed on a commission to inquire into abuses in the navy. In the following April his exertions secured the success of the forced loan in Yorkshire,[9] and soon after, through Buckingham's influence, he succeeded Sir John Suckling as comptroller of the household. In May he was placed on a commission to inquire into offices existing and fees taken in Elizabeth's reign. In July he was appointed receiver of the revenues from recusants in the north, and a year later he was created Baron Savile of Pontefract, on the same day (21 July) that Wentworth was raised to the peerage. He held the office of comptroller till his death, aged 74, on 31 August 1630, so that Clarendon's reference to him as an "abject, disconsolate old man" is exaggerated. He was buried in Batley church, Yorkshire, where a monument, with an inflated inscription (printed by Whitaker), was raised to his memory by his daughter, Anne Leigh.[8]

    About 1590 Savile built Howley Hall in Batley, which he made his seat; Camden described it as "µdes elegantissimas", and its ruins were still extant in 1900. Tradition says that Rubens visited him there, and painted for him a view of Pontefract. Savile married, first, Catherine, daughter of Charles, lord Willoughby of Parham, by whom he had no issue; secondly, on 20 November 1586, Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Edward, and sister of Sir Henry Cary, 1st Viscount Falkland. By her he had five sons and three daughters; he was succeeded by his eldest surviving son, Thomas Savile, Earl of Sussex.[8]

    Notes

    1. ^ Lee, Sidney (1903), Dictionary of National Biography Index and Epitome p. 1161.
    2. ^ Pollard 1897, p. 372.
    3.^ Pollard 1897, p. 372 cites: Gardiner, ii. 249.
    4.^ Pollard 1897, p. 372 cites: Ranke, ii. 202–3.
    5.^ a b Pollard 1897, p. 373 cites: Clarendon Rebellion, i. 341.
    6.^ Pollard 1897, p. 373 cites: cf. Strafford Letters, passim; Fortescue Papers, Camden Soc., pp. 24, 27; and Browning, Life of Strafford, 1892, pp. 25, &c.
    7. ^ Pollard 1897, p. 373 cites: Gardiner, v. 349–51; Forster, Eliot, i. 160.
    8.^ a b c Pollard 1897, p. 373
    9. ^ Pollard 1897, p. 373 cites: Gardiner, vi. 158.

    References

    This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Pollard, Albert Frederick (1897). "Savile, John (1556-1630)". In Lee, Sidney. Dictionary of National Biography 50. London: Smith, Elder & Co. pp. 372,373. The entry cites:
    Cal. State Papers, Dom.;
    Strafford Letters, passim;
    Fortescue Papers (Camden Soc.);
    Official Returns of Members of Parliament;
    Journals of the House of Commons;
    Clarendon's Rebellion;
    Forster's Eliot;
    Forster's Life of Strafford (sometimes attributed to Robert Browning);
    Gardiner's Hist. of England;
    G. E. C.'s Complete Peerage;
    Burke's Extinct Peerage;
    Foster's Yorkshire Pedigrees;
    Hunter's Antiquarian Notices of Lupset;
    Whitaker's, Life and Correspondence of Sir George Radcliffe;
    Whitaker's, Loidis et Elmete, pp. 237–9.
    From: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Savile,_1st_Baron_Savile_of_Pontefract
    __________________
    Sir John Savile, 1st Baron Savile of Pomfret1
    M, #112485, b. 1556, d. 31 August 1630
    Father Sir Robert Savile, Sheriff of Lincolnshire2 d. 1585
    Mother Anne Hussey3 b. c 1516, d. 1562
    Sir John Savile, 1st Baron Savile of Pomfret was born in 1556 at of Howley, Yorkshire, England.1 He married Elizabeth Carey, daughter of Sir Edward Carey and Katherine Knyvett, on 20 November 1586 at Great Berkhampsted, Hertfordshire, England.1 Sir John Savile, 1st Baron Savile of Pomfret left a will on 15 January 1629; Date of his will.1 He left a will on 15 August 1630; Date he signed his will.1 He died on 31 August 1630.1 His estate was probated on 23 February 1631 at York, Yorkshire, England.1
    Family Elizabeth Carey
    Child
    Sir Thomas Savile, 12th Earl of Sussex, Baron & Viscount Savile, Baron of Castlebar+1 b. 14 Sep 1590, d. c 1659
    Citations
    1.[S11568] The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain, and the United Kingdom, by George Edward Cokayne, Vol. XI, p. 459-461.
    2.[S11568] The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain, and the United Kingdom, by George Edward Cokayne, Vol. XI, p. 457.
    3.[S31] Unknown author, Wikipedia.
    From: http://our-royal-titled-noble-and-commoner-ancestors.com/p3745.htm#i112485
    ________
    John Savile, 1st Baron Savile of Pomfret1
    M, #26378, b. 1556, d. 31 August 1630
    Last Edited=11 Feb 2012
    John Savile, 1st Baron Savile of Pomfret was born in 1556.2 He was the son of Sir Robert Savile and Anne Hussey.2 He married Katherine Willoughby, daughter of Charles Willoughby, 2nd Baron Willoughby of Parham, in February 1546.3 He married, secondly, Elizabeth Cary, daughter of Sir Edward Cary and Katherine Knyvett, on 20 November 1586.4 He died on 31 August 1630.4
    Memb Cncl of –30 (V-Pres 1626–28).3 High Steward Honour of Pontefract, Steward Wakefield.3 Thus excluding his eldest (the only one of the two eldest then still living).3 So created (E) with remainder in tail male to his third sons onwards.3 Comptroller Household , Mayor Leeds 1626.3 Knighted by.3 He was County York.3 He gained the title of 1st Baron Savile of Pomfret. He lived Howley.3 He was High Sheriff Lincolnshire , Member of Parliament (M.P.) Lincoln 1586–87 and Yorkshire 1597–98, March 1603/4–11, 1614, Feb 1623/4–25 and Feb 1625/6 circa 1585.3 He was Privy Counsellor (P.C.) in 1626.3
    Children of John Savile, 1st Baron Savile of Pomfret and Katherine Willoughby
    1.Katherine Savile+1
    2.Henry Savile
    3.Edward Savile
    4.Robert Savile
    5.Edmund Savile
    6.Elizabeth Savile
    7.Frances Savile
    Child of John Savile, 1st Baron Savile of Pomfret and Elizabeth Cary
    1.Thomas Savile, 1st Earl of Sussex+5 b. 14 Sep 1590, d. c 1659
    Citations
    1.[S15] George Edward Cokayne, editor, The Complete Baronetage, 5 volumes (no date (c. 1900); reprint, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 1983), volume II, page 196. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Baronetage.
    2.[S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume XI, page 459. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
    3.[S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke's Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke's Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 2, page 2673. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    4.[S37] Charles Mosley, Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition, volume 1, page 1382.
    5.[S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume XII/1, page 531.
    From: http://www.thepeerage.com/p2638.htm#i26378
    ____________
    SAVILE, John II (1556-1630), of Doddington, Lincs. and Howley, Yorks.
    b. 1556, 1st s. of Sir Robert Savile of Barkston, Lincs. by Anne, da. and coh. of Sir Robert Hussey of Linwood in Blankney, Lincs., wid. of Matthew Thymbleby of Poolam in Edlington, Lincs., half-bro. of Stephen Thymbleby. educ. Trinity Coll. Camb. 1572; L. Inn 1577. m. (1) Catherine, da. of Charles, 2nd Baron Willoughby of Parham, s.p.; (2) 20 Nov. 1586, Elizabeth, da. of Edward Carey, 5s. 3da. suc. fa. 1585. Kntd. by 1597; cr. Baron Savile 1628.1
    From: http://www.historyofparliamentonline.org/volume/1558-1603/member/savile-john-ii-1556-1630
    __________
    Anne HUSSEY
    Born: 1516, Linwood, Blankney, Lincolnshire, England
    Died: 1562
    Father: Robert HUSSEY of Linwood
    Mother: Anne SAY
    Married 1: Mathew THIMELBY 1536, Blankney, Lincolnshire, England
    Married 2: Robert SAVILE (son of Henry Savile and Margaret Barkston)
    Children:
    1. John SAVILE (m. Elizabeth Carey)
    From: http://www.tudorplace.com.ar/HUSSEY.htm#Anne HUSSEY6
    ________________________

    Birth:
    in Howley, West Riding...

    Alt Birth:
    Click this link to view York's map and history and in particular a map showing the subdivisions of Northm West & East Riding ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yorkshire#Roman_Yorkshire

    John married Elizabeth Cary 20 Nov 1586, (Devonshire) England. Elizabeth (daughter of Edward Cary and Catherine Knevet) was born 0___ 1570, Cockington, Devon, England; died Pontefract, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 11.  Elizabeth Cary was born 0___ 1570, Cockington, Devon, England (daughter of Edward Cary and Catherine Knevet); died Pontefract, Yorkshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Elizabeth Carey

    Notes:

    Residence (Family):
    About 1590 Savile built Howley Hall in Batley, which he made his seat; Camden described it as "µdes elegantissimas", and its ruins were still extant in 1900. Tradition says that Rubens visited him there, and painted for him a view of Pontefract.

    Children:
    1. 5. Frances Savile was born 0___ 1604, Pontefract, Yorkshire, England; died 30 Jan 1663, Pontefract, Yorkshire, England.


Generation: 5

  1. 20.  Robert Barkston Savile was born ~ 1524, Howley, Yorkshire, England (son of Henry Savile and Margaret Barkston); died 0___ 1585.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Sheriff of Lincolnshire
    • Residence: Lincolnshire, England

    Robert married Anne Hussey 1 Mar 1555, Howley, Yorkshire, England. Anne (daughter of Robert Hussey and Anne Saye) was born ~ 1520, Linwood, Blankney, Lincoln, England; died 1 Dec 1562. [Group Sheet]


  2. 21.  Anne Hussey was born ~ 1520, Linwood, Blankney, Lincoln, England (daughter of Robert Hussey and Anne Saye); died 1 Dec 1562.
    Children:
    1. 10. John Savile, Knight, 1st Baron Savile of Pontefract was born 0___ 1556, Yorkshire, England; died 31 Aug 1630, Garforth, Yorkshire, England.

  3. 22.  Edward Cary was born ~ 1540, Cockington, Devon, England (son of John Carey, Knight and Joyce Denny); died 18 Jul 1618, St. Bartholomew, London, Middlesex, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Master and Treasurer of His Majesty's Jewels
    • Occupation: Member of Parliament
    • Also Known As: Edward Carey of Aldenham

    Notes:

    Sir Edward Cary, of Berkhamstead and Aldenham, Hertfordshire, and his wife Catherine Knevet, daughter of Sir Henry Knevet, master of the jewel office to Queen Elizabeth and King James, and widow of Henry Paget, 2nd Baron Paget.

    *

    Sir Edward Cary

    M, #18395, b. circa 1540, d. 18 July 1618

    Last Edited=1 Feb 2009

    Sir Edward Cary was born circa 1540.2 He was the son of Sir John Cary and Joice Denny.2 He married Katherine Knyvett, daughter of Sir Henry Knyvett and Anne Pickering, after 1568.1 He died on 18 July 1618.1

    He held the office of Master and Treasurer of His Majesty's Jewels.1 He lived at Aldenham, Hertfordshire, England.1 He lived at Berkhamsted, Hertfordshire, England.2

    Children of Sir Edward Cary and Katherine Knyvett

    1.Frances Cary2
    2.Adolphus Cary2 d. 10 Apr 1609
    3.Sir Philip Cary+3 d. c Jun 1631
    4.Elizabeth Cary+2
    5.Katherine Cary2
    6.Muriel Cary2
    7.Henry Cary, 1st Viscount Falkland+1 b. c 1576, d. c Sep 1633
    8.Anne Cary+2 b. 10 Aug 1585, d. b 1660
    9.Jane Cary4 b. c 1595, d. c Dec 1632
    Citations

    1.[S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume X, page 281. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
    2.[S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke's Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke's Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 1, page 1382. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
    3.[S15] George Edward Cokayne, editor, The Complete Baronetage, 5 volumes (no date (c. 1900); reprint, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 1983), volume II, page 134. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Baronetage.
    4.[S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume I, page 431.
    From: http://www.thepeerage.com/p1840.htm#i18395
    _______________
    Sir Edward Carey1,2

    M, b. circa 1540, d. 18 July 1618

    Father John Cary3 b. c 1495, d. 8 Sep 1552

    Mother Joyce Denny3 b. 29 Jul 1495, d. 6 Apr 1560

    Sir Edward Carey was born circa 1540 at Cockinghams, Devonshire, England.1 He married Katherine Knyvett, daughter of Sir Henry Knyvett and Anne Pickering, in 1562 at Buckenham, Norfolk, England.2 Sir Edward Carey died on 18 July 1618 at of Berkhamstead, Hertfordshire, England; Buried at St. Bartholomew, London.1
    Family Katherine Knyvett b. c 1543, d. 20 Dec 1622

    Child

    ?Elizabeth Carey+1,2
    Citations

    1.[S11568] The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain, and the United Kingdom, by George Edward Cokayne, Vol. V, p. 239.
    2.[S11568] The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain, and the United Kingdom, by George Edward Cokayne, Vol. XI, p. 459-461.
    3.[S31] Unknown author, Wikipedia.
    From: http://our-royal-titled-noble-and-commoner-ancestors.com/p3745.htm#i112487
    ___________________
    Edward CAREY of Aldenham (Sir)

    Born: ABT 1540, Cockingham, Devonshire, England

    Acceded: Berkhamsted

    Died: 18 Jul 1618, St Bartholomew, London, Middlesex, England

    Notes: See his Biography.

