John Stamps, Jr.

Male 1784 - 1843  (~ 59 years)


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Generation: 1

  1. 1.  John Stamps, Jr. was born 0___ 1784, (Virginia) (son of John Stamps, Sr. and Eleanor Dodson); died 14 Sep 1843.

    John married Nancy Slade 13 Jan 1808, (Virginia). Nancy was born 10 Nov 1792, (Virginia); died 10 Nov 1844. [Group Sheet]


Generation: 2

  1. 2.  John Stamps, Sr. was born 1732-1746, (Virginia) (son of Thomas Stamps and Mary Rose); died 0___ 1812, Pittsylvania County, Virginia.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: gentleman

    John married Eleanor Dodson Fauquier County, Virginia. Eleanor (daughter of Elisha Dodson, Sr. and Sarah Everett) was born 0___ 1749, Fauquier County, Virginia; died 10 Jul 1816. [Group Sheet]


  2. 3.  Eleanor Dodson was born 0___ 1749, Fauquier County, Virginia (daughter of Elisha Dodson, Sr. and Sarah Everett); died 10 Jul 1816.
    Children:
    1. William Stamps was born 6 Jan 1761, (Virginia); died 24 Jun 1844.
    2. Mollie Stamps was born 0___ 1766, (Virginia).
    3. Nancy Stamps was born 0___ 1767, (Richmond County, Virginia); died 0Feb 1837, (Fauquier County, Virginia).
    4. Elizabeth "Betsey" Stamps was born 0___ 1772, (Virginia); died 0___ 1793, (Virginia).
    5. Sarah "Sallie" Stamps was born 0___ 1774, (Virginia); died 0___ 1780, (Virginia).
    6. Rhoda Stamps was born 0___ 1776, (Virginia).
    7. Catherine Stamps was born 0___ 1778, (Virginia); died 0Jul 1839.
    8. Timothy Stamps was born 19 Jan 1779, (Virginia); died 21 Oct 1867.
    9. Thomas Stamps was born 15 Mar 1781, (Virginia); died 18 Jul 1834.
    10. 1. John Stamps, Jr. was born 0___ 1784, (Virginia); died 14 Sep 1843.
    11. Lydia Stamps was born 0___ 1785, (Virginia).


Generation: 3

  1. 4.  Thomas Stamps was born CIRCA. 1700, St.Mary's White Chapel Parish,VA; died CIRCA 1763, Fauquier County, Virginia.

    Thomas married Mary Rose ~ 1727, (Virginia). Mary (daughter of John Rose and Mary Jenkins) was born ~ 1704, Northumberland County, Virginia. [Group Sheet]


  2. 5.  Mary Rose was born ~ 1704, Northumberland County, Virginia (daughter of John Rose and Mary Jenkins).
    Children:
    1. 2. John Stamps, Sr. was born 1732-1746, (Virginia); died 0___ 1812, Pittsylvania County, Virginia.

  3. 6.  Elisha Dodson, Sr. was born 22 Feb 1727, Richmond County, Virginia (son of Thomas Dodson, Sr. and Mary May Durham); died 27 Apr 1791, Pittsylvania County, Virginia.

    Other Events:

    • Military: Revolutionary War Patriot

    Notes:

    Biography

    Elisha Dodson was born 22 FEB 1727, North Farnham Parish, Richmond County, Virginia, page 22, of The Dodson (Dotson) Family of North Farnham Parish, Richmond County, Virginia: A History and Genealogy of Their Descendants Volume One, by Mrs. Sherman Williams, Compiler and Editor and Rev. Silas Emmett Lucas, Jr., Publisher, copyright 1988; Library of Congress Number: 88-60291.

    Elisha Dodson and Sarah Everett were married about 1748 in Richmond County, Virginia. Sarah Everett (daughter of William Everett and Margaret [Everett]) was born on 13 Apr 1729 in North Farnham Parish, Richmond County, Virginia. Sarah Everett's father said to be William Everett, born 15 Mar 1691 in VA; his father was Daniel Everett.

    Elisha Dodson and Sarah Dodson were baptized December 4, 1762 in the Broad Run Baptist Church, Fauquier County. Their son Elisha Jr was one of the infants received into the care of the church on 9 Oct 1763. It is indicated in such records that Elisha and Sarah Dodson were "dismissed to Halifax" - date not shown.

    Elisha Dodson is in the DAR patriot index. He is listed in the Pittsylvania Co. Court Order Book 4, 1777-1783, p.127 as a ensign in the milita, Capt. Richard Gwynn's Company.

    In 1774 Elisha patented 400 acres in Halifax Co and appears on the tax lists there from 1782 until 1787 when he apparently moved to Pittsylvania. He continues on the tax lists in Pittsylvania Co through 1796, so apparently died at at hat time. He had perhaps taken care of his estate distribution previously by a deed of gift to his children.

    Elisha Dodson on 27 Apr 1791, "for love and affection he doth bear his children," gave to his sons, Presley and William Dodson "the land whereon he now lives" containing 300 acres on Toby Creek, and slaves Simon, Harry, Sam, Winny, Milly, Letty, Crisia, Sucky, Aggy and Eve, as well as moveable estate to be equally divided between all the children. Margaret the wife of Railey [Rawleigh]Dodson, Lydda the wife of John Waller, Ruth the wife of Jesse Dodson, Sarah the wife of Thomas Dodson, Jemimah the wife of Joshua Hardey & Elisha Dodson Jr. Said Negro Harry to be delivered to John Waller and with him to remain until a debt is paid which the said Elisha Dodson is now owing the said Waller. Negro Aggy already given & in possession of said Elisha Dodson Jr. After said Debt is paid then Harry to be returned into a division. Slaves & moveable estate to be equally divided between all the afore named children. Wit: W. Wright, Ann Wright, Martha (X) Wright. Ack by Elisha Dodson 16 May 1791 Pittsylvania Co., Va. Deed Book 9, page 11.


    Sources

    The Dodson (Dotson) Family of North Farnham Parish, Richmond County, Virginia: A History and Genealogy of Their Descendants Volume One, by Mrs. Sherman Williams, Compiler and Editor and Rev. Silas Emmett Lucas, Jr., Publisher, copyright 1988; Library of Congress Number: 88-60291.
    Two Volumes and Volume Two contains the index, abstracts & transcripts of documents. Pages 22 and 23.

    Repository: R10 Name: NEHGS Lending Library Address: New England Historic Genealogical Society Address 1: New England Historic Genealogical Society Note: 2008. No longer lends books, available only at the Library.
    Source: S652 Abbreviation: North Farnham Parish Registers Title: George Harrison Sanford King, Compiler & Publisher, The Registers of North Farnham Parish 1663-1814 and Lunenburg Parish 1783-1800 Richmond County, Virginia (Self-Published; Fredericksburg, VA; 1966) Repository: #R17 Call Number: F232 .R4K52 1986
    Source: S860 Abbreviation: Pittsylvania Co VA Deeds Title: Pittsylvania Co Virginia Deeds; Deed Books 3 & 4, Microfilm #0033263; Deeds & Wills Book 5, Microfilm #0033264; DB 6 & 7 with some Court Records from 1767, Microfilm #0033265; DB 8, Microfilm #0033266; DB 9 & 10, Microfilm #0033267; Deeds & Wills 11, Microfilm #0033290 [these are dated earlier than DB 9; the wills begin in 1780]
    Note

    Elias Dodson found on a list of taxpayers for Hamilton Parish, Elk Run & vicinity, 1751. From the account book of Capt. John Crump, Sheriff of Prince William County. After 1759, this area became Fauquier County.

    [Since the earliest known Elias Dodson was not born until 1760, this is most likely Elisha.]

    The Rev. Elias Dodson in writing his history of the family claimed that Elisha Sr was blind due to an eye injury in his youth; he also stated that Elisha Jr and perhaps daughter Peggy [Margaret] were born in Maryland. There's no explanation for this statement. [There were Dodsons in Maryland with some of the same given names, but they are of no relationship - some of the early researchers have confused the families.] Rev. Dodson stated that seven daughters were born before they had a son; he named two children that were not named in the deed of gift that perhaps had died before 1791. Eleanor is not named and she was still living. Eleanor had perhaps already received her inheritance or had elected to opt out if she had no need of additional property.

    1763 moved to Halifax Co. 7/5/1774 Elisha Dodson land in Halifax Co adj to Joseph Wm and Russell Terry

    In 1774 Elisha patented 400 acres in Halifax Co and appears on the tax lists there from 1782 until 1787 when he apparently moved to Pittsylvania. He continues on the tax lists in Pittsylvania Co through 1796, so apparently died at at hat time. He had perhaps taken care of his estate distribution previously by a deed of gift to his children.

    *

    Will of Elisha Dodson

    Pittsylvania DB9, p.11

    p.11 27 Apr 1791

    Elisha Dodson to Presley Dodson, William Dodson, Margaret the wife of Railey [Rawleigh]Dodson, Lydda the wife of John Waller, Ruth the wife of Jesse Dodson, Sarah the wife of Thomas Dodson, Jemimah the wife of Joshua Hardey & Elisha Dodson Jr.

    For natural love & affection to his said children and also for 5sh (shillings), makes over to them, the land whereon he now lives.

    300 acres on Toby Creek unto his sd sons Presley & William to be divided between them Presley the N side & Wm the S including to William 4 acres on N side known Antain Land reputed bounds thereof.

    Also the following slaves: Simon, Harry, Sam, Winney, Milley, Lettey, Cresia, Suckey, Aggy & Ever.

    And all his moveable estate of what kind of quality.

    Said Negro Harry to be delivered to John Waller and with him to remain until a debt is paid which the sd Elisha Dodson is now owing the sd Waller.

    Negro Aggy already given & in possession of sd Elisha Dodson Jr.

    After sd Debt is paid then Harry to be returned into a division.

    Slaves & moveable estate to be equally divided between all the afore named children.

    Wit: W. Wright, Ann Wright, Martha (X) Wright.

    Ack by Elisha Dodson 16 May 1791

    *

    Revolutionary Patriot, Ensign. Was blinded during early adulthood.

    Birth:
    in Farnham Parish...

    Elisha married Sarah Everett 1747-1748, Richmond County, Virginia. Sarah (daughter of William Everett and Margaret LNU) was born 13 Apr 1729, Pittsylvania County, Virginia; died 0___ 1824, Halifax County, Virginia. [Group Sheet]


  4. 7.  Sarah Everett was born 13 Apr 1729, Pittsylvania County, Virginia (daughter of William Everett and Margaret LNU); died 0___ 1824, Halifax County, Virginia.

    Other Events:

    • Death: 0___ 1824, Richmond County, Virginia

    Children:
    1. 3. Eleanor Dodson was born 0___ 1749, Fauquier County, Virginia; died 10 Jul 1816.
    2. Margaret "Peggy" Dodson was born C. 1752, Richmond County, Virginia.
    3. Ruth Dodson was born 12 Dec 1754, Fauquier County, Virginia; died 22 Nov 1828, McMinn County, Tennessee; was buried Matlock Cemetery, Athens, McMinn County, Tennessee.
    4. Sarah "Sally" Dodson was born C. 1758, Richmond County, Virginia; died 21 Sep 1835, Giles County, Tennessee.
    5. Lydia Dodson was born Commonwealth of Virginia.
    6. Jemima "Mima" Dodson was born C. 1760, Richmond County, Virginia.
    7. Tabitha Dodson was born C. 1762, Richmond County, Virginia; died Commonwealth of Virginia.
    8. Elisha Dodson was born C. 1764, Halifax County, Virginia.
    9. Presley Dodson was born C. 1766, Halifax County, Virginia.
    10. William E. Dodson was born 0___ 1768, Halifax County, Virginia; died 18 Mar 1821, Pittsylvania County, Virginia.


Generation: 4

  1. 10.  John Rose was born ~ 1680, (Virginia); died 18 Nov 1742, Northumberland County, Virginia.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: plantation owner

    Notes:

    John Rose
    Birthdate: circa 1680 (62)
    Birthplace: England or Northern Neck of, Virginia
    Death: November 18, 1742 (58-66)
    Wiccomico, Northumberland, Virginia, United States
    Immediate Family:
    Husband of Mary Rose - Blackerby
    Father of Mary Stamps and Elizabeth Dodson
    Occupation: Planter
    Managed by: Tim Stamps
    Last Updated: January 10, 2017
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    Immediate Family

    Mary Rose - Blackerby
    wife

    Mary Stamps
    daughter

    Elizabeth Dodson
    daughter

    James Blackerby, Jr.
    stepson

    ?? Davis
    stepdaughter
    About John Rose of Wicomico
    John Rose
    Birth: abt 1680 probably England, possibly Virginia
    Death: Nov 18 1742 - Wiccomico, Northumberland, Virginia, United States
    Parents: unknown
    Wife: Mary Blackerby
    Children: Mary Rose, Elizabeth Rose

    The earliest record that we have of our John Rose is that in 1701 in Northumberland County when he and his wife, Mary Rose, witnessed the will of James Wildey. Rose is mentioned in a number of land purchases and finally we have his will dated November 18, 1742 wherein he names James Blackerby, his wife's son by her first marriage; and Joseph Davis, his wife's grandson, his daughters Mary Stamps and Elizabeth Dodson and his beloved wife Mary Rose.

    Will of John Rose of Wicomico Parish, Northumberland County, Virginia

    In the name of God, Amen, I, John Rose, of Weiomore Parish and County of Northumberland, being weak of age, but of perfect mind and memory, thanks be to Almighty God for it, calling to mind the mortality of my body, knowing that it is appointed for all men once to die, do make ordain this my last will and testament, that is to say, principally and first of all, I recommend my Soul unto the hands of Almighty God that gave it to me and as for my body I recommend it to the Earth, to be buried in a Christian like and decent manner, at the discretion of my executors hereafter mentioned, nothing doubting but at the general resurrection I shall receive the same again by the Might power of God, and as for such worldly estate as it hath pleased Almighty God to bless me with in the world I give as follows:

    Imprimes, I give to James Blackerby my wife's son three sheep.

    Item, I give to Joseph Davis my wife's grandson seven sheep and as for the rest of my personal estate, such as my lands, negroes, stocks and all other tenements I give to my two daughters, viz: Mary Stamps and Elizabeth Dodson and their heirs forever, to be equally divided between the two, and it is my will that my land shant be sold as long as the wars continue.

    Item, I leave the rest of my estate to my loving wife Mary Rose during her widowhood or natural life.

    Item, I constitute, make, appoint and ordain my loving wife Mary Rose, Thomas Stamps, Thomas Dodson and William Thomas Sr. to be my sole executors of this my last will and testament, wills and legacies, bequests executed to me anyways before this time named, willed and bequeathed, ratifying and confirming this and no other to be my last will and testament.

    In witness whereunto I set my hand and seal this 18th day of November in the year our Lord God 1742.

    John Rose (seal)

    Witnessed by: Wm. Stonum Elenor (x) Chapman"

    Links

    http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~bouquet/john_rose.html
    http://www.thehennesseefamily.com/getperson.php?personID=I3722&tree=hennessee

    John married Mary Jenkins Bef 1701, (Virginia). Mary was born ~ 1666, Weldmore, Northumberland County, Virginia; died ~ 1742, Weldmore, Northumberland County, Virginia. [Group Sheet]


  2. 11.  Mary Jenkins was born ~ 1666, Weldmore, Northumberland County, Virginia; died ~ 1742, Weldmore, Northumberland County, Virginia.

    Notes:

    Mary Rose - Blackerby (Jenkins)
    Also Known As: "Mary (Jenkins) Blackerby Rose", "NOT Mary Wildly", "Mary (Jenkins) Blakesley Rose"
    Birthdate: circa 1666 (76)
    Birthplace: Weldmore, Northumberland, Virginia USA
    Death: circa 1742 (68-84)
    Weldmore, Northumberland, Virginia USA
    Immediate Family:
    Daughter of Philip Jenkins and Sarah Jenkins
    Wife of John Rose of Wicomico and James Blackerby
    Mother of Mary Stamps; Elizabeth Dodson; James Blackerby, Jr. and ?? Davis
    Managed by: Timothy Paul Setser
    Last Updated: January 10, 2017

    View Complete Profile

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    Immediate Family

    John Rose of Wicomico
    husband

    Mary Stamps
    daughter

    Elizabeth Dodson
    daughter

    James Blackerby
    husband

    James Blackerby, Jr.
    son

    ?? Davis
    daughter

    Philip Jenkins
    father

    Sarah Jenkins
    mother
    About Mary Rose - Blackerby
    will of John Rose
    Attached hereto is a copy of the will of John Rose dated November 11, 1742. When it was offered for probate, John Rose lived in Wicomico Parish, Northumberland County. The original will is in possession of the Shackleford family of Seattle, Washington. They also have the original will of Thomas Stamps and also his revoked will.

    The executors of John Rose's will were Mary, his widow, his sons-in-law Thomas Stamps and Thomas Dodson. Witnesses were William Stonum and Eleanor Chapman. The will gave to his wife's son James Blackerby three sheep, her grandson Joseph Davis seven sheep; his lands, negroes, stock, etc., to Mary Stamps and Elizabeth Dodson equally, but the entire estate to his wife during her natural life or widowhood.

    notes
    Another researcher thought Mary "Blackerby" had been previously married to a Blackerby and was not the daughter of a Blackerby. Can anyone fine additional documentation?

    The "Rose Tree" http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~bouquet/john_rose.html

    lists her as being born Mary Jenkins, whose first husband was the Blackerby. As Mary Jenkins, she is the daughter of PHILIP JENKINS and SARAH STORY.

    The latest information that I have is that Mary was born Mary Jenkins, and married into the name Blackerby. Her second marriage was to John Rose

    According to Patt Roach: "Apparently James Blackerby I died and his wife, Mary married John Rose. Date of death of James Blackerby I would be about 1700-1701." "Her name was not Wildly."

    Citations

    Roach, Patt. We Boast of the Name Of Blackerby Blackaby Blackorby. Baltimore, MD: Gateway Press, 2007. Print.
    Links

    http://www.thehennesseefamily.com/getperson.php?personID=I3723&tree=hennessee
    http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~bouquet/john_rose.html

    Children:
    1. 5. Mary Rose was born ~ 1704, Northumberland County, Virginia.
    2. Elizabeth Rose was born 0___ 1706, Richmond County, Virginia; died 0___ 1766, Fauquier County, Virginia.

  3. 12.  Thomas Dodson, Sr. was born 15 May 1681, Richmond County, Virginia (son of Charles Dodson, Sr. and Anne LNU); died 21 Nov 1740, Richmond County, Virginia.

