David Thomas Hennessee

Male 1950 - 2013  (63 years)


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Generation: 1

  1. 1.  David Thomas Hennessee was born 25 Apr 1950, Valdese, Burke County, North Carolina (son of Paul Edwin "Ed" Hennessee and Ola Faye "Faye" Lowery); died 8 May 2013, Burke County, North Carolina; was buried Burke Memorial Park, Morganton, Burke County, North Carolina.

    Notes:

    David Hennessee

    VALDESE

    Mr. David Thomas Hennessee, 63, of Valdese, passed away Wednesday, May 8, 2013, at Burke Hospice & Palliative Care, following a period of declining health.

    David was born April 25, 1950, in Burke County, to the late Paul Edwin Hennessee and Ola Faye Lowery Hennessee.

    He worked for the city of Morganton on a surveying crew for 26 years and was a member of the Morganton Moose Lodge. David was also a member of Pleasant View Baptist Church and loved to feed the birds and squirrels around his house.

    In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by a special friend, Dixie Matheis.

    Survivors include one brother, Bob Hennessee and wife, Inita, of Morganton; one nephew, Michael Hennessee, of Morganton; and one stepniece, Tammy Bowden, of Valdese. Funeral services will be held Friday, May 10, at 2 p.m. in the Chapel of Heritage Funeral Service with, the Rev. Burt Wilbur officiating.

    Interment will follow at Burke Memorial Park in Morganton. The family will receive friends Friday, from 1 to 2 p.m. at Heritage Funeral Service in Valdese. Memorials may be sent to the Morganton Moose Lodge, 2722 Moose Lodge Rd., Morganton, NC 28655 or to Burke Hospice & Palliative Care, 1721 Enon Rd., Valdese, NC 28690. An online guestbook and obituary is available at www.heritagefuneral services.com Heritage Funeral Service & Crematory of Valdese is serving the Hennessee family.

    Published in The News Herald on May 9, 2013


Generation: 2

  1. 2.  Paul Edwin "Ed" Hennessee was born 19 Jul 1922, Burke County, North Carolina (son of Robert Avery Hennessee and Flora Edith Newton); died 8 Aug 1971, Oteen, Buncombe County, North Carolina; was buried Burke Memorial Park, Morganton, Burke County, North Carolina.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: furniture worker

    Paul married Ola Faye "Faye" Lowery (Burke County, North Carolina). Ola (daughter of Dewey Lowery and Lillie McKinney) was born 15 Jun 1925, Yancey County, North Carolina; died 28 Feb 2012, Valdese General Hospital, Valdese, Burke County, North Carolina; was buried 2 Mar 2012, Burke Memorial Park, Morganton, Burke County, North Carolina. [Group Sheet]


  2. 3.  Ola Faye "Faye" LoweryOla Faye "Faye" Lowery was born 15 Jun 1925, Yancey County, North Carolina (daughter of Dewey Lowery and Lillie McKinney); died 28 Feb 2012, Valdese General Hospital, Valdese, Burke County, North Carolina; was buried 2 Mar 2012, Burke Memorial Park, Morganton, Burke County, North Carolina.

    Other Events:

    • Religion: Baptist

    Notes:

    Mrs. Faye Lowery Hennessee, 86, of Valdese died Tuesday February 28, 2012 at Valdese General Hospital, after a period of declining health.

    Mrs. Hennessee was born June 15, 1925 in Yancey County, a daughter of the late Dewey and Lillie Willis Lowery. She was a member of Pleasant View Baptist Church, the Women of the Moose, and retired from Burke Mills, Inc.

    In addition to her parents she was preceded in death by her husband, Paul Edwin Hennessee.

    Surviving are two sons, David Thomas Hennessee of the home, Robert Hennessee and wife Inita of Morganton, two sisters, Lois Jenson of Artula, Fla., Lillian Kincaid of Morganton, two brothers, Robert Lowery of Tn. and Gene Lowery of Pontiac, Mich. Also surviving is her grandson, Michael Hennessee of Morganton.
    Funeral Services for Faye L. Hennessee will be held at 2:00 P.M. Friday March 2, 2012 in the Chapel of Heritage Funeral Service, Valdese. Interment will follow in the Burke Memorial Park.

    The family will receive friends from 1 until 2:00 P.M. Friday at Heritage Funeral Service.
    Memorials may be made to the Women of the Moose, 2722 Moose Lodge St., Morganton, NC 28655.

    Children:
    1. Edwin Bradley Hennessee was born 8 Nov 1946, Valdese, Burke County, North Carolina; died 18 Sep 1969, North Atlantic.
    2. Robert Wayne Hennessee
    3. 1. David Thomas Hennessee was born 25 Apr 1950, Valdese, Burke County, North Carolina; died 8 May 2013, Burke County, North Carolina; was buried Burke Memorial Park, Morganton, Burke County, North Carolina.


Generation: 3

  1. 4.  Robert Avery Hennessee was born 3 Jul 1880, Burke County, North Carolina (son of Robert Jones Hennessa and Martha Matilda Brown); died 15 Nov 1941, (Burke County, North Carolina); was buried Zion Memorial United Methodist Church Cemetery, Morganton, North Carolina.

    Robert married Flora Edith Newton (CIR 1900), (Burke County, North Carolina). Flora (daughter of Martin Hoyle Newton and Margaret C. Wortman) was born 23 Aug 1882, Cleveland County, North Carolina; died 18 Feb 1944, Morganton, Burke County, North Carolina; was buried Zion Memorial United Methodist Church Cemetery, Morganton, North Carolina. [Group Sheet]


  2. 5.  Flora Edith Newton was born 23 Aug 1882, Cleveland County, North Carolina (daughter of Martin Hoyle Newton and Margaret C. Wortman); died 18 Feb 1944, Morganton, Burke County, North Carolina; was buried Zion Memorial United Methodist Church Cemetery, Morganton, North Carolina.

    Notes:

    She was a daughter of Martin Newton and Margaret Wortman/Workman. She married R.A. Hennessee.

    Children:
    1. Josie Blanche Hennessee was born 9 Sep 1901, Morganton, Burke County, North Carolina; died 18 Sep 1980, Morganton, Burke County, North Carolina; was buried Zion Memorial United Methodist Church Cemetery, Morganton, North Carolina.
    2. Robert Jones Hennessee was born 26 Mar 1904, Morganton, Burke County, North Carolina; died 21 Feb 1990, Drexel, Burke County, North Carolina; was buried Zion Memorial United Methodist Church Cemetery, Morganton, North Carolina.
    3. James Phifer Hennessee was born 17 Jul 1906, Morganton, Burke County, North Carolina; died 13 Feb 1946, Morganton, Burke County, North Carolina; was buried Zion Memorial United Methodist Church Cemetery, Morganton, North Carolina.
    4. Russell Avery Hennessee was born 27 Nov 1908, Morganton, Burke County, North Carolina; died 30 Nov 1968, Valdese, Burke County, North Carolina; was buried 1 Dec 1968, Burke Memorial Park, Morganton, Burke County, North Carolina.
    5. William Carl "Carl" Hennessee was born 21 Dec 1911, Morganton, Burke County, North Carolina; died 28 Jul 1988, Morganton, Burke County, North Carolina; was buried Forest Hill Cemetery, Morganton, Burke County, North Carolina.
    6. Margaret Matilda Hennessee was born 19 Jun 1914, Morganton, Burke County, North Carolina; died 14 Aug 2011, Burke County, North Carolina; was buried 20 Aug 2011, Burke Memorial Park, Morganton, Burke County, North Carolina.
    7. Helen Elmyra Hennessee was born 16 Aug 1917, Morganton, Burke County, North Carolina; died 10 Mar 2000, (Richmond County, Virginia); was buried Burke Memorial Park, Morganton, Burke County, North Carolina.
    8. Mary Hennessee was born 27 Dec 1919, Morganton, Burke County, North Carolina; died 29 Apr 2011, Morganton, Burke County, North Carolina; was buried 2 May 2011, Zion Memorial United Methodist Church Cemetery, Morganton, North Carolina.
    9. 2. Paul Edwin "Ed" Hennessee was born 19 Jul 1922, Burke County, North Carolina; died 8 Aug 1971, Oteen, Buncombe County, North Carolina; was buried Burke Memorial Park, Morganton, Burke County, North Carolina.
    10. Martha June Hennessee was born 5 Sep 1926, Morganton, Burke County, North Carolina; died 18 Sep 1971, Dayton, Ohio; was buried Mountain View Memorial Park, Lakewood, Washington.

  3. 6.  Dewey Lowery

    Dewey — Lillie McKinney. [Group Sheet]


  4. 7.  Lillie McKinney
    Children:
    1. 3. Ola Faye "Faye" Lowery was born 15 Jun 1925, Yancey County, North Carolina; died 28 Feb 2012, Valdese General Hospital, Valdese, Burke County, North Carolina; was buried 2 Mar 2012, Burke Memorial Park, Morganton, Burke County, North Carolina.


Generation: 4

  1. 8.  Robert Jones Hennessa was born 11 Aug 1840, Morganton, Burke County, North Carolina (son of Patrick Hennessa and Nancy Sudderth); died 11 Jun 1902, Morganton, Burke County, North Carolina; was buried Zion Memorial United Methodist Church Cemetery, Morganton, North Carolina.

    Other Events:

    • Residence: 0___ 1850, Burke County, North Carolina
    • Military: 0___ 1862; CSA Veteran

    Notes:

    "North Carolina Troops", Vol. V: R.J. Hennessee, Private, Co. G, 1st Regiment, N.C. Infantry. Enlisted at Yorktown, VA., July 3, 1861 through Nov. 13, 1861, Age: 21.

    This particular company of the 1st Regiment was known as the "Burke Rifles" and was composed of men from Burke County.

    "North Carolina Troops", 1975 volume, 11th - 15th Regiments:

    Hennessa, R.J., Sgt., Co. "B", 11th Regiment, N.C. Troops. Resided in Burke County where he enlisted at age 20, Dece. 20, 1861, for the war.
    Mustered as a corporal. Present or accounted for until captured at Gettysburg, PA., July 3, 1863. Confined at Fort Delaware, Delaware until transferred to Point Lookout, Md., Oct. 15, 1863. Exchanged at an unspecified date in February-April, 1864. Promoted to Sgt. on Feb. 15, 1864. Present or accounted for until parolled at Appomattox Court House, Va., April 9, 1865. May haved served previously in Co. "G", 1st Regiment, N.C. Troops Infantry (6 mos., 1861).

    Grant Hennessa notes that it was at "Pickett's Charge" and that RJ was captured.

    end of bio

    In some documents, the name is spelled Hennessee, which is common to the area. THe tombstones are carved with the spelling Hennessa.

    In the 1880 U.S. Census, Robert Hennessee (sic) is listed with wife Martha, and children Phipher (sic) 9; Patrick Lee, 7; Mary Ella, 5; and Maggie Lee, 2.

    end of message

    Will of Robert Jones Hennessee




    end of file

    Robert married Martha Matilda Brown 11 Jul 1869, Morganton, Burke County, North Carolina. Martha was born 10 Nov 1844, Marion, McDowell County, North Carolina; died 3 Feb 1897, Morganton, Burke County, North Carolina; was buried Zion Memorial United Methodist Church Cemetery, Morganton, North Carolina. [Group Sheet]


  2. 9.  Martha Matilda Brown was born 10 Nov 1844, Marion, McDowell County, North Carolina; died 3 Feb 1897, Morganton, Burke County, North Carolina; was buried Zion Memorial United Methodist Church Cemetery, Morganton, North Carolina.

    Notes:

    29 Mar 2011

    This record cites, "Margaret Brown" as his mother...DAH


    North Carolina Deaths, 1906-1930 for Patrick L. Hennessa

    Name: Patrick L. Hennessa
    Titles & Terms (original):
    Titles & Terms (standardized):
    Death Date: 28 Jan 1927
    Death Place: Shelley, Cleveland Co., North Carolina
    Gender: Male
    Race (original): White
    Race (expanded): White
    Age at Death: 54y 3m 13d
    Estimated Birth Year: 1873
    Birth Date: 05 Oct 1862
    Birthplace: Morganton, N C
    Marital Status: Married
    Spouse: Bertie Hennessa
    Spouse's Titles & Terms (original):
    Spouse's Titles & Terms (standardized):
    Father: Robert Hennessa
    Father's Titles & Terms (original):
    Father's Titles & Terms (standardized):
    Father's Birthplace: Burke Co.
    Mother: Margaret Brown
    Mother's Titles & Terms (original):
    Mother Titles & Terms (standardized):
    Mother's Birthplace: Burke Co.
    Occupation:
    Residence: Shelly, N C
    Cemetery: Sunset
    Burial Place:
    Burial Date: 30 Jan 1927
    Funeral Home:
    Informant:
    Additional Relatives:
    GSU Film Number: 1907300
    Digital GS Number: 4216674
    Image Number: 3192
    Volume/Page/Certificate Number: 330
    .

    Buried:
    Inscription: Wife of R.J. Hennessa

    Children:
    1. James Phifer Hennessa was born 15 Jul 1870, Burke County, North Carolina; died 10 Apr 1896, Burke County, North Carolina; was buried Zion Memorial United Methodist Church Cemetery, Morganton, North Carolina.
    2. Patrick Lee Hennessa was born 5 Oct 1872, Burke County, North Carolina; died 28 Jan 1927, Shelby, Cleveland County, North Carolina; was buried Sunset Cemetery, Shelby, Cleveland County, North Carolina.
    3. Mary Ella "Ella" Hennesa was born 13 Aug 1874, Burke County, North Carolina; died 20 Nov 1931, Morganton, Burke County, North Carolina; was buried Zion Memorial United Methodist Church Cemetery, Morganton, North Carolina.
    4. Margaret Lee "Maggie" Hennessee was born 1 Dec 1877, Morganton, Burke County, North Carolina; died 7 Dec 1941, Morganton, Burke County, North Carolina; was buried Salem United Methodist Church Cemetery, Morganton, Burke County, North Carolina.
    5. 4. Robert Avery Hennessee was born 3 Jul 1880, Burke County, North Carolina; died 15 Nov 1941, (Burke County, North Carolina); was buried Zion Memorial United Methodist Church Cemetery, Morganton, North Carolina.
    6. John Wesley Hennessa was born 5 Jun 1882, Burke County, North Carolina; died 18 Mar 1963, Marion, McDowell County, North Carolina; was buried 20 Mar 1963, Pleasant Gardens Baptist Church Cemetery, Marion, McDowell County, North Carolina.

  3. 10.  Martin Hoyle Newton was born 12 Jan 1860, Cleveland County, North Carolina (son of William Swofford Newton and Anna Canipe); died 17 Aug 1935, Morganton, Burke County, North Carolina; was buried 19 Aug 1935, Zion Memorial United Methodist Church Cemetery, Morganton, North Carolina.

    Martin married Margaret C. Wortman 0___ 1882, Burke County, North Carolina. Margaret was born 8 Mar 1854, (Burke County) North Carolina; died 16 Jun 1903, Morganton, Burke County, North Carolina; was buried Zion Memorial United Methodist Church Cemetery, Morganton, North Carolina. [Group Sheet]


  4. 11.  Margaret C. Wortman was born 8 Mar 1854, (Burke County) North Carolina; died 16 Jun 1903, Morganton, Burke County, North Carolina; was buried Zion Memorial United Methodist Church Cemetery, Morganton, North Carolina.
    Children:
    1. 5. Flora Edith Newton was born 23 Aug 1882, Cleveland County, North Carolina; died 18 Feb 1944, Morganton, Burke County, North Carolina; was buried Zion Memorial United Methodist Church Cemetery, Morganton, North Carolina.


Generation: 5

  1. 16.  Patrick Hennessa was born ~ 1793, Burke County, North Carolina (son of John Hennessee and (Elizabeth Sumpter)); died 29 Aug 1845, (Caldwell County) North Carolina; was buried Sudderth Family Cemetery, Chesterfield, Burke County, North Carolina.