    Father: John CAREY of Plashey (Sir Knight)

    Mother: Joyce DENNY

    Married 1: Catherine WALSINGHAM

    Married 2: Catherine KNYVETT (B. Paget of Beaudesert) ABT 1568, Buckenham, Norfolk, England

    Children:

    1. Henry CAREY (1º V. Falkland)
    2. Frances CAREY (C. Rutland)
    3. Adolphus CAREY
    4. Phillip CAREY (Sir)
    5. Jane CAREY
    6. Muriel CAREY
    7. Catherine CAREY
    8. Anne CAREY
    9. Elizabeth CAREY
    From: http://www.tudorplace.com.ar/CAREY.htm#Edward CAREY of Aldenham (Sir)
    _____________________
    From Aldenham and Berkhamstead, Hertfordshire, England. Knighted 1596. Groom of the Privy Chamber 1563; Receiver of Tickhill 1567-9, Steward of Wakefield and Porter of Sandal, Duchy of Lancaster 1569-88; Teller of the Exchequer 1592; Joint Master of the Jewel House 1595 to Queen Elizabeth and James VI., sole 1596; Receiver-General. S. Wales 1604; Keeper of Hyde, Marylebone and Hampton Court Parks. He bought Aldenham, Hertfordshire, England in 1588; sold Aldenhem residence in 1642 and Great Berkhamstead, Hertfordshire, England.

    Sir Edward Cary of Aldenham was born circa 1540. He was the son of Sir John Cary and Joice Denny.
    He married Katherine Knyvett, daughter of Sir Henry Knyvett and Anne Pickering, after 1568 and he died on 18 July 1618.

    He held the office of Master and Treasurer of His Majesty's Jewels. Children : - 1.Frances Cary

    2.Adolphus Cary d. 10 Apr 1609 3.Sir Philip Cary d. c Jun 1631 4.Elizabeth Cary 5.Katherine Cary 6.Muriel Cary 7.Henry Cary, 1st Viscount Falkland b. c 1576, d. c Sep 1633 8.Anne Cary b. 10 Aug 1585, d. b 1660 9.Jane Cary b. c 1595, d. c Dec 1632

    Showing 23 people
    Son of Sir John Carey and Joyce Carey
    Husband of Catherine Carey
    Father of Henry Cary, 1st Viscount Falkland; Elizabeth Carey; Sir Adolphus Carey, Kt., MP; Frances Carey; Catherine Longueville and 5 others
    Brother of William Carey., Sr. and Wymond Carey, of Snettisham
    Half brother of Mary Mildmay; Sir Francis Walsingham; Elizabeth Wentworth; Barbara Walsingham; Christian Dodington and 1 other

    Edward married Catherine Knevet ~ 1568, Buckenham, Norfolkshire, England. Catherine (daughter of Henry Knevet, Knight, 1st Baron Knyet of Escrick and Anne Pickering) was born 0___ 1543, Buckenham, Norfolkshire, England; died 20 Dec 1622. [Group Sheet]


  4. 23.  Catherine KnevetCatherine Knevet was born 0___ 1543, Buckenham, Norfolkshire, England (daughter of Henry Knevet, Knight, 1st Baron Knyet of Escrick and Anne Pickering); died 20 Dec 1622.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Catherine Knyvett

    Children:
    1. 11. Elizabeth Cary was born 0___ 1570, Cockington, Devon, England; died Pontefract, Yorkshire, England.


Generation: 6

  1. 40.  Henry Savile was born ~ 1502, Thornhill, Dewsbury, West Riding, Yorkshire, England (son of John Savile, (VIII) Knight and Elizabeth Paston); died 23 Apr 1558.

    Other Events:

    • Will: 15 Feb 1555

    Notes:

    IX. SIR HENRY SAVILE, Knt., of Thornhill, etc., and of Sothill, ju. ux.; High Sheriff of Yorkshire I537-41; a very important man in the reign of Henry VIII, to whom he steadfastly adhered at the time of the Pilgrimage of Grace; a great supporter of Robert Holdsworth, Vicar of Halifax, and an enemy of Sir Richard Tempest, Knt., of Bolling.1 He died 25 April, 1558 (Dewsbury Reg.), but probably bur. Thornhill.

    Will. - Feb. 15, 1555. Henrye Savyle, of Thornehill, knyghte. I wyll that my bodye be buryed at Thornehill if I die wythein the countie of Yorke, the same buryall and funralles expenses there of to be done by the dystression of my executrix. I wyll that Dorythe Savyle, my dowghter, shall have all my manors, landes, tenementes and heridamentes in the countie of Yorke or ells where wythein the realme of Englande, and shall tayke all the yssues of all the manors, &c., unto the end of fyve yeres next, and that she shall pay all my lawfull debtes and performe all my gyftes, &c., in my will. Also I gyve to Elizabethe my wyffe all my corne in Dewsburye and Emlay peryshes, also all maner of my goodes there, my playtt onelye except, which playtte wythe all my goodes wythein the peryshes of Thornhill and Tankersley I gyve to Edwarde Savyle, my sonne, my corne at Thornhill bothe grovynge and in the laythe excepted. Also I gyve to John Byrkes all money as he nowe owethe me, except suche money as he owethe me for corne. And I wyll that my sayde exectrixe shall appoynt Henrye Bayt to keipe the courtes wythein all my lorde shippes and manors, and yf he dye, wyche God defende, then Henrye Gryce to enyoye the same offyce. I gyve unto the sayde Henrye Batte one yerelye annuyte of fortye shillinges to be payde to hime durynge his lyfe. I gyve Henrye Gryce one yerelye annuyte of fortye shillinges. I gyve unto Henrye Payge all somes of money as he dyd owe me at the fourte day of Aprill last past. I wyll that my executrix shall pay unto George Savyle one hundrethe markes in fyve yeres. I gyve the profyttes of all the landes belongynge to yonge Claton to my cosyn Thomas Savyll of Kyrkbye, he honestlie kepinge the sayde Rycherde in lerneynge. I gyve to the sayde Rycherde his maryage so that he do not marye but by the consent of John Birkes, John Claton of Dewly (? Denby) grannge, and Robert Wheatley, or two of them. Also I dyscharge all wardes dew to me at this day of there

    1 He had an illegitimate son whom he allowed to bear the name of Savile, whose mother was Margaret Barkston, one of the waiting maids of Lady Savile. In this son was centred the talent of the family, and it was a great object to release out of entail as much as possible of his estate, that he might establish a family in the posterity of this son called Robert (Hunter’s Lupset). See the Saviles of Howley.

    12
    maryages. I wyll that all my landes whiche I have commytted in maryage in the indentors of Henry Savyll of Lup­sett, my wyll fulfylled, yf anye thinge chance to Edwarde Savyll, my son, wythe oute yssew mayle to remayne treulye accordynge to the same commyttes, and also all landes as I have couynanted in maryage in the indentors of couynantes of Robert Savill shall remayne to the true intent of the same couinanttes. Also I gyve unto my dowgter Dorythe my leasses of Waythe and Bolton frome the terme of Ester next to the end of thos yeres that I nowe have in the same so that she suffer my son Thomas Wentworthe and his uncle Thomas Wentworthe durynge the same terme to haue that that they do occupye at this present day paynges lyke rentes for the same as they do to me. And I wyll my dettes and bequestes be truly payd wythe reasonable charges for execution of my wyll. And all the rest of the revynes to be resayved durynge the sayde fyve yeres I gyve to Dorythe Savyle, my dowgter, for the avauncement of hir maryage. Also I gyve Geffray Barmeby and Fraunces his Wyffe all my leas and terme I haue of the Lady Brandon durynge there lyves, and yf they dye durynge the sayd yeares I gyve the rest of the sayde terme to the heyres malle of there two bodyes lawfullye be­gotten. I do mayke the abouesayde Dorythe, my dowghter, my hole executrix. Thes beynge wytnes, Alverye Coppelay, esquyer, Thomas Cockson, preist, Henrye Batte. I mayke the supervisors of my wyll Sir Thomas Gargrave, Sir John Nevyle, and Sir Wyllm Caluerlay, knyghtes, and every one of them to have twentye nobylls for there paynes. No probate annexed (Reg. Test., xv, ii, 387).

    Inq. p. m. - 25 Aug., 5 and 6 Phil. and Mary (1558). This Inquisition is very imperfect, but a little information can be extracted. It was taken at Pontefract before Thos. Gargrave, ..... Nevile, Knt., Francys Frobisher, Wm. Hawmond. The Jury say he was seised with his wife Elizabeth in her right in the manors of Soythyll, Rowtonstall, Laxton, Hadlesay, Daryngton and Emley, and of 10 watermills, 1 windmill, ..... acres of pasture, 80 of wood, 4,000 of heath and furze, ¹20 rent in the above and in Chydsell, Myrfeld, Stansfeld, Dewsbury and Ovenden, and the advowson of the parish church of Emley, with remainder to Edward Sayvell, their son and heir, and in default of his issue to Elizabeth and her heirs.

    Sir Henry before his death, in consideration of a marriage between Henry Sayvell of Lupset, Esq., his kinsman, and Margaret Fuller, one of the daughters and heiresses of Thos. Fuller, late of Islington, Esq., granted an estate in Hunsworth to the said Henry, Knt., and heirs, and in default of issue to the same Henry Sayvell, Esq., and heirs, in default to Robert Sayvell and heirs, remainder to Sir Henry Sayvell. By the same deed he would make sufficient estate. In consideration of a marriage between Robert Sayvell and Anne Thymbleby, widow, he granted to Humfrey Browne, Knt., and Francis Ascough, Knt., he would have an estate made in the manors of Elland, etc., to the use of Sir Henry, Knt., remainders to Robert Sayvell, the heirs of Thomas Sayvell, late of Lupsett. In consideration of a marriage between Edward Sayvell, his

    13
    son and heir, and Mary, one of the daughters and heiresses of Richard Leigh, Knt., he granted to said Edward and Mary and their heirs the manors of Tankersley and Southourome, the park of Southourome called Eland Park, and ..... of Myrfeld, Thurleston, and Estryngton, with all his lands in the said places by deed 3 Feb., 2 and 3 Phil. and Mary (1555-6), by virtue whereof they are still possessed.

    He died 23 April last. These manors are held of the King and Queen as of their lordship of Wakefield, now parcel of the Duchy of Lancaster - Wadsworth and Stansfeld by rent of 2s. yearly, worth ¹30. Ovenden by rent 5s., worth ¹26 10s. Skircote and Halifax, rent 2s., worth ¹13 6s. 8d. Shelf by rent 2s., worth ¹8. Rysheworth, Shakelton, Heptonstall and Northland, Northowrome, Hunshelfe by rent 2s., worth ¹22. Brygehouse in free socage by fealty only, worth 8s. beyond a rent of ¹5 6s. 8d. (to the chantry priest of Thornhill). The manors of Eland, Southowram and Gretland, and messuages there, are held of the King and Queen of their honor of Pontefract, parcel of the Duchy of Lancaster, for the third part of a knight's fee and rent of 6s., worth ¹56. The manor of Myrfeld for 20th part of a knight's fee, worth ¹5. The manor of Thornhill by 4th part of a knight's fee and rent of 16s. 8d., worth ¹80. The manors of Gylcerr and Bothomley, worth ..... Haddlesey, worth ¹3. Darton manor, worth ¹13. Thurleston, worth ¹4. The manor of Wyke held of the King and Queen of their manor of Bradford, parcel of the Duchy of Lancaster, and that an annual rent of ¹5 6s. 8d. was paid yearly, having been granted by the ancestors of said Henry to a chantry priest in Elland church, worth ¹5 6s. 8d. The manor of Estrington is held of the Bp. of Durham, worth ¹29. Hunsworth is held of Henry and Ellen Tempest of their manor of Tonge, worth ¹80. Laxton held of the Bp. of Durham, worth (?) ¹33. Hanging heaton, Chydsell of the manor of Wakefield, worth ¹5. Stainland, Barkisland, and Over Lyndley, worth ¹6.1

    Mar. Elizabeth, daughter and coheiress of Thomas Sothill, of Soothill; remar. Thomas Gascoigne, of Barnbow, Esq. They had issue -

    Edward Savile,2 of weak intellect, aged 20 years 20 weeks and 12 days at his father's death; bapt. Dewsbury, 16 Feb., 1538-9; bur. 16 Feb., 1603-4, Thornhill; mar. 1st, Mary, daughter and heiress of Sir Richard Leigh, Knt., of St. Albans, before his father's death in 1555; she was divorced; mar. 2ly, Elizabeth, daughter of Geoffrey Barnby (Whitaker).
    1 Mr. Whitaker has printed a list of the estates in Loidis and Elmete, p. 312, not quite corresponding with the above. He makes the total ¹489 14s., consisting of 300 messuages, 300 tofts, 10 water mills, and 22,080 acres, not including the extensive wastes and commons perhaps amounting to as much more.
    2 He lived in obscurity, and it is said he was under the influence of the Earl of Shrewsbury. A settlement of the es­tates was made 28 Sept., 1559, which transferred them at Edward's death to the Lupset Saviles.

    *

    Henry married Margaret Barkston ~ 1519. Margaret was born ~ 1503, Thornhill, Dewsbury, West Riding, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 41.  Margaret Barkston was born ~ 1503, Thornhill, Dewsbury, West Riding, Yorkshire, England.
    Children:
    1. 20. Robert Barkston Savile was born ~ 1524, Howley, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1585.

  3. 42.  Robert Hussey was born 0___ 1483, Linwood, Blankney, Lincoln, England (son of William Hussey and Elizabeth Berkeley); died 28 May 1547, Linwood, Blankney, Lincoln, England.

    Robert married Anne Saye 0___ 1515. Anne was born 0___ 1489, Linwood, Blankney, Lincoln, England; died 2 Sep 1522. [Group Sheet]


  4. 43.  Anne Saye was born 0___ 1489, Linwood, Blankney, Lincoln, England; died 2 Sep 1522.
    Children:
    1. 21. Anne Hussey was born ~ 1520, Linwood, Blankney, Lincoln, England; died 1 Dec 1562.

  5. 44.  John Carey, Knight was born ~ 1495, Pleshey, Essex, England (son of Thomas Carey and Margaret Spencer); died 8 Sep 1552, Hunsdon, Hertfordshire, England; was buried 9 Sep 1552, Hunsdon, Hertfordshire, England.

    Notes:

    Sir John Carey, of Plashey (ca. 1491-1552) was a courtier to King Henry VIII. He served the king as a Groom of the Privy Chamber, and, being a descendant of Edmund Beaufort, Duke of Somerset, John Carey was a third cousin to Henry VIII.

    Life

    Carey was the eldest son of Sir Thomas Carey of Chilton Foliat in Wiltshire and his wife Margaret Spencer. By July 1522 he was serving in the royal navy as the captain of the King’s ship, The Katherine Galley which was in the Channel between Cinque Ports and Jersey during Henry VIII’s first war with Francis I.