    Other Events:

    • Probate: Richmond County, Virginia

    Notes:

    Richmond County,VA Wills:05-378,

    "Will of Thomas Dodson, dated 17 Feb 1739; proved 2 March 1740

    In The Name Of God Amen I Thomas Dodson of Northfarnham p'ish in Richmond County Being sick and Weak of Body but in Perfect since and Memory do make and ordain this to be my Last Will and Testam.t in manner and forme -

    Impri I lend to my Wife Mary Dodson my Plantation whereon I now Live and the Land thereto Blonging with all my Negroes and Moveable Estate dureing her Natural Life -

    Item. I give to my Son Thomas Dodson Five Shill.s to be Paid by Ex.rrs -

    I give to my Son George Dodson and his heirs for Ever one hundred and fifty Acres of Land whereon he ye sd George Dodson is now Liveing -

    I Give to my Son Greenham Dodson and his heirs for Ever the Whole Tract of Land I bought of Lambarth Dodson -

    I give to my Sone Elisha Dodson & his Heirs for Ever the Plantation whereon I now Live and Land Land therto Belonging after my Wife Mary Dodsons Decease -

    I Give to my Daughter Alice Creel One Negroe Girl named Sarah -

    I give to my Daughter Mary Oldam one New Suit of calica Cloaths -

    I Give to my Son Greenham Dodson one Negroe man Named Harry -

    I GIve to my Son Abraham Dodson one Negroe Woman named Bess and one Negroe Boy named Joe -

    I Give to my Son Josha Dodson one Negroe woman Named Sue and one Negroe Boy named Dick -

    I give to my son Elisha Dodson one Negroe Girl Named Nan -

    I give to my son Greenham Dodson one feather Bed and furniture -

    I give to my son Abraham Dodson one feather Bed and furniture -

    I give to my son Joshua Dodson one feather Bed and furniture -

    I give to my son Elisha Dodson one feather Bed and furniture -

    I Give to Granddaughter ye Daughter of David Dodson Twenty Shill.s

    All the Remaining Part of My Estate be the same more or Less I give to be Equally Divided between three of my sons Vist Abraham Dodson Joshua Dodson & Elisha Dodson

    I Likewise ordain and Appoint my Wife Mary Dodson and my son Greenham Dodson to be the true and Lawful Exr.s of the my Last will & Tesatam.t

    as Witness my hand and seal this 17th Day of February 1739


    (S) Thomas (T his mark) Dodson (Seal)


    Wits: H. Miskell, John (X) Hightower, Charles Dodson"

    end of entry

    Thomas Dodson's Estate Inventory

    An exhaustive examination by Roberta Estes:

    https://dna-explained.com/2017/03/26/thomas-dodsons-estate-inventory-a-tallow-sort-of-fellow-52-ancestors-153/

    end of note

    Thomas Dodson , He Married Mary May Dorothy Durham.1 Aug 1701 in North Farnham Richmond County Virginia, He was born 15 Jun 1686 in North Farnham Richmond County Virginia, and died Aft Jan 1745 in North Farnham Richmond County Virginia. She was buried Aft Jan 1745 in North Farnham Richmond County Virginia. {{son of Charles Dodson and Anne Elmore. He was born 15 May 1681 in Jamestown, Virginia, and died 21 Nov 1740 in North Farnham Richmond County Virginia. He was buried Nov 1740 in North Farnham Richmond County Virginia.}}

    Children of Thomas Dodson and Mary May Dorothy Durham are:

    i. George Dodson was born 31 Oct 1702 in North Farnham, Richmond County, Virginia, and died 1758 in Prince William/Pittsylvania County Virginia.
    ii. Thomas Dodson was born Oct 1707 in North Farnham Parish Richmond County Virginia, and died 21 Oct 1783 in Halifax, Virginia.
    iii. Greenham Dodson was born Abt 1709.
    iv. Elisha Dodson was born 22 Feb 1727.
    v. Alice Dodson was born Abt 1711. She married William Creel 15 Nov 1729.
    vi. Abraham Dodson was born 4 Apr 1723, and died 1768 in Fauquier Co., VA. He married Barbary Russell, daughter of George Russell and Mary. She was born 9 Nov 1729 in North Farmham Richmond County VA.
    vii. Mary Dodson was born 5 Oct 1715. She married Oldham.
    viii. Joshua Dodson was born 25 May 1725. He married Ruth.
    ix. David Dodson was born Abt 1704, and died 1740 in Prince William County, VA.
    x. Joseph Dodson was born 21 Feb 1725.

    2. -George Dodson was born 31 Oct 1702 in North Farnham, Richmond County, Virginia, and died 1758 in Prince William/Pittsylvania County Virginia. He was buried 1758 in Virginia. He married Margaret Dagord 20 Apr 1726 in North Farmham Richmond County Virginia, daughter of Henry Dagood Dagord. She was born 30 Apr 1708 in Richmond, VA, and died Abt 1770 in Pittsylvania County Virginia. She was buried 1770 in Virginia.

    Children of George Dodson and Margaret Dagord are:
    i. Mary Dodson was born 21 Dec 1726.
    ii. Lazarus Dodson was born 7 Oct 1728 in Richmond County, Virginia, and died Abt 1795 in Pittsylvania Co., VA.
    iii. Rawleigh Dodson was born 18 Jan 1730 in Richmond County, Virginia, and died Aft 20 Jul 1793 in Hawkins County, TN.
    iv. Thomas Dodson was born 25 May 1735 in Richmond County, Virginia.
    v. George Dodson was born 31 Oct 1737, and died 1825 in Pittsylvania Co., VA. He married Elizabeth Dodson. He married Margaret.
    vi. Fortunatus Dodson was born 31 Jul 1740. He married Margaret (Peggy) Dodson Aft 1836, daughter of Elisha Dodson and Sarah Everett.
    vii. Hannah Dodson was born 2 May 1747. viii. David Dodson was born 1743 in Culpeper County, VA.

    3. Thomas Dodson was born Oct 1707 in North Farnham Parish Richmond County Virginia, and died 21 Oct 1783 in Halifax, Virginia. He was buried in Pittsylvania County Virginia. He married Elizabeth Rose 3 Apr 1724 in Pittyslvania County Virginia, daughter of John Rose and Mary Dodson Blackerby. She was born 1710 in Richmond County, Virginia, and died 1766 in Fauquier Co., VA.

    Children of Thomas Dodson and Elizabeth Rose are:

    i. Thomas "Second Fork" Dodson was born 3 Oct 1728 in Richmond County, Virginia, and died Bef 1809 in Hawkins County, TN.
    ii. Joseph Dodson was born 21 Feb 1725 in Richmond County, Virginia, and died 1773. He married Martha Anna.
    iii. Mary Dodson was born 16 Jun 1730. She married Childress.
    iv. Sarah Dodson was born 27 May 1732. She married John Neville.
    v. Elizabeth Dodson was born 27 May 1732. She married John Bennett.
    vi. Alce Dodson was born Abt 1734, and died 1792 in Pittsylvania Co., VA.
    vii. Joshua Dodson was born Abt 1736.
    viii. William Dodson was born Abt 1738, and died 6 May 1832 in Iredell Co., NC.
    ix. George "Lame George" Dodson was born Abt 1740.
    x. Jesse Dodson was born 22 Nov 1752 in Fauquier Co., VA, and died 1841-1843 in East Stanley Valley, TN.
    xi. Rhoda Dodson was born Abt 1744, and died 1792. She married John Creel.

    4. Greenham Dodson was born Abt 1709. He married Elinor Hightower. She was born Abt 1718 in Richmond County, Virginia.
    Children of Greenham Dodson and Elinor Hightower are:

    i. Judith Dodson was born 6 Jan 1741.
    ii. Thomas Dodson was born Abt 1743 in Richmond County, Virginia. He married Sarah Dodson, daughter of Elisha Dodson and Sarah Everett. She was born Abt 1758 in Richmond County, Virginia.
    iii. Hightower Dodson was born Abt 1745. He married Unity Dodson 7 Jan 1804.
    iv. Rawleigh Dodson was born Abt 1745, and died 3 Jun 1836. He married Margaret (Peggy) Dodson, daughter of Elisha Dodson and Sarah Everett.
    v. William Fortunatus Dodson was born Abt 1747.
    vi. George Dodson was born Abt 1751.

    5.Elisha Dodson was born 22 Feb 1727. He married Sarah Everett.

    Children of Elisha Dodson and Sarah Everett are:
    i. Margaret (Peggy) Dodson. She married Fortunatus Dodson Aft 1836, son of George Dodson and Margaret Dagord. He was born 31 Jul 1740. She married Rawleigh Dodson, son of Greenham Dodson and Elinor Hightower. He was born Abt 1745, and died 3 Jun 1836.
    ii. Eleanor Dodson was born Abt 1749 in Richmond County, Virginia.
    iii. Ruth Dodson was born Abt 1756 in Richmond County, Virginia.
    iv. Lydia Dodson was born Abt 1756.
    v. Sarah Dodson was born Abt 1758 in Richmond County, Virginia. She married Thomas Dodson, son of Greenham Dodson and Elinor Hightower. He was born Abt 1743 in Richmond County, Virginia.
    vi. Jemima "Mima" Dodson was born Abt 1760 in Richmond County, Virginia. She married Joshua Hardy.
    vii. Tabitha Dodson was born Abt 1762 in Richmond County, Virginia.
    viii. Elisha Dodson was born Abt 1764 in Halifax County, VA. He married Hannah Lawson 21 May 1789. He married Mary Lipscomb Pettus Jordan.
    ix. Presley Dodson was born Abt 1766 in Halifax County, VA. He married Elizabeth Bates 22 Oct 1789.
    x. William Dodson was born Abt 1768 in Halifax County, VA.

    10. David Dodson was born Abt 1704, and died 1740 in Prince William County, VA. He married Amey. Child of David Dodson and Amey is:

    i. Unknown Dodson was born Abt 1740.

    Descendant Register, Generation No. 3

    12. Mary Dodson was born 21 Dec 1726. She married Thomas "Second Fork" Dodson, son of Thomas Dodson and Elizabeth Rose. He was born 3 Oct 1728 in Richmond County, Virginia, and died Bef 1809 in Hawkins County, TN.

    Children of Mary Dodson and Thomas "Second Fork" Dodson are:
    i. Ida (Ioda) Dodson.
    ii. George Dodson.

    13. Lazarus Dodson was born 7 Oct 1728 in Richmond County, Virginia, and died Abt 1795 in Pittsylvania Co., VA. He married Alce Dodson, daughter of Thomas Dodson and Elizabeth Rose. She was born Abt 1734, and died 1792 in Pittsylvania Co., VA.

    Children of Lazarus Dodson and Alce Dodson are:

    i. Elisha Dodson was born Abt 1753 in Pittsylvania Co., VA, and died 1828 in Williamson Co., TN. He married Rachel Henry. She was born Abt 1754 in Holsten Co., TN.
    ii. George Dodson was born Abt 1755.

    14. Rawleigh Dodson was born 18 Jan 1730 in Richmond County, Virginia, and died Aft 20 Jul 1793 in Hawkins County, TN. He married Elizabeth Dodson Abt 1750. She died Aft 1793.

    Children of Rawleigh Dodson and Elizabeth Dodson are:

    i. Rawleigh Dodson was born Abt 1751.
    ii. Mary Dodson.
    iii. Peggy Dodson. She married Menafee.
    iv. James Dodson was born Abt 1760. He married Lucy Davis 20 Dec 1804 in Jefferson Co TN.
    v. Lazarus Dodson. vi. Toliver Dodson. vii. Eleanor "Nelly" Dodson was born Abt 1755. She married John Saunders. 19. David Dodson was born 1743 in Culpeper County, VA. He married Elizabeth Betty Dodson, daughter of Thomas "Second Fork" Dodson and Ann Mary Neville. She was born Abt 1748.

    Children of David Dodson and Elizabeth Betty Dodson are:
    i. Fortunatus Dodson.
    ii. Abner Dodson.
    iii. Ann Dodson.

    20. Thomas "Second Fork" Dodson was born 3 Oct 1728 in Richmond County, Virginia, and died Bef 1809 in Hawkins County, TN. He married Ann Mary Neville 1747 in VA, daughter of Joseph Neville and Ann Neville. She was born 1730 in VA. He married Mary Dodson, daughter of George Dodson and Margaret Dagord. She was born 21 Dec 1726.

    Children of Thomas "Second Fork" Dodson and Ann Mary Neville are:

    i. Elizabeth Betty Dodson was born Abt 1748.
    ii. Thomas Jeremiah Dodson was born in Halifax County, VA, and died Abt 1835 in Hawkins County, TN.
    iii. Leonard Dodson. He married Randall.
    iv. Jesse Dodson was born Abt 1774. He married Judith Combs 19 Mar 1794 in Halifax County, VA. She was born Abt 1775.
    v. Fanny Dodson. She married Thomas Dodson.
    vi. Agnes Aggy Dodson. She married Moses Hanks.
    vii. Rhoda Dodson. She married Alexander Hitson 20 Nov 1786 in Halifax County, VA.
    viii. Winny Dodson. She married William Johnson. ix. Alcy Dodson. She married Jerry Johnson. x. Samuel Dodson. xi. William Dodson died 22 Dec 1809 in KY.
    xii. James Dodson.

    Children of Thomas "Second Fork" Dodson and Mary Dodson are:
    i. Ida (Ioda) Dodson.
    ii. George Dodson.

    25. Alce Dodson was born Abt 1734, and died 1792 in Pittsylvania Co., VA. She married Lazarus Dodson, son of George Dodson and Margaret Dagord. He was born 7 Oct 1728 in Richmond County, Virginia, and died Abt 1795 in Pittsylvania Co., VA.
    Children of Alce Dodson and Lazarus Dodson are:
    i. Elisha Dodson was born Abt 1753 in Pittsylvania Co., VA, and died 1828 in Williamson Co., TN. He married Rachel Henry. She was born Abt 1754 in Holsten Co., TN.
    ii. George Dodson was born Abt 1755.

    27. William Dodson was born Abt 1738, and died 6 May 1832 in Iredell Co., NC.
    Children of William Dodson are:
    i. Sarah Sally Dodson was born Abt 1777 in Halifax County, VA.
    ii. William Dodson.
    iii. Annis Dodson was born 1759, and died 1788.
    iv. Elija Dodson was born 1759, and died 1788.
    v. James B Dodson was born 1764 in Halifax County, VA.
    vi. Rachael Dodson was born 1765 in Fauquier Co., VA.
    vii. Winnifred Dodson was born 1770 in Halifax County, VA.
    viii. Rosannah Dodson was born 1775 in Halifax County, VA.
    ix. Mary Dodson was born 12 Apr 1790 in Halifax County, VA.
    x. Elizabeth Dodson was born 1796 in Halifax County, VA.

    29. Jesse Dodson was born 22 Nov 1752 in Fauquier Co., VA, and died 1841-1843 in East Stanley Valley, TN. He married Ruth Dodson, daughter of Elisha Dodson and Sarah Everett. She was born Abt 1756 in Richmond County, Virginia.

    Children of Jesse Dodson and Ruth Dodson are:

    i. Nimrod Dodson was born Abt 1775.
    ii. Elizabeth Dodson was born Abt 1776.
    iii. Elisha Dodson was born 17 Sep 1785.
    iv. Elijah Dodson was born 17 Sep 1785.
    v. Jesse Dodson was born 7 Mar 1791.
    vi. William Dodson was born 14 Jun 1795.
    vii. Sarah Dodson.
    viii. Tabitha Dodson was born 19 Mar 1798.
    ix. Sallie Dodson was born 1801.
    x. Ruth Dodson was born 1 Apr 1802.

    39. Ruth Dodson was born Abt 1756 in Richmond County, Virginia. She married Jesse Dodson, son of Thomas Dodson and Elizabeth Rose. He was born 22 Nov 1752 in Fauquier Co., VA, and died 1841-1843 in East Stanley Valley, TN.

    Children of Ruth Dodson and Jesse Dodson are:

    i. Nimrod Dodson was born Abt 1775.
    ii. Elizabeth Dodson was born Abt 1776.
    iii. Elisha Dodson was born 17 Sep 1785.
    iv. Elijah Dodson was born 17 Sep 1785.
    v. Jesse Dodson was born 7 Mar 1791.
    vi. William Dodson was born 14 Jun 1795.
    vii. Sarah Dodson.
    viii. Tabitha Dodson was born 19 Mar 1798. ix. Sallie Dodson was born 1801. x. Ruth Dodson was born 1 Apr 1802.
    Descendant Register, Generation No. 4

    53. Mary Dodson She married Shelton.

    Children of Mary Dodson and Shelton are:
    i. Mary Shelton.
    ii. Nancy Shelton.

    62. Elizabeth Betty Dodson was born Abt 1748. She married David Dodson, son of George Dodson and Margaret Dagord. He was born 1743 in Culpeper County, VA.
    Children of Elizabeth Betty Dodson and David Dodson are:

    i. Fortunatus Dodson.
    ii. Abner Dodson.
    iii. Ann Dodson.

    63. Thomas Jeremiah Dodson was born in Halifax County, VA, and died Abt 1835 in Hawkins County, TN. He married Jemina Lockett. She was born in Halifax County, VA, and died 29 Dec 1850 in TN.

    Children of Thomas Jeremiah Dodson and Jemina Lockett are:

    i. Elisha Dodson was born 1 Nov 1801 in Hawkins County, TN, and died 17 Jun 1874 in Hawkins County, TN.
    ii. James Dodson was born Abt 1790. He married Rachel Grantham.
    iii. Sarah Dodson.
    iv. Raleigh "Rolly" Dodson was born 1804 in TN, and died 1853.

    Descendant Register, Generation No. 5

    96. Elisha Dodson was born 1 Nov 1801 in Hawkins County, TN, and died 17 Jun 1874 in Hawkins County, TN. He married Frances "Fanny" Thompson 4 Nov 1819 in Hawkins County, TN. She was born 17 Feb 1803 in Hawkins County, TN, and died 17 Jun 1874 in Hawkins County, TN.

    Children of Elisha Dodson and Frances "Fanny" Thompson are:

    i. Thomas Richard Dodson was born 10 Aug 1820 in Hawkins County, TN, and died 20 Aug 1893 in Overton County, TN.
    ii. Mary M W Dodson was born 17 Feb 1822 in Hawkins County, TN, and died 2 Jun 1885.
    iii. James Kendrick Dodson was born 10 Jan 1824 in Hawkins County, TN, and died 4 Mar 1885 in Hamblen Co., TN. He married Narcissa A Taylor 28 Sep 1854.
    iv. Sarah J Dodson was born 26 May 1825 in Hawkins County, TN, and died 23 Aug 1826 in Hawkins County, TN.
    v. William T. Dodson was born 14 Jun 1827 in Hawkins County, TN, and died 26 Jul 1827 in Hawkins County, TN.
    vi. Raleigh J. Dodson was born 22 Jul 1828 in Hawkins County, TN, and died 11 Dec 1891. He married Emma. He married Eliza J.
    vii. Samuel E Dodson was born 9 Dec 1830 in Hawkins County, TN, and died 13 Jan 1905.
    viii. Stephen Orville Dodson was born 8 Jan 1833 in Hawkins County, TN, and died 29 Jan 1892 in Pickett, TN.
    ix. Nancy Cornelia Dodson was born 7 Jan 1836 in Hawkins County, TN, and died 11 Jan 1913 in Pickett, TN.
    x. Stokley D M Dodson was born 4 Apr 1839 in Hawkins County, TN, and died 18 Apr 1862 in TN.
    xi. Lucinda M Dodson was born 4 Apr 1841 in Hawkins County, TN, and died 18 Apr 1915 in TN.
    xii. Susan B Dodson was born 26 May 1843-1844 in Hawkins County, TN.

    99. Raleigh "Rolly" Dodson was born 1804 in TN, and died 1853. He married Martha "Patsy" Johnson. She was born 1802 in TN.

