James Thomas Hennessee

James Thomas Hennessee

Male 1846 - 1927  (80 years)

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Generation: 1

  1. 1.  James Thomas HennesseeJames Thomas Hennessee was born 3 Nov 1846, Warren County, Tennessee (son of Thomas Hennessee and Sarah "Sally" Jennings); died 22 Feb 1927, Warren County, Tennessee; was buried Shellsford Cemetery, 121 Bottoms Road, McMinnville, Warren County, Tennessee 37111.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Teamster
    • Census Name: James Hennessee
    • Residence: 0___ 1860, (Hartville) Wright County, Missouri
    • Residence: 0___ 1920, Warren County, Tennessee

    Notes:

    28 Apr 1991 - William Butler Smith (1919-2007), great grandson of Thomas, retells the following story;

    The tale is about his grandfather, James Thomas Hennessee, who at the young age of 10 or 12 walked back to Warren County,TN from Wright County,MO. It appears that Thomas was ailing and wanted to return his family to the his homeplace and sent son, James, in advance to ascertain that possiblity. James then returned to Missouri and Thomas & family returned to Warren County. Other family members tell me stories that James was head-strong and never gave an inch while teamstering, even when he had an empty load he would travel the middle of the road.

    I cannot remember exactly, however I think my Dad told me stories of his grandfather running whiskey from the mountains. I once asked Dad about his grandfather, "Ol Jim" Hennessee and all he could remember was that they shared the same birthday. That irked him as he said the family paid attention to his grandfather and not him..DAH

    James was a first cousin, once-removed, to his wife, Rachel.

    1910 Warren County Census cites birth-state as Arkansas?

    1860 Wright Co.,MO cites TN as birth-state.

    Birth:
    More about Warren County, Tennessee... http://bit.ly/PIsRbw

    Residence:
    Civil District 5,

    Buried:
    A BRIEF HISTORY OF SHELLSFORD BAPTIST CHURCH

    Shellsford Baptist Church is one of the oldest active congregations in Warren County, Tennessee.

    Shellsford, located on the Collins River a short distance downstream from Buck Springs, was one of the earliest settlements in Warren County. The community got its name from the Shell family who settled here in the early 1800's near the ford of the river, hence the name Shellsford. James Shell established a grist mill at the Shellsford location, an exact date is not known. Shellsford, the old Shell mill, Buck Springs, and Shellsford Baptist Church became important in the history of early Warren County. Buck Springs, according to tradition, received its name as a result of the successful deer hunting of pioneer Jordan Sellars at the spring.

    The Shellsford Baptist Church was originally known as the Buck Springs Baptist Church and was sometimes further identified by its location "on Collins River." The congregation was established in 1810 as a result of a brush arbor meeting held by Reverend William Thompson and Reverend George Stubblefield, prominent Baptist ministers of that era.

    The original meeting house, built after the brush arbor meeting, was built of split logs. The church building consisted of one door, two windows and a fireplace. The first building stood until 1851 when it was replaced by a frame building. The present building was erected in 1947 and completed with the addition of a two story educational building in 1959.

    James married Rachel Anne Hennessee 18 Jul 1869, Warren County, Tennessee. Rachel (daughter of James C. Hennessee and Maxa "Maxie" Dodson) was born 11 Nov 1847, Warren County, Tennessee; died 29 Apr 1883, Warren County, Tennessee; was buried Hennessee Cemetery, Warren County, Tennessee. [Group Sheet]

    Notes:

    Married:
    by H. A. Cunningham, M.G.

    Residence (Family):
    District 5

    Residence (Family):
    Civil Districts 4-5

    Children:
    1. Millie Kathryn Hennessee was born 13 Aug 1870, Warren County, Tennessee; died 16 Jun 1950, Warren County, Tennessee; was buried Smyrna Cemetery, Irving College, Warren County, Tennessee.
    2. Sarah Maxey "Sallie" Hennessee was born 19 Dec 1871, Warren County, Tennessee; died 16 Jun 1956, Warren County, Tennessee; was buried Shellsford Cemetery, 121 Bottoms Road, McMinnville, Warren County, Tennessee 37111.
    3. James Thomas Hennessee, Jr. was born 23 Jun 1875, Warren County, Tennessee; died 25 Jun 1875, Warren County, Tennessee; was buried Hennessee Cemetery, Warren County, Tennessee.
    4. Rachel Chambers Hennessee was born 9 Jan 1876, Warren County, Tennessee; died 12 Jan 1954, Warren County, Tennessee; was buried Smyrna Cemetery, Irving College, Warren County, Tennessee.
    5. Jesse D Hennessee was born 23 Dec 1880, Warren County, Tennessee; died 23 Jul 1952, Detroit, Wayne County, Michigan; was buried 26 Jul 1952, Shellsford Cemetery, 121 Bottoms Road, McMinnville, Warren County, Tennessee 37111.
    6. Andy Franklin Hennessee was born 21 Aug 1881, Warren County, Tennessee; died 4 May 1882, Warren County, Tennessee; was buried Hennessee Cemetery, Warren County, Tennessee.

    James married Nancy Wright 21 Nov 1883, Warren County, Tennessee. Nancy (daughter of David Mortimer "Mort" Wright and Mary "Polly" Jennings) was born 16 Feb 1860, Warren County, Tennessee; died 10 May 1902, Warren County, Tennessee; was buried Shellsford Cemetery, 121 Bottoms Road, McMinnville, Warren County, Tennessee 37111. [Group Sheet]

    Notes:

    Married:
    by B. P. Jarrett, J.P.

    Children:
    1. George Martin Hennessee was born 14 Apr 1884, Warren County, Tennessee; died 29 Nov 1979, Warren County, Tennessee; was buried Shellsford Cemetery, 121 Bottoms Road, McMinnville, Warren County, Tennessee 37111.
    2. Mary Darthula "Aunt Thulie" Hennessee was born 27 Dec 1885, Warren County, Tennessee; died 22 Jul 1978, Warren County, Tennessee; was buried Grange Hall Cemetery, Centertown, Warren County, Tennessee.
    3. Oscar Hennessee was born 0___ 1887, Warren County, Tennessee.
    4. Henry Bertha Hennessee was born 15 Apr 1887, Warren County, Tennessee; died 7 Jan 1961, Warren County, Tennessee; was buried Shellsford Cemetery, 121 Bottoms Road, McMinnville, Warren County, Tennessee 37111.
    5. Suely Hennessee was born 0Nov 1888, Warren County, Tennessee.
    6. Andrew T(homas) "Andy" Hennessee was born (1891-1899), Warren County, Tennessee; died (1891-1899), Warren County, Tennessee.
    7. Almedia Hennessee was born 2 Feb 1892, Warren County, Tennessee; died 3 Feb 1892, Warren County, Tennessee; was buried Shellsford Cemetery, 121 Bottoms Road, McMinnville, Warren County, Tennessee 37111.
    8. Arcie Womack Hennessee was born 15 Jul 1893, Warren County, Tennessee; died 8 Aug 1956, Memphis, Tennessee; was buried Shellsford Cemetery, 121 Bottoms Road, McMinnville, Warren County, Tennessee 37111.
    9. Josephine Agnes "Josie" Hennessee was born 13 Aug 1896, Warren County, Tennessee; died 12 Jul 1971, Warren County, Tennessee; was buried Shellsford Cemetery, 121 Bottoms Road, McMinnville, Warren County, Tennessee 37111.
    10. Albert Audley "Uncle Aud" Hennessee was born 16 Feb 1899, Warren County, Tennessee; died 7 Dec 1987, Warren County, Tennessee; was buried Gardens of Memory Cemetery, McMinnville, Warren County, Tennessee.

Generation: 2

  1. 2.  Thomas Hennessee was born 0___ 1795, Burke County, North Carolina (son of James Hennessee and Sarah "Sallie" Wilcher); died 1861-1865, Warren County, Tennessee; was buried Hennessee Cemetery, Warren County, Tennessee.

    Other Events:

    • Residence: 0___ 1826, White County, Tennessee

    Notes:

    "White County TN Tax List:1826", lists "Thomas Henesy"...

    Appears in the "1830 Census - Middle Tennessee", Byron Sistler, 1971", page 165

    Both Sally and Thomas buried in unmarked graves in Hennessee Cem. Appears in 1860 TN Census, Davidson Co. (Nashville). See photo.

    There appears listed on the roster of the 35th Tenn.Regiment, CSA, Co."B", Thomas Hennessee Sr. & Jr. The senior would have been in his sixties...?

    Appears in the 1850 Wright Co.,MO Federal Census

    Appears in Wright Co.,MO 1860 Census. Could have left Missouri early in 1860 on his way back to Warren County...

    27 Mar 2011:

    United States Census, 1860 for Thomas Hennessee
    Name: Thomas Hennessee
    Residence: , Wright, Missouri
    Ward:
    Age: 66 years
    Estimated Birth Year: 1794
    Birthplace: North Carolina
    Gender: Male
    Page: 65
    Family Number: 405
    Film Number: 803660
    DGS Number: 4234825
    Image Number: 00389
    NARA Number: M653

    To view the "Old Hennessee Cemetery", go to: http://www.tngenweb.org/warren/cemeteries/Hen.html

    From: info@classroomfurniture.com
    To: sam_broyles@hotmail.com
    Subject: Daniel Broyles 1815-1856
    Date: Thu, 25 Sep 2008 09:52:34 -0400

    Hello Sam.

    Apparently you are to 'gotoguy' for BROYLES. Have you any data regarding this Daniel, son of Thomas & Susanna Yeager Broyles, who married Catherine Hennessee, 4 Aug 1842, in White Co.,TN?
    I can list seven children, but none of their issue.
    Can you help?

    Thank you,

    David Hennessee
    800.327.3380 Voice
    866.746.3813 Fax
    www.classroomfurniture.com
    info@classroomfurniture.com
    'We make it easy...'


    David,

    Below is the data I have. If you have any corrections or additions, I would very much appreciate your assistance.

    Regards,
    Sam Broyles
    San Francisco, CA
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++=
    Descendants of: Thomas Hennessee

    1 Thomas Hennessee m. --- Cain
    2 Catherine Hennessee b. 1820 TN d. > 1860 MO m. Daniel Broyles m. 4 Aug 1842 White Co., TN b. 21 Aug 1815 White Co., TN d. c. 1856 Wright Co., MO [son of Thomas (Samuel Thomas) Broyles and Susanna Yeager]
    3 Sarah Ann Broyles b. 1844 TN m. William L. Murrell m. c. 1867 b. 2 Apr 1844 Taney Co., MO d. 15 Sep 1920 Hartville, Wright, MO
    4 Dorthula Murrell b. c. 1868 Hartville, Wright Co., MO
    4 James M. Murrell b. c. 1870 Hartville, Wright Co., MO m. Fannie M. --- b. c. 1875
    4 William Dee Murrell b. 21 May 1871 Hartville, Wright Co., MO d. 27 Aug 1954 Wright Co., MO m. Nancy Robinett b. 19 Jun 1872 Wright Co., MO d. 7 Oct 1965 Wright Co., MO [daughter of James Robinett and Nancy Smith] survived by 6 grandchildren; 13 great-grandchildren
    5 Edna Murrell m. --- Nichols
    5 Gladys Murrell m. --- Roberts
    5 Harry Murrell
    5 Cecil Murrell
    4 Avah A. Murrell b. c. 1877 Hartville, Wright Co., MO
    4 George Clarence Murrell b. 23 May 1878 Hartville, Wright Co., MO d. 27 Mar 1966 Springfield, MO m. Jannie --- b. c. 1880 survived by grandchildren; 3 great-grandchildren
    5 Mildred Murrell m. --- Mitchell
    5 Van V. Murrell
    3 Elizabeth Broyles b. 1846 TN d. > 1900 m. Thomas J. Bramhall b. 25 Apr 1845 d. 30 Mar 1877 [son of Jacob Bramhall and Elizabeth Aaron]
    4 Barney Bramhall
    4 Jacob Bramhall
    4 Atlanta Bramhall
    4 Isaiah Bramhall
    4 H.T. Bramhall b. _____ d. > 1935 res Hartville, MO 1935
    4 James Polk Bramhall m. Nora Dell Bohannon b. 3 Nov 1878
    5 --- Bramhall
    5 --- Bramhall
    3 Thomas Broyles b. 23 Oct 1847 TN d. 3 Jul 1946 Montgomery, Wright, MO m. Sarah McRoberts b. 1849 MO d. < 1900 [daughter of Frances McConnell McRoberts and Eliza Young] A Confederate veteran who attended parades for many years in Mountain Grove, MO, he lived in Manes, Mo. and was age 94 in 1940. He died in the mid 1940's still faithful to the Southern Cause.
    4 Amanda J. Broyles b. 4 Sep 1869 Wright Co., MO d. 10 Jul 1956 Springfield, MO m. --- Choate
    5 Oran Choate b. Feb 1892
    5 Hosa Choate b. Aug 1897
    4 Daniel F. Broyles b. 1871 d. < 1956 m. --- Choate
    4 James Broyles b. Sep 1873 d. < 1974
    4 William P. Broyles b. 1876 MO d. > 1956 < 1974 m. Ella --- b. 1886 MO
    5 Evert C. Broyles b. 27 Feb 1905 Wright Co., MO d. Nov 1987 Kansas City, Jackson Co., MO
    5 Tommy A. Broyles b. 1908 Wright Co., MO
    5 Ausber L. Broyles b. 15 Oct 1910 Wright Co., MO d. 22 Oct 1996 Kansas City, Jackson Co., MO m. Ruby Owens d. resided 1996 Kansas City, Jackson Co., MO

    Ausber L. Broyles, 86, Kansas City, MO, passed away Tuesday, October 22, 1996, at Research Medical Center. Funeral services will be 3 p.m. Saturday, October 26, at D.W. Newcomer's Sons Floral Hills Chapel; burial in Floral Hills Memorial Gardens. Visitation will be 2-3 p.m. Saturday, at the chapel. Mr.Broyles was born in Wright County, MO. He worked as a mail/baggage handler for K.C. Terminal Railroad. He was a U.S. Army veteran of World War II. He was a member of Red Bridge Baptist Church. Mr. Broyles is survived by his wife, Ruby Owens Broyles, of the home; three sons, Bill, Kansas City, MO, Tommy, Dallas, TX, and Edwin, Oklahoma City, OK; a sister, Estelline Mort, Sun City West, AZ; several grandchildren; and one great-grandson.

    6 Bill Broyles b. _____ d. resided 1996 Kansas City, Jackson Co., MO
    6 Tommy Allen Broyles b. _____ d. resided 2007 Gregg Co., TX m. Karen D. --- m. Neely Tyann Tackett m. 07 Jul 2007 Gregg Co., TX d. resided 2007 Gregg Co., TX
    7 Tommy Broyles b. 23 Feb 1969 d. resided 2005 Gregg Co., TX
    6 Edwin Broyles b. _____ d. resided 1996 Oklahoma City, OK
    5 Mary O. Broyles b. 1917 Wright Co., MO
    5 Sarah E. Broyles b. 1923 Wright Co., MO
    5 Estelline Broyles b. _____ d. resided 1996 Sun City West, AZ m. Robert C. Mort b. 19 Sep 1924 KS d. 18 Feb 2004 Sun City West, AZ
    4 John L. Broyles b. 31 Oct 1877 MO d. 13 Nov 1960 MO m. Susie Caddell b. 18 Feb 1875 KY d. 02 Dec 1941 Jasper Co., MO
    4 Joseph Broyles b. _____ d. > 1956 < 1974
    4 Reuben Thomas Broyles b. 3 Sep 1883 MO d. 07 Mar 1975 Fresno, Fresno Co., CA m. Naomi A. Baker b. 07 Oct 1888 MO d. 25 Aug 1966 Visalia, Tulare, CA
    5 Orville Noah Broyles b. 05 Jul 1913 MO d. 09 Mar 1982 Bishop, Inyo, CA m. Inez ---
    5 Ineza Broyles b. 1917
    5 Ruby Broyles b. 1920
    5 Dorothy Broyles b. 1922
    5 Dannie Broyles b. 1926
    5 Esther M. Broyles b. 1923
    4 Samuel Montgomery Broyles b. Nov 1886 MO d. 1962 Buhl, Twin Falls Co m. Oma Shropshire b. 1891 MO d. resided 1962 Buhl, Twin Falls Co
    5 Loman C. Broyles b. 31 Aug 1914 MO d. 01 Jul 1989 MO
    5 Stanley F. Broyles b. 1911 MO
    4 Sara Aretta Broyles b. 15 Mar 1890 Manes, Wright Co., MO d. 8 Mar 1974 Hartville, Wright Co., MO m. --- Sullivant
    3 James Gideon Broyles b. 23 Jun 1850 Hartville, Wright Co., MO d. 24 Mar 1928 Hartville, Wright Co., MO m. Laura B. Hart b. 30 Jul 1863 d. 9 Aug 1895 Wright Co., MO [daughter of Isaac Hart and Triphena P. Pool] m. Elizabeth A. Absher b. 06 Aug 1866 Mountain Grove, Wright Co., MO d. 25 Feb 1925 Hartville, Wright Co., MO [daughter of John Anderson Absher and Elizabeth Watson]
    4 Roy Broyles b. 01 Mar 1890 Wright Co., MO d. 14 Apr 1967 Cabool, Wright Co., MO m. Jessie Nickle b. 01 Oct 1904 d. Sep 1981 Hartville, Wright Co., MO

    7 grandchildren

    5 Jerry Broyles b. _____ d. resided 1967 Slater, MO
    5 Dorothy Broyles b. _____ d. resided 1967 Hartville, Wright Co., MO m. --- Branstetter d. resided 1967 Hartville, Wright Co., MO
    5 Jewell Broyles b. _____ d. resided 1967 Mountain Grove, MO m. --- Pearman d. resided 1967 Mountain Grove, MO
    4 James Kingsley Broyles b. 23 Oct 1884 Wright Co., MO d. 25 May 1977 Springfield, Greene Co., MO m. Alice Lamb m. 25 May 1918 Brigham City, Box Elder Co., Utah b. 1890 MO m. Ethel Aleth Findley b. Jul 1895 Hartville, Wright Co., MO d. 4 Jun 1963 Springfield, Greene Co., MO
    [daughter of Marion Findley and Mary Jane Newton]
    5 Ralph Eugene Broyles b. 06 Sep 1907 MO d. 24 Jan 1969 El Paso, El Paso Co., TX
    5 James Kingsley Broyles Jr. b. 1922 d. resided 1977 Springfield, Greene Co., MO
    5 Paul Donald Broyles b. _____ Wright Co., MO d. reside 1977 West Bloomfield, Oakland Co., MI
    4 Zona Broyles b. Jan 1888 m. Joseph A. Copening
    4 James A. Broyles b. Oct 1884 m. Elizabeth Smith m. 2 Oct 1851
    4 Roup Broyles b. Mar 1889
    4 Oria Broyles b. Jun 1892
    3 Patrick Broyles b. 1852 Wright Co., MO
    3 Rebecca Broyles b. 1854 Wright Co., MO m. --- Garner
    4 Catherine Garner b. 1873 MO
    3 Daniel Broyles b. Feb 1856 Wright Co., MO m. Lucy A. --- b. Jan 1860 KY
    4 Thomas R. Broyles b. 1881 MO m. Liza --- m. Virgie --- b. 1881 MO
    5 Woneta Hazel Broyles b. 04 Nov 1898 Mountain Grove, Wright Co., MO d. 27 Jan 1987 St. Helens, Columbia, OR m. Jess Barger m. 31 Oct 1915 St. Helens, Columbia, OR b. 12 Mar 1897 MO d. Mar 1987 PA m. Lester Egbert (Bert) Brown m. 02 Mar 1923 Columbia Co., Oregon b. 19 Dec 1900 Greenfield, Adair, IA d. 11 Sep 1979 St. Helens, Columbia, OR
    6 Wilbur Barger b. 14 Sep 1916 St. Helens, Columbia, OR
    6 Doris Barger b. 25 Mar 1918 St. Helens, Columbia, OR
    6 Morris Barger b. 10 Dec 1919 St. Helens, Columbia, OR
    6 Lester Egbert Brown b. 05 Apr 1927 St. Helens, Columbia, OR m. June Birt m. 5 Apr 1947 m. --- Blankinship
    7 Lester Arthur Brown b. 22 Feb 1956 Portland, Multnomah, ORi d. 8 Jun 1985 Riverside Co., CA m. --- Schaeffer
    5 Edmon Broyles b. 1906 MO
    5 Mabel Broyles b. 1912 AR

    Birth:
    Map & History of Burke County, North Carolina http://bit.ly/Rd17uM

    Buried:
    in an unmarked grave, view location and grave-site photos of the Old Hennessee Cemetery... http://bit.ly/1FVXSxM

    Died:
    Map & History of Warren County, Tennessee... http://bit.ly/Sl3IRM or

    Thomas married Sarah "Sally" Jennings (CIRCA 1826), (Warren County) Tennessee. Sarah (daughter of Obediah Jennings and Elizabeth Dodson) was born 27 Jun 1814, (Warren County) Tennessee; died 10 Aug 1887, Warren County, Tennessee; was buried Warren County, Tennessee. [Group Sheet]


  2. 3.  Sarah "Sally" Jennings was born 27 Jun 1814, (Warren County) Tennessee (daughter of Obediah Jennings and Elizabeth Dodson); died 10 Aug 1887, Warren County, Tennessee; was buried Warren County, Tennessee.

    Notes:

    1860 Wright Co.,MO Census implies Sarah was born in 1808. DODSON book lists 6/27/1814 but the date is caveated.
    1880 Warren Co. Census confirms her birth year as 1808. She living with her daughter, Rachel.

    Buried:
    in an unmarked grave in Hennessee Cemetery...

    View location and grave-site photos of the old Hennessee cemetery... http://www.tngennet.org/warren/cemeteries/Hen.html

    Children:
    1. Patrick Scott "Paddy" Hennessee was born 27 Nov 1826, Warren County, Tennessee; died 18 Oct 1900, (Cookeville) Putnam County, Tennessee.
    2. Thomas Hennessee, Jr. was born 0___ 1827, Warren County, Tennessee; died Aft 1870, (Wright County, Missouri).
    3. Paralee Hennessee was born ~ 1830, Warren County, Tennessee.
    4. Elihu C. Hennessee was born 0___ 1834, (Warren County) Tennessee; died Lookout Mountain, Hamilton County, Tennessee.
    5. Rachel Hennessee was born 3 Jun 1836, (Wright County, Missouri); died 25 Mar 1902, Warren County, Tennessee; was buried Shellsford Cemetery, 121 Bottoms Road, McMinnville, Warren County, Tennessee 37111.
    6. Jesse Hennessee was born (Warren County) Tennessee; died (Warren County) Tennessee.
    7. Obadiah Hennessee was born 0___ 1837, (Warren County) Tennessee; died 8 Oct 1862, Perryville, Kentucky.
    8. Nancy Hennessee was born 0___ 1839, Warren County, Tennessee; died 1872-1876, Warren County, Tennessee.
    9. George W. Hennessee was born (Warren County, Tennessee); died (Warren County, Tennessee).
    10. Sarah "Sally" Hennessee was born (CIRCA 1843), (Warren County) Tennessee.
    11. (Martin Hennessee) was born Abt 1842, (Warren County, Tennessee); died 8 Oct 1862, Perryville, Kentucky.
    12. Adeleonidas "Dion" Hennessee was born 25 Mar 1844, White County, Tennessee; died 25 Mar 1927, Dunlap, Sequatchie County, Tennessee; was buried 26 Mar 1927, Rankin Cemetery, Dunlap, Sequatchie County, Tennessee.
    13. 1. James Thomas Hennessee was born 3 Nov 1846, Warren County, Tennessee; died 22 Feb 1927, Warren County, Tennessee; was buried Shellsford Cemetery, 121 Bottoms Road, McMinnville, Warren County, Tennessee 37111.
    14. Andrew Jackson Hennessee was born 0Jun 1850, McMinnville, Warren County, Tennessee; died Morrison, Warren County, Tennessee; was buried Smyrna Cemetery, Irving College, Warren County, Tennessee.


Generation: 3

  1. 4.  James Hennessee was born 0___ 1766, Burke County, North Carolina (son of Patrick Hennessee and Alice "Ailsey" LNU); died February 1851, Warren County, Tennessee; was buried Liberty Hill Cumberland Presbyterian Cemetery, Warren County, Tennessee.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Farmer
    • Possessions: 0___ 1805; Warren County, Tennessee
    • Possessions: 0___ 1812; Warren County, Tennessee
    • Will: 7 Mar 1848, Warren County, Tennessee
    • Probate: March 1851, Warren County, Tennessee

    Notes:

    From James came all of the Tennessee, Missouri, Oklahoma, Texas and other Western Hennessee families...

    Last Will & Testament of James Hennessee of the County of Warren and the State of Tennessee

    I, James Hennessee, considering the uncertainty of this mortal life, I being of sound mind and memory do make and publish this my last will and testament in manner and form following: That is to say

    Item First:

    I have heretofore given my oldest son, Thomas Hennessee, one tract of land lying in Warren County on the waters of Collins River worth two hundred dollars, also one negro girl worth three hundred dollars, one horse, bridle and saddle worth fifty dollars, one bed and furniture, one cow and calf worth sixteen dollars and that is all I ever intend to give him.

    Item Second:

    I have given my son, Patrick S. Hennessee, on tract or parcel of land worth two hundred and fifty dollars, one horse, bridle and saddle worth fifty dollars and one cow and calf and one bed and furniture worth sixteen dollars and also one other negro girl, named Hannah, worth two-hundred and fifty dollars and that is all I ever intend to give him.

    Item Third:

    I have given my daughter, Alsey Christian, one negro woman named Betty, worth five hundred dollars, one cow and calf and one bed and furniture worth sixteen dollars and two horses worth thirty dollars each and that is all I ever intend to give her.

    Item Fourth:

    I have given my son Archibald W. Hennessee one tract or parcel of land on the waters of Collins River in the County of Warren worth two hundred dollars, one mare, bridle and saddle worth fifty dollars, and one cow and calf, bed and furniture worth sixteen dollars, and that is all I ever intend to give him.

    Item Fifth:

    I have given my son Alfred Hennessee one tract or parcel of land in County of Warren on the waters of Collins River worth two hundred dollars, one negro boy worth four hundred dollars and one bed and furniture and one cow and calf worth sixteen dollars and that is all I ever intend to give him.

    Item Sixth:

    I have given my son Alexander Hennessee one tract of land lying on the waters of Collins River worth two hundred dollars and two negro girls worth two hundred and fifty dollars each and one bedstead bed and furniture worth ten dollars and that is all I ever intend to give him.

    Item Seventh:

    I have given my son Henry Hennessee one negro boy and one negro girl worth three hundred dollars each, one bed and furniture and one cow and calf worth sixteen dollars and that is all I ever intend to give him.

    Item 8:

    I have given my son James W. Hennessee one tract of land in the county of Warren on the waters of Collins River worth two hundred dollars and one negro girl worth two hundred dollars and one horse, bridle and saddle worth eighty-five dollars, one bed and furniture worth eight dollars and that is all I ever intend to give him.

    Now as touching my free hold estate which I am lawfully seized and possessed of at this time. First, I give to and bequeath to my beloved wife Jane Hennessee ten acres of land including by dwelling houses and all other out-building running from the bank of Collins River west to the branch, also the seventh part of forty acres of land in the County of Warren and west of my dwelling house and formerly know as school land, also the seventh part of all my household furniture and here saddle which she now is in possession of and the seventh part of my stock.

    Item 2nd:

    I give to my son John Hennessee ten acres of land on the upper end of my land next to the river including a small field, also his saddle and also the seventh part of all my stock and household furniture and the seventh part of the above mentioned school-land, and lastly as to all the rest residing and remainder of my real and personal estate goods and cattles of whatsoever kind, the one I give and demise to Polly Ann Hennessee my oldest daughter, Samuel M. Hennessee, Ester Hennessee, Anderson L. Hennessee and Eliza Jane Hennessee in the following manner, that is to say the same shall be equally divided amongst the five last mentioned children.

    I hereby appoint my wife Jane Hennessee and P. S. Hennessee sole executrix and executor of this my last will and testament hereby revoking all former wills by me made and my said wife Jane Hennessee shall remain in full possession of all that part of the land then divided to my last mentioned six children during her widowhood or until the youngest child becomes of age my said executrix and executor give theirs of their portion as mentioned in my last will and testament.

    In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this seventh day of March in the year of our Lord one-thousand-eight-hundred and forty-eight. The above division shall be made after all my just debts is paid.

    Signed: James Hennessee

    Note: A Codicil was signed by James Hennessee on February 2, 1851, affirming "Item 2nd" of his will. On April 19, 1851 a commission was appointed to sell the property.

    Elisha David Cunningham witnessed the will of James Hennessee, Warren County, TN Will Book I, p. 119 ... DAH

    *

    more...

    Individual Record FamilySearch™ Ancestral File v4.19

    Archibald WILCHER (AFN: 1FBT-DF5) Pedigree
    Sex: M Family
    Event(s)
    Birth: Abt. 1771
    <, Burke Co., North Carolina>
    Parents
    Father: Thomas WILCHER (AFN: 1FBT-DCQ) Family
    Mother: Nancy WALTON (AFN: JRKG-F2)

    Wanda Gant, who has abstracted a list of 1820 Warren County jail-petitioners, cites among them;

    "...Wilcher, Thomas
    Wilsher, R. P.". - Who is this? Could he be another son of Thomas (Ransom Pinckney?). He must have been born before 1799 as the list cites those who are in majority only. On further reflection, R. P., could be simply a misread or typo for A. P. - Archibald Price...DAH

    What is the relationship between Miss Cain and John CAIN listed in following complaint?

    circa 1830-1831:

    "CHANCERY of M'MINVILLE DECREES

    Thomas Wilcher, administrator and legale of Archibald P. Wilchire, dec. and Leroy Hammans, guardian of Barto Vaughn, complaints vs.