    Other Events:

    • Probate: 0___ 1845, Burke County, North Carolina

    Notes:

    Cited from the monograph by Allen R. Hennessee:

    " Patrick and Nancy Henessa maintained the plantation left to Patrick by his father John. In 1833, a ferry was established across the Catawba River below the mouth of Johns River at the plantation of Col. John Sudderth on the north side and Patrick Hennessa on the south side. According to the book by Edward W. Phifer, Jr. entitled, "Burke - The History of a North Carolina County", the bond for each ferry was $500. Rates listed for cargo were 75 cents for a wagon and 4 horses, loaded 50 cents for a wagon and 4 horses, empty 37 cents for a wagon or carryall and 2 horses 25 cents for a carryall and 1 horse 12 cents for a man and horse 75 cents for a carriage and 4 horses 25 cents for a gig or sulky. The ferry was still operating in 1846 and was called Sudderth's Ferry."

    end

    Suddreth land is currently owned by Peggy (Hennessee) & Ralph Ballew.

    end

    This first one I believe belongs to this Patrick based on some of the documents within it which have initials of some of his heirs:

    The dates you have and the dates on the record appears to be off though but as best as I can tell, that seems to be him. I couldn't swear to it though.

    end of message

    Birth:
    Map & History of Burke County, North Carolina http://bit.ly/Rd17uM

    Buried:
    tombstone on the property of Colonel John Sudderth

    Patrick married Nancy Sudderth 8 Feb 1824, Burke County, North Carolina. Nancy (daughter of Abraham Sudderth, Sr. and Martha "Patsy" Sumpter) was born 4 Apr 1799, Burke County, North Carolina; died 6 Sep 1889, McDowell County, North Carolina; was buried North Catawba Cemetery, North Cove, McDowell County, North Carolina. [Group Sheet]


  2. 17.  Nancy Sudderth was born 4 Apr 1799, Burke County, North Carolina (daughter of Abraham Sudderth, Sr. and Martha "Patsy" Sumpter); died 6 Sep 1889, McDowell County, North Carolina; was buried North Catawba Cemetery, North Cove, McDowell County, North Carolina.

    Notes:

    Owned a large spread of land on the southside of the Catawba River across from her brother, Col. John Suddreth. Patrick & John operated a ferry.

    Birth:
    Map & History of Burke County, North Carolina http://bit.ly/Rd17uM

    Notes:

    Married:
    , Jacob Johnson, Bondsman

    Children:
    1. Emanuel Augustus "Manuel" Hennessee was born 26 Mar 1826, Burke County, North Carolina; died 22 May 1903, Burke County, North Carolina; was buried Gilboa Methodist Cemetery, Morganton, Burke County, North Carolina.
    2. Martha Elizabeth Hennessee was born 0___ 1828, Burke County, North Carolina; died Aft 1870, Burke County, North Carolina.
    3. William Richard Hennessee was born 6 Apr 1829, Burke County, North Carolina; died 11 Oct 1898, North Cove, McDowell County, North Carolina; was buried North Catawba Cemetery, North Cove, McDowell County, North Carolina.
    4. Alexander Hennessee was born 0___ 1829, Burke County, North Carolina; died 0___ 1852, Yuba County, California; was buried Yuba County, California.
    5. Lavenia Hennessee was born 0___ 1831, Burke County, North Carolina; died Aft 1870, Burke County, North Carolina.
    6. James David "David" Hennessee was born 1 Mar 1832, Burke County, North Carolina; died 28 Dec 1900, (Burke County, North Carolina); was buried Gilboa Methodist Cemetery, Morganton, Burke County, North Carolina.
    7. Patrick Waightsill Hennessee was born 0___ 1833, Burke County, North Carolina; died Aft 1862.
    8. Thomas A. Hennessee was born 0___ 1835, Burke County, North Carolina; died 1862-1865.
    9. Mannasa S(udderth) Hennessee was born 0___ 1838, Burke County, North Carolina; died ~ 1865, Salem, Salem County, New Jersey.
    10. Myra Ann Hennessa was born 2 Aug 1839, Burke County, North Carolina; died 16 May 1903, (Burke County, North Carolina); was buried Zion Memorial United Methodist Church Cemetery, Morganton, North Carolina.
    11. 8. Robert Jones Hennessa was born 11 Aug 1840, Morganton, Burke County, North Carolina; died 11 Jun 1902, Morganton, Burke County, North Carolina; was buried Zion Memorial United Methodist Church Cemetery, Morganton, North Carolina.

  3. 20.  William Swofford Newton was born 28 Mar 1831, Rutherford County, North Carolina; died 16 Dec 1911, Cleveland County, North Carolina; was buried Clover Hill United Methodist Church Cemetery, Lawndale, North Carolina.

    Notes:

    William was the son of John Oliver and Catherine "Kate" Swofford Newton. His first wife was Anna Canipe.

    He married Mary Jane Eding after Anna's death.

    William — Anna Canipe. Anna was born 6 Jun 1827, North Carolina; died 2 Dec 1893, Cleveland County, North Carolina; was buried Clover Hill United Methodist Church Cemetery, Lawndale, North Carolina. [Group Sheet]


  4. 21.  Anna Canipe was born 6 Jun 1827, North Carolina; died 2 Dec 1893, Cleveland County, North Carolina; was buried Clover Hill United Methodist Church Cemetery, Lawndale, North Carolina.

    Notes:

    Buried:
    Inscription:

    wife of
    W. S. Newton

    Aged
    66 yrs 5 m 28 ds

    Children:
    1. 10. Martin Hoyle Newton was born 12 Jan 1860, Cleveland County, North Carolina; died 17 Aug 1935, Morganton, Burke County, North Carolina; was buried 19 Aug 1935, Zion Memorial United Methodist Church Cemetery, Morganton, North Carolina.


Generation: 6

  1. 32.  John Hennessee was born ~ 1775, (Burke County, North Carolina) (son of Patrick Hennessee and Alice "Ailsey" LNU); died 0___ 1844, Caldwell County, North Carolina; was buried 0___ 1844, Fairfield Cemetery, Lenoir, North Carolina.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: John Henesy
    • Also Known As: John Hensey
    • Alt Birth: 0___ 1780, Burke County, North Carolina
    • Will: 17 Jun 1844, Caldwell County, North Carolina

    Notes:

    The Last Will and Testament of John Hennessee of Caldwell County, North Carolina.

    I, John Hennessee, considering uncertainty of this mortal life and being of sound mind and memory blessed be Almighty God for the same as make and publish this my last will and Testament in manner and form following that is to say

    Item first.

    I give and bequeath unto my beloved wife Elizabeth Hennessee during her natural life my negro boy Philip or any other she may choose and my negro girl Sopshonia aged about thirteen years also my grey mare and colt also two cows and calves also what hogs I have and what few sheep I have and the increase of the stock The stock and its increase to be disposed of as she thinks best at her death and to have the use of the increase of the negro girl Sopshonia during her lifetime only; I also leave her all my household and kitchen furniture except two feather beds and furniture. I also give her my wheel and loom and one woman's saddle. also one Sett of horse gear one plow hoe and I give her the above bequest including all and every article she brought with her after her marriage I also give her her lawful dower in my Land where David Hennessee lives in Cherokee County but if my son David Hennessee and wife Catherine will make a good and sufficient deed to the tract of land given to them by Abraham Sudderth Jr called the Staples place during her natural life time and my life time. If my son David and his wife complies with the foregoing condition she is to have that for her Dower in land inlieu of the land in Cherokee County.

    Item Second.

    I give to my son Patrick Hennessee his choice of the negroes after my wife takes the two I bequeathed to her. If he takes my negro woman Dolly he is to have her youngest child Tom with her and Dolly's increase The above I give with all I have heretofore given him as his share of my estate also one feather bed

    Item 3rd.

    I give to my son David Hennessee all my interest in the tract of land where he now lives and all my other lands in Cherokee County subject to the Dower of my wife. but if my son David Hennessee will comply with the matter named in the first Item and make a Deed to land named therein (viz the Staples place) then my wife is to have the Staples place during her lifetime for dower and to have no dower in the land in Cherokee. I also give him choice of one of my negroes after what I have already bequeathed are taken out also one feather bed and furniture.

    Item 4th.

    I give Abraham Sudderth's children my Grand children the one half of my negroes remaining after the above bequests are taken out. and. also the boy my wife has during her lifetime.

    Item 5th.

    I give to my daughter Ailsey Johnson my negro Girl Sophsonia and her increase after the death of my wife and also any increase she may before my wife's death and also the one half of the negroes remaining after first those bequests are take out of which I have bequeathed Abraham Sudderth's children the other half.

    Item 6th.

    My will and desire is that all the balance of my property that I have not disposed of above of every description whatsoever to be sold and the proceeds after all my just debts are paid to be divided equally
    between all my children viz Patrick Hennessee, David Hennessee, Elmina Sudderth, Children & Ailsey Johnson.

    Item 7th.

    I nominate and appoint Abraham Sudderth Jnr. and Patrick Hennessee my executors of the last will & testament revoking all former wills by me made

    Item 8th.

    And lastly my express will and meaning is and I do hereby order and appoint that if any differences disputes questions or controversy shall be arise or happen concerning any gift bequest matter or thing in the my will given and bequeathed expressed or contained that then no suit or suits in Law or Equity or other wise shall be brought, commemced or prosecuted for and concerning the same shall refund wholly to the award order and determination of my friends Wm. Greenway and James Harper both of the County & State aforesaid and what they shall order direct & determine therein shall be binding and conclusive to all and every person or persons therein concerned In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this 17th day if June, 1844.

    Published and declared by the above named John Hennessee to be John his mark Hennessee his last will & Testament in presence of the Testator

    the Testator Wm. Greenway Jurat Wm. C. Tate Jas. Harper Jurat


    Codicil to the above will this day as above written It is further my will and desire that if my son David Hennessee complies with the condition of the aforesaid will (viz) to make a sufficient deed as before stated to the
    Staples place that he also is to build a comfortable double house each Sixteen feet square with a passage between one and a half Story high with a chimney with one fire place at each end the chimnies to be built of
    stone or brick Two twelve windows in each room and otherwise furnished in comfortable manner & also to build a Kitchen smoke house and corn crib all to be finished by the 1st day of Jany. next

    Item 2nd.

    It is further my will and desire that out of the proceeds of sale of the balance of my property in my will there be paid to Mrs. Elizabeth Spencer wife Tisdell Spencer the sum of one dollar and no more

    Signed, sealed and delivered in presence of the 17th day of June 1844

    Wm. Greenway Jurat
    Wm. C. Tate John Hennessee (his mark)
    James Harper Jurat

    (Burke County Tax List of 1815 list John as owning 850 acres valued at $3000.)

    end of message

    Text of speech given by Nita Hennessee Shepard during the Hennessee Reunion held in McMinnville,TN, July of 1991:

    Hello-o-o Tennessee Hennessees! And my Hennessee cousins from the various States of the Union. It's nice to see you! It's nice to be with you! I am Nita Raye Hennessee Shepard.

    I've been asked to speak on John Hennessee, Sr., son of our elder Patrick, and brother to your James.

    When brother James decided to leave western North Carolina for Tennessee, John decided to stay on, buying James' land on the Catawba River.

    John was my great-great grandfather - born about 1775. If John's birth date is reasonably accurate, John was 9 years younger than brother James. This makes me wonder about the accuracy of the date of John's birth or if there were other brothers or sisters born in those intervening 9 years. However, I was told today that there were other children between James and John, so we will leave the year of his birth as about 1775.

    It is thought John's mother was Ailsey McDowell, possibly a sister to Generals Charles and Joseph McDowell. It is said the McDowells came from Virgina with the Hennessees.

    I became especially interested in John Hennessee because of two articles in the Burke Co., N.C. Historical Society volumes. One article said John had 4 children and his wife's name was Elizabeth. The other article said Elizabeth Wilson, born Feb.13, 1782 married John Hennessee and had an only child.

    Senator Sam Erwin of Morganton,N.C., who had written the second article, said his information came from his mother and her information from a friend. Both were long deceased.

    We know from John's will dated, June 7, 1844, that his wife then was an Elizabeth. He mentions sons Patrick and David, daughter Elmira's children (Elmira was already deceased, having been struck by lightning), and he mentioned daughter Ailsey Johnson. As a codicil 10 days later - June 17, 1884 - he disinherits Elizabeth Spencer by leaving her the sum of $1.00.

    In trying to conciliate the two Burke Co. articles, I have come the conclusion, rightly or wrongly, that John may have been married 3 times. I think his first wife was possibly Elizabeth Sumpter from Kentucky. I believe she was the mother of my great-grandfather, Patrick, Jr., who was born about 1793, and Ailsey, born 1795.

    Since son David was not born until 11 years later and David's sister, Elmira, until 13 years later, I believe David and Elmira's mother was not Elizabeth Sumpter - unless of course there had been other children in those 11 years that did not live to maturity.

    We do know when John died his wife was an Elizabeth - Elizabeth Wilson Hennessee - and their 1 child was the Elizabeth Spencer disinherited in the will. I can only speculate that Elizabeth Spencer married against her father's wishes and was left with $1.00.

    Of interest, you might like to know that Elizabeth Wilson Hennessee was a descendant of John Howland and wife Elizabeth Tilley who came to what is now America on the Mayflower in 1620. Of further interest, while on board ship, John Howland was washed overboard, nearly drowned, but was miraculously saved. John Howland is described as being young and strong who was able to survive in the waters unitl he could be rescued.

    John Hennessee evidently died soon after his June, 1844, will because John's last will and testament was proved July 11, 1844, with his wife "Eliza" appearing in court to admit his will for probate.

    John was buried in the Fairfield Cemetery at Lenoir, N.C. His headstone has not been seen for many, many years so the exact location of his grave is not known. My husband and I, along with a Sudderth-cousin and her husband, went to the cemetery a few years ago and made a valiant effort to find the grave - but if his headstone was there somewhere, it had fallen is buried deeply.

    The Fairfield Cemetery, once the former cemetery of the 1st Methodist Church, goes back to the late 1700's and is said to hold the remains of 70 slaves and about 100 white people. We were told it is believed that John's father, the elder Patrick, is buried there too.

    When my husband and I tried to locate John's grave, we found the cemetery to be a small jungle, located at the back yards of a nice development of homes. A number of hours later, bent, sometimes on our hands and knees, with clothes snagged, hot and dirty, and many insect bites, we gave up trying to locate John (and Patrick too).

    Upon coming back home to Arlington, VA, I was hopeful that Fairfield would be cleared of underbrush and fallen stones. We pinned our hopes on the fact that the cemetery was to be turned over to the Caldwell County Genealogical Society. But, alas, in 1989, through what was charitably said to be a misunderstanding, a company brought heavy equipment into the cemetery, cut trees, and pulled the trees out across graves. There were, of course, many complaints.

    Since then, we have not heard of any further developments at the cemetery but perhaps good will come from this unhappy event.

    I wish I know more about John. I don't have a physical description nor a picture. I don't know whether he was kind and good. I must assume that John was industrious and brave. One had to be in what was a dangerous, undeveloped area of western North Carolina. He had to be industrious because he had land, slaves and obviously a standing in the community. I wish we had letters written by John. Then we could know him better. But,nevertheless, we are grateful to you, John, for being!

    Thank you very much for your time!

    end of biography

    John Hennessee (b c 1775 - d June, 1844, Caldwell County, North Carolina) was the son of pioneer Patrick Hennessee I and the husband of Elizabeth Wilson Hennessee (b February 13, 1782, Randolph County - d September 21, 1855, Forsyth County). Records indicate that an "only child" was born of that union. It is known that John had at least an older brother, James David (b 1766) who about 1805 moved with his family to Tennessee, and two sisters unidentified but married by 1780.

    A widower when he married Elizabeth Wilson, John had five other children. Some believe the mother of these children was Elizabeth Sumter (Sumpter) from Kentucky. Other names are offered. John's June 7, 1844, Caldwell County will names and makes bequests to his children Patrick (b c 1793), Ailsey (b c 1795), David (b September 3, 1805), and the children of his daughter Elmina (b October 20, 1808). (Tragically, Elmina was deceased, struck by lightning June 2, 1841.) A June 17, 1844, codicil disowns Elizabeth Spencer, wife of Tisdale Spencer. Although the codicil does not identify Elizabeth as his child, it is almost certain this Elizabeth was John's oldest - born c 1791. John named son Patrick II and son-in-law Abraham Sudderth, Jr., executors. When he died near the end of June, John was buried in Fairfield Cemetery, Lenoir. With his gravestone missing for many years, the location of John's grave is unknown. Patrick died August 29, 1845, just a little over a year after the death of his father, leaving Abraham sole executor. With some delays, John's estate was accepted for settlement in 1850, almost six years after his death.

    Senator Sam Ervin, Jr., wrote (Article 766 Burke Heritage Volume 1): "Elizabeth Wilson born February 13, 1782. She married John Hennessee of Caldwell County, North Carolina and had an only child." Questions remain as to the identity of the "only child". John's will did not include this child, leaving the conviction he or she predeceased John. Some time after John's death, Elizabeth, probably wishing to be near her own people, moved to Forsyth County. Here her April 29, 1855, will was dictated to and written by George C. Mendenhall, prominent attorney and husband of Elizabeth's niece, Delphina E. Gardner. It was not surprising that Elizabeth's bequests were to close family members mainly. Surprising were Elizabeth's bequests "to my daughter Louisa Kerr and her son Thomas Kerr." This leads one to question if the "only child" was alive and identified as Louisa or misidentified in the telling.