    By 1526 John, probably through the influence of his younger brother William Carey was at Henry VIII's court as a Groom of the Privy Chamber.

    Several historians credit John Carey with convincing Anne Boleyn (his sister-in-law as John's brother William was married to Anne's sister Mary) to support his sister Eleanor as a candidate for abess of Wilton Abbey where she was a nun in the spring of 1528. Eleanor did not get the appointment, however, due to questionable conduct on her part. Later that year John Carey fell ill with the sweating sickness. Although he recovered, his brother William who had also fallen ill was not so fortunate and died in June 1528.

    John Carey married Joyce Denny, the daughter of Sir Edmund Denny of Chestnut and his wife Mary Troutbeck probably in late 1538. Joyce was also the widow of William Walsingham, by whom she had had seven children, including Sir Francis Walsingham. Together John and Joyce Carey had two sons, Sir Edward Carey of Aldenham (a member of Parliament in the late 16th century) and Wymond Carey.

    On 21 July 1538 John Carey was granted the priory of Thremhall in Essex where he often lived. By September 1542 he had returned to sea as a vice-admiral commanding the transports of the East Coast in support of the Duke of Norfolk’s expedition against Scotland.

    John Carey was knighted by Edward VI in 1547, probably through the influence of his brother-in-law, Sir Anthony Denny. Carey died on the ninth of September, 1552 in Hunsdon, Hertfordshire and was buried in Hunsdon church.

    *

    Sir John Cary (1491-1552) of Plashey, eldest son, ancestor to the Cary Viscounts Falkland.

    *

    Buried:
    at Hunsdon Church...

    John married Joyce Denny LATE 1538. Joyce (daughter of Edmund Denny and Mary Troutbeck) was born 29 Jul 1495, Howe, Norfolk, Englan; died 6 Apr 1560, London, Middlesex, England; was buried St. Mary Aldermanbury, London, Middlesex, England. [Group Sheet]


  6. 45.  Joyce Denny was born 29 Jul 1495, Howe, Norfolk, Englan (daughter of Edmund Denny and Mary Troutbeck); died 6 Apr 1560, London, Middlesex, England; was buried St. Mary Aldermanbury, London, Middlesex, England.
    Children:
    1. 22. Edward Cary was born ~ 1540, Cockington, Devon, England; died 18 Jul 1618, St. Bartholomew, London, Middlesex, England.

  7. 46.  Henry Knevet, Knight, 1st Baron Knyet of Escrick was born 1506-1510, Buckenham, Norfolkshire, England (son of Thomas Knyvet, Knight and Muriel Howard); died 30 Mar 1547, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Master of the Jewel Office

    Notes:

    Occupation:
    to Queen Elizabeth and King James...

    Henry — Anne Pickering. Anne was born 0___ 1496, Killington, England; died 0___ 1582. [Group Sheet]


  8. 47.  Anne Pickering was born 0___ 1496, Killington, England; died 0___ 1582.

    Notes:

    daughter of Sir Christopher Pickering of Killington and Jane Lewknor...

    Children:
    1. 23. Catherine Knevet was born 0___ 1543, Buckenham, Norfolkshire, England; died 20 Dec 1622.


Generation: 7

  1. 80.  John Savile, (VIII) Knight was born ~ 1478, Thornhill, Dewsbury, West Riding, Yorkshire, England (son of John Savile, (VII) and Jane Herrington); died 7 Jan 1504.

    Other Events:

    • Will: 31 Mar 1503

    Notes:

    1Will - The last day of March A.D. (1503), 18 Henry VII, I Sir John Sayvell, Knight. Soul to God, body to be buried in church of Thornhill, debts to be paid. Whereas by indenture between William Calverley, the elder, now deceased and me, of the marriage of Sir William Calverley, the elder, his son and Alice my sister, it is lawful for me, if my sister inherit my lands, to do with lands of the yearly value of (100)li. what my will is, or shall be; also if I die without issue the same William immediatly after my decease shall pay 100li. yearly to my executors, till 800 marks be fully paid; I will that if he and my sister and their heirs peaceably suffer my executors to occupy and minister according to this my last will, the same sum of 800 marks be not asked of the said William (his) heirs or executors. Immediately after my decease my feoffees, viz. Thomas, earl of Surrey, Sir Raynold Bray, George Tailbois, Sir Thomas Wortley, Knts., William Fayrfax, John Cut, Richard Chumley, John Chaloner, and Robert Fryston, shall make a lease of all such lands and advowsons and chantries, to take such profits of, to my son Henry or to such as there happen to be next heir, if he or they be at the age of twenty years, he or they finding sufficient surety to my executors to pay them yearly 100li. during ten years next after my decease at Whitson and Martinmas equally, Provided that the said lease be not prejudicial to my wife in such lands as her jointure or to any other grant by me made in this my last will; and if he or they to whom the said lease be made, be under twenty, or refuse to find the said surety, then I will that my executors take the profits of all my lands which should ... the said lease, till such time as the sum of 1,000li. be received; if my said heir or heirs being at the age of 20 trouble my executors, I will that my feoffees sell the lordship of Thornhill with the advowson and lands to the yearly value of 100li. to the King of England for the time being after the price of xiiiith yere purchase to be paid in iiii yerez day; and if his higness refuse to buy it, then my executors to sell it at their pleasure and ther with perform this my last will. Provided if my son Henry or other issue of my body, be within the age of twenty years at the time of my decease, then my feoffees shall suffer my executors to take the whole profits of my lands during the nonage of my said heir, my wife's jointure excepted, and if the said profits shall content the King's grace 1,000 marks, so that his highness suffer my lady his mother, the said earl of Surrey, Sir Henry Vernon, Master Robert Frost, Chancellor to the prince and Sir Thomas Pek, parson of Thornhill, or such of them as shall be then living, to have the ward, marriage and governance of my said son and heir; if it be a daughter or daughters, his Grace to have 1,000li.; either sum to be paid in (three) years after my decease; and if his Grace refuse the said sum or sums then I will that his Grace have the governance of my said heir or heirs and 20li. a year for finding thereof or they come to the age of twenty years, to be paid yearly by my executors; executors to suffer wife to have all her apparel and all such goods as was her father's, and over that of my

    1 Mr. E. W. Crossley found this will in the State Papers, which does not appear to have before seen the light.

    9
    goods to the value of 100 marks in such stuff as she think con­venient, to be delivered and appraised by Master Robert Frost, chancellor to the prince, if living, and if not by Sir Thomas Pek, parson of Thornhill; my house to be kept as it is at my costs twenty weeks after my decease; if son under age at my death live to age of twenty, executors to account to him, and my debts paid and will performed, the residue over costs and charges to be to the (use of such) son; on coming to his age of sixteen son to have 100li. yearly for his finding, if the King suffer him to be married by such as I have assigned before, and that he be in such place as he may go to school till he be fourteen years old and it at the discretion of them that have the ordering of him as is aforesaid, and if it be a daughter or daughters it to be disposed by my executors and if or they (to have) nothing at the age of twenty years but my lands and the 20li. to their finding as is aforesaid, the 1000li. aforesaid received, anything behind to be received after she or they be twenty after the some of 100li. a year, as above. At Michaelmas after my decease my executors shall meet at the abbey of St. Oswald's and the prior for the time being, calling to him John Chaloner, William Eleson and William Amyas, is to take account of my executors, and yearly at Michaelmas, or within twenty days, the said prior to have 40s. at the finishing of the account and 5li. for the costs of the audit, if he will be content and the audit to be at my charges; pro­vided always that every of my executors exceed not the number of eight horses and the auditor four horses; and I will that the said John Chaloner, William Eleson, and William Amyas to have 40s. for their reward at every audit when they have made and engrossed their books, and such as minister of my executors to have 10 marks yearly during their (ministering) over their reasonable costs; if they all die within ten years such other persons to act as shall be assigned by the said earl of Surrey and Sir Reynald Bray, or if they die the said prior for the time being to put in such as he shall think meet. If any of my executors fail in coming to the audit, if he send his accounts he is to be rebated 5 marks of his reward, if he neither come nor send his account, the said prior is forthwith to sue him by the church law and compel him thereto, the said prior so doing to receive 5 marks over the said costs; and if the said John Chaloner, William Elleson, and William Amyas or any of them fail in coming to the audit, they shall lose their reward for that year, if they die the prior shall put in other as aforesaid. At the three years' (end) (the executors) to bring or send the accounts then finished to the said carl, Sir Raynald Bray and Marmaduke, now Abbot of Fountains, and John Cutt to comp(t)rolle the said accounts, whether it agree with my will and thereupon to subscribe it with their hands, the earl and Sir Reynald receiving 100s. each and the abbot and John Cutt 46s. 8d., etc. At the ten years' end the ac­counts to be engrossed and sent to the archbishop of York under the seals of the earl and the others and of the said prior of St. Oswald's and the archbishop to make acquittance to the executors. Anything doubtful in the will to be construed by Master Robert Frost, one of my executors or the said Sir Thomas Pek. Servants to have a year's wages, etc. Executors,

    10
    Sir Harry Vernon, Knight, Master Robert Frost, chan­cellor to my lord prince, and Sir Thomas Pek, parson of Thornhill. Witnesses, Robert Fryston, William Levet, and Richard Breres.

    The said John Sayvell, Knight, died on Palm Sunday, 20 Henry VII. Henry Sayvell is his son and heir and was aged at the time of his father's death six years and more.

    Cal. of State Papers. Inq. p.m. Hen. VII, vol. ii, p. 511, No. 803.

    *

    Died:
    ...on Palm Sunday

    John married Elizabeth Paston ~ 1501. Elizabeth (daughter of William Paston and Anne Beaufort) was born 0___ 1480, Paston, Norfolk, England; died 1 Feb 1538. [Group Sheet]


  2. 81.  Elizabeth Paston was born 0___ 1480, Paston, Norfolk, England (daughter of William Paston and Anne Beaufort); died 1 Feb 1538.

    Other Events:

    • Will: 1 Jul 1542

    Notes:

    Her will, 1 July, 33 Hen. VIII (1542). Called Elizabeth Savile of Tankersley, widow. To be buried in the Lady quire in Thornhill church.

    To Edward and Dorithie, children of my son Henry Savile, each a spoon.
    To my daughter, Lady Anne Thwaites, my daughter, Lady Elizabeth Conyers, each a goblet.
    To Margaret Wortley a goblet.
    To Chris­topher Conyers, son of Sir Christopher Conyers, knt., 2 silver salts.
    To William and Isabell Thwaites, children of the aforesaid Anne, to Michaell and Frances Sotehill, children of the aforesaid Elizabeth Conyers, each a spoon.
    To Elizabeth Lacie, wife of Richard Lacie, a spoon and a pair of beads.
    To Katherine Thwaites, daughter of Lady Anne, a pair of coral beads.
    To Richard Lacie and Henrie Thwaites, sons of the Lady Anne, each a spoon. All other goods to Isabell Thwaites and Frances Sotehill equally.

    The Lord Talbote, Earl of Shrewsbury, and Henry Savile, knt., super­visors.

    Proved 12 Jan., 1541-2, by Lady Elizabeth Conyers, Lady Anne Thwaites, the other executrix, renouncing (Reg. Test., xi, 591).

    Notes:

    Married:
    mar. 2ly, Elizabeth, daughter of Sir William Paston, Knt., by Jane daughter and coheiress of Edmund Beaufort, Duke of Somerset who was slain at the battle of St. Albans, 1455, and cousin german to the Countess of Richmond, mother of King Henry VII. Mr. Hunter calls this the most splendid marriage of any of the earlier Saviles, as the son was thus a partaker of the royal blood.

    Children:
    1. 40. Henry Savile was born ~ 1502, Thornhill, Dewsbury, West Riding, Yorkshire, England; died 23 Apr 1558.

  3. 84.  William Hussey was born 0___ 1443, Sleaford, Lincoln, England (son of John Hussey, Knight and Elizabeth Sheffield); died 8 Sep 1495, Sleaford, Lincoln, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Lord Chief Justice

    William married Elizabeth Berkeley ~ 1464, Sleaford, Lincoln, England. Elizabeth (daughter of Thomas Berkeley, IV, Knight and Petronella Brooksby) was born ~ 1445, Berkeley Castle, Berkeley, Gloucestershire, England; died 6 Aug 1503, Sleaford, Lincoln, England; was buried Sempringham, Lincoln, England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 85.  Elizabeth Berkeley was born ~ 1445, Berkeley Castle, Berkeley, Gloucestershire, England (daughter of Thomas Berkeley, IV, Knight and Petronella Brooksby); died 6 Aug 1503, Sleaford, Lincoln, England; was buried Sempringham, Lincoln, England.
    Children:
    1. 42. Robert Hussey was born 0___ 1483, Linwood, Blankney, Lincoln, England; died 28 May 1547, Linwood, Blankney, Lincoln, England.

  5. 88.  Thomas Carey was born 0___ 1465, Clovelly, Devon, England (son of William Cary, Knight and Alice Fulford); died Bef 1548, Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England.

    Thomas married Margaret Spencer ~ 1492. Margaret (daughter of Robert Spencer and Eleanor Beaufort, Countess of Ormonde) was born ~ 1471, Spencer Combe, Devon, England; died 0___ 1536. [Group Sheet]


  6. 89.  Margaret Spencer was born ~ 1471, Spencer Combe, Devon, England (daughter of Robert Spencer and Eleanor Beaufort, Countess of Ormonde); died 0___ 1536.

    Other Events:

    • Baptism: Spencer Combe, Devon, England
    • Also Known As: Eleanor Spencer

    Notes:

    Margaret (or Eleanor) Spencer (1472–1536) was the daughter of Sir Robert Spencer, of Spencer Combe in the parish of Crediton, Devon,[1] by his wife Lady Eleanor Beaufort, the daughter of Edmund Beaufort, 2nd Duke of Somerset and Lady Eleanor Beauchamp.