    John Cain, Jesse Wooton, Jas. Henessee, Nancy Wilcher, Charles Colson, Jonathan Wootton and Wm. Pragill, defendants."

    13 Jul 2008: Could not locate Wooton or Pragill in 1850 Warren or White County census...DAH

    Abstracted from "The Upper Cumberland Researcher", Volume XXI, No.1, Spring 1996,article entitled, "The Sparta Recorder and Law Journal by Anderson and Long, July 31, 1830 Vol. 1, No. 13", p. 18

    20 Jul 2008

    http://www.tngenweb.org/white/_minutes/1814_172.html

    Would Frances Hennessee be a sibling or a son to James? There no further references to the name, "Frances", in James' line...DAH

    21 July 1815

    P. 172 It is therefore considered by the Court the cause continue until the next term of this Court.

    Ordered by Court that Zachariah Jones be appointed Overseer of the road leading from Sparta to Allens ferry beginning where Furgersons path turns off, thence to said ferry, and that William Irwin Esqr. furnish a sufficient number of hand to work there on and open said road and who shall be considered bound to work thereon until sufficiently opened and then to return to work on former road assigned them to work on and keep in repair &c.

    Ordered by Court that Moses Lynnville be appointed Overseer of the road from Hailys old Cabin to the house of Reuben Ragland Esqr. and that Reuben Ragland assign a list of hand to work there on.

    Saturday July 22nd 1815. Ordered that Court be adjourned until Court in Court.

    Turner Lane )

    Frances Hennessee )

    Joseph Smith ) Esqrs.

    Isaac Medkiff )

    Test- Jacob A. Lane. Clk.

    *

    more...

    Other "James'" found in early records...

    James Henesy 1762 North Carolina Taxpayers List New Hanover County, NC p. 95 Tax Roll: North Carolina New Hanover D.A.Hennessee Item:
    James Henesy 1763 North Carolina Taxpayers List New Hanover County, NC p. 95 Tax Roll: North Carolina New Hanover D.A.Hennessee Item:
    James Hennesy 1780 Irish Settlers in America Vermont Revolutionary Patriot p. 257 Rev.Patriots: Vermont Uncited Vol. I Grant Hennessa Item:
    James Hennessy 1778 Calender of Maryland State Papers:The Red Papers Oath: Maryland Anne Arundel State of Maryland D.A.Hennessee Item:
    James Hennessee 1860 Alabama Census:1860 p. 220 Census: Alabama Jones Bluff,Sumter 1860Sumter ALD.A.Hennessee Item:

    James Henecy 1778 Burke County, NC, Land Records: 1778 p. 565 Land Record: North Carolina Burke County Vol. I Mary Barnes Item:
    James Heney 1778 Burke County, NC, Land Records: 1778 p. 230 Land Record: North Carolina Burke County Vol. I Mary Barnes Item:
    James Henecy 1778 Burke County, NC, Land Records: 1778 p. 229 Land Record: North Carolina Burke County Vol. I Mary Barnes Item:
    James Hennessy 1780 Irish Settlers in America p. 318 Mil. Service: Uncited Uncited Vol. IMichael J. O'Brien Grant Hennessa Item:

    James Hennesy 1777 Irish Settlers in America Vermont Revolutionary Patriot p. 257 Rev.Patriots: Vermont County Unknown Vol. IMichael J. O'Brien Grant Hennessa Item:

    James Hennessy 1805 Talbot County,MD Guardian Accounts Apprenticeship: Maryland Talbot D.A.Hennessee Item:
    James Hennessy 1793 Talbot County,MD Guardian Accounts Birth: Maryland Talbot D.A.Hennessee Item:
    James Hennessee 1809 Early Deeds of Williamson Co.,TN:1792-1812 Land Purchase Tennessee Franklin Joyce Martin Murray Davidson Mary Barnes

    *

    more...

    Subject Jump: You might be interested that on this same 1805 Tax List, image 4 of 5, left side, entry number 17 is a James Hennessee.

    {Someone has scribbled in the edge of the document that James Hennessee was a handsome dude, wealthy beyond belief and the local power broker for Rock Island governent when it was still White County---or something like that........}

    Source Information: Ancestry.com. Tennessee, Early Tax List Records, 1783-1895 [database on-line].

    more...

    "Tennessee County Formation Maps" 1777-1985 ... http://tngenweb.org/maps/county-ani/tn-maps/tn-cf.html

    Select a year and view county line changes...

    *

    Birth:
    Map & History of Burke County, North Carolina http://bit.ly/Rd17uM

    Will:
    - Will recorded

    Buried:
    http://home.att.net/~jemjr/graveyard.htm

    OLD BURIAL GROUNDS OF WARREN COUNTY, TENN. By MRS. BLANCHE BENTLEY

    "One of the best known and first organized churches of Warren County was Liberty, a mile or so from McMinnville. As shown by his will, land was given by Thomas Wiltshire (Wilcher), the church house built and the church, Cumberland Presbyterian in doctrine, organized all in 1815. William Cheek Smartt is the reputed founder and he and John Allison, a Revolutionary soldier, were two of its first elders..."

    Died:
    Map & History of Warren County, Tennessee... http://bit.ly/PIsRbw

    James married Sarah "Sallie" Wilcher Abt 1794, (Burke County, North Carolina). Sarah (daughter of Thomas Wilcher, Sr. and (Nancy Anna) "Anne" (Walton) LNU) was born 0___ 1775, (Amherst County, Virginia); died Abt 8 Jul 1830, Warren County, Tennessee; was buried (Liberty Hill Cumberland Presbyterian Cemetery, Warren County, Tennessee). [Group Sheet]


  2. 5.  Sarah "Sallie" Wilcher was born 0___ 1775, (Amherst County, Virginia) (daughter of Thomas Wilcher, Sr. and (Nancy Anna) "Anne" (Walton) LNU); died Abt 8 Jul 1830, Warren County, Tennessee; was buried (Liberty Hill Cumberland Presbyterian Cemetery, Warren County, Tennessee).

    Other Events:

    • Alt Death: (BEFORE 1825), Warren County, Tennessee

    Notes:

    Birth:
    or Amherst Co.,VA

    Buried:
    http://home.att.net/~jemjr/graveyard.htm

    OLD BURIAL GROUNDS OF WARREN COUNTY, TENN. By MRS. BLANCHE BENTLEY

    "One of the best known and first organized churches of Warren County was Liberty, a mile or so from McMinnville. As shown by his will, land was given by Thomas Wiltshire (Wilcher), the church house built and the church, Cumberland Presbyterian in doctrine, organized all in 1815. William Cheek Smartt is the reputed founder and he and John Allison, a Revolutionary soldier, were two of its first elders..."

    Children:
    1. 2. Thomas Hennessee was born 0___ 1795, Burke County, North Carolina; died 1861-1865, Warren County, Tennessee; was buried Hennessee Cemetery, Warren County, Tennessee.
    2. Patrick S(amuel) "Paddy" Hennessee was born 0___ 1796, Burke County, North Carolina; died 0___ 1860, Warren County, Tennessee; was buried Hennessee Cemetery, Warren County, Tennessee.
    3. Alford Hennessee was born 0___ 1801, (Burke County) North Carolina.
    4. (FNU Hennessee) was born (ABT 1800), (Burke County, North Carolina).
    5. Archibald Wilcher "Archie" Hennessee was born 25 Sep 1802, Burke County, North Carolina; died 7 Aug 1875, Warren County, Tennessee.
    6. Ailsey Hennessee was born 1794-1804, Burke County, North Carolina; died Aft 1848.
    7. Alexander Hennessee was born 0___ 1804, Burke County, North Carolina; died 0___ 1875, Warren County, Tennessee; was buried Shellsford Cemetery, 121 Bottoms Road, McMinnville, Warren County, Tennessee 37111.
    8. Henry D(avid) Hennessee was born 0___ 1805, Warren County, Tennessee; died (Lawrence County, Arkansas).
    9. James W(ilcher) I. Hennessee was born 25 Jul 1811, Warren County, Tennessee; died 16 Feb 1846, White County, Tennessee.

  3. 6.  Obediah Jennings was born ~ 1775, North Carolina (son of (John Jennings) and (Mary LNU)); died SUMMER 1830, Warren County, Tennessee.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Surveyor
    • Religion: Primitive Baptist
    • Also Known As: Obadiah Jennings
    • Probate: 12 Apr 1832, Warren County, Tennessee

    Notes:

    "The parents of Obediah are not proven but his name was thought to be Royal Obediah and if so, he is listed in the Grainger Co.,TN will of Royal Jennings, Sr. Others say his name was Pleasant Obediah and that he is the Pleasant Jennings mentioned in the will. All unproven...CGL"

    Note: Seems more likely that Obediah is a brother to Royal...DAH.

    Re: Obediah Jennings of Claiborne/Warren TN

    Posted by: Walter Dreier Date: January 10, 2002 at 17:31:19

    In Reply to: Re: Obediah Jennings of Claiborne/Warren TN by Dana of 5891


    I have proof that Obadiah Jennings, (the surveyor)who died in 1839 in Warren Co. Tenn. was in Grainger Co. Tenn. by 1796. His name is on a marriage bond application. in County records. He left the area for Warren Co. in about 1805

    Family members say that Obadiah died and is buried under a Rock Fence on a farm belonging to Gobel Jennings. in Warren Co

    A descendent took my wife and I out to that site in 1980. There are several big rocks in the area,-but there is no sign of individual grave marking any graves.Some family descendants think he might have used another name,in Virginia and that he was really Pleasant Obadiah Jennings. He did have a son named Pleasant who was killed by Yankees looking for deserters. I attached the the name of "The Surveyor" to our Obadiah to distinguish him from the Rev. Obadiah Jennings-a distinguished minister in Nashville who died the same year as Obadiah. He did surveying work in Warren Co.
    _____

    Excerpted from "The Warren County,TN Will Book I", abstracted and compiled by Betty Moore Majors, p. 10:

    "pg 52. 12 Apr 1830. The will of Obadiah Jennings.

    I, Obadiah Jennings, being low in body but of sound mind and disposing memory, knowing life is uncertain and death certain, after committing my soul to God that gave it, and my body to the Earth, I now set about to fix my worldly affairs.

    1st, I wish all my debts and funeral expenses paid. I give my loving wife Elizabeth Jennings stock, furniture [etc.] and sufficient provision for one year. My desire is that all the rest of my estate, both real and personal be sold and equally divided, and that part which fall to daughter Sally Hennisee that of her legacy be and remain in the hands of my executors and be paid out by them as her "kneads" may require and that part which falls to my daughter Nancy Watley to remain in the hands of my executors to give to her as they may think her kneads require, and in addition I wish my loving daughter Elizabeth to have a horse beast, bridle and saddle, bed and furniture, and my son Riol to have a bed and furniture. I wish my executors to pay to my loving wife Elizabeth $300.00 out of the proceeds of my estate.

    After the sale of the estate [the money is to be] paid to my heirs, to wit:
    Rutha Smith,
    Jesse Gennings,
    Polly Griffith,
    Lear Gennings,
    John Gennings,
    Sally Hennisee,
    Nancy Watley,
    Elizabeth Gennings,
    and Riol Jennings.

    Executors Audley Harrison and William McGregor

    Witnesses: Haston S. Crim and Frances Cardwell."

    _____________

    Found in the Jennings genforum, submitted by Carin, fourpawsjake@worldnet.att.net;

    Documented Notes on Jennings and Allied Families by Doughtie

    Page 906

    Obidiah Jennings, Sr. married Ruth Dodson, a daughter of Jesse Dodson of Halifax and Pittsylvania County, Virginia to Hawkins County, Tennessee settling in the part that later became Grainger County. He is buried in the Matlock Cemetery in McMinn County, Tennessee. Obidiah Jennings, Sr. and Ruth Dodson had a son Obidiah Jennings who married Minnie McGee. Obidiah Jennings, Sr. had a sister who married Marion Clendening Drake in Warren County, Tennessee.
    ________

    October Second Saturday 1806. Church met at Big Spring (Primitive Baptist Church, Claiborne County, Tennessee) and after worship proceeded to business.

    1st Hannah Hill, Mercurius and Rachel Cook took their seats.

    2nd Agreed to petition the Association for an alteration of their citing from Thursday to Saturday.

    3rd Association letter read and approved.

    4th Reference relative to Ritchard Harper continued to the 14th day of this month.

    William and Nancy Stroud, Obediah and Elisabeth Jennings, Jesse and Ruth Dodson and Dodson's Sukey and James Cunningham dismisd by letter.

    Religion:
    Primitive Baptists, are also known as Hard Shell Baptists, Anti-Mission Baptists, or Old School Baptists. The adjective "Primitive" in the name has the sense of "original".

    Obediah married Elizabeth Dodson (~ 1793), (North Carolina). Elizabeth (daughter of Jesse Buford Dodson, Sr. and Ruth Dodson) was born 0___ 1776, (Halifax County) Commonwealth of Virginia; died 18 May 1850, Warren County, Tennessee; was buried Warren County, Tennessee. [Group Sheet]


  4. 7.  Elizabeth Dodson was born 0___ 1776, (Halifax County) Commonwealth of Virginia (daughter of Jesse Buford Dodson, Sr. and Ruth Dodson); died 18 May 1850, Warren County, Tennessee; was buried Warren County, Tennessee.

    Notes:

    Buried:
    on Gobel Jennings Farm, Harrison's Ferry, Warren County, Tennessee

    Children:
    1. Rutha "Ruthie" Jennings was born 6 Jan 1796, Grainger County, Tennessee; died 9 Jan 1878, Warren County, Tennessee; was buried Shellsford Cemetery, 121 Bottoms Road, McMinnville, Warren County, Tennessee 37111.
    2. Nancy Jennings was born 0___ 1798, (Grainger County, Tennessee).
    3. John Jennings was born (Grainger County, Tennessee).
    4. Mary "Polly" Jennings was born 10 Jan 1800, (Grainger County, Tennessee); died 16 Oct 1854, Fayette County, Illinois; was buried Bob Doan Cemetery, Fayette County, Illinois.
    5. Rial Jennings was born 0___ 1801, (Grainger County, Tennessee).
    6. Leah Jennings was born 1801, (Grainger County, Tennessee).
    7. Jesse Dodson Jennings was born 23 Dec 1802, (Grainger County) Tennessee; died 27 Jul 1884, Warren County, Tennessee; was buried Shellsford Cemetery, 121 Bottoms Road, McMinnville, Warren County, Tennessee 37111.
    8. Tabitha Jennings was born (Grainger County, Tennessee).
    9. Isham Dodson Jennings was born 0Mar 1805, (Grainger County) Tennessee; died 22 Sep 1877, Fayette County, Illinois; was buried Bob Doan Cemetery, Fayette County, Illinois.
    10. Elizabeth Jennings was born 12 Apr 1812, (Warren County) Tennessee; died 23 Dec 1877, Warren County, Tennessee; was buried Shellsford Cemetery, 121 Bottoms Road, McMinnville, Warren County, Tennessee 37111.
    11. 3. Sarah "Sally" Jennings was born 27 Jun 1814, (Warren County) Tennessee; died 10 Aug 1887, Warren County, Tennessee; was buried Warren County, Tennessee.


Generation: 4

  1. 8.  Patrick Hennessee was born (1720-1730), (Ireland) (son of (Thomas Henesy) and (Catherine LNU)); died 0___ 1795, Burke County, North Carolina; was buried 25 Oct 1795, Tryon, Polk County, North Carolina.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Patrick Henacie
    • Also Known As: Patrick Henesey
    • Also Known As: Patrick Henesy
    • Also Known As: Patrick Henicie
    • Also Known As: Patrick Hennesey
    • Also Known As: Patrick Hensey
    • Census Name: Patrick Hensy
    • Military: 3 Jul 1754; Battle of the Great Meadows
    • Military: 0___ 1755; Braddock's Defeat
    • Military: 0___ 1758; Bedford Militia, Bedford County, Virginia
    • Residence: 0___ 1761, New London, Campbell County, Virginia
    • Military: 10 Oct 1774; Battle of Point Pleasant
    • Probate: 0Oct 1796, Burke County, North Carolina

    Notes:

    From: Nick Hennessee
    To: David Hennessee
    Subject: Re: Check-in
    Date: Thursday, March 12, 1998 12:32 PM

    David,

    Here is what I have on Patrick I in the Revolution. Emmett White found his name (with spelling only close to Hennessee) in "NC Rev Army Accts, Vol III, BKG-16 (Haun, Part V)." Emmett said he has yet to extract from the source the data that he will use in his Volume III. I encouraged him to add to his data before he shares with us at our reunion April 19.

    My source is the November 1997 issue of the "Journal of Burke County Historical Society" and a section, "Revolutionary War Soldiers of Burke County, NC." Pages 8-13 are a "Roster of 500 Participants with Service Documentation." The roster has 325 names with sketches in Dr. White’s first two volumes, Revolutionary War Soldiers of Western North Carolina : Burke County, NC. The remaining 175 names are eligible to be sketches in Vol. III.

    Southern Historical Press, Greenville, SC published the first two volumes. The sketches are of "partisans of the American Revolution, including Loyalists, who resided in, served in, or later moved to Burke County." Among those with sketches in Vol. I are the Kincaids, James, John Sr. and Robert. Also Thomas Sumter and Charles McDowell. Vol. II includes William Sumter.

    Dr. White’s explanatory note for "NC Rev Army Accts" reads: "Revolutionary Army Auditors’ Accounts. Since payments due both soldiers and civilians were spotty during the Revolution, vouchers were often given, or no remuneration at all. Boards of auditors were set up in each of the Military-judicial districts of NC. The records of the accounts are extant and, in many cases, establish proof of service. The auditors were to settle all Revolutionary claims by direct payments. Land warrants were issued to Continental Line veterans (in Tennessee Military District). Printed versions of these accounts are available from Weynette Parks Haun of Durham (243 Argonne Drive, 27704-1423)."

    If you need more, let me know

    Best regards,

    Nick

    At 11:34 AM 3/11/98 -0500, you wrote:

    Dear Cuz - Thanks for e-mailing the letter re Patrick I and Emmet White. Keep in touch and best regards to Betty...

    Sincerely yours...

    David Hennessee
    626 Biscayne Drive
    West Palm Beach,FL 33401
    H:561/832-6612
    O:800/327-3380
    F:561/655-5331

    16 Sep 2009:

    http://files.usgwarchives.org/nc/burke/census/morgandis.txt

    This census is from Microcopy No. T-498 Roll 2

    "Hensy, Patrick, 1,1,1,0,3"

    1790 Census North Carolina
    Burke County Morgan District

    1 of 1st # free white males 16 year upwards and head of families (Patrick)
    1 of 2nd # free white males under 16 years (Ailsey)
    1 of 3rd # free white females and head of families (John)
    0 of 4th # all other free persons (no other children)
    3 of 5th # slaves (unnamed)

    *

    more...

    "Kegley's Virginia Frontier: The Beginning of the Southwest - The Roanoke of Colonial Days: 1740-1783", by F. B. Kegley, p. 322: "New London in Bedford (County, Virginia) became a new western frontier town. Lots were laid off in 1761 and a good percentage of the purchasers came from the up country. The original owners were Col. Wm. Callaway...Patrick Henacie.
    Besides a sufficient number of stores there was an Academy of learning in operation as early as 1765."

    It is not known at this point whether Patrick had siblings. Given the average size of families in the 18th century if would seem likely that he did. There are several Hennessees appearing in census records and tax rolls during the late 18th century in and around the Virginia and North Carolina areas, i.e., David and Sarah appear in the Wilmington District (eastern North Carolina) well before 1800.

    "Thomas" is another Hennessee name rife in Colonial Virginia history and appears frequently during Patrick's early lifetime. If we consider the fact that there are several traditional forenames in our family, i.e., Patrick, James, David, John, Alexander and Thomas, to name but a few, Patrick's first son, John had a David, James' middle name was David, etc. It is likely that the aforementioned were brothers to Patrick. Other children of Patrick may have been Alexander and Richard, who both appear the 1800 Burke County, NC census. Reference my work titled, "Unlinked Hennessees".

    View document: http://thehennesseefamily.com/media/Early%20Unlinked%20Hennessees.pdf

    "Burke County, North Carolina, Land Records and More Important Miscellaneous Records: 1751-1809", Vol.III, p. 103;

    "John and Mary Ballew vs. Hensey, Oct.15. Affid. of sd. Ballews: In 1780 he was at Patrick Henesys on Catawba River and saw a field of mares, and Henesy said his sons in law sent them, and later saw a similar mare delivered to Mr. Wm. Heartgrove."

    ...interesting passage in the fact that it implies Patrick had daughters. If he did, we have yet no knowledge of them...DAH*

    In 1761, Patrick shows ownership of a Land Grant in Bedford County, Virginia (see document). Later in 1774-1775, court records list many purchases for Patrick around the Catawba River. Also refer to "Petition of North Carolina Congress", 1775; many signatories: i.e., "David Crockett" and "Patrick Hennesey".

    More content:

    Patrick's will was proven October 25, 1795, in Tryon,Polk Co., NC. Will has been lost...Nita Shepherd

    Hamilton Mortimer Hennessee cited that his great-grandfather was from Ireland as was reported in his Civil War Veteran Interview...

    View his questionnaire: http://thehennesseefamily.com/getperson.php?personID=I904&tree=hennessee

    *Posted By: Nita Shepherd
    Email:
    Subject: Patrick Hennessee, 1700's, Va. & N. C.
    Post Date: November 03, 1998 at 11:26:08
    Message URL: http://genforum.genealogy.com/va/messages/1364.html
    Forum: Virginia Genealogy Forum
    Forum URL: http://genforum.genealogy.com/va/

    Need parentage and names of children of Patrick Hennessee who owned lot 31 in Bedford, Va., who left Va., settling in western N. C., whose will was probated in N. C. but whose will cannot be located, even in the N. C. Archives at Raleigh. His father may have been Thomas who fought in the French & Indian War. Patrick had sons James & John, possibly Peter who had schooling in Bedford, Va., and at least two daughters, names of daughters and sons-in-law not known.

    ...Nita was one of the earliest HENNESSEE researchers and a joy to work with. We spent many happy hours conjecturing early Hennessee heritage. Nita passed away 6 May 2003...

    *

    more...

    Received via E-mail Dec. 23, 1999, information on Patrick Hennessy, from Jim Hamlin:

    "Nita, here is some info from Bedford County Court orders:

    25 May 1763 Youile & Co vs Henicie. Charles Pattison represented Youile & Co and stated he had sold a Negro for the debt, but more was owed and Patrick Henicie's estate was in disrepute (Bedford Co., Va. OB 3 1763 - 71 pg 36). "Gar" was used after Pattison's name.

    25 May 1763 Alice* Henicie allowed 3 days in Matlock v Walker (Bedford Co. Va OB 3 1763 - 71 pg 37).

    Later he was in Burke Co., NC.:

    April 1784 Charles Ballow vs Patrick Henesy re horses. Deferred to court to be held 3rd Monday in July 1784. John and wife Mary were subpoenaed, with Wm Welch, John Harper, and Esther McMullin (NC Archives Series CRO 14.325.2 Box: Civil Action. Folder: 1784 (#2).

    Margaret Hawkins was summoned to give testimony for Patrick Henesy at the January 1784 court (1784 #1).

    April 1785 Patrick Henesy made oath that William Dalton, a material witness was sick and unable to appear in court (1785 #2). The suit was continued. In July 1785, Henesy swore that Dalton was summoned, but did not appear and he (Henesy) cannot come safely to trial (1785 #2).

    Came across Patrick while researching Ballew family who were also in Bedford & then Burke Co., N. C. The Ballews were from Goochland, Albemarle, and Amherst Counties. Have not seen Patrick there, though.

    Not much, but all I have. Hope it helps some. Jim Hamlin"

    * First and only record of Ailsey's Christian name being cited as "Alice".

    item:

    http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/va/bedford/military/mil1758b.txt

    Bedford County Militia, 1758 (part 2)

    Submitted by Gwen Hurst

    Transcribed from: Hening, William Waller

    1820 The Statutes at Large; Being A Collection Of All The Laws Of Virginia, From The First Session Of The Legislature In The Year 1619. Volume VII. Franklin Press, Richmond, Virginia.

    "...Patrick Hensey (¹0.5.0 each) ...five shillings"

    More content:

    A conclusion: Apparently, Patrick went to Bedford Co.,VA before 1758 and was there through 1763

    *

    More Content:

    PATRICK HENNESSEE

    INSIGHT FROM LAND GRANTS

    BURKE COUNTY, NORTH CAROLINA

    INTRODUCTION

    Patrick Hennessee (c.1735-1796), the Patriarch of his family in America, had several land grants in Burke County, North Carolina during the era of the Revolutionary War. Patrick settled on them and raised a family, which has over 3,700 descendants.

    This paper is in two parts. Part I: Summarizes the settlement problems and grant difficulties existing in rebellious colonial North Carolina before and just after the Mecklenburg Declaration. It gives a glimpse into this time of terrible turmoil during the period when Patrick was making entries for land grants. Then, his land grant data are presented in tabular form. Part II: Describes the grants and highlights new insight and significant knowledge about Patrick and his family from the grants and collateral data.

    The work is an extension of research about Hennessee land grants by Fred and Carl Hennessee and others. It is dedicated to Nita Hennessee-Houk Shepard and her brother Dr. Albert Hennessee Houk, both children of Dr. E. A. Hennessee of Glen Alpine, North Carolina. Late in her life, Nita (my aunt) "discovered" a need for knowledge of her "roots". She then spent twenty years of inquiry in the noble search. Her work -- is an inspiration to all!

    For comments, please contact Gene Hennessee at (937) 864-7047.

    *

    (Author's note: The first computerized compilations of survey maps of Patrick's and his neighbors' grants are featured in the article. The mapping is part of research in progress concerning Burke County by Dr. Robert McNeely. Earlier work had been initiated by the Burke County Genealogical Society.)

    PART I: HENNESSEE LAND GRANTS

    ROYAL GRANTS IN NORTH CAROLINA (1578-1777)


    The history of Royal land grants in colonial North Carolina is one of failure for many reasons.

    In 1578, Queen Elizabeth I of England granted a large territory in America, including present North Carolina, to Sir Gilbert. Following his unsuccessful venture in colonization, the Queen granted the territory to Sir Raleigh in 1584. He was not successful either. So, the territory was next granted in 1606 to the Virginia Company. However, this grant was revoked in 1629. At that time, King Charles I granted a large region south of Virginia to Sir Heath. Failure in colonization happened again.

    Finally in 1663, Charles II granted large separate tracts of this region to eight loyal supporters of his restoration. Most of these proprietors' colonization efforts were failures. So, these tracts were returned to the Crown. An exception was made for the grant, which eventually became known as the Granville District, in the northern part of the Royal Province of North Carolina.

    The district was bounded on the north by the North Carolina-Virginia border and on the south by an east-west survey line designated the "Granville Line". The line was just to the south of the "old" Burke County. Patrick's grants were located entirely in the Granville District. However due to (perhaps because of "creative") surveying, there was often confusion about the location of the line between Granville and the Crown lands bordering Burke County. Burke County was formed from Rowan County in 1777. At that time, Burke County contained all or part of 16 future counties including present Burke County.

    INDIANS AND SPECULATION IN BURKE COUNTY (1752)


    In 1752, at the invitation of Lord Granville, Bishop August Spangenburg became one of the early explorers of Burke area. His purpose was to assess the suitability of several locations for a Moravian settlement there. The Bishop recorded the first written description of the area. He noted in the Burke area many buffalo, deer, and hunters including white ones, but not settlements.

    Others described the area as part of a "hunting ground" between the Cherokees and the Catawba Indians. The Bishop also claimed that "…the forest had been ruined by the Indians who are accustom to setting fire to large tracts to drive deer to a given spot [in order to easily kill them] and that keeps the trees from growing." (This was very likely to have been the case on the home grant of Patrick Hennessee based on the salient features of his grant area.)

    According to E. Phifer Burke: History of a North Carolina County, 1977, "Spangenburg chose his fourth tract, 6,000 acres beginning seven or eight miles above the mouth of Middle Creek because the land between the mouth of the river [was] already taken up". (This is of special interest because some of the later Hennessee grants were in this "taken up area".)

    EARLY SETTLEMENT IN BURKE COUNTY (1753-1776)


    In 1753, the Crown's legislators established Rowan County. At once, Granville land promoters began selling the "cheap" land in the Burke County area, then a part of Rowan County. They sold to speculators, immigrants just off the boats in port cities, settlers who had been "late" in other areas, and to those who had settled on marginal farmland elsewhere. Phifer, in his history emphasizes the promoter's appeal to the "pinched" settlers in the northeast. They found many in Pennsylvania eager to buy in North Carolina because land prices in Pennsylvania were very high. Other colonies contributing significant number of pioneers, settlers, and speculators to Burke County were Virginia, Maryland, and the North and South Carolina coast cities according to Burke County Heritage, 1981, Volume 1, published for the Burke County Historical Society. (Both books are highly recommended by the writer as 'the' sources of information about Burke County.)

    Many settlers did not acquire formal title to the land. They were "squatters" who "tried-it-out" or "avoided-the-taxes". Some eventually sought grants for the land; others just moved "on" or "back". However, the migration into the Burke area certainly did not really begin until after the French and Indian War in 1754-1763. During this period, several forts were built along the Indian frontier areas in the Appalachian Mountains, including Burke County for defense. Fear of the Cherokees caused many frontier families to "go-back". Many had died "at the hands of the Cherokees" or from diseases. In fact, Phifer writes, "Between 1756 and 1759, taxable persons in the fairly large Rowan County (which at that time included Burke) diminished from over 1,500 to fewer than 800."