    Known to have had at least 300 acres of land through early Burke County land grants, January 14 and March 12, 1794, as well as other acreage, John's will included slaves, live stock, farm equipment, furnishings, etc. Inventory sale dated November 1, 1844, listed many buyers whose names would be recognized in Burke and Caldwell Counties even today. Slave Philip, left to Elizabeth Wilson Hennessee by John 11 years previously, appears on an inventory of the property and estate of Eliza W. Hennessee taken by John Watson, her executor, and returned to the March Term of Forsyth Court in 1856.

    The Hennessees and the Sudderths were good friends. Three of John's children married three children of Abraham Sudderth, Sr. Patrick married Nancy, David married Catherine, and Elmina married Abraham, Jr. Ailsey married Jacob Johnson, son of Philip Johnson and Martha Bassett.

    Descendants of John and his brother James were in touch at times over the years but their first known reunion was held in July, 1991, 186 years after James moved away. Over 260 family members representing 19 states came together at Shell's Ford Baptist Church, McMinnville, Tennessee, at the invitation of and hosted mainly by David Alden Hennessee, descendant of James.

    Sources:

    "Burke County, North Carolina, Land Records and More Important Miscellaneous Records 1751-1809, Excerpts from Miscellaneous Papers of Civil and Criminal Cases 1755-1790", Volume 3, Page 103, by Edith Warren Huggins;

    "Burke County, North Carolina, Records 1755-1821 (Including Wills Index 1784-1900), Tax Records 1794-1795", Page 112, Tax Records 1794-1798, Page 122"; "Land Grants, Burke County, North Carolina, 1787, 1794";

    "Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions, Caldwell County, North Carolina, First Six Years 1841-1847", Volume 1, Second Edition, Pages 37-38, 40-41, and 55 by Linda M. Staley and John O. Hawkins;

    "Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions, Caldwell County, North Carolina, 1847-1852", Volume 2, Page 51, Compiled by John O. Hawkins; North Carolina Archives, Raleigh;

    Research of David Alden Hennessee, West Palm Beach, Florida,

    Manassa Nixon (Nick) Hennessee, III, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, and Elaine Gordon, San Antonio, Texas.

    Nita H. Shepard, 206 Treetop Place, Holland, Ohio 4352 (419) 867-7439


    Pg# Ln# Head of Household to-10 10-16 16-26 26-45 45+
    to10 10-16 16-26 26-45 45+ Others Slaves Remarks
    Last Name First Name (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12)
    ==================================================================================================================================================
    0 0 1 0 0 0
    754 17 Hinsy John H 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 2

    This census is from Microcopy No. T-498 Roll 2

    Hensy, Patrick, 1,1,1,0,3,I

    1790 Census North Carolina Burke County Morgan District

    1 of 1st # free white males 16 year upwards and head of families (Patrick)
    1 of 2nd # free white males under 16 years (Ailsey)
    1 of 3rd # free white females and head of families (John)
    0 of 4th # all other free persons (no other children)
    3 of 5th # slaves

    end of biography











    MESSAGE FROM TOMBSTONE PICTURE VOLUNTEER: "I went back today Oct 29, 2009 and walked this small cemetery. About half of the markers are legible, but the other half are not...many are just broken off. I was not able to locate a marker for either John or Elizabeth Hennessee."
    - Sandra "Spiritwalker" Selph-Hunter
    Added: Oct. 29, 2009

    end of message

    August 29, 2015:

    I found a record for "John Henesy" who is enumerated in the 1790 Burke County, North Carolina Index:

    97-52 Henesy, John 2 . 2 . . . 7th Co.

    end of note

    Probate record for John Hennessee:



    A second probate record for John ... this time in Cherokee County in 1843. It looks like there was a dispute:

    end of message

    Birth:
    Map & History of Burke County, North Carolina http://bit.ly/Rd17uM

    Will:
    Map & History of Caldwell County, North Carolina.. http://bit.ly/PiwwME

    Buried:
    Map & History of Caldwell County, North Carolina.. http://bit.ly/PiwwME

    John married (Elizabeth Sumpter) (Burke County, North Carolina). (Elizabeth (daughter of John Sumpter and Catherine Van Pelt) was born (CIRCA 1774), North Carolina. [Group Sheet]


  2. 33.  (Elizabeth Sumpter) was born (CIRCA 1774), North Carolina (daughter of John Sumpter and Catherine Van Pelt).
    Children:
    1. Elizabeth Hennessee was born 0___ 1791, (Burke County) North Carolina; died 0___ 1865, Gilmer County, Georgia.
    2. 16. Patrick Hennessa was born ~ 1793, Burke County, North Carolina; died 29 Aug 1845, (Caldwell County) North Carolina; was buried Sudderth Family Cemetery, Chesterfield, Burke County, North Carolina.
    3. Ailsey Hennessee was born Abt 1795, Burke County, North Carolina; died 31 Jul 1865, Murphy, Cherokee County, North Carolina; was buried Mount Moriah Baptist Cemetery, Johnsonville, Cherokee County, North Carolina.

  3. 34.  Abraham Sudderth, Sr. was born 28 Dec 1767, Albermarle County, Virginia (son of William Sudderth, II and Margaret LNU); died 12 Jan 1853, (Caldwell County, North Carolina); was buried Belleview Cemetery, Caldwell County, North Carolina.

    Notes:

    Lived on Lower Creek (Gamewell area). Re "Caldwell County Heritage Book" for more information on the SUDDERTH line.

    Abraham married Martha "Patsy" Sumpter 16 Jan 1786, Caldwell County, North Carolina. Martha (daughter of John Sumpter and Catherine Van Pelt) was born 16 Feb 1765, Commonwealth of Virginia; died 5 Feb 1846, (Lenoir, Caldwell County, North Carolina); was buried Belleview Cemetery, Caldwell County, North Carolina. [Group Sheet]


  4. 35.  Martha "Patsy" Sumpter was born 16 Feb 1765, Commonwealth of Virginia (daughter of John Sumpter and Catherine Van Pelt); died 5 Feb 1846, (Lenoir, Caldwell County, North Carolina); was buried Belleview Cemetery, Caldwell County, North Carolina.
    Children:
    1. Catherine Sudderth was born 11 May 1797, Burke County, North Carolina; died 9 Jan 1886, Cherokee County, North Carolina; was buried Harshaw Chapel Cemetery, Murphy, Cherokee County, North Carolina.
    2. 17. Nancy Sudderth was born 4 Apr 1799, Burke County, North Carolina; died 6 Sep 1889, McDowell County, North Carolina; was buried North Catawba Cemetery, North Cove, McDowell County, North Carolina.
    3. Abraham "Little Abe" Sudderth, Jr. was born 15 Jun 1800, Burke County, North Carolina; died 0___ 1868, Cherokee County, North Carolina; was buried Greenlaw Memorial Gardens, Cherokee County, North Carolina.
    4. Thomas Sudderth was born 20 Aug 1805, (Caldwell County, North Carolina); died 2 Aug 1847, (Caldwell County, North Carolina).


Generation: 7

  1. 64.  Patrick Hennessee was born (1720-1730), (Ireland) (son of (Thomas Henesy) and (Catherine LNU)); died 0___ 1795, Burke County, North Carolina; was buried 25 Oct 1795, Tryon, Polk County, North Carolina.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Patrick Henacie
    • Also Known As: Patrick Henesey
    • Also Known As: Patrick Henesy
    • Also Known As: Patrick Henicie
    • Also Known As: Patrick Hennesey
    • Also Known As: Patrick Hensey
    • Census Name: Patrick Hensy
    • Military: 3 Jul 1754; Battle of the Great Meadows
    • Military: 0___ 1755; Braddock's Defeat
    • Military: 0___ 1758; Bedford Militia, Bedford County, Virginia
    • Residence: 0___ 1761, New London, Campbell County, Virginia
    • Military: 10 Oct 1774; Battle of Point Pleasant
    • Probate: 0Oct 1796, Burke County, North Carolina

    Notes:

    From: Nick Hennessee
    To: David Hennessee
    Subject: Re: Check-in
    Date: Thursday, March 12, 1998 12:32 PM

    David,

    Here is what I have on Patrick I in the Revolution. Emmett White found his name (with spelling only close to Hennessee) in "NC Rev Army Accts, Vol III, BKG-16 (Haun, Part V)." Emmett said he has yet to extract from the source the data that he will use in his Volume III. I encouraged him to add to his data before he shares with us at our reunion April 19.

    My source is the November 1997 issue of the "Journal of Burke County Historical Society" and a section, "Revolutionary War Soldiers of Burke County, NC." Pages 8-13 are a "Roster of 500 Participants with Service Documentation." The roster has 325 names with sketches in Dr. White’s first two volumes, Revolutionary War Soldiers of Western North Carolina : Burke County, NC. The remaining 175 names are eligible to be sketches in Vol. III.

    Southern Historical Press, Greenville, SC published the first two volumes. The sketches are of "partisans of the American Revolution, including Loyalists, who resided in, served in, or later moved to Burke County." Among those with sketches in Vol. I are the Kincaids, James, John Sr. and Robert. Also Thomas Sumter and Charles McDowell. Vol. II includes William Sumter.

    Dr. White’s explanatory note for "NC Rev Army Accts" reads: "Revolutionary Army Auditors’ Accounts. Since payments due both soldiers and civilians were spotty during the Revolution, vouchers were often given, or no remuneration at all. Boards of auditors were set up in each of the Military-judicial districts of NC. The records of the accounts are extant and, in many cases, establish proof of service. The auditors were to settle all Revolutionary claims by direct payments. Land warrants were issued to Continental Line veterans (in Tennessee Military District). Printed versions of these accounts are available from Weynette Parks Haun of Durham (243 Argonne Drive, 27704-1423)."

    If you need more, let me know

    Best regards,

    Nick

    At 11:34 AM 3/11/98 -0500, you wrote:

    Dear Cuz - Thanks for e-mailing the letter re Patrick I and Emmet White. Keep in touch and best regards to Betty...

    Sincerely yours...

    David Hennessee
    626 Biscayne Drive
    West Palm Beach,FL 33401
    H:561/832-6612
    O:800/327-3380
    F:561/655-5331

    16 Sep 2009:

    http://files.usgwarchives.org/nc/burke/census/morgandis.txt

    This census is from Microcopy No. T-498 Roll 2

    "Hensy, Patrick, 1,1,1,0,3"

    1790 Census North Carolina
    Burke County Morgan District

    1 of 1st # free white males 16 year upwards and head of families (Patrick)
    1 of 2nd # free white males under 16 years (Ailsey)
    1 of 3rd # free white females and head of families (John)
    0 of 4th # all other free persons (no other children)
    3 of 5th # slaves (unnamed)

    *

    more...

    "Kegley's Virginia Frontier: The Beginning of the Southwest - The Roanoke of Colonial Days: 1740-1783", by F. B. Kegley, p. 322: "New London in Bedford (County, Virginia) became a new western frontier town. Lots were laid off in 1761 and a good percentage of the purchasers came from the up country. The original owners were Col. Wm. Callaway...Patrick Henacie.
    Besides a sufficient number of stores there was an Academy of learning in operation as early as 1765."

    It is not known at this point whether Patrick had siblings. Given the average size of families in the 18th century if would seem likely that he did. There are several Hennessees appearing in census records and tax rolls during the late 18th century in and around the Virginia and North Carolina areas, i.e., David and Sarah appear in the Wilmington District (eastern North Carolina) well before 1800.

    "Thomas" is another Hennessee name rife in Colonial Virginia history and appears frequently during Patrick's early lifetime. If we consider the fact that there are several traditional forenames in our family, i.e., Patrick, James, David, John, Alexander and Thomas, to name but a few, Patrick's first son, John had a David, James' middle name was David, etc. It is likely that the aforementioned were brothers to Patrick. Other children of Patrick may have been Alexander and Richard, who both appear the 1800 Burke County, NC census. Reference my work titled, "Unlinked Hennessees".

    View document: http://thehennesseefamily.com/media/Early%20Unlinked%20Hennessees.pdf

    "Burke County, North Carolina, Land Records and More Important Miscellaneous Records: 1751-1809", Vol.III, p. 103;

    "John and Mary Ballew vs. Hensey, Oct.15. Affid. of sd. Ballews: In 1780 he was at Patrick Henesys on Catawba River and saw a field of mares, and Henesy said his sons in law sent them, and later saw a similar mare delivered to Mr. Wm. Heartgrove."

    ...interesting passage in the fact that it implies Patrick had daughters. If he did, we have yet no knowledge of them...DAH*

    In 1761, Patrick shows ownership of a Land Grant in Bedford County, Virginia (see document). Later in 1774-1775, court records list many purchases for Patrick around the Catawba River. Also refer to "Petition of North Carolina Congress", 1775; many signatories: i.e., "David Crockett" and "Patrick Hennesey".

    More content:

    Patrick's will was proven October 25, 1795, in Tryon,Polk Co., NC. Will has been lost...Nita Shepherd

    Hamilton Mortimer Hennessee cited that his great-grandfather was from Ireland as was reported in his Civil War Veteran Interview...

    View his questionnaire: http://thehennesseefamily.com/getperson.php?personID=I904&tree=hennessee

    *Posted By: Nita Shepherd
    Email:
    Subject: Patrick Hennessee, 1700's, Va. & N. C.
    Post Date: November 03, 1998 at 11:26:08
    Message URL: http://genforum.genealogy.com/va/messages/1364.html
    Forum: Virginia Genealogy Forum
    Forum URL: http://genforum.genealogy.com/va/

    Need parentage and names of children of Patrick Hennessee who owned lot 31 in Bedford, Va., who left Va., settling in western N. C., whose will was probated in N. C. but whose will cannot be located, even in the N. C. Archives at Raleigh. His father may have been Thomas who fought in the French & Indian War. Patrick had sons James & John, possibly Peter who had schooling in Bedford, Va., and at least two daughters, names of daughters and sons-in-law not known.

    ...Nita was one of the earliest HENNESSEE researchers and a joy to work with. We spent many happy hours conjecturing early Hennessee heritage. Nita passed away 6 May 2003...

    *

    more...

    Received via E-mail Dec. 23, 1999, information on Patrick Hennessy, from Jim Hamlin:

    "Nita, here is some info from Bedford County Court orders:

    25 May 1763 Youile & Co vs Henicie. Charles Pattison represented Youile & Co and stated he had sold a Negro for the debt, but more was owed and Patrick Henicie's estate was in disrepute (Bedford Co., Va. OB 3 1763 - 71 pg 36). "Gar" was used after Pattison's name.

    25 May 1763 Alice* Henicie allowed 3 days in Matlock v Walker (Bedford Co. Va OB 3 1763 - 71 pg 37).

    Later he was in Burke Co., NC.:

    April 1784 Charles Ballow vs Patrick Henesy re horses. Deferred to court to be held 3rd Monday in July 1784. John and wife Mary were subpoenaed, with Wm Welch, John Harper, and Esther McMullin (NC Archives Series CRO 14.325.2 Box: Civil Action. Folder: 1784 (#2).

    Margaret Hawkins was summoned to give testimony for Patrick Henesy at the January 1784 court (1784 #1).

    April 1785 Patrick Henesy made oath that William Dalton, a material witness was sick and unable to appear in court (1785 #2). The suit was continued. In July 1785, Henesy swore that Dalton was summoned, but did not appear and he (Henesy) cannot come safely to trial (1785 #2).

    Came across Patrick while researching Ballew family who were also in Bedford & then Burke Co., N. C. The Ballews were from Goochland, Albemarle, and Amherst Counties. Have not seen Patrick there, though.

    Not much, but all I have. Hope it helps some. Jim Hamlin"

    * First and only record of Ailsey's Christian name being cited as "Alice".

    item:

    http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/va/bedford/military/mil1758b.txt

    Bedford County Militia, 1758 (part 2)

    Submitted by Gwen Hurst

    Transcribed from: Hening, William Waller

    1820 The Statutes at Large; Being A Collection Of All The Laws Of Virginia, From The First Session Of The Legislature In The Year 1619. Volume VII. Franklin Press, Richmond, Virginia.

    "...Patrick Hensey (¹0.5.0 each) ...five shillings"

    More content:

    A conclusion: Apparently, Patrick went to Bedford Co.,VA before 1758 and was there through 1763

    *

    More Content:

    PATRICK HENNESSEE

    INSIGHT FROM LAND GRANTS

    BURKE COUNTY, NORTH CAROLINA

    INTRODUCTION

    Patrick Hennessee (c.1735-1796), the Patriarch of his family in America, had several land grants in Burke County, North Carolina during the era of the Revolutionary War. Patrick settled on them and raised a family, which has over 3,700 descendants.