    Children of Raleigh "Rolly" Dodson and Martha "Patsy" Johnson are:
    i. Penelope Dodson was born 1822 in TN.
    ii. Eliza Dodson was born 1824 in TN.
    iii. Thomas Dodson was born 1825 in TN.
    iv. William Dodson was born 1828 in TN.
    v. James Hardy Dodson was born 1831 in TN, and died 1904.
    vi. Raleigh Sanford Samuel Dodson was born 1832 in TN, and died 1905.
    vii. George Dodson was born 1835 in TN.
    viii. Cynthia Dodson was born 1839 in TN.

    Descendant Register, Generation No. 6

    100. Thomas Richard Dodson was born 10 Aug 1820 in Hawkins County, TN, and died 20 Aug 1893 in Overton County, TN. He was buried in Dodson Chapel Cemetery, Overton County, TN. He married Martha Ann Johnson 26 Nov 1840. She was born 7 Jan 1821 in TN, and died 12 Oct 1906 in Putnam County, TN.

    Children of Thomas Richard Dodson and Martha Ann Johnson are:
    i. Louisa Frances Dodson was born 5 Jan 1842, and died 26 May 1880.
    ii. James Elbert Dodson was born 13 Feb 1844, and died 2 Feb 1885. He married Margaret Etta "Bette" Gentry 17 Nov 1869. She was born 1 Oct 1850, and died 20 Mar 1940.
    iii. Sanford Johnson Dodson was born 12 Aug 1846, and died 18 May 1882 in TN.
    iv. Elisha Frank Dodson was born 20 Nov 1848, and died 29 Sep 1924. He married Elizabeth "Bessie" Kembrough. v.John Larkin Dodson was born 30 Jul 1851 in TN, and died 13 Dec 1892.
    vi. Mary Nancy C Dodson was born 29 Apr 1854 and died 8 Apr 1936.
    vii. William Robert L Dodson was born 28 Jul 1856. viii. Sarah Catherine Hannah Dodson was born 8 Apr 1860, and died 13 Sep 1894.
    ix. Susan Alice Dodson was born 15 Feb 1863.

    106. Samuel E Dodson was born 9 Dec 1830 in Hawkins County, TN, and died 13 Jan 1905. He was buried in Coldwell Cemetery, #195, Hawkins Co., TN. He married Mary Jane Taylor 12 Oct 1854 in Hawkins County, TN. She was born 1840, and 1910. She was buried in Coldwell Cemetery, #195, Hawkins Co., TN.

    Children of Samuel E Dodson and Mary Jane Taylor are:
    i. Elisha S Dodson was born 1857.
    ii. William H Dodson was born 1857.
    iii. J E Dodson was born 1859.
    iv. Margaret Dodson was born 1861.
    v. Eliza Emma Dodson was born 1863, and died 1893.
    vi. Narcissus Dodson was born 7 Nov 1866, and died 16 Feb 1888. She married John E Jones. He was born 3 Apr 1887, and died 3 Jul 1894.
    vii. Fannie Effie Dodson was born 17 Feb 1876 in Morresburg, TN, and died 12 Nov 1914.
    viii. Ludie T Dodson was born 18 Aug 1878.
    ix. James S. Dodson was born 1880. He married Dollie Lawson.

    107. Stephen Orville Dodson was born 8 Jan 1833 in Hawkins County, TN, and died 29 Jan 1892 in Pickett, TN. He married Mary Alta Catherine Johnson 28 Oct 1852. She was born 1835, and died 1909.

    Children of Stephen Orville Dodson and Mary Alta Catherine Johnson are:
    i. James Elisha Dodson was born 1854.
    ii. Martha Lucinda Dodson was born 1855.
    iii. Sarah Maneova Dodson was born 1857, and died 1908.
    iv. William Dodson was born 1859. v. Fannie Dodson was born 1860.
    vi. Raleigh J " Rolla" Dodson was born 1 Jun 1862.
    vii. Louise Dodson was born Abt 1863.
    viii. Nancy Jane Dodson was born 1865.
    ix. Steven Orville Dodson was born 1866.
    x. Alice Dodson was born 1868.
    xi.Charles Dodson was born 1869.
    xii. Robert Dodson was born 1871.
    xiii. Merchant Frank Dodson was born 30 Sep 1883 in Overton County, TN, and died 18 Nov 1962.
    xiv. Rebecca Melvina Johnson Dodson was born 15 Apr 1868 in Overton County, TN, and died 18 Sep 1948 in Pickett, TN.
    109. Stokley D M Dodson was born 4 Apr 1839 in Hawkins County, TN, and died 18 Apr 1862 in TN. He married Sarah J Hartman 26 Mar 1857 in TN. She was born 28 Feb 1840 in TN, and died 9 Mar 1899 in TN.

    Children of Stokley D M Dodson and Sarah J Hartman are:

    ** i. John Henry Dodson was born 17 Apr 1858 in Hawkins County, TN, and died 4 Jun 1918 in Tulare, Tulare County, CA. He married Mary Rosina "Mollie" Williams 13 Mar 1874 in Hamblen Co., TN. She was born Dec 1858 in TN, and died 28 Sep 1889 in Whitesburg, Hamblen County, TN.
    ii. Thomas E Dodson was born 20 Nov 1859 in TN.

    iii. Stokely C Dodson was born 12 Aug 1861 in TN.


    Sarah J. Hartman
    1840 - 1899
    Parents: John and Mary
    Siblings: Marshall, Rebecca A. and Margaret
    Partners: (1)Stokely D. M. and(2)Benjamin Abbot
    Children: (1)John Henry, Thomas E., Stokely C., ----(2)-Sarah J., Angeline R., Benjamin Abbot, Marion, Flora, Robert, Nora Etta and Hattie

    end of registry

    Birth:
    Click here to view maps, record & history of Richmond County, Virginia ...http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richmond_County,_Virginia

    Thomas married Mary May Durham 1 Aug 1701, Richmond County, Virginia. Mary (daughter of Thomas Durham, Sr. and Dorothy Smoot) was born 5 Jun 1686, Richmond County, Virginia; died 21 Nov 1740, Richmond County, Virginia. [Group Sheet]


  4. 13.  Mary May Durham was born 5 Jun 1686, Richmond County, Virginia (daughter of Thomas Durham, Sr. and Dorothy Smoot); died 21 Nov 1740, Richmond County, Virginia.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Dorothy Mary Durham
    • Death: 1 Jan 1715, Richmond County, Virginia

    Notes:

    Birth:
    in Farnham Parish...

    Children:
    1. George Dodson, Sr. was born 31 Oct 1702, Richmond County, Virginia; died 0___ 1770, Pittsylvania County, Virginia.
    2. David Dodson was born (CIRCA 1704), Richmond County, Virginia; died EARLY 1740, (Prince William County) Virginia.
    3. Thomas Dodson, Jr. was born 0Oct 1707, Richmond County, Virginia; died 21 Oct 1783, Halifax County, Virginia.
    4. Greenham Dodson was born ~ 1709, (Richmond County) Virginia; died ~ 1777, (Nottaway County, Virginia).
    5. Alice "Alcy" Dodson was born 0___ 1711, Richmond County, Virginia.
    6. Mary Dodson was born 10 May 1715, Richmond County, Virginia.
    7. Abraham Dodson was born 4 Apr 1723, Richmond County, Virginia; died 0___ 1768, Fauquier County, Virginia.
    8. Joshua Dodson was born 25 May 1725, Richmond County, Virginia; died 0___ 1798, Surry County, North Carolina.
    9. 6. Elisha Dodson, Sr. was born 22 Feb 1727, Richmond County, Virginia; died 27 Apr 1791, Pittsylvania County, Virginia.

  5. 14.  William Everett was born 15 Mar 1692, Richmond County, Virginia (son of Daniel Everett and Anne Elmore); died 0___ 1759, Richmond County, Virginia.

    Notes:

    24 Jul 2007


    Posted By: Doyleen Turner
    Email:
    Subject: William Everett b.1692, Virginia
    Post Date: February 07, 2001 at 07:24:52
    Message URL: http://genforum.genealogy.com/everett/messages/1281.html
    Forum: Everett Family Genealogy Forum
    Forum URL: http://genforum.genealogy.com/everett/


    I am seeking information about the parents of William Everett who was born March 15, 1692 in Richmond County, Virginia.

    William (my 6th great grandfather) was married to "Margaret" and they had eight known children: Sarah, Anne, Elizabeth, Lucrecy, Daniel, George, William, and Ruth.

    Does anyone know who William's parents were and who the immigrant Everett was for this line? THANKS Doyleen







    Birth:
    in Farnham Parish...

    William married Margaret LNU ~ 1715, (Virginia). Margaret was born (Richmond County, Virginia). [Group Sheet]


  6. 15.  Margaret LNU was born (Richmond County, Virginia).
    Children:
    1. 7. Sarah Everett was born 13 Apr 1729, Pittsylvania County, Virginia; died 0___ 1824, Halifax County, Virginia.


Generation: 5

  1. 24.  Charles Dodson, Sr. was born 0___ 1649, Essex County, Virginia; died 1704-1705, Richmond County, Virginia.

    Other Events:

    • Possessions: 0___ 1679; Old Rappahannock County, Virginia
    • Will: 11 Jan 1703, (Richmond County, Virginia)
    • Probate: 6 Feb 1705, Richmond County, Virginia

    Notes:

    Re: Charles Dodson Sr.'s pars

    Home: Surnames:Dodson Family Genealogy Forum

    Re: Charles Dodson Sr.'s pars
    Posted by: Jonelle
    Date: April 27, 2000 at 12:45:10

    In Reply to: Charles Dodson Sr.'s pars by Mike Williams of 2181


    Charles Dodson Sr. was born 1649, in Probably, Rappahannock Co., Va. married to Anne Elmore he died 6 Feb 1705, in Rappahannock Co., Va. His parents was Jessie Dodson and Judith Hagger. Jessie Dodson's Father was John Dods, who came over from England with Capt. John Smith.

    July 8, Charles Dodson (3) leased land in Old Rappahannock Co. Rappahannock Co became extinct in 1692 being divided into Essex and Richmond counties. Charles Dodson owned land in both bounties, but resided in North Farnham Parish, Richmond Co., Va.

    From 1680 to 1692 Charles Dodson acquired land which he and his sons proceeded to improved Chalres Dodson is found in many documents where he witnessed various documents and on several occasions he is named in Wills as executor. In a Will of John Lincoln dictated Dec 18, 1686, the comment was made in the affidavit of witnesses that the maker of the Will "would have no other but Charles Dodson as his executor although several insisted that he have his wife."

    During Charles Dodson's lifetime, he saw many new immigrants arriving in Virginia from England. By 1700 there were more than 80,000 person living in the tidewater region of Virginia.

    On July 8, Charles Dodson leased land in Old Rappahannock County.Rappahannock Co. became extinct in 1692 being divided into Essex and Richmond counties. Charles Dodson owned land in both counties but resided in North Farnham Parish, Richmond Co., Va. where he became a large land owner.


    I do have a lot more of information on the Dodsons. If you email me I can help you. I do have doc. on this information. Email me at Jonelle43@yahoo.com

    Jonelle

    *

    more ...

    Richmond County,VA Wills:02-095,


    "Will of Charles Dodson, dated 11 Jan 1702/3; pr. 6 Feb 1705

    In the name of God amen I Charles Dodson being sick and weake of body but in Sound and Good disposing memory praise be given to God for the same do make this my Last Will and Testament in manner and forme following that is to say first & principally I resigne my soul into the mercifull hands of almighty God my Creator assuredly hoping through the merritts of my blessed Saviour to obtaine Remission of all my sins and my body I Committ to the Earth whence it was taken to be Decently buryed by the Discretion of my Executrix herein after named and as for the worldly Goods and Estate the Lord hath Lent me I dispose thereof as followeth

    I Give and bequeath to my son

    Charles Dodson the plantation formeryly Called Coll Travers quarter with a hundred and fifty acres of Land to him and to the male heires Lawfulluy begotten of his body and if the abovesd Charles Dodson should Die without any male heire that then the Land should Returne to the next heire of the Dodson.

    Secondly.

    I give and bequeath to my son Thomas Dodson a plantacon seated in a neck formerly called the Rich neck with a hundred and Fifty acres of Land to him I the male heires Lawfully begotten of his own body forever and if the abovesd Thomas Dodson should dye without any male that then the Land Should Returne to the next heire of the Dodson -

    Thirdly.

    I Give and bequeath to my son Bartho: Richd. Dodson the plantation that Thomas Reeves liveth on knowne by the name of oake neck with one hundred and fifty acres of Land binding upon the Lan formerly belonging to Daniel Evarard from the head to the foot to him & the male heires Lawfully begotten of his owne body and if he shoud dye without male heires that then the Land to Returne to the heaire of the Dodson-

    Fourthly.

    I Give and bequeath to my son William Dodson the Plantation in the hickory neck with one humdred and fifty acres of Land to him and the male heires Lawfulluy begotten of his body and if no male heire appeare then to Returne to next heire of the Dodson the said Land to bind upon brother Bartho Richd Dodsons Land from the head to the foot -

    Fifthly.

    I give and bequesth to my son John Dodson two hundred acres of Land it being part of hickory neck and of Indian Cabin neck binding upon his brother William Dodson to him and male heires Lawfully begotten of his own body and if the abovesd John Dodson should die without any male heires that then the Land Returne to the next of the Dodson -

    Sixthly.

    I Give and bequeath to my son Lambert Dodson my new Dwelling plantation with the hundred acres of Land belonging to it to him and male heires Lawfully begotten of his body and if no male heire appeare that then the Land to Returne to the next of the Dodson

    Seventhly.

    I Give and bequeath to my Deare and Loving wife Anne Dodson and my daughters Anne Dodson and Elizabeth Dodson all my moveable Estate of what kind soever within and without to be Equally Divided between them.

    Eightly.

    My desire is that none of the Land out of the name might be sold Except one Brother selleth to another and if no male appeareth by none of my sons that then my Daughters my Inherritt the Land.

    Lastly.

    And all the Rest and Residue of my Estate Goods and Chattells not herein before bequeathed after my Debts and funrall Expenses discharged I do give and bequeath unto my Deare and Loving wife Ann Dodson whome I do make sole Exect:ex of this my Last Will and Testament Revoking all other will by me heretofore made

    In witness whereof I have hereunto sett my hand and seale the 11th of Jany one thousand seven hudnred two three


    (signed) Charles Dodson Senr. (Seal)"

    *

    "Until then, all we can say is that the parents of Charles Dodson were almost certainly NOT Jesse Dodson and Judith Hagar who supposedly married in 1645 in Jamestown. Unless new information is forth coming with actual documentation of some sort, this couple must be relegated to the annals of myth – along with Charles Dodson being the son of John Dods of Jamestown."

    "Following further rumors, the marriage between John Dodson’s son, Jesse Dodson and Judith Hagar is supposed to have occurred on May 7, 1645 in Jamestown. The problem with this information is that there appear to be no records whatsoever of Jamestown marriages that have survived. Furthermore, there is no record of Judith Hagar arriving in Jamestown, either. Nor is there any record of Jesse Dodson. This rumor has struck out altogether."

    end of comment

    Charles Dodson’s Estate Inventory

    Charles Dodson’s estate inventory was filed with the court on Oct. 17, 1706, as follows:

    Feather bed and bedstead and parcel of sheets and one blanket and one rugg – 0600
    One flock bed and paire of blankets one sheet and rug and bolster and bedstead – 0500
    One saw and six reep hooks and one paire of old pestells holsters and one old chest and one old bill book – 0200
    Eight chairs – 0800
    Two wooden chairs – 0100
    One chest of drawers and table – 1000
    Two chest – 0250
    One small table couch – 0150
    One warming pan two paire of tongs and one box iron – 0200
    One pair hilliards – 0250
    One super table cloth and 12 napkins – 0200
    Four old napkins and one old table cloth – 0050
    One feather bed curtains and valens one blankett one pair of sheets and two pillows – 1100
    A parcel of old books – 0150
    Ole looking glass and lantron? – 0050
    One old flock bed 2 blankets rug bolster and pillows – 0400
    2 spinning wheels – 0150
    3 pots 3 pothooks and 3 pot hangers one spit and one iron pestell – 0450
    99 weight of pewter – 0950
    One bellmettle pestle and mortar 0 0700
    7.5 pounds of brass – 0130
    One servant man 3 years and 8 months to serve – 2200
    One pare of small hilliards and two smoothing iron and two cutting knives and skewers – 0150
    One mare and two horses – 2400
    Parcel of old iron – 0100
    Pair of cart wheels – 0060
    Old crosscut saw – 0150
    One saddle and pillow or pillion – 0120
    3 cows and 3 years old – 1800
    One cow and calfe – 0500
    6 two yeare olde – 1200
    One steere of 5 years old – 0500
    2 barren cows and heifer and one calfe – 1400
    3 old sheep – 0300
    3 lambs – 0200
    Total 18780
    Signed John Rankin, William Smoot and Richard R. White (his mark)

    I absolutely love estate inventories, because they tell us exactly what was in the household and on the farm when the man died. Inventories included everything owned by the couple, because the man was presumed to own all property of any kind except for the wife’s clothes and any real estate deeded to her individually after they were married. The wife was entitled to one third of the value of the husband’s estate unless the husband provided for more. However, the estate’s real value was established by the sale of the inventory items, not by the inventory itself, so everything was inventoried prior to sale. In some cases, the widow was made an initial allocation so she and the children could simply survive.

    The feather bed clearly was the bed that Charles and Ann slept in, but it’s worth noting that there were no bedcurtains or valances which would have suggested a more upper-class household.

    There were three beds in the inventory, two of flock which meant a mattress of scraps of fabric and wool instead of feathers. However, Ann and Charles had 8 children and a servant. Obviously there was a lot of bed-sharing going on and not everyone had a bed. The servant may have slept in the barn or on straw in the kitchen.

    The spinning wheels certainly weren’t tools used by Charles and were obviously Ann’s.

    This photo of a woman with a spinning wheel was taken about 1920, but not a lot had changed in spinning wheel design in the past couple hundred years.

    The looking glass may have been a shared resource. Looking glasses were scarce and status symbols.

    I do wonder why there were no pots and pans, silverware, candle holders, etc. The absence of these items if very unusual for this time period – and let’s face it, you can’t live without candles and silverware and Charles Dodson, while he wasn’t rich, he certainly was not a poor man.

    end of commentary

    Life on the Northern Neck

    Life on the Northern Neck of Virginia at that time revolved around the planting, nurturing and harvesting of tobacco, a very labor intensive crop.

    Charles Dodson was very clearly a man with a great deal of initiative and drive, given that he started out in 1679 by working the land of Peter Elmore that he would never own, and by the time he died, 27 years later, he owned 900 acres.

    Ann’s life too would have revolved around crops, seasons and church. While church attendance was mandatory at the time, most people, especially women, didn’t need much encouragement to attend. Where the court sessions were an important social occasion for men, women didn’t usually attend court, and church provided that same type of camaraderie for women.

    Charles and Ann lived in, along or on Briery Swamp, a part of the Totuskey watershed. They paid for their land with tobacco, the traditionally accepted money in colonial Virginia.