    NC'S "FREEDOM" VOIDS ALL ROYAL GRANTS (1777)


    In 1771, a military force of the North Carolina Regulators engaged Royalists near Greensboro. This was the first overt action in the Colonies against the British. More significantly, in 1775, the North Carolina General Assembly in Charlotte passed the Mecklenburg Declaration proclaiming independence from the Crown. So, this Colony was the first colony to formally declare "freedom" from Royal English rule. (Patrick lived during an exciting time in history!)

    North Carolina's Assembly declared all previous Royal derived land grants void in 1777. To be valid, all the Crown and Granville grants and all new land entries were required to be entered in a new procedure with new records. Having just become a county in 1777, Burke County commissioned Joseph MacDowell as entry taker and Christopher Beekman as surveyor for North Carolina grants in Burke County. Patrick's land transactions were with them.

    "SQUATTERS" ON ROYAL LAND


    There are no known records of Crown/Granville land grants to Hennessees in old Burke County. The date Patrick entered North Carolina is as yet unknown. This writer believes it's most likely that Patrick Hennessee could have been among the early hunters/squatters that did not make any land entries. Apparently, many early pioneers did not apply for grants in the Burke area.

    I speculate that Pat had disdain for the Granville rights derived from the Crown and preferred not to pay "rent" or the taxes required by them. Or possibly he was one of the many whose land entries were lost by the inefficient and very corrupt Granville system. Another possibility is corrupt Crown officials, who supposedly "unknowingly" sold land in the Granville District, never properly recorded the grants.

    NORTH CAROLINA GRANTS TO HENNESSEES (1778-1898)


    There were at least 13 land entries granted by North Carolina to Patrick (b c1735-d 1796) and other Hennessees. Of these, at least four were to Patrick and are listed in Table I. The grants are located on or near the Catawba River about three miles north east of Morganton. Pat's home place, grant #226, was on the south bank of the Catawba River. Other grants in Burke County were taken by James (1766-1851), Patrick's older son; and John (before 1775-1844), the younger son; and Patrick's grandson, Patrick (II) (c.1793-1845) the son of John. The final grant was to R. J. Hennessee (1845-1902), a descendent of Patrick II. Discussions of these other grants and their ramification are beyond the scope of this paper.

    INTRODUCTION TO PART II


    In Part II, Patrick's and his neighbors' land grants are presented in map form. A summary description of his neighbors follows this. Then, comes a brief but "grim" account of the regional war waged by the Cherokee Indians. The local war in the Catawba valley was during the period when Patrick was probably "squatting" on the land for which he was to make a land entry. Next, his wise selections of a home site and other land grants are described. Finally, Patrick's family and progeny beginning are summarized.

    PART II: INSIGHT ABOUT PATRICK

    INTRODUCTION


    Patrick Hennessee, the Patriarch of his family with over 3,700 descendants, had several North Carolina land grants in Burke County during the Revolutionary War. Part I of this paper in the previous issue of the Journal contains a concise history of the Royal grants issues, settlement problems, and background for Pat's grants. It also cataloged the Hennessee grants. Part II, given below, highlights significant insight and knowledge about Patrick from the grants correlated with the latest genealogical and other data sources.

    MAP OF HENNESSEE LAND GRANTS


    (In the final draft of this paper) Patrick's land grants listed in Table I are presented in map form in Figure 1. The location of his grants listed in Table I and other grants can readily be determined from Figure 1. This map is from "Burkemap." It is the work of Dr. Robert L. McNeely. His pioneer ancestors had several grants in Burke County. For copies of the Hennessee grants and survey descriptions, see Carl Hennessee's enhanced packet of grant data. These maps, data, and additional grant information are available at the Burke County Library and partially available at the State Archives.

    PATRICK'S NEIGHBORS (1771-1810)


    The location of Pat's and his neighbors' grants are shown in Figure 1. There are several rewarding "clues-about Pat" that have been derived or confirmed from grantees' names and collateral information. The clues are rewarding in knowledge about the early Hennessees. For example, near Pat's home:
    --To the south, was a grant to Charles McDowell, of military fame.
    --To the north, across the Catawba, was Patrick's grant, which "changed hands" and became the home of Col. John Suddreth (his sister married Patrick(II), the grandson of Patrick, the Patriarch); and also, Thomas Wilcher (his daughter married James).
    --To the east, John Ballew*, whose affidavit, indicated Patrick Hennessee, his neighbor, had at least two married daughters (Burke County: Land and Misc. Records 1771-1809, Volume III, Page 103); and also, Abraham Harshaw, alleged loyalist, indicted by the State of North Carolina in 1782.
    --To the west, John Hughes, selected as justice of the County Court.

    Did Pat travel to Burke with any of them? From where? When? etc, Hopefully, more will be learned by future research into these and other clues from the past about Patrick of North Carolina. (Note: *In 2005, Peggy Hennessee and her husband Ralph Ballew were living near Patrick Hennessee's grant on the north side of the Catawba River.)

    PATRICK BOLDLY CLAIMED LAND: WAR RAGED (1778-1794)


    One of Patrick's North Carolina land grants was entry # 185. It was located on the south bank of the Catawba River. (Note this is his west grant on the river in Figure 1). This early entry indicates several characteristics of Pat. Apparently, he was quick to adapt to change (and the War for Independence and the new freedom of North Carolina from English rule were major changes).

    In 1776, the situation of Pat and his family on the south bank of the Catawba River bank was grim. Now, threats on their lives from the Cherokees had always existed. But during that summer, the Cherokees boldly struck the Burke area in force. Down the Catawba and then to the east of Morganton, the Cherokees savagely destroyed and dealt death to those not in the forts or strong houses.


    Later that year, a large joint colonial military action on the western frontier of North and South Carolina, Virginia, and Georgia devastated the Cherokees. Most of their large villages and crops were destroyed and the Cherokees scattered. The following year 1777, as Burke became a county, North Carolina even placed a bounty of 15 pounds for each prisoner and 10 pounds for each scalp. Finally, the Cherokee by treaty ceded all claims to land east of the Blue Ridge. (The above is a condensed summary of the area's history from Heritage of Burke, 2001, Volume I, Article 1 and Volume II, Article 53.) Patrick and his family probably were relieved at this new freedom from fear of the Cherokee tomahawk. So following the military action, the entry rush for land grants began!

    Pat acted and made several entries! A land entry required an oath of allegiance to North Carolina, not the king. (No Tories Need Apply!)The decision to make early land entries beginning in 1778 certainly highlights the confidence he had that the Colonies would win the War. At that time, the threat in Burke County from the Tories and the British was yet to come.

    HOMESITE WISELY SELECTED


    Again, consider Patrick's homeland grant on the south bank of the Catawba River below the mouth of Hunting Creek (It is his west grant on the river shown in Fgure 1). As he probably lived there at the time, most likely, he was the first to place an entry for the parcel. However, the description of the grant indicates Pat was probably not the first to have been there. The land survey description noted an "Allen's Bottom". This probably indicated that somebody had previously been there. A search of available Burke County records, in that time frame, provided no additional information about Allens. He was possibly a hunter who quartered there and moved on west. Less likely, he was killed by the Indians, was frightened, or was "worked out" and had moved back to "civilization" or "followed a hope" for better land elsewhere. (However in 1771, there is record of a John Allen who signed a petition to form a county west of Rowan County).

    For that period, the location of Pat's home on the south bank of the Catawba River, near his river bank grant to the east, was a very desirable one. Consider the advantages of the location. There were easily defended high sites for a cabin and other buildings. They could readily be built using logs from trees located thereon or from the flat ridge to the south. (The cabin site has probably been identified.) The relatively flat bottom, next to the river, appears better for corn than the steep slope rising to higher level ground, which was probably treed. However, this slope and ridge top most likely supplied wood for poles, fences, and fireplaces from an uphill location. The hunting technique of "burning-over" used by the Indians most likely had cleared the bottom. The method was typically used during their hunting in the region.

    The easy access to the river and the adjacent streams made the location ideal for canoe and raft travel. The main north-south road passing through the property had a rocky ford on the river to his grant on the north bank. The ridge road to the south connected with the main east-west wagon road. While to the north, the road was to Fort Defiance and other east-west roads.

    PATRICK'S NORTH BANK GRANT


    Another example of Patrick's wise selection of property was his only grant on the north bank of the Catawba River. It had outstanding development potential with some low bank frontage and a ford for the 'south-to-north' road that passed through both the north bank grant and his grant on the opposite bank.

    As noted in Table I above, Entry #1015 (or #22 from Phifer) was between Middle Creek (now the John's River) and Lower Creek. Both of these were hardy waterways with banks that could readily support grain and lumber mills. Timber was available or could be "floated" to the mill from more than one direction or transported by road. This valuable property was acquired by Col. John Suddreth as his home place. He developed the potential of the property by building mills there. The Colonel was a master investor, land speculator, horse breeder, and had other enterprises. For example, he, with the Hennessees, initiated a ferry operation near the Catawba River ford by their homesteads. According to Phifer, …"the ferry was still operating in 1846 and probably in 1861."

    Between the two families, there were three marriages within a generation and there were more interesting happenings. But that is another story.

    PATRICK'S POSTERITY


    The name(s) of Patrick's wife (wives) has yet to be confirmed. Some say that she was a McDowell. Their two sons, James and John, assured the Hennessee posterity. In addition, there were at least two married daughters with little more being known at this time. Patrick's date of birth is essentially undocumented. He died ca 1796 (his will has not been "found" but is said to have been "proven" then).

    James, the elder son, married Sally Wilcher. After Sally died, James married Jane McGee of Tennessee. He had a total of at least 14 children. John, the younger son, remained on his grant in Burke County. He had at least two wives and probably four children. From these two families, Patrick has at least 3,700 descendants without consideration of the children of his daughters. (The best compilation of the descendants is David Hennessee's Hennessees in America, 1991, located in the Burke County Library). There are several informal family histories about the Hennessees that provide information about branches and families of Patrick's descendants. Proper judgement to resolve certain conflicts in these histories concerning Patrick's early life can not be made because the available evidence is inadequate at this time. The histories are mainly in possession of family members.

    JAMES MARRIED AND MOVED WEST


    As was customary and practical because of transportation limitation, marriages were often between neighbors. This was true for the Thomas Wilchers, with their grants on the north bank of the Catawba just to the west and adjacent to Patrick's north bank grant (see Figure 1). They were the parents of Sally, the bride of James. In 1804, the Wilchers sold 600 acres to William Walton, a trader who also trained servants, from Charleston, South Carolina. Then, the Wilchers "moved over the mountains" to Tennessee. James and his new family went with them to the less settled and "more promising land".

    More can be derived about James from the move. The wills of the early Tennessee Hennessees and Wilchers have given some insight into the situation at that time and their characteristics. The status of Thomas Wilcher in Tennessee is attested to as he held the first court for the area in which he lived at his home. It is hoped that future inquiries into Hennessee/Wilcher genealogical data may document more information about Patrick's family in North Carolina.

    JOHN REMAINED IN BURKE COUNTY


    John, Patrick's younger son, made an entry for a land grant on the north side of the Catwaba River in Burke. The grant was "one-land grant" north of Patrick's grant as shown in Figure 1. It is believed that John procured the land of the Alan Derryberry grant, which was between his grant and his father's grant. John acquired James' grant and his other land when James moved to Tennessee. The will of John is available.

    John's son, Patrick (II), also made entries for land grants adjacent to Patrick's homestead grant as shown in Figure 1. The Hennessees who today are located in Burke County, surrounding counties, and those originating in Burke County and moving elsewhere are mostly descendants from the John and Patrick (II) line.

    CONCLUSION


    Hopefully, Patrick, the Patriarch of the Hennessee family in America, is now better known from the insight provided by this paper in terms of the turmoil from the War during his time, his decisions, land grants, family, and neighbors. However, there is much that is unknown and even difficult to speculate about Patrick.

    Patrick Hennessee was definitely on the banks of the Catawba River in Burke County, North Carolina. But from where did he come? Who was his wife? His daughters? His military service? His description? Personal characteristics? Etc, Etc?

    Again, hopefully, this paper has provided clues for leads to sources that will furnish some answers in the future.

    By Eugene L. Hennessee Jr.
    4237 West Enon Drive
    Enon, OH 45323
    ehennessee@aol.com
    (937) 864-7047

    More content:

    The earliest Hennessee in America, as far as we know, landed in Maryland about 1690. He had guessed wrong at the Battle of the Boyne in the English Civil War. He had supported the ambitions of James II. He had fought at the Saarsfield brigade at the Battle of the Boyne in Ireland. And for his part in that, after James II lost his throne, the principal officers were exiled, including him. He was exiled and lived in Maryland. As far as we know he was a member of the Roman Catholic Church.

    He brought his wife to Maryland and had one son. And this son married in Virginia into a family by the name of Courtney who were members of the Episcopal Church. This son at,...this son had a son, who was killed at the Battle of Fort Necessity, in Washington's Company, in 1754 or 1755, I'm not sure which. He in turn left a boy seven years old. And this boy fought through the Revolution and then came down near Morganton and settled in Burke County.

    *

    More...

    In the Bedford Militia in the 1750s were Thomas Hennesey and Patrick Henicie. In the French and Indian War, the Virginia Militia on the western frontier consisted mostly of the Bedford Militia. It was under command of celebrated land surveyor, map maker and college professor Colonel Joshua Fry, Major (later Colonel, General and President) George Washington and Captain (later Colonel) William Calloway, wealthy Bedford County merchant, land developer and manufacturer.

    Virginia records report that Thomas Hennesey survived the first battle of the war at Fort Necessity, PA, in 1754 and that Patrick Henicie received militia pay in 1758.

    A 1761 indenture evidences that Patrick paid "one pound, one shilling and six pence" to Colonel Calloway for a lot in New London. Four months later, Patrick sold it back at a good profit.

    In 1763, he and Alice were sued in Bedford Court for non-payment of debt.

    *

    more...

    December 31, 2015;

    Are you aware that the 1775 Joshua Frye & Peter Jefferson map of Virginia and northern North Carolina shows two surveys in North Carolina made for Moravian Bishop Spangenburg:

    (1) land for Salem, settled by the Moravians in the central Piedmont's Yadkin River watershed to begin metropolitan Winston-Salem in present Forsyth County, and

    (2) a western Piedmont tract east of present Morganton in the Piedmont's upper Catawba River watershed where pioneer settler Patrick Hennessee purchased in Burke County?

    *

    This first one I believe belongs to this Patrick based on some of the documents within it which have initials of some of his heirs:

    The dates you have and the dates on the record appears to be off though but as best as I can tell, that seems to be him. I couldn't swear to it though.

    end of message

    Sorry for so many emails but I seem to be on a roll lol. I found this 1781 military service pay voucher for Patrick Hennesy. It is from Salisbury, Rowan County, NC



    end of message

    Birth:
    Hamilton Mortimer Hennessee (1845-1939) responded to the "Confederate Soldiers Questionaire", 1922;

    "My father Archibald Hennessee was the son of James Hennessee. My great grandfather came from Ireland and settled in N. C.

    View Hamilton's page: http://thehennesseefamily.com/getperson.php?personID=I904&tree=hennessee

    Military:
    The Battle of the Great Meadows, also known as the Battle of Fort Necessity was a battle of the French and Indian War fought on July 3, 1754 in present-day Fayette County, Pennsylvania. It, along with the Battle of Jumonville Glen, are considered the opening shots of the French and Indian War which would spread to the Old World and become the Seven Years War. It was the only time George Washington ever surrendered on the battlefield.

    source: http://www.patriotfiles.com/index.php?name=Sections&req=viewarticle&artid=8988&page=1

    Military:
    The Braddock expedition, also called Braddock's campaign or, more commonly, Braddock's Defeat, was a failed British military expedition which attempted to capture the French Fort Duquesne (modern-day downtown Pittsburgh) in the summer of 1755 during the French and Indian War. It was defeated at the Battle of the Monongahela on July 9, and the survivors retreated. The expedition takes its name from General Edward Braddock, who led the British forces and died in the effort. Braddock's defeat was a major setback for the British in the early stages of the war with France and has been described as one of the most disastrous defeats for the British in the 18th century.

    Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Braddock_Expedition

    Military:
    Map & History of Bedford County, Virginia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bedford,_Virginia

    Residence:
    Notes & History for New London, Virginia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_London,_Virginia

    Military:
    The Battle of Point Pleasant — known as the Battle of Kanawha in some older accounts — was the only major action of Dunmore's War. It was fought on October 10, 1774, primarily between Virginia militia and Indians from the Shawnee and Mingo tribes. Along the Ohio River near modern Point Pleasant, West Virginia, Indians under the Shawnee Chief Cornstalk attacked Virginia militia under Colonel Andrew Lewis, hoping to halt Lewis's advance into the Ohio Valley. After a long and furious battle, Cornstalk retreated. After the battle, the Virginians, along with a second force led by Lord Dunmore, the Royal Governor of Virginia, marched into the Ohio Valley and compelled Cornstalk to agree to a treaty, ending the war.

    Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Point_Pleasant

    Probate:
    Will proved by Thomas Lain...

    Map & History of Burke County, North Carolina http://bit.ly/Rd17uM

    Buried:
    Map & History of Polk County, North Carolina... http://bit.ly/1ebUmzJ

    Died:
    Map & History of Burke County, North Carolina http://bit.ly/Rd17uM

    Patrick married Alice "Ailsey" LNU (Virginia). Alice was born (ABT 1735), (Virginia); died Aft 1800, (Burke County) North Carolina. [Group Sheet]


  2. 9.  Alice "Ailsey" LNU was born (ABT 1735), (Virginia); died Aft 1800, (Burke County) North Carolina.

    Notes:

    "Ailsey" is a dimunitive for "Alice"...DAH

    Suggested by some as a sister of Generals Charles and Joseph McDowell according to Dr. Emmet White, a Revolutionary War Historian, however Helen Money could find NO McDowell-Hennessee relationship in early NC.

    Died:
    Map & History of Burke County, North Carolina http://bit.ly/Rd17uM

    Children:
    1. 4. James Hennessee was born 0___ 1766, Burke County, North Carolina; died February 1851, Warren County, Tennessee; was buried Liberty Hill Cumberland Presbyterian Cemetery, Warren County, Tennessee.
    2. (Samuel Hennessee) was born (~ 1770), (Burke County, North Carolina).
    3. John Hennessee was born ~ 1775, (Burke County, North Carolina); died 0___ 1844, Caldwell County, North Carolina; was buried 0___ 1844, Fairfield Cemetery, Lenoir, North Carolina.
    4. (Frances Hennessee) was born (Burke County, North Carolina).
    5. (Peter Hennessee) was born (Virginia).
    6. FNU Hennessee was born (Burke County, North Carolina).
    7. FNU Hennessee was born (Burke County, North Carolina).

  3. 10.  Thomas Wilcher, Sr. was born ~ 1745, (Amherst County) Virginia Colony (son of Benjamin Wilsher and unnamed spouse); died LATE 1816, McMinnville, Warren County, Tennessee; was buried Liberty Cemetery, McMinnville, Warren County, Tennessee.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Thomas L. Wilcher
    • Military: Revolutionary War Patriot
    • Possessions: 16 Apr 1770; Amherst County, Virginia
    • Occupation: 5 Feb 1776; Appraiser, Amherst County, Virginia
    • Will: 8 Aug 1816, Warren County, Tennessee
    • Probate: 7 Jun 1823, Warren County, Tennessee

    Notes:

    From: "Nita Shepard"
    To: "David Alden Hennessee"
    Subject: Grants
    Date: Saturday, August 03, 2002 3:49 PM

    Hi, David:

    I received Grants #0941 dated Dec 1 1780, #1220 dated Sept 9 1780, #2295 dated Jan 14 1794, and #2576 dated Mar 3 1790 from Robert McNeely this afternoon

    #1220 (9 Sep 1780) shows land belonging to Charles Welsher, Jumping Creek, to the left of Miles Harper and above 2 pieces of land belonging to John Harper.

    #2295 (14 Jan 1794) shows 2 pieces of land belonging to Thomas Welsher. 1 piece is next to Patrick Hennessee. That same piece is above John Hughes.

    Who is Charles Welsher? [Editor's Note] Click here to view a registry of Joseph Wilcher, Sr. which offers many clues to the early WILCHER lines in Amherst County, Virginia...

    http://genforum.genealogy.com/cgi-bin/pageload.cgi?charles::wilcher::329.html

    Cuz Nita

    26 Jun 2007

    Interesting tidbit re Thomas...

    http://home.att.net/~jemjr/graveyard.htm

    OLD BURIAL GROUNDS OF WARREN COUNTY, TENN. By MRS. BLANCHE BENTLEY

    "One of the best known and first organized churches of Warren County was Liberty, a mile or so from McMinnville. As shown by his will, land was given by Thomas Wiltshire (Wilcher), the church house built and the church, Cumberland Presbyterian in doctrine, organized all in 1815. William Cheek Smartt is the reputed founder and he and John Allison, a Revolutionary soldier, were two of its first elders..."

    Thomas Wilcher, TN

    Posted By:Cecile Harrell
    Email:
    Subject:Thomas Wilcher, TN
    Post Date:December 10, 1999 at 10:00:34
    Message URL:http://www.genforum.com/wilcher/messages/78.html
    Forum:Wilcher Family Genealogy Forum
    Forum URL:http://www.genforum.com/wilcher/

    Have recently received info that Thomas Wilcher, d. 8 Aug 1816 in Warren County, TN has been certified as a Revolutionary soldier. Have a little more info if anyone is interested.

    Cecile Harrell


    Burke County (NC) Land Grants, abstracted by Betsy Dodd Pittman, The Burke Journal, August, 1993, p. 17:

    "1409. THOMAS WELSHER 100 A. on No. side of Catawba River, on a conditional line between Welsher & Alexander Erwin, adj. McKenny. Ent. 31 Oct. 1779, #1020. CB: Micajah Sansom & Benj. Harris. Grant issued 16 Nov. 1790. [Warrant for survey mentions John Deals line and the Improvements made by Thomas Day.]"

    Early Wilchers...

    The name is spelled Welcher, Whelchel, Wilsher, Wilshire, Wicher, Willshire, Whiltshire, Wilsure, Wilkshire in various early VA and NC records. In 1654 John Wiltshire is listed as a Virginia immigrant, and in 1679 several of the Wilsheir family immigrated from Barbados. There was a Thomas Wiltshire in Northampton country, VA in 1672 and in the Isle of Wight Country in 1682. By the mid 1700's Thomas, Dorcas, and Joseph Wilshire are in Caroline County, VA. John Weltshire was in Augusta County, VA in 1762 and David Whiticher is there in 1769.

    The name seems without doubt Wiltshire, at first, and shows an English origin - becoming Wilcher in both English and pioneer usage, until Wilcher became generally adopted. Thomas, of Warrant County, signs himself "Thomas Wiltshire" on several county records, one of them among the last he signed, in 1816 - the year of his death. (Copied from "The History and Genealogy of some pioneer Norther Alabama Families" by Mary N. Gibson - Brittain, Marie Brittain Craig, and Marjorie Craig Churchill.)

    Research on the surname "Wilcher" shows it to be a variation on the name "Wiltshire," a county in SW England. About 90% of all people with that name 200-300 years ago came from there. Wilshire, England, is probably where the American Wilchers came from.

    The vast majority of the Wilchers (or other spellings) who came to the New World in the 1600s and 1700s came as indentured servants, usually as an alternative to other punishment for petty offenses.

    The first Wilcher in America showed up in Virginia in 1635 as an indentured servant. Over the next 150 years a couple dozen others showed up in various places: Maryland, Pennsylvania, and the Bahamas.

    About ¾ of the Wilchers came to Virginia in the 1600s and 1700s.

    One of these early Virginia indentured servants was likely the progenitor of the Wilchers in Amherst-Bedford.

    End.

    Abstraction from Thomas Bragg, 14 Apr 2005, Tom Bragg

    Thomas Wilcher, Sr.
    Anne Walton Wilcher

    Father: See early Wiltsheirs from Barbadoes immigration about 1769 - John or Thomas Wiltsheir

    Mother:

    Born: About 1745 (court order on 2 Jun 1766 concerning road work listed Thomas Wilcher along with others which may suggest he was at least 21 years old at that time).

    Married to: Anne (Nancy) Walton Wilcher who was born about 1745-50 and died after 1831 - age ~81 (she relinquished unto Thomas Wilcher Jr and Alberto Vaughan ... my life estate to the farm on which I now live and all the personal property.") [Warren County, TN, Deed Vol. I, Book D, pp.412-415]. Based on the age of her father and her oldest child, and the age of her brother William; she may have been born about 1745-50. Assumed to have married about 1774 (first child born 1775).

    Re: 1. Moses Park (1738-1828): His Descendants and Related Families Vaughan and Wilcher. Gateway Press, 1991. Birmingham Public Library.
    2. The Wiseman Family and Allied Lines, Vol I, 1991, Eugene M. Wiseman Author [PO Box 14054, Bradenton, FL 34280-4054

    Children:

    1. Sarah (Sally) Wilcher, born 1775, Burke County, NC, died before July 8, 1830 (age ~55) in Warren County. She was the wife of James Hennessee (born 1766, died 3 Mar 1851, son of Patrick Hennesee of Burke,County, NC).

    2. Thomas W. Wilcher, Jr. born in the 1780's (Moses Park lists as 2nd child) - ~1785

    3. Nancy Wilcher born 1776, Died 1843 in Blount County, Alabama married first Chambers, second George D. Staton (need to go back to Wiseman Collection and verify info on children)

    4. Ritty (Ritrier, Kitriece, Kittie) Wilcher, born 1780, died 22 Aug 1827 in Cooper County, MO. She was the wife of Thomas Vaughn, Sr. - p 219, 248.

    5. Elizabeth (Betsy) Wilcher was born 1782; died after 17 Dec 1835; married John Harper who died prior to the 1830 census.

    6. Christian (Christeen, Christine) Wilcher, born 1790-1800 wife of Mr. North - p 283.

    7. Winifred (Winny) Wilcher, wife of William Brassell, both living 1 Feb 1831 - p285.

    8. Lucy Wilcher born 1784, died 1865 married first Joseph England, second Richard Forrest in 1828 - see p286.

    9. Archibald born 1802-1804, never married, died about 1827 - page 265.

    Note: The exact order of births of the children, 7 daughters and 2 sons, is not known.

    Died: Between 8 Aug 1816 and 7 Oct 1816 in McMinnville, TN (about age 74)
    Buried: Buried in the Liberty Cumberland Presbyterian Church Cemetery, but exact location unknown.

    The earliest records of Thomas Wilcher, Sr. are in Amherst County, Virginia and were two court cases which were started in Dec 1767 against Thomas Wilcher for slander decided in Wilcher's favor. The other was for trespass and assault, but it was dismissed by the plaintiffs. He was probably born in the 1740s in Virginia. A good assumption might be that he was about 21 years old when the court order on road work was issued on 2 Jun 1766. Thus, he might have been born about 1745.

    On 5 Feb 1776 he was appointed as 1 of 4 appraisers for a personal estate in Amherst County, VA. During the 1770s in Amherst County no court cases could be found. He did buy and sell land with the purchase of 174 acres on 16 Apr 1770 of part of tract which had been conveyed by Peyton Randolph and Lusford Lomax, Jr. to Philip Grymes.In 1770 he bought 150 acres which he and his wife Anne sold on 13 Feb 1779. He bought 200 acres in Amherst County on 2 Jan 1785. On 7 May 1787 he sold 481 acres in Amherst County. Thomas Wilcher Sr and his wife Anne sold 681 of his 855 acres in 1787 and 1788. He and Anne sold 81 acres on 2 Jul 1787. On 4 Nov 1788 they sold 600 acres. He also sold 200 acres on the south side of Berry's Mountain which he had bought in Oct 1785. Also on 4 Nov 1788 Thomas Wilcher and Anne sold 400 acres on both sides of Harris Creek.

    In May 1787 he served on the Amherst County Court grand jury. The court orders of the late 1780s and early 1790s show that Thomas Wilcher was the defendant in two suits and was the plaintiff in six suits. None of these appear to be overly significant. There were other suits for amounts of about $100 or less, some of which were ruled in Wilcher's favor, and others dismissed. A case in court in May 1791 mentioned that Thomas Wilcher was "not a resident of Amherst County." In an Aug 1789 case it was state that "it appearing to the court that the said Thomas Wilcher hath removed to the State of North Carolina . . "

    He died in 1816 so he would have been about 71 years old at the time of his death. He moved to Burke County, NC in 1789, and to Warren County, TN in 1807.

    Thomas Wilcher, Sr purchased land on John's River in Burke County, NC as early as 1778. He moved there from Amherst Country, Virginia in 1789 (the suit against David Tinsley proves that Thomas Wilcher moved from Amherst County, VA, to North Carolina prior to Aug 1789).

    Thomas Wilcher's wife is thought by most Wilcher researchers to be Anne Walton.

    William Walton, Sr., was a Revolutionary Soldier, born 1735 in Virginia, son of William and Susannah Walton who were in Amherst County, VA by 1761 and in Burke County, NC 1792.

    Thomas Walton purchased 600 acres at the mouth of John's River from Thomas Welcher (later a plantation belonging to Colonel John Sudderth).

    Thomas Welcher's land in Burke Co., NC was granted to him by the State of North Carolina (copied from Burke: The History of a North Carolina County, 1777-1920). Thomas Welcher and William White were overseers of John's River in 1796.

    Patrick Hennessey lived on the south side of John's River. After Thomas Wilcher Sr's death it was conveyed in 1818 by "Joseph England, Thomas Wilcher, Jr. and Benjamin Wooten, all of Warren County, TN to William Erwin of Burke County, NC" ... "tract adjoining the lands of John and Samuel Franklin, William Erwin and the children of William Walton",. This was a tract of land granted to Thomas Wilcher Sr. in 1799 by the State of North Carolina. This deed is recorded in Deed Book C, Warren County, TN.