    This paper is in two parts. Part I: Summarizes the settlement problems and grant difficulties existing in rebellious colonial North Carolina before and just after the Mecklenburg Declaration. It gives a glimpse into this time of terrible turmoil during the period when Patrick was making entries for land grants. Then, his land grant data are presented in tabular form. Part II: Describes the grants and highlights new insight and significant knowledge about Patrick and his family from the grants and collateral data.

    The work is an extension of research about Hennessee land grants by Fred and Carl Hennessee and others. It is dedicated to Nita Hennessee-Houk Shepard and her brother Dr. Albert Hennessee Houk, both children of Dr. E. A. Hennessee of Glen Alpine, North Carolina. Late in her life, Nita (my aunt) "discovered" a need for knowledge of her "roots". She then spent twenty years of inquiry in the noble search. Her work -- is an inspiration to all!

    For comments, please contact Gene Hennessee at (937) 864-7047.

    *

    (Author's note: The first computerized compilations of survey maps of Patrick's and his neighbors' grants are featured in the article. The mapping is part of research in progress concerning Burke County by Dr. Robert McNeely. Earlier work had been initiated by the Burke County Genealogical Society.)

    PART I: HENNESSEE LAND GRANTS

    ROYAL GRANTS IN NORTH CAROLINA (1578-1777)


    The history of Royal land grants in colonial North Carolina is one of failure for many reasons.

    In 1578, Queen Elizabeth I of England granted a large territory in America, including present North Carolina, to Sir Gilbert. Following his unsuccessful venture in colonization, the Queen granted the territory to Sir Raleigh in 1584. He was not successful either. So, the territory was next granted in 1606 to the Virginia Company. However, this grant was revoked in 1629. At that time, King Charles I granted a large region south of Virginia to Sir Heath. Failure in colonization happened again.

    Finally in 1663, Charles II granted large separate tracts of this region to eight loyal supporters of his restoration. Most of these proprietors' colonization efforts were failures. So, these tracts were returned to the Crown. An exception was made for the grant, which eventually became known as the Granville District, in the northern part of the Royal Province of North Carolina.

    The district was bounded on the north by the North Carolina-Virginia border and on the south by an east-west survey line designated the "Granville Line". The line was just to the south of the "old" Burke County. Patrick's grants were located entirely in the Granville District. However due to (perhaps because of "creative") surveying, there was often confusion about the location of the line between Granville and the Crown lands bordering Burke County. Burke County was formed from Rowan County in 1777. At that time, Burke County contained all or part of 16 future counties including present Burke County.

    INDIANS AND SPECULATION IN BURKE COUNTY (1752)


    In 1752, at the invitation of Lord Granville, Bishop August Spangenburg became one of the early explorers of Burke area. His purpose was to assess the suitability of several locations for a Moravian settlement there. The Bishop recorded the first written description of the area. He noted in the Burke area many buffalo, deer, and hunters including white ones, but not settlements.

    Others described the area as part of a "hunting ground" between the Cherokees and the Catawba Indians. The Bishop also claimed that "…the forest had been ruined by the Indians who are accustom to setting fire to large tracts to drive deer to a given spot [in order to easily kill them] and that keeps the trees from growing." (This was very likely to have been the case on the home grant of Patrick Hennessee based on the salient features of his grant area.)

    According to E. Phifer Burke: History of a North Carolina County, 1977, "Spangenburg chose his fourth tract, 6,000 acres beginning seven or eight miles above the mouth of Middle Creek because the land between the mouth of the river [was] already taken up". (This is of special interest because some of the later Hennessee grants were in this "taken up area".)

    EARLY SETTLEMENT IN BURKE COUNTY (1753-1776)


    In 1753, the Crown's legislators established Rowan County. At once, Granville land promoters began selling the "cheap" land in the Burke County area, then a part of Rowan County. They sold to speculators, immigrants just off the boats in port cities, settlers who had been "late" in other areas, and to those who had settled on marginal farmland elsewhere. Phifer, in his history emphasizes the promoter's appeal to the "pinched" settlers in the northeast. They found many in Pennsylvania eager to buy in North Carolina because land prices in Pennsylvania were very high. Other colonies contributing significant number of pioneers, settlers, and speculators to Burke County were Virginia, Maryland, and the North and South Carolina coast cities according to Burke County Heritage, 1981, Volume 1, published for the Burke County Historical Society. (Both books are highly recommended by the writer as 'the' sources of information about Burke County.)

    Many settlers did not acquire formal title to the land. They were "squatters" who "tried-it-out" or "avoided-the-taxes". Some eventually sought grants for the land; others just moved "on" or "back". However, the migration into the Burke area certainly did not really begin until after the French and Indian War in 1754-1763. During this period, several forts were built along the Indian frontier areas in the Appalachian Mountains, including Burke County for defense. Fear of the Cherokees caused many frontier families to "go-back". Many had died "at the hands of the Cherokees" or from diseases. In fact, Phifer writes, "Between 1756 and 1759, taxable persons in the fairly large Rowan County (which at that time included Burke) diminished from over 1,500 to fewer than 800."

    NC'S "FREEDOM" VOIDS ALL ROYAL GRANTS (1777)


    In 1771, a military force of the North Carolina Regulators engaged Royalists near Greensboro. This was the first overt action in the Colonies against the British. More significantly, in 1775, the North Carolina General Assembly in Charlotte passed the Mecklenburg Declaration proclaiming independence from the Crown. So, this Colony was the first colony to formally declare "freedom" from Royal English rule. (Patrick lived during an exciting time in history!)

    North Carolina's Assembly declared all previous Royal derived land grants void in 1777. To be valid, all the Crown and Granville grants and all new land entries were required to be entered in a new procedure with new records. Having just become a county in 1777, Burke County commissioned Joseph MacDowell as entry taker and Christopher Beekman as surveyor for North Carolina grants in Burke County. Patrick's land transactions were with them.

    "SQUATTERS" ON ROYAL LAND


    There are no known records of Crown/Granville land grants to Hennessees in old Burke County. The date Patrick entered North Carolina is as yet unknown. This writer believes it's most likely that Patrick Hennessee could have been among the early hunters/squatters that did not make any land entries. Apparently, many early pioneers did not apply for grants in the Burke area.

    I speculate that Pat had disdain for the Granville rights derived from the Crown and preferred not to pay "rent" or the taxes required by them. Or possibly he was one of the many whose land entries were lost by the inefficient and very corrupt Granville system. Another possibility is corrupt Crown officials, who supposedly "unknowingly" sold land in the Granville District, never properly recorded the grants.

    NORTH CAROLINA GRANTS TO HENNESSEES (1778-1898)


    There were at least 13 land entries granted by North Carolina to Patrick (b c1735-d 1796) and other Hennessees. Of these, at least four were to Patrick and are listed in Table I. The grants are located on or near the Catawba River about three miles north east of Morganton. Pat's home place, grant #226, was on the south bank of the Catawba River. Other grants in Burke County were taken by James (1766-1851), Patrick's older son; and John (before 1775-1844), the younger son; and Patrick's grandson, Patrick (II) (c.1793-1845) the son of John. The final grant was to R. J. Hennessee (1845-1902), a descendent of Patrick II. Discussions of these other grants and their ramification are beyond the scope of this paper.

    INTRODUCTION TO PART II


    In Part II, Patrick's and his neighbors' land grants are presented in map form. A summary description of his neighbors follows this. Then, comes a brief but "grim" account of the regional war waged by the Cherokee Indians. The local war in the Catawba valley was during the period when Patrick was probably "squatting" on the land for which he was to make a land entry. Next, his wise selections of a home site and other land grants are described. Finally, Patrick's family and progeny beginning are summarized.

    PART II: INSIGHT ABOUT PATRICK

    INTRODUCTION


    Patrick Hennessee, the Patriarch of his family with over 3,700 descendants, had several North Carolina land grants in Burke County during the Revolutionary War. Part I of this paper in the previous issue of the Journal contains a concise history of the Royal grants issues, settlement problems, and background for Pat's grants. It also cataloged the Hennessee grants. Part II, given below, highlights significant insight and knowledge about Patrick from the grants correlated with the latest genealogical and other data sources.

    MAP OF HENNESSEE LAND GRANTS


    (In the final draft of this paper) Patrick's land grants listed in Table I are presented in map form in Figure 1. The location of his grants listed in Table I and other grants can readily be determined from Figure 1. This map is from "Burkemap." It is the work of Dr. Robert L. McNeely. His pioneer ancestors had several grants in Burke County. For copies of the Hennessee grants and survey descriptions, see Carl Hennessee's enhanced packet of grant data. These maps, data, and additional grant information are available at the Burke County Library and partially available at the State Archives.

    PATRICK'S NEIGHBORS (1771-1810)


    The location of Pat's and his neighbors' grants are shown in Figure 1. There are several rewarding "clues-about Pat" that have been derived or confirmed from grantees' names and collateral information. The clues are rewarding in knowledge about the early Hennessees. For example, near Pat's home:
    --To the south, was a grant to Charles McDowell, of military fame.
    --To the north, across the Catawba, was Patrick's grant, which "changed hands" and became the home of Col. John Suddreth (his sister married Patrick(II), the grandson of Patrick, the Patriarch); and also, Thomas Wilcher (his daughter married James).
    --To the east, John Ballew*, whose affidavit, indicated Patrick Hennessee, his neighbor, had at least two married daughters (Burke County: Land and Misc. Records 1771-1809, Volume III, Page 103); and also, Abraham Harshaw, alleged loyalist, indicted by the State of North Carolina in 1782.
    --To the west, John Hughes, selected as justice of the County Court.

    Did Pat travel to Burke with any of them? From where? When? etc, Hopefully, more will be learned by future research into these and other clues from the past about Patrick of North Carolina. (Note: *In 2005, Peggy Hennessee and her husband Ralph Ballew were living near Patrick Hennessee's grant on the north side of the Catawba River.)

    PATRICK BOLDLY CLAIMED LAND: WAR RAGED (1778-1794)


    One of Patrick's North Carolina land grants was entry # 185. It was located on the south bank of the Catawba River. (Note this is his west grant on the river in Figure 1). This early entry indicates several characteristics of Pat. Apparently, he was quick to adapt to change (and the War for Independence and the new freedom of North Carolina from English rule were major changes).

    In 1776, the situation of Pat and his family on the south bank of the Catawba River bank was grim. Now, threats on their lives from the Cherokees had always existed. But during that summer, the Cherokees boldly struck the Burke area in force. Down the Catawba and then to the east of Morganton, the Cherokees savagely destroyed and dealt death to those not in the forts or strong houses.


    Later that year, a large joint colonial military action on the western frontier of North and South Carolina, Virginia, and Georgia devastated the Cherokees. Most of their large villages and crops were destroyed and the Cherokees scattered. The following year 1777, as Burke became a county, North Carolina even placed a bounty of 15 pounds for each prisoner and 10 pounds for each scalp. Finally, the Cherokee by treaty ceded all claims to land east of the Blue Ridge. (The above is a condensed summary of the area's history from Heritage of Burke, 2001, Volume I, Article 1 and Volume II, Article 53.) Patrick and his family probably were relieved at this new freedom from fear of the Cherokee tomahawk. So following the military action, the entry rush for land grants began!

    Pat acted and made several entries! A land entry required an oath of allegiance to North Carolina, not the king. (No Tories Need Apply!)The decision to make early land entries beginning in 1778 certainly highlights the confidence he had that the Colonies would win the War. At that time, the threat in Burke County from the Tories and the British was yet to come.

    HOMESITE WISELY SELECTED


    Again, consider Patrick's homeland grant on the south bank of the Catawba River below the mouth of Hunting Creek (It is his west grant on the river shown in Fgure 1). As he probably lived there at the time, most likely, he was the first to place an entry for the parcel. However, the description of the grant indicates Pat was probably not the first to have been there. The land survey description noted an "Allen's Bottom". This probably indicated that somebody had previously been there. A search of available Burke County records, in that time frame, provided no additional information about Allens. He was possibly a hunter who quartered there and moved on west. Less likely, he was killed by the Indians, was frightened, or was "worked out" and had moved back to "civilization" or "followed a hope" for better land elsewhere. (However in 1771, there is record of a John Allen who signed a petition to form a county west of Rowan County).

    For that period, the location of Pat's home on the south bank of the Catawba River, near his river bank grant to the east, was a very desirable one. Consider the advantages of the location. There were easily defended high sites for a cabin and other buildings. They could readily be built using logs from trees located thereon or from the flat ridge to the south. (The cabin site has probably been identified.) The relatively flat bottom, next to the river, appears better for corn than the steep slope rising to higher level ground, which was probably treed. However, this slope and ridge top most likely supplied wood for poles, fences, and fireplaces from an uphill location. The hunting technique of "burning-over" used by the Indians most likely had cleared the bottom. The method was typically used during their hunting in the region.

    The easy access to the river and the adjacent streams made the location ideal for canoe and raft travel. The main north-south road passing through the property had a rocky ford on the river to his grant on the north bank. The ridge road to the south connected with the main east-west wagon road. While to the north, the road was to Fort Defiance and other east-west roads.

    PATRICK'S NORTH BANK GRANT


    Another example of Patrick's wise selection of property was his only grant on the north bank of the Catawba River. It had outstanding development potential with some low bank frontage and a ford for the 'south-to-north' road that passed through both the north bank grant and his grant on the opposite bank.

    As noted in Table I above, Entry #1015 (or #22 from Phifer) was between Middle Creek (now the John's River) and Lower Creek. Both of these were hardy waterways with banks that could readily support grain and lumber mills. Timber was available or could be "floated" to the mill from more than one direction or transported by road. This valuable property was acquired by Col. John Suddreth as his home place. He developed the potential of the property by building mills there. The Colonel was a master investor, land speculator, horse breeder, and had other enterprises. For example, he, with the Hennessees, initiated a ferry operation near the Catawba River ford by their homesteads. According to Phifer, …"the ferry was still operating in 1846 and probably in 1861."

    Between the two families, there were three marriages within a generation and there were more interesting happenings. But that is another story.

    PATRICK'S POSTERITY


    The name(s) of Patrick's wife (wives) has yet to be confirmed. Some say that she was a McDowell. Their two sons, James and John, assured the Hennessee posterity. In addition, there were at least two married daughters with little more being known at this time. Patrick's date of birth is essentially undocumented. He died ca 1796 (his will has not been "found" but is said to have been "proven" then).

    James, the elder son, married Sally Wilcher. After Sally died, James married Jane McGee of Tennessee. He had a total of at least 14 children. John, the younger son, remained on his grant in Burke County. He had at least two wives and probably four children. From these two families, Patrick has at least 3,700 descendants without consideration of the children of his daughters. (The best compilation of the descendants is David Hennessee's Hennessees in America, 1991, located in the Burke County Library). There are several informal family histories about the Hennessees that provide information about branches and families of Patrick's descendants. Proper judgement to resolve certain conflicts in these histories concerning Patrick's early life can not be made because the available evidence is inadequate at this time. The histories are mainly in possession of family members.

    JAMES MARRIED AND MOVED WEST


    As was customary and practical because of transportation limitation, marriages were often between neighbors. This was true for the Thomas Wilchers, with their grants on the north bank of the Catawba just to the west and adjacent to Patrick's north bank grant (see Figure 1). They were the parents of Sally, the bride of James. In 1804, the Wilchers sold 600 acres to William Walton, a trader who also trained servants, from Charleston, South Carolina. Then, the Wilchers "moved over the mountains" to Tennessee. James and his new family went with them to the less settled and "more promising land".

    More can be derived about James from the move. The wills of the early Tennessee Hennessees and Wilchers have given some insight into the situation at that time and their characteristics. The status of Thomas Wilcher in Tennessee is attested to as he held the first court for the area in which he lived at his home. It is hoped that future inquiries into Hennessee/Wilcher genealogical data may document more information about Patrick's family in North Carolina.

    JOHN REMAINED IN BURKE COUNTY


    John, Patrick's younger son, made an entry for a land grant on the north side of the Catwaba River in Burke. The grant was "one-land grant" north of Patrick's grant as shown in Figure 1. It is believed that John procured the land of the Alan Derryberry grant, which was between his grant and his father's grant. John acquired James' grant and his other land when James moved to Tennessee. The will of John is available.

    John's son, Patrick (II), also made entries for land grants adjacent to Patrick's homestead grant as shown in Figure 1. The Hennessees who today are located in Burke County, surrounding counties, and those originating in Burke County and moving elsewhere are mostly descendants from the John and Patrick (II) line.