    Ann’s husband did the normal male things of the day. He witnessed wills, witnessed deeds and attended court, occasionally serving as a juror. Charles apparently settled differences with people amicably, because for a very long time, he wasn’t sued and he didn’t sue anyone.

    He was highly thought of in the community, because in 1686/1687, when neighbor John Lincoln died, it was reported that John would “have none other than Charles Dodson” for his executor.

    end of comment

    Birth:
    Old Rappahannock, (now Essex County) Virginia

    Possessions:
    Charles first appears in Old Rappahannock County in 1679 in a lease type arrangement with Peter Elmore. Charles does not purchase his own land until 1686, so he clearly didn’t have funds until that time. Nor did Charles patent land, so apparently someone else took credit for his 50 acre headright.

    Charles married Anne LNU BY 1671, (England). Anne was born ~ 1654, England; died 1 Aug 1715, Richmond County, Virginia. [Group Sheet]


  2. 25.  Anne LNU was born ~ 1654, England; died 1 Aug 1715, Richmond County, Virginia.

    Other Events:

    • Probate: 4 Mar 1718

    Notes:

    We’ve now produced evidence that suggests Ann Dodson is not Ann Elmore. However, we still have no idea who Ann Dodson is.

    We also don’t know who Charles Dodson’s parents were, or where he came from either. We do know that there is no record of any Dodson family in the region before Charles first appears in the 1679 transaction between Charles Dodson and Peter Elmore.

    For all we know, Charles and Ann may have married in England, or wherever they were before they are found in Rappahannock County in 1679.

    By that time, Ann and Charles have at least one son, Charles Jr., have probably been married about 9 years and most likely have had about 4 children. We know that Charles Jr. lived to adulthood, and it’s safe to say that Thomas born in 1781 is the second son that lived, but we don’t know if any of the children born between Charles and Thomas survived.

    Can Ann Dodson Write?

    Ann witnesses four documents in 1693, 1694 and 1705. It appears that she signed her name, although that may simply be because the clerk did not mention that she could not write and signed with a mark. Given that her son, Charles Jr., also married an Ann, it’s difficult to discern which Ann was signing, although the ones where Charles Jr. is absent are much more likely to have been signed by Ann, wife of Charles Sr.

    If Ann is literate, it makes the probability that she was raised in England much more likely than being raised in early Virginia.

    Birth:
    There is absolutely no record to substantiate the claim that Ann was the daughter of Benjamin Dodson, or that there were any transactions between John Hill and Benjamin Dodson, or that John Hill even owned land in what would become Essex County.

    Died:
    in Farnham Parish...

    Children:
    1. Charles Joseph Dodson, Jr. was born 1672-1677; died 1 Aug 1775, Richmond County, Virginia.
    2. 12. Thomas Dodson, Sr. was born 15 May 1681, Richmond County, Virginia; died 21 Nov 1740, Richmond County, Virginia.
    3. Bartholomew Richard Dodson was born ~ 1683, (Richmond County) Virginia.
    4. William Dodson was born 0___ 1685, (Richmond County) Virginia; died 10 Aug 1744, North Carolina.
    5. John Dodson was born 1687-1693, Richmond County, Virginia; died 17 ___ 1780, Richmond County, Virginia.
    6. Lambeth Dodson was born 1689-1695, (Richmond County) Virginia; died ~1780.
    7. Elizabeth Dodson was born 0___ 1695, (Richmond County) Virginia; died 0___ 1727, Richmond County, Virginia.
    8. Anne Dodson was born 16 Jul 1715, (Richmond County) Virginia; died 0___ 1719, (Richmond County) Virginia.
    9. Mary Dodson was born 0___ 1719, (Richmond County) Virginia; died 0___ 1719, (Richmond County) Virginia.

  3. 26.  Thomas Durham, Sr. was born Bef 1649, Richmond County, Virginia; died 30 May 1715, Richmond County, Virginia.

    Other Events:

    • Alt Birth: 6 Mar 1661, Richmond County, Virginia
    • Alt Birth: 6 Mar 1661, Port Royal, Bermuda
    • Will: 11 Aug 1711, Richmond County, Virginia
    • Alt Death: Bef June 1, 1715
    • Probate: 1 Jun 1715, Richmond County, Virginia

    Notes:

    Thomas is NOT the son of Henry DURHAM of Bermuda...

    Posted By: Mrs. Gene Rooks
    Email: generooks@cfl.rr.com
    Subject:Thomas NOT son of Henry of Bermuda
    Post Date:December 13, 1998 at 19:01:23
    Message URL:http://genforum.genealogy.com/durham/messages/278.html
    Forum:Durham Family Genealogy Forum
    Forum URL:http://genforum.genealogy.com/durham/

    Sorry, guys, LDS records notwithstanding, Thomas DURHAM 1661/1715 of Richmond Co.VA married to Dorothy ??? is NOT the son of Gov. Henry DURHAM of Bermuda. I bought that story too, but couldn't prove it was the same Thomas. Finally I wrote Bermuda Archives, and received an abstract of a lawsuit filed in Bermuda in 1734 that definitely proved that the Thomas who was born to Gov. Hunt lived and died in Bermuda where he had a son "Richard Durham of Sandys tribe marriner Eldest son and heir of Thomas Durham Late of the same Gent: dec'd, who was the son of Henry Durham, Esq.

    " The suit was in regard to property in Bermuda lately in the possession of Judith DURHAM, Henry's wife. I would love to know also who the parents of our Thomas of Virginia were, but they weren't Henry and Judith Hunt DURHAM of Bermuda. I will say there is an outside chance there could be a collateral relationship, since the father of Henry DURHAM of Bermuda also named Thomas had other sons, who also may have had a son named Thomas, and of course there was trading, etc. between Bermuda and Virginia during that time, of which scant records were kept.. Incidentally, since these are our ancestors also, Jim, I'd be really pleased to hear from you about clues you have for the possible family for Dorothy and her sisters.

    Gene in Gotha.
    ______

    Richmond County,VA Wills,03-210,

    "Will of Thomas Durham, dated 4 Aug 1711; proved 1 June 1715

    to wife Dorothy, my plantation and lands for her natural life, and at her death plantation and lands to son Thomas Durham and Mary his wife provided he signs over 50 acres to my son John Durham or pay him 8,000 pounds tobacco and to daughter Mary Dodson, 1,500 pounds of tobacco. -grandson, Thomas Dodson.

    *

    Thomas Durham Sr
    Born about 6 Mar 1661 in Port Royal, Bermuda [uncertain]
    Son of Henry Durham and Judith Hunt
    Brother of Thomas Durham [half] and Esq Thomas Durham esq [half]
    Husband of Dorothy Smoot — married [date unknown] [location unknown]
    Husband of Dorothy Doreen Unknown — married [date unknown] [location unknown]
    Father of Richard Durham, Samuel Durham, Mary May (Durham) Dodson, Thomas Durham Jr and John Durham
    Died 30 May 1715 in Richmond County, Virginiamap
    Profile managers: John Schmeeckle private message [send private message], Jerry Murdock private message [send private message], and Cindy Jajuga private message [send private message]
    Durham-145 created 22 Apr 2011 | Last modified 31 Dec 2016
    This page has been accessed 2,668 times.

    Contents

    1 Disputed Parents and eldest son Richard
    2 Presumed Second Son Samuel
    3 Biography
    3.1 Second Wife's Origin
    3.2 Will
    4 Sources

    Disputed Parents and eldest son Richard

    It has often been assumed that Thomas was the son of Henry Durham and Judith Hunt, who married Feb. 14, 1660 in Port Royal, Carine, Bermuda. This couple did have a son Thomas who was baptized 6 Mar. 1661, the right age to be Thomas Durham of Richmond County.[1] Henry Durham was a mariner or sea captain. [2]

    However, per a 1998 genforum post: "I wrote Bermuda Archives, and received an abstract of a lawsuit filed in Bermuda in 1734 that definitely proved that the Thomas who was born to Gov. Hunt lived and died in Bermuda where he had a son "Richard Durham of Sandys tribe marriner Eldest son and heir of Thomas Durham Late of the same Gent: dec'd, who was the son of Henry Durham, Esq. The suit was in regard to property in Bermuda lately in the possession of Judith DURHAM, Henry's wife.[3]

    Whooever wrote the above quote assumes that because Thomas Durham was described as "late of" Sandys Tribe, Bermuda, that Thomas died there. That doesn't have to be the case. "Late of" can mean "moved away from." The father of Thomas Durham of Burmuda was a mariner, and the son of Thomas Durham of Bermuda was a mariner, which leads to the logical supposition that Thomas himself was a mariner. And of course mariners sailed to other places and sometimes had more than one residence. Thomas Durham could have promised his Bermuda property to his eldest son, and then set up a household in Virginia in order to eventually obtain land for his younger sons, while maintaining and occasionally visiting his Bermuda property (which was actually under the control of his widowed mother with her dower right).

    There is one important piece of evidence to support such a supposition. In Bermuda at the time it was forbidden to build boats or ships, because the Bermuda Company wanted all the settlers to grow tobacco. This means that mariners from Bermuda had to develop relationships with shipwrights and boatwrights to build and repair their ships and the boats that their ships carried. Thomas Durham of Richmond County, Virginia married the granddaughter of a boatwright. William Smoot was recruited by the Virginia Company in 1637 to settle in Virginia, and eventually was induced to relocate to Charles County, Maryland. In addition, there was a "Durham and Hall Shipping Co. 1702 Philadelphia ... sailing up and down the eastern seaboard, to England and to the Caribbean. The account of this shipping Company losing a ship in Lynn Heaven Inlet, VA, in 1702, can be read in the book by Don Shomette, called "Pirates on the Chesapeake Bay."[4] For further research: Michael Jarvis, In the Eye of All Trade: Bermuda, Bermudians, and the Maritime Atlantic World (2010). And to continue the boat-builder theme, there was the legendary Robert Durham, inventor of the "Durham Boats" that would later carry George Washington and his troops across the Delaware River in the successful Christmas Day attack at Trenton, New Jersey.[5]

    Biography

    It appears that Thomas Durham, by an unknown first wife, had sons Richard and Samuel. Thomas's son Thomas was referred to as the eldest son of wife Dorothy (but not Thomas's eldest) in both a 1707 land record and in Thomas's will (see below). Thomas presumably married Dorothy around 1685, as his daughter Mary (identified as Dorothy's eldest daughter) was born in 1686.

    Thomas Durham was in Richmond County, Virginia as early as 1686, when the baptism of his daughter Mary was recorded. The baptisms of sons Thomas (1690) and John (1698) also appear in the parish register.

    On 10 Mar. 1693/4 Thomas Durham witnessed the will of Elizabeth Grady (probated 4 Nov. 1702), who left all her land to Mary Smoot, daughter of William Smoot (the uncle of Thomas Durham's wife Dorothy), who was executor of the will. Other witnesses to the will were Richard Draper and John Rankin.[6] Mary Smoot would eventually marry Thomas Durham's son Thomas.

    Second Wife's Origin

    It is now known that Dorothy, wife of Thomas Durham and mother of his three youngest children, was the daughter of Mary (Smoot) Gilbert, youngest sister of William Smoot.[7]

    It was often speculated that Dorothy was a daughter of William Smoot Jr., who was actually Dorothy's maternal uncle. William Smoot Jr. conveyed property to Dorothy Durham in 1700 "with love and affection." Various records prove that Dorothy Durham, Thomazin Goodridge, and Alice Chinn were all sisters.[8] However, the women are only recorded by their married names. The maiden name has not been proved.[9][8]

    Sources

    ? Julia E. Mercer, Bermuda Settlers of the 17th Century: Genealogical Notes from Bermuda, p. 49.
    ? On p. 119 of Julia E. Mercer's Bermuda Settlers of the 17th Century: Genealogical Notes from Bermuda is a record that Henry Durham and others were allowed to fish for whales in 1676.
    ? Thomas NOT son of Henry of Bermuda.
    ? Ancestral Durham Research website, by Harry Muncey and Raymond Durham.
    ? History of the Durham Boat
    ? Byron K. Durham's Durham Family Heritage website, citing Wills of Richmond County, p. 9.
    ? See Dorothy's profile for sources.
    ? 8.0 8.1 Ule, Michelle Duval, compiler The Dodsons, Durhams, Roses and Nevilles. Spring, 2000, Michelle Ule's Website Author generously provided a PDF.
    ? Louer, Graham "William Smoot Was NOT the Father of Dorothy Durham" genforum post April 25, 2012, Web accessed May 25, 2014.
    ? Portions of the will are quoted at this 1998 genforum post by Gene Brooks. The majority of the will is included in a 1998 will by Michelle Ule, posted by her at this 1999 forum post. The entire will is quoted at Byron K. Durham's Durham Family Heritage website.
    See also:

    Williams, Mrs. Sherman, Compiler & Editor The Dodson (Dotson) Family of North Farnham Parish, Richmond County, Virginia: A History and Genealogy of Their Descendants. Two Volumes with index in Volume Two. Volume Two contains abstracts & transcripts of documents. (Easley, SC: Rev. Silas Emmett Lucas Jr.; Southern Historical Press, Inc., 1988) Call Number: CS 71 D648
    Durham, Keith Byron Descendants of David Milton Durham and Jane Coleman (with sources) accessed online 3/14/14

    *

    Will of Thomas Durham

    Will dated 4 Aug 1711; Probated 1 Jun 1715. Named wife Dorothy, children Thomas, John and Mary Durham., a grandson Thomas Dodson. [Richmond Co WB 3, p210][10]

    In the name of God Amen, I Thomas Durham of Northfarnham in the County of Richmond...

    Item. I give and Bequeath unto my Dear and Loving wife Dorothy Durham the use of my Plantations, together with all my Lands and Tenements with all and Every of their Appurtenances--Profits and Commoditys ----Belonging or appertaining for and During the ----of her natural Life and after her Decease if my Son Thomas Durham and Mary his wife do by some sufficient instrument in writing under their hands and seals and affording to due forme of Law Release and Acquitt all and singular their Right ,title and Interest in and unto Fifty acres of Land being the same Tract & Plantations which we had conveyed us by Mary Gilbert unto my son John Durham and his heirs or pay him the said: John Durham Eight Thousand Pounds of Tobacco in Lieu of His said Land and also pay unto my Daughter Mary Dodson Fifteen hundred pounds of Tobacco that then and upon this consideration-----aforesaid: I do give and bequeath unto my said son Thomas Durham and his heirs Lawfully Begotten and for want of such issue unto my son John Durham and his heirs Lawfully Begotten and for want of such issue unto my GrandSon Thomas Dodson and his heirs. But if my said son Thomas Durham doth refuse and will not release the said fifty acres of Land nor pay the Tobacco aforesaid: I do will and Bequeath the said Plantation whereon I now dwell with all my Lands unto my son John Durham and his heirs---

    Item. I give and Bequeath unto my Son John Durham Fifty acres of Land more or less being the Plantation with all the Tract and Parcell of Land that was Conveyed us by Mary Gilbert, to have and to hold the said Tract and Parcell of Land with the appurtainances unto my said son John Durham and his heirs Lawfully begotten and for want of such issue unto my GrandSon Thomas Dodson and his heirs-

    Item. I give and bequeath unto my Son John Durham one Feather Bed and Furniture, one Cow and calf, one Mare and Iron Pott, Two ____ Dishes and half a dozen Plates

    Item. I give and bequeath unto my Daughter Mary Dodson Five Thousand Pounds of Tobacco; Fifteen hundred Pounds of the same to be paid by my son Thomas Durham within Nine months after the Decise of my wife and Five hundred the Rest of the said Tobacco to be paid by my Son John Durham at the Decease of my Wife----

    Item. I give and Bequeath all the Residue of my Estate, Goods, Cattle and Chattells unto my wife Dorothy Durham for & During her widowhood, but if she doth Marry that _____ off my Personall Estate, Except what is herein given to John Durham shall be Equally Divided between my wife and my three Children, and I do make and Ordain my Dear & well beloved Wife Sole Executrix of this my Last Will & Testament---Rattifying and Confirming this & none other to be my Last Will & Testament. In Witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand & seal this Fourth Day of August in the year of our Lord, One Thousand Seven Hundred and Eleven.

    Signed, Sealed & Published and Declared in the presence of us-- Joan O Searles her mark, Arthur Kay his mark, Miles Walters Thomas Durham his mark (seal)

    Att. at a Court held for Richmond County ye first Day of June 1715 This Will was approved in open Court by the oaths of Arthur Key & Joan Searles ______ of the Witness or tthereto be on admitted to Recored...Tests M: Beckewith C.C.O."

    *

    Thomas Durham (before 1649-1715), A Governor’s Son?, 52 Ancestors #161
    Posted on May 20, 2017
    Thomas Durham’s land ultimately fell into Richmond county, on the peninsula of land known as the Northern Neck of Virginia.

    We know nothing about Thomas Durham’s early life, except it’s unlikely that he was born on the Northern Neck of Virginia. In 1652, in Northumberland County, part of which ultimately became Richmond County, all men had to sign an oath of loyalty, and there is no Durham name among the signers.

    The Northern Neck area was still inhabited by Indians at that time, and the region was not easily settled, although people were pushing into the area and carving out farmsteads – much to the chagrin of the Indians whose land they were settling upon.

    According to “A Tricentennial Portrait” by Robert Harper for the Richmond County, Tricentennial Commission:

    In September 1661, the area that would become Richmond County had its own version of warfare when Indians killed 3 men in retaliation for the killing of an Indian man in the spring. The situation escalated and for the next 5 years, raids ensued.

    In an unrelated, but threatening incident, the Dutch fleet appeared in the Rappahannock River in 1666. They engaged, and most of the men on the ship were killed. Then, on November 8th, 1666, the worst hurricane to hit Virginia in the 17th century arrived, destroying more than 10,000 buildings and hurling hail the size of eggs.

    In case you don’t know, hail the size of marbles descends at about 20 miles an hour, but hail the size of baseballs descends at the rate of over 100 miles an hour. A 100 mile an hour baseball sized piece of hail kills people as well as livestock and wildlife.

    A fort was erected at the head of Cat Point Creek to protect settlers within a 20 mile radius, which tells us there were few settlers. Fortunately, a treaty was reached with the Dutch before the fort came into use.

    In 1675, war with Indians continues, with 2 settlers being killed in Richmond County by Indians from Maryland. A retaliatory force of 30 men crossed the Potomac River into Maryland and killed Indian King and 10 warriors.

    On January 21, 1675/1676, a group of northern Indians went to war with the English and killed 36 people in Rappahannock County. Starting near Port Royal, the Indian warriors fanned out in a circle and destroyed everything English. Turning down the river valley, their objective was to kill 10 men for every Indian who had been killed.

    Small groups of planters met for protection and begged Governor Berkeley to send them a commissioned leader. Berkley wrote that no leader could be sent until the next Assembly meeting and ordered the residents to build a new fort at the head of the Rappahannock River (Cat Tail Creek.)

    Berkley’s idea was that the Indians would attack the fort in number and not harass the isolated farmers. In February of 1676/1677, the Governor sent an order that no more than 10 men could meet as a group due to fear of a general uprising against him. This act was the fuel that the Indians needed and a number of attacks were carried out on the small groups of settlers.