    Thomas Wilcher Sr moved to Warren County in 1807 (actually was White County that became Warren County about 1817-1820) from Burke County, NC. His business life is very well documented with many legal proceedings, including land deals and various disagreements with associates (see Moses Park reference). On 4 Dec 1807 he was 1 of 12 men appointed or commissioned as Justice of the Peace by the Tennessee General Assembly as part of the first County Court of Warren County [McMinnville at a Milestone 1810-1960 in the Birmingham Public Library written by the Southern Standard in McMinnville].

    Thomas Wilcher Sr first arrived in White County in 1807, part of which became Warren County in late 1807. About 1807, Thomas Wilcher assignee of three Revolutionary War Soldiers, Martin Armstrong, John Nelson and Grady Byinham, entered a part of the land called for in the warrant of each. This was land extending south from the Barron Fork river to beyond present day Liberty Lane. Wilcher built a two-story brick home sometime after 1807, a portion of which exists recently as the home of Dr. B.C. Smoot. Thomas Wilcher Sr. died in this house. His earliest land grant records were in Aug 1808 in White County. There were six in the amount of 75 to 240 acres. He had 4 land grants for land in Warren Country of 33 to 125 acres on 24 Aug 1808. There were numerous other land related transactions. It is noted in the Warren County, TN marriage records prior to 1852 and court records prior to 1848 were lost or destroyed leaving quite a void for researchers.

    When Warren County was organized in 1807, according to the laws of the State, a temporary log house and jail were erected near the center of the county, where the courts were to be held until the citizens of the county should elect commissioners who were to select a proper place for a permanent county seat. In 1808 a small log courthouse was built on top of a high hill, near a big spring just above the Barron Fork - at the towns southeast fording place - and where the Looney's Trace then crossed the river. From 1808 until sometime in 1811, circuit court was well as the other courts, met in the little log house twice a year at which time other lawyers from other towns with the circuit attended.

    From Laughlin's "Reminiscences of McMinnville "as it was in 1811, he says "On occasions when the courts met in the log court house across the river, the judges and lawyers boarded about in the neighborhood as best they could. Most of them stayed in the home of Thomas Wilcher Sr. - two miles from the place of holding the court. After the death of Mr. Wilcher in 1816, the late Joshua Coffee occupied the house until his death in 1842 (Mr. Coffee didn't occupy the house until after Mrs. Wilcher's death).

    Abstracted form the WCGA Bulletin, Volume XXII, Spring & Summer 2013, page 57:

    SALE OF PROPERTY OF THOS. WELCHER [WILCHER] DECEASED

    The Nashville Whig, Nashville, Tennessee, Tuesday, November 12, 1816, Volume V, Number 12, front page:

    NOTICE:

    There will be sold to the highest bidder, at the late dwelling-house of Thos. Welcher [Wilcher], deceased, on the first of January next, the following property belonging to the estate of said decedant [sic], viz:

    One tract of first rate land, lying on the Barren fork of Collin's river, containing 300 acres, with 12 acres cleared and under good fence:

    One tract of 90 acres, with 18 acres cleared:

    One town lot in the town of M'Minnville. Twelve months credit will be given, the purchaser giving bond with approved security.

    Executors:

    Benj. Wooten (relationship unknown, Thomas cites him as a "trusted friend")
    Tho. Welcher (son)
    Jos. England (son-in-law)

    On 7 Oct 1818 the executors sold 333 acres for $1,053. They sold about 183 acres of land in Burke Co. NC on 25 Nov 1818 for $100 (was originally granted on 7 Jun 1799).

    One of the best known and first organized churches of Warren County was Liberty, a mile or so from McMinnville. As shown by his will, land was given by Thomas Wiltshire (Wilcher), the church house built and the church, Cumberland Presbyterian in doctrine, organized all in 1815. William Cheek Smartt is the reputed founder and he and John Allison, a Revolutionary soldier, were two of its first elders. On August 8, 1816, Thomas Wilcher gave the land to build the Cumberland Presbyterian Church at Liberty.

    Thomas Wilcher Sr and his wife, Anne Walton, are likely buried in the Liberty Cumberland Presbyterian Church cemetery. He donated the land for the cemetery. Liberty is 1 mile south of McMinnville off Highway 55 on Liberty Lane. Turn left going south on Morrison St on Old Morrison Hwy then Liberty Lane and the Liberty Cumberland Presbyterian Church will be on the right as well as the cemetery.

    Joseph M. Bragg and his wife, Richard M. Bragg, and other family members are buried here in order: Richard M. Bragg 14 Jun 1833 - 11 Dec 1858; Joseph M. Bragg 25 May 1798 - 9 Jul 1879; Clarissa T. Bragg 25 Sep 1806 - 16 Aug 1851; Hugh T. Bragg 25 Nov 1831 - 22 Dec 1845; and Martha Bragg 8 Feb 1845 - Jun 1845.

    In summary Thomas Wilcher was probably born about 1745-46. He moved from Amherst County, VA, to Burke County, North Carolina (near Morganton), whe he was approximately 44 years old, in before Aug 1779. He moved on to Tennessee when he Thomas Wilcher, Sr. (cont'd) was about 62 years old.Thomas Wilcher died in Warren County, TN, Oct 1816 when he was about 71 years old.

    Will of Thomas Wilcher, Sr

    The will of Thomas Wilcher, Sr. to Annie Wilcher, et al was a Deed of Gift and is recorded in Warren County Deed Book D, pages 412-414.. It reads as follows:

    "In the name of God, Amen. I, Thomas Wilcher of the County of Warren and the State of Tennessee, this 8th day of August A.D. 1816, being weak of body but of perfect mind and memory and calling to mind the mortality of my body and knowing that it is appointed unto all men to die, do make and ordain this to be my last Will and Testament.

    Principally and first of all, I recommend my soul into the hands of Almighty God who gave it, and my body to the dust to be interred in a decent and Christian-like manner. At the discretion of my executors hereinafter named and as touching such worldly estate wherewith it has pleased God to bless me with in this life I give, devise and dispose of in the following manner. Viz,--I will and desire that all my just debts and funeral expenses be paid out of my estate.

    1st Imprimis. I give and bequeath to my beloved wife Anne and son Archibald, all the tract of land whereon I now live lying north of John Harper old line to join a line of Thomas Wilcher, Junr said tract to run with the main road until it strikes the aforesaid line of Thomas Wilcher, Junr. Further I give to my wife and son aforesaid four negroes, viz. Isaac, Rella, Jo and Lawson with the increase of said slave Rella forever and should one or more of the aforesaid Negroes die before my decease in that case I will and allow the number to be kept up of others of my Negroes of my son's own choice. Also to my said wife and son I leave all my household furniture that I possess at my decease together with all stock of every description with all farming utentials and every necessary thing or things suitable for a farm and necessary to make life comfortable and living convenient to my wife during her natural life and to my son Archibald his heirs forever, and I do put my son in possession of the above with the injunction laid of my son Archibald that he shall during his mother's natural life support, take care, and nourish her as comfortable in this world as will be in his power.

    2 Item. I give to my son Thomas Wilcher the tract of land where on he now lives containing 250 acres agreeable to the survey, be the same more or less to him and his heirs forever.

    3 Imprimis. I give and bequeath to my daughter Sally Hennessee a Negro woman named Sucky with her off spring, the tract of land whereon James Hennessee now lives, containing by estimation 223 acres all my right and title of the same to her and her heirs forever.

    4th Item. I give to my daughter Christian a tract of land beginning on my son Thomas' line where it crosses the road south side of said road that is the line between my son Thomas and son Archibald running with the road till it strikes John Harpers line thence with Harpers line to a red oak south side of the ?ting being a corner of Harper's tract, thence northeastwardly to a poplar marked TW, thence with said line east to a corner of another tract, thence south to a corner thence continuing south till it strikes another line of mine being a preference of Edmond McMahons(?) purchased from Anderson and Thomas Wilcher, Sr. (cont'd)

    Doak, thence east to a corner thence south to a corner thence east to a corner then north to a corner on Thomas Vaughans line then west with his line to his corner thence north with his line to Thomas Wilcher, Junr., line to the road to the beginning including all in that boundary except an acre for the use of the church, also a Negro girl named June and her offspring to her and her heirs forever.

    5th Item. I give to my daughter Nancy Staton a Negro girl Peggy and offspring during her natural life and at her death to be sold and the money accruing therefrom to be equally divided among her children begotten of her body, to them and their heirs forever.

    6th Item. I give to my grand daughter Rachel Chambers one hundred dollars when collected out of my estate by my Exrs.

    6th(sic) Item. I give to my daughter Betsey Harper a Negro girl named Pat which are (sic) now in the possession of John Harper and that said girl shall never be sold not put away by no bargain or contract whatsoever from the use and benefit of my aforesaid daughter and her children during my daughter's natural life, and at her death my will is that said girl and her offspring be equally divided between her children forever.

    7th I give to my daughter Lucy England a Negro boy named John, together with $300 that she has already received making her dividend equal with my other children to her and heirs forever.

    8th Item. I give to daughter Ritty the sum of five dollars as she has heretofore received her dividend of my estate.

    9th Item. I give to Polly, Thomas, and Aaron Vaughan my daughter Ritty's children begotten of her body one hundred dollars each and no more, by my Exors. To be given them when they arrive at age or at marriage.

    10th Item. I give to my daughter Winny the sum of $5 at the discretion of my Exors. Hereafter named and empowering them to consider my daughter Winny that if they see her necessity required assistance that they will allow her the use of Negroe girl named Lucy as her need requires and to recall her at their discretion also upon their discretion to allow her to the amount of three hundred dollars occasionally as her necessity demands and should it be that her circumstance should not required to that amount I wish the other part of the $300 to be adapted for the purpose of educating her grandchildren viz Sandy England and Polly Taylor. The property that I bought at William Brasel's sale to be returned to my Exors. And it to be at their discretion if not discretionally used. Two horses, thirteen head of cattle, 15 head of hogs and the house furniture.

    11th Item. And the residue of my estate both real and personal not heretofore bequeathed I wish to be sold and equally divided amon my legatees viz. Sally Hennessee, Nancy Staton, Betsey Harper, Lucy England, Thomas Wilcher, and daughter Christian, Archibald Wilcher to them and them only and heirs forever.

    12th Item. And I do by these presents appoint my trusty friends Benjamin Wooten, Thomas Wilcher, Jr., and Joseph England the sole executors of this my will and testament and none other ratifying and confirming this to be my last will and testament and revoking and disallowing all other wills heretofore by me made. In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal the date first written."

    Signed Thomas Wilcher (Seal)

    Signed, sealed, and pronounced In presence of Aaron Abernathy, Joseph Taylor x his mark, Alexander Snell.

    To my son Arch I want my wife and son to have two horses of their choosing.

    State of Tennessee October Term 1816
    Warren County Court

    I do hereby certify that the due execution of the within last will and Testament of Thomas Wilcher deceased was proven in open Court of the first day of the above Term by the oaths of Joseph Taylor and Alexander Shenell two of the subscribing witnesses thereto, and ordered to be recorded.

    Given at office the 7th June A. D. 1823
    Jos. Coville Clk
    By S. D. Own D. Clk.

    This will was proved in open court on the 7th day of June 1823 and registered 9 June 1823. Thomas I and Ann had 7 daughters and 2 sons, all of whom received bequests from his will. [See "Siblings," p. 4]

    On 7 Oct 1818 the executors sold 333 acres for $1,053. They sold about 183 acres of land in Burke Co. NC on 25 Nov 1818 for $100 (was originally granted on 7 Jun 1799).

    Per "The North Carolinian Journal by Wm. Perry Johnson editor in March 1960 the North Carolina Revolutionary War Pay Vouchers listed Thomas Wilcher (or Welsher) from the Morgan District, Burke Co., NC. No further information is available, but this shows clearly Thomas Wilcher Sr was a Revolutionary War soldier from the state of North Carolina. He was in North Carolina from 1789 - 1807.

    Early Wilchers

    From "The Wiseman Family and Allied Lines, Vol I" found in the Warren County, TN genealogical library. The ancestors for the Warren Country, TN family by the surname Wilcher are difficult to assertain. The name is spelled Welcher, Whelchel, Wilsher, Wilshire, Wicher, Willshire, Whiltshire, Wilsure, Wilkshire in various early VA and NC records. In 1654 John Wiltshire is listed as a Virginia immigrant, and in 1679 several of the Wilsheir family immigrated from Barbados. There was a Thomas Wiltshire in Northampton country, VA in 1672 and in the Isle of Wight Country in 1682. By the mid 1700's Thomas, Dorcas, and Joseph Wilshire are in Caroline County, VA. John Weltshire was in Augusta County, VA in 1762 and David Whiticher is there in 1769.

    The name seems without doubt Wiltshire, at first, and shows an English origin - becoming Wilcher in both English and pioneer usage, until Wilcher became generally adopted. Thomas, of Warrant County, signs himself "Thomas Wiltshire" on several county records, one of them among the last he signed, in 1816 - the year of his death. (Copied from "The History and Genealogy of some pioneer Northern Alabama Families" by Mary N. Gibson - Brittain, Marie Brittain Craig, and Marjorie Craig Churchill.)
    Thomas Wilcher, Sr. (cont'd)

    Research on the surname "Wilcher" shows it to be a variation on the name "Wiltshire," a county in SW England. About 90% of all people with that name 200-300 years ago came from there. Wilshire, England, is probably where the American Wilchers came from. The vast majority of the Wilchers (or other spellings) who came to the New World in the 1600s and 1700s came as indentured servants, usually as an alternative to other punishment for petty offenses. The first Wilcher in America showed up in Virginia in 1635 as an indentured servant. Over the next 150 years a couple dozen others showed up in various places: Maryland, Pennsylvania, and the Bahamas. About 3/4 of the Wilchers came to Virginia in the 1600s and 1700s. One of these early Virginia indentured servants was likely the progenitor of the Wilchers in Amherst-Bedford.

    William Walton & Susannah Walton (father/mother of Anne Walton)

    Children:

    1. William Walton -to become William Walton Sr. born 24 Dec 1736. Married Elizabeth Tilghman in St. James, Northern Parish, Goochland County, Virginia to Elizabeth Tilghman on 1 Dec 1758. Had 15 children. Before 1767 moved to Amherst County, Virginia. Served in the American Revolution. Son, William Jr. served in the Army in South Carolina. In Amherst County 1785-87. Moved to Charleston, SC where Elizabeth Tilghman died on 8 Sep 1787. Listed in 1800 census of Burke County. Died 31 Jan 1806 (age70). Buried at the churchyard of the First Presbyterian Church, Morganton, NC.
    2. Jesse Walton -in the Revolutionary War records of Wilkes County, NC. Later moved to Tennessee and was second in command to John Sevier. Founder of Jonesboro, TN.
    3. Susannah Walton
    4. Mary Walton
    5. Anne Walton, born about 1748, and married Thomas Wilcher, Sr.
    6. Louise Walton
    7. Frances Walton

    End

    10 Oct 2008:

    Abstracted from,

    "Early Tennessee Tax List", Sistler; p. 206;

    WELCHIR, Thomas L., Warren-1812

    p. 207;

    WHELCHAE, Day?, Warren-1812
    WHELCHAE, John, Warren-1812
    WHELCHAE, William, Warren-1812
    WHILCHAE, Francis, Warren-1812

    "The Reconstructed 1810 Census of Tennessee", Charles A. Sherrill,

    p. 546;

    Whelchae, Dave ?, Warren Co. Tax 1812 tax list, in Christian Schell's district
    Whelchae, John, Warren Co. Tax 1812 tax list, in Christian Schell's district
    Whelchae, Dave ?, Warren Co. Tax 1812 tax list, in Christian Schell's district
    Wilcher, Thomas, Jr, Warren Co. Tax 1812 tax list, in Samuel Colville's district
    Whehae, Frances, Warren Co. Tax 1812 tax list, in Christian Schell's district

    24 Jun 2009:

    Listed in the 1812 Warren County, Tennessee Tax List...

    Enumerated by Christian Shell:

    12. Wilchar, John
    48. Wilchar, Davis
    49. Wilchar, William
    56. Wilchar, Frances

    John, Davis & Frances are, no doubt, connected to the WILCHER tree, however, there is no mention of them in any of the Thomas Wilcher, Sr. documents. Nor do they appear in the 1820, 1830 or the 1850 Warren County Census records. Could they be issue of the Charles WILCHER of Burke Co.,NC as noted by Nita Shepard? ...DAH

    End.

    Could John be his father? Go to this link... http://www.geni.com/people/John-Wilcher/6000000014961325946 or his record within this website:

    http://thehennesseefamily.com/getperson.php?personID=I36645&tree=hennessee

    Birthdate: April 5, 1716 Birthplace: Christ Church, Middlesex, Virginia, British Colonies of North America

    Died 1770 in Spartanburg, South Carolina, British Colonies of North America

    End.

    Joseph Wilcher Sr. Amherst Co., VA

    Probably connected to an earlier WILCHER line and might be a brother to Thomas & Charles Wilcher:

    Chronology Report 1
    Printed by Legacy on 20 Nov 2002
    Age Name: Joseph WILCHER Sr.
    Life Range: 70 1760-1765 - After 1830
    1760-1765 Birth: 1, 2
    Between 1760-1770 Spouse (#2): Sarah TYREE (Between 1760- ).
    1 1761 History: Virginia, Amherst Co.. Formed from southern half of Albemarle County.
    1 1761 History: Virginia, Amherst Co.. Amherst Parish was formed from St. Anne's Parish to cover the county. . 3
    11 1771 May 25 To 1771 May 27 History: Virginia, Amherst Co.. Amherst suffered a disaster when the James river ws a t flood stage, 150 persons were lost at that time.
    Marriage (1): Mildred "Milly" ( -Bef 1798). 17
    Unknown Spouse (#1): Mildred "Milly" ( -Bef 1798). Died before 28 Apr 1798. 4
    23 1783-1786 Tax: Virginia, Amherst Co.. list Charles Wilcher & Joseph Wilcher. 4
    25 1785 Tax: Virginia, Amherst Co.. Welsher, Joseph 5 white.
    27 1787 Tax: VA, Amherst Co., List B. List B: Wilcher, Joseph self, 0 16/21 white males, 0 black 16/+, 0 black 16/-, Horses 2, Cattle 7. 5
    29 1789 Nov 12 Deed: Virginia, Amherst Co.. Saml Meredith, Jno Stewart & Jos Wilsher, AC to Jas Owen AC for 70 lbs 95 acres 56 acres is that of Wilsher; Lines. Christian, Saml Meredith (formerly Braxton) Wit. Nelson Crawford, Lindsey Coleman, Jas Callaway, Jas Ballinger. 6
    Abt 1790 Child born (1-#1): 30 Joseph WILCHER Jr. (Abt 1790- ).
    1793 Sep 2 Child born (1-#2): 33 Virginia, Amherst Co.. Lawson Green WILCHER (1793-1843). Born in Amherst Co., Virginia, USA. Died on 4 Dec 1843 in Amherst Co., Virginia, USA.17
    36 1796 Feb 23 To 1798 Sep 22 Deed: VA, Amherst Co., 102a. Saml & Jane Meredith to Jos Wilcher 5sh 102a pt. tract Rockey River, Braxton's old line, Notley Maddox, Jos Higginbotham. Wit. Davis S Garland, Jas Garland, Jas P Garland.. 7
    38 Bef 1798 Apr 28 Death of Spouse (#1): Mildred "Milly" ( -Bef 1798).
    38 1798 Apr 28 Bond: Virginia, Amherst Co.. Joseph Wilcher & Jacob Tyree are bound to commonwealth of VA $150 28 Apr 1798. A marriage is intended between Sally Rutherford (widow) & Joseph Wilcher (Widower) signed Jos Wilsher Jacob Tyree. 19
    38 1798 Apr 28 Certificate: Virginia, Amherst Co.. Married Wilsher, Joseph and Sally Rutherford, widow by the Rev Walter Christian. (M.R.).. 20
    1798 Apr 28 Marriage (2): 38 Virginia, Amherst Co.. Sarah TYREE
    (Between 1760- ). In Amherst Co., Virginia, USA. 19
    38 1798 May 12 Deed: Virginia, Amherst Co.. Jos Wilcher AC to Andrew Monroe (Munroe) AC for 300 lbs 231a branches Rockey Run, Lines :Jos Higginbotham, Peter Cashwell, Charles Christian, Richa Wilson, Saml Huckstep. Wit. Chas Christian, Jacob Pierce, Rich Wilson. 8
    38 1798 Jun 21 Deed: Virginia, Amherst Co.. Jacob Tyree AC to jos Wilcher AC for 5 sh & love a slave Sue for his wife Sarah who is my daughter. Wit. Francis Bunt, Nicodemus Vermilion. 9
    50 1810 Census: Virginia, Amherst Co.. Joseph Wilcher m. 2 16/26, 1 26/45, 1 45/+ f. 1 0/10, 1 16/26, 1 45/+; slaves 8. 1
    51 1811 Jun 12 Bondsman: Virginia, Amherst Co.. Joseph Willshire Jr. and Joseph Willshire Senior are bound; a marrriage is intended between Joseph Wilcher Jr. & Nancy Rutherford; Sarah Willshire signed dau. Nancy is 20y of age. Recorded in Marriage Regiter #1 p. 226, Amherst County Clerks Office, Amherst, Virginia. 12
    Jun 1811. Know all men by these presents that we Joseph Willshire Jr. and Joseph Willshire Senior are held jointly bound unto his excellency Gov. Wm. South Lieutenant governor of chief magistrate of the 10
    52 1812 Aug 17 Deed: Virginia, Amherst Co.. Joseph WILSHIRE, JacobPIERCE & Joseph KENNEDY- Joseph WILSHIRE debt to Joseph KENNEDY 200 lbs due 1 Jan 1814, slaves, Moll Isham, China (life est of wife Sarah Wilshire) Dick, Wiatt, Robinson, Joe, Clara, horse, cattle, beds, furniture, hogs . 11
    57 1817 Tax: Virginia, Amherst Co.. Joe Wilchar 1 wm/+16, 2 horses; Joseph W Wilcher 1 wm/+16, 1 bm/+16,
    1horse (2nd hundred); . 12
    57 1817 Tax: Virginia, Amherst Co.. Jos Wilshar 1 wm/+16 1 bm/12-16; Joseph W Wilcher 1. 13
    59 1819 Tax: Virginia, Amherst Co.. Joseph Wilcher Sr 1 wm/+ 16, 1 slave; Joseph Wilcher 1 wm+16, 1. Tax list 1819 Amherst Co. VA. 14
    60 1820 Census: Virginia, Amherst Co.. Wilsher, Joseph Amherst Co VA p. 38 No Twp. . 15
    61 1821 Mar 12 Purchased: Virginia, Amherst Co.. James M (W) Wilshire, Amherst County, to Joseph Wilshire, amherst Co $133 horse; beds, etc. Wit. Charles A Christian, Samuel DChristian, William Pollard (could be Jr). 16
    70 1830 Census: Virginia, Amherst Co.. Joseph Wilcher m 1 80/90, f 1 15/20, 2 20/30, 1 60/70 9 slaves. 2
    70 After 1830 Death:

    Source Citations
    1. 1810 U. S. Census Amherst Co., Virginia. Wilchers, Calab m. 2 10/16 1 16/26 1 45/+ f. 1 16/26 1 45+26/45: Richard m. 1 45/+ slaves 11: Joseph m. 2 16/26 1 26/45 145/+ f 1 0/10 1 16/26 1 45/+ slaves 8
    2. 1830 U S Population Census Amherst Co., Virginia.
    3. Charles Frances Cocke, Parish Lines Diocese of Virginia, (Richmond, VA: The Virginia State Library, 1967).
    4. Smith, Melba M, Wilcher Family Information, a descendant of Lawson Green Wilcher son of Joseph Wilcher Sr & Milly, (1998). 5. Netti Schreiner-Yantis and Florene Speakman Love, The 1787 Census Of Virginia: An accounting of the Name of Every White Male Tithable Over 21 Years; the Number of Wite Males between 16 & 21 Years; the Number of Slaves Over 16 & those Under 16 years, together with a Listing of their Horses; Cattle & Carriages: and also the Names of all Persons to whom Ordinary Licenses and Physician's Licenses were Issued, (Genealogical Books in Print, Springfield, VA).
    5. Netti Schreiner-Yantis and Florene Speakman Love, The 1787 Census Of Virginia: An accounting of the Name of Every White Male Tithable Over 21 Years; the Number of Wite Males between 16 & 21 Years; the Number of Slaves Over 16 & those Under 16 years, together with a Listing of their Horses; Cattle & Carriages: and also the Names of all Persons to whom Ordinary Licenses and Physician's Licenses were Issued, (Genealogical Books in Print, Springfield, VA).
    6. Rev Bailey Fulton Davis, The Deeds of Amherst County, Virginia 1761-1807 & Albemarle County, Virginia 1748-1763, (The Rev. S Emmett Lucas Jr, P O Box 738 Easley, SC 29640: Southern Historical Press, 1979), p. 243: 413.
    7. Ibid, p. 325: p. 204 & p. 340: p. 429.
    8. Ibid, p. 333. p. 329.
    9. Ibid, Deed Bk L p.335/358.
    10. William Montgomery Sweeny, Marriage Bonds, and Other Marriage Records of Amherst County, Virginia 1763-1800 [Although Amherst was formed in 1761, no marriage records have been found before 1763], (Baltimore MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc, 1937 & 1973), Recorded in Marriage Regiter #1 p. 226, Amherst County Clerks Office, Amherst, Virginia.
    11. Rev Bailey Fulton Davis, The Deeds of Amherst County, Virginia 1807- 1827: Books L-R, (The Rev. S Emmett Lucas Jr, P O Box 738 Easley, SC 29640: Southern Historical Press, 1985), p. 39. DB M p228.
    12. Tax list 1817 Amherst Co., VA.
    13. Tax list 1818 Amherst Co., VA.
    14. Tax list 1819 Amherst Co. VA.
    15. AIS Census Indexes: This collection contains Federal Census Indexes, State Census indexes, and indexes to various Federal non-population schedules (Mortality Schedules, Veterans Schedules, Slaves Schedules) for most of the U.S. and parts of Canada. The scope of the collection includes colonial records (pre-1790 tax lists, resident's lists, etc.) and censuses from 1790 to 1870. Some census indexes for later years exist for some states, (1999 , Url: http://data/ancestry/com), Wilsher, Joseph Amherst Co VA p. 38 No Twp.
    16. Rev Bailey Fulton Davis, The Deeds of Amherst County, Virginia 1807- 1827: Books L-R, (The Rev. S Emmett Lucas Jr, P O Box 738 Easley, SC 29640: Southern Historical Press, 1985), p. 635. 12 Mar 1821.
    17. Smith, Melba M, Wilcher Family Information, a descendant of Lawson Green Wilcher son of Joseph Wilcher Sr & Milly, (1998).
    18. The Holy Bible, Containing The Old and New Testaments: Together with The Apocrypha: Translated out of the Original Tongues, and with The Former Translations Diligently Compared and Revised, with Canne's Marginal Notes and Refrences, to which are added an index; An Alphabetical, Table of all the names in the old and new testaments, with their Sigifications, tables of Scripture weights, measures and coins & C., Family Info: Lawson G. Wilcher, (White & Hutchinson & Dwier, Hartford, 1836), Lawson G Wilsher Died the 4 of December 1843.
    19. William Montgomery Sweeny, Marriage Bonds, and Other Marriage Records of Amherst County, Virginia 1763-1800 [Although Amherst was formed in 1761, no marriage records have been found before 1763], (Baltimore MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc, 1937 & 1973), Marriage Register #1 p. 125, Amherst County Clerk's Office, Amherst, VA.
    20. Ibid, p 28.

    End.

    A summation of early Wilchers...

    Peggy,

    Below is a message I posted a couple of years ago to Geneva Anderson. She apparently has the "link" I'm looking for which puts my John Wilcher (b. 1783) in KY at the right time. However, we haven't connected yet. I think she sent me a monumental, several megabyte database dump in 1999, but nothing specific on the link.
    I
    've posted this to her again in hopes she will be more specific. It doesn't look like my John and your John are the same guy, although they may have been from the same family before that.

    Brett (previous posting below)

    I am descended from a line of Wilchers that found its way to the Pacific Northwest in 1868. I can trace back five generations (including myself) to a Stephen Wilcher, who was born in Casey Co. or Lincoln Co., KY, in 1810. He moved to Missouri in the 1840's, then on to Clark Co., WA, in 1868. His descendants all live in the PNW.

    Stephen's father appears to have been named John Wilcher, who was 67 years old in the 1850 census and claimed to have been born in KY. That would put his birth in 1783, pretty early for KY, but possible if his parents were there with Daniel Boone and George Rogers Clark (and a whole lot of Indians).

    The family seems to have been from Virginia. Your Amherst, Bedford Co., connections look promising because of the same set of names-- John, Joseph, Charles, etc.-- and because of the dates. They were there in the late 1700's and the same names show up in Casey-Lincoln, KY, in the early 1800's. This doesn't do much for John Wilcher's claim about being born in KY in 1783, but works well for connecting Wilchers in KY and VA.

    I've also been looking back further to try to figure out how Wilchers got to Amherst-Bedford in the late 1700's. Most of my conclusions are based purely on statistical probablilities. For example, research on the surname "Wilcher" shows it to be a variation on the name "Wiltshire," a county in SW England. About 90% of all people with that name 200-300 years ago came from there. I'm inclined to think that Wiltshire, England, is where the American Wilchers came from. The vast majority of the Wilchers (or other spellings) who came to the New World in the 1600's and 1700's came as indentured servants, usually as an alternative to other punishment for petty offenses. The first Wilcher in America showed up in Virginia ca. 1635 as an indentured servant. Over the next 150 years a couple dozen others showed up in various places: Maryland, Pennsylvania, and the Bahamas. About three-quarters of the Wilchers came to Virginia in the 1600's and 1700's. I suspect one of these early Virginia indentured servants was the progenitor of the Wilchers in Amherst-Bedford.