    CONCLUSION


    Hopefully, Patrick, the Patriarch of the Hennessee family in America, is now better known from the insight provided by this paper in terms of the turmoil from the War during his time, his decisions, land grants, family, and neighbors. However, there is much that is unknown and even difficult to speculate about Patrick.

    Patrick Hennessee was definitely on the banks of the Catawba River in Burke County, North Carolina. But from where did he come? Who was his wife? His daughters? His military service? His description? Personal characteristics? Etc, Etc?

    Again, hopefully, this paper has provided clues for leads to sources that will furnish some answers in the future.

    By Eugene L. Hennessee Jr.
    4237 West Enon Drive
    Enon, OH 45323
    ehennessee@aol.com
    (937) 864-7047

    More content:

    The earliest Hennessee in America, as far as we know, landed in Maryland about 1690. He had guessed wrong at the Battle of the Boyne in the English Civil War. He had supported the ambitions of James II. He had fought at the Saarsfield brigade at the Battle of the Boyne in Ireland. And for his part in that, after James II lost his throne, the principal officers were exiled, including him. He was exiled and lived in Maryland. As far as we know he was a member of the Roman Catholic Church.

    He brought his wife to Maryland and had one son. And this son married in Virginia into a family by the name of Courtney who were members of the Episcopal Church. This son at,...this son had a son, who was killed at the Battle of Fort Necessity, in Washington's Company, in 1754 or 1755, I'm not sure which. He in turn left a boy seven years old. And this boy fought through the Revolution and then came down near Morganton and settled in Burke County.

    *

    More...

    In the Bedford Militia in the 1750s were Thomas Hennesey and Patrick Henicie. In the French and Indian War, the Virginia Militia on the western frontier consisted mostly of the Bedford Militia. It was under command of celebrated land surveyor, map maker and college professor Colonel Joshua Fry, Major (later Colonel, General and President) George Washington and Captain (later Colonel) William Calloway, wealthy Bedford County merchant, land developer and manufacturer.

    Virginia records report that Thomas Hennesey survived the first battle of the war at Fort Necessity, PA, in 1754 and that Patrick Henicie received militia pay in 1758.

    A 1761 indenture evidences that Patrick paid "one pound, one shilling and six pence" to Colonel Calloway for a lot in New London. Four months later, Patrick sold it back at a good profit.

    In 1763, he and Alice were sued in Bedford Court for non-payment of debt.

    *

    more...

    December 31, 2015;

    Are you aware that the 1775 Joshua Frye & Peter Jefferson map of Virginia and northern North Carolina shows two surveys in North Carolina made for Moravian Bishop Spangenburg:

    (1) land for Salem, settled by the Moravians in the central Piedmont's Yadkin River watershed to begin metropolitan Winston-Salem in present Forsyth County, and

    (2) a western Piedmont tract east of present Morganton in the Piedmont's upper Catawba River watershed where pioneer settler Patrick Hennessee purchased in Burke County?

    *

    This first one I believe belongs to this Patrick based on some of the documents within it which have initials of some of his heirs:

    The dates you have and the dates on the record appears to be off though but as best as I can tell, that seems to be him. I couldn't swear to it though.

    end of message

    Sorry for so many emails but I seem to be on a roll lol. I found this 1781 military service pay voucher for Patrick Hennesy. It is from Salisbury, Rowan County, NC



    end of message

    Birth:
    Hamilton Mortimer Hennessee (1845-1939) responded to the "Confederate Soldiers Questionaire", 1922;

    "My father Archibald Hennessee was the son of James Hennessee. My great grandfather came from Ireland and settled in N. C.

    View Hamilton's page: http://thehennesseefamily.com/getperson.php?personID=I904&tree=hennessee

    Military:
    The Battle of the Great Meadows, also known as the Battle of Fort Necessity was a battle of the French and Indian War fought on July 3, 1754 in present-day Fayette County, Pennsylvania. It, along with the Battle of Jumonville Glen, are considered the opening shots of the French and Indian War which would spread to the Old World and become the Seven Years War. It was the only time George Washington ever surrendered on the battlefield.

    source: http://www.patriotfiles.com/index.php?name=Sections&req=viewarticle&artid=8988&page=1

    Military:
    The Braddock expedition, also called Braddock's campaign or, more commonly, Braddock's Defeat, was a failed British military expedition which attempted to capture the French Fort Duquesne (modern-day downtown Pittsburgh) in the summer of 1755 during the French and Indian War. It was defeated at the Battle of the Monongahela on July 9, and the survivors retreated. The expedition takes its name from General Edward Braddock, who led the British forces and died in the effort. Braddock's defeat was a major setback for the British in the early stages of the war with France and has been described as one of the most disastrous defeats for the British in the 18th century.

    Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Braddock_Expedition

    Military:
    Map & History of Bedford County, Virginia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bedford,_Virginia

    Residence:
    Notes & History for New London, Virginia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_London,_Virginia

    Military:
    The Battle of Point Pleasant — known as the Battle of Kanawha in some older accounts — was the only major action of Dunmore's War. It was fought on October 10, 1774, primarily between Virginia militia and Indians from the Shawnee and Mingo tribes. Along the Ohio River near modern Point Pleasant, West Virginia, Indians under the Shawnee Chief Cornstalk attacked Virginia militia under Colonel Andrew Lewis, hoping to halt Lewis's advance into the Ohio Valley. After a long and furious battle, Cornstalk retreated. After the battle, the Virginians, along with a second force led by Lord Dunmore, the Royal Governor of Virginia, marched into the Ohio Valley and compelled Cornstalk to agree to a treaty, ending the war.

    Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Point_Pleasant

    Probate:
    Will proved by Thomas Lain...

    Map & History of Burke County, North Carolina http://bit.ly/Rd17uM

    Buried:
    Map & History of Polk County, North Carolina... http://bit.ly/1ebUmzJ

    Died:
    Map & History of Burke County, North Carolina http://bit.ly/Rd17uM

    Patrick married Alice "Ailsey" LNU (Virginia). Alice was born (ABT 1735), (Virginia); died Aft 1800, (Burke County) North Carolina. [Group Sheet]


  2. 65.  Alice "Ailsey" LNU was born (ABT 1735), (Virginia); died Aft 1800, (Burke County) North Carolina.

    Notes:

    "Ailsey" is a dimunitive for "Alice"...DAH

    Suggested by some as a sister of Generals Charles and Joseph McDowell according to Dr. Emmet White, a Revolutionary War Historian, however Helen Money could find NO McDowell-Hennessee relationship in early NC.

    Died:
    Map & History of Burke County, North Carolina http://bit.ly/Rd17uM

    Children:
    1. James Hennessee was born 0___ 1766, Burke County, North Carolina; died February 1851, Warren County, Tennessee; was buried Liberty Hill Cumberland Presbyterian Cemetery, Warren County, Tennessee.
    2. (Samuel Hennessee) was born (~ 1770), (Burke County, North Carolina).
    3. 32. John Hennessee was born ~ 1775, (Burke County, North Carolina); died 0___ 1844, Caldwell County, North Carolina; was buried 0___ 1844, Fairfield Cemetery, Lenoir, North Carolina.
    4. (Frances Hennessee) was born (Burke County, North Carolina).
    5. (Peter Hennessee) was born (Virginia).
    6. FNU Hennessee was born (Burke County, North Carolina).
    7. FNU Hennessee was born (Burke County, North Carolina).

  3. 66.  John Sumpter was born 0___ 1733, Hanover County, Virginia (son of William Thomas Sumpter and Elizabeth (Iveson)); died 0___ 1786, Burke County, North Carolina.

    Other Events:

    • Military: Revolutionary War Patriot

    Notes:

    Notes for John Sumpter:
    From U.S. House of Representative Private Claims, Congress 3 Session 2
    Petition page 315 - John Sumpter made Petition to the 3rd Congress for Claim for Compensation for making clothing. Revolutionary army and Petition reviewed by the Representative of Secretary of War and withdrew Petition to the 4th Congress, Session 1 recorded on Journal page 445 of Claims Jan. 6 1795 - John Sumpter received land Grants in the State of Kentucky

    More About John Sumpter:
    Military service: Bet. 1812 - 1814, War of 1812 - 7th Regiment 2nd Company Burke County, North Carolina.
    Note 1: War of 1812 - Listed with Reuben Coffey.
    Note 2: Burke County was formed from Rowan County in 1777..
    Note 3: Caldwell County was formed from Burke and Wilkes County in 1841.

    More About John Sumpter and Catherine Van Pelt:
    Marriage: 1762, Albermarle County, Virginia

    John married Catherine Van Pelt 0___ 1762, Albermarle County, Virginia. Catherine was born Abt 1737, Virginia; died 0___ 1810, Burke County, North Carolina. [Group Sheet]


  4. 67.  Catherine Van Pelt was born Abt 1737, Virginia; died 0___ 1810, Burke County, North Carolina.
    Children:
    1. 35. Martha "Patsy" Sumpter was born 16 Feb 1765, Commonwealth of Virginia; died 5 Feb 1846, (Lenoir, Caldwell County, North Carolina); was buried Belleview Cemetery, Caldwell County, North Carolina.
    2. 33. (Elizabeth Sumpter) was born (CIRCA 1774), North Carolina.

  5. 68.  William Sudderth, II was born 0___ 1730, Albermarle County, Virginia (son of William Sudderth I and Elizabeth LNU); died Abt 1784, Amherst County, Virginia.

    William married Margaret LNU C. 1755, Albermarle County, Virginia. Margaret was born (Albermarle County, Virginia); died Caldwell County, North Carolina. [Group Sheet]


  6. 69.  Margaret LNU was born (Albermarle County, Virginia); died Caldwell County, North Carolina.
    Children:
    1. 34. Abraham Sudderth, Sr. was born 28 Dec 1767, Albermarle County, Virginia; died 12 Jan 1853, (Caldwell County, North Carolina); was buried Belleview Cemetery, Caldwell County, North Carolina.


Generation: 8

  1. 128.  (Thomas Henesy) was born (1650-1658), Ireland (son of FNU O'Sheal and unnamed spouse); died (Maryland).

    Other Events:

    • Immigration: Talbot County, Maryland
    • Immigration: 8 Mar 1679, Youghal, Ireland

    Notes:

    Philip Popplestone craves [claims] Rtts for 1150 Acres of Land due to him for importation of 23 persons into this Province to Inhabit according to the following Catalog: viz.

    A Catalogue of the names of what Servants were brought in the Shipp called the Increase of Youghale, Philip Popleston, Commander, Anno Domini 1679:

    Cornelius Nevill
    Mary Buchan
    Ann Barry
    Piers Wally
    Dennis Donnavan
    Margarett Duohy
    Darby Quick
    Cornelius Lynch
    Robert Kearny
    Dennis Murphy
    Edward Kirby
    John Clancy
    Cornelius Hible
    Katherine Leary
    Hana Neal
    Margarett Joflynger
    Darby Sullivan
    Joan Dally
    Daniel Murphy
    Thomas Corcran

    Thomas Henesy

    John Haghiesen
    Joan Ronayne

    The Persons above specified were imported by me Philip Popleston and never made use of the rtts for their transportation untill assigned by me unto William Sharp. Witness my hand this 19th of March 1679: s/ Philip Popleston

    March 19, 1679:

    Warrant: then granted by the Rtt Honorable: the Lord Proprietor to William Sharp of Talbott County for 1150 Acres for and in consideration of the foregoing rtts of Assignment :
    __________________ Ret. in Six Months.

    Phil:
    129

    Philip Poplestone craved Rtts to One Thousand Acres of Land for Importacon from Ireland into this Province to Inhabitt according to the following Catalogue viz

    Anno 1679

    William Newmarch
    Morrish Keally
    Timothy Connor
    Adam Merritt
    Thomas White
    Joan English
    Habia Loftus
    John Legge
    Thomas Gelliburne
    James Smyth
    Dennis Nunane
    Edmund Goremond
    John Haghieren

    Thomas Henery (sp)

    Honor Mulrean
    Thomas Bullen
    Robert Hawkins
    Corneluis Sheehane
    John Brendevill
    Katherine Londry

    The persons above specified were imported by me Philip Poplestone and never made use of the rights for their transportation untill Assigned by me unto John Stevens Witness my hand this nineteenth Day of March 1679

    s/ Philip Popleston

    and underneath was thus written vis

    Do hereby Assigne and make over all my right and Interest to the Rtts above specified unto John Stephens and his Assigns as witness my hand and seal the 19th March 1679:

    Philip Popleston (Seale)

    March 19th: 1679
    Warrant then granted unto John Stevens of Dorchester County by the Rtt Honorable the Lord Proprietor for and in consideration of the foregoing Rtts and Assignment from Philip Poplestone for one Thousand Acres of Land. ___
    _______________
    Thom:
    ( 184 )
    [ Preceeding Item Omitted from this Transcription ]
    Maryland Ss:
    Know all men by these presents that William Sharpe of Talbott County and Phillip Poplestone, Master of the Ship Encrease of Youghal are holden and firmly bound to the right Honorable Charles Lord Baltimore in the sum of One hundred pounds Sterling money to be paid to the said Charles Lord Baltimore the said Sum of One Hundred Pounds or his certain Attorney Executors and Administrators or Assignees To which payment well and trulely to be made We bind us and either of us, our and either of our heirs executors and Administrators and every of us joyntly and severally by Himself for all and in the whole firmly by these presents. Signed with our hands and Sealed with our Seals dated this eight and twentieth day of March One Thousand six hundred seventy nine and in the fourth Year of the Dominion of the Said Charles Lord Baltemore over Maryland ?? ____

    WHEREAS the persons in the Catalogue mentioned were lately brought over by the above bound Philip Poplestone in the Ship above mentioned and their rights to him assigned to the above bound William Sharpe as by the said Catalogue may appear due. Whereas upon their Humble request the the above named Charles Lord Baltemore hath the day of the date above written promised a grant to the said William Sharpe by his generall Warrant to take up Land in this Province for the rights of the said severall Persons mentioned and named in the said Catalogue or any or either of them have not formerly been mad use of in order to their rights nor shall hereafter be made use of that purpose otherwise than according to the Interest that is herein and hereby declared Then this obligation to be void and of none Effect otherwise to remain in full force and Virtue ____

    Sealed and delivered by the said William Sharpe in the presence of William Sharpe Vincent Sower Rich Recii Thomas Greenway?

    Annexed to the above Obligation was this Catalogue followingn Viz.

    (667) Catalogue of all the Servants Nameds which came out of Ireland into Maryland in the Ship the Encrease of Youghall Philip Poplestone, Master

    I????
    John Coverane 1
    Morrish Magrath 2
    Morgan Caduell 3
    Edward Burke 4
    Thomas Smith 5
    Patrick Sacey 6
    Patrick Freeman 7
    David Dally 8
    Morish Doulen 10
    Rich Ashwood 14
    Dorris Brothers 12
    Coriel Driskols 13
    Dave Gallahoe 14
    John Jones 15
    John Feakine 16
    Thomas Nanury 17
    Patrick Cahane 18
    Mortagh Murphey 19
    Tim Hartaggue 20
    Thomas Sherwin 21
    William Heage 22
    John London 24
    John Tye 25
    Norris Fitzgerald 26
    John Mushhave 27
    Catherine Magralis 28
    her young daughter 29
    Alice Green 30
    Catherine Haloorans 32
    Margaret West 33
    Catherine Kennedy 34
    Mary Ireland 35
    Catherine Ahagh 36
    Elizabeth Fostor 37
    Alice Quaine 38
    Houdra Neale 39
    Mary Bower 40
    Mary Carrous 41

    Catherine Henesy 42

    Helena Mulreau 43
    Marg Gerrald 44
    Joan Pully 45
    John Bughlaus 46

    Underneath the aforegoing Catalogue was thus written ???
    This)

    ( 185)

    This is a true Account of the names of what Servants I brought to Maryland as above said and do by these Presents assign all my right Title of this Forty-six Servants by name above said unto William Sharpe being never before assigned nor made over to any other person as Wittness my hand

    Witness George Sullivan Philip Poplestone (Signed)


    Maryland Ss: Know all men by these presents that Samuel Groome the Younger as owner Commander of the Globe of Soudou are holden and firmly bound to the right Honorable Charles Lord Baltimore in the value? of One hundred and fifty pounds Sterling to be paid to the said Charles Lord Baltimore or his order Attorney Executors of Assignees To which payment well and trulely to be made We bind us, our heirs executors and Administrators firmly by these presents. Signed with my hand and Sealed with my Seal dated this five and twentiety day of April One Thousand six hundred seventy nine.........................