    Richmond County wasn’t very safe and was likely not a location one would choose to settle with a family. A decade later, things had calmed, the remnants of the Indians were gone, and births of many English families were being recorded in the Farnham Parish Church register.

    Thomas Durham’s Life

    I’ve rebuilt Thomas’s life, as best I can, by extracting the records from the early Virginia counties, beginning with the formation of York County in 1633 and for the next hundred years in Northumberland, Lancaster, Old Rappahannock and Richmond as they were formed from the original York County. Richmond and Essex were both formed in 1692 when old Rappahannock was dissolved and divided into half, with Richmond County being on the north of the Rappahannock River and Essex on the South.



    We don’t know where Thomas Durham came from, but we do know that the first record that includes Thomas is found in the Farnham Parish church register with the birth of his daughter, Mary, to Thomas and Dorothy Durham on June 5, 1686.

    Additional births attributed to Thomas and Dorothy were for son, Thomas on June 17, 1690 and son John on November 23, 1698.

    These records suggest that Thomas was already married to Dorothy who has been reported to be related to the Smoots by sometime in 1685, if not earlier. Dorothy’s history will be reviewed in a separate article.

    Farnham Parish was split into two when Old Rappahannock County was split into Richmond and Essex County, with Richmond County becoming North Farnham Parish and Essex County becoming South Farnham Parish.

    The North Farnham Parish register transcription, which includes the original Farnham Parish records, does still exist, but is fragmentary and known to be incomplete.

    Who is Elizabeth Grady?

    In a will written by Elizabeth Grady on March 10, 1693/94 and probated on Nov 4, 1702, Mary Smoot daughter of William Smoot is left all of Elizabeth Grady’s land. The executor of the estate is William Smoot, and the witnesses are Thomas Durham, Richard Draper and John Rankin.

    Court Order Book Page 184 July 1, 1702 – Will of Elizabeth Grady proved by oaths of John Rankin and Thomas Durham.

    This question of Elizabeth’s identity has further reaching implications than it appears, because the people involved are intertwined.

    Thomas Durham’s son, Thomas Durham, marries this same Mary Smoot about 1710. Furthermore, based on a 1700 transaction, Dorothy, wife of Thomas Durham is related to William Smoot in some fashion.

    Lastly, Thomas Durham and William Smoot appear to be neighbors and lifelong friends.

    To answer the question more directly, I have no idea who Elizabeth Grady is, nor why she would be leaving land to Mary Smoot – but tracking Elizabeth Grady and figuring out who she is and how she was connected might well lead to unraveling other mysteries involving the Smooth and Durham families.

    The 1700 Deed

    August 2, 1700 – Deed of gift. William Smoot Sr. of N. Farnham Parish Richmond Co. for consideration received and for the great love that I have and beare unto Dorothy Durham wife of Thomas Durham of same county and her children do give unto her and her children a 62 acre parcel of land bounded by Thomas Durham, branch of Morattico Creek, land of the same William Smoot Sr., land of Rowland Lawson, line of Mr. Grimes and line of Clare. If in case the said Dorothy Durham die that then the land shall come to Thomas Durham eldest son of the said Dorothy and in case that he die without issue that then the land shall come to John Durham second son of the said Dorothy and in case that he die without issue that the land shall come to Mary Durham eldest dau of the said Dorothy Durham and in case she shall happen to die without issue that then the land shall come to the fourth, fifth, sixth and c children of the same Dorothy, but in case of want of issue that the land shall descend to Ann Fox wife of William Fox of Lancaster Co., gent. Wit John Simmons, Thomas Mackey, ack Aug 7, 1700 Book 3 page 57

    Aug 2, 1700 – Power of attorney Jane Smoot wife of William Smoot Sr. having appointed Edward Jones my attorney to ack the above gift to Dorothy Durham and her children. Wit Thomas Mackey, Edmond Overton. Book 3 page 58

    Court Order Book Page 56, August 7, 1700 – Ordered that the deed for land ack in this court by William Smoot Sr unto Dorothy Durham, wife of Thomas Durham, be recorded.

    This deed is quite interesting and somewhat perplexing. Just to keep the players straight, William Smoot is the father of Mary Smoot, to whom Mary Grady left her land. Clearly there is a very close connection between William Smoot and Dorothy Durham.

    First, this deed names Dorothy’s living children that are documented in the North Farnham Parish registers. The deed was written in August 1700 and John Durham was born on November 23, 1698.

    This deed tells us that of Dorothy’s children, Mary is the eldest living daughter rand John and Thomas are the eldest living sons. Given John’s birth date, they have to be the only living sons. What we don’t know is whether or not the children referenced as 4th, 5th and 6th are living or are speculative in case they exist in the future.

    It’s certainly unlikely that between 1686 and 1700 and Dorothy only had 3 children. Six or 7, assuming they all lived until weaned, would be more normal. If the children 4-6 noted in the will, were living, they were assuredly females.

    Second, this deed tells us who the neighbors are, that Thomas Durham and William Smoot’s lands abut, and that they live on a branch of Morattico Creek.

    Third, who are Ann and William Fox? William Fox’s wife appears to be Anne Chinn, daughter of John Chinn and Alice who is suspected of being a Gilbert and who is Dorothy Durham’s sister.

    The following will from Lancaster County by Alice Stretchley indicates that Dorothy Durham is her sister and that Tomassin Marshall is as well.

    Abstracts of Lancaster County, Virginia Wills 1653-1800 by Ida J. Lee:

    Stretchley, Alice, wife of Jno. Stretchley of St. Mary’s White Chappell. 29 Aug. 1701. Rec. 8 Oct. 1701. Daus: Anne Fox the portion bequeathed her by Jno. Chinn, her father, and by Jno. Stretchley, her father-in-law; Catherine Heale. Sisters: Dorothy Durham and Tomassin Marshall. Son-in-law: Capt. Wm. Fox. Son: Rawleigh Chinn “all money in the hands of Mr. Jno. Pemberton, Mercht. of Liverpool.” Cousin: Mary Dodson. Error: Son, Rawleigh Chinn Wits: Jas. Taylor, Lewis Pugh, David Smith. W.B. 8, p. 106.

    Alice Stretchley appears to be Ann Fox’s mother who would have been married first to John Chinn and then to John Stretchley. So Ann Fox would have been Dorothy Durham’s niece.

    Fourth, why did William Smoot leave this land to Dorothy separately from her husband, meaning that Thomas Durham could not dispose of this land. This is outside the norms and customs of the day.

    How was William Smoot related to both Dorothy and Ann Fox, daughter of Alice Quinn Stretchy?

    Thomas Durham’s Great Age

    Court Order Book Page 475, Sept 7, 1699 – Ordered that Thomas Durham for the future be exempted from payment of leveys by reason of his great age.

    I checked the tithable language in the state of Virginia, and it clearly specifies who shall be taxed, and how, and allows for exemptions for people who were disabled and unable to support themselves, and for people who were aged. The state apparently allowed each county court to determine who was exempted. In other locations, I’ve seen men as young as 45, 55 and as old as 70 being exempted due to age, so I’m guessing that the age at exemption was more a combination of age plus ability to work than age alone.

    I would think it would be very unlikely that Thomas Durham was less than 50 years old with his age referred to as “great” so this would put his birth likely in 1649 or before.

    Men in colonial American typically married about the age of 25, which would have been in about 1674 if he were born in 1649. However, we don’t find Mary’s birth until 1686. Was Thomas not married until 1685 or so, or did he have a first wife we don’t know about, or was Dorothy significantly younger than Thomas, or was Thomas younger than age 50 when he was exempted from paying taxes?

    It’s also possible that Thomas Durham was an indentured servant and he was not able to marry until his indenture was complete.

    Court and Deeds

    The ebb and flow of life in colonial Virginia was marked by court sessions that were attended by nearly all men. Deeds were filed, orders made and drinking all around with camaraderie. Thomas Durham witnessed deeds and was found participating in the normal life of colonial planters.

    Multiple records indicate a very close relationship with William Smoot(e.)

    Court Order Book Page 218 Dec. 3, 1702 – Nonsuite is granted to Thomas Durham and Dorothy his wife for the nonappearance of William Smoote Jr. which is ordered to be paid with costs of suit.

    Deed Book March 3, 1704/5 – John Ingo and Martha (Matthew) his wife of Richmond Co. for 36 lb sterling sold to George Glascock of same a 100 acre plantation near the head of Moratico Creek that did formerly belong to John Ingo Sr. father of the same John Ingo and lately purchased of Capt. William Fanteleroy and Catherine his wife bounded by the house of John (blurred), the house of Thomas Durham, house of Edward Ryley, decd and the land of his brother James Ingo. Wit Wells Smoot, John Simmons Ack March 7, 1704. Book 3 page 174

    Deed Book Page 352-354 December 1704 – Between John Ingoe and Matthew (sic) his wife and George Glascock…plantation situate near head of Moratico Creek in Richmond County which did formerly belong to John Ingo Sr. father of ye said John Ingo and lately by him sealed with a plantacion together with a considerable quantity of land said John Ingo Sr. purchased of Capt., William Fauntleroy with as much of the said land as lyes within the said John Ingoes bounds beginning ta a marker hickory standing within the house of John Simsted and the said John Ingoes and running along ye line to a swamp issuing out of Miratico Creek hard by the house of Thomas Durham then up said swamp meeting with the line, then NW by the house of Edward Ryley decd then land of his brother James Ingo 100 acres more or less. Signed, John Ingo and Martha Ingo (mark) witness William Smoot and John Simson (mark)

    This deed confirmed again that the Durham land was along Moratico Creek.

    Court Order Book Page 18 December 6, 1704 – Charles Dodson Jr and Thomas Dodson and Thomas Durham summoned to court for not going to church for two months together.

    Court Order BookPage 34 February 7, 1704/05 – Peter Elmore, Thomas Dodson, Charles Dodson Jr. and Thomas Durham summoned to court to answer presentment of grand jury against them for not going to church for 2 months together and not appearing, ordered they be fined according to law and pay same with costs.

    The Dodsons, Durhams and Elmores were neighbors and apparently influenced one another, or at least there was comfort among neighbors and safe haven for resistance. Church attendance was mandatory in colonial Virginia.

    Court Order Book Page 68 September 5, 1705 – Power of attorney made by John Ingo to James Ingo proved by oaths of William (?) and Dorothy Durham and ordered to be recorded.

    The ? is probably William Smoot from other evidence. If so, once again, Dorothy Durham is found with William Smoot.

    biography contiued...

    *

    James Gilbert and the Depositions

    Richmond County Misc. Record Book (1699-1724)

    Page 26b Deposition Ann Kelly, aged 20 years or thereabouts, says that on last New Year’s Day, Thomas Durham, your deponent’s master, sent her to James Gilbert’s to desire him to come down to pipe it, and as your deponent and said James Gilbert were coming back, by John Mills his plantation, James Gilbert asked your deponent whether this old woman was at your deponent’s master’s house and your deponent answered, yes, she was, and said James Gilbert held up his 2 hand and said, God’s Curse Light upon that family naming John Mills and all his family and said that if it were not for John Mills and his wife, he and his wife would never have lived at variance as they did, and your deponent told said James Gilbert that it was his own fault, living so, and asked him why he had not fought away his chest and confound that will which he made, and the said James Gilbert said that John Mills and his family had robbed his chest so that they would not agree upon any means that he should fetch it away, and that they were ashamed of it, and the said James Gilbert said that there was a will made but swore by God that he knew not what was in it no more than I did, and your deponent asked said James Gilbert whether he was no sent for to sign his will, but said Gilbert answered, swearing by his God, that he did not sign it, and told your deponent that he had not the sense to make a will, and that John Mills was a rogue for making a false will and that made him and his wife live to discontentedly and further your deponent says that she saw said Gilbert last Feb. count 15 head of cattle for 40. Signed Nov. 2, 1704 by mark

    Page 27 Dorothy Durham aged about 41 years says that sometime before James Gilbert’s death, being in company of said Gilbert and William Smoote, amongst other discourse, she heard said Gilbert say to said Smoote that he did not know that there was any Resurrection or not, and that had made a will to John Mills, but that it signified nothing, and that your deponent did, several times, hear the said Gilbert say that John Mills was a rogue and that he nor any of his should ever be the better for what he had. Signed Nov. 2, 1704 – Dorothy (P her mark) Dureham

    The two depositions above were given in 1704. In 1707, Mary Gilbert, as a widow, was deeding and to Thomas Durham and Dorothy.

    26 Apr 1707 Richmond County, Virginia Deed Book 4, 1705-1708 page 109a-110a – This Indenture made the six and twentieth day of April anno Domini 1707 and in sixth year of the Reign of our Sovereign Lady Anne by the Grace of God of England, Scotland, France and Ireland Queene, Defender of the faith Between Mary Gilbert of the parish of North Farnham in the county of Richmond and Dominion of Virginia, Widdow of the one part, and Thomas Durham of North Farnham in the county of Richmond and Dominion aforesaid, Planter and Dorothy his wife of the other party. Witnesseth that the said Mary Gilbert for good and valuable consideration in hand payed the receipt whereof the said Mary doth hereby acknowledge and of every part and parcel thereof doth requitt consrate and discharge the said Thomas Durham and Dorothy his wife and theire heires by these presents do give grant, bargaine sole alienate entaile and confirme unto the said Thomas Durham and Dorothy his wife theire heirs and assignes a certain plantation tract or parcele of land scituate lying and being in the parish of North Ffarnham in the county of Richmond and Dominion of Virginia upon a Branch of Ffarnham in the county of Richmond and Dominion of Virginia upon a Branch of Ffarnham Creeke called and knowne by the name of the Buory (Briery) Swamp, containing by estimation fifty acres, now in the tenure and occupation of Walter WRIGHT and bounded as followeth: …corner along land of William Smoot… the said Mary Gilbert for her self, her heires, Exors. and Admns. doth covenant promise, grant and assign to the said Thomas Durham and Dorothy his wife and their heires and assignes In manner and form as followeth, That is to say, that the said Mary Gilbert att the time of the ensealing and delivery hereof hath true title, full power and lawful authority to grant and convey the said bargained land and premisses as aforesaid and allso from time to times and att all times hereafter …… doth hereby grant unto the said Thomas Durham and Dorothy his wife and their heires and assignes with all the rights members and appurtanances thereunto belonging or appurtaining without…..and do Execute and acknowledge any other or further deed or deeds which shall be advised, devised or required by the said Thomas Durham, Dorothy his wife or theire Counsel learned in the law or theire heires or assignes for the better and more sure settlement of all and singular of the premisses hereto granted and every part and parcle of the said land unto the said Thomas Durham and Dorothy his wife and theire heires and assignes forever, In Witness whereof the said Mary Gilbert have hereunto put her hand and seal the day and month and year above written. Signed, sealde and Delivered in the presence of: William Smoot, Mil. Walters Mary M. Gilbert (signed with mark) (seal) Recorded 15 May 1707, Teste: J. Sherlock (Supplement to the History of the Dodson-Dotson Family of Southwest Virginia. Compiled and edited by the Rev. Silas Emmett Lucas, Jr. N.p: the author, 1966., pp. 106-107)

    P 110a – William Smoote planter, Farnham Parish, consideration to Thomas Durham of same, planter, quit claim a certain plantation and tract or land situate in upon a branch of Farnham Creek called the Bryery Swamp and bounded (same description as deed between Mary Gilbert and Thomas Durham above) April 20, 1707 signed. Wit Anne Kelly and Mil. Waters

    (Note Anne Kelly is Thomas Durham’s indentured servant.)

    Court Order Book Page 299 Sept 3, 1707 – Mary Gilbert ack deed to Thomas Durham, ordered recorded.

    Court Order Book Page 299 Sept 3, 1707 – William Smoot ack release of right and title of parcel of land sold by Mary Gilbert to Thomas Durham and ordered to be recorded.

    I’ve grouped the information about James Gilbert together, because it becomes very important in the story of Dorothy, Thomas Durham’s wife.

    The Lay of the Land

    We have references to land off of a Branch of Farnham Creek and also Moratico Creek. You can see both of these on the 1859 Bucholtz Map, just below Toreskey and Corbin’s Creeks. Briery Swamp that I believe became Marshy Swamp appeared to be on Totuskey Creek, based on previous Dodson Deeds, and is shown such on this map, but these deeds refer to Briery Swamp off of Farnham Creek, so who knows exactly.



    This contemporary map shows Totuskey Creek, Farnham Creek and Morattico Creek. Thomas Dodson lived as far north as Rich Neck and we have Thomas Durham mentioned as far south as Morattico Creek. Both men owned multiple pieces of land that likely did not abut each other.



    On the map above, Rich Neck is at the top, then Totuskey Creek, then Farnham Creek near Sharps, and the lowest arrow is Morattico Creek. As you can see, these creeks have many small feeders across about half of the width of the peninsula.



    Today this area is dotted by cleared areas for farming, woodlands and small villages.

    The Scandal of Ann Kelly

    Ann Kelly’s indenture to Thomas Durham begins like normal in 1699 when she was determined to be 14 years old. The court determined her age so that the length of her indenture could be determined. In 1704, she gave her age to be 20, which would have put her birth in 1684. If she were 14 in 1699, then she would have been born in 1685.

    Court Order Book Page 406, June 7, 1699 – Ann Kelly servant to Thomas Durham being presented to this court to have inspection into her age is adjudged 14 years old and ordered to serve her master or his assigns according to act.

    However, by 1708, things had heated up quite a bit.

    Court Order Book Page 372, July 7, 1708 – Anne Kelly, servant to Thomas Durham, being brought before the court by her master for committing the sin of fornication and having a bastard child and said Anne refusing to confess who was the father of the child, the court have ordered she be committed to the county goale there to remaine until such time as she shall confess who is the true father of her child and it is also ordered that she serve her master or his assignes after her time by indenture custome or otherwise shall be fully expired according to law in compensation for the trouble of his house during the time of her childbirth.

    Court Order Book Page 372, July 7, 1708 – This day Dorothy Durham for an the behalf of her husband Thomas Durham confessed judgement to the church wardens of Northfarnham parish to the use of the parish for 500 pounds tobacco the same being the fine of Anne Kelly for committing the sin of fornication and having a bastard child which is ordered to be paid with costs.

    Court Order Book Page 4, March 2, 1708/9 – Anne Kelly came into court and made oath that Thomas Durham Jr. is the true father of 2 bastard children borne of her body in the time of her service with his father, Thomas Durham the elder. Upon motion of the Queen’s attorney ordered that Thomas Durham Jr be summoned to next court to enter into bond with security for the indemnification of the parish and what charge may acrew to the parish for or by reason of the children aforesaid.

    Questions and More Questions

    I have so many questions.

    Thomas Durham Jr. was born in 1690, so he was 17 when he impregnated Anne Kelly who was then 22 or 23, assuming the child was born in 1708. Given the timing of the second child’s birth, it’s certainly possible that the first child was born even earlier, as in 1706 which means Anne would have gotten pregnant as early as 1705 when Thomas was 15. Why was she protecting Thomas, even to her own detriment? Did she believe she would one day marry him? Or was she fearful? And if she was fearful, of whom? And why?