    My challenges are:

    1) to verify the connection between my Stephen Wilcher, born KY in 1810, with John Wilcher;
    2) connect that John Wilcher with the Amherst-Bedford, VA, Wilchers; and
    3) figure out the who, when, and how of the Wilcher migration from England to Virginia and then to Amherst-Bedford.

    Any information you can provide that might help fill in the "middle years" would be appreciated.

    Later response...

    Hi Brett

    Do you have further info on the Amherst County, Va Wilchers which you could share with me? I have come across references to Charles and John W. Wilcher being sons of Joseph and Barbara Wilcher of Amherst Co, Va (late 1700s time period). There was also a Thomas Wilcher who may fit as another relative. Thomas Wilcher, formerly of Amherst co, Va, is listed in land records of Burke co, Nc along with Charles Wilcher. This same Thomas had issue who removed to Warren and Cannon Counties, Tennessee.

    I would appreciate any details you might have on any Amherst co, Va Wilcher family, which might help me verify or add to the limited Wilcher info I have...

    Thanks

    David Travillion Bunton
    613 South Commerce Ave
    Russellville, AR 72801
    travillion@hotmail.com

    End.

    Thomas Wilcher built a two-story brick home sometime after 1807, a portion of which exists today as the home of Dr. B. C. Smoot...

    end

    Sat 3/11/2017 4:41 PM

    Hey cuz,

    I was looking at your notes for Nancy Anna Walton and looking at the sources... I was wondering if you realized that the Family Search sources link back to trees that give her parents as the William who married Susannah Cobb? Even so, I still don't think this is correct because there is no proof that she was even a Walton let alone the daughter of William and Susannah. Also, I have seen (but not sure if it is sources) that Anne, the daughter of William and Susannah was married to someone else. Again, I don't know if that had sources or not but it is worth noting. I thought you might want to know in case you want to alter or remove those cited sources. So far I haven't found anything regarding her parentage or even real surname. I have definitely ruled out William Walton and Elizabeth Tilman as her parents. They were married on 1 Dec 1758. I found the record proving their marriage date and therefore proving they aren't her parents.

    I have found quite a few deed records for Thomas Wilcher. I wasn't really thinking about Warren County having been formed from White County before. A lot of the land deeds for him are in White County...something to keep in mind when searching for records for Warren County. I will have to change the format from jpg to pdf for you so it may take some time.

    Here is a plat map that shows his land in Warren County:

    A note regarding Thomas Wilcher's death date... it is given by everyone as 08 Aug 1816...but that was the day he made the will. The transcription of his will indicates his will was proved in open court during the Oct 1816 term so his death date is sometime between when he wrote his will (08 Aug 1816) and when it was proved (Oct 1816). Then there is a note at the bottom which reads:
    Given at office the 7th June A.D. 1823
    So I am not sure what that is about.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Interestingly, on the page opposite to one of the Thomas Wilcher land deeds was one for James Cain. The name is mistranscribed as Caise but when you look at the bottom of the document it is more obvious that it said Cain. I also found this tidbit in the White County Minutes on GenWeb (this site also has lots several mentions of Thomas Wilcher suing various people for money owed).


    Peter Hutson )
    vs. )
    Henry Lowery )
    In this case the parties personally appeared in Court and agreed to refer the cause in dispute to Henry J. H. Hill, Esq., james Kane, Joseph Hutton, John Huse, Isham McGuire, James Boyd and Vincent Hubbs, and their verdict be returned to next court and be binding as the verdict of a Jury would have been.
    Tuesday 14 Apl. 1807 Court adjourned till tomorrow morning Seven O'clock, Members present: John Dergan, Henry J. H. Hill & Benjamine Weaver, Esqr.
    Wednesday 15th April 1807 Court met according to adjournment
    Members Present: Henry J. H. Hill, Thomas Bounds ) Esqrs.
    & Thomas Matthews )

    and this on a John Kain:

    October 8, 1821
    P. 285
    Andrew McElroy. )
    To Issd. ) Deed trust
    Thomas Hopkins & )
    John Kain )
    Was this day proven in open Court by the oaths of Richard Nelson and Nathan Haggard the subscribing witnesses thereto, for the purposes and things mentioned and ordered to be recorded, let it be registered.
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    I remember you talking about always coming across Cunninghams, so here are a few things:

    Here is a bio on George Cunningham, husband of Sarah Hennessee:


    Another Hennessee and Cunningham marriage... Bible record:

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    I will let you know what else I find but wanted to send a rundown of this stuff. Otherwise it gets to be too much to remember and include at once lol.

    Love,
    Stef

    end

    Birth:
    Amherst County, Virginia was formed in 1761, from parts of Albemarle County, Virginia... http://bit.ly/1opXGkp

    Possessions:
    purchased 174 acres...

    Occupation:
    Appointed as an appraiser...

    Buried:
    http://home.att.net/~jemjr/graveyard.htm

    OLD BURIAL GROUNDS OF WARREN COUNTY, TENN. By MRS. BLANCHE BENTLEY

    "One of the best known and first organized churches of Warren County was Liberty, a mile or so from McMinnville. As shown by his will, land was given by Thomas Wiltshire (Wilcher), the church house built and the church, Cumberland Presbyterian in doctrine, organized all in 1815. William Cheek Smartt is the reputed founder and he and John Allison, a Revolutionary soldier, were two of its first elders..."

    Died:
    on Wilcher's Plantation...

    Map & History of Warren County, Tennessee... http://bit.ly/PIsRbw and http://www.tngenweb.org/warren

    Thomas married (Nancy Anna) "Anne" (Walton) LNU (~ 1768), (Amherst County, Virginia Colony). (Nancy was born 24 May 1748, Amherst County, Virginia, British Colonies of America; died 0___ 1831, McMinnville, Warren County, Tennessee; was buried (Liberty Cemetery, Warren County, Tennessee). [Group Sheet]


  4. 11.  (Nancy Anna) "Anne" (Walton) LNU was born 24 May 1748, Amherst County, Virginia, British Colonies of America; died 0___ 1831, McMinnville, Warren County, Tennessee; was buried (Liberty Cemetery, Warren County, Tennessee).

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Anne Walton
    • Also Known As: Nancy Ann Walton
    • Alt Birth: ~ 1748, (Goochland County) Virginia

    Notes:

    Friday, March 10th, 2017:

    Allen Thomas, allanharlthomas@gmail.com, alerts me to this error and I can thank him for his quick-eye:

    "Hey David we have a problem with Nancy and her Mom's birthdates, what do you think?
    "

    Allan

    to which I replied on the same day:

    "Oh, shit...

    I've got to do some diggin'"

    I spent several hours revisiting sites to verify her lineage and to no avail, so with great chagrin and embarrassment on

    Saturday, March 11th, 2017:

    I have unlinked Nancy Anna "Ann" Walton,

    http://thehennesseefamily.com/getperson.php?personID=I1215&tree=hennessee,

    from the family William & Elizabeth Tilman Walton,

    http://thehennesseefamily.com/getperson.php?personID=I25624&tree=hennessee,

    because there is no proof of the relationship.

    It is likely that she was enumerated as one of their issue in error and that error has been copied, repeated and recapitulated by other researchers too lazy to verify the information

    Alt Birth:
    Now a part of Albermarle County, Virginia.

    Goochland was founded in 1728 as the first county formed from Henrico shire, followed by Chesterfield County in 1749. Goochland was named for Sir William Gooch,[5] the royal lieutenant governor from 1727 to 1749, at which time the nominal governor, the Earl of Albemarle, remained in England. Goochland originally included all of the land from Tuckahoe Creek, on both sides of the James River, west as far as the Blue Ridge Mountains...

    Map & History of Goochland County, Virginia ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goochland_County,_Virginia

    Notes:

    Married:
    Amherst County, Virginia was formed in 1761, from parts of Albemarle County, Virginia... http://bit.ly/1opXGkp

    Residence (Family):
    then it was known as "White County"...

    Children:
    1. Archibald P. Wilcher was born Abt 1771, (Amherst County, Virginia); died 0___ 1829, Warren County, Tennessee.
    2. 5. Sarah "Sallie" Wilcher was born 0___ 1775, (Amherst County, Virginia); died Abt 8 Jul 1830, Warren County, Tennessee; was buried (Liberty Hill Cumberland Presbyterian Cemetery, Warren County, Tennessee).
    3. Nancy Wilcher was born 6 Apr 1776, Amherst County, Virginia; died 0___ 1843, Blount County, Alabama; was buried Summit Cemetery, Summit, Blount County, Alabama.
    4. Christian Wilcher was born Abt 1777, (Amherst County, Virginia).
    5. Winnefred "Winne" Wilcher was born 1770-1780, (Amherst County, Virginia); died 1840-1850, Blount County, Alabama.
    6. Ritnier "Ritty" Wilcher was born (ABT 1780), (Amherst County, Virginia); died (ABT 1813), (Warren County, Tennessee).
    7. Lucy Wilcher was born 0___ 1784, (Amherst County) Virginia; died 7 Oct 1863, Warren County, Tennessee.
    8. Elizabeth "Betsy" Wilcher was born 0___ 1782, (Amherst County) Virginia; died Aft 1850, Warren County, Tennessee.
    9. Thomas Wilcher, Jr. was born 0___ 1788, Amherst County, Virginia; died 0___ 1854, Warren County, Tennessee; was buried McMinnville, Warren County, Tennessee.

  5. 12.  (John Jennings) was born (Henrico County, Virginia).

    Notes:

    12 Feb 2007:

    After eighteen years of searching, can find no sources citing father to Obediah. I've assigned, 'John', as his grand father, 'Mary', his grand mother based on the traditional naming protocol of:

    First female child is named after maternal mother...
    Second female child is named after paternal mother...
    First male child is named after paternal father...
    Second male child is named after maternal father...
    Later issue named after siblings...DAH


    Clue-laden message citing possible siblings of Obediah;

    http://genforum.genealogy.com/cgi-bin/pageload.cgi?isham::jennings::1746.html

    ' Late 1700 Jennings in TN
    Posted by: Rand Cardwell, kahuna@netramp.net

    Date: December 16, 1999 at 21:46:23
    of 6059


    I have a few Jennings men that show up in early court records in Claiborne Co.,TN

    Can anyone place them with families in NC or VA?

    Mentioned in 1804 to 1810 in records working as road hands;

    Obediah Jennings
    Edward Jennings
    William Jennings
    John Jennings
    Isom or Isham Jennings
    George Jennings'

    end of message

    Surname: Jennings

    This interesting surname, is of early medieval English origin, although later strongly associated with both Wales and Ireland. Recorded in the spellings of Jennings, Jennins and Jennens, it is a patronymic. It derives from the given name Janyn or Jenyn, a diminutive of the personal name John, and meaning "Little John". John itself derives from the Hebrew name "Yochanan", meaning "Jehovah has favoured (me with a son)". The patronymic surname which in this case means "the son of Little John", dates back to the late 13th Century (see below), "John" being a 12th century Crusader introduction. Soldiers of the crusades returning from the Holy Land, gave to their children and specifically sons, Hebrew and Greek names as a reminder of the fathers "pilgrimage". These "English" personal names which later became surnames, include such examples as Thomas, Isaac, Abraham, and many others. In this case early recordings include Walter Jannes and Richard Janyns in the Subsidy Rolls of Worcestershire of 1327, and Thomas Jenyn, in the charter rolls of 1428 known as "Inquisitions and Assessments relating to Feudal Aids". Elizabeth, the daughter of Thomas Jennyns, was christened on August 9th 1544, at St. Pancras', Soper Lane, London, and Jeffrey Jennings was christened on August 24th 1561, at St. Dunstans in the East, London. Among the namebearers in the "Dictionary of National Biography" is Sir Patrick Alfred Jennings (1831 - 1896), who was Premier of New South Wales. He was born in Newry, Ireland, and emigrated to the gold fields of Victoria in 1852, before moving to New South Wales in 1863. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Roger Jonyng, which was dated 1296, in the Subsidy Rolls of the county of Sussex, during the reign of King Edward 1, known as "The Hammer of the Scots", 1272 - 1307. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

    © Copyright: Name Orgin Research www.surnamedb.com 1980 - 2007

    (John — (Mary LNU). [Group Sheet]


  6. 13.  (Mary LNU)
    Children:
    1. Royal Jennings, Sr. was born 1 Feb 1762, Henrico County, Virginia; died 1 Feb 1839, Grainger County, Tennessee; was buried Locust Grove Cemetery, Washburn, Grainger County, Tennessee.
    2. 6. Obediah Jennings was born ~ 1775, North Carolina; died SUMMER 1830, Warren County, Tennessee.

  7. 14.  Jesse Buford Dodson, Sr. was born 22 Nov 1752, Halifax County, Virginia (son of Thomas Dodson, Jr. and Elizabeth Rose); died 22 Nov 1843, Riceville, McMinn County, Tennessee; was buried Matlock Cemetery, Athens, McMinn County, Tennessee.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: Farmer
    • Military: Revolutionary War Patriot
    • Religion: 1801-1805; Primitive Baptist Elder
    • Religion: 0___ 1820; Primitive Baptist Elder

    Notes:

    Sketches of Tennessee's Pioneer Baptist Preachers... http://www.knoxcotn.org/tnbaptists/index.html

    JESSE DODSON

    "In memory of Rev. Jesse Dodson; born November 22, 1752; died November 22, 1843. A minister of the gospel sixty years." (Tombstone record, Eastanallee Church.)

    The deceased was born in Halifax County, Va. His first settlement in Tennessee was in Claiborne County. From there he went to Middle Tennessee. In 1819 he came to the Hiwassee Purchase, making a settlement in McMinn County, a few months before the county was "erected." On the Eastanallee is a house still standing, I believe, built ninety-eight years ago by Jesse Dodson.

    Soon after his settlement in the Hiwassee district he began pioneer work. He and seven others constituted themselves into the Eastanallee Church. He and Silas Witt organized New Hopewell. He and James Courtney founded the Hiwassee Church. Salem Church was organized by him and Richard Wilson, while he and John Short were co-founders of the Friendship Church. He was preacher to and pastor of these and other churches for many years. He was of Welsh extraction and had the Welsh fire. He was not trained to methodical sermonizing or systematic exposition of Scripture, but was earnest and fervent in exhortation, and was successful in revivals.

    Elder Dodson owned 300 acres of land in the heart of Eastanallee valley, and ten negroes, whom he "freed," it is said, after the death of his wife (by whom he came into possession of them), giving as his reason that he had "concluded that a bill of sale of negroes in his pocket would be a bad passport at the gate of Heaven."

    His wife was a Miss Ruth Johnson, of South Carolina, of a well-to-do. family, but the date of his marriage and other family and ministerial records have perished, were washed away or destroyed, it is thought, by the high waters of the Eastanallee in the year 1875. Editor's Note: Jesse was, in fact, married to Ruth Dodson, daughter of Elisha Dodson, Sr.

    He lived to preach and exhort sinners to repentance about sixty-one years, and on his 91st birthday died in the triumph of a living faith.

    Burnett, J .J. Sketches of Tennessee's Pioneer Baptist Preachers. Nashville, Tenn.: Press of Marshall & Bruce Company, 1919.

    HTML presentation of this material is Copyright (c) 2002 by Rose-Anne Cunningham Bray. All rights reserved.

    Thanksgiving of 1752 had a special meaning for Reverend Thomas DODSON and his wife Elizabeth ROSE, for on November 22nd they welcomed a new child into their Virginia family, Jesse DODSON. Not much is known about Jesse DODSON as a youth...one of at least 10 children in his family....but plenty is known about his adult life. Unknown to his father, a Virginia Baptist minister, Jesse would follow in his footsteps and change the lives of many settlers in the early days of America.

    At the time of the American Revolution, the dominant religious force in the colonies was the Church of England, the mother country for so many of its settlers. To be a minister of any church that had broken ties with England was difficult in many social settings, but by the time Jesse DODSON was 23 years old, he was living on land given to him by his father in what is now Pittsylvania County in Virginia, and starting his life as a Baptist preacher, . Jesse and his wife Ruth were married in 1774, one year before the gunfire at Lexington and Concord would start the colonies on a path of thier own, and in 1777, Jesse's name is on the list of those taking an Oath of Allegiance to the State of Virginia. While there is no evidence of military service for Jesse DODSON during the War, we can feel confident that he served in some capacity, for at the end of the War he received a Land Grant in North Carolina, which would become Tennessee.

    We know Jesse was still in Pittsylvania County, Virginia when the Revolutionary War ended in 1781, for he obtained property on Birch Creek, or Burches' Creek in some records. The following year he sold that land on "Jeremiah's Fork of Birches Creek" to relatives, and headed for Tennessee, leaving behind his brother William, also a Baptist minister.

    Rev. Jesse DODSON is listed as a member of the County Line Baptist Church, also known as the North on Holston River Baptist Church, in 1785 Hawkins County, Tennessee. Rev. Jesse DODSON joined the Big Springs Primitive Baptist Church in what is now Springdale, Tennessee in 1801, and became the Pastor of the congregation from November 1801 until November of 1805.

    In 1803, Jesse DODSON was listed in the tax records of what is now Claiborne County, in the northeast part of Tennessee, which includes part of Cumberland Gap National Park. The path from Virginia to Tennessee through Cumberland Gap had been widened by none other than Daniel Boone, and opened to wagon traffic after Rev. Jesse DODSON and his family passed through. The Big Springs Primitive Baptist Church that Jesse led was constructed in the winter of 1795-96 from hand-hewn logs, and is still standing today near Springdale, over two centuries later. It is one of the oldest churches still standing in the State of Tennessee.

    Jesse and Ruth DODSON left Claiborne County in 1806 and moved to Warren County, Tennessee, where they are listed on the 1812 Tax List, and the 1820 Census. While in Warren County, they were involved with the Collins Creek Baptist Church and several others in the area.

    Reverend Jesse DODSON was described by his peers as "earnest and fervent in exhortation", and "successful in Revivals". He was also said to have had the "Welsh fever" in describing his ancestrial traits and style of preaching, and is mentioned in the 1919 Baptist historical sketches as a Tennessee Pioneer Baptist Preacher.

    Around 1820, Rev. Jesse DODSON was called to lead the Big Springs Baptist Church on Mouse Creek, near Niota in McMinn County, Tennessee...only a year after the Hiwassee Purchase Treaty with the Cherokee Indians had opened that land to settlement. Jesse was a founder of the Eastanallee Baptist Church, and his son Elisha donated the land for the structure. Over the years Rev. Jesse DODSON would be involved in the early McMinn County churches of Salem, Hiwassee, Friendship, and New Hopewell. Owning 300 acres of land in the Eastanallee Valley, his wife Ruth had obtained ten slaves from her father's Will, and when Ruth died in 1828 Jesse set the slaves free stating that "a Bill of Sale of Negroes in my pocket would be a bad passport at the Gates of Heaven"....another brave act in a Southern State over 30 years before the Civil War. After more than 60 years of preaching from the pulpit, and inspiring many pioneer churches, Jesse DODSON died on his 91st birthday in 1843. He is buried in the Eastanalle Church Cemetery in McMinn County, Tennessee.

    The cemetery photo used at the top of this page in the header is the Eastanallee Cemetery, with the two broken headstones on the left side being those of Ruth and Jesse DODSON...and the Eastanallee Church is planning to replace them. Pioneer and Frontier Preacher, another good story in the ancestral book. Jesse is the 5th great grandfather of Anthony Martini, on his mother's side.

    "In memory of Rev. Jesse Dodson; born November 22, 1752; died November 22, 1843. A minister of the gospel sixty years." (Tombstone record, Eastanallee Church.)

    The deceased was born in Halifax County, Va. His first settlement in Tennessee was in Claiborne County. From there he went to Middle Tennessee. In 1819 he came to the Hiwassee Purchase, making a settlement in McMinn County, a few months before the county was "erected." On the Eastanallee is a house still standing, I believe, built ninety-eight years ago by Jesse Dodson.

    Soon after his settlement in the Hiwassee district he began pioneer work. He and seven others constituted themselves into the Eastanallee Church. He and Silas Witt organized New Hopewell. He and James Courtney founded the Hiwassee Church. Salem Church was organized by him and Richard Wilson, while he and John Short were co-founders of the Friendship Church. He was preacher to and pastor of these and other churches for many years.

    He was of Welsh extraction and had the Welsh fire. He was not trained to methodical sermonizing or systematic exposition of Scripture, but was earnest and fervent in exhortation, and was successful in revivals.


    His wife was Ruth Dodson, of the same family lineage of Dodson pastors. Together, Jesse and Ruth raised 12 children whom all followed in their faith.

    He lived to preach and exhort sinners to repentance about sixty-one years, and on his 91st birthday died in the triumph of a living faith.

    MINUTES OF BIG SPRING PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH

    [The first few pages are in very bad shape.]

    Church Records for the Year 1800 - 1801

    December 2nd Saturday 1800. ______Received John Goin in to fellowship. Received Obediah Jennings by experience. Agreed to continue meeting at Rob Camp 1st Saturday in January 1801 and appointed James Kinney, Elijah Chissum, William________, ________Harper and Isaac Lane to attend. Agreed to send James Kinney to Powder Gap Creek at their request.

    Feby the 2nd Saturday 1801. Church met and after worship proceeded to business.
    1st…..to continue meeting at Rob Camp.
    2nd____
    2nd Saturday_____Cloud by experience_______Richard________attend_______
    ______Saturday 1801. Church met for worship and proceeded to business.
    1st Opened a door for the reception of members.
    2nd Report made by the members from Robcamp that they received Marjorie Connor, Millie Armstrong into Fellowship.
    3rd Appointed James Kinney, Isaac Lane and Thomas Jeffries to attend at Rob Camp first Saturday in April.
    4th Peter Neal and William Stroud appointed to attend at Powells Valley Church on Gap Creek.

    April the 2nd Saturday 1801. Church met and after worship proceeded to business.
    1st. Opened a door for the reception of new members and received Judah Dodson by Experience.
    2nd Appointed Bro James Kinney, Thomas Jeffries, William Stroud, Joseph Clark and Elijah Chissum to attend at Rob Camp meeting house on the first Saturday in May.

    May the 2nd Saturday 1801. Church met and after worship proceeded to business.
    1st Opened a door for the reception of new members.
    2nd The brethren that attended at Rob Camp made_______that they had received Richard Hanes and advised____Members to meet together to worship God and____over each other according to the gospel________if any should want to join to the Church______advise that they send to the body for________

    June the 2nd Saturday 1801. Church met and after worship proceed_________
    1st Considered Bro. Obediah Martin's___________the ministry of the gospel______glory of God that he be_______ordinances but exercise______public prayer.
    2nd ______Zachariah McCul_____
    _____appoint Isaac Lane, Jesse Dodson and Joseph____to write with the church to which he formerly belonged their distresses.
    4th Appoint Isaac Lauk and Joseph______to write to the association.

    July the 2nd Saturday 1801. Church met and after worship proceeded to business.
    1st Letters read and approbated.
    2ne Appointed a Church Meeting at Rob Camp meetinghouse and appoint Joseph Clark and Peter Neal to attend.
    3rd Appointed Joseph Cogdal to the association.

    August the 1st Saturday 1801. Church met at Rob Camp and after worship proceeded to business.
    1st Appointed James Kinney, Jesse Dodson and Peter Neal to settle a distress with Bro. Obediah Martin which was attended by Brother Martin's recantation.
    2nd Dismist Richard Hanes, John Grimes, Milly Armstrong and Margery Conner.

    August the 2nd Saturday 1801. Church met and after worship proceeded to business.
    1st Opened a door for the reception of members. Received Jesse Dodson by letter.
    2nd Elijah Chissum intended to travel desires letter of recommendation. Is granted a letter of dismission for himself and his wife when called for.
    3rd Agreed to petition for a division of the association.

    September the 2nd Saturday 1801. Church met and after worship proceeded to business.
    1st Opened a door for the reception of members and received James Forrest and Mary his wife by letter.
    2nd Received Stacy Edwards by experience.

    ______Saturday 1801. Church met and after worship proceeded to business.
    1st Opened a door for the reception of members.
    2nd Appointed our meeting in November for sacrament and the day before for fasting and prayer.
    3rd. Brother William Stroud having a mind to travel requests a letter of recommendation is granted.
    4th Motion for choosing a pastor is defered.

    November the 2nd Saturday 1801. Church met and after worship proceeded to business.
    1st Chose Jesse Dodson pastor.
    2nd Agreed to call Isaac Barton and William Jones to install our pastor.

    December the 2nd Saturday 1801. Church met and after worship proceeded to business.
    1st Agreed to send Brethren Jesse Dodson, Isaac Land and Joseph Cogdal to the church on Buffaloo to inquire into their stand with John Conley.
    End of Year 1800 - 1801

    Could he have had a daughter who married James Cunningham?

    October Second Saturday 1806. Church met at Big Spring and after worship proceeded to business.

    1st Hannah Hill, Mercurius and Rachel Cook took their seats.

    2nd Agreed to petition the Association for an alteration of their citing from Thursday to Saturday.

    3rd Association letter read and approved.

    4th Reference relative to Ritchard Harper continued to the 14th day of this month.

    William and Nancy Stroud, Obediah and Elisabeth Jennings, Jesse and Ruth Dodson and Dodson's Sukey (Susanna) and James Cunningham dismisd by letter.

    Tony Martini has put together an excellent biography with lots of location shots in Middle Tennessee ... http://graveyardgossip.blogspot.com/2010/03/martini-family-jesse-dodson-frontier.html

    Military:
    While there is no evidence of military service for Jesse DODSON during the War, we can feel confident that he served in some capacity, for at the end of the War he received a Land Grant in North Carolina, which would become Tennessee.

    Religion:
    Primitive Baptists, are also known as Hard Shell Baptists, Anti-Mission Baptists, or Old School Baptists. The adjective "Primitive" in the name has the sense of "original".

    Joined the Big Springs Primitive Baptist Church in what is now Springdale, Tennessee in 1801, and became the Pastor of the congregation from November 1801 until November of 1805.

    Religion:
    Around 1820, Rev. Jesse DODSON was called to lead the Big Springs Baptist Church on Mouse Creek, near Niota in McMinn County, Tennessee...only a year after the Hiwassee Purchase Treaty with the Cherokee Indians had opened that land to settlement.

    Jesse married Ruth Dodson 0___ 1774, Halifax County, Virginia. Ruth (daughter of Elisha Dodson, Sr. and Sarah Everett) was born 12 Dec 1754, Fauquier County, Virginia; died 22 Nov 1828, McMinn County, Tennessee; was buried Matlock Cemetery, Athens, McMinn County, Tennessee. [Group Sheet]


  8. 15.  Ruth Dodson was born 12 Dec 1754, Fauquier County, Virginia (daughter of Elisha Dodson, Sr. and Sarah Everett); died 22 Nov 1828, McMinn County, Tennessee; was buried Matlock Cemetery, Athens, McMinn County, Tennessee.

    Other Events:

    • Birth: 25 Dec 1754, Pittsylvania County, Virginia

    Notes:

    Married:
    Ruth was his first cousin.

    Children:
    1. Nancy Dodson was born 0___ 1773, (Halifax County) Commonwealth of Virginia.
    2. Nimrod H. "Tip" Dodson, Sr. was born ~ 1775, Fauquier County, Virginia; died 18 Jan 1837, Viola, Warren County, Tennessee.
    3. 7. Elizabeth Dodson was born 0___ 1776, (Halifax County) Commonwealth of Virginia; died 18 May 1850, Warren County, Tennessee; was buried Warren County, Tennessee.
    4. Elisha Dodson was born 17 Sep 1785, (Halifax County) Commonwealth of Virginia; died 27 Apr 1864, Polk County, Tennessee; was buried Reliance Cemetery, Polk County, Tennessee.
    5. Elijah "Grandsir" Dodson was born 17 Sep 1785, (Halifax County) Commonwealth of Virginia; died 0___ 1858, Warren County, Tennessee; was buried Shellsford Cemetery, 121 Bottoms Road, McMinnville, Warren County, Tennessee 37111.
    6. Jesse Buford Dodson, Jr. was born 7 Mar 1791, (Halifax County) Commonwealth of Virginia; died 3 Aug 1878, McMinn County, Tennessee; was buried Matlock Cemetery, Athens, McMinn County, Tennessee.
    7. William Dodson was born (Halifax County, Commonwealth of Virginia).
    8. Sarah "Sary" Dodson was born 4 Jun 1795, (Halifax County, Commonwealth of Virginia); died After 1860, (Tennessee).
    9. Tabitha Dodson was born 19 Mar 1798, (Halifax County, Commonwealth of Virginia); died 24 Nov 1839, Riceville, McMinn County, Tennessee.
    10. Sarah "Sallie" Dodson was born 0___ 1800, (Grainger County) Tennessee; died ~ 1870, Warren County, Tennessee; was buried Smyrna Cemetery, Irving College, Warren County, Tennessee.
    11. Ruth Dodson was born 1 Apr 1802, (Halifax County, Virginia); died 2 Mar 1885, McMinn County, Tennessee; was buried Liberty Cemetery, McMinn County, Tennessee.


Generation: 5

  1. 16.  (Thomas Henesy) was born (1650-1658), Ireland (son of FNU O'Sheal and unnamed spouse); died (Maryland).

    Other Events:

    • Immigration: Talbot County, Maryland
    • Immigration: 8 Mar 1679, Youghal, Ireland

    Notes:

    Philip Popplestone craves [claims] Rtts for 1150 Acres of Land due to him for importation of 23 persons into this Province to Inhabit according to the following Catalog: viz.