    WHEREAS the persons mentioned in the Catalogue annexed were brought over in the Ship above mentioned by Samuel Groome the Elcer, father of the above bound Samuel Groome as by the said Catalogue ??? appear and Whereas upon the Humble request of the said Samuel Groome the above named Charles Lord Baltemore hath promised against? Warrant to take up Lands for the rights of the said Several Persons amounting in the whole to four Score and Three Now the Conditionn of this obligation is such that if the said persons mentioned in the Catalogue annexed or any or either of them have not formerly been made use of [or?] in order to use? their rights ??? shall hereafter be made use of to that purpose by Consent or Knowledge of the said Samuel Groome the Elder of Samuel Groome the Younger or either of them or by any other under them or by their Title otherwise before mentioned then this present Obligation to be void and of none Effect or else it to Stand and abide in full force and Virtue _________ Samuel Groome ??? (Sealed)

    Sealed and delivered in the presence of

    Thomas Green???. Annexed to the above Obligacion was the following Catalogue Viz

    Servants imported into Maryland by the Owners of the Ship Globe .. Viz

    *




    More content:

    5 Jun 1995:

    There is no proof that this Thomas HENESY is our progenitor. I include him as he is the earliest HENNESSEE found in records and the fact that "Thomas" is a re-occuring forename in our family...DAH

    30 Jul 2009:

    Nick Hennessee confirms that "Thomas & Catherine" are the parents of Patrick. This fact has been long suspected but not proven until now...

    Through a serendipitous web search, Nick found:

    "An 1820 publication that I found in a 2009 internet search, A Collection Of All The Laws Of Virginia, From The First Session Of The Legislature In The Year 1619, Volume VII, documents that Patrick was son of Irish natives, Thomas and Catherine, who immigrated in 1688 and 1689 to Maryland. Colonial Maryland records confirm the immigration: Thomas was indentured to John Stevens of Dorchester County and Catherine to William Sharpe of adjacent Talbot County under arrangements made by Philip Poplestone, Captain of the ship Increase of Youghale (Ireland), with the employers of Thomas and Catherine and with Lord Baltimore, Proprietary Governor of Maryland."

    Note:

    Nick & I suspected that there was an intermediate generation between Thomas and Patrick because of the considerable age disparity between the two. I still feel uncomfortable with their pairing for that same reason. In addition, I wonder why we've not been able to locate more issue for Thomas & Catherine given their assumed Catholic heritage and its cultural invective to procreate large families. An Irish Catholic family with one child? If that is the case, then there must have been some tragic circumstance regarding their union, i. e., a death of one of the spouses or infertility for either...

    30 Aug 2009 Nick's response:

    "I can agree with your comment with the addition that ages of Thomas and Catherine at time of marriage or conception ...if after they had fulfilled the indentures... could be a factor in family size. Also, if other children had been female, poor people, colonial practices did not honor female identity for posterity as much as later periods (witness Ailsey McDowell)."

    *

    More...

    Hennessee pioneer genealogy questions and answers by Nick Hennessee relating to Thomas Hennessee (the immigrant), Thomas (son of the immigrant), Thomas (possible grandson of the immigrant) and Patrick of Burke County, North Carolina

    CONCLUSIONS 9/9/2009:

    (1) It can reasonably be assumed and concluded (but is not completely documented) that 1688 Maryland immigrant Thomas Henesy was forebearer of Patrick Hensey of Bedford County, VA, and Burke County,NC.

    (2) Whether there were one or more generations between late 17th Century Maryland immigrant Thomas and mid 18th Century Bedford resident Patrick depends on assumptions (no birth year records found) of birth years of Maryland immigrant Thomas, of other Henesys named Thomas and of Patrick.

    (3) The Thomas christening reported in Middlesex County, VA, in 1736, while not identifying the christened person by age, has other value because it shows location then of the Hennessee family near the Chesapeake Bay after the earlier Maryland locale and before their migrating west (a pattern common in that century) to Bedford County.

    (4) Was the 1736 christening of an adult or an infant? With other evidence of Thomas and Patrick at Bedford, an adult christening in Middlesex County in 1736 would fit supposed age of the adult Thomas of Bedford, and an infant christening would fit a reasonably calculated age of child Patrick. Whatever the answer, a reasonable assumption is that Thomas was father and not brother of Patrick.

    (5) The father-son (not brother) relationship assumption also extends from (a) historic records of community popularity and honor from serving in the Bedford Militia that would likely attract any male old engough to be eligible and (b) Militia records that Thomas of the Militia survived the French and Indian War initial battle at Fort Necessity in Pennsylvania in 1754 before (c) the earliest record of Patrick in the Militia in 1758.

    (6) Therefore, I propose to report in an article for a Burke County book:

    18th Century Burke County, NC, settler Patrick Henesy was son of French and Indian War militiaman Thomas, who had earlier migrated from coastal Middlesex County, VA, to western frontier Bedford County, VA, and who likely descended one or two generations from Thomas and Catherine Henesy, 1688 and 1689, immigrants to Maryland from Ireland.

    DISCUSSION:

    Early Hennessee History documentations:
    Thomas, Irish immigrant indentured to Maryland 1688
    Thomas christening, Middlesex County, VA, 1736
    Thomas, member Bedford Militia, French and Indian War, 1754
    Thomas, land grant (for Militia service) 1755 in Bedford County
    Patrick, Bedford Militia, 1758
    Patrick, homesteader in North Carolina, 1775 (Polk) and 1778 (Burke)

    Thomas Hennessee, the immigrant in Maryland as an indentured servant in 1688, would have worked off his indenture by 1691 or 1695 (3 to 7 years per Wikipedia extract below).

    How old was he in 1695? (Maybe 25, if born 1670. Maybe 45, if 1650 birth as assumed in http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/va/bedford/military/mil1758b.txt).

    Were there one or two Henesys named Thomas between Thomas the immigrant and Patrick of Burke?

    To me, the Thomas christening reported in Middlesex County, VA, in 1736, has greatest riddle-solving value of the listed Hennessee documentations because it shows location then of the Hennessee family near the Chesapeake Bay. Irish immigrant Thomas, if still living in 1736, could then be 66 or 86 years old when member-of-Bedford-Militia Thomas was 20 years old and Patrick was an infant. That leaves a large age gap that supports existence of a generation or more between immigrant Thomas and member-of-Bedford-Militia Thomas. The christening makes sense to me now only if it:

    (A) was an adult christening (a) of immigrant Thomas or (b) of son of immigrant Thomas or (c) of member-of-Bedford-Militia Thomas or

    (B) if it was an infant christening of Patrick, who was in the Bedford Militia in 1758 (age 22 if Christened 1736). Presumed also is that some time after the christening, the family (particularly family of member-of-Bedford-Militia Thomas) migrated from Middlesex County (near Chesapeake Bay) to Bedford County (just east of the Blue Ridge Mountains).

    Scenario 1: Where does the 1736 Patrick christening premise put birth year for his father Thomas, who was in the Bedford Militia in 1754? If father of Patrick were to be 20 before the presumed christening of Patrick, that would make father-of-Patrick's birth in 1716 and his age 38 at Fort Necessity in 1754. In this scenario, immigrant Thomas would have been 46 or 56 when father of Patrick was born in 1716. That suggests greater possibility but not certainty that immigrant Thomas was grandfather, not father, of Thomas, the father of Patrick.

    Scenario 2 assumes another generation, between Thomas, the immigrant (1650 or 1660-?), and Thomas (possibly 1716-?), father of Patrick. This alternative implies younger ages for births in generations from the immigrant Thomas to father of Patrick.

    Scenario 3 supports assumption by some Hennessee genealogists that Thomas in Bedford County was brother of Patrick in Bedford County and accepts, without identifying intermediate kin, that both descended from immigrant Thomas.

    From Wikipedia -- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indentured_servant

    "Indentured Servant"

    An indentured servant is a laborer under contract of an employer for usually three to seven years, in exchange for their transportation, food, drink, clothing, lodging and other necessities. Unlike a slave, an indentured servant is required to work only for a limited term specified in a signed contract.[1]

    The labor-intensive cash crop of tobacco was farmed in the American South by indentured laborers in the 17th and 18th centuries.[2] Indentured servitude was not the same as the apprenticeship system by which skilled trades were taught, but similarities do exist between the two mechanisms, in that both require a set period of work.

    In addition to slaves (who were mostly from Africa), Europeans, including Irish,[3] Scottish,[4] English, and Germans,[5] were brought over in substantial numbers as indentured servants,[6] particularly in the British Thirteen Colonies.[7] Over half of all white immigrants to the English colonies of North America during the 17th and 18th centuries may have been indentured servants.[8

    In Colonial North America, employers usually paid for European workers' passage across the Atlantic Ocean, reimbursing the shipowner who held their papers of indenture. In the process many families were broken apart. During the time living with their masters, their fellow indentured servants took the role of family.[citation needed]

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    HENNESSEE FAMILY OF BURKE COUNTY

    In three trips in September and October 1791, Patrick Hennessee and his teenage son, John, patronized The Morganton Store, "the only store for miles around." Then they either walked or rode on horseback or in a horse- or mule-drawn wagon or buggy. It was a 4 to 6 hour or more roundtrip from their home six miles northeast of Courthouse Square. That was long travel time for purchases of 100 10-penny nails, stirrup irons and spurs as well as three pints of rum and a bushel of Indian corn.
    Patrick (circa 1735-1796) was forebear of the Hennessee family in Burke County. Records of the State of North Carolina show he was paid for Revolutionary War army service. In 1778, his first land grant in Burke was on both sides of the Catawba River between Johns River and Lower Creek. In his home, up from the south bank of the Catawba at Hunting Creek, he lived with his wife Alice, (nicknamed Ailsey), and sons James and John. Two daughters had married.
    Long after Patrick of Burke was alive and available to answer questions, descendants wanted to know more about him and his forebears. Was he an Irish immigrant or a descendant of immigrants? Was Patrick of Burke the Patrick of Bedford County, VA?

    LURE OF INEXPENSIVE FERTILE CAROLINA LAND

    Vagueness continues in the record, but helpful perspective and inspiration came in 2006. Then Virginia and North Carolina frontier historian Dr. Christopher Hendricks published The Backcountry Towns of Colonial Virginia, one of which was New London in Bedford County. Data and patterns emphasized by Professor Hendricks would logically relate Patrick of Bedford to the large colonial migration through Virginia to North Carolina via the store of William Calloway in New London. That perspective plus studies of 17th Century maps available to militiamen in that era and internet-enabled finding in 2009 of data previously not as accessible to or appreciated by family historians make plausible conclusions not earlier reached about Patrick of Burke and his heritage.
    In the Bedford Militia in the 1750s were Thomas Hennesey and Patrick Henicie. At the beginning of the French and Indian War, the Virginia Militia (on the western frontier consisting mostly of the Bedford Militia) was under command of celebrated land surveyor, map maker and college professor Colonel Joshua Fry, Major (later Colonel, General and President) George Washington and Captain (later Colonel) William Calloway, wealthy Bedford County merchant, land developer and manufacturer. Official Virginia records report Thomas Hennesey survived the first battle of the war at Fort Necessity, PA, in 1754 and Patrick Henicie received militia pay in 1758.
    A 1761 indenture evidences that Patrick Henicie paid "one pound, one shilling and six pence" for a lot in New London owned by Colonel Calloway. Within a year, he sold it back at a good profit.
    Some have suggested--and some questioned--the kinship of Patrick and Thomas (whether father-son or brothers) while proposing that one or both descended a generation or two from Thomas and Catherine Henesy, 1688 and 1689 immigrants to Maryland from County Cork, Ireland; Maryland records confirm the immigration. Some others have argued that Patrick descended from James Hennessee, who left County Cork and landed in Norfolk, Va., in 1740; they were influenced (1) by the Irish tradition that the oldest son is named after the father's father and (2) by Patrick's first-born son being named James. Another claim: Confederate war veteran Hamilton Mortimer Hennessee said that his great grandfather, Patrick of Burke, migrated from Ireland.
    Regardless of the ancestry, pre-Revolutionary-War records show in addition to Thomas of Bedford, VA, (1) some Thomas Hennesey and other Hennesey families who continued to be residents of Maryland, (2) other Hennesys who located in coastal Virginia and North Carolina counties early in the 18th Century and (3) great migrations later in the century of many families from coastal counties in Virginia, Maryland and Pennsylvania not only to the western frontier of Virginia (including Bedford County) but also south to the western North Carolina Piedmont (including Burke County).

    GREAT WAGON ROAD TO NORTH CAROLINA

    A 1752 map of Virginia, Maryland and northern North Carolina had been surveyed by Militia Colonel Fry and Peter Jefferson. It informed migrating settlers about the Great Wagon Road from Philadelphia via the Valley of Virginia to inexpensive fertile North Carolina land. The primary route in Virginia went through the Roanoke Gap of the Blue Ridge Mountains. However, many settlers -- as many as 300 one week - went through the James River Gap. They continued toward North Carolina through Bedford County via Colonel Calloway's New London store, where many paused to buy provisions. Understandably, the great enthusiasm of the settlers en route to North Carolina opportunities would be contagious to New London witnesses such as Patrick Henicie.
    Other maps also added to the lure. A 1752 Moravian Church survey described fertile Burke County land on the Catawba River, Lower Creek, Johns River and Upper Creek. The Mouzon 1775 North Carolina map showed an old Cherokee Indian trail between Virginia and South Carolina crossing the Catawba River north of present-day Morganton near Quaker Meadows. From the river, the Indian trail went south on the path later followed by the old Rutherfordton road. Just north of the South Carolina line, the trail went through the remote Green River wilderness, where land was even less expensive than in Burke County. It was in that wilderness, southeast of Chimney Rock, that Patrick Henecy obtained a 200 acre grant February 28, 1775. (Acting under Patrick's will proven October 25, 1796, son John, executor of the estate, sold the Green River tract in 1800.)

    PIONEER VOCATIONS

    Twentieth Century descendant Elizabeth Hennessee Finger, heralded as a talented school teacher, as a diligent family historian and as a founding officer and life member of the Burke County Historical Society, shared her conclusions. She said that typical of the times for poor first-arriving settlers on the frontier wildernesses (as recorded by many families in the American colonies), Patrick initially was a trapper and hunter, trading animals and pelts for food and income. Most likely, she said, he devoted full time to trapping and hunting … in Green and Broad River forests and other frontier wilderness forests in and west of Burke … before he was able to acquire fertile Catawba River land, and he continued trapping, hunting and trading while farming in Burke County.
    Owning river-and-creek-enriched bottom land, it was natural that Patrick and his sons and grandsons were farmers (and at least one was also a blacksmith) in Burke County into the 20th Century. Until after the War Between the States, Patrick, John and their descendants farmed their Catawba river-front acreage.
    "The location of Patrick's home on the south bank of the river (below the mouth of Hunting Creek) was a very desirable one," wrote descendant Eugene L. Hennessee Jr. "There were easily defended…sites for a cabin and other buildings…. The relatively flat bottom, next to the river, appears better for corn than the steep slope rising to higher level ground…. However, this slope and ridge top … supplied wood for (house logs), poles, fences and fireplaces…. (Already cleared, Allen's Bottom, as shown on the land survey, suggested a previous occupant.)… The easy access to the river and the adjacent streams made the location ideal…. The ridge road to the south connected with the main east-west wagon road. The main north-south (Old Wilkes Road) passed through the property at a rocky ford on the river and went to Fort Defiance and other east-west roads." Evidence of the Old Wilkes Road still exists (2009) on a steep grade through the former Hennessee farm.
    It was a good neighborhood. General Charles McDowell had a grant to the south. North across the Catawba (on land previously Patrick's that in the 20th Century became the Burke County landfill) was Colonel John Suddreth (his sister married Patrick II). Also north was Thomas Wilcher (his daughter married James). To the east were John Ballew and Abraham Harshaw. West was John Hughes, Justice of the Burke County Court.
    About 1805, Patrick's older son James (1766-1851) and family, his Wilcher in-laws and other Burke residents moved west to even cheaper land. They went from Morganton via the old Indian Road south past Patrick's Green River grant into South Carolina and then west across Georgia and north to McMinnville in less-crowded middle Tennessee.

    Younger son John (circa 1775-1844) had two sons, Patrick II (1793-1845), who maintained the Hennessa plantation until his death, and John II, who moved to Murphy in Cherokee County. Beginning in 1833, Patrick II and John Sudderth, his brother-in-law on the north side of the Catawba, operated a ferry to carry Old Wilkes Road traffic.