    Why did Dorothy step in “on behalf of her husband,” an extremely unusual move for a woman in colonial Virginia? Why didn’t Thomas Durham step in for himself, or sign a power of attorney? Instead, Dorothy rode all the way to the court house and appeared personally, instead of Thomas. This suggests a very strong woman defying her husband’s wishes. Why? Did she secretly know that Ann’s child was her grandchild? Or was it exactly the opposite? She had no idea and was appalled to make that discovery, which might explain why Thomas Dodson posted Ann’s bond for the second child.

    To their credit, between Dorothy Durham and Thomas Dodson, they did not allow Ann to go to jail for something she was only half responsible for, while the non-servant male child of the plantation owner went scot free. Thomas Dodson was, of course, Mary Durham’s husband and the fact that he posted Anne Kelly’s bond made her indentured to Thomas Dodson after her original indenture ended, according to court order. Mary Durham Dodson, Thomas’s wife, was the daughter of Thomas and Dorothy Durham.

    Oh, what a web we weave!

    Then, to add insult to injury, Thomas Durham Jr. married Mary Smoot (who had inherited Mary Grady’s land) about 1710. Ann Kelly was still serving her additional indentures for having two “bastard children” when Thomas married, given that the additional time to serve was typically 5 years, per child. She still had years to go. If Ann had any thought that she would one day marry Thomas Durham Jr., they were assuredly dashed by this point. Ann is left with two small children, serving additional time as a servant, and Thomas Durham Jr. marries the neighbor girl who inherited land. After Thomas Durham Jr. and Mary Smoot were married, he legally controlled her land.

    This isn’t the first or last time Thomas Durham Jr.’s character would be called into question.

    Constable

    Court Order Book Page 92, May 6, 1713 – Ordered Thomas Durham officiate as constable for this ensuing year in the roome and stead of Bartholomew Richard Dodson between Moratico and Farnham Creeks and that he repaire to some Justice to be sworn accordingly.

    There is no Jr. mentioned, so this looks to be Thomas Durham Sr. This further confirms the area where Thomas Durham was actually living.

    biography contiued...

    Thomas Durham’s Will

    In 1711, Thomas Durham wrote his will, but he didn’t pass away until in 1715.

    Thomas Durham’s will was dated August 4, 1711 and proved in court June 1, 1715.

    In the name of God Amen, I, Thomas Durham of Northfarnham in the County of Richmond being sick in Body but of sound and perfect Memory. Praise be given unto God therefore calling to Mind His Mortallity of my body and that it is appointed for all Men once to Die, Do make and Ordain this my Last Will & Testament, That is to say– Principally & first of all I Recommend my soul unto the hands of God that gave it and my Body to the Earth to be Buried in Christian and Decent manner at the Discretion of my Executors hereafter named; nothing Doubting but at the generall Resurrection I shall receive the same again by the mighty Power of God; And as touching such Worldly Estate wherewith it hath Pleased God to Bless me in this Life—–

    Item. I give and Bequeath unto my Dear & Loving wife Dorothy Durham the use of my Plantations, together with all my Lands & Tenements with all and Every of their Appurtenances–Proffits and Commoditys __________ Belonging or appertaining for & During the _____________ of her natural Life and after her Decease if my Son Thomas Durham and Mary his wife do by some sufficient Instrument in writing under their hands and seals and affording to due forme of Law Release and acquitt all and singular their Right, Title and Interest in and unto Fifty acres of Land being the same Tract & Plantation which we had conveyed us by Mary Gilbert unto my son John Durham and his heirs or pay him the said: John Durham Eight Thousand Pounds of Tobacco in Lieu of His said Land and also pay unto my Daughter Mary Dodson Fifteen hundred pounds of Tobacco that then and upon this consideration——-aforesaid: I do give and bequeath unto my said son Thomas Durham and his heirs Lawfully Begotten and for want of such issue unto my son John Durham and his heirs Lawfully Begotton and in _______ of such issue unto my GrandSon Thomas Dodson and his heirs, But if my said son Thomas Durham doth refuse and will not release the said fifty acres of Land nor pay the Tobacco aforesaid: I do will and Bequeath the said Plantation whereon I now dwell with all my Lands unto my son John Durham and his heirs—

    Item. I give and Bequeath unto my Son John Durham Fifty acres of Land more or less being the Plantation with all the Tract and Parcell of Land that was Conveyed us by Mary Gilbert, to have and to hold the said Tract and Parcell of Land with the appurtainances unto my said son John Durham and his heirs Lawfully begotten and for want of such issue unto my GrandSon Thomas Dodson and his heirs—

    Item. I give and bequeath unto my Son John Durham one Feather Bed and Furniture, one Cow and calf, one Mare and Iron Pott, Two ____ Dishes and half a dozen Plates

    Item I give and bequeath unto my Daughter Mary Dodson Five Thousand Pounds of Tobacco; Fifteen hundred Pounds of the same to be paid by my son Thomas Durham within Nine months after the Decise of my wife and Five hundred the Rest of the said Tobacco to be paid by my Son John Durham at the Decease of my Wife—-

    Item. I give and Bequeath all the Residue of my Estate, Goods, Cattle and Chattells unto my wife Dorothy Durham for & During her widowhood, but if she doth Marry that _____ off my Personall Estate, Except what is herein given to John Durham shall be Equally Divided between my wife and my three Children, and I do make and Ordain my Dear & well beloved Wife Sole Executrix of this my Last Will & Testament—Rattifying and Confirming this & none other to be my Last Will & Testament. In Witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand & seal this Fourth Day of August in the year of our Lord, One Thousand Seven Hundred and Eleven. Signed, Sealed & Published and Declared in the presence of us– Joan O Searles her mark, Arthur Kay his mark, Miles Walters Thomas Durham his mark (seal)

    Att. at a Court held for Richmond County ye first Day of June 1715 This Will was approved in open Court by the oaths of Arthur Key & Joan Searles ______ of the Witness or tthereto be on admitted to Recored…Tests M: Beckewith C.C.O.”

    Thomas Durham’s will entry in the will book looks like the clerk reproduced Thomas’s own mark.



    Does this mean that Thomas Durham could never write, or that he was simply too ill or old to sign his will? He didn’t pass away for another 4 years, so he certainly was not on his deathbed when he wrote his will in 1711, although he might have thought he was. He does say that he is “sick in body” but he apparently recovered enough to be appointed constable in 1713. Although there is no Jr. or Sr. mentioned, so the 1713 constable entry could have been for his son.

    And speaking of his son, Thomas Jr., Thomas Sr. left an inheritance only to the children “lawfully begotten” with his sons, excluding his grandchildren by Anne Kelly, if either of those children were still living. In that era, illegitimate children could not inherit from their father unless there was specific verbiage to the contrary.

    Thomas Durham, according to his will, apparently has two parcels of land – although the will is confusing and he only mentions the 50 acre parcel obtained from Mary Gilbert specifically. The second, referenced rather obliquely, must surely be the 62 acres that he is living on conveyed to Dorothy from William Smoot in 1700. The fact that Thomas Durham does not include this second piece specifically in his will is likely because William Smoot conveyed the land directly to Dorothy, omitting Thomas.

    As it turns out, which of his two sons obtained the land becomes irrelevant, because John died without issue in 1722.

    P 212 – Thomas Durham inventory July 6, 1715

    Dorothy Remarries

    We don’t know exactly when Thomas Durham died, but by the time his will was probated, which is typically within 90 days of death, Dorothy was remarried. This seems soon by today’s standards but wasn’t at all uncommon in colonial Virginia.

    The fact that Dorothy had remarried meant that she would only receive a child’s share of Thomas’s estate, one fourth, except for the land which he had already bequeathed to his children.

    Court Order Book Page 283, June 1, 1715 – Last will and testament of Thomas Durham decd presented into court by Dorothy Greenham, his executrix who made oath and proved by the oaths of Arthur Key and John Searles, two of the witnesses.

    Jeremiah Greenham, Dorothy Greenham, John Doyle and Richard Fowler came into court and ack bond for the said Dorothy Greenham admin for the estate of Thomas Durham, decd.

    Thomas Griffin, Thomas Glascock, William Downham and George Davenport or any 3 of them to appraise the estate of Thomas Durham, decd. Oath of appraisers to be sworn and also of Dorothy Greenham, the executrix, for her true discovery thereof.

    Thomas Durham’s Estate Inventory

    Court Order Book Page 62-63 – Jeremiah Greenham and Dorothy, his wife, John Boyle and Richard Fowler of Richmond Co. held and bound for 200 pounds currant money of Virginia condition that Dorothy Greenham executrix of last will of Thomas Durham decd to make a true and perfect inventory of estate of said decd. Signed Jeremiah Greenham, Dorothy Greenham her mark as a D, John Doyle and Richard Fowler

    Court Order Book Page 292 July 6, 1715 – Appraisement for estate of Thomas Durham decd returned and recorded.

    Thomas’s inventory was taken on June 27, as follows:

    One feather bed, bolster, 2 pillows and cafos? (cases?), 3 blankets and one rug, one par of cotton cheets, curtains, valances and bedstead – 6.0.0
    Rugs at that time meant bed rugs, which were wool and decorative and functioned as both a layer of warmth and decoration on top of colonial beds.

    One large table and form – 1.0.0
    A form was a type of bench.

    One small “ – 0.05.0
    Six wooden chairs and one flagg – 0.10.0
    One Bible and two old books – 0.05.0
    I sure would like to know the names of the books. It would tell us a lot about Thomas.

    One butter pott, ditto plate and pann – 0.02.06
    One brass candlestick and one iron pann – 0.01.0
    Just one candlestick?

    One bedstead – 0.05.0
    One pair small styl’ds (probably stillyards) – 0.02.06
    One looking glass – 0.01.03
    One Huckaback table cloth and one dozen of napkins – 1.11.06
    Huckaback was a type of course absorbent cotton or linen fabric typically used for making towels.

    One small old table cloth, 4 old cotton napkins and 2 linen towels, one sheet of the same cloth and one cotton sheet – 0.12.0
    Above Stairs

    One feather bed, bolster, curtains, valances, 1 rugg ? pair of blankets – 02.10.0
    One old couch bod an old blanket and a cadord? – 0.10.00
    One rug, two pillows and one bolster case – 0.15.00
    Three chests – 0.10.00
    In the Kitchin

    One flock bed and bolster, two blankets, one rug and bedstead – 01.0.0
    One old “, one blanket, one cadoro – 0.05.0
    One spinning sheel and hoop of cards – 0.10.00
    A parcel of old tubs – 0.05.00
    A parcel of iron work – 0.04.02
    Kitchin

    One large iron pott and hooks, qt 9 gal 4 ? p’s – 01.12.00
    Five small “with four pair of hooks qt 1345 at “ – 02.04.02
    Two pair of old pott racks – 0.02.00
    A pair of tongs, one spit – 0.08.0
    Two smoothing irons – 0.02.0
    One old musket and one old frying pann – 0.05.06
    If the musket was in the kitchen, it probably wasn’t for self-defense.

    One pofflo? – 0.05.00
    Two bags 1’b:6’l a and one old sadle 2’b:6’l, one old chest 1’b:6’l – 0.05.06
    Five hodgos? 8’b, two pailed, two piggins, one old tubb 5’l – 0.13.0
    A parcel of white salt a’l 2 bushels 2’l, one cart sadle and harness 1’d:6’l – 0.03.06
    35 of good pewter at 10’l pr p’d – 29 of old ditto at 6’l ? pd – 02.04.01
    Three dozen of pewter spoons at 6’b, 16 of wools at 9’l ? pd, one old sauce pann 2’d – 0.18.02
    Two cows and calves at 2 each, three yearlings at 15’l each, one bull at 3’l 10’s – 06.15.0
    Five cows at ? 15’s each, one steer 6 years old in 2’l 10’s, two heifers at ? each – 13.05.00
    Eight sheep at 6 each, one large mare at 3’l – 5.08.0
    A servant boy two years and 7 months to serve – 08.0.0
    Signed:

    Thomas Griffin, Thomas Glascock, George Davenport on June 27, 1715

    Apparently Anne Kelly long ago completed her indenture, or at least she is not listed as a servant in 1713. She would have been about 33 by this time.

    I love this inventory because it tells us where various items were located in the house. For example, we know that there is an upstairs, and it’s large enough for a bed that included curtains and valances, so no shoddy place to sleep.

    The main living quarters, downstairs, included a bed with all the trappings, a second bedstead, but perhaps without a mattress, 2 tables complete with tablecloths and napkins, chairs, butter molds, a looking glass, but only 1 candlestick.

    There’s another bed in the kitchen, maybe for the servant boy. It’s flock instead of a feather bed. Flock is a type of filling made of scraps and wool. The spinning wheel is in the kitchen too.

    I’m guessing this house had two rooms downstairs, one room “above the stairs,” and the kitchen which may or may not have been attached. There doesn’t seem to be any furniture for more rooms.

    There was no mention of tobacco or any farm implements associated with anything except livestock, although tobacco was mentioned in Thomas’s will, so he clearly farmed tobacco in 1711.

    Furthermore, there was no cart or wagon. There is only one horse and an old saddle. There are no pistols, which “gentlemen” would have had, and the old musket is in the kitchen. There is no women’s saddle either.

    Thomas Durham does not appear to be a wealthy man, yet he does have pewter and tablecloths.

    He does not own any slaves which was very common for plantation owners in that time and place.

    What I wouldn’t give for that Bible and the information it contained. We wouldn’t have to wonder who his parents were, or question his wife’s maiden name. We might even know who his grandparents were, and where they were from in England. I wonder what ever happened to that Bible.

    Guardian

    This looks like some tension might have existed between John, the youngest son, Thomas Jr., the eldest son and Dorothy along with her new husband, Jeremiah Greenham. Daughter Mary was already married to Thomas Dodson.

    Page 351, October 5, 1715 – This day John Durham by his petition prayed that his brother Thomas Durham might be admitted his guardian which was granted and said Thomas Durham gives security. Whereupon the said Thomas Durham together with John Harris and Thomas Elmore acknowledge their bond for the said Thomas Durham’s true performance of his guardianship.

    Judgement granted to Thomas Durham as guardian for his brother John Durham against Jeremiah Greenham and Dorothy his wife, executrix of the last will of (page 352) Thomas Durham, decd for 1 feather bed and furniture, 1 cow and calf, 1 mare, 1 iron pott, 2 pewter dishes and half a dozen of plates being legacies left him the said John Durham buy the said Thomas Durham, his late father, decd, in his last will and testament, which is ordered to be paid.

    Here, we find the source of the issue. John who was only 17, wanted his share of the estate, even though he would have still been living at home. This probably means that John went to live with Thomas…and took with him the bed, furniture, cow, calf, mare pewter and other items. Thomas obviously did not release the 50 acres to John.

    Dorothy probably argued that John, as yet underage, was yet living at home so not yet entitled to any of the estate until he came of age. Clearly, this was not settled and went through the court process, probably causing very hard feelings between Dorothy and both of her sons.

    Thomas Durham sells Land

    In 1723, Thomas Durham Jr. sells land which could have been his father’s to Thomas Dodson, his sister’s husband.

    Deed Book Page 240 Dec 4-10, 1723 – From Thomas Durham of Richmond County to Thomas Dodson Sr of same 5000 pounds tobacco parcel of 100 acres formerly belonging to Abraham Marshall bearing date of Nov 25th 1692 situate in Richmond Co and bounded by Charles Dodson, being part of the pat formerly granted to William Thatcher by the main branch of Toteskey. Signed Thomas and Mary Durham. Wit John Hill, William Walker, Jeremiah Greenham. Rec May 6, 1724 and Mary Durham appeared in court relinquished dower.

    Abraham Marshall is Dorothy Durham Greenham’s sister’s husband.

    In 1733, the 100 acres is sold to the Lyell family

    Deed Book Page 12, Lease and release, Dec 6-7, 1733 – From Thomas Dodson Sr. and Mary his wife and Thomas Dodson Jr. and Eliza his wife all of NFP to John’n Lyell of same in consideration of a negro woman to be delivered to said Dodson as soon as any comes to Virginia to be sold as the said Dodson Jr. wished about 130 acres in NFP and bounded by Charles Dodson by the main swamp of Totuskey. The other 30 acres of land is bounded by old Cone path formerly belonging to Daniel Oneal, a line of trees that divides the land of Mr. Spencer and the land of Thomas Dusin, corner oak formerly belonging to William Matthews, along Matthews line the land formerly belonging to John Jenly. Of the 130 acres, 100 acres formerly belonged to Abraham Marshall by a deed dates 25 9ber 1692 and from thence conveyed to Thomas Durham and by the said Durham sold to Thomas Dodson Sr. The other 30 acres was formerly sold by Thomas Dusin to Thomas Southern by deed dated 21 7ber 1687. Signed Thomas Dodson Sr. his mark T, Mary her mark M, Thomas Dodson Jr., Elizabeth her mark, wit Robert Reynolds and George Gibson and William Creel Rec April 1, 1734

    Deed Book Page 25, May 4 1734 _ From Jane Lawson, John Steptoe Jr. and Joanna his wife of Christchurch parish in Lancaster Co. to Robert Mitchell of St. Mary’s Whiteside in Lancaster 18,000 pounds tobacco and 50# and divers other causes 450 acres in North Farnham Parish bounded on west by a branch of Moratico that divides this land from the land of John Mills, Thomas Durham on the north side, Abraham Goad on the NE, William King and Mr. Anthony Sydnor on the east side, Isaac White on the south. Land part of a patent granted to Thomas Madison dated 1770 (sic) by him sold to Capt. John Purvis and by Purvis to John Ockley and by Ockley given by will to said Jean Lawson. Signed by all.

    Drunk at Church

    Court Order Book Page 11, Nov. 7, 1721 – Ordered sheriff to summon Thomas Durham of North Farnham Parish to answer presentment of the grand jury against him for coming to his parish church drunk on the 29th day of October last past.

    Apparently, Thomas Durham’s son, Thomas Jr., now age 31, was a bit rowdy or couldn’t hold his liquor, or both. Apparently now he’s attending church, but not sober. He obviously did not like to attend church. Perhaps his earlier escapades weren’t quite forgiven nor forgotten by parishioners.

    We’ll leave Thomas’s life and times on this rather humorous note. Well, it’s humorous if you weren’t there and are looking back from a perspective of nearly 200 years. Perhaps Thomas felt that showing up drunk was better than not showing up at all, a fineable offense, as we already know. Or perhaps Thomas had a drinking problem. Drinking alcoholic beverages during that time was a daily affair, especially if the water was suspect in terms of cleanliness – but drunk on Sunday morning to the point that he was actually fined?

    The Durham family seems determined to leave us with questions!

    The Persistent Rumor about Governor Henry Thomas Durham

    If you sign on to Ancestry or any other site and look at trees, you’ll find the persistent rumor that Thomas Durham is the son of Governor Henry Thomas Durham who had a son, Thomas, born about 1634.

    Unfortunately, there is not one shred of evidence to connect the two. Several trees also have the Governor passing away in 1694 in North Farnham Parish in Richmond County. I can assuredly tell you that there are absolutely NO records to corroborate this information.

    The one piece of evidence I did find was posted in 1999 on GenForum by Gene, as follows:

    Sorry, guys, LDS records notwithstanding, Thomas DURHAM 1661/1715 of Richmond Co.VA married to Dorothy ??? is NOT the son of Gov. Henry DURHAM of Bermuda. I bought that story too, but couldn’t prove it was the same Thomas.