    A Catalogue of the names of what Servants were brought in the Shipp called the Increase of Youghale, Philip Popleston, Commander, Anno Domini 1679:

    Cornelius Nevill
    Mary Buchan
    Ann Barry
    Piers Wally
    Dennis Donnavan
    Margarett Duohy
    Darby Quick
    Cornelius Lynch
    Robert Kearny
    Dennis Murphy
    Edward Kirby
    John Clancy
    Cornelius Hible
    Katherine Leary
    Hana Neal
    Margarett Joflynger
    Darby Sullivan
    Joan Dally
    Daniel Murphy
    Thomas Corcran

    Thomas Henesy

    John Haghiesen
    Joan Ronayne

    The Persons above specified were imported by me Philip Popleston and never made use of the rtts for their transportation untill assigned by me unto William Sharp. Witness my hand this 19th of March 1679: s/ Philip Popleston

    March 19, 1679:

    Warrant: then granted by the Rtt Honorable: the Lord Proprietor to William Sharp of Talbott County for 1150 Acres for and in consideration of the foregoing rtts of Assignment :
    __________________ Ret. in Six Months.

    Phil:
    129

    Philip Poplestone craved Rtts to One Thousand Acres of Land for Importacon from Ireland into this Province to Inhabitt according to the following Catalogue viz

    Anno 1679

    William Newmarch
    Morrish Keally
    Timothy Connor
    Adam Merritt
    Thomas White
    Joan English
    Habia Loftus
    John Legge
    Thomas Gelliburne
    James Smyth
    Dennis Nunane
    Edmund Goremond
    John Haghieren

    Thomas Henery (sp)

    Honor Mulrean
    Thomas Bullen
    Robert Hawkins
    Corneluis Sheehane
    John Brendevill
    Katherine Londry

    The persons above specified were imported by me Philip Poplestone and never made use of the rights for their transportation untill Assigned by me unto John Stevens Witness my hand this nineteenth Day of March 1679

    s/ Philip Popleston

    and underneath was thus written vis

    Do hereby Assigne and make over all my right and Interest to the Rtts above specified unto John Stephens and his Assigns as witness my hand and seal the 19th March 1679:

    Philip Popleston (Seale)

    March 19th: 1679
    Warrant then granted unto John Stevens of Dorchester County by the Rtt Honorable the Lord Proprietor for and in consideration of the foregoing Rtts and Assignment from Philip Poplestone for one Thousand Acres of Land. ___
    _______________
    Thom:
    ( 184 )
    [ Preceeding Item Omitted from this Transcription ]
    Maryland Ss:
    Know all men by these presents that William Sharpe of Talbott County and Phillip Poplestone, Master of the Ship Encrease of Youghal are holden and firmly bound to the right Honorable Charles Lord Baltimore in the sum of One hundred pounds Sterling money to be paid to the said Charles Lord Baltimore the said Sum of One Hundred Pounds or his certain Attorney Executors and Administrators or Assignees To which payment well and trulely to be made We bind us and either of us, our and either of our heirs executors and Administrators and every of us joyntly and severally by Himself for all and in the whole firmly by these presents. Signed with our hands and Sealed with our Seals dated this eight and twentieth day of March One Thousand six hundred seventy nine and in the fourth Year of the Dominion of the Said Charles Lord Baltemore over Maryland ?? ____

    WHEREAS the persons in the Catalogue mentioned were lately brought over by the above bound Philip Poplestone in the Ship above mentioned and their rights to him assigned to the above bound William Sharpe as by the said Catalogue may appear due. Whereas upon their Humble request the the above named Charles Lord Baltemore hath the day of the date above written promised a grant to the said William Sharpe by his generall Warrant to take up Land in this Province for the rights of the said severall Persons mentioned and named in the said Catalogue or any or either of them have not formerly been mad use of in order to their rights nor shall hereafter be made use of that purpose otherwise than according to the Interest that is herein and hereby declared Then this obligation to be void and of none Effect otherwise to remain in full force and Virtue ____

    Sealed and delivered by the said William Sharpe in the presence of William Sharpe Vincent Sower Rich Recii Thomas Greenway?

    Annexed to the above Obligation was this Catalogue followingn Viz.

    (667) Catalogue of all the Servants Nameds which came out of Ireland into Maryland in the Ship the Encrease of Youghall Philip Poplestone, Master

    I????
    John Coverane 1
    Morrish Magrath 2
    Morgan Caduell 3
    Edward Burke 4
    Thomas Smith 5
    Patrick Sacey 6
    Patrick Freeman 7
    David Dally 8
    Morish Doulen 10
    Rich Ashwood 14
    Dorris Brothers 12
    Coriel Driskols 13
    Dave Gallahoe 14
    John Jones 15
    John Feakine 16
    Thomas Nanury 17
    Patrick Cahane 18
    Mortagh Murphey 19
    Tim Hartaggue 20
    Thomas Sherwin 21
    William Heage 22
    John London 24
    John Tye 25
    Norris Fitzgerald 26
    John Mushhave 27
    Catherine Magralis 28
    her young daughter 29
    Alice Green 30
    Catherine Haloorans 32
    Margaret West 33
    Catherine Kennedy 34
    Mary Ireland 35
    Catherine Ahagh 36
    Elizabeth Fostor 37
    Alice Quaine 38
    Houdra Neale 39
    Mary Bower 40
    Mary Carrous 41

    Catherine Henesy 42

    Helena Mulreau 43
    Marg Gerrald 44
    Joan Pully 45
    John Bughlaus 46

    Underneath the aforegoing Catalogue was thus written ???
    This)

    ( 185)

    This is a true Account of the names of what Servants I brought to Maryland as above said and do by these Presents assign all my right Title of this Forty-six Servants by name above said unto William Sharpe being never before assigned nor made over to any other person as Wittness my hand

    Witness George Sullivan Philip Poplestone (Signed)


    Maryland Ss: Know all men by these presents that Samuel Groome the Younger as owner Commander of the Globe of Soudou are holden and firmly bound to the right Honorable Charles Lord Baltimore in the value? of One hundred and fifty pounds Sterling to be paid to the said Charles Lord Baltimore or his order Attorney Executors of Assignees To which payment well and trulely to be made We bind us, our heirs executors and Administrators firmly by these presents. Signed with my hand and Sealed with my Seal dated this five and twentiety day of April One Thousand six hundred seventy nine.........................

    WHEREAS the persons mentioned in the Catalogue annexed were brought over in the Ship above mentioned by Samuel Groome the Elcer, father of the above bound Samuel Groome as by the said Catalogue ??? appear and Whereas upon the Humble request of the said Samuel Groome the above named Charles Lord Baltemore hath promised against? Warrant to take up Lands for the rights of the said Several Persons amounting in the whole to four Score and Three Now the Conditionn of this obligation is such that if the said persons mentioned in the Catalogue annexed or any or either of them have not formerly been made use of [or?] in order to use? their rights ??? shall hereafter be made use of to that purpose by Consent or Knowledge of the said Samuel Groome the Elder of Samuel Groome the Younger or either of them or by any other under them or by their Title otherwise before mentioned then this present Obligation to be void and of none Effect or else it to Stand and abide in full force and Virtue _________ Samuel Groome ??? (Sealed)

    Sealed and delivered in the presence of

    Thomas Green???. Annexed to the above Obligacion was the following Catalogue Viz

    Servants imported into Maryland by the Owners of the Ship Globe .. Viz

    *




    More content:

    5 Jun 1995:

    There is no proof that this Thomas HENESY is our progenitor. I include him as he is the earliest HENNESSEE found in records and the fact that "Thomas" is a re-occuring forename in our family...DAH

    30 Jul 2009:

    Nick Hennessee confirms that "Thomas & Catherine" are the parents of Patrick. This fact has been long suspected but not proven until now...

    Through a serendipitous web search, Nick found:

    "An 1820 publication that I found in a 2009 internet search, A Collection Of All The Laws Of Virginia, From The First Session Of The Legislature In The Year 1619, Volume VII, documents that Patrick was son of Irish natives, Thomas and Catherine, who immigrated in 1688 and 1689 to Maryland. Colonial Maryland records confirm the immigration: Thomas was indentured to John Stevens of Dorchester County and Catherine to William Sharpe of adjacent Talbot County under arrangements made by Philip Poplestone, Captain of the ship Increase of Youghale (Ireland), with the employers of Thomas and Catherine and with Lord Baltimore, Proprietary Governor of Maryland."

    Note:

    Nick & I suspected that there was an intermediate generation between Thomas and Patrick because of the considerable age disparity between the two. I still feel uncomfortable with their pairing for that same reason. In addition, I wonder why we've not been able to locate more issue for Thomas & Catherine given their assumed Catholic heritage and its cultural invective to procreate large families. An Irish Catholic family with one child? If that is the case, then there must have been some tragic circumstance regarding their union, i. e., a death of one of the spouses or infertility for either...

    30 Aug 2009 Nick's response:

    "I can agree with your comment with the addition that ages of Thomas and Catherine at time of marriage or conception ...if after they had fulfilled the indentures... could be a factor in family size. Also, if other children had been female, poor people, colonial practices did not honor female identity for posterity as much as later periods (witness Ailsey McDowell)."

    *

    More...

    Hennessee pioneer genealogy questions and answers by Nick Hennessee relating to Thomas Hennessee (the immigrant), Thomas (son of the immigrant), Thomas (possible grandson of the immigrant) and Patrick of Burke County, North Carolina

    CONCLUSIONS 9/9/2009:

    (1) It can reasonably be assumed and concluded (but is not completely documented) that 1688 Maryland immigrant Thomas Henesy was forebearer of Patrick Hensey of Bedford County, VA, and Burke County,NC.

    (2) Whether there were one or more generations between late 17th Century Maryland immigrant Thomas and mid 18th Century Bedford resident Patrick depends on assumptions (no birth year records found) of birth years of Maryland immigrant Thomas, of other Henesys named Thomas and of Patrick.

    (3) The Thomas christening reported in Middlesex County, VA, in 1736, while not identifying the christened person by age, has other value because it shows location then of the Hennessee family near the Chesapeake Bay after the earlier Maryland locale and before their migrating west (a pattern common in that century) to Bedford County.

    (4) Was the 1736 christening of an adult or an infant? With other evidence of Thomas and Patrick at Bedford, an adult christening in Middlesex County in 1736 would fit supposed age of the adult Thomas of Bedford, and an infant christening would fit a reasonably calculated age of child Patrick. Whatever the answer, a reasonable assumption is that Thomas was father and not brother of Patrick.

    (5) The father-son (not brother) relationship assumption also extends from (a) historic records of community popularity and honor from serving in the Bedford Militia that would likely attract any male old engough to be eligible and (b) Militia records that Thomas of the Militia survived the French and Indian War initial battle at Fort Necessity in Pennsylvania in 1754 before (c) the earliest record of Patrick in the Militia in 1758.

    (6) Therefore, I propose to report in an article for a Burke County book:

    18th Century Burke County, NC, settler Patrick Henesy was son of French and Indian War militiaman Thomas, who had earlier migrated from coastal Middlesex County, VA, to western frontier Bedford County, VA, and who likely descended one or two generations from Thomas and Catherine Henesy, 1688 and 1689, immigrants to Maryland from Ireland.

    DISCUSSION:

    Early Hennessee History documentations:
    Thomas, Irish immigrant indentured to Maryland 1688
    Thomas christening, Middlesex County, VA, 1736
    Thomas, member Bedford Militia, French and Indian War, 1754
    Thomas, land grant (for Militia service) 1755 in Bedford County
    Patrick, Bedford Militia, 1758
    Patrick, homesteader in North Carolina, 1775 (Polk) and 1778 (Burke)

    Thomas Hennessee, the immigrant in Maryland as an indentured servant in 1688, would have worked off his indenture by 1691 or 1695 (3 to 7 years per Wikipedia extract below).

    How old was he in 1695? (Maybe 25, if born 1670. Maybe 45, if 1650 birth as assumed in http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/va/bedford/military/mil1758b.txt).

    Were there one or two Henesys named Thomas between Thomas the immigrant and Patrick of Burke?

    To me, the Thomas christening reported in Middlesex County, VA, in 1736, has greatest riddle-solving value of the listed Hennessee documentations because it shows location then of the Hennessee family near the Chesapeake Bay. Irish immigrant Thomas, if still living in 1736, could then be 66 or 86 years old when member-of-Bedford-Militia Thomas was 20 years old and Patrick was an infant. That leaves a large age gap that supports existence of a generation or more between immigrant Thomas and member-of-Bedford-Militia Thomas. The christening makes sense to me now only if it:

    (A) was an adult christening (a) of immigrant Thomas or (b) of son of immigrant Thomas or (c) of member-of-Bedford-Militia Thomas or

    (B) if it was an infant christening of Patrick, who was in the Bedford Militia in 1758 (age 22 if Christened 1736). Presumed also is that some time after the christening, the family (particularly family of member-of-Bedford-Militia Thomas) migrated from Middlesex County (near Chesapeake Bay) to Bedford County (just east of the Blue Ridge Mountains).

    Scenario 1: Where does the 1736 Patrick christening premise put birth year for his father Thomas, who was in the Bedford Militia in 1754? If father of Patrick were to be 20 before the presumed christening of Patrick, that would make father-of-Patrick's birth in 1716 and his age 38 at Fort Necessity in 1754. In this scenario, immigrant Thomas would have been 46 or 56 when father of Patrick was born in 1716. That suggests greater possibility but not certainty that immigrant Thomas was grandfather, not father, of Thomas, the father of Patrick.

    Scenario 2 assumes another generation, between Thomas, the immigrant (1650 or 1660-?), and Thomas (possibly 1716-?), father of Patrick. This alternative implies younger ages for births in generations from the immigrant Thomas to father of Patrick.

    Scenario 3 supports assumption by some Hennessee genealogists that Thomas in Bedford County was brother of Patrick in Bedford County and accepts, without identifying intermediate kin, that both descended from immigrant Thomas.

    From Wikipedia -- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indentured_servant

    "Indentured Servant"

    An indentured servant is a laborer under contract of an employer for usually three to seven years, in exchange for their transportation, food, drink, clothing, lodging and other necessities. Unlike a slave, an indentured servant is required to work only for a limited term specified in a signed contract.[1]

    The labor-intensive cash crop of tobacco was farmed in the American South by indentured laborers in the 17th and 18th centuries.[2] Indentured servitude was not the same as the apprenticeship system by which skilled trades were taught, but similarities do exist between the two mechanisms, in that both require a set period of work.

    In addition to slaves (who were mostly from Africa), Europeans, including Irish,[3] Scottish,[4] English, and Germans,[5] were brought over in substantial numbers as indentured servants,[6] particularly in the British Thirteen Colonies.[7] Over half of all white immigrants to the English colonies of North America during the 17th and 18th centuries may have been indentured servants.[8

    In Colonial North America, employers usually paid for European workers' passage across the Atlantic Ocean, reimbursing the shipowner who held their papers of indenture. In the process many families were broken apart. During the time living with their masters, their fellow indentured servants took the role of family.[citation needed]

    *

    More...

    HENNESSEE FAMILY OF BURKE COUNTY

    In three trips in September and October 1791, Patrick Hennessee and his teenage son, John, patronized The Morganton Store, "the only store for miles around." Then they either walked or rode on horseback or in a horse- or mule-drawn wagon or buggy. It was a 4 to 6 hour or more roundtrip from their home six miles northeast of Courthouse Square. That was long travel time for purchases of 100 10-penny nails, stirrup irons and spurs as well as three pints of rum and a bushel of Indian corn.
    Patrick (circa 1735-1796) was forebear of the Hennessee family in Burke County. Records of the State of North Carolina show he was paid for Revolutionary War army service. In 1778, his first land grant in Burke was on both sides of the Catawba River between Johns River and Lower Creek. In his home, up from the south bank of the Catawba at Hunting Creek, he lived with his wife Alice, (nicknamed Ailsey), and sons James and John. Two daughters had married.
    Long after Patrick of Burke was alive and available to answer questions, descendants wanted to know more about him and his forebears. Was he an Irish immigrant or a descendant of immigrants? Was Patrick of Burke the Patrick of Bedford County, VA?

    LURE OF INEXPENSIVE FERTILE CAROLINA LAND

    Vagueness continues in the record, but helpful perspective and inspiration came in 2006. Then Virginia and North Carolina frontier historian Dr. Christopher Hendricks published The Backcountry Towns of Colonial Virginia, one of which was New London in Bedford County. Data and patterns emphasized by Professor Hendricks would logically relate Patrick of Bedford to the large colonial migration through Virginia to North Carolina via the store of William Calloway in New London. That perspective plus studies of 17th Century maps available to militiamen in that era and internet-enabled finding in 2009 of data previously not as accessible to or appreciated by family historians make plausible conclusions not earlier reached about Patrick of Burke and his heritage.
    In the Bedford Militia in the 1750s were Thomas Hennesey and Patrick Henicie. At the beginning of the French and Indian War, the Virginia Militia (on the western frontier consisting mostly of the Bedford Militia) was under command of celebrated land surveyor, map maker and college professor Colonel Joshua Fry, Major (later Colonel, General and President) George Washington and Captain (later Colonel) William Calloway, wealthy Bedford County merchant, land developer and manufacturer. Official Virginia records report Thomas Hennesey survived the first battle of the war at Fort Necessity, PA, in 1754 and Patrick Henicie received militia pay in 1758.
    A 1761 indenture evidences that Patrick Henicie paid "one pound, one shilling and six pence" for a lot in New London owned by Colonel Calloway. Within a year, he sold it back at a good profit.
    Some have suggested--and some questioned--the kinship of Patrick and Thomas (whether father-son or brothers) while proposing that one or both descended a generation or two from Thomas and Catherine Henesy, 1688 and 1689 immigrants to Maryland from County Cork, Ireland; Maryland records confirm the immigration. Some others have argued that Patrick descended from James Hennessee, who left County Cork and landed in Norfolk, Va., in 1740; they were influenced (1) by the Irish tradition that the oldest son is named after the father's father and (2) by Patrick's first-born son being named James. Another claim: Confederate war veteran Hamilton Mortimer Hennessee said that his great grandfather, Patrick of Burke, migrated from Ireland.
    Regardless of the ancestry, pre-Revolutionary-War records show in addition to Thomas of Bedford, VA, (1) some Thomas Hennesey and other Hennesey families who continued to be residents of Maryland, (2) other Hennesys who located in coastal Virginia and North Carolina counties early in the 18th Century and (3) great migrations later in the century of many families from coastal counties in Virginia, Maryland and Pennsylvania not only to the western frontier of Virginia (including Bedford County) but also south to the western North Carolina Piedmont (including Burke County).

    GREAT WAGON ROAD TO NORTH CAROLINA

    A 1752 map of Virginia, Maryland and northern North Carolina had been surveyed by Militia Colonel Fry and Peter Jefferson. It informed migrating settlers about the Great Wagon Road from Philadelphia via the Valley of Virginia to inexpensive fertile North Carolina land. The primary route in Virginia went through the Roanoke Gap of the Blue Ridge Mountains. However, many settlers -- as many as 300 one week - went through the James River Gap. They continued toward North Carolina through Bedford County via Colonel Calloway's New London store, where many paused to buy provisions. Understandably, the great enthusiasm of the settlers en route to North Carolina opportunities would be contagious to New London witnesses such as Patrick Henicie.
    Other maps also added to the lure. A 1752 Moravian Church survey described fertile Burke County land on the Catawba River, Lower Creek, Johns River and Upper Creek. The Mouzon 1775 North Carolina map showed an old Cherokee Indian trail between Virginia and South Carolina crossing the Catawba River north of present-day Morganton near Quaker Meadows. From the river, the Indian trail went south on the path later followed by the old Rutherfordton road. Just north of the South Carolina line, the trail went through the remote Green River wilderness, where land was even less expensive than in Burke County. It was in that wilderness, southeast of Chimney Rock, that Patrick Henecy obtained a 200 acre grant February 28, 1775. (Acting under Patrick's will proven October 25, 1796, son John, executor of the estate, sold the Green River tract in 1800.)

    PIONEER VOCATIONS

    Twentieth Century descendant Elizabeth Hennessee Finger, heralded as a talented school teacher, as a diligent family historian and as a founding officer and life member of the Burke County Historical Society, shared her conclusions. She said that typical of the times for poor first-arriving settlers on the frontier wildernesses (as recorded by many families in the American colonies), Patrick initially was a trapper and hunter, trading animals and pelts for food and income. Most likely, she said, he devoted full time to trapping and hunting … in Green and Broad River forests and other frontier wilderness forests in and west of Burke … before he was able to acquire fertile Catawba River land, and he continued trapping, hunting and trading while farming in Burke County.
    Owning river-and-creek-enriched bottom land, it was natural that Patrick and his sons and grandsons were farmers (and at least one was also a blacksmith) in Burke County into the 20th Century. Until after the War Between the States, Patrick, John and their descendants farmed their Catawba river-front acreage.
    "The location of Patrick's home on the south bank of the river (below the mouth of Hunting Creek) was a very desirable one," wrote descendant Eugene L. Hennessee Jr. "There were easily defended…sites for a cabin and other buildings…. The relatively flat bottom, next to the river, appears better for corn than the steep slope rising to higher level ground…. However, this slope and ridge top … supplied wood for (house logs), poles, fences and fireplaces…. (Already cleared, Allen's Bottom, as shown on the land survey, suggested a previous occupant.)… The easy access to the river and the adjacent streams made the location ideal…. The ridge road to the south connected with the main east-west wagon road. The main north-south (Old Wilkes Road) passed through the property at a rocky ford on the river and went to Fort Defiance and other east-west roads." Evidence of the Old Wilkes Road still exists (2009) on a steep grade through the former Hennessee farm.
    It was a good neighborhood. General Charles McDowell had a grant to the south. North across the Catawba (on land previously Patrick's that in the 20th Century became the Burke County landfill) was Colonel John Suddreth (his sister married Patrick II). Also north was Thomas Wilcher (his daughter married James). To the east were John Ballew and Abraham Harshaw. West was John Hughes, Justice of the Burke County Court.
    About 1805, Patrick's older son James (1766-1851) and family, his Wilcher in-laws and other Burke residents moved west to even cheaper land. They went from Morganton via the old Indian Road south past Patrick's Green River grant into South Carolina and then west across Georgia and north to McMinnville in less-crowded middle Tennessee.

    Younger son John (circa 1775-1844) had two sons, Patrick II (1793-1845), who maintained the Hennessa plantation until his death, and John II, who moved to Murphy in Cherokee County. Beginning in 1833, Patrick II and John Sudderth, his brother-in-law on the north side of the Catawba, operated a ferry to carry Old Wilkes Road traffic.

    GOLD RUSH AND CIVIL WAR

    The two oldest sons of Patrick II, John Alexander and Emanuel Augustus (Manuel) Hennessee, followed the lure of the 1852 California Gold Rush. John remained and died there. Manuel returned home to resume his cabinetmaker trade and to marry Elizabeth Caroline Johnson, daughter of Isaac Wilburn and Catherine Louisa Kincaid Johnson.
    Elizabeth's cousin, Lt. William Joseph Kincaid, recruited Manuel to join the 11th NC Regiment of the Confederate Army. Also in the Army were four of Manuel's brothers. Thomas A. was killed in action, Manasa Sudderth died in a Yankee prison camp, and Patrick Waightsill surrendered with General Lee at Appomattox but did not return home.
    Two brothers did return home, Robert Jones (RJ) of the Burke Rifles and Manuel. RJ had been captured July 3, 1863 at Gettysburg near "the angle," the farthest advance of Pickett's Charge. Freed in early 1864, RJ won promotion to sergeant. In the Fall of 1864 in the Battle of Peebles Farm near Petersburg, VA, Manuel was gravely wounded and left to die on the battlefield. But he did not die. The next day, one may conclude from hospital records, RJ got him from the battlefield to the first of a series of hospitals.
    Among many wounds, Manuel had a hole in his forehead and suffered "paralysis of right arm and leg and loss of power of speech." However, he outlived all of his brothers, dying in 1903. Then the Morganton News Herald heralded him as best known of Burke's Civil War survivors. Also, ex-lieutenant Kincaid, by then a Georgia textile manufacturer, praised Manuel for his service in the war and example after the war and added: "The Hennessees are a good old Burke family and were among the valiant North Carolinians who won for our dear old state, during the Civil War, everlasting renown."

    FARM SOLD, FAMILY RELOCATES

    Not in the army were brothers William Richard, who managed his in-law family farms in North Cove and was a Confederate quartermaster supplier, and James David, farmer and blacksmith who managed the Burke farm for his mother until it was sold. Sisters were Martha H. (Mrs. John) Ferree, Levinia Hennessee and Myra H. (wife of Sheriff Bartlett A.) Berry. Sheriff Berry acquired part of the riverfront Hennessee farm, and in the 20th Century, Duke Power Company bought all of it along with miles of Catawba riverfront south from the upper reaches of Lake James into South Carolina.
    By the time of the sale of the Hennessee Hunting Creek farm, the family of Patrick II had relocated. RJ continued nearby, a leader in the Zion Church community. Manuel and James David moved their families to farms near Gilboa Methodist Church in Silver Creek Township. Widow Nancy Sudderth Hennessee went to live with son William in North Cove. She took with her family heirlooms and records which could later have informed and enlightened family historians had they not been destroyed when the 1916 Catawba River Flood washed downstream the family's North Cove home, barns, etc.
    Manuel's children were Sarah (Mrs. George) Farr, Idalia (Mrs. Horace) Kincaid, Florence (Mrs. John) Ferree, Alice (Mrs. Thomas P.) Satterwhite, Manassa Nixon (Nas), Dr. Emanuel Augustus (Gus) MD, Joseph Richardson, Daniel Lafatte, William L. and Russell Kimsey Hennessee. All resided in Burke County. After US Army service and college medical education, Gus returned to Burke in 1902 to practice medicine, and in the 1920s, Spanish American War veteran Russell moved to Sunshine in Rutherford County.
    Children of RJ were Patrick Lee, James Phifer, Robert Avery, Ella H. Thompson, John and Margaret H. Garrison. Children of William Richard were Robert Horace Sr., James Patrick, William Lee, Paralee H. Brown, Wade Hampton and Samuel Arthur Hennessee. Children of James David were Martha Jo H. Duckworth, Thomas Patrick, Mary, Lois May and Ophelia Hennessee.
    Much more data about these and other descendants of Patrick are included in the 1981 and 2001 editions of Burke County Historical Society's Heritage of Burke County.

    SPELLINGS AND PRONUNCIATION

    Henesy, Henacie, Hensy, Hennessy, Henicie, Hennessa, Henessee, Henecy, Henessey and Hennessee are spellings found in documents from colonial to current times. Near consensus among later descendants of Patrick to spell the name "Hennessee" may be attributed not only to increasing familiarity with the spelling of Tennessee but also to the greater number of Tennessee Hennessees than North Carolina Hennessees. The name derives from the ancient Irish "O'haonghusa" (son of Angus) as also does Guinness -- the actor Alec, the stout beer and the world records.
    However the name is spelled, pronounce it Hen'-i-sy.
    Never never rhyme the last syllable with Tennessee.

    COINCIDENCES, PRECEDENTS, INCIDENTS

    Patrick's great great grandson Nas in the late 19th Century began his mercantile career on the old Cherokee Indian Road south of Morganton toward Rutherfordton. At the store, just south of Conley Road and north of Mount Olive Church Road, Nas bought Silver Creek gold and served Brindletown area residents and patrons of the nearby Glen Alpine Springs Hotel. In 1889, he relocated his store near the Glen Alpine railroad depot to compete more productively for the hotel-bound trade and to serve the town's growing population. Nas was also Town of Glen Alpine Treasurer and Justice of the Peace and proprietor of the Linville Hotel, which additionally was his family residence until 1930. At both Brindletown (1888) and Glen Alpine (1893-1897), Nas was postmaster as was his son Paul at Glen Alpine (1939-1972). Also, both Nas (1898-1900 and 1917-1918) and Paul (1936-1939) were Burke County Commissioners.
    Reflecting the zeal of their mother and wives for childhood education, Gus and Nas Hennessee were among Glen Alpine leaders who won, 44-2, a 1906 public tax vote for a new school. Gus was Chairman and Nas Treasurer of the building committee to set a leadership precedent followed by school-teaching descendants, by Charliemae H. Hamilton (Morganton School Board member for 14 years) and by her sister Nelle's advocating college for talented students and, as warranted, providing scholarship aid.
    Incidents in Glen Alpine in 1913 in Pitts Store and in 1918 at the railroad depot resulted (a) in deaths of two men, including Dr. Gus Hennessee in 1918, (b) in trials that attracted extensive interest and newspaper coverage both in Morganton and across North Carolina and (c) in life-long emotional trauma for witnesses and the victims' families.
    Nas purchased the Pitts building in 1926 and made it his primary store location. After he died in 1946, the business continued as partnership of Paul and Nelle until, after Nelle died, Paul closed the 100+ year-old Hennessee business in 1996.

    WHERE IS HENESSEY?

    Henessey was on early 20th Century US postal maps. It identified a post office established in 1896 in the store of John C. Landreau in the former home of Manuel and Elizabeth Caroline Hennessee at the intersection of US 64 and Bollinger Loop. The office served postal patrons south of Chambers, north of Brindletown and east of Rollins until rural free delivery began in 1903.

    SPECULATION

    Paddy's Creek flows into Lake James. Because of trapping and hunting ventures of Patrick before and after he settled in Burke, some 20th Century Hennessees speculated that Paddy's Creek was named for him. (What other men named Patrick and nicknamed Paddy were in Burke in the North Carolina Colony?)

    REUNIONS

    Toward the end of the 20th Century, descendants of Patrick Hennessee began annual reunions, with descendants of son John convening initially at Gilboa Methodist Church in Burke's Silver Creek Township and descendants of son James convening at McMinnville in Warren County, Tennessee. John and James descendants had a joint reunion in McMinnville in 1991. Reunions of descendants of John have also been held at Chesterfield (close to Patrick's farm and to Sudderth Cemetery), at Glen Alpine and Morganton in Burke County and at Sunshine in Rutherford County.