    GOLD RUSH AND CIVIL WAR

    The two oldest sons of Patrick II, John Alexander and Emanuel Augustus (Manuel) Hennessee, followed the lure of the 1852 California Gold Rush. John remained and died there. Manuel returned home to resume his cabinetmaker trade and to marry Elizabeth Caroline Johnson, daughter of Isaac Wilburn and Catherine Louisa Kincaid Johnson.
    Elizabeth's cousin, Lt. William Joseph Kincaid, recruited Manuel to join the 11th NC Regiment of the Confederate Army. Also in the Army were four of Manuel's brothers. Thomas A. was killed in action, Manasa Sudderth died in a Yankee prison camp, and Patrick Waightsill surrendered with General Lee at Appomattox but did not return home.
    Two brothers did return home, Robert Jones (RJ) of the Burke Rifles and Manuel. RJ had been captured July 3, 1863 at Gettysburg near "the angle," the farthest advance of Pickett's Charge. Freed in early 1864, RJ won promotion to sergeant. In the Fall of 1864 in the Battle of Peebles Farm near Petersburg, VA, Manuel was gravely wounded and left to die on the battlefield. But he did not die. The next day, one may conclude from hospital records, RJ got him from the battlefield to the first of a series of hospitals.
    Among many wounds, Manuel had a hole in his forehead and suffered "paralysis of right arm and leg and loss of power of speech." However, he outlived all of his brothers, dying in 1903. Then the Morganton News Herald heralded him as best known of Burke's Civil War survivors. Also, ex-lieutenant Kincaid, by then a Georgia textile manufacturer, praised Manuel for his service in the war and example after the war and added: "The Hennessees are a good old Burke family and were among the valiant North Carolinians who won for our dear old state, during the Civil War, everlasting renown."

    FARM SOLD, FAMILY RELOCATES

    Not in the army were brothers William Richard, who managed his in-law family farms in North Cove and was a Confederate quartermaster supplier, and James David, farmer and blacksmith who managed the Burke farm for his mother until it was sold. Sisters were Martha H. (Mrs. John) Ferree, Levinia Hennessee and Myra H. (wife of Sheriff Bartlett A.) Berry. Sheriff Berry acquired part of the riverfront Hennessee farm, and in the 20th Century, Duke Power Company bought all of it along with miles of Catawba riverfront south from the upper reaches of Lake James into South Carolina.
    By the time of the sale of the Hennessee Hunting Creek farm, the family of Patrick II had relocated. RJ continued nearby, a leader in the Zion Church community. Manuel and James David moved their families to farms near Gilboa Methodist Church in Silver Creek Township. Widow Nancy Sudderth Hennessee went to live with son William in North Cove. She took with her family heirlooms and records which could later have informed and enlightened family historians had they not been destroyed when the 1916 Catawba River Flood washed downstream the family's North Cove home, barns, etc.
    Manuel's children were Sarah (Mrs. George) Farr, Idalia (Mrs. Horace) Kincaid, Florence (Mrs. John) Ferree, Alice (Mrs. Thomas P.) Satterwhite, Manassa Nixon (Nas), Dr. Emanuel Augustus (Gus) MD, Joseph Richardson, Daniel Lafatte, William L. and Russell Kimsey Hennessee. All resided in Burke County. After US Army service and college medical education, Gus returned to Burke in 1902 to practice medicine, and in the 1920s, Spanish American War veteran Russell moved to Sunshine in Rutherford County.
    Children of RJ were Patrick Lee, James Phifer, Robert Avery, Ella H. Thompson, John and Margaret H. Garrison. Children of William Richard were Robert Horace Sr., James Patrick, William Lee, Paralee H. Brown, Wade Hampton and Samuel Arthur Hennessee. Children of James David were Martha Jo H. Duckworth, Thomas Patrick, Mary, Lois May and Ophelia Hennessee.
    Much more data about these and other descendants of Patrick are included in the 1981 and 2001 editions of Burke County Historical Society's Heritage of Burke County.

    SPELLINGS AND PRONUNCIATION

    Henesy, Henacie, Hensy, Hennessy, Henicie, Hennessa, Henessee, Henecy, Henessey and Hennessee are spellings found in documents from colonial to current times. Near consensus among later descendants of Patrick to spell the name "Hennessee" may be attributed not only to increasing familiarity with the spelling of Tennessee but also to the greater number of Tennessee Hennessees than North Carolina Hennessees. The name derives from the ancient Irish "O'haonghusa" (son of Angus) as also does Guinness -- the actor Alec, the stout beer and the world records.
    However the name is spelled, pronounce it Hen'-i-sy.
    Never never rhyme the last syllable with Tennessee.

    COINCIDENCES, PRECEDENTS, INCIDENTS

    Patrick's great great grandson Nas in the late 19th Century began his mercantile career on the old Cherokee Indian Road south of Morganton toward Rutherfordton. At the store, just south of Conley Road and north of Mount Olive Church Road, Nas bought Silver Creek gold and served Brindletown area residents and patrons of the nearby Glen Alpine Springs Hotel. In 1889, he relocated his store near the Glen Alpine railroad depot to compete more productively for the hotel-bound trade and to serve the town's growing population. Nas was also Town of Glen Alpine Treasurer and Justice of the Peace and proprietor of the Linville Hotel, which additionally was his family residence until 1930. At both Brindletown (1888) and Glen Alpine (1893-1897), Nas was postmaster as was his son Paul at Glen Alpine (1939-1972). Also, both Nas (1898-1900 and 1917-1918) and Paul (1936-1939) were Burke County Commissioners.
    Reflecting the zeal of their mother and wives for childhood education, Gus and Nas Hennessee were among Glen Alpine leaders who won, 44-2, a 1906 public tax vote for a new school. Gus was Chairman and Nas Treasurer of the building committee to set a leadership precedent followed by school-teaching descendants, by Charliemae H. Hamilton (Morganton School Board member for 14 years) and by her sister Nelle's advocating college for talented students and, as warranted, providing scholarship aid.
    Incidents in Glen Alpine in 1913 in Pitts Store and in 1918 at the railroad depot resulted (a) in deaths of two men, including Dr. Gus Hennessee in 1918, (b) in trials that attracted extensive interest and newspaper coverage both in Morganton and across North Carolina and (c) in life-long emotional trauma for witnesses and the victims' families.
    Nas purchased the Pitts building in 1926 and made it his primary store location. After he died in 1946, the business continued as partnership of Paul and Nelle until, after Nelle died, Paul closed the 100+ year-old Hennessee business in 1996.

    WHERE IS HENESSEY?

    Henessey was on early 20th Century US postal maps. It identified a post office established in 1896 in the store of John C. Landreau in the former home of Manuel and Elizabeth Caroline Hennessee at the intersection of US 64 and Bollinger Loop. The office served postal patrons south of Chambers, north of Brindletown and east of Rollins until rural free delivery began in 1903.

    SPECULATION

    Paddy's Creek flows into Lake James. Because of trapping and hunting ventures of Patrick before and after he settled in Burke, some 20th Century Hennessees speculated that Paddy's Creek was named for him. (What other men named Patrick and nicknamed Paddy were in Burke in the North Carolina Colony?)

    REUNIONS

    Toward the end of the 20th Century, descendants of Patrick Hennessee began annual reunions, with descendants of son John convening initially at Gilboa Methodist Church in Burke's Silver Creek Township and descendants of son James convening at McMinnville in Warren County, Tennessee. John and James descendants had a joint reunion in McMinnville in 1991. Reunions of descendants of John have also been held at Chesterfield (close to Patrick's farm and to Sudderth Cemetery), at Glen Alpine and Morganton in Burke County and at Sunshine in Rutherford County.

    SOURCES:

    The Back country Towns of Colonial Virginia, by Dr. Christopher E. Hendricks, 2006, University of Tennessee Press/Knoxville; "New London," pages 72-76 et al.

    "A Map of the Most Inhabited Part of Virginia (and) the Whole Province of Maryland With Parts of Pensilvania, New Jersey and North Carolina Drawn by Joshua Fry and Peter Jefferson in 1775," an update based on their 1751 original and including the 1752 Moravian Church survey of Catawba River and tributaries in what since 1777 has been Burke County, NC.

    "An Accurate Map of North and South Carolina With Their Indian Frontiers…from Actual Surveys by Henry Mouzon and Others, London, 1775."

    "Patrick Hennessee, Insight from Land Grants, Burke County, NC," by E. L. Hennessee Jr., 4237 West Enon Drive, Enon, OH, ehennessee@aol.com. ww.http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/va/bedford/military/mil1758b.txt. Hening, William Waller 1820, The Statutes at Large; Being A Collection Of All The Laws Of Virginia, From The First Session Of The Legislature In The Year 1619; VolumeVI; Franklin Press, Richmond, VA.

    "Hennessee Family in America", 1991 and revisions since, compiled by David A. Hennessee, including "Hennessee Pre-Revolution Chronology," Patrick, homesteader in North Carolina, 1775 (Polk) and 1778 (Burke), Transcript of answers by Hamilton Mortimer Hennessee on government questionnaire for Tennessee Civil War veterans.

    Fort Necessity National Battlefield Roster of Virginia Militia: Thomas Henacy (pre-battle), Thomas Hennesey (list of survivors) (http://www.nps.gov/archive/fone/rostercmb.htm#h).

    Archives, Colony of Maryland, documentation of passengers 1688 and 1689 by Philip Poplestone, Captain of the ship Increase of Youghale (Cork County, Ireland).

    North Carolina Atlas & Gazetteer, Fourth Edition, Copyright 2000, pages 33, 54.

    Bedford Co., Va. OB 3 1763 - 1771 pg 36-37, court cases involving Patrick Henicie and Alice Henicie, furnished Nita Hennessee by Jim Hamlin in 1999.
    Book of Patents, Colony of North Carolina, 1765-1775, County of Rowan, 200 Acres to Patrick Henecy, February 28, 1775, on both sides of the south fork of White Creek of the Green River (land in Polk County since it was established in 1855). Burke County: Land and Misc. Records 1771-1809, Volume III, Page 103. BURKE,

    The History of a North Carolina County, 1777-1920, 1982, by Edward William Phifer, Jr., pages 179-180, 364, 367, 369. North Carolina Wills: A Testator Index, 1665-1900;
    Corrected and Revised Edition by Thornton W. Mitchell including: "Hennessa, John/Heslip, Thomas/Deed/10-11/533/1800 and Hennessy, John/Heslip, Thomas/Deed/ 10-11/536/1800" (deeds of Green River land to Thomas Heslip by John Hennessa, executor of estate of Patrick Hennessa I). http://files.usgwarchives,org/nc/rutherford/deeds/h2grntor.txt. http://www.lib.unc.edu/mss/inv/n/North_Carolina_Land_Grants_and-Deeds.html.

    CSA Army records 1861-1865--regiment: "E A Hennessee" (spelling used by Manual); hospitals (1864): "E A Hennessa" (spelling favored by RJ Hennessa).

    My Dearest Friend, Civil War Correspondence of Cornelia McGimsey and Lewis Warlick, page 184. The Heritage of Burke County 1981, published by The Burke County Historical Society, Morganton, NC, pages 225-226, sketches 100,152, 221, 304, 329, 359, 408, 413, 596, 612, 650, 661,724 and 763.

    The Heritage of Burke County 2001, published by The Burke County Historical Society, Morganton, NC, articles 10, 24, 29, 31, 63, 80, 136, 173, 295, 365, 404, 413, 414, 416-428, 466, 488, 532, 534, 617,645, 676, 678, 717, 718,727 and 775.

    NC Rev Army Accts (Rev. Army Auditors Accounts),Vol III,BKG-16(Haun,Part V). North Carolina Atlas, 1975, University of North Carolina Press, Pages 13, 16.

    North Carolina Yearbook 1902, published by News & Observer, Raleigh ttp://www.archive.org/stream/northcarolinayea1902/northcarolinayea1902_djvu.txt.

    Interviews, conversations and correspondence with Elizabeth Hennessee Finger, Jean Davis Hennessee, Nita Hennessee Shepard, David A. Hennessee, Eugene L. Hennessee, Jr., Keith C. Hennessee, Philip H. Hennessee, Fred Hennessee, Carl D. Hennessee, R. Floyd Hennessee, Nelle Augusta Hennessee, Margaret Hennessee Williams, Peggy Hennessee Ballew, Dewey W. Hennessee, Caroline Hamilton Ervin, Nixon Scott Hennessee, James D. Spainhour, Robert T. Pitts, et al.

    By Manassa Nixon (Nick) Hennessee III,

    Descendant of Patrick, John, Patrick II, Emanuel Augustus (Manuel), Manassa (Nas) Nixon and Manassa Nixon (Nick) Hennessee Jr.,

    Father of Nixon Scott Hennessee,

    Grandfather of Sean Alexander, Ryan Augustus and Aidan Patrick Hennessee

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    From: Helen R Money
    To: schoolstuff@worldnet.att.net
    Subject: Archibald W. Hennessee
    Date: Saturday, March 07, 1998 1:27 PM

    David,

    The other day when I talked to you, I mentioned that someone had moved to TN when they were 6 yrs. old. I said that it was Patrick but I was WRONG. It was Archibald W. Hennessee. Could you tell me where you found that fact. Reference in your notes: See testimony. What testimony and do I have it? I have not seen anything in detail on Archibald at all. Where are you getting this? I realize that you said that you did not have references on some of the things but if you have this, I would like to have it. I do have the rest of the references.

    The Revolutionary War........

    In the book VIRGINIA'S COLONIAL SOLDIERS by Lloyd Bockstuck, it lists

    Thomas Henacy, pg 129, 12 March
    Thomas Henacy, pg 134,
    Thomas Hennesey, pg 47, 50
    Thomas Hennessey, pg 131
    Patrick Hensey, pg 208 0.5.0

    REVOLUTIONARY WAR RECORDS Vol. I VA by Gaius M. Brumbaugh

    Wm. Henesey #4803 3 yrs. pg. 448

    This was all they had at the Family History Library here. It is very small. Don't know if you are interested in this "poop" or not. I printed off the Hennessee family that they had at the FHL-BC. I do not use it but only as a reference to look for something.

    I am really having a problem with Ailsey McDowell. Can't find doodley-squat on her. Will continue to look...................

    Helen

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    "An 1820 publication that I found in a 2009 internet search, A Collection Of All The Laws Of Virginia, From The First Session Of The Legislature In The Year 1619, Volume VII, documents that Patrick was son of Irish natives, Thomas and Catherine, who immigrated in 1688 and 1689 to Maryland. Colonial Maryland records confirm the immigration: Thomas was indentured to John Stevens of Dorchester County and Catherine to William Sharpe of adjacent Talbot County under arrangements made by Philip Poplestone, Captain of the ship Increase of Youghale (Ireland), with the employers of Thomas and Catherine and with Lord Baltimore, Proprietary Governor of Maryland."

    The full Virginia citation: Hening, William Waller 1820, The Statutes at Large; Being A Collection Of All The Laws Of Virginia, From The First Session Of The Legislature In The Year 1619. VolumeVII. Franklin Press, Richmond, Virginia. “Patrick Hensey, Bedford County Militia, 1758, Parents (Thomas Henesy) #26192 born (circa 1650), (Ireland), died (MD or PA), married in (VA), (Catherine) #26193, born (circa 1650), Ireland, died (MD or PA).”

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    http://www.electricscotland.com/webclans/scotsirish/hennessey.htm

    "Hennessy" and all its corruptions;

    The early homeland of one O'hAonghusa sept, ancestors of families named Hennessy, was in the barony of Lower Philipstown, Co. Offaly, along the present border of that county and Co. Westmeath.
    Hennessy is a name from which the prefix O has been dropped in modern times, though O'Hennessy was still widely used in the seventeenth century and may be retained by some families today. In Irish it is O'hAonghusa, i.e. descendant of Aonghus of Angus. The principal sept of the name was located near the town of Kilbeggan and the hill of Croghan, their territory being chiefly in the northern part of Co. Offaly, where they shared with O'Holohan the lordship of Clan Cholgain: a branch of this was located nearer to Dublin, the head of it being chief of Gailenga Beg on the north side of the River Liffey on the borders of Counties Meath and Dublin. The latter was displaced by the Anglo-Norman invasion. The Offaly O'Hennessys spread into Tipperary and Clare - in the later county they are now called Henchy, formerly Hensey.

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    Immigration:
    on the ship, "Increase"

    (Thomas married (Catherine LNU) (Ireland). (Catherine was born (1650-1660), Ireland; died (Maryland). [Group Sheet]


  2. 129.  (Catherine LNU) was born (1650-1660), Ireland; died (Maryland).