    Marriage and issue

    In 1490 she married Sir Thomas Carey, of Chilton Foliat, in Wiltshire, second son of Sir William Cary (1437-1471) of Cockington, Devon, by his second wife Alice (or Anna) Fulford,[2] a daughter of Sir Baldwin Fulford (d.1476) of Great Fulford, Devon.[3] They had eight children:

    Sir John Carey, of Plashey (1491–1552), married Joyce Denny (1495–1559). She was the daughter of Sir Edmund Denny, of Cheshunt by his second wife, Mary Troutbeck.
    Anne Carey (1493–1550)
    William Carey (1500–1528), Gentleman of the Privy Chamber and Esquire of the Body to King Henry VIII of England, married Mary Boleyn. It is thought that shortly after the marriage, Henry VIII began an affair with Mary, and around this time she gave birth to two children whose parentage is questioned by historians, Henry Carey, 1st Baron Hunsdon and Catherine Carey. If they were Margaret's biological grandchildren, then her descendants include Charles Darwin, Winston Churchill, Elizabeth II and Diana, Princess of Wales.
    Margaret Carey (1496–1560)
    Eleanor Carey (died after 1528). She was a nun at Wilton Abbey.
    Daughter Carey. She was a nun at Wilton Abbey.
    Edward Carey (1498–1560)
    Mary Carey (1501–1560), married John Delaval, Sheriff of Northumberland (1493–1562).

    *

    Children:
    1. 44. John Carey, Knight was born ~ 1495, Pleshey, Essex, England; died 8 Sep 1552, Hunsdon, Hertfordshire, England; was buried 9 Sep 1552, Hunsdon, Hertfordshire, England.
    2. William Carey was born ~ 1500, Aldenham, Hertfordshire, England; died 22 Jun 1528.

  7. 90.  Edmund Denny was born ~ 1457, London, Middlesex, England; died 22 Dec 1520, London, Middlesex, England; was buried St. Benet Paul's Wharf, London, Middlesex, England.

    Edmund — Mary Troutbeck. Mary (daughter of William Troutbeck, Knight and Margaret Stanley) was born ~ 1458, Albrighton, Shropshire, England; died 29 Jun 1507, London, Middlesex, England; was buried St. Benet Paul's Wharf, London, Middlesex, England. [Group Sheet]


  8. 91.  Mary Troutbeck was born ~ 1458, Albrighton, Shropshire, England (daughter of William Troutbeck, Knight and Margaret Stanley); died 29 Jun 1507, London, Middlesex, England; was buried St. Benet Paul's Wharf, London, Middlesex, England.
    Children:
    1. 45. Joyce Denny was born 29 Jul 1495, Howe, Norfolk, Englan; died 6 Apr 1560, London, Middlesex, England; was buried St. Mary Aldermanbury, London, Middlesex, England.

  9. 92.  Thomas Knyvet, Knight was born 0___ 1482, Buckenham, Norfolkshire, England (son of Edmund Knyvett and Eleanor Tyrrell); died 10 Aug 1512, St. Mathieu, France.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Thomas Knyvett
    • Military: KIA - Battle of St. Mathieu

    Notes:

    Thomas' pedigree: http://www.wikitree.com/genealogy/Knyvet-Family-Tree-12

    *

    Military:
    Its history ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Saint-Mathieu

    Buried:
    Body lost at sea;
    Plot: Royal flagship The Regent, in the naval Battle of St. Mathieu off the coast of Brest, France

    Thomas married Muriel Howard Bef 1510, Norfolkshire, England. Muriel (daughter of Thomas Howard, 2nd Duke of Norfolk and Elizabeth Tilney, Countess of Surrey) was born 0___ 1486, Buckenham, Norfolkshire, England; died 14 Dec 1512, Greenwich, England. [Group Sheet]


  10. 93.  Muriel Howard was born 0___ 1486, Buckenham, Norfolkshire, England (daughter of Thomas Howard, 2nd Duke of Norfolk and Elizabeth Tilney, Countess of Surrey); died 14 Dec 1512, Greenwich, England.

    Notes:

    Died:
    in childbirth

    Children:
    1. Edmund Knyvet was born ~ 1508, Norwich, Norfolk, England; died 1 May 1551, London, England.
    2. 46. Henry Knevet, Knight, 1st Baron Knyet of Escrick was born 1506-1510, Buckenham, Norfolkshire, England; died 30 Mar 1547, England.


Generation: 8

  1. 160.  John Savile, (VII) was born ~ 1433, Harewood, Yorkshire, England (son of John Savile, (VI) Knight and Alice Gascoigne); died Bef 1481, Yorkshire, England.

    John married Jane Herrington ~ 1461, Thornhill, Dewsbury, West Riding, Yorkshire, England. Jane (daughter of Thomas Harrington, Knight and Elizabeth Dacre) was born ~ 1441, Thornhill, Dewsbury, West Riding, Yorkshire, England. [Group Sheet]


  2. 161.  Jane Herrington was born ~ 1441, Thornhill, Dewsbury, West Riding, Yorkshire, England (daughter of Thomas Harrington, Knight and Elizabeth Dacre).

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Jane Harrington

    Children:
    1. 80. John Savile, (VIII) Knight was born ~ 1478, Thornhill, Dewsbury, West Riding, Yorkshire, England; died 7 Jan 1504.
    2. Alice Savile was born Thornhill, Dewsbury, West Riding, Yorkshire, England; died 0___ 1522.

  3. 162.  William Paston was born 0___ 1436 (son of William Paston and Agnes Barry); died 0Sep 1496.

    Notes:

    William Paston (1436 – September 1496), who married, before 1470, Anne Beaufort, third daughter of Edmund Beaufort, 2nd Duke of Somerset, by whom he had at least four daughters, one of whom died in childhood.

    He is credited with having compiled, about 1450, part of the manuscript known as The Paston Book of Arms (NRO, MS Rye 38)

    end

    William married Anne Beaufort Bef 1470. Anne (daughter of Edmund Beaufort, Knight, 2nd Duke of Somerset and Eleanor Beauchamp, Duchess of Somerset) was born ~ 1453; died ~ 1496. [Group Sheet]


  4. 163.  Anne Beaufort was born ~ 1453 (daughter of Edmund Beaufort, Knight, 2nd Duke of Somerset and Eleanor Beauchamp, Duchess of Somerset); died ~ 1496.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Jane Beaufort

    Children:
    1. 81. Elizabeth Paston was born 0___ 1480, Paston, Norfolk, England; died 1 Feb 1538.

  5. 168.  John Hussey, Knight was born 0___ 1417, Sleaford, Lincoln, England (son of William Hussey and Katherine Lumley); died 0___ 1444, Sleaford, Lincoln, England.

    Notes:

    John Hussey, Sir
    Birthdate: 1417 (23)
    Birthplace: Old Sleaford, , Kent, England
    Death: circa 1440 (19-27)
    Sleaford, , Lincolnshire, , England
    Immediate Family:
    Son of Sir William Hussey and Katherine de Lumley
    Husband of Elizabeth Hussey
    Father of Thomas Hussey; Sir William Hussey, Lord Chief Justice and Gilbert Hussey
    Brother of Oliver Hussey
    Half brother of Katherine de Chideock; Margaret Stourton and Eleanor Grey
    Managed by: Private User
    Last Updated: November 6, 2015

    About Sir John Hussey
    John Hussey1
    M, b. circa 1417, d. circa 1440
    Father William Hussey b. c 1391
    Mother (Miss) Lumley b. c 1394
    John Hussey married Elizabeth Sheffield. John Hussey was born circa 1417 at of Old Sleaford, Lincolnshire, England. He died circa 1440.
    Family Elizabeth Sheffield b. c 1419
    Child
    Sir William Hussey, Chief Justice of the King's Bench+ b. c 1443, d. 8 Sep 1496
    Citations
    1.[S10726] Unknown author, The Hussey Connection to the Plantagenet Lineage, by Roy Leggitt.
    From: http://our-royal-titled-noble-and-commoner-ancestors.com/p1154.htm#i34658
    ________________________

    John HUSSEY of Old Sleaford
    Born: ABT 1417, Old Sleaford, England
    Died: ABT 1440, Old Sleaford, England
    Father: William HUSSEY
    Mother: Dau. LUMLEY
    Married: Elizabeth NOFFIELD (or Nesfield) ABT 1425, England
    Children:
    1. William HUSSEY (Sir Knight)
    2. Gilbert HUSSEY
    3. Thomas HUSSEY
    From: http://www.tudorplace.com.ar/HUSSEY.htm#John HUSSEY of Old Sleaford1
    ___________________

    Sir William Hussey (or Huse or Husee), SL (1443 – 8 September 1495) was an English judge who served as Chief Justice of the King’s Bench.
    Hussey was born at Gray's Inn, Holborn, London, Middlesex, England, the son of John Hussey of Sleaford, and Elizabeth Noffield.[1]
    He was a member of Gray's Inn, and on 16 June 1471 was appointed Attorney General, with full power of deputing clerks and officers under him in courts of record. As Attorney General he conducted the impeachment of the Duke of Clarence for treason. In Trinity term of 1478 he was made a Serjeant-at-Law, and on 7 May 1481 was appointed Chief Justice of the King's Bench, in succession to Sir Thomas Billing, at a salary of 140 marks a year. This appointment was renewed at the ascension of each of the next three kings, and under Henry VII, he was also a commissioner to decide the claims made to fill various offices at the coronation.

    In the first year of this reign, he successfully protested against the king's practice of consulting the judges beforehand upon crown cases which they were subsequently to try. In June 1492, he was a commissioner to treat with the ambassadors of the King of France. He died in 1495 at Semprington,[1] Lincolnshire, and on 24 November of that year, Sir John Fineux succeeded him as Chief Justice.
    About 1474 Hussey married Elizabeth Berkeley (c. 1453 - 1504), daughter of Thomas Berkeley of Wymondham, Leicestershire, and Petronella Brooksby.[1] They had five sons, and two daughters:

    Elizabeth Hussey (d. Ampthill, 19 November 1516, bur. Warden Abbey); married Richard Grey, 3rd Earl of Kent
    Gilbert Hussey
    Thomas Hussey
    John Hussey, 1st Baron Hussey of Sleaford (1476–1537); married Margaret Blount; married Anne Grey
    Robert Hussey of Linwood (1483 - 20 May 1546), from whom descend the Hussey family of Honnington, Leicestershire (see Hussey Baronets); married Anne Saye
    Mary Hussey (1484); married William Willoughby, 11th Baron Willoughby de Eresby
    William Hussey; married Anne Salvin[2]
    From: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Hussey_(judge)

    end of biography

    John married Elizabeth Sheffield 0___ 1440, (Sleaford, Lincoln, England). Elizabeth was born 0___ 1419, Sleaford, Lincoln, England; died Bef 1466, Sleaford, Lincoln, England. [Group Sheet]


  6. 169.  Elizabeth Sheffield was born 0___ 1419, Sleaford, Lincoln, England; died Bef 1466, Sleaford, Lincoln, England.
    Children:
    1. 84. William Hussey was born 0___ 1443, Sleaford, Lincoln, England; died 8 Sep 1495, Sleaford, Lincoln, England.

  7. 170.  Thomas Berkeley, IV, KnightThomas Berkeley, IV, Knight was born Wymondham, Leicestershire, England (son of Laurence Berkeley, Knight and Joan Woodford); died 0___ 1488.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Member of Parliament, 1472-1475
    • Occupation: Sheriff of Rutland, 1443-1444
    • Occupation: Sheriff of Warwickshire and Leicestershire, 1454-1455

    Notes:

    Sir Thomas Berkeley (died 1488), of Wymondham, Leicestershire was an English lawyer and politician who represented Leicestershire in Parliament and served as Sheriff for Rutland, Warwickshire and Leicestershire.

    Ancestry

    He was the eldest son of Sir Laurence Berkeley of Wymondham (died in France in 1458[3]) and Joan sister of the Agincourt veteran[4]:762 Sir Robert Woodford, Knight Banneret[4]:227 of Sproxton.[3]

    Sir Lawrence Berkeley was the 2*great grandson of Sir Thomas Berkeley, Lord of Coston, 2nd son of Thomas de Berkeley, 1st Baron Berkeley and Jane daughter of William de Ferrers, 5th Earl of Derby.[3]

    Sir Thomas Berkeley, Lord of Coston had moved to Wymondham upon his marriage to Isabel, daughter of Sir John Hamelin of Wymondham.[3][nb 1]

    Career and Life

    Thomas was a Justice of the Peace for Leicestershire from 1442–58 and Sheriff of Rutland between 1443 and 1444.[2] He was admitted as a Fellow of Lincoln's Inn in 1449 by special admission.[6]

    In December 1457 he was appointed as one of Leicestershire's Commissioners of Array who were responsible for raising 226 archers to help repel Richard, Duke of York's Yorkist rebellion and again in 1459.[5] He had been knighted by Nov 1460 perhaps having taken part in the Battle of Northampton but changed allegiance after the bloody Battle of Towton brought about the end of Henry VI's reign and the start of Edward of York's.[5]

    Towards the end of 1465 Thomas became involved in a fight with Sir John Bourchier over the wardship and marriage of the underage grandson of former M.P. Sir Manser Marmion and who Thomas was accused of abducting.[7] The Marmion's estate was composed of over 2,500 acres spread over several counties so, as well as being an attractive prize, was owned by way of a complex set of homages and services to multiple overlords.[7] It would seem Thomas won and later wed his daughter Edith to the Marmion heir.[8][9][10]

    In 1468 Thomas accused William Purley (whose family had lived in Wymondham since the early 13th century) of entering his land two years earlier and stealing 20 hares, 200 rabbits, 12 pheasants and 20 partridges using swords, bows and arrows.[11] William was either found not guilty or let off for some reason as he appears to have later married Thomas Berkeley's daughter Joyce.[8][12]

    Sir Thomas was appointed as Sheriff of Rutland in 1471 and as a Justice of the Peace for Rutland from 1470-75.[2]

    He served in Parliament for Leicestershire between 1472 and 1475.[2]

    Thomas died in 1488 and is buried in an alabaster topped altar tomb with his wife Petronella in Wymondham St Peters.