    SOURCES:

    The Back country Towns of Colonial Virginia, by Dr. Christopher E. Hendricks, 2006, University of Tennessee Press/Knoxville; "New London," pages 72-76 et al.

    "A Map of the Most Inhabited Part of Virginia (and) the Whole Province of Maryland With Parts of Pensilvania, New Jersey and North Carolina Drawn by Joshua Fry and Peter Jefferson in 1775," an update based on their 1751 original and including the 1752 Moravian Church survey of Catawba River and tributaries in what since 1777 has been Burke County, NC.

    "An Accurate Map of North and South Carolina With Their Indian Frontiers…from Actual Surveys by Henry Mouzon and Others, London, 1775."

    "Patrick Hennessee, Insight from Land Grants, Burke County, NC," by E. L. Hennessee Jr., 4237 West Enon Drive, Enon, OH, ehennessee@aol.com. ww.http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/va/bedford/military/mil1758b.txt. Hening, William Waller 1820, The Statutes at Large; Being A Collection Of All The Laws Of Virginia, From The First Session Of The Legislature In The Year 1619; VolumeVI; Franklin Press, Richmond, VA.

    "Hennessee Family in America", 1991 and revisions since, compiled by David A. Hennessee, including "Hennessee Pre-Revolution Chronology," Patrick, homesteader in North Carolina, 1775 (Polk) and 1778 (Burke), Transcript of answers by Hamilton Mortimer Hennessee on government questionnaire for Tennessee Civil War veterans.

    Fort Necessity National Battlefield Roster of Virginia Militia: Thomas Henacy (pre-battle), Thomas Hennesey (list of survivors) (http://www.nps.gov/archive/fone/rostercmb.htm#h).

    Archives, Colony of Maryland, documentation of passengers 1688 and 1689 by Philip Poplestone, Captain of the ship Increase of Youghale (Cork County, Ireland).

    North Carolina Atlas & Gazetteer, Fourth Edition, Copyright 2000, pages 33, 54.

    Bedford Co., Va. OB 3 1763 - 1771 pg 36-37, court cases involving Patrick Henicie and Alice Henicie, furnished Nita Hennessee by Jim Hamlin in 1999.
    Book of Patents, Colony of North Carolina, 1765-1775, County of Rowan, 200 Acres to Patrick Henecy, February 28, 1775, on both sides of the south fork of White Creek of the Green River (land in Polk County since it was established in 1855). Burke County: Land and Misc. Records 1771-1809, Volume III, Page 103. BURKE,

    The History of a North Carolina County, 1777-1920, 1982, by Edward William Phifer, Jr., pages 179-180, 364, 367, 369. North Carolina Wills: A Testator Index, 1665-1900;
    Corrected and Revised Edition by Thornton W. Mitchell including: "Hennessa, John/Heslip, Thomas/Deed/10-11/533/1800 and Hennessy, John/Heslip, Thomas/Deed/ 10-11/536/1800" (deeds of Green River land to Thomas Heslip by John Hennessa, executor of estate of Patrick Hennessa I). http://files.usgwarchives,org/nc/rutherford/deeds/h2grntor.txt. http://www.lib.unc.edu/mss/inv/n/North_Carolina_Land_Grants_and-Deeds.html.

    CSA Army records 1861-1865--regiment: "E A Hennessee" (spelling used by Manual); hospitals (1864): "E A Hennessa" (spelling favored by RJ Hennessa).

    My Dearest Friend, Civil War Correspondence of Cornelia McGimsey and Lewis Warlick, page 184. The Heritage of Burke County 1981, published by The Burke County Historical Society, Morganton, NC, pages 225-226, sketches 100,152, 221, 304, 329, 359, 408, 413, 596, 612, 650, 661,724 and 763.

    The Heritage of Burke County 2001, published by The Burke County Historical Society, Morganton, NC, articles 10, 24, 29, 31, 63, 80, 136, 173, 295, 365, 404, 413, 414, 416-428, 466, 488, 532, 534, 617,645, 676, 678, 717, 718,727 and 775.

    NC Rev Army Accts (Rev. Army Auditors Accounts),Vol III,BKG-16(Haun,Part V). North Carolina Atlas, 1975, University of North Carolina Press, Pages 13, 16.

    North Carolina Yearbook 1902, published by News & Observer, Raleigh ttp://www.archive.org/stream/northcarolinayea1902/northcarolinayea1902_djvu.txt.

    Interviews, conversations and correspondence with Elizabeth Hennessee Finger, Jean Davis Hennessee, Nita Hennessee Shepard, David A. Hennessee, Eugene L. Hennessee, Jr., Keith C. Hennessee, Philip H. Hennessee, Fred Hennessee, Carl D. Hennessee, R. Floyd Hennessee, Nelle Augusta Hennessee, Margaret Hennessee Williams, Peggy Hennessee Ballew, Dewey W. Hennessee, Caroline Hamilton Ervin, Nixon Scott Hennessee, James D. Spainhour, Robert T. Pitts, et al.

    By Manassa Nixon (Nick) Hennessee III,

    Descendant of Patrick, John, Patrick II, Emanuel Augustus (Manuel), Manassa (Nas) Nixon and Manassa Nixon (Nick) Hennessee Jr.,

    Father of Nixon Scott Hennessee,

    Grandfather of Sean Alexander, Ryan Augustus and Aidan Patrick Hennessee

    *

    More...

    From: Helen R Money
    To: schoolstuff@worldnet.att.net
    Subject: Archibald W. Hennessee
    Date: Saturday, March 07, 1998 1:27 PM

    David,

    The other day when I talked to you, I mentioned that someone had moved to TN when they were 6 yrs. old. I said that it was Patrick but I was WRONG. It was Archibald W. Hennessee. Could you tell me where you found that fact. Reference in your notes: See testimony. What testimony and do I have it? I have not seen anything in detail on Archibald at all. Where are you getting this? I realize that you said that you did not have references on some of the things but if you have this, I would like to have it. I do have the rest of the references.

    The Revolutionary War........

    In the book VIRGINIA'S COLONIAL SOLDIERS by Lloyd Bockstuck, it lists

    Thomas Henacy, pg 129, 12 March
    Thomas Henacy, pg 134,
    Thomas Hennesey, pg 47, 50
    Thomas Hennessey, pg 131
    Patrick Hensey, pg 208 0.5.0

    REVOLUTIONARY WAR RECORDS Vol. I VA by Gaius M. Brumbaugh

    Wm. Henesey #4803 3 yrs. pg. 448

    This was all they had at the Family History Library here. It is very small. Don't know if you are interested in this "poop" or not. I printed off the Hennessee family that they had at the FHL-BC. I do not use it but only as a reference to look for something.

    I am really having a problem with Ailsey McDowell. Can't find doodley-squat on her. Will continue to look...................

    Helen

    *

    More...

    "An 1820 publication that I found in a 2009 internet search, A Collection Of All The Laws Of Virginia, From The First Session Of The Legislature In The Year 1619, Volume VII, documents that Patrick was son of Irish natives, Thomas and Catherine, who immigrated in 1688 and 1689 to Maryland. Colonial Maryland records confirm the immigration: Thomas was indentured to John Stevens of Dorchester County and Catherine to William Sharpe of adjacent Talbot County under arrangements made by Philip Poplestone, Captain of the ship Increase of Youghale (Ireland), with the employers of Thomas and Catherine and with Lord Baltimore, Proprietary Governor of Maryland."

    The full Virginia citation: Hening, William Waller 1820, The Statutes at Large; Being A Collection Of All The Laws Of Virginia, From The First Session Of The Legislature In The Year 1619. VolumeVII. Franklin Press, Richmond, Virginia. “Patrick Hensey, Bedford County Militia, 1758, Parents (Thomas Henesy) #26192 born (circa 1650), (Ireland), died (MD or PA), married in (VA), (Catherine) #26193, born (circa 1650), Ireland, died (MD or PA).”

    *

    More...

    http://www.electricscotland.com/webclans/scotsirish/hennessey.htm

    "Hennessy" and all its corruptions;

    The early homeland of one O'hAonghusa sept, ancestors of families named Hennessy, was in the barony of Lower Philipstown, Co. Offaly, along the present border of that county and Co. Westmeath.
    Hennessy is a name from which the prefix O has been dropped in modern times, though O'Hennessy was still widely used in the seventeenth century and may be retained by some families today. In Irish it is O'hAonghusa, i.e. descendant of Aonghus of Angus. The principal sept of the name was located near the town of Kilbeggan and the hill of Croghan, their territory being chiefly in the northern part of Co. Offaly, where they shared with O'Holohan the lordship of Clan Cholgain: a branch of this was located nearer to Dublin, the head of it being chief of Gailenga Beg on the north side of the River Liffey on the borders of Counties Meath and Dublin. The latter was displaced by the Anglo-Norman invasion. The Offaly O'Hennessys spread into Tipperary and Clare - in the later county they are now called Henchy, formerly Hensey.

    *

    Immigration:
    on the ship, "Increase"

    (Thomas married (Catherine LNU) (Ireland). (Catherine was born (1650-1660), Ireland; died (Maryland). [Group Sheet]


  2. 17.  (Catherine LNU) was born (1650-1660), Ireland; died (Maryland).

    Other Events:

    • Immigration: Talbot County, Maryland
    • Immigration: 8 Mar 1679, Youghal, Ireland

    Notes:

    "...Know all men by these presents that we William Sharpe of Talbot County and Phillip Poplestone master of the ship Encrease of Youghall are holden and firmly bound to the right honorable Charles Lord Baltimore in the sum of one hundred pounds sterling to be paid to the said Charles Lord Baltimore the said sum of one hundred pounds or his certain attorney, executors and administrators or assigns to they which payment well and truly be made we bind us and either of us our and either of our heirs executors and administrators and every of us jointly and severally by himself for all and in the whole firmly by these presents signed with our hand and sealed with our seals dated the eight and twentieth day of March one thousand six hudred seventy nine and in the fourth year of the Dominion of the said Charles Lord Baltimore over Maryland.

    Whereas the persons in the catague(sic) mentioned were lately brought over by the above bound Phillip Poplestone in the ship above mentioned and their rights by him assigned to the above bound William Sharpe as by the said catalogue may appear and whereas upon their humble request the above named Charles Lord Baltimore hath the day of the date above written promised a grant to the said William Sharpe by his general warrant to take up land in the province for the right of the said several persons now the condition of this obligation is such that if the said persons mentioned and named in the said catalogue or any or either of them have not formerly been made use or in order to their rights nor shall be hereafter made use of to the purpose otherwise then according to the intent that is herein and hereby declared then this obligation to be void and of none effect otherwise to remain in full force and virtue.

    Sealed and delivered by the said Wm. Sharpe in the presence of William Sharpe, Vincent Lowe, Rich Keen, Thos. Greening. Annexed to the above obligation was this catalogue follow viz and catalogue of all the servants names which came out of Ireland into Maryland in the ship Encrease of Youghall Phillip Poplestone master, March 8, 1679.

    ...42. Cath Hennesy"

    (Data taken from a photocopy of the original record, located at the Maryland Hall of Records (Patents, Liber 20, folio 184). Photocopy. Personal library of Eric Shawn, Oak Grove, Oregon. This reference to Thomas Shehawne is also found in Harry Wright Newman's To Maryland from Overseas. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1986, p. 156.)

    Immigration:
    on the ship, "Increase"

    Children:
    1. 8. Patrick Hennessee was born (1720-1730), (Ireland); died 0___ 1795, Burke County, North Carolina; was buried 25 Oct 1795, Tryon, Polk County, North Carolina.

  3. 20.  Benjamin Wilsher was born 1700-1715, Amherst County, Virginia, British Colonies of America (son of Joseph Wilsher and unnamed spouse); died 5 May 1777, (Amherst County, Virginia, British Colonies of America).

    Notes:

    December 23, 2015:

    I've abstracted this information for Benjamin and his issue from the web. And his profile must be questioned as there was NO sources cited for any of his events. It is also noteworthy that Thomas WILCHER did not name any of his children after his grandfather or his issue...DAH

    Benjamin married unnamed spouse (Amherst County, Virginia, British Colonies of America). [Group Sheet]


  4. 21.  unnamed spouse
    Children:
    1. Joseph Wilsher was born 0___ 1740, (Amherst County, Virginia Colony); died 6 May 1782, (Amherst County, Virginia Colony).
    2. Richard Wilsher was born 0___ 1744, (Amherst County, Virginia, British Colonies of America); died 0___ 1810.
    3. 10. Thomas Wilcher, Sr. was born ~ 1745, (Amherst County) Virginia Colony; died LATE 1816, McMinnville, Warren County, Tennessee; was buried Liberty Cemetery, McMinnville, Warren County, Tennessee.

  5. 28.  Thomas Dodson, Jr. was born 0Oct 1707, Richmond County, Virginia (son of Thomas Dodson, Sr. and Mary May Durham); died 21 Oct 1783, Halifax County, Virginia.

    Other Events:

    • Probate: Pittsylvania County, Virginia
    • Religion: Baptist Minister
    • Will: 12 Aug 1779
    • Probate: 21 Oct 1783, Pittsylvania County, Virginia

    Notes:

    "Will of Thomas Dodson of Pittsylvania Co.,VA, dated August 12, 1779, proved, October 21, 1783". Abstracted by Catherine Lynn.


    "In the name of God Amen this twelfth day of August in the year of our Lord 1779, I Thomas Dodson of Pittsylvania County of the State Virginia being in good health and perfect and sound memory...

    I give to my grandson Thomas Dodson, son of Jospehy deceased, the sum of one shilling Sterling.

    Item - I give and bequeath to my son Tho's Dodson my whip saw.

    Item - I also give and bequeath to my son George Dodson a Negro Levina, to him and his heirs forever.

    Item - I also give and bequeath to my son William Dodson after the death of my wife the plantation and tract of land whereon I now alive to him and his heirs forever.

    Item - I give and bequeath to my daughter Sarah Nevil one shilling.

    Item - I give and bequeath to my daughter Elizabeth one shilling.

    Item - I give and bequeath my daughter Else Dodson one shilling.

    Item - I give and bequeath to my loving wife Ellinor Dodson all my moveable Estate excepting my still and whipsaw, such as horses, cattle, hogs, and sheep with all my household and kitchen furniture provided she will give up her join and what I had with and in not as much to be sold as will pay her and she shall have the remainder likewise I lend her the use of my Negro woman named Violet, her natural life and afterward to my son Jesse Dodson and his heirs forever provided the wench should breed in my wife's life the said child or children to return with their mother to my son Jesse Dodson and his heirs forever.

    Item - I also leave my still to be valued at my decease and for my son Jesse to have the still by paying his brother and sisters their equal proportion according to the valuation of said still.

    Item - I also give to use of the Separate and Regular Baptists to meet in the worship service of the Lord, the Meeting house near John Creek's Mill with three acres of land to the same more of less.

    Item - I also appoint my loving wife Elenor Dodson and my son George Dodson my only and sole Executors of this my last Will and Testament and I do hereby disallow, revoke and disannul all and every other former will and Legacies and Executors by me in any ways before this time named, willed and bequeathed Ratifying and confirming this and no other to be my last Will and Testament, as witness wereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this day and year above written.


    Thomas Dodson



    Signed, sealed and delivered by the said Thomas Dodson to be his last will and Testament in the presence of the subscribers.

    Daniel Gardner
    Heath Gardner
    Silvaney Gardner
    Nathaniel Gardner"

    end

    Birth:
    in Farnham Parish...

    Thomas married Elizabeth Rose 3 Apr 1726, (Richmond County, Virginia). Elizabeth (daughter of John Rose and Mary LNU) was born 0___ 1706, Richmond County, Virginia; died 0___ 1766, Fauquier County, Virginia. [Group Sheet]


  6. 29.  Elizabeth Rose was born 0___ 1706, Richmond County, Virginia (daughter of John Rose and Mary LNU); died 0___ 1766, Fauquier County, Virginia.

    Other Events:

    • Birth: 0___ 1710, Richmond County, Virginia

    Children:
    1. Joseph Dodson was born 21 Feb 1725, Richmond County, Virginia; died 0___ 1773, Halifax County, Virginia.
    2. Thomas "Second Fork Tommy" Dodson was born 3 Oct 1728, Richmond County, Virginia; died 0___ 1811, Hawkins County, Tennessee.
    3. Mary Dodson was born 16 Jun 1730, Commonwealth of Virginia.
    4. Sarah Dodson was born 27 May 1732, Richmond County, Virginia.
    5. Elizabeth "Betty" Dodson was born 27 May 1732, Richmond County, Virginia.
    6. Alice "Alcy" Dodson was born 0___ 1733, Pittsylvania County, Virginia; died 0___ 1792, (Pittsylvania County, Virginia).
    7. Joshua Dodson was born ~ 1736, Commonwealth of Virginia.
    8. William Dodson was born Abt 1738, Richmond County, Virginia; died 6 May 1832, Iredell County, North Carolina.
    9. George "Lame George" Dodson was born 17 Feb 1739, Pittsylvania County, Virginia; died 0___ 1816.
    10. Rosanna Dodson was born 0___ 1744, Pittsylvania County, Virginia; died 0___ 1792.
    11. 14. Jesse Buford Dodson, Sr. was born 22 Nov 1752, Halifax County, Virginia; died 22 Nov 1843, Riceville, McMinn County, Tennessee; was buried Matlock Cemetery, Athens, McMinn County, Tennessee.

  7. 30.  Elisha Dodson, Sr. was born 22 Feb 1727, Richmond County, Virginia (son of Thomas Dodson, Sr. and Mary May Durham); died 27 Apr 1791, Pittsylvania County, Virginia.

    Other Events:

    • Military: Revolutionary War Patriot

    Notes:

    Biography

    Elisha Dodson was born 22 FEB 1727, North Farnham Parish, Richmond County, Virginia, page 22, of The Dodson (Dotson) Family of North Farnham Parish, Richmond County, Virginia: A History and Genealogy of Their Descendants Volume One, by Mrs. Sherman Williams, Compiler and Editor and Rev. Silas Emmett Lucas, Jr., Publisher, copyright 1988; Library of Congress Number: 88-60291.

    Elisha Dodson and Sarah Everett were married about 1748 in Richmond County, Virginia. Sarah Everett (daughter of William Everett and Margaret [Everett]) was born on 13 Apr 1729 in North Farnham Parish, Richmond County, Virginia. Sarah Everett's father said to be William Everett, born 15 Mar 1691 in VA; his father was Daniel Everett.

    Elisha Dodson and Sarah Dodson were baptized December 4, 1762 in the Broad Run Baptist Church, Fauquier County. Their son Elisha Jr was one of the infants received into the care of the church on 9 Oct 1763. It is indicated in such records that Elisha and Sarah Dodson were "dismissed to Halifax" - date not shown.

    Elisha Dodson is in the DAR patriot index. He is listed in the Pittsylvania Co. Court Order Book 4, 1777-1783, p.127 as a ensign in the milita, Capt. Richard Gwynn's Company.

    In 1774 Elisha patented 400 acres in Halifax Co and appears on the tax lists there from 1782 until 1787 when he apparently moved to Pittsylvania. He continues on the tax lists in Pittsylvania Co through 1796, so apparently died at at hat time. He had perhaps taken care of his estate distribution previously by a deed of gift to his children.

    Elisha Dodson on 27 Apr 1791, "for love and affection he doth bear his children," gave to his sons, Presley and William Dodson "the land whereon he now lives" containing 300 acres on Toby Creek, and slaves Simon, Harry, Sam, Winny, Milly, Letty, Crisia, Sucky, Aggy and Eve, as well as moveable estate to be equally divided between all the children. Margaret the wife of Railey [Rawleigh]Dodson, Lydda the wife of John Waller, Ruth the wife of Jesse Dodson, Sarah the wife of Thomas Dodson, Jemimah the wife of Joshua Hardey & Elisha Dodson Jr. Said Negro Harry to be delivered to John Waller and with him to remain until a debt is paid which the said Elisha Dodson is now owing the said Waller. Negro Aggy already given & in possession of said Elisha Dodson Jr. After said Debt is paid then Harry to be returned into a division. Slaves & moveable estate to be equally divided between all the afore named children. Wit: W. Wright, Ann Wright, Martha (X) Wright. Ack by Elisha Dodson 16 May 1791 Pittsylvania Co., Va. Deed Book 9, page 11.


    Sources

    The Dodson (Dotson) Family of North Farnham Parish, Richmond County, Virginia: A History and Genealogy of Their Descendants Volume One, by Mrs. Sherman Williams, Compiler and Editor and Rev. Silas Emmett Lucas, Jr., Publisher, copyright 1988; Library of Congress Number: 88-60291.
    Two Volumes and Volume Two contains the index, abstracts & transcripts of documents. Pages 22 and 23.

    Repository: R10 Name: NEHGS Lending Library Address: New England Historic Genealogical Society Address 1: New England Historic Genealogical Society Note: 2008. No longer lends books, available only at the Library.
    Source: S652 Abbreviation: North Farnham Parish Registers Title: George Harrison Sanford King, Compiler & Publisher, The Registers of North Farnham Parish 1663-1814 and Lunenburg Parish 1783-1800 Richmond County, Virginia (Self-Published; Fredericksburg, VA; 1966) Repository: #R17 Call Number: F232 .R4K52 1986
    Source: S860 Abbreviation: Pittsylvania Co VA Deeds Title: Pittsylvania Co Virginia Deeds; Deed Books 3 & 4, Microfilm #0033263; Deeds & Wills Book 5, Microfilm #0033264; DB 6 & 7 with some Court Records from 1767, Microfilm #0033265; DB 8, Microfilm #0033266; DB 9 & 10, Microfilm #0033267; Deeds & Wills 11, Microfilm #0033290 [these are dated earlier than DB 9; the wills begin in 1780]
    Note

    Elias Dodson found on a list of taxpayers for Hamilton Parish, Elk Run & vicinity, 1751. From the account book of Capt. John Crump, Sheriff of Prince William County. After 1759, this area became Fauquier County.

    [Since the earliest known Elias Dodson was not born until 1760, this is most likely Elisha.]

    The Rev. Elias Dodson in writing his history of the family claimed that Elisha Sr was blind due to an eye injury in his youth; he also stated that Elisha Jr and perhaps daughter Peggy [Margaret] were born in Maryland. There's no explanation for this statement. [There were Dodsons in Maryland with some of the same given names, but they are of no relationship - some of the early researchers have confused the families.] Rev. Dodson stated that seven daughters were born before they had a son; he named two children that were not named in the deed of gift that perhaps had died before 1791. Eleanor is not named and she was still living. Eleanor had perhaps already received her inheritance or had elected to opt out if she had no need of additional property.

    1763 moved to Halifax Co. 7/5/1774 Elisha Dodson land in Halifax Co adj to Joseph Wm and Russell Terry

    In 1774 Elisha patented 400 acres in Halifax Co and appears on the tax lists there from 1782 until 1787 when he apparently moved to Pittsylvania. He continues on the tax lists in Pittsylvania Co through 1796, so apparently died at at hat time. He had perhaps taken care of his estate distribution previously by a deed of gift to his children.

    *

    Will of Elisha Dodson

    Pittsylvania DB9, p.11

    p.11 27 Apr 1791

    Elisha Dodson to Presley Dodson, William Dodson, Margaret the wife of Railey [Rawleigh]Dodson, Lydda the wife of John Waller, Ruth the wife of Jesse Dodson, Sarah the wife of Thomas Dodson, Jemimah the wife of Joshua Hardey & Elisha Dodson Jr.

    For natural love & affection to his said children and also for 5sh (shillings), makes over to them, the land whereon he now lives.

    300 acres on Toby Creek unto his sd sons Presley & William to be divided between them Presley the N side & Wm the S including to William 4 acres on N side known Antain Land reputed bounds thereof.

    Also the following slaves: Simon, Harry, Sam, Winney, Milley, Lettey, Cresia, Suckey, Aggy & Ever.

    And all his moveable estate of what kind of quality.

    Said Negro Harry to be delivered to John Waller and with him to remain until a debt is paid which the sd Elisha Dodson is now owing the sd Waller.

    Negro Aggy already given & in possession of sd Elisha Dodson Jr.

    After sd Debt is paid then Harry to be returned into a division.

    Slaves & moveable estate to be equally divided between all the afore named children.

    Wit: W. Wright, Ann Wright, Martha (X) Wright.

    Ack by Elisha Dodson 16 May 1791

    *

    Revolutionary Patriot, Ensign. Was blinded during early adulthood.

    Birth:
    in Farnham Parish...

    Elisha married Sarah Everett 1747-1748, Richmond County, Virginia. Sarah (daughter of William Everett and Margaret LNU) was born 13 Apr 1729, Pittsylvania County, Virginia; died 0___ 1824, Halifax County, Virginia. [Group Sheet]


  8. 31.  Sarah Everett was born 13 Apr 1729, Pittsylvania County, Virginia (daughter of William Everett and Margaret LNU); died 0___ 1824, Halifax County, Virginia.

    Other Events:

    • Death: 0___ 1824, Richmond County, Virginia

    Children:
    1. Eleanor Dodson was born 0___ 1749, Fauquier County, Virginia; died 10 Jul 1816.
    2. Margaret "Peggy" Dodson was born C. 1752, Richmond County, Virginia.
    3. 15. Ruth Dodson was born 12 Dec 1754, Fauquier County, Virginia; died 22 Nov 1828, McMinn County, Tennessee; was buried Matlock Cemetery, Athens, McMinn County, Tennessee.
    4. Sarah "Sally" Dodson was born C. 1758, Richmond County, Virginia; died 21 Sep 1835, Giles County, Tennessee.
    5. Lydia Dodson was born Commonwealth of Virginia.
    6. Jemima "Mima" Dodson was born C. 1760, Richmond County, Virginia.
    7. Tabitha Dodson was born C. 1762, Richmond County, Virginia; died Commonwealth of Virginia.
    8. Elisha Dodson was born C. 1764, Halifax County, Virginia.
    9. Presley Dodson was born C. 1766, Halifax County, Virginia.
    10. William E. Dodson was born 0___ 1768, Halifax County, Virginia; died 18 Mar 1821, Pittsylvania County, Virginia.


Generation: 6

  1. 32.  FNU O'Sheal was born (1600-1650), Ireland.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: The O'Sheal Progenitor

    FNU — unnamed spouse. [Group Sheet]


  2. 33.  unnamed spouse
    Children:
    1. 16. (Thomas Henesy) was born (1650-1658), Ireland; died (Maryland).
    2. John O'Sheal was born 0___ 1660, England; died 0Apr 1736, Greater London, Middlesex, England; was buried 13 Apr 1736, Saint Martin-in-the-Fields Churchyard, Westminister, London, England.
    3. Donnie Lynn O'Shields
    4. Robert C. O'Shields
    5. John Michael Shiels
    6. Dermot Stephen Shields
    7. Ray Chumley
    8. Glenn Aiken O'Sheal
    9. Fred Schouten
    10. Marie Shields
    11. Francis Xavier Shields

  3. 40.  Joseph Wilsher was born 0___ 1660, England.

    Notes:

    December 23, 2015:

    To:
    Bj²rn P. Brox Jacqueline Livingston
    Type a first or last name
    Add Group:Immediate Family | Family | Immediate Family of | Descendants of
    Subject:

    Re: Joseph Wilsher
    Message:

    Managers of Joseph Wilsher,

    I am contacting you about this profile: http://www.geni.com/people/Joseph-Wilsher/6000000011087806899

    Please share source citation...

    Sincerely,

    David Hennessee, info@classroomfurniture.com

    Joseph married unnamed spouse (England). [Group Sheet]


  4. 41.  unnamed spouse
    Children:
    1. 20. Benjamin Wilsher was born 1700-1715, Amherst County, Virginia, British Colonies of America; died 5 May 1777, (Amherst County, Virginia, British Colonies of America).

  5. 56.  Thomas Dodson, Sr. was born 15 May 1681, Richmond County, Virginia (son of Charles Dodson, Sr. and Anne LNU); died 21 Nov 1740, Richmond County, Virginia.