    Other Events:

    • Immigration: Talbot County, Maryland
    • Immigration: 8 Mar 1679, Youghal, Ireland

    Notes:

    "...Know all men by these presents that we William Sharpe of Talbot County and Phillip Poplestone master of the ship Encrease of Youghall are holden and firmly bound to the right honorable Charles Lord Baltimore in the sum of one hundred pounds sterling to be paid to the said Charles Lord Baltimore the said sum of one hundred pounds or his certain attorney, executors and administrators or assigns to they which payment well and truly be made we bind us and either of us our and either of our heirs executors and administrators and every of us jointly and severally by himself for all and in the whole firmly by these presents signed with our hand and sealed with our seals dated the eight and twentieth day of March one thousand six hudred seventy nine and in the fourth year of the Dominion of the said Charles Lord Baltimore over Maryland.

    Whereas the persons in the catague(sic) mentioned were lately brought over by the above bound Phillip Poplestone in the ship above mentioned and their rights by him assigned to the above bound William Sharpe as by the said catalogue may appear and whereas upon their humble request the above named Charles Lord Baltimore hath the day of the date above written promised a grant to the said William Sharpe by his general warrant to take up land in the province for the right of the said several persons now the condition of this obligation is such that if the said persons mentioned and named in the said catalogue or any or either of them have not formerly been made use or in order to their rights nor shall be hereafter made use of to the purpose otherwise then according to the intent that is herein and hereby declared then this obligation to be void and of none effect otherwise to remain in full force and virtue.

    Sealed and delivered by the said Wm. Sharpe in the presence of William Sharpe, Vincent Lowe, Rich Keen, Thos. Greening. Annexed to the above obligation was this catalogue follow viz and catalogue of all the servants names which came out of Ireland into Maryland in the ship Encrease of Youghall Phillip Poplestone master, March 8, 1679.

    ...42. Cath Hennesy"

    (Data taken from a photocopy of the original record, located at the Maryland Hall of Records (Patents, Liber 20, folio 184). Photocopy. Personal library of Eric Shawn, Oak Grove, Oregon. This reference to Thomas Shehawne is also found in Harry Wright Newman's To Maryland from Overseas. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1986, p. 156.)

    Immigration:
    on the ship, "Increase"

    Children:
    1. 64. Patrick Hennessee was born (1720-1730), (Ireland); died 0___ 1795, Burke County, North Carolina; was buried 25 Oct 1795, Tryon, Polk County, North Carolina.

  3. 132.  William Thomas Sumpter was born 0___ 1692, Histon, Cambridgeshire, England (son of Nicholas Sumpter, Jr. and Katherine Matthews); died 7 Jul 1752, Albermarle County, Virginia.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Miller
    • Birth: 18 Aug 1695, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, England

    Notes:

    Posted By: Ana Montero-Smith
    Email: amontero@bsc.net
    Subject: William Sumpter son of William Sumpter & Eliz. Patience Dulce Iveson UK>VA>NC>Ky
    Post Date: June 17, 2002 at 13:17:19
    Message URL: http://genforum.genealogy.com/sumpter/messages/553.html
    Forum: Sumpter Family Genealogy Forum
    Forum URL: http://genforum.genealogy.com/sumpter/


    My line it through John Sumpter & Catherine Van Pelt, parents of Betty Sumpter. Betty married Richard Ramsey in 1781.

    Your Cpt William Sumpter is brother to my John Sumpter. You will find your info on the first link I have listed below.
    I had posted these links on a previous message on the Sumpter website, but since then I have found one more site of interest so check out my #6 item below.

    Here are some links where I have found more info on my Ramsey & Sumpter line.

    Check out the links below to view this info:

    1. http://genforum.genealogy.com/sumpter/messages/180.html
    This site show's Betty's Sumpter's parents as John Sumpter and Catherine Van Pelt.
    John Sumpter's parents are listed as William Thomas Sumpter & Elizabeth Iveson, both from England.

    2. http://genforum.genealogy.com/sumpter/messages/5.html
    This one shows that John Sumpter's parents as William Sumpter and Elizabeth Iveson ( who supposedly lived to 111 yrs old)

    3. http://genforum.genealogy.com/sumpter/messages/49.html
    This one identifies Richard Ramsey's burial at Coopersville, Wayne Co., Ky

    4. http://genforum.genealogy.com/sumpter/messages/31.html
    This one identifies the wife of William Sumpter as Elizabeth Iveson but it states that she was married once before, so it's questionable if Iveson is her married or maiden name. Also this one has info on William Sumpter's death record ***

    5. http://genforum.genealogy.com/sumpter/messages/179.html
    This one brings up the possibility that Elizabeth Iveson's maiden name might have been Doulce, a granddaughter of Lord Bacon of England.

    6. http://genforum.genealogy.com/sumpter/messages/167.html
    This one show the parents of William Sumpter as Nicholas Sumpter and Katherine Mathews.

    7. http://genforum.genealogy.com/sumpter/messages/505.html Shows the marriage date of William Sumpter and Elizabeth Patience Dulce Iveson as 18 Jun 1729.


    I will be glad to swap info on. Please contact me if you are connected to any of these lines. Thank you

    Ana Montero-Smith
    101 Claire Drive
    Crestview, FL .32536
    amontero@bsc.net


    Posted By: Ron Hooper
    Email: ab4ru@aol.com
    Subject: William Sumpter/John/Betty/
    Post Date: September 25, 1999 at 04:26:08
    Message URL: http://genforum.genealogy.com/sumpter/messages/180.html
    Forum: Sumpter Family Genealogy Forum
    Forum URL: http://genforum.genealogy.com/sumpter/


    I descend from John Sumpter and then from his daughter Betty that married the Ramsey. Can you add any info to this line? Please e mail me at ab4ru@aol.com
    Thanks Ron
    Descendants of William Thomas Sumpter

    1 William Thomas Sumpter d: 1752 in Albemarle County, Virginia b: 1692 in Histon, Cambridgeshire, England
    . +Elizabeth Iveson m: June 18, 1729 in Hanover County, Virginia b: 1695 in England
    ........ 2 John Sumpter d: 1786 in Burke County, North Carolina b: 1733 in Albemarle County, Virginia
    ............ +Catherine Van Pelt m: 1762 d: Aft. 1809 in Burke County, North Carolina b: 1745 in Virginia Colony
    ................... 3 Betty Sumpter d: Aft. 1822 in Wayne County, Kentucky b: Abt. 1763 in Albemarle County, Virginia
    ....................... +Richard Ramsey m: 1781 in Burke County, North Carolina d: April 09, 1822 in Wayne County, Kentucky b: 1755 in Albemarle County, Virginia
    .............................. 4 Catherine Ramsey d: Aft. 1861 in Macon County, North Carolina b: 1782 in Burke County, North Carolina
    .................................. +Nathan DeHart m: November 06, 1803 in Burke County, North Carolina d: September 10, 1861 in Macon County, North Carolina b: February 23, 1781 in Rowan County, North Carolina
    .............................. 4 Ransom Ramsey
    .................................. +Elizabeth Grice
    .............................. 4 Randall Ramsey
    .............................. 4 Elizabeth Ramsey
    .............................. 4 William Ramsey
    .............................. 4 Isham Ramsey
    .............................. 4 Nancy Patsy Ramsey
    .............................. 4 Mary Polly Ramsey
    ........ 2 Thomas Sumpter d: June 01, 1832 in Statesburg, South Carolina b: August 14, 1734 in Preddy's Creek near Piney Mt, Albemarle Co, Va.
    ............ +Mary Cantey Jamenson m: 1767 d: 1817 in Statesburg, South Carolina b: 1723
    ........ 2 William Sumpter d: 1819 in Burke County, North Carolina b: October 29, 1731 in Albemarle County, Virginia
    ............ +Judith Randall
    ................... 3 William Sumpter
    ................... 3 John Sumpter
    ................... 3 Thomas Sumpter
    ................... 3 James Sumpter
    ................... 3 Fielding Sumpter
    ................... 3 Livinston Sumpter
    ................... 3 Amelia Sumpter
    ................... 3 Judith Sumpter
    ................... 3 Elizabeth Sumpter
    ........ 2 Patience Sumpter d: Abt. 1814 in Albemarle County, Virginia b: 1729 in Albemarle County, Virginia
    ............ +James Suddarth m: in Albemarle County, Virginia d: 1800 in Albemarle County, Virginia b: Abt. 1720 in Virginia
    ................... 3 Agnes Suddarth d: 1812 in Castalian Springs, Tennessee b: Abt. 1753 in Albemarle County, Virginia
    ....................... +Francis Weatherred m: Abt. 1786
    ................... 3 Mildred Suddarth d: Abt. 1810 in Sumner County, Tennessee b: Abt. 1755 in Albemarle County, Virginia
    ....................... +John Turner
    ................... 3 William Suddarth d: November 18, 1832 in Albemarle County, Virginia b: February 02, 1756 in Albemarle County, Virginia
    ....................... +Martha Patsy Pleasants m: April 01, 1786 in Goochland County, Virginia
    ................... 3 Sarah Suddarth d: July 1826 in Carthage, Smith County, Tennessee b: Abt. 1759 in Albemarle County, Virginia
    ....................... +Henry Lyon
    ................... 3 James Suddarth d: Abt. 1856 in Albemarle County, Virginia b: Abt. 1763 in Albemarle County, Virginia
    ....................... +Jane Randolph
    ........ *2nd Husband of Patience Sumpter:
    ............ +Benjamin Franklin m: Abt. 1745 d: 1751 in Albemarle County, Virginia
    ................... 3 Elizabeth Franklin
    ....................... +Clinton Coffee
    ................... 3 Anne Franklin d: Abt. 1797 in Albemarle County, Virginia
    ....................... +John Dowell
    ................... 3 Mary Franklin
    ................... 3 Dorcus Franklin d: 1800 in Albemarle County, Virginia
    ....................... +Claudius Buster
    ........ 2 Edmund Sumpter d: Aft. 1790 in Charlotte County, Virginia b: 1738 in Albemarle County, Virginia
    ............ +Anne Tackett
    ................... 3 John Sumpter d: Abt. 1855 b: Abt. 1770
    ....................... +Hannah Morrison
    .............................. 4 William Sumpter
    .............................. 4 John T Sumpter
    .................................. +Louisa E Robinson







    William Sumpter was born Abt. 1692 in England, and died 07 Jul 1752 in Virginia691. He married Elizabeth.

    Notes for William Sumpter:

    HISTORY OF THE SUMPTERS

    (From materials received from John Alexander Sumpter, 1952/1932, in the form of notes in long hand by Lois Sumpter)

    "The first Sumpters that came to North America were three brothers sent for back in England to do some fine mechanical work for the colonies or English Government. They were Father's Great Great Uncles (brothers of George Sumpter (1)). They fought in the Revolutionary War. One was quite a commandeer in that war. Our grandfather (George Washington Sumpter) was in Washington's Army. Father (Alexander Sumpter) was carried there in his mother's arms to see his Grandfather or our Great Great Grandfather (Henry Sumpter)**
    Alexander Sumpter, Sr went to the Black Hawk Indian War in 1832 and was one of a chosen party of 22 to cross the Mississippi River and follow a small band of Indians that succeeded in crossing. He was in the last battle fought in the war.

    He was in St. Louis when there were but a few houses in it and no good ones mostly Dobies and rock huts.

    His Uncle John Sumpter served 3 terms in Washington's Army in the Revolutionary War. Uncle John Sumpter's son Buckhanan Sumpter was also Captain of a cannon in the Revolutionary War under Washington. Captain Buck Sumpter disobeyed orders and won a battle. He was ordered to spike his cannon, but his judgment told him victory was near and he continued firing and when the smoke cleared away the enemy was running, but not until the Americans had burned some of their property.
    Our Great Grand Father was Henry Sumpter and his wife was Agness Dillon. They came from Virginia. They were tailors. They were "First Families of Virginia".
    Our grand Father, George Washington Sumpter and his wife, Nancy Powers, came from East Tennessee.

    John Sumpter married and lived in Souther Illinois. His children were: Ben Sumpter, Buck Sumpter, John Sumpter, Danial Sumpter. Uncle John became a very wealthy man.

    He (John Sumpter) served three terms in Revolutionary War.
    His son Buck Sumpter was commanding officer in that war.
    Danial Sumpter was with his father in the BlackHawk war.
    Polly sumptere married Robert Chopin
    Sally Sumpter married Absalem Adams
    Their son Jessie Adams lived at Marion Station, Marion County, Oregon

    Our Uncles and Aunts
    Father's (Alexander, Jr) Half-brothers:
    John sumpter
    Henry Sumpter
    Abraham Sumpter

    John Sumpter married twice.
    His first wife was Nancy Caldwell

    **Think this is misinterpretation of notes. George was born in 1776, so more likely that Henry was in Washington's Army, and George was carried there as a baby, not George's son.
    "First Families of Virginia" states that Henry was a tailor and well-to-do, with fine property

    This generation is based only on hypotheses.

    As written by Jane Sumpter Malone-George on 28 Januray 1998:

    "Thanks to Jim Landrum and his research, we have George Sumpter coming to America as an indentured servant 20 June 1721. Also, Jim found records showing a George Sumpter was christened to William and Elizabeth Sumpter 9 Feb 1699 in St. Brides Parish Fleet Street, London. The same parish from which George leaves for America. I had found the item about George the Immigrant in a book, Emigrants from England to America, 1718-1759 by Jack and Marian Kaminkow.

    The Kaminkows listed James Gerald as the English Agent who signed George to the indenture. It is my understanding that the Agents then sold the indentures to men in the colonies which could account for not finding any record of a James Gerald in early Virginia.

    The notebook written by Alexander Sumpter, Sr., of Missouri and later of Washington, stated that "Gr.Gr. Grandfather was a George Sumpter, an Englishman, a tailor by trade, a brother of Sumpters
    sent to America as carpenters by the English Government to perform a fine piece of mechanical work."

    I would like some comments on this: could William Sumpter, the father of General Sumter and family, Richard Sumpter of Manikintowne, and George, the immigrant, all be brothers who came
    to America during the early 1700s?

    As Jim Landrum wrote, Henry Sumpter who married Agnes Dillon did not name known children Richard. But John of Chesterfield did have a son Richard according to Curtis Sumpter's papers. George who married Elizabeth Gross and lived in Floyd Co,VA, did name a son Richard.

    The father of the General did not have a known son named Richard. I wonder if we can begin to organize these very early Sumpters and their ancestors by such a simple method as the names they gave their children? Of course, this is not proof but it could give us clues for further search.

    Please, let's have some thoughts about this.

    Thanks Jane Sumpter Malone-George.

    More About William Sumpter:
    Occupation: Miller - Mill on Preddy's Creek near Piney Mt. Albermarle Co., Virginia.

    Children of William Sumpter and Elizabeth are:
    +William Sumpter, b. 23 Oct 1731, d. 1819, Burke County, North Carolina.
    +John Sumpter, b. Abt. 1733, Hanover County, Virginia, d. 1787, Burke County, North Carolina.
    +Thomas O. Sumpter, b. 14 Aug 1734, Hanover County, Virginia, d. 01 Jun 1832, Statesburg, South Carolina.
    +Patience Sumpter, b. 1736, Hanover County or Albermarle County, Virginia, d. 1805, Albermarle County, Virginia.
    Edmond Sumpter, b. 1738, Preddy's Creek Settlement, Hanover County, Virginia, d. date unknown.
    Ann Sumpter, b. 1740, d. date unknown.
    +Dorcas Sumpter, b. 1742, Charlottesville, Hanover County, Virginia, d. 1800.



    Occupation:
    - Mill on Preddy's Creek near Piney Mt. Albermarle Co., Virginia

    William married Elizabeth (Iveson) 18 Jun 1729, Hanover County, Virginia. Elizabeth was born 0___ 1695, (Histon,Cambridgeshire),England; died (Albermarle County, Virginia). [Group Sheet]


  4. 133.  Elizabeth (Iveson) was born 0___ 1695, (Histon,Cambridgeshire),England; died (Albermarle County, Virginia).
    Children:
    1. 66. John Sumpter was born 0___ 1733, Hanover County, Virginia; died 0___ 1786, Burke County, North Carolina.

  5. 136.  William Sudderth I was born Abt 1700, (Virginia) (son of James Sudderth and Elizabeth Travis); died 0___ 1762, (Albermarle County) Virginia.

    William married Elizabeth LNU (Virginia). Elizabeth was born (CIRCA 1705), (Virginia). [Group Sheet]


  6. 137.  Elizabeth LNU was born (CIRCA 1705), (Virginia).
    Children:
    1. 68. William Sudderth, II was born 0___ 1730, Albermarle County, Virginia; died Abt 1784, Amherst County, Virginia.