    Finally, I wrote Bermuda Archives, and received an abstract of a lawsuit filed in Bermuda in 1734 that definitely proved that the Thomas who was born to Gov. Hunt lived and died in Bermuda where he had a son “Richard Durham of Sandys tribe marriner Eldest son and heir of Thomas Durham Late of the same Gent: dec’d, who was the son of Henry Durham, Esq.” The suit was in regard to property in Bermuda lately in the possession of Judith DURHAM, Henry’s wife. I would love to know also who the parents of our Thomas of Virginia were, but they weren’t Henry and Judith Hunt Durham of Bermuda. I will say there is an outside chance there could be a collateral relationship, since the father of Henry Durham of Bermuda also named Thomas had other sons, who also may have had a son named Thomas, and of course there was trading, etc. between Bermuda and Virginia during that time, of which scant records were kept. Gene in Gotha.

    What Gene didn’t mention is that Thomas is a very common first name.

    In case you’re having trouble with all the characters, I charted the relationships of Henry Durham, the Governor.



    I think we can put the rumor of Thomas Durham of Richmond County being the son of Henry Durham, the Governor of Bermuda, to bed. Furthermore, a Governor’s son would not show up penniless and not own land until 8 years after he was beyond “a great age,” according to court records.

    DNA

    I was unable to find any evidence in the Durham DNA project that any male Durham descendants of Thomas Durham had done the Y DNA testing. I was quite hopeful, because, needless to say, a match to a Durham from England would give us someplace to look for the origins of our Thomas.

    The Y chromosome is passed from father to son, with no admixture from the mother, so Thomas’s two sons, would have passed their Durham Y chromosome to their sons and so forth to the current generation of Durham men descended from Thomas.

    It appears that Thomas Durham’s son, John, died unmarried on September 23, 1722.

    Son Thomas Durham, Jr., aside from the illegitimate children he had with Anne Kelly, whose genders are unknown, according to the North Farnham Parish records had several children, as follows, with Mary Smoot:

    Durham, John son of Thomas and Mary Durham, Dec. 14, 1724/5 (sic)
    Durham, Mary daughter of Thomas and Mary Durham, May 14, 1728
    Durham, Susanna daughter of Thomas and Mary Durham, May 14, 1728
    Durham, Margaret and Dominick Newgent, Dec. 2, 1729 (identity of Margaret who is marrying is entirely unknown)
    Durham, Wilmoth daughter of Thomas and Mary Durham, May 21, 1730
    Durham, Kathrine daughter of Thomas and Mary Durham, March 18, 1731
    Durham, Millicent daughter of Thomas and Mary Durham, Aug. 4, 1734
    Durham, Willmoth Oct. 2, 1734 (death)
    Durham, Thomas Dec. 3, 1734 (death)
    Poor Mary – a new child born in August, a daughter dead two months later and her husband two months following that.

    These births and deaths leave us with Thomas Durham Jr. having only one known son, John, born in 1724. John is reported to have married Sarah Hightower and had three sons, Joshua Durham (1748-1816), Charnel Hightower Durham (1753-1836) and Daniel Durham (1777-1868). The births of both Joshua and Charnel are recorded in the North Farnham Parish records, but Daniel is not. I’m hopeful that a male Durham descends from one of these lines and has tested or is willing to Y DNA test at Family Tree DNA. If that’s you, please let me know. I have a testing scholarship for you!!!

    biography contiued...

    Summary

    I have this nagging feeling that we are missing the first half of Thomas Durham Sr.’s adult life.

    The first mention of the Durham surname is in 1686 with the birth of Thomas and Dorothy’s child, Mary. She may have been their first child born and she is the first recorded, but the records are known to be incomplete.

    In 1699, we find Thomas exempted from taxes due to his great age, but his wife, Dorothy, in 1704 says she’s about 41 years of age, which would put her birth year at about 1663.

    If Thomas was of “great age” in 1699, he would have been at least 50, if not 60 or older. In 1699, Dorothy would have been 37.

    Furthermore, Thomas Durham owns no land at all until in 1700 when William Smoot deeds 62 acres to Dorothy, omitting him in the deed, and then in 1707, Mary Gilbert adds another 50 acres.

    We know, based on Thomas’s will in 1711 he still owns two pieces of land, one of which is the 50 acre tract.

    However, there are some rather unusual things about Thomas. He never, not once, sits on a jury. In Virginia, at that time, I believe you had to be a white landowner to do so. That would likely mean he was not eligible until 1707. Either he or his son were appointed constable in 1713, which means they were respected and trusted within the community.

    In 1723, Thomas Durham Jr. sells 100 acres of land that belonged to his mother’s sister’s husband. However, there is no record of either Thomas Jr. or Thomas Sr. purchasing that land. Where Thomas Jr. obtained it is a mystery. If the 1692 notation in the deed refers to when Abraham Marshall sold the land to Thomas, it would have had to be Thomas Sr. because Thomas Jr. was still a child, born in 1690.

    In other words, there seems to have been some transactions that were handled by family that were never recorded at the courthouse.

    While we know quite a bit about the life of Thomas Durham from 1686 on, we know absolutely nothing about his life before that time. Was he perhaps an indentured servant, fulfilling his obligation before he could marry?

    He certainly did not come to the Northern Neck with any money, because he did not purchase land until 21 years after his presence is the area is first known. He never owned slaves which was very common for plantation owners, although he did have at least two indentured servants – one of which gave him two grandchildren.

    Thomas Durham Sr. remains, in very large part, a mystery.

    end of biography

    Alt Birth:
    (North Farnham Parish)

    Died:
    (North Farnham Parish)

    Thomas married Dorothy Smoot 168?, Richmond County, Virginia. Dorothy was born ~ 1663, Richmond County, Virginia; died Aft 1725, (Richmond County, Virginia). [Group Sheet]


  4. 27.  Dorothy Smoot was born ~ 1663, Richmond County, Virginia; died Aft 1725, (Richmond County, Virginia).

    Notes:

    Dorothy Durham (1663 - after 1725), No Shrinking Violet, 52 Ancestors #164

    Posted on June 10, 2017

    Dorothy, born in 1663, was the wife of Thomas Durham by sometime in 1685, because their daughter, Mary, was born on June 5, 1686 in what was then Rappahannock County, Virginia, now referred to as Old Rappahannock. We don’t know if Mary was Dorothy’s first child, but Mary was the first of Dorothy’s children recorded in the North Farnham Parish church records which are known to be incomplete.

    We also know that Dorothy had two more children that lived, Thomas Durham born on June 17, 1690 and John Durham on November 23, 1698. By that time, Richmond County had been formed and Rappahannock County was dissolved.

    Dorothy appears to be somewhat younger than Thomas Durham, her husband, who was probably born sometime before 1649 based on the fact that he was exempted from paying levies by the court in September of 1699 “by reason of his great age.” Dorothy was all of 36 years old at that time. It wasn’t uncommon for second wives to be significantly younger than their husbands and it looks like Thomas was probably at least 25+ years older than Dorothy, if not more.

    Thomas died before June 1, 1715 when his will was probated, leaving Dorothy with children still at home. Dorothy did what colonial wives did, she remarried quickly, in February 1715, before Thomas Durham’s will was probated. Probate of a will generally happened no later than 90 days after the person died although in this case, Thomas had obviously died sometime prior to February when Dorothy remarried. Someone had to manage the plantation, plant the crops, maintain tobacco which necessitated a lot of manual labor and TLC at just the right time, and harvest the tobacco when ripe. Dorothy married Jeremiah Greenham, a well-respected gentleman who had been involved with the family and neighborhood for years.

    Jeremiah Greenham died in 1753 and we know that his wife at the time was named Mary. Dorothy was last recorded in a document in 1725 and died sometime between then and 1753, a span of 28 years. Dorothy died between the ages of 62 and 90.

    It’s possible that Dorothy had passed away by January 13, 1726 when Jeremiah Greenham sold his Stafford County land to brothers Thomas Dodson and Greenham Dodson. No wife signed a release of dower, so we can’t tell if the lack of a signature was because Jeremiah was unmarried at the time, or it was an oversight. I think this at least suggests that Dorothy might have been deceased by this date.

    However, Dorothy was alive a year earlier on February 9, 1725 when Ann Chinn Fox Chichester, Dorothy’s niece who had no children wrote a will wherein she left “my suit of silk crape clothes and a suit of muslin head clothes, with apron, rufels and —“ to her Aunt Dorothy Greenham. Ann’s will was probated on December 10, 1729 but we can’t tell if Aunt Dorothy was alive to collect her suit of silk crepe.

    Clothes were expensive in colonial Virginia, and silk crepe, by whatever spelling, would have been a very nice gift that Aunt Dorothy surely would have appreciated.

    We don’t know when Dorothy died, but we do know that Jeremiah retained a close relationship with John Durham, Dorothy’s grandson through her son Thomas Durham. Jeremiah Greenham left John Durham his “Great Bible.” Sadly, Jeremiah had no children of his own.

    Dorothy Durham had two known sisters, Alice who married first to John Chinn and second to John Stretchly and Thomazin who married first to Abraham Marshall and second to William Goodridge. Dorothy could have had more siblings, but those are the only two mentioned in 1701 and 1725 wills.

    The oft-repeated story about Dorothy’s parents is that she is the daughter of William and Jane Smoot, but working with the records, I can tell you that I’m nearly positive that Dorothy is not William Smoot’s daughter, although she is clearly somehow related to William Smoot. I even have some idea about who Dorothy’s parents might have been, but there is no smoking gun yet today. Maybe in due time, utilizing advanced DNA methodologies. Or maybe someone’s “great Bible” will turn up on e-Bay or records from another location will be found. There is always hope!

    Colonial Northern Neck Virginia

    What was life like in the Northern Neck of Virginia when Dorothy would have lived there?

    This area was still suffering from Indian warfare in 1676 when Bacon’s Rebellion gained a foothold. Servants and slaves took the opportunity to escape. Plantations were burned, as was Jamestown, depicted in the engraving below.



    Armed men gathered, eager to fight and emotions ran high. In 1677, the Northern Neck settlers dared not venture from their plantations for fear of their lives. If Dorothy’s family lived in tidewater Virginia then, it would have been a frightening place. Dorothy would have been about 13 at that time.

    Militia units were formed and frontier patrols were maintained in this region until about 1700 to protect the families from Indian attack from hostile northern Indians. These patrols were reinstituted in 1704 across the Rappahannock River in Essex County. Plantations were distant from each other, and although the area was sparsely settled, it was still in many ways a frontier.

    Bacon’s Rebellion resulted in the courts removing the ability for men without land to have a vote. It would be more than 200 years before non-landowners recovered that right. Dorothy’s husband, Thomas Durham, wouldn’t have been able to vote until 1700, when William Smoot deeded land to Dorothy, if indeed Dorothy’s land would have been considered Thomas Durham’s land for purposes of voting. Furthermore, to sit on a jury, one had to be a landowner, so the lack of land was a handicap and detriment to Civil liberties we all take for granted today. Serving at court and voting was reserved for the more successful male residents, in essence creating a defacto class system. While Thomas and Dorothy don’t appear to be poor, based on Thomas’s estate inventory and the fact that they eventually owned land, they certainly had to work their way up the social and economic ladder.

    There is no record of Thomas Durham ever purchasing or patenting land although in 1723, Thomas Durham’s son, Thomas Jr. sells land that looks for all the world like it might have originally belonged to his father. If indeed this was Thomas Durham Sr.’s land, the deed was never filed at the courthouse, just passed down by hand.

    Deed Book Page 240 Dec 4-10, 1723 – From Thomas Durham of Richmond County to Thomas Dodson Sr. of same 5000 pounds tobacco parcel of 100 acres formerly belonging to Abraham Marshall bearing date of Nov. 25th 1692 situate in Richmond Co and bounded by Charles Dodson, being part of the pat formerly granted to William Thatcher by the main branch of Toteskey. Signed Thomas and Mary Durham. Wit John Hill, William Walker, Jeremiah Greenham. Recorded May 6, 1724 and Mary Durham appeared in court to relinquished dower.

    Abraham Marshall is Dorothy Durham’s sister’s husband. By 1723, Thomas Durham Sr. had died and Dorothy was married to Jeremiah Greenham.

    Thomas Durham Sr.’s will is confusing. He directly addressed the 50 acres of land deeded to him in 1707 by Mary Gilbert, but he also makes indirect reference to additional land in this statement:

    “If said Thomas Durham doth refuse and will not release the said 50 acres of land nor pay the tobacco aforesaid, I do will and bequeath the said plantation whereon I now dwell with all my lands unto my son John Durham and his heirs.”

    Was the land Thomas and Dorothy dwelt on the Abraham Marshall land of 100 acres or the 62 acres deeded by William Smoot? By all rights, Thomas should not have been willing the Smoot land, because Dorothy owned that land severally. However, I was never able to discover what happened to Dorothy’s 62 acres. Dorothy did not have a will.

    Unruly Virginia!

    Dorothy and Thomas Durham began their married life at what was economically, probably the worst time possible. Beginning in the early 1680s, too much tobacco caused a glut in the market and tobacco prices plummeted. Planters called for the Virginia government to limit planting and restore prosperity, and when that didn’t happen, plant cutting riots erupted. If the governor wouldn’t help them, then they would take matters into their own hands, literally.

    In May of 1682, rioting spread up and down the Rappahannock River and the Northern Neck peninsula, resulting in militias from other counties being called in to keep the peace. This was about the time that Dorothy and Thomas would have been courting and marrying.

    One burgess blamed the time of year and cider brewing for the riots, according to the History of Essex County, Virginia, by James Slaughter, stating that, “All plantations flowing with cider, drunk so unripe by our licentious inhabitants that they allow no time for its fermentation but in their brains.”

    According to Slaughter, half the tobacco crop was destroyed in Rappahannock County that summer and tensions ran high. Thankfully, tobacco prices rose in 1683 but the specter of “renewed rebellion hung over an unruly Virginia until the end of the century.”

    Unruly Virginians, indeed – but the specter of those angry frontiersmen brings a smile to my lips. Yep, those would be my ancestors.

    In 1684, a French visitor to Rappahannock County did us the favor of recording his travels and attendance at a wedding celebration, thus:

    “The Virginians eat almost no bread, seldom drink during meals, but they did nothing afterwards for the rest of the day and all night but drink, smoke, sing and dance. They had no wine. They drank beer, cider and punch, a mixture of beer, three jugs of brandy, three pounds of sugar and some nutmeg and cinnamon. Mix these well together and when the sugar has melted they drink it and while making away with the first, they prepare another bowl of it.”

    Anyone want to try that recipe?

    The Frenchman then reported that the next morning he “did not see one who could stand straight.” Guests spent the night at parties in colonial Virginia because travel was difficult. Probably also because people were highly intoxicated. Ladies slept on beds and men on the floor.

    The French visitor also mentioned that one “could not enter a house without being served venison. It is very good in pies, boiled and baked.” This tells us that hunting was an important part of the culture of colonial Virginia, and domestic livestock had not yet taken the place of wild game on the tables of the planters and their families.

    At least twice, the Rappahannock court sponsored county-wide parties. In 1683, the county declared a public feast to celebrate the birth of a son to King Charles II and in 1689, the birth of a Price of Wales in England.

    More than 100 gallons of “rum or other strong liquors with sugar proportionable” so that the party could “be done with all the expressions of joy this county is capable of” were ordered by the court and consumed – mostly on the north side of the Rappahannock River, now Richmond County, where court was in session at the time. I bet that was one very interesting court session!


    (Sir Walter) Raleigh’s First Pipe in England, an illustration in Fredrick William Fairholt’s Tobacco, its history and associations

    Tobacco smoking was also quite in vogue, according to our traveling Frenchman:

    “Large quantities of it are used in this country, besides what they sell. Everyone smokes while working and idling. I sometimes went to hear the sermon. Their churches are in the woods and when everyone has arrived the minister and all the others smoke before going in. The preaching over, they do the same thing before parting. They have seats for that purpose. It was here I saw that everyone smokes, men, women, girls and boys from the age of seven years.”

    I must say, I knew that adult men smoked tobacco as a social pastime, and to some extent, it doesn’t surprise me that some women smoked. However, I was taken aback to think about my 7-year- old ancestors, both boys and girls, smoking. It would be another 300 years before we understood how harmful that habit is, and how difficult to break once established. At that time, it was not only popular, tobacco smoking conveyed that one was of the upper class. Tobacco was also believed to have medicinal and curative properties.

    Education, if it happened at all, was a private matter. Public schools did not exist in this part of Virginia until after the Civil War, and most people could not read or write. In fact, according to Slaughter, Governor Berkley (1642-1677) said, “I thank God that there are no free schools nor printing, and I hope we shall not have these hundred years; for learning has brought disobedience and heresy and sects into the world, and printing has divulged them, and libels against the best government. God keep us from both.”

    Wealthy planters sent their sons to England to be properly educated, but the Durham family certainly did not fall into that category. Dorothy in her 1704 deposition where, among other things, she gave her age as “about 41 years,” signed with a “P” for her mark. Thomas Durham signed his will with a mark as well.

    The Deed

    In 1700, something quite unusual happened.

    William Smoot Sr. deeded land to Dorothy Durham in her own right, meaning the land was in her name only. Her husband could not sell it or otherwise control that land. This is an extremely unusual circumstance and begs the question of why. Unfortunately, any clue we might have is entirely mute.

    Richmond County VA Deed Book, August 2, 1700 – Deed of gift. William Smoot Sr. of N. Farnham Parish Richmond Co. for consideration received and for the great love that I have and beare unto Dorothy Durham wife of Thomas Durham of same county and her children do give unto her and her children a 62 acre parcel of land bounded by Thomas Durham, branch of Morattico Creek, land of the same William Smoot Sr., land of Rowland Lawson, line of Mr. Grimes and line of Clare. If in case the said Dorothy Durham die that then the land shall come to Thomas Durham eldest son of the said Dorothy and in case that he die without issue that then the land shall come to John Durham second son of the said Dorothy and in case that he die without issue that the land shall come to Mary Durham eldest dau of the said Dorothy Durham and in case she shall happen to die without issue that then the land shall come to the fourth, fifth, sixth and c children of the same Dorothy, but in case of want of issue that the land shall descend to Ann Fox wife of William Fox of Lancaster Co., gent. Wit John Simmons, Thomas Mackey, ack Aug 7, 1700 Book 3 page 57

    Aug 2, 1700 – Power of attorney Jane Smoot wife of William Smoot Sr. having appointed Edward Jones my attorney to ack the above gift to Dorothy Durham and her children. Wit Thomas Mackey, Edmond Overton. Book 3 page 58

    Court Order Book Page 56, August 7, 1700 – Ordered that the deed for land ack in this court by William Smoot Sr unto Dorothy Durham, wife of Thomas Durham, be recorded.

    It’s also obvious that somehow, William Smoot is related to Dorothy. Not only does he convey this land for “the great love that I beare unto Dorothy…and her children,” but he also reverts the land ownership to Anne Fox, who just happens to be Dorothy’s niece through sister Alice, if Dorothy dies without heirs.