    Family

    Sir Thomas married Emma[1]/Petronella[3] daughter of Sir William Brokesby,[3] Marshall of the Kings Hall, and had the following issue:-

    Sir Maurice Berkeley[1] (d.30 Nov 1522)[1] son and heir.
    Lawrence Berkeley[1]
    Elizabeth Berkeley[1] (d.1504[8]) m. Sir William Hussey,[1] Chief Justice of the King’s Bench.
    Edith Berkeley[9] (d.23 Oct 1538[9]) m. Mauncer Marmion,[8][9][10] (Sheriff of Lincolnshire in 1497) and buried in a tomb together in Rippingale Church.[9][10]
    Joyce Berkeley (d.1530) m. William Purley[8][12]
    ? Berkeley m. ? Gaton[8]
    Thomas was the 3*great-grandfather of Sir Henry Berkeley 1st Baronet of Wymondham.[3]

    Notes

    Jump up ^ Sir John's Great Grand-father Sir William Hamelyn is thought to have gone on the 3rd Crusade with Richard the Lionheart. He is now thought to be the knight represented in a stone effigy in Wymondham church and not, as Nicholls suggested, Sir John Hamelyn who only appears to have taken part in the Scottish wars.[5]

    References[edit]

    ^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g Visitation of Leicestershire 1619, London: Harleian Society, 1870
    ^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h i Josiah Wedgwood (1936), History of Parliament 1439-1509 Biographies (hardback), London: HMSO
    ^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h i j John Burke & John Bernard Burke (1844), Extinct and Dormant Baronetcies of England, Ireland and Scotland (hardback), London: John Russell Smith
    ^ Jump up to: a b John Burke (1838), A Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Commoners of Great Britain and Ireland (hardback), 4, London: Henry Colburn
    ^ Jump up to: a b c Ralph Penniston Taylor (1996), A History of Wymondham, Wymondham: Witmeha Press
    Jump up ^ Lincolns Inn Admission Register (hardback), London: Lincolns Inn, 1897
    ^ Jump up to: a b George F. Farnham (1929–33), Leicestershire Medieval Village Notes, II, Leicester: W.Thornley & son, p. 275
    ^ Jump up to: a b c d e f Will of Elizabeth Huse 1504, National Archives Kew: Prerogative Court of Canterbury, 1504
    ^ Jump up to: a b c d e Holles Lincolnshire Church Notes, I, Lincolnshire Records Society, 1910
    ^ Jump up to: a b c E.R.Kelly, ed. (1885), Kellys Directory of Lincolnshire, London: Kelly & Co, p. 605
    Jump up ^ George F. Farnham (1929–33), Leicestershire Medieval Village Notes, IV, Leicester: W.Thornley & son, p. 316
    ^ Jump up to: a b Descents and Pedigrees of Families in Lincolnshire, London: British Library, Harl MS 5874

    External links[edit]

    Hamelin Knight in Wymmondham St Peters thought to be Sir John's Great Grand-father Sir William Hamelyn
    Wymondham St Peters

    Thomas — Petronella Brooksby. [Group Sheet]


  8. 171.  Petronella Brooksby
    Children:
    1. 85. Elizabeth Berkeley was born ~ 1445, Berkeley Castle, Berkeley, Gloucestershire, England; died 6 Aug 1503, Sleaford, Lincoln, England; was buried Sempringham, Lincoln, England.

  9. 176.  William Cary, KnightWilliam Cary, Knight was born 12 Aug 1437, Clovelly, Devon, England (son of Phillip Cary, Knight and Christian Orchard); died 6 May 1471, Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Member of Parliament
    • Also Known As: Thomas Carey
    • Also Known As: William Carey

    Notes:

    Sir William Cary (1437-1471) of Cockington and Clovelly in Devon was a member of the Devonshire gentry. He was beheaded after the defeat of the Lancastrians at the Battle of Tewkesbury in 1471.[2]

    Origins

    He was the son and heir of Philip Cary (died 1437) of Cockington, Member of Parliament for Devon in 1433, by his wife Christiana de Orchard (died 1472), daughter and heiress of William de Orchard of Orchard (later Orchard Portman), near Taunton in Somerset. Christiana de Orchard survived her first husband and remarried to Walter Portman,[3] ten times MP for Taunton,[4] by whom she had children, ancestors of the present Viscount Portman, owner of the Portman Estate in London.

    Marriages and children

    Cary married twice:

    Marquess of Winchester COA.svg Firstly to Elizabeth Poulett, a daughter of Sir William Poulett of Hinton St George, Somerset (ancestor of Earl Poulett), by whom he had a son and heir:
    Robert Cary (died 1540), of Cockington
    FulfordArms.png Secondly he married Anna (or Alice) Fulford, a daughter of Sir Baldwin Fulford (died 1476) of Fulford, Devon, by whom he had children:
    Thomas Cary of Chilton Foliat, Wiltshire, who married Margaret Spencer (1472–1536), (or Eleanor Spencer[2]), one of the two daughters and co-heiresses of Sir Robert Spencer (died c. 1510), "of Spencer Combe", in the parish of Crediton in Devon, by his wife Eleanor Beaufort (1431–1501), daughter of Edmund Beaufort, 2nd Duke of Somerset (1406–1455), KG. By Margaret Spencer, Thomas had two sons:
    Sir John Cary (1491–1552) of Plashey, eldest son, ancestor to the Cary Viscounts Falkland.[5]
    William Cary, her second son, the first husband of Mary Boleyn, sister of Queen Anne Boleyn, and ancestor to the Cary Barons Hunsdon, Barons Cary of Leppington, Earls of Monmouth, Viscounts Rochford and Earls of Dover.[5]
    Death[edit]
    Cary was beheaded on 6 May 1471[1] after the defeat of the Lancastrians at the Battle of Tewkesbury.[2] He is believed to be represented by a monumental brass of a knight, without surviving identifying inscription, set into a slate ledger stone on the floor of the chancel of All Saints Church, Clovelly, next to a smaller brass, in similar style, of his son and heir Robert Cary (died 1540).[1]

    *

    Direct Descendants of Adam De Kari
    The following outline contains the DIRECT Descendancy from Adam De Kari to Nancy Lou Sparks Morrison and her children, along with notes for selected De Kari, Cary, Carey and other family lines. A gedcom of ALL descendants now in this file is available from me by e-mailing: nmorri3924@aol.com

    Lord Adam DeKari, Baron of Castle Kari

    Sources for this family information are:

    A.) The Cary Family in England by Henry Grosvenor Cary, published 1906 by Seth Cooley Cary, Dorchester Centre, Boston.

    B.) Early History of Va. & Md. & 7 Centuries of Lines.
    Virginia Room, Roanoke Va. Library, V. Ref. 929.2 K62e

    C.) Ancestors and Descendants of John Quarles Winn and his wife Mary Liscome Jarvis
    Winn 929.2 W
    Jones Memorial Library, Lynchburg, Va.
    Lynchburg Gen. Lib., Lynchburg, Va. copied June 20, 1996

    D.) Carey Highlights: Yesterday for Tomorrow by Virginia Miller Carey, copyright 1983.
    Dogwood Printing, P.O.Bo 716, Ozark, Mo 65721

    E.) Plymouth Pilgrim by Seth C. Cary published 1911, Boston Mass.

    F.) From the records of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

    G.) Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England, James Savage 4 vols.

    H.) Peirce's Colonial Lists of Plymouth & Rhode Island,. 1621-1700 by Ebenezer W. Peirce.

    I.) The Cary Family in America. By Henry Grosvenor Cary. Appe...
    Boston, (Press of Murray and Emery Company) 1907.
    Henry Grosvenor Cary, 1829-1905
    Virginia State Archives, Richmond, Virginia - July, 1996

    J.) Edward Poole of Weymouth, Mass. and His Descendants by Murray Edward Poole - 1893

    K.) 1820 Census of Cabell County, Virginia (WVA

    L.) 1830 Census of Logan Co. VA. (WVA)

    M.) 1850 Census of Lawrence County, Kentucky.

    N.) 'The History of Logan Co.' By Ragland

    O.) The McCoy's: Their Story by Truda Wiliams McCoy.

    P.) Information for this family was given to me by Anna Lee Mayo Clay in Ballard,W.Va.
    Aug.19, 1977. She was 75 years old and her memory was clear.

    Q. Information for this family was given to me by Fanny Mayo, b.Dec. 25, 1904 in Ballard, WV,
    Aug. 19, 1977. She was 73 years old and her memory was clear.


    1 ADAM De KARI b: 1170 in Castle Kari, Somerset, England
    .... +Amy Trevitt Father: William Trevitt

    NOTES on ADAM De KARI:

    1.) For centuries the castle has existed only in history, but the town where it was located is known today as Castle Cary and may thus be found on maps. It is in Somersetshire and twelve miles southeast of Wells.
    2.) It is known that it was a fortified place in the time of the Saxons. About the year 1125, the Lord William Percival named 'Lovel the Wolf" erected strong fortifications at Kari.

    3.) Much of the time during the reign of King Steven (1135-1154) the Barons were divided into two parties, The Lord Kari being opposed to the King.

    4.) He made so much trouble that Stephen turned his whole attention to Castle Kari and took it. In 1153, it was beseiged again and nearly ruined.

    5.) The Manor House stands on the east side of the street and was a stately edifice. During the wanderings of Charles II, when his army was defeated by Cromwell at the Battle of Worchester, the disguised King slept at Castle Cary on the night of 3 Sept. 1651.

    6.) Reign of Henry II and Richard I.


    2 John De Kary b: 1200
    +Elizabeth Stapleton Father: Richard Stapleton

    1.) Reign of John and Henry III.
    3 William DeKary b: 1230 in Castle Kary, Somerset, England
    +Alice Beaumont Father: William Beaumont Mother: Alwyn
    1.) Reign of Henry III and Edward I.
    4 John DeKarry b: 1270 in Castle Karry
    +Phillippa Archdeacon Father: Warren Archdeacon
    Notes on John DeKarry:

    1.) The use of the French 'DE' was not universal. Sometimes the children used it when their parents did not.
    2.) Reign of Edward I and Edward II.


    5 William Kary b: 1300 in Castle Kary, Somerset, England
    +Margaret Bosun (Bozon or Bozume) b: in Clovelly of Devon

    Notes for William Kary:

    1.) The spelling of the name was changed during the reign of Edward II and has remained to to this day.
    2.) Reign of Edward III and Richard II.

    6 John Cary b: 1325 in St.Giles-in-the-Heath, Devon, England
    +Jane DeBryen Father: Guy de Bryen
    Notes for John Cary:

    1.) Reign of Edward III and Richard II.
    2.) The spelling of the name was changed to Cary during the reign of Edward II and has ever since been spelled as Cary (until 1906). Sometime after that some Carys added an "e" to the name and there have been both Carys and Careys since.


    7 John Cary b: 1350 in England d: 1404 in Waterford, Ireland
    +Margaret Holway

    Notes for John Cary:

    1.) He was banished to Waterford, Ireland, where he was no less than 4 years in banishment. A long time living, to be confined to the shades of misery and sorrow.
    2.) Among his estates were Cockington and Clovelly.

    3.) He lived during the reigns of Edward III and Richard II

    4.) From The Cary Family in Eng. by Cary,

    "Prince says: 'On the fifth of November, 1387, he was by the King Richard II, made Chief Baron of the Exchequer, and advanced to be a Judge of the land; who being now placed in a high and spacious Orb, he scattered the Rays of Justice about him with great splendor. In his post he continued many years, manifesting in all his actions, an inflexible Virtue and Honesty; and indeed it fell out at last that he had an extraordinary occasion laid before him, for the proof and tryal thereof, upon which we find him as true as steel, for the greatest dangers could not affright him from his duty and Loyalty to his distressed Master, King Richard II, unto whom he faithfully adhered when most others had forsaken him.' After the king was put to death by Henry IV, Sir John was banished and all his goods and lands confiscated for his loyalty to his royal master.
    Westcote says: 'I will speak of Sir John Cary, Baron of the Exchequer in the time of Richard II. This knight neither able nor willing, like a willow, to bow with every blast of the wind, so confidently and freely spoke his mind, opposing the proceedings for procurators to take the resignation of his master, King Richard, his true and undoubted Sovereign, that there-upon he was dis-officed, his goods and lands confiscated, and himself banished."

    "Prompt me, Muses, if you can,
    And show me such another man."
    8 Robert Cary b: 1375 in Holway, Devon, England
    +Jane Hanchford Father: William Hanchford
    Notes for Robert Cary:

    1.) b. in 1375, an extract from Burkes Heraldry: 'In the beginning of the reign of Henry V. (1413- 1422) a certain knight-errant of Aragon, having passed through divers countries, and performed many feats of arms, arrived here in England, where he challenged any man of his rank and quality to make a trial of his skill at arms. This challenge was accepted by Sir Robert Cary, between whom a cruel encounter and a long and doubtful combat was waged in Smithfield, London. But at length this noble champion vanquished the presumptuous Arragonois, for which King Henry V, restored unto him a good part of his fathers lands, for which his loyalty to Richard II, he had been deprived of by Henry IV.
    2.) He was authorized to bear the arms of a Knight of Aragon, which the noble posterity wear to this day. For according to the Laws of Heraldry , whosoever fairley in the field conquers his adversary may justify the wearing of his arms.'

    9 Philip Cary b: 1400 in, England d: 1437
    +Christian Orchard
    Notes for Philip Cary:

    1.) Lived during the reigns of Henry IV, V, VI.
    2.) Cary, Phillip Sir Knight

    *

    William Cary b: 1437 in , England d: May 06, 1471
    +Elizabeth Paulett
    Notes for William Cary:

    1.) He was an ardent supporter of the House of Lancaster, and took an active part in the struggle between the adherents of Henry VI and Edward IV in the WAR OF THE ROSES.
    2.) At the Battle of Tewksbury on May 4, 1471, the Lancastrians were defeated, and William with others took refuge in the Abbey Church. According to the customs of the times the church was a 'Sanctuary', so that they could not be taken out of it. They were enticed out on the promise of pardon and two days later were beheaded. His property was confiscated as usual in such cases, but Henry VII restored it to his son Robert. We cannot ascertain for what reason, but probably because King Henry was a scion of the House of Lancaster in whose cause, his father lost his life and property.

    3.) William left two sons Robert and Thomas. From Robert sprang the families of Clovelly, Torre Abbey, and Somersetshire. And from Thomas the three lines of nobles, Baron Hunsdon, Earl of Monmouth, and Viscount Falkland Line.

    4.) He lived during the reign of Henry VI and Edward IV.