    Other Events:

    • Probate: Richmond County, Virginia

    Notes:

    Richmond County,VA Wills:05-378,

    "Will of Thomas Dodson, dated 17 Feb 1739; proved 2 March 1740

    In The Name Of God Amen I Thomas Dodson of Northfarnham p'ish in Richmond County Being sick and Weak of Body but in Perfect since and Memory do make and ordain this to be my Last Will and Testam.t in manner and forme -

    Impri I lend to my Wife Mary Dodson my Plantation whereon I now Live and the Land thereto Blonging with all my Negroes and Moveable Estate dureing her Natural Life -

    Item. I give to my Son Thomas Dodson Five Shill.s to be Paid by Ex.rrs -

    I give to my Son George Dodson and his heirs for Ever one hundred and fifty Acres of Land whereon he ye sd George Dodson is now Liveing -

    I Give to my Son Greenham Dodson and his heirs for Ever the Whole Tract of Land I bought of Lambarth Dodson -

    I give to my Sone Elisha Dodson & his Heirs for Ever the Plantation whereon I now Live and Land Land therto Belonging after my Wife Mary Dodsons Decease -

    I Give to my Daughter Alice Creel One Negroe Girl named Sarah -

    I give to my Daughter Mary Oldam one New Suit of calica Cloaths -

    I Give to my Son Greenham Dodson one Negroe man Named Harry -

    I GIve to my Son Abraham Dodson one Negroe Woman named Bess and one Negroe Boy named Joe -

    I Give to my Son Josha Dodson one Negroe woman Named Sue and one Negroe Boy named Dick -

    I give to my son Elisha Dodson one Negroe Girl Named Nan -

    I give to my son Greenham Dodson one feather Bed and furniture -

    I give to my son Abraham Dodson one feather Bed and furniture -

    I give to my son Joshua Dodson one feather Bed and furniture -

    I give to my son Elisha Dodson one feather Bed and furniture -

    I Give to Granddaughter ye Daughter of David Dodson Twenty Shill.s

    All the Remaining Part of My Estate be the same more or Less I give to be Equally Divided between three of my sons Vist Abraham Dodson Joshua Dodson & Elisha Dodson

    I Likewise ordain and Appoint my Wife Mary Dodson and my son Greenham Dodson to be the true and Lawful Exr.s of the my Last will & Tesatam.t

    as Witness my hand and seal this 17th Day of February 1739


    (S) Thomas (T his mark) Dodson (Seal)


    Wits: H. Miskell, John (X) Hightower, Charles Dodson"

    end of entry

    Thomas Dodson's Estate Inventory

    An exhaustive examination by Roberta Estes:

    https://dna-explained.com/2017/03/26/thomas-dodsons-estate-inventory-a-tallow-sort-of-fellow-52-ancestors-153/

    end of note

    Thomas Dodson , He Married Mary May Dorothy Durham.1 Aug 1701 in North Farnham Richmond County Virginia, He was born 15 Jun 1686 in North Farnham Richmond County Virginia, and died Aft Jan 1745 in North Farnham Richmond County Virginia. She was buried Aft Jan 1745 in North Farnham Richmond County Virginia. {{son of Charles Dodson and Anne Elmore. He was born 15 May 1681 in Jamestown, Virginia, and died 21 Nov 1740 in North Farnham Richmond County Virginia. He was buried Nov 1740 in North Farnham Richmond County Virginia.}}

    Children of Thomas Dodson and Mary May Dorothy Durham are:

    i. George Dodson was born 31 Oct 1702 in North Farnham, Richmond County, Virginia, and died 1758 in Prince William/Pittsylvania County Virginia.
    ii. Thomas Dodson was born Oct 1707 in North Farnham Parish Richmond County Virginia, and died 21 Oct 1783 in Halifax, Virginia.
    iii. Greenham Dodson was born Abt 1709.
    iv. Elisha Dodson was born 22 Feb 1727.
    v. Alice Dodson was born Abt 1711. She married William Creel 15 Nov 1729.
    vi. Abraham Dodson was born 4 Apr 1723, and died 1768 in Fauquier Co., VA. He married Barbary Russell, daughter of George Russell and Mary. She was born 9 Nov 1729 in North Farmham Richmond County VA.
    vii. Mary Dodson was born 5 Oct 1715. She married Oldham.
    viii. Joshua Dodson was born 25 May 1725. He married Ruth.
    ix. David Dodson was born Abt 1704, and died 1740 in Prince William County, VA.
    x. Joseph Dodson was born 21 Feb 1725.

    2. -George Dodson was born 31 Oct 1702 in North Farnham, Richmond County, Virginia, and died 1758 in Prince William/Pittsylvania County Virginia. He was buried 1758 in Virginia. He married Margaret Dagord 20 Apr 1726 in North Farmham Richmond County Virginia, daughter of Henry Dagood Dagord. She was born 30 Apr 1708 in Richmond, VA, and died Abt 1770 in Pittsylvania County Virginia. She was buried 1770 in Virginia.

    Children of George Dodson and Margaret Dagord are:
    i. Mary Dodson was born 21 Dec 1726.
    ii. Lazarus Dodson was born 7 Oct 1728 in Richmond County, Virginia, and died Abt 1795 in Pittsylvania Co., VA.
    iii. Rawleigh Dodson was born 18 Jan 1730 in Richmond County, Virginia, and died Aft 20 Jul 1793 in Hawkins County, TN.
    iv. Thomas Dodson was born 25 May 1735 in Richmond County, Virginia.
    v. George Dodson was born 31 Oct 1737, and died 1825 in Pittsylvania Co., VA. He married Elizabeth Dodson. He married Margaret.
    vi. Fortunatus Dodson was born 31 Jul 1740. He married Margaret (Peggy) Dodson Aft 1836, daughter of Elisha Dodson and Sarah Everett.
    vii. Hannah Dodson was born 2 May 1747. viii. David Dodson was born 1743 in Culpeper County, VA.

    3. Thomas Dodson was born Oct 1707 in North Farnham Parish Richmond County Virginia, and died 21 Oct 1783 in Halifax, Virginia. He was buried in Pittsylvania County Virginia. He married Elizabeth Rose 3 Apr 1724 in Pittyslvania County Virginia, daughter of John Rose and Mary Dodson Blackerby. She was born 1710 in Richmond County, Virginia, and died 1766 in Fauquier Co., VA.

    Children of Thomas Dodson and Elizabeth Rose are:

    i. Thomas "Second Fork" Dodson was born 3 Oct 1728 in Richmond County, Virginia, and died Bef 1809 in Hawkins County, TN.
    ii. Joseph Dodson was born 21 Feb 1725 in Richmond County, Virginia, and died 1773. He married Martha Anna.
    iii. Mary Dodson was born 16 Jun 1730. She married Childress.
    iv. Sarah Dodson was born 27 May 1732. She married John Neville.
    v. Elizabeth Dodson was born 27 May 1732. She married John Bennett.
    vi. Alce Dodson was born Abt 1734, and died 1792 in Pittsylvania Co., VA.
    vii. Joshua Dodson was born Abt 1736.
    viii. William Dodson was born Abt 1738, and died 6 May 1832 in Iredell Co., NC.
    ix. George "Lame George" Dodson was born Abt 1740.
    x. Jesse Dodson was born 22 Nov 1752 in Fauquier Co., VA, and died 1841-1843 in East Stanley Valley, TN.
    xi. Rhoda Dodson was born Abt 1744, and died 1792. She married John Creel.

    4. Greenham Dodson was born Abt 1709. He married Elinor Hightower. She was born Abt 1718 in Richmond County, Virginia.
    Children of Greenham Dodson and Elinor Hightower are:

    i. Judith Dodson was born 6 Jan 1741.
    ii. Thomas Dodson was born Abt 1743 in Richmond County, Virginia. He married Sarah Dodson, daughter of Elisha Dodson and Sarah Everett. She was born Abt 1758 in Richmond County, Virginia.
    iii. Hightower Dodson was born Abt 1745. He married Unity Dodson 7 Jan 1804.
    iv. Rawleigh Dodson was born Abt 1745, and died 3 Jun 1836. He married Margaret (Peggy) Dodson, daughter of Elisha Dodson and Sarah Everett.
    v. William Fortunatus Dodson was born Abt 1747.
    vi. George Dodson was born Abt 1751.

    5.Elisha Dodson was born 22 Feb 1727. He married Sarah Everett.

    Children of Elisha Dodson and Sarah Everett are:
    i. Margaret (Peggy) Dodson. She married Fortunatus Dodson Aft 1836, son of George Dodson and Margaret Dagord. He was born 31 Jul 1740. She married Rawleigh Dodson, son of Greenham Dodson and Elinor Hightower. He was born Abt 1745, and died 3 Jun 1836.
    ii. Eleanor Dodson was born Abt 1749 in Richmond County, Virginia.
    iii. Ruth Dodson was born Abt 1756 in Richmond County, Virginia.
    iv. Lydia Dodson was born Abt 1756.
    v. Sarah Dodson was born Abt 1758 in Richmond County, Virginia. She married Thomas Dodson, son of Greenham Dodson and Elinor Hightower. He was born Abt 1743 in Richmond County, Virginia.
    vi. Jemima "Mima" Dodson was born Abt 1760 in Richmond County, Virginia. She married Joshua Hardy.
    vii. Tabitha Dodson was born Abt 1762 in Richmond County, Virginia.
    viii. Elisha Dodson was born Abt 1764 in Halifax County, VA. He married Hannah Lawson 21 May 1789. He married Mary Lipscomb Pettus Jordan.
    ix. Presley Dodson was born Abt 1766 in Halifax County, VA. He married Elizabeth Bates 22 Oct 1789.
    x. William Dodson was born Abt 1768 in Halifax County, VA.

    10. David Dodson was born Abt 1704, and died 1740 in Prince William County, VA. He married Amey. Child of David Dodson and Amey is:

    i. Unknown Dodson was born Abt 1740.

    Descendant Register, Generation No. 3

    12. Mary Dodson was born 21 Dec 1726. She married Thomas "Second Fork" Dodson, son of Thomas Dodson and Elizabeth Rose. He was born 3 Oct 1728 in Richmond County, Virginia, and died Bef 1809 in Hawkins County, TN.

    Children of Mary Dodson and Thomas "Second Fork" Dodson are:
    i. Ida (Ioda) Dodson.
    ii. George Dodson.

    13. Lazarus Dodson was born 7 Oct 1728 in Richmond County, Virginia, and died Abt 1795 in Pittsylvania Co., VA. He married Alce Dodson, daughter of Thomas Dodson and Elizabeth Rose. She was born Abt 1734, and died 1792 in Pittsylvania Co., VA.

    Children of Lazarus Dodson and Alce Dodson are:

    i. Elisha Dodson was born Abt 1753 in Pittsylvania Co., VA, and died 1828 in Williamson Co., TN. He married Rachel Henry. She was born Abt 1754 in Holsten Co., TN.
    ii. George Dodson was born Abt 1755.

    14. Rawleigh Dodson was born 18 Jan 1730 in Richmond County, Virginia, and died Aft 20 Jul 1793 in Hawkins County, TN. He married Elizabeth Dodson Abt 1750. She died Aft 1793.

    Children of Rawleigh Dodson and Elizabeth Dodson are:

    i. Rawleigh Dodson was born Abt 1751.
    ii. Mary Dodson.
    iii. Peggy Dodson. She married Menafee.
    iv. James Dodson was born Abt 1760. He married Lucy Davis 20 Dec 1804 in Jefferson Co TN.
    v. Lazarus Dodson. vi. Toliver Dodson. vii. Eleanor "Nelly" Dodson was born Abt 1755. She married John Saunders. 19. David Dodson was born 1743 in Culpeper County, VA. He married Elizabeth Betty Dodson, daughter of Thomas "Second Fork" Dodson and Ann Mary Neville. She was born Abt 1748.

    Children of David Dodson and Elizabeth Betty Dodson are:
    i. Fortunatus Dodson.
    ii. Abner Dodson.
    iii. Ann Dodson.

    20. Thomas "Second Fork" Dodson was born 3 Oct 1728 in Richmond County, Virginia, and died Bef 1809 in Hawkins County, TN. He married Ann Mary Neville 1747 in VA, daughter of Joseph Neville and Ann Neville. She was born 1730 in VA. He married Mary Dodson, daughter of George Dodson and Margaret Dagord. She was born 21 Dec 1726.

    Children of Thomas "Second Fork" Dodson and Ann Mary Neville are:

    i. Elizabeth Betty Dodson was born Abt 1748.
    ii. Thomas Jeremiah Dodson was born in Halifax County, VA, and died Abt 1835 in Hawkins County, TN.
    iii. Leonard Dodson. He married Randall.
    iv. Jesse Dodson was born Abt 1774. He married Judith Combs 19 Mar 1794 in Halifax County, VA. She was born Abt 1775.
    v. Fanny Dodson. She married Thomas Dodson.
    vi. Agnes Aggy Dodson. She married Moses Hanks.
    vii. Rhoda Dodson. She married Alexander Hitson 20 Nov 1786 in Halifax County, VA.
    viii. Winny Dodson. She married William Johnson. ix. Alcy Dodson. She married Jerry Johnson. x. Samuel Dodson. xi. William Dodson died 22 Dec 1809 in KY.
    xii. James Dodson.

    Children of Thomas "Second Fork" Dodson and Mary Dodson are:
    i. Ida (Ioda) Dodson.
    ii. George Dodson.

    25. Alce Dodson was born Abt 1734, and died 1792 in Pittsylvania Co., VA. She married Lazarus Dodson, son of George Dodson and Margaret Dagord. He was born 7 Oct 1728 in Richmond County, Virginia, and died Abt 1795 in Pittsylvania Co., VA.
    Children of Alce Dodson and Lazarus Dodson are:
    i. Elisha Dodson was born Abt 1753 in Pittsylvania Co., VA, and died 1828 in Williamson Co., TN. He married Rachel Henry. She was born Abt 1754 in Holsten Co., TN.
    ii. George Dodson was born Abt 1755.

    27. William Dodson was born Abt 1738, and died 6 May 1832 in Iredell Co., NC.
    Children of William Dodson are:
    i. Sarah Sally Dodson was born Abt 1777 in Halifax County, VA.
    ii. William Dodson.
    iii. Annis Dodson was born 1759, and died 1788.
    iv. Elija Dodson was born 1759, and died 1788.
    v. James B Dodson was born 1764 in Halifax County, VA.
    vi. Rachael Dodson was born 1765 in Fauquier Co., VA.
    vii. Winnifred Dodson was born 1770 in Halifax County, VA.
    viii. Rosannah Dodson was born 1775 in Halifax County, VA.
    ix. Mary Dodson was born 12 Apr 1790 in Halifax County, VA.
    x. Elizabeth Dodson was born 1796 in Halifax County, VA.

    29. Jesse Dodson was born 22 Nov 1752 in Fauquier Co., VA, and died 1841-1843 in East Stanley Valley, TN. He married Ruth Dodson, daughter of Elisha Dodson and Sarah Everett. She was born Abt 1756 in Richmond County, Virginia.

    Children of Jesse Dodson and Ruth Dodson are:

    i. Nimrod Dodson was born Abt 1775.
    ii. Elizabeth Dodson was born Abt 1776.
    iii. Elisha Dodson was born 17 Sep 1785.
    iv. Elijah Dodson was born 17 Sep 1785.
    v. Jesse Dodson was born 7 Mar 1791.
    vi. William Dodson was born 14 Jun 1795.
    vii. Sarah Dodson.
    viii. Tabitha Dodson was born 19 Mar 1798.
    ix. Sallie Dodson was born 1801.
    x. Ruth Dodson was born 1 Apr 1802.

    39. Ruth Dodson was born Abt 1756 in Richmond County, Virginia. She married Jesse Dodson, son of Thomas Dodson and Elizabeth Rose. He was born 22 Nov 1752 in Fauquier Co., VA, and died 1841-1843 in East Stanley Valley, TN.

    Children of Ruth Dodson and Jesse Dodson are:

    i. Nimrod Dodson was born Abt 1775.
    ii. Elizabeth Dodson was born Abt 1776.
    iii. Elisha Dodson was born 17 Sep 1785.
    iv. Elijah Dodson was born 17 Sep 1785.
    v. Jesse Dodson was born 7 Mar 1791.
    vi. William Dodson was born 14 Jun 1795.
    vii. Sarah Dodson.
    viii. Tabitha Dodson was born 19 Mar 1798. ix. Sallie Dodson was born 1801. x. Ruth Dodson was born 1 Apr 1802.
    Descendant Register, Generation No. 4

    53. Mary Dodson She married Shelton.

    Children of Mary Dodson and Shelton are:
    i. Mary Shelton.
    ii. Nancy Shelton.

    62. Elizabeth Betty Dodson was born Abt 1748. She married David Dodson, son of George Dodson and Margaret Dagord. He was born 1743 in Culpeper County, VA.
    Children of Elizabeth Betty Dodson and David Dodson are:

    i. Fortunatus Dodson.
    ii. Abner Dodson.
    iii. Ann Dodson.

    63. Thomas Jeremiah Dodson was born in Halifax County, VA, and died Abt 1835 in Hawkins County, TN. He married Jemina Lockett. She was born in Halifax County, VA, and died 29 Dec 1850 in TN.

    Children of Thomas Jeremiah Dodson and Jemina Lockett are:

    i. Elisha Dodson was born 1 Nov 1801 in Hawkins County, TN, and died 17 Jun 1874 in Hawkins County, TN.
    ii. James Dodson was born Abt 1790. He married Rachel Grantham.
    iii. Sarah Dodson.
    iv. Raleigh "Rolly" Dodson was born 1804 in TN, and died 1853.

    Descendant Register, Generation No. 5

    96. Elisha Dodson was born 1 Nov 1801 in Hawkins County, TN, and died 17 Jun 1874 in Hawkins County, TN. He married Frances "Fanny" Thompson 4 Nov 1819 in Hawkins County, TN. She was born 17 Feb 1803 in Hawkins County, TN, and died 17 Jun 1874 in Hawkins County, TN.

    Children of Elisha Dodson and Frances "Fanny" Thompson are:

    i. Thomas Richard Dodson was born 10 Aug 1820 in Hawkins County, TN, and died 20 Aug 1893 in Overton County, TN.
    ii. Mary M W Dodson was born 17 Feb 1822 in Hawkins County, TN, and died 2 Jun 1885.
    iii. James Kendrick Dodson was born 10 Jan 1824 in Hawkins County, TN, and died 4 Mar 1885 in Hamblen Co., TN. He married Narcissa A Taylor 28 Sep 1854.
    iv. Sarah J Dodson was born 26 May 1825 in Hawkins County, TN, and died 23 Aug 1826 in Hawkins County, TN.
    v. William T. Dodson was born 14 Jun 1827 in Hawkins County, TN, and died 26 Jul 1827 in Hawkins County, TN.
    vi. Raleigh J. Dodson was born 22 Jul 1828 in Hawkins County, TN, and died 11 Dec 1891. He married Emma. He married Eliza J.
    vii. Samuel E Dodson was born 9 Dec 1830 in Hawkins County, TN, and died 13 Jan 1905.
    viii. Stephen Orville Dodson was born 8 Jan 1833 in Hawkins County, TN, and died 29 Jan 1892 in Pickett, TN.
    ix. Nancy Cornelia Dodson was born 7 Jan 1836 in Hawkins County, TN, and died 11 Jan 1913 in Pickett, TN.
    x. Stokley D M Dodson was born 4 Apr 1839 in Hawkins County, TN, and died 18 Apr 1862 in TN.
    xi. Lucinda M Dodson was born 4 Apr 1841 in Hawkins County, TN, and died 18 Apr 1915 in TN.
    xii. Susan B Dodson was born 26 May 1843-1844 in Hawkins County, TN.

    99. Raleigh "Rolly" Dodson was born 1804 in TN, and died 1853. He married Martha "Patsy" Johnson. She was born 1802 in TN.

    Children of Raleigh "Rolly" Dodson and Martha "Patsy" Johnson are:
    i. Penelope Dodson was born 1822 in TN.
    ii. Eliza Dodson was born 1824 in TN.
    iii. Thomas Dodson was born 1825 in TN.
    iv. William Dodson was born 1828 in TN.
    v. James Hardy Dodson was born 1831 in TN, and died 1904.
    vi. Raleigh Sanford Samuel Dodson was born 1832 in TN, and died 1905.
    vii. George Dodson was born 1835 in TN.
    viii. Cynthia Dodson was born 1839 in TN.

    Descendant Register, Generation No. 6

    100. Thomas Richard Dodson was born 10 Aug 1820 in Hawkins County, TN, and died 20 Aug 1893 in Overton County, TN. He was buried in Dodson Chapel Cemetery, Overton County, TN. He married Martha Ann Johnson 26 Nov 1840. She was born 7 Jan 1821 in TN, and died 12 Oct 1906 in Putnam County, TN.

    Children of Thomas Richard Dodson and Martha Ann Johnson are:
    i. Louisa Frances Dodson was born 5 Jan 1842, and died 26 May 1880.
    ii. James Elbert Dodson was born 13 Feb 1844, and died 2 Feb 1885. He married Margaret Etta "Bette" Gentry 17 Nov 1869. She was born 1 Oct 1850, and died 20 Mar 1940.
    iii. Sanford Johnson Dodson was born 12 Aug 1846, and died 18 May 1882 in TN.
    iv. Elisha Frank Dodson was born 20 Nov 1848, and died 29 Sep 1924. He married Elizabeth "Bessie" Kembrough. v.John Larkin Dodson was born 30 Jul 1851 in TN, and died 13 Dec 1892.
    vi. Mary Nancy C Dodson was born 29 Apr 1854 and died 8 Apr 1936.
    vii. William Robert L Dodson was born 28 Jul 1856. viii. Sarah Catherine Hannah Dodson was born 8 Apr 1860, and died 13 Sep 1894.
    ix. Susan Alice Dodson was born 15 Feb 1863.

    106. Samuel E Dodson was born 9 Dec 1830 in Hawkins County, TN, and died 13 Jan 1905. He was buried in Coldwell Cemetery, #195, Hawkins Co., TN. He married Mary Jane Taylor 12 Oct 1854 in Hawkins County, TN. She was born 1840, and 1910. She was buried in Coldwell Cemetery, #195, Hawkins Co., TN.

    Children of Samuel E Dodson and Mary Jane Taylor are:
    i. Elisha S Dodson was born 1857.
    ii. William H Dodson was born 1857.
    iii. J E Dodson was born 1859.
    iv. Margaret Dodson was born 1861.
    v. Eliza Emma Dodson was born 1863, and died 1893.
    vi. Narcissus Dodson was born 7 Nov 1866, and died 16 Feb 1888. She married John E Jones. He was born 3 Apr 1887, and died 3 Jul 1894.
    vii. Fannie Effie Dodson was born 17 Feb 1876 in Morresburg, TN, and died 12 Nov 1914.
    viii. Ludie T Dodson was born 18 Aug 1878.
    ix. James S. Dodson was born 1880. He married Dollie Lawson.

    107. Stephen Orville Dodson was born 8 Jan 1833 in Hawkins County, TN, and died 29 Jan 1892 in Pickett, TN. He married Mary Alta Catherine Johnson 28 Oct 1852. She was born 1835, and died 1909.

    Children of Stephen Orville Dodson and Mary Alta Catherine Johnson are:
    i. James Elisha Dodson was born 1854.
    ii. Martha Lucinda Dodson was born 1855.
    iii. Sarah Maneova Dodson was born 1857, and died 1908.
    iv. William Dodson was born 1859. v. Fannie Dodson was born 1860.
    vi. Raleigh J " Rolla" Dodson was born 1 Jun 1862.
    vii. Louise Dodson was born Abt 1863.
    viii. Nancy Jane Dodson was born 1865.
    ix. Steven Orville Dodson was born 1866.
    x. Alice Dodson was born 1868.
    xi.Charles Dodson was born 1869.
    xii. Robert Dodson was born 1871.
    xiii. Merchant Frank Dodson was born 30 Sep 1883 in Overton County, TN, and died 18 Nov 1962.
    xiv. Rebecca Melvina Johnson Dodson was born 15 Apr 1868 in Overton County, TN, and died 18 Sep 1948 in Pickett, TN.
    109. Stokley D M Dodson was born 4 Apr 1839 in Hawkins County, TN, and died 18 Apr 1862 in TN. He married Sarah J Hartman 26 Mar 1857 in TN. She was born 28 Feb 1840 in TN, and died 9 Mar 1899 in TN.

    Children of Stokley D M Dodson and Sarah J Hartman are:

    ** i. John Henry Dodson was born 17 Apr 1858 in Hawkins County, TN, and died 4 Jun 1918 in Tulare, Tulare County, CA. He married Mary Rosina "Mollie" Williams 13 Mar 1874 in Hamblen Co., TN. She was born Dec 1858 in TN, and died 28 Sep 1889 in Whitesburg, Hamblen County, TN.
    ii. Thomas E Dodson was born 20 Nov 1859 in TN.

    iii. Stokely C Dodson was born 12 Aug 1861 in TN.


    Sarah J. Hartman
    1840 - 1899
    Parents: John and Mary
    Siblings: Marshall, Rebecca A. and Margaret
    Partners: (1)Stokely D. M. and(2)Benjamin Abbot
    Children: (1)John Henry, Thomas E., Stokely C., ----(2)-Sarah J., Angeline R., Benjamin Abbot, Marion, Flora, Robert, Nora Etta and Hattie

    end of registry

    Birth:
    Click here to view maps, record & history of Richmond County, Virginia ...http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richmond_County,_Virginia

    Thomas married Mary May Durham 1 Aug 1701, Richmond County, Virginia. Mary (daughter of Thomas Durham, Sr. and Dorothy Smoot) was born 5 Jun 1686, Richmond County, Virginia; died 21 Nov 1740, Richmond County, Virginia. [Group Sheet]


  6. 57.  Mary May Durham was born 5 Jun 1686, Richmond County, Virginia (daughter of Thomas Durham, Sr. and Dorothy Smoot); died 21 Nov 1740, Richmond County, Virginia.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Dorothy Mary Durham
    • Death: 1 Jan 1715, Richmond County, Virginia

    Notes:

    Birth:
    in Farnham Parish...

    Children:
    1. George Dodson, Sr. was born 31 Oct 1702, Richmond County, Virginia; died 0___ 1770, Pittsylvania County, Virginia.
    2. David Dodson was born (CIRCA 1704), Richmond County, Virginia; died EARLY 1740, (Prince William County) Virginia.
    3. 28. Thomas Dodson, Jr. was born 0Oct 1707, Richmond County, Virginia; died 21 Oct 1783, Halifax County, Virginia.
    4. Greenham Dodson was born ~ 1709, (Richmond County) Virginia; died ~ 1777, (Nottaway County, Virginia).
    5. Alice "Alcy" Dodson was born 0___ 1711, Richmond County, Virginia.
    6. Mary Dodson was born 10 May 1715, Richmond County, Virginia.
    7. Abraham Dodson was born 4 Apr 1723, Richmond County, Virginia; died 0___ 1768, Fauquier County, Virginia.
    8. Joshua Dodson was born 25 May 1725, Richmond County, Virginia; died 0___ 1798, Surry County, North Carolina.
    9. 30. Elisha Dodson, Sr. was born 22 Feb 1727, Richmond County, Virginia; died 27 Apr 1791, Pittsylvania County, Virginia.

  7. 58.  John Rose was born Abt 1680, (England); died 18 Nov 1742, Northumberland County, Virginia.

    Other Events:

    • Occupation: plantation owner

    Notes:

    ------------

    From LeeVerne de Place, Sept. 1971


    THE ROSE FAMILY

    (I don't know who wrote this history, but is was sent me by a descendant ofThomas Stamps and John Rose.)

    My interest in the Rose family is due to the fact that my ancestor, Thomas Stamps, of Fauquier County, Virginia, married Mary Rose, daughter of John Rose.

    John Rose. Married Mary Blackerby, widow of James Blackerby. By her first husband she had a son, James Blackerby. (Also a daughter who evidently married man named Davis -- see will. LVdP).

    Issue:

    1. Mary Rose. Married Thomas Stamps, of Fauquier County.
    2. Elizabeth Rose. Married Thomas Dodson.

    John Rose had no sons.

    At least eleven Rose immigrants settled in Virginia between 1636 to 1655. It is possible that our John Rose was not born in Virginia, but was himself an immigrant from England, arriving in Virginia the latter part of theseventeenth century. It is thought that he could have been born in Virginia, the son of David Rose who in 1656 was a witness to the sale of 200 acres of land on the south side of the Rappahannock River, but again, no proof.

    Crozier states that the Virginia Roses did not have a coat-of-arms.

    Northumberland County was formed in 1648; Lancaster County in 1652; Richmond County in 1692. These three counties are grouped north of the Rapphannock at the southeast end of the peninsula between the Rappahannock and Potomac Rivers and are known as the northern Neck of Virginia. In early record many families are identified in all three of these counties and when they began moving from the tidewater it was usually up the peninsula toward Fauquier County.

    The earliest record that we have of our John Rose is that in 1701 in Northumberland County when he and his wife, Mary Rose, witnessed the will of James Wildey (Editor's Note: Documents available). Rose is mentioned in a number of land purchases and finally we have his will dated November 18, 1742 wherein he names James Blackerby, his wife's son by her first marriage; and Joseph Davis, his wife's grandson. His daughters Mary Stamps and Elizabeth Dodson and his beloved wife Mary Rose.

    On March 12, 1736 John Rose of Wicomico, Northumberland County, purchased 200 acres out of an original grant of 800 acres for 4629 pounds of tobacco and six pounds currant money of Virginia. The land was partly in Northumberland, part in Richmond and bordered lands of Robert Boyd, Charels Fallin, Captain Richard Span, Winnifred Warrick, Graves Eves, Gilbert Croswell, James Blackerby, his stepson, and Merryman Payne, one boundary running on the south side of a branch issuing out of Merattico. The deed was attested by Turf and Twigg and the original deed is in possession of the Shackleford family of Seattle, Washington.

    Also attached hereto is a copy of a deed from (it wasn't LVdP) John Hill, dated, March 2, 1719, conveying land situated in Farnum (sic) Parish in Richmond County to John Rose. He paid John Hill 1500 pounds of tobacco for the land. John Hill was husband to Ann Dodson, widow of the first Dodson in America - Charles Dodson. She was the grandmother of Thomas Dodson who married Elizabeth Rose, daughter of John rose.

    Attached hereto is a copy of the will of John Rose dated November 11, 1742. When it was offered for probate, John Rose lived in Wicomico Parish, Northumberland County. The original will is in possession of the Shackleford family of Seattle, Washington. They also have the original will of Thomas Stamps and also his revoked will.

    The executors of John Rose's will were Mary, his widow, his sons-in-law Thomas Stamps and Thomas Dodson. Witnesses were William Stonum and Eleanor Chapman. The will gave to his wife's son James Blackerby three sheep, her grandson Joseph Davis seven sheep; his lands, negroes, stock, etc., to Mary Stamps and Elizabeth Dodson equally, but the entire estate to his wife during her natural life or widowhood.

    Will of John Rose of Wicomico Parish, Northumberland County, Virgina

    In the name of God, Amen, I, John Rose, of Weiomore Parish and County of Northumberland, being weak of age, but of perfect mind and memory, thanks be to Almighty God for it, calling to mind the mortality of my body, knowing that it is appointed for all men once to die, do make ordain this my last will and testament, that