    The Deposition

    James Gilbert died in 1704, having made a will in January 1701/02 leaving his entire estate to John Mills Jr., instead of his wife and family. James suffered from “fits,” as seizures were called at the time, and based on the 1704 depositions of various neighbors and (possibly) family members, he verbally revoked his will, but didn’t seem to believe that he needed to do so in writing, officially.

    Therefore, as you might imagine, there was quite a hullaballoo after his death regarding his will and estate.

    Dorothy Durham gave a deposition about the matter in 1704, which is how we discover her age. From the Richmond County, VA Miscellaneous Record Book, we find the following:

    Page 27 – Deposition. Dorothy Durham aged about 41 years says that sometime before James Gilbert’s death, being in company of said Gilbert and William Smoote, amongst other discourse, she heard said Gilbert say to said Smoote that he did not know that there was any Resurrection or not, and that had made a will to John Mills, but that it signified nothing, and that your deponent did, several times, hear the said Gilbert say that John Mills was a rogue and that he nor any of his should ever be the better for what he had. Signed Nov. 2, 1704 – Dorothy (P her mark) Dureham

    Furthermore, in 1707, after James Gilbert’s estate is (presumably) settled, Mary Gilbert, James Gilbert’s widow sells 50 acres of land to Dorothy and Thomas Durham, with William Smoot quit-claiming the deed.

    How are Dorothy, her sister Alice, William Smoot and Mary Gilbert related? We don’t know exactly, but we’ll discuss the various options and data in a separate article about Dorothy’s parents.

    Dorothy Was No Shrinking Violet

    Women don’t appear much in county records, except for an occasional release of dower rights when their husbands sold land. Even then, most women appointed a male as her power of attorney in order to release her dower right so she did not have to attend court in person.

    Dorothy was unique in a couple of ways. She not only owned land in her own right, she also personally appeared in court in a rather controversial case. I can just imagine Dorothy waltzing before the burgesses, in spite of the gasps of the assembled men because of her audacity, showing up in court like that…and taking care of business

    The drama that unfolds in 1708 casts Dorothy in quite a different light than any other colonial women I have ever encountered in the records.

    The drama didn’t begin as anything unusual. Ann Kelly’s indenture to Thomas Durham begins like normal in 1699 when she was determined to be 14 years old. The court determined Ann’s age so that the length of her indenture could be determined and so that she could be taxed appropriately. In 1704, Ann gave her age to be 20, which would have put her birth in 1684. If she were 14 in 1699, then she would have been born in 1685.

    Court Order Book Page 406, June 7, 1699 – Ann Kelly servant to Thomas Durham being presented to this court to have inspection into her age is adjudged 14 years old and ordered to serve her master or his assigns according to act.

    However, by 1708, nine years later, Anne was 23 and circumstances had changed.

    Court Order Book Page 372, July 7, 1708 – Anne Kelly, servant to Thomas Durham, being brought before the court by her master for committing the sin of fornication and having a bastard child and said Anne refusing to confess who was the father of the child, the court have ordered she be committed to the county goale there to remaine until such time as she shall confess who is the true father of her child and it is also ordered that she serve her master or his assignes after her time by indenture custome or otherwise shall be fully expired according to law in compensation for the trouble of his house during the time of her childbirth.

    Imagine how intimidating this must have been for Ann. Not only did all those men, dressed in their finery and powdered wigs “know what she had done,” they were pressuring her for the name of the child’s father. Ann, a servant with nothing of her own, probably dressed in hand-me-down clothes, if not rags, didn’t even have the right to direct her own body. Ann faced them down and stood firm, probably shaking with fear, even when sentenced to goale (jail.)

    Having none of this, Dorothy steps in.

    Court Order Book Page 372, July 7, 1708 – This day Dorothy Durham for on the behalf of her husband Thomas Durham confessed judgement to the church wardens of Northfarnham parish to the use of the parish for 500 pounds tobacco the same being the fine of Anne Kelly for committing the sin of fornication and having a bastard child which is ordered to be paid with costs.

    I can’t even begin to explain how unusual this was. Not only did Dorothy appear at court, of her own volition, she clearly defied her husband to do so. Not only that, but Dorothy apparently controlled some financial aspects of the household, because there seemed to be no doubt in anyone’s mind that Dorothy was capable and authorized to pay the 500 pounds of tobacco – even though Dorothy did say she was acting “on behalf of her husband.” In every other similar case, some male community member steps forward and posts bail, or not, but no female ever steps forward like Dorothy did.

    I’m convinced that posting bail, in most cases, wasn’t so much to help the poor woman who had the child as it was to retain the services of the woman and not be inconvenienced by her absence. In Dorothy’s case, we’ll never know what motivated her to attend court alone, step up in place of her husband AND pay the fine for Anne Kelly. But she did!

    Furthermore, in most cases, the female willingly named the child’s father. In this case, we do discover the name of the father the following March, and I wonder if Dorothy knew all along.

    Court Order Book Page 4, March 2, 1708/9 – Anne Kelly came into court and made oath that Thomas Durham Jr. is the true father of 2 bastard children borne of her body in the time of her service with his father, Thomas Durham the elder. Upon motion of the Queen’s attorney ordered that Thomas Durham Jr. be summoned to next court to enter into bond with security for the indemnification of the parish and what charge may acrew to the parish for or by reason of the children aforesaid.

    In March of 1708/09, Anne Kelly was dragged before the court a second time. This time, however, she named the father of the children – Thomas Durham Jr., the son of Dorothy and Thomas Durham Sr. While Thomas was summoned to post bond to the churchwardens so they would not incur future costs on behalf of the children, Thomas Jr. was not fined for fornication nor did he have to pay Anne Kelly’s fine for fornication and having a bastard child. Men were never fined, prosecuted for the sin of fornication, nor treated with or sentenced to “goale.” I guess those women somehow managed to get pregnant all by themselves!

    This time, it wasn’t Dorothy who paid Anne Kelly’s fees, nor Thomas Durham Sr. or Jr., who should have by all rights paid her fines – but Thomas Dodson who was married to Mary Durham, Dorothy’s daughter.

    No place in any of this does Thomas Durham Jr. step up – not once.

    I’m proud of Dorothy and her chutzpah in defiance of the social norms of the day and for her courage to do what was right, in spite of whatever the personal consequences.

    I can just hear the conversation:

    Dorothy: “Thomas Durham, if you won’t pay the fine for Anne Kelly, I’ll just go to court and do it myself.”

    Thomas: “Thou will, will thou?”

    Dorothy: “Indeed, I will.”

    Thomas: “I think not.”

    Dorothy: “The Hell I won’t. You watch.”

    Thomas: “Bet me? I forbid it.”

    Dorothy: “Bloody Hell. Hold my beer!”

    Thomas: “Dorothy, it’s not nice to swear.”

    Thomas:

    Dorothy, you go girl!!!

    Dorothy’s Children

    Dorothy had three children that lived and very likely many more that didn’t.

    All three of Dorothy’s children’s births are recorded in the North Farnham Parish Register.

    Daughter Mary Durham was born June 5, 1686 and married Thomas Dodson, the neighbor lad, on August 1, 1701. She would only have been 15 years old. Their first child, and Dorothy’s first grandchild, was George Dodson, born on October 31, 1702. With mother and baby both safe, the Durham and Dodson households were both celebrating!

    Son John Durham was born on November 23, 1698. John was somewhat of a challenging child. He may have been troubled by the death of his father in 1715, because in 1716, John and his brother, Thomas sued his mother, Dorothy, who had remarried to Jeremiah Greenham. Custody of John was awarded by the court to his brother, Thomas, and John’s share of the estate was distributed. What the heck does a teenage boy need with a bedstead? Regardless, John went to live with his brother Thomas, taking with him all of the items his father left him in the will. It could be argued that perhaps brother Thomas coveted some of those items along with brother John’s labor and hence, encouraged the suit against their mother. John never married and was dead by 1722.

    Son Thomas Durham was born on June 17, 1690 and died on December 3, 1734. He would have been 44 years old. He married Mary Smoot, daughter of William Smoot and wife Jane sometime around 1710, when his “bastard children” by Ann Kelly would only have been a couple years old and when Ann would still have been indentured to his father, probably serving her additional time for fornication with Thomas. Talk about awkward!

    1734 was a terrible year for Mary Smoot Durham, Thomas Durham Jr.’s wife. She gave birth to her youngest child, Millicent on August 4th, buried daughter Wilmoth, 4 years old on October 2nd and her husband, Thomas Durham (Jr.), died on December 3rd, leaving Mary with a 4-month-old baby and 8 other children, although it appears that daughter Margaret was already married by this time and some of the other children may have died.

    The Silent Spaces

    Understanding that women are typically married and fertile for about 24 years, and presuming all children live to the age of weaning, approximately 12 children are born to each woman before the days of birth control. If some children die at birth or before they are weaned, then more than a dozen children can be born.

    We know that Dorothy was born in 1663, so we can presume she would have begun having children about the time she married, with the first child arriving probably about 1684. Therefore, we have many spaces in which she probably had children that died and were buried at the Farnham Parish church in the old location, lost today, with only a general location known.



    In the cemetery in the now-lost churchyard, we would find several of Dorothy’s children born in about the following years:

    1684
    1688
    1692
    1694
    1696
    1700
    1702
    1704
    1706
    1708 possibly

    That’s an awful lot of babies to have died. Nine, maybe ten. Some may have lived long enough to smile, to play, even to talk and run in the warmth of the sunshine. Then they died, taking a piece of their mother’s heart with them. Every single one.

    Every child was buried in a tiny grave, probably with a small wooden cross. Each one had a name. Dorothy probably held each one as they died, cleaned their tiny body and dressed them in the best way she could afford.

    One baby girl was probably named Dorothy, her own namesake. Other baby girls would likely have been named Alice and Thomasin, after Dorothy’s sisters. Two more would have been named after her parents and two more after Thomas Durham’s parents as well.

    Dorothy probably visited the graveyard to tend the graves of her children, then to visit Thomas, for the duration of her life. She is probably buried beside them. Knowing in her heart she would be reunited with them one day is probably the only thing to relieve her grief, even a little, and only for a short time.

    Those children’s birthdays and death days are never forgotten, even if they are unspoken.

    Dorothy’s DNA

    Dorothy only had one daughter, Mary, that lived. Mitochondrial DNA is passed from mothers to both genders of their children, but only females pass it on. Dorothy’s mitochondrial DNA would have been passed through daughter Mary to her daughters, and so forth on to the current generation, where male children carry it as well.

    Mary Durham Dodson had the following daughters:

    Alice Dodson married William Creel about 1729. It’s unknown what happened to Alice Creel after her father, Thomas Dodson’s death in 1739.
    Mary Dodson was born in 1715 and married an Oldham by the time her father wrote his will in 1739. Nothing more is known of this line.
    It Dorothy’s mitochondrial DNA was passed on, it was through Mary, through one of these daughters.

    Dorothy’s and her two sisters both carried their mother’s mitochondrial DNA. Dorothy’s sister’s mitochondrial DNA was the same as hers, so we can look at descendants of Dorothy’s sisters who descend through all females to view Dorothy’s mitochondrial DNA.

    Sister Thomasin who married Abraham Marshall had only one known daughter, Mary, who married Alexander Campbell in 1708. I have not traced this family thoroughly, but what I have found shows only two male Campbell children. If this is the case, then Thomasin’s mitochondrial DNA is no more. Perhaps Mary Marshall did have additional children by Alexander Campbell and daughters would be discovered if the line was thoroughly researched.

    Dorothy’s sister Alice who married John Chinn had two daughters. Anne Chinn had no children, but Catherine Chinn married William Heale and had several, including daughters:

    Ellen Heale married David Ball
    Anne Heale
    Catherine Heale married John Canaday
    Sarah Heale married Lindsay Opie
    Elizabeth Heale married William Davenport and had 2 daughters, Judith Davenport born April 4, 1747 and Elizabeth Davenport born Dec. 27, 1749, both in Richmond County, Virginia. Nothing more is known about Judith or Elizabeth. Hopefully there are descendants through all females living today.

    The females who could have passed Dorothy or her sister’s mitochondrial DNA to currently living descendants are shown in the chart below. You can click to enlarge.



    If anyone (male or female) descends from these females through all females from Dorothy or her sisters to the current generation, I have a DNA testing scholarship for you through Family Tree DNA. You carry the mitochondrial DNA of Dorothy Durham and her mother, whoever she was. Perhaps you carry the answer to the secret of her mother’s identity too!

    end of commentary

    confused Thomas DURHAMs

    Posted By:Fredric Z. Saunders
    Email: fzsaund@ix.netcom.com
    Subject:confused Thomas DURHAM's
    Post Date:October 30, 2001 at 19:48:55
    Message URL:http://genforum.genealogy.com/durham/messages/2040.html
    Forum:Durham Family Genealogy Forum
    Forum URL:http://genforum.genealogy.com/durham/


    I think you are confusing Thomas DURHAM's. If I read what you are saying correctly, you are saying that William SMOOT was the father of Dorothy who married Thomas DURHAM, and that was the Thomas DURHAM he listed as his "son-in-law" in his 1716 will.

    Thomas DURHAM married Dorothy [surname unknown].

    They had a son Thomas DURHAM, Jr. born ca. 1690 who married Mary SMOOT [born 7 April 1693], daughter of William SMOOT, Sr. (of the 1716 will) and wife Jane.

    William SMOOT, Sr. who wrote the will was probably born in the late 1640s or early 1650s, and not much older than Dorothy, wife of Thomas DURHAM.

    http://home.netcom.com/~fzsaund/smoot.html

    end of message

    Birth:
    The oft-repeated story about Dorothy’s parents is that she is the daughter of William and Jane Smoot, but working with the records, I can tell you that I’m nearly positive that Dorothy is not William Smoot’s daughter, although she is clearly somehow related to William Smoot. I even have some idea about who Dorothy’s parents might have been, but there is no smoking gun yet today. Maybe in due time, utilizing advanced DNA methodologies. Or maybe someone’s “great Bible” will turn up on e-Bay or records from another location will be found. There is always hope!

    Notes:

    Married:
    (North Farnham Parish)

    Children:
    1. 13. Mary May Durham was born 5 Jun 1686, Richmond County, Virginia; died 21 Nov 1740, Richmond County, Virginia.
    2. Thomas Durham, Jr. was born 27 Jun 1690, Richmond County, Virginia; died 3 Dec 1734, Richmond County, Virginia.
    3. John Durham was born 23 Nov 1698, Richmond County, Virginia; died 8 May 1750.

  5. 28.  Daniel Everett was born 0___ 1670, Richmond County, Virginia (son of Thomas Everett and unnamed spouse); died 0___ 1693, Richmond County, Virginia.

    Notes:

    Birth:
    in Farnham Parish...

    Daniel married Anne Elmore (Virginia). Anne (daughter of Peter Elmore, I, The Immigrant and Jane LNU) was born 29 Aug 1674, Richmond County, Virginia; died 6 Oct 1725, Rappahannock County, Virginia. [Group Sheet]


  6. 29.  Anne Elmore was born 29 Aug 1674, Richmond County, Virginia (daughter of Peter Elmore, I, The Immigrant and Jane LNU); died 6 Oct 1725, Rappahannock County, Virginia.

    Notes:

    Birth:
    in North Farnham Parish...

    Died:
    in Farnham Parish...

    Children:
    1. 14. William Everett was born 15 Mar 1692, Richmond County, Virginia; died 0___ 1759, Richmond County, Virginia.


Generation: 6

  1. 56.  Thomas Everett (son of Charles Everett and unnamed spouse).

    Thomas — unnamed spouse. [Group Sheet]


  2. 57.  unnamed spouse
    Children:
    1. 28. Daniel Everett was born 0___ 1670, Richmond County, Virginia; died 0___ 1693, Richmond County, Virginia.

  3. 58.  Peter Elmore, I, The Immigrant was born 0___ 1627, England; died 0___ 1681, Richmond County, Virginia.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Thomas Peterus "Peter" Elmore, I

    Notes:

    About Thomas Peterus "Peter" Elmore, I

    Sources: http://www.larkcom.us/ancestry/elmore/reports/Elmore%20Descendancy%20Chart.pdf

    born about 1627 in England, and died after 1681 in Virginia. He married JANE [last name unknown] about 1639. She was born about 1618 in Virginia.

    Children of PETER and JANE ELMORE are:

    THOMAS ELMORE, b. about 1642, Warboys Parish, Huntingdonshire, England.

    PETER ELMORE, b. about 1643, Richmond County, Virginia; d. 01 Dec 1725, Richmond County, Virginia. Ann Elmore, b. c1654, Richmond County, Virginia, d. 1 Aug 1715, North Farnham Parish, Richmond County, Virginia; m. Charles Dodson, in 1678, Richmond County, Virginia.

    Research Notes: There was a Peter Elmore living along Totasky Creek, Richmond County, Virginia who was the subject of a headright in 1657. He was born circa 1627 and died after 1681. This Peter, in all probability was the father of Peter Elmore born circa 1643. Peter2 outlived all his children but one and named all his grandchildren in his last will which was proved 5 October, 1726 in Richmond County, Virginia.

    Peter's oldest son Peter3 had five sons.

    The youngest was John Elmore born 1703 and died 1757. His will was proved 3 October, 1757 in Richmond County, Virginia.

    John had four sons and two daughters.

    One son George born 1722 and died 1792. He married in 1743 and had eight sons and one daughter.

    Peter1 may have had a brother named Fauntleroy, born about 1630, died after 1681, who had a son named Francis who married Anne Allen on 2 Dec 1677 in Richmond County, Virginia.

    For a more complete registry of his issue...http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/h/e/n/Lori-Henshaw-Bessemer/FILE/0023text.txt

    "Descendants of Peter Elmore"... http://www.larkcom.us/ancestry/elmore/reports/Elmore%20Descendancy%20Chart.pdf (WikiTree conflicts this data...DAH)

    *

    Died:
    Map & History of Richmond County, Virginia... http://bit.ly/1HHTZw6

    Peter married Jane LNU Virginia. Jane was born ~ 1618, Colony of Virginia; died Virginia. [Group Sheet]


  4. 59.  Jane LNU was born ~ 1618, Colony of Virginia; died Virginia.
    Children:
    1. Peter Elmore, II was born 0___ 1643, Farnham, Virginia; died 1 Dec 1725, Richmond County, Virginia.
    2. 29. Anne Elmore was born 29 Aug 1674, Richmond County, Virginia; died 6 Oct 1725, Rappahannock County, Virginia.
    3. Thomas Archer Elmore
    4. Francis Elmore


Generation: 7

  1. 112.  Charles Everett was born 0___ 1607, England.

    Notes:

    24 Jul 2007:


    Posted By: Margo Everett
    Email:
    Subject: Re: William Everett b.1692, Virginia
    Post Date: February 12, 2001 at 18:42:51
    Message URL: http://genforum.genealogy.com/everett/messages/1294.html
    Forum: Everett Family Genealogy Forum
    Forum URL: http://genforum.genealogy.com/everett/


    PS - Daniel is third generation. The first EVERETT I have is Charles Everett, b. @1607 in England. He had 3 sons, George, Thomas and John. Thomas was the father of Daniel.




    Charles married unnamed spouse (England). unnamed was born (England). [Group Sheet]


  2. 113.  unnamed spouse was born (England).
    Children:
    1. 56. Thomas Everett