    11 Robert Cary b: 1460 in, England d: 1540
    +Agnes Hody Father: William Hody

    Notes for Robert Cary:

    1.) His tomb is in the Little Clovelly Church. It has a figure if a Knight set in brass in the slab with this inscription: PRAY FOR THE SOWLE OF SIR ROBERT CARY, ESQUIRE, SONNE AND HEYER OF SIR WM. CARY, KNYGHTE. WHICH SIR ROBERT DECESSYD THE XXV DAY OF JUNE IN THE YERE OF OUR LORD GOD M.V.XL O'WHO'S SOWLE IHU MERCY.
    2.) Lived during the reigns of Edward IV and V, Richard III, and Henry VII and VIII.

    *

    Sir William Carey, Kt.
    Also Known As: "Cary", "Carye"
    Birthdate: August 12, 1437 (33)
    Birthplace: Cockington, Devon, England
    Death: Died May 6, 1471 in Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England
    Place of Burial: Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England, United Kingdom
    Immediate Family:
    Son of Philip Carey of Cockington and Christianna Carey
    Husband of Alice Carey and Elizabeth Ann Carey (Paulet)
    Father of Thomas Carey; Isabel Carey and Sir Robert Carey, II
    Occupation: Knight of Cockington
    Managed by: Private User
    Last Updated: January 13, 2017

    Immediate Family

    Alice Carey
    wife

    Thomas Carey
    son

    Isabel Carey
    daughter

    Elizabeth Ann Carey (Paulet)
    wife

    Sir Robert Carey, II
    son

    Philip Carey of Cockington
    father

    Christianna Carey
    mother

    Walter /James Portman
    stepfather
    About Sir William Carey, Kt.
    William CAREY (Sir)

    Born: 12 Aug 1437, Cockington, Devonshire, England

    Died: 6 May 1471, Tewkesbury, Gloucester, England

    Notes: beheaded for supporting Lancaster in the War of the Roses

    Father: Phillip CAREY

    Mother: Christian ORCHARD

    Married 1: Anne (Elizabeth) PAULET

    Children:

    1. Robert CAREY

    Married 2: Alice FULFORD (dau. of Sir Baldwin Fulford) ABT 1458, Fulford, Devonshire, England

    Children:

    2. Thomas CAREY of Chilton

    http://www.tudorplace.com.ar/CAREY.htm#William CAREY (Sir)1

    1.) He was an ardent supporter of the House of Lancaster, and took an active part in the struggle between the adherents of Henry VI and Edward IV in the WAR OF THE ROSES.
    2.) At the Battle of Tewksbury on May 4, 1471, the Lancastrians were defeated, and William with others took refuge in the Abbey Church. According to the customs of the times the church was a 'Sanctuary', so that they could not be taken out of it. They were enticed out on the promise of pardon and two days later were beheaded. His property was confiscated as usual in such cases, but Henry VII restored it to his son Robert. We cannot ascertain for what reason, but probably because King Henry was a scion of the House of Lancaster in whose cause, his father lost his life and property.
    3.) William left two sons Robert and Thomas. From Robert sprang the families of Clovelly, Torre Abbey, and Somersetshire. And from Thomas the three lines of nobles, Baron Hunsdon, Earl of Monmouth, and Viscount Falkland Line.
    4.) He lived during the reign of Henry VI and Edward IV.
    Beheaded at Tewkesbury or supporting the Lancastrians in the War of the .

    Sir William inherited Clovelly from his father.
    During the War of the Roses, he sided with the House of Lancaster and suffered defeat with them. He was beheaded along with the others; his properties being confiscated.

    William Cary was born in Cockington on August 12, 1439. He died May 6, 1471 in Tewksbury after a battle. He was cornered and sought sanctuary in a church. He was promised a pardon if he came out. He did and was beheaded. So much for the word and honor of his opponent.
    He married Elizabeth Paulett around1459. She was born 1445 in Hinton St. George Parish, England. Her parents were William Paulett (born 1405 and died 10/2/1488) and Elizabeth Denebaud was born 1414 and died 11/17/1497.

    I have a report that he married Alice Fulford in 1464. If this is true, Elizabeth was still alive. I am still trying to confirm or refute this.

    One of their sons, Thomas, married Mary Boleyne. She was a sister to Anne Boleyne that King Henry beheaded rather than get a divorce.

    Sept 2008 NOTE: add'l info (provided by Val Jennings-a Cary descendant) and possible ancestors can be reviewed here, but the dates are questionable so not included on this tree:

    http://www.angelfire.com/ga3/LowmanHistory/CARY.htm

    *

    Died:
    ...beheaded...

    William married Alice Fulford 0___ 1464, (Little) Fulford, Crediton, Devon, England. Alice (daughter of Baldwin Fulford, Knight and Elizabeth Bosome) was born ~ 1436; died Great Fulford, Devon, England. [Group Sheet]


  10. 177.  Alice Fulford was born ~ 1436 (daughter of Baldwin Fulford, Knight and Elizabeth Bosome); died Great Fulford, Devon, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Anne Fulford

    Children:
    1. 88. Thomas Carey was born 0___ 1465, Clovelly, Devon, England; died Bef 1548, Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England.

  11. 178.  Robert Spencer was born Abt 1430, Spencer Combe, Devon, England (son of John Spencer and Joan LNU); died ~ 11510.

    Robert married Eleanor Beaufort, Countess of Ormonde Abt 1470, Crediton, Devonshire, England. Eleanor (daughter of Edmund Beaufort, Knight, 2nd Duke of Somerset and Eleanor Beauchamp, Duchess of Somerset) was born 0___ 1431, London, Middlesex, England; died 16 Aug 1501. [Group Sheet]


  12. 179.  Eleanor Beaufort, Countess of Ormonde was born 0___ 1431, London, Middlesex, England (daughter of Edmund Beaufort, Knight, 2nd Duke of Somerset and Eleanor Beauchamp, Duchess of Somerset); died 16 Aug 1501.

    Notes:

    Origins

    She was the daughter of Edmund Beaufort, 2nd Duke of Somerset, KG (1406-1455), by his wife, Lady Eleanor Beauchamp daughter of Richard de Beauchamp, 13th Earl of Warwick by his first wife, Elizabeth de Berkeley, daughter and heiress of Thomas de Berkeley, 5th Baron Berkeley by his wife Margaret de Lisle, 3rd Baroness Lisle. Eleanor Beauchamp was an elder half-sister of Henry de Beauchamp, 1st Duke of Warwick and Anne Neville, 16th Countess of Warwick.

    Marriages & progeny

    Eleanor Beaufort married twice:

    Firstly in about April 1458[1] she married James Butler, 5th Earl of Ormond, 1st Earl of Wiltshire (d.1461), Lieutenant of Ireland in 1453. When civil conflict broke out, the lieutenant fought on the Lancastrian side. He was present at the first battle of St. Albans in 1455, Mortimer's Cross in 1461 and at the Battle of Towton. Ormond also held the post of councillor to the Lancastrian Prince of Wales. After Towton, he was a proscribed as a traitor and was captured in the same year at Cockermouth and executed there in 1461.[citation needed]

    Secondly she married Sir Robert Spencer[2] of Spencer Combe in the parish of Crediton, Devon,[3] by whom she had two daughters and co-heiresses:
    Margaret Spencer (1472-1536), (or Eleanor Spencer[4]) wife of Thomas Cary of Chilton Foliot, Wiltshire, second son of Sir William Cary (1437-1471) of Cockington, Devon.[5] She had two sons:
    Sir John Cary (1491–1552) of Plashey, eldest son, ancestor to the Cary Viscounts Falkland.[6]
    William Cary, her 2nd son, the first husband of Anne Boleyn's sister Mary Boleyn and ancestor to the Cary Barons Hunsdon, Barons Cary of Leppington, Earls of Monmouth, Viscounts Rochford and Earls of Dover.[7]
    Catherine Spencer (1477–1542), wife of Henry Percy, 5th Earl of Northumberland and mother to Henry Percy, 6th Earl of Northumberland, an early love interest of Anne Boleyn.

    Children:
    1. 89. Margaret Spencer was born ~ 1471, Spencer Combe, Devon, England; died 0___ 1536.
    2. Catherine Spencer, Countess of Northumberland was born 0___ 1477, Spencer Combe, Devon, England.

  13. 182.  William Troutbeck, Knight was born 13 Jan 1436, Dunham on the Hill, Cheshire, England; died 23 Sep 1459, Blore Heath, Staffordshire, England.

    Notes:

    Facts and Events
    Name[2] Sir William Troutbeck, Knight
    Alt Name William Troutbeck
    Gender Male
    Birth[2] 13 January 1436 Dunham-on-the-Hill, Cheshire, England

    Marriage
    to Margaret Stanley

    Death[1] 23 September 1459 Blore, Staffordshire, England

    Combatant of Blore Heath
    Ancestral File Number
    9FXK-90
    ?References
    ? Clayton, Dorothy J. The administration of the County Palatine of Chester, 1442-1485. (Manchester: Published for the Chetham Society by Manchester University Press, c1990), page 164.
    ? 2.0 2.1 Ormerod, George; Peter Leycester; William Smith; William Webb; and Thomas Helsby. The history of the county palatine and city of Chester: compiled from original evidences in public offices, the Harleian and Cottonian mss., parochial registers, private muniments, unpublished ms. collections of successive Cheshire antiquaries, and a personal survey of every township in the county, incorporated with a republication of King's Vale royal and Leycester's Cheshire antiquities. (London: G. Routledge, 1882), Volume 2 page 39.
    The National Archives catalogue has this note on the Troutbecks:

    For a full account and pedigree of the Troutbeck family, see J. Brownbill, 'The Troutbeck Family' (C.N.W.S., n.s. v.28 pt.II, pp.149-179). The pedigree in Ormerod (v.ii, p.42) is not reliable. For some related deeds see DDX 181.

    Sir William Troutbeck, in Lundy, Darryl. The Peerage: A genealogical survey of the peerage of Britain as well as the royal families of Europe.

    *

    Died:
    on the battlefield...

    William — Margaret Stanley. Margaret (daughter of Thomas Stanley, Knight, 1st Baron Stanley and Joan Goushill, Baroness Stanley) was born ~ 1433, Lathom, Ormskirk, Lancashire, England. [Group Sheet]


  14. 183.  Margaret Stanley was born ~ 1433, Lathom, Ormskirk, Lancashire, England (daughter of Thomas Stanley, Knight, 1st Baron Stanley and Joan Goushill, Baroness Stanley).

    Notes:

    Click here to view Margaret's 5-generation pedigree...

    Children:
    1. 91. Mary Troutbeck was born ~ 1458, Albrighton, Shropshire, England; died 29 Jun 1507, London, Middlesex, England; was buried St. Benet Paul's Wharf, London, Middlesex, England.

  15. 184.  Edmund Knyvett was born 0___ 1462, (Norfolkshire) England (son of William Knyvett and Alice Grey); died 0___ 1504.

    Notes:

    Buried:
    Body lost at sea...

    Edmund — Eleanor Tyrrell. Eleanor was born 0___ 1461, Ashwellthorpe, Norfolk, England; died 0Apr 1514, Greater London, Middlesex, England. [Group Sheet]


  16. 185.  Eleanor Tyrrell was born 0___ 1461, Ashwellthorpe, Norfolk, England; died 0Apr 1514, Greater London, Middlesex, England.
    Children:
    1. 92. Thomas Knyvet, Knight was born 0___ 1482, Buckenham, Norfolkshire, England; died 10 Aug 1512, St. Mathieu, France.

  17. 186.  Thomas Howard, 2nd Duke of NorfolkThomas Howard, 2nd Duke of Norfolk was born 0___ 1443, Stoke by Nayland, Suffolk, England (son of John Howard, 1st Duke of Norfolk and Katherine Moleyns, Duchess of Norfolk); died 21 May 1524, Framlingham Castle, Suffolk, England; was buried 22 Jun 1524, Thetford Priory, Thetford, Norfolk, England.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Earl Marshall of England
    • Also Known As: Earl of Surrey

    Notes:

    Thomas Howard, 2nd Duke of Norfolk, KG, PC, Earl Marshal (1443 – 21 May 1524), styled Earl of Surrey from 1483 to 1485 and again from 1489 to 1514, was the only son of John Howard, 1st Duke of Norfolk, by his first wife, Katherine Moleyns. The Duke was the grandfather of both Queen Anne Boleyn and Queen Catherine Howard and the great grandfather of Queen Elizabeth I. He served four monarchs as a soldier and statesman.

    Early life

    Thomas Howard, 2nd Duke of Norfolk, was born in 1443 at Stoke-by-Nayland, Suffolk, the only surviving son of John Howard, 1st Duke of Norfolk, by his first wife, Katherine, the daughter of William Moleyns (d. 8 June 1425) and his wife Margery.[1] He was educated at Thetford Grammar School.[2]

    Service under Edward IV

    While a youth he entered the service of King Edward IV as a henchman. Howard took the King's side when war broke out in 1469 with the Earl of Warwick, and took sanctuary at Colchester when the King fled to Holland in 1470. Howard rejoined the royal forces at Edward's return to England in 1471, and was severely wounded at the Battle of Barnet on 14 April 1471.[2] He was appointed an esquire of the body in 1473. On 14 January 1478 he was knighted by Edward IV at the marriage of the King's second son, the young Duke of York, and Lady Anne Mowbray (d.1483).[3]

    Service under Richard III

    After the death of Edward IV on 9 April 1483, Thomas Howard and his father John supported Richard III's usurpation of the throne. Thomas bore the Sword of State at Richard's coronation, and served as steward at the coronation banquet. Both Thomas and his father were granted lands by the new King, and Thomas was also granted an annuity of ¹1000. On 28 June 1483, John Howard was created Duke of Norfolk, while Thomas was created Earl of Surrey.[2] Surrey was also sworn of the Privy Council and invested with the Order of the Garter. In the autumn of that year Norfolk and Surrey suppressed a rebellion against the King by the Duke of Buckingham.[3] Both Howards remained close to King Richard throughout his two-year reign, and fought for him at the Battle of Bosworth in 1485, where Surrey was wounded and taken prisoner, and his father killed. Surrey was attainted in the first Parliament of the new King, Henry VII, stripped of his lands, and committed to the Tower of London, where he spent the next three years.

    Service under Henry VII

    A painting by Mather Brown depicting Norfolk defending his allegiance to Richard III before Henry VII after the Battle of Bosworth Field.
    Howard was offered an opportunity to escape during the rebellion of the Earl of Lincoln in 1487, but refused, perhaps thereby convincing Henry VII of his loyalty. In May 1489 Henry restored him to the earldom of Surrey, although most of his lands were withheld, and sent him to quell a rebellion in Yorkshire. Surrey remained in the north as the King's lieutenant until 1499.[3] In 1499 he was recalled to court, and accompanied the King on a state visit to France in the following year. In 1501 he was again appointed a member of the Council, and on 16 June of that year was made Lord High Treasurer. Surrey, Bishop Richard Foxe, the Lord Privy Seal, and Archbishop William Warham, the Lord Chancellor, became the King's 'executive triumvirate'.[3] He was entrusted with a number of diplomatic missions. In 1501 he was involved in the negotiations for Catherine of Aragon's marriage to Arthur, Prince of Wales, and in 1503 conducted Margaret Tudor to Scotland for her wedding to King James IV.[3]

    Service under Henry VIII

    Surrey was an executor of the will of King Henry VII when the King died on 21 April 1509, and played a prominent role in the coronation of King Henry VIII, in which he served as Earl Marshal. He challenged Thomas Wolsey in an effort to become the new King's first minister, but eventually accepted Wolsey's supremacy. Surrey expected to lead the 1513 expedition to France, but was left behind when the King departed for Calais on 30 June 1513. Shortly thereafter James IV launched an invasion, and Surrey, with the aid of other noblemen and his sons Thomas and Edmund, crushed James's much larger force near Branxton, Northumberland, on 9 September 1513 at the Battle of Flodden. The Scots may have lost as many as 10,000 men, and King James was killed. The victory at Flodden brought Surrey great popular renown and royal rewards. On 1 February 1514 he was created Duke of Norfolk, and his son Thomas was made Earl of Surrey. Both were granted lands and annuities, and the Howard arms were augmented in honour of Flodden with an escutcheon bearing the lion of Scotland pierced through the mouth with an arrow.[3]

    Final Years

    In the final decade of his life, Norfolk continued his career as a courtier, diplomat and soldier. In 1514 he joined Wolsey and Foxe in negotiating the marriage of Mary Tudor to King Louis XII of France, and escorted her to France for the wedding. On 1 May 1517 he led a private army of 1300 retainers into London to suppress the Evil May Day riots. In May 1521 he presided as Lord High Steward over the trial of Edward Stafford, 3rd Duke of Buckingham. According to Head, 'he pronounced the sentence of death with tears streaming down his face'.[3]

    By the spring of 1522, Norfolk was almost 80 years of age and in failing health. He withdrew from court, resigned as Lord Treasurer in favour of his son in December of that year, and after attending the opening of Parliament in April 1523, retired to his ducal castle at Framlingham in Suffolk where he died on 21 May 1524. His funeral and burial on 22 June at Thetford Priory were said to have been 'spectacular and enormously expensive, costing over ¹1300 and including a procession of 400 hooded men bearing torches and an elaborate bier surmounted with 100 wax effigies and 700 candles', befitting the richest and most powerful peer in England.[4] After the dissolution of Thetford Priory, the Howard tombs were moved to the Church of St Michael the Archangel, Framlingham. A now-lost monumental brass depicting the 2nd Duke was formerly in the Church of St. Mary at Lambeth.[citation needed]

    Marriages and issue

    On 30 April 1472 Howard married Elizabeth Tilney, the daughter of Sir Frederick Tilney of Ashwellthorpe, Norfolk, and widow of Sir Humphrey Bourchier, slain at Barnet, son and heir apparent of Sir John Bourchier, 1st Baron Berners.[5] They had issue:

    Thomas Howard, 3rd Duke of Norfolk[2]
    Sir Edward Howard[6]
    Lord Edmund Howard, father of Henry VIII's fifth Queen, Catherine Howard[7]
    Sir John Howard[2]
    Henry Howard[2]
    Charles Howard[2]
    Henry Howard (the younger)[2]
    Richard Howard[2]
    Elizabeth Howard, married Thomas Boleyn, 1st Earl of Wiltshire, and was mother of Queen Anne Boleyn, and grandmother of Queen Elizabeth.[8]
    Muriel Howard (d.1512), married firstly John Grey, Viscount Lisle (d.1504), and secondly Sir Thomas Knyvet[9]
    daughter (died young)[10]

    Norfolk's first wife died on 4 April 1497, and on 8 November 1497 he married, by dispensation dated 17 August 1497, her cousin, Agnes Tilney, the daughter of Hugh Tilney of Skirbeck and Boston, Lincolnshire and Eleanor, a daughter of Walter Tailboys. They had issue:

    William Howard, 1st Baron Howard of Effingham[11]
    Lord Thomas Howard (1511–1537)[12]
    Richard Howard (d.1517)[10]
    Dorothy Howard, married Edward Stanley, 3rd Earl of Derby[13]
    Anne Howard, married John de Vere, 14th Earl of Oxford[14]
    Catherine Howard, married firstly, Rhys ap Gruffydd. Married secondly, Henry Daubeney, 1st Earl of Bridgewater.
    Margaret Howard (d. 1536), married Henry Radclyffe, 2nd Earl of Sussex.

    *

    Earl of Surrey. Earl Marshall of England. The Complete Peerage vol.XIIpI,p.513. 1 May 1484 and 8 Dec 1484 Richard III directed John, Duke of Suffolk; Thomas, Earl of Surrey; John, Lord Fitzwalter; Sir Henry Grey; Sir Edmund Bedingfield; Sir William Boleyn; William Paston; Ralph Shelton; Richard Southwell; John Paston; Robert Clere and others to array men at arms in Norfolk, no doubt readying for an assault by the Lancastrians. Fought on the wrong side at the battle of Bosworth, his father was killed and was taken prisoner by Henry VII, attainted, and placed in the Tower of London. Thomas Howard, stripped of his lands and titles, remained in prison for 3 years. Was released 1489. Henry VII needed a good general to fight the Scots. Thomas, who had been trained as a soldier all his life and was a good general, was released from prison and his title Earl of Surrey, which he had received in 1483, was restored. But his lands and the dukedom were not. He was entrusted by Henry VII with the care of the northern borders.

    As the King's lieutenant of the north, Surrey suppressed the English rebels and advanced against the King of Scots seizing several castles along the border. The King of Scots refused to fight Surrey and disbanded his army.

    As part of the peace settlement Henry VII's daughter Margaret married James, King of Scotland. Surrey and his wife escorted Margaret to Scotland to seal the Anglo-Scots peace by marrying James IV, and the Earl's entire family went along.

    On 25 Jun 1501 Surrey was confirmed as Lord Treasurer and, as one of the great officers of state, became one of the executive triunvirate of Henry's council, along with Richard Fox, lord privy seal, and William Warham. The Earl was constantly at court and in council, serving as the only prominent titled noble among Henry VII's heavily ecclesiastical inner circle.

    Surrey, his son Thomas, Fox and several others were given charge of negotiations which led to a treaty in 1508 binding Charles of Burgundy, grandson of the Emperor Maximilian, to wed Henry's younger daughter Mary.

    At the death of Henry VII in Apr 1509 Surrey was named an executor of the King's will and at the burial stood by the grave with the other officials of state and household who broke their staves of office and cast them down. At the coronation of Henry VIII and Catalina de Aragon, Surrey served as Earl Marshal. His son Sir Thomas was also involved in the passing of the crown, being paid five hundred marks along with Sir John Carre on 24 May for his services in Henry VII's funeral and Henry VIII's coronation.

    For the Howards, the transition from Henry VII to his son was far smoother than that from Richard III to the first Tudor. Surrey and his sons were anxious to prove their loyalty and usefulness. The dukedom of Norfolk still stood as the last great reward to be earned; the Howards were prepared to study the new King Henry VIII, to judge how best to serve him, and to win reward for that service. The Earl of Surrey, as treasurer, has been accused of using his position to encourage the King to lavish expenditure and wasteful pageantry, dissipating the resources of the crown in order to worm the Howard family into Henry's closest circle.

    In Nov 1509, Surrey, Thomas and Edmund Howard and Thomas Boleyn obtained the lease of the lands of Elizabeth, daughter and heiress of Sir John Grey, viscount Lisle. Lisle had died in 1504, but had been married to Surrey's daughter Muriel, who later wed Thomas Knyvett. Thus the lands of this minor niece were retained in Howard hands pending her marriage.

    Although an influential member of Henry VIII’s privy council, he was gradually forced to relinquish much of his power to the ascending Thomas Wolsey. Norfolk was no courtier and didn't play much of a role in the affairs of state after that. Cardinal Wolsey held the power then and saw to it that men like Norfolk didn't gain too much influence with the King. Wolsey was soon seeking an independent position on the council and encouraging Henry to seek martial glory in France. The Howards favored action against a nearer and more pressing enemy, the Scots.

    In the summer of 1511, Thomas and Edward Howard were sent out to engage Andrew Barton, a favorite sea captain of James IV. Barton, sailing with letters of marque against Portugal, had taken several English ships on the pretext that they were carrying Portuguese goods. Henry was willing to view Barton as a pirate; without complaining to James, the King turned the Howards loose to capture him. In the ensuing fight, a full-scale sea battle in the Channel, Barton was killed and his two ships, captured. James was angry enough to fight had England pursued the matter but, despite Surrey's prodding, Henry still thought it more rewarding to attack France. Wolsey had persuaded the King to risk greater dangers to seek a greater prize. Surrey may have overplayed his hand in pushing Henry to follow up the defeat of Barton with further action against the Scots, for on 30 Sep Wolsey wrote to Fox that the Earl had been so discountenanced by his latest meeting with Henry that he had retired from court, leaving the field to the anti-French party. Nonetheless, the Howards continued their stirrings against Scotland, for Wolsey complained that Edward Howard used his closeness with Henry to urge the King to war with James.

    By Nov 1511 Surrey returned to court, ready to implement the king's chosen policy.

    Early in his reign Henry VIII crossed the Channel to France in an attempt to revive the English claim to the French throne. Fortunately he left the Earl of Surrey in England. The French campaign was a disaster. While Henry VIII was in France, King James of Scotland invaded England with an army 30,000. Surrey rushed to the defense with an army of about 20,000. The battle of Flodden was a disaster for James and the Scots. Over 10,000 of his men were killed, including many Scottish peers. King James died only a few feet from Surrey.

    Although King Henry was most likely jealous of Surrey's success and his own failure, he restored the titles of Duke of Norfolk and Earl Marshall to him. Surrey was the toast of England. And the Scottish border was secure for many years.

    In 1517 Norfolk put down a revolt by the London apprentices. Afterward he persuaded Henry not to treat them harshly.

    When King Henry returned to France for The Field of the Cloth of Gold he left Norfolk at home in charge of the country. He served as guardian of the realm during Henry’s absence in 1520. In 1521, acting as Lord High Steward, he was compelled to sentence his friend Edward Stafford, 3° Duke of Buckingham, to death.

    In 1522 Norfolk was sent as Ambassador to the Holy Roman Emperor, Carlos V who honored him by making his eldest son Admiral of the Imperial Dominions.


    He died in 1524 in the great castle of Framlingham which had once been the seat of the Mowbray dukes of Norfolk and before that had been home to the Bigods, Earls for Norfolk during the Norman era. He was about 80.

    Died:
    Framlingham Castle is a castle in the market town of Framlingham in Suffolk in England. An early motte and bailey or ringwork Norman castle was built on the Framlingham site by 1148, but this was destroyed by Henry II of England in the aftermath of the revolt of 1173-4. Its replacement, constructed by Roger Bigod, the Earl of Norfolk, was unusual for the time in having no central keep, but instead using a curtain wall with thirteen mural towers to defend the centre of the castle. Despite this, the castle was successfully taken by King John in 1216 after a short siege. By the end of the 13th century, Framlingham had become a luxurious home, surrounded by extensive parkland used for hunting.

    During the 15th and 16th centuries Framlingham was at the heart of the estates of the powerful Mowbray and Howard families. Two artificial meres were built around the castle, which was expanded in fashionable brick. With a large, wealthy household to maintain, the castle purchased supplies from across England and brought in luxury goods from international markets. Extensive pleasure gardens were built within the castle and older parts redesigned to allow visitors to enjoy the resulting views. By the end of the 16th century, however, the castle fell into disrepair and after the final Howard owner, Theophilus, entered into financial difficulties the castle and the surrounding estates were sold off.

    Framlingham Castle was given to Pembroke College as a philanthropic gesture in 1636, after which the internal buildings were taken down to make way for the construction of a poorhouse within the site. The castle was used in this way until 1839 when the facility was closed; the castle was then used as a drill hall and as a county court. In 1913, Pembroke College donated Framlingham to the Commissioner of Works. During the Second World War, Framlingham Castle was used by the British military as part of the regional defences against a potential German invasion. Today, Framlingham Castle is a scheduled monument and a grade I listed building, owned by English Heritage and run as a tourist attraction.

    Click here to view images & map ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Framlingham_Castle

    Thomas married Elizabeth Tilney, Countess of Surrey 30 Apr 1472, Norfolkshire, England. Elizabeth (daughter of Frederick Tilney and Elizabeth Cheney) was born Bef 1445, Ashwellthorpe, Norfolkshire, England; died 4 Apr 1497, (Norfolkshire, England); was buried 31 May 1545, Thetford Priory, Thetford, Norfolk, England. [Group Sheet]


  18. 187.  Elizabeth Tilney, Countess of SurreyElizabeth Tilney, Countess of Surrey was born Bef 1445, Ashwellthorpe, Norfolkshire, England (daughter of Frederick Tilney and Elizabeth Cheney); died 4 Apr 1497, (Norfolkshire, England); was buried 31 May 1545, Thetford Priory, Thetford, Norfolk, England.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Duchess of Norfolk

    Notes:

    Elizabeth Tilney, Countess of Surrey (before 1445 – 4 April 1497) was an English heiress and lady-in-waiting to two queens. She became the first wife of Thomas Howard, Earl of Surrey.

    She served as a lady-in-waiting to Queen consort Elizabeth Woodville, and later as Lady of the Bedchamber to the Queen's daughter, Elizabeth of York, consort of King Henry VII of England. She stood as joint godmother to Princess Margaret Tudor at her baptism.

    She was the mother of Thomas Howard, 3rd Duke of Norfolk. Through her daughter Elizabeth she was the maternal grandmother of Anne Boleyn, and through another son, Edmund, the paternal grandmother of Catherine Howard, both queens consort of King Henry VIII. Elizabeth's great-granddaughter was Queen Elizabeth I of England.

    Elizabeth was commemorated as the "Countess of Surrey" in John Skelton's poem, The Garlande of Laurell, following his visit to the Howard residence of Sheriff Hutton Castle.

    Family

    Elizabeth Tilney was born at Ashwellthorpe Hall sometime before 1445, the only child of Sir Frederick Tilney, of Ashwellthorpe, Norfolk, and Boston, Lincolnshire, and Elizabeth Cheney (1422–1473) of Fen Ditton, Cambridgeshire. Sir Frederick Tilney died before 1447, and before 1449 Elizabeth's mother married as her second husband Sir John Say of Broxbourne, Hertfordshire, Speaker of the House of Commons, by whom she had three sons, Sir William, Sir Thomas and Leonard, and four daughters, Anne (wife of Sir Henry Wentworth of Nettlestead, Suffolk), Elizabeth (wife of Thomas Sampson), Katherine (wife of Thomas Bassingbourne), and Mary (wife of Sir Philip Calthorpe).[1] A fifth daughter died as a young child. Henry VIII's third queen consort, Jane Seymour, was the granddaughter of Henry Wentworth and Anne Say,[2] and thus a second cousin to Henry VIII's second and fifth queens consort, Anne Boleyn and Katherine Howard.[3]

    Elizabeth's paternal grandparents were Sir Philip Tilney and Isabel Thorpe, and her maternal grandparents were Sir Laurence Cheney of Fen Ditton and Elizabeth Cockayne, widow of Sir Philip Butler. Elizabeth Cockayne was the daughter of Sir John Cockayne, Chief Baron of the Exchequer and Ida de Grey. Ida was a daughter of Welsh Marcher Lord Reginald Grey, 2nd Baron Grey de Ruthyn and Eleanor Le Strange of Blackmere.[4] Through her mother, Ida was a direct descendant of Welsh Prince Gruffydd II ap Madog, Lord of Dinas Bran and his wife Emma de Audley.

    Elizabeth was co-heiress to the manors of Fisherwick and Shelfield in Walsall, Staffordshire by right of her descent from Roger Hillary, Chief Justice of the Common Pleas (d.1356).[5]


    The Battle of Barnet where Elizabeth's first husband Sir Humphrey Bourchier was slain

    Marriages

    Elizabeth married her first husband, Sir Humphrey Bourchier, the son and heir of John Bourchier, 1st Baron Berners, and his wife Margery, in about 1466. The marriage produced a son, John Bourchier, 2nd Baron Berners and two daughters. Following her marriage, Elizabeth went to court where she served as lady-in-waiting to Queen Elizabeth Woodville, whose train she had carried at the latter's coronation in May 1465 at Westminster Abbey. Elizabeth accompanied the Queen and her children into sanctuary at Westminster Abbey when King Edward IV had been ousted from the throne, and was present at the birth of the future King Edward V. She remained with the Queen until Edward IV was restored to power.

    Sir Humphrey was killed at the Battle of Barnet on 14 April 1471 fighting on the Yorkist side.[6] On 30 April 1472 Elizabeth married Thomas Howard, Earl of Surrey,[7] a marriage arranged by the King.[8] In 1475, Elizabeth inherited her father's property of Ashwellthorpe Manor.[9] Her second husband was a close friend and companion of Richard, Duke of Gloucester who was crowned king in 1483. Elizabeth was one of Queen Anne Neville's attendants at Richard's coronation, while her husband bore the Sword of State.[10] On 22 August 1485 Thomas's father John Howard, 1st Duke of Norfolk was killed at the Battle of Bosworth while fighting for Richard III; like his son, John was also one of King Richard's dearest friends.[11] Thomas Howard was wounded at Bosworth and imprisoned in the Tower for several years, and the dukedom of Norfolk was forfeited. Elizabeth was fortunate that Thomas' attainder stipulated that she would not lose her own inheritance. On 3 October 1485, she wrote to John Paston, who was married to her cousin. The letter, which she had written from the Isle of Sheppey, mentioned how she had wished to send her children to Thorpe, pointing out that Paston had pledged to send her horses as a means of transporting them there. She continued to complain that Lord FitzWalter, an adherent of the new king Henry VII, had dismissed all of her servants; however, because of the stipulations in her husband's attainder, FitzWalter was unable to appropriate her manor of Askwell.[12] In December 1485 she was living in London, near St Katharine's by the Tower, which placed her in the vicinity of her incarcerated husband.[13]

    After Thomas was released from prison and his earldom and estates were restored to him, he entered the service of Henry VII. In November 1487, Thomas and Elizabeth attended the coronation of Henry's consort Elizabeth of York, who appointed Elizabeth a Lady of the Bedchamber. Elizabeth was further honoured by being asked to stand as joint godmother to the Princess Margaret Tudor at her baptism in late 1489.

    Her second marriage produced nine children, including Thomas Howard, 3rd Duke of Norfolk, Elizabeth Howard, mother of Queen Anne Boleyn, and Lord Edmund Howard, father of Queen Katherine Howard.

    Anne Boleyn,
    granddaughter of Elizabeth Tilney by her second husband, Thomas Howard, 2nd Duke of Norfolk
    Death and legacy[edit]
    Elizabeth Tilney died on 4 April 1497 and was buried in the nun's choir of the Convent of the Minoresses outside Aldgate.[14] In her will, she left money to be distributed to the poor of Whitechapel and Hackney.[15] By licence dated 8 November 1497 Thomas Howard married as his second wife her cousin, Agnes Tilney, by whom he had six more children.[16]

    Elizabeth's granddaughters included not only Queen Katherine Howard and Queen Anne Boleyn, but also three of Henry VIII's mistresses, Elizabeth Carew, Mary Boleyn and, allegedly, Mary Howard, Duchess of Richmond.[17] During the reign of Henry VIII the Howards, led by Elizabeth's eldest son, Thomas Howard, 3rd Duke of Norfolk, became the premier family of England.

    In poetry, art and fiction

    Elizabeth Tilney has been identified as the "Countess of Surrey" commemorated in John Skelton's The Garlande of Laurell, written by the poet laureate while he was a guest of the Howards in 1495 at Sheriff Hutton Castle. Three of Elizabeth's daughters, Anne, Elizabeth and Muriel are also addressed in the poem, which celebrates the occasion when Elizabeth, her daughters, and gentlewomen of her household placed a garland of laurel worked in silks, gold and pearls upon Skelton's head as a sign of homage to the poet.[18]

    Elizabeth's likeness is depicted in a stained glass window at Holy Trinity Church, Long Melford, Suffolk. She is shown facing Elizabeth Talbot, Duchess of Norfolk, and both figures are surmounted by the Mowbray family's coat of arms.

    A highly romanticized fictional account of Elizabeth Tilney's life was written by Juliet Dymoke in The Sun in Splendour which depicts Elizabeth, known as "Bess", at the court of King Edward IV.

    Issue

    By Sir Humphrey Bourchier:

    John Bourchier, 2nd Baron Berners (1467–1533), married Katherine (d. 12 March 1536), the daughter of John Howard, 1st Duke of Norfolk, by whom he had a son, Thomas, and three daughters, Joan, Margaret and Mary; by a mistress allegedly named Elizabeth Bacon he had three illegitimate sons, Sir James, Humphrey and George, and one daughter, Ursula (wife of Sir William Sherington)[19]

    Margaret Bourchier (1468–1552), Lady Governess to Princess Mary and Princess Elizabeth; married firstly, by agreement dated 11 November 1478, John Sandys, son and heir apparent of William Sandys of the Vyne, by whom she had no issue; secondly, Sir Thomas Bryan, by whom she had three children, including Sir Francis Bryan.[20]

    Anne Bourchier (1470- 29 September 1530), married Thomas Fiennes, 8th Baron Dacre,[21] by whom she had three children.

    By Thomas Howard, 2nd Duke of Norfolk:

    Thomas Howard, 3rd Duke of Norfolk[22]
    Sir Edward Howard[23]
    Lord Edmund Howard, father of Henry VIII's fifth Queen, Katherine Howard[24]
    Sir John Howard[25]
    Lord Henry Howard[26]
    Lord Charles Howard[27]
    Lord Henry Howard (the younger)[28]
    Lord Richard Howard[29]
    Lady Elizabeth Howard, married Thomas Boleyn, 1st Earl of Wiltshire, and was mother of Queen Anne Boleyn, and grandmother of Queen Elizabeth[30]
    Muriel Howard (d.1512), married firstly John Grey, 2nd Viscount Lisle (d.1504), and secondly Sir Thomas Knyvet[31]
    daughter (died young)[32]

    Ancestry

    [show]Ancestors of Elizabeth Tilney, Countess of Surrey

    See also

    Dukes of Norfolk family tree

    Footnotes

    Jump up ^ Roskell 1981, p. 170; Richardson 2004, pp. 206–207; Kirby 2008.
    Jump up ^ Beer 2004; Richardson 2004, pp. 381, 611, 729.
    Jump up ^ G. E. Cokayne. The Complete Peerage
    Jump up ^ Taylor 1822, p. 8.
    Jump up ^ Richardson 2004, p. 141.
    Jump up ^ Cokayne 1912, pp. 153–154.
    Jump up ^ Richardson 2004, pp. 141, 236; Cokayne 1912, p. 153.
    Jump up ^ Women of History - Index S. Retrieved 15 March 2011
    Jump up ^ Women of History - Index S
    Jump up ^ Women of History - Index S. Retrieved 15 March 2011
    Jump up ^ Kendall, pp. 193–196.
    Jump up ^ Kathy Lynn Emerson. A Who's Who of Tudor Women - T
    Jump up ^ Kathy Lynn Emerson. A Who's Who of Tudor Women - T. Retrieved 15 March 2011
    Jump up ^ Women of History - Index S. Retrieved 15-03-11
    Jump up ^ Women of History - Index S
    Jump up ^ Richardson 2004, p. 237.
    Jump up ^ Hart 2009.
    Jump up ^ Skelton 1990, pp. 23, 31–32; Scattergood 2004.
    Jump up ^ Richardson 2004, p. 142; Cokayne 1912, pp. 153–154.
    Jump up ^ Richardson 2004, pp. 141–2.
    Jump up ^ Richardson 2004, p. 141.
    Jump up ^ Richardson 2004, p. 236.
    Jump up ^ Richardson 2004, p. 236; Loades 2008.
    Jump up ^ Richardson 2004, p. 236;Warnicke 2008.
    Jump up ^ Richardson 2004, p. 236.
    Jump up ^ Richardson 2004, p. 236.
    Jump up ^ Richardson 2004, p. 236.
    Jump up ^ Richardson 2004, p. 236.
    Jump up ^ Richardson 2004, p. 236.
    Jump up ^ Richardson 2004, p. 236; Hughes 2007.
    Jump up ^ Richardson 2004, p. 236; Gunn 2008.
    Jump up ^ Weir 1991, p. 619.

    References

    Beer, Barrett L. (2004). Jane (nâee Jane Seymour) (1508/9–1537), queen of England, third consort of Henry VIII. Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Retrieved 15 March 2011.
    Cokayne, George Edward (1912). The Complete Peerage edited by the Honourable Vicary Gibbs II. London: St. Catherine Press.
    Cokayne, George Edward (1936). The Complete Peerage, edited by H.A. Doubleday IX. London: St. Catherine Press.
    Gunn, S.J. (2008). Knyvet, Sir Thomas (c.1485–1512), courtier and sea captain. Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Retrieved 13 March 2011.
    Hart, Kelly (2009). The Mistresses of Henry VIII.
    Head, David M. (2008). Howard, Thomas, second duke of Norfolk (1443–1524), magnate and soldier. Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Retrieved 12 March 2011.
    Hughes, Jonathan (2007). Boleyn, Thomas, earl of Wiltshire and earl of Ormond (1476/7–1539), courtier and nobleman. Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Retrieved 13 March 2011.
    Kendall, Paul Murray (1953). Richard III. London: George Allen and Unwin Ltd.
    Kirby, J.L. (2008). Say (Fynys), Sir John (d. 1478), administrator and speaker of the House of Commons. Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Retrieved 15 March 2011.
    Loades, David (2008). Howard, Sir Edward (1476/7–1513), naval commander. Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Retrieved 13 March 2011.
    Richardson, Douglas (2004). Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, ed. Kimball G. Everingham. Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc.
    Riordan, Michael (2004). Howard, Lord Thomas (c.1512–1537), courtier. Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Retrieved 12 March 2011.
    Roskell, John Smith (1981). Parliament and Politics in Late Medieval England II. London: The Hambledon Press. pp. 153–174. Retrieved 14 March 2011.
    Scattergood, John (2004). Skelton, John (c.1460–1529), poet. Cambridge: Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Retrieved 14 March 2011.
    Skelton, John (1990). The Book of the Laurel, ed. by Frank Walsh Brownlow. London: Associated University Presses. Retrieved 14 March 2011.
    Taylor, Ida Ashworth (1822). Lady Jane Grey and Her Times. London: Sherwood, Neely and Jones. Retrieved 14 March 2011.
    Warnicke, Retha M. (2008). Katherine (Catherine; nee Katherine Howard) (1518x24-1542), queen of England and Ireland, fifth consort of Henry VIII. Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Retrieved 13 March 2011.
    Weir, Alison (1991). The Six Wives of Henry VIII. New York: Grove Weidenfeld.

    External links

    Elizabeth Tylney in A Who's Who of Tudor Women
    Dukes of Norfolk (Howard), Medieval Lands website by Charles Cawley

    Children:
    1. Edmund Howard, Knight was born Abt 1480, Tisbury, Wiltshire, England; died 19 Mar 1538.
    2. Elizabeth Howard, Countess of Wiltshire was born Abt 1486, Norwich, Norfolk, England; died 3 Apr 1537.
    3. 93. Muriel Howard was born 0___ 1486, Buckenham, Norfolkshire, England; died 14 Dec 1512, Greenwich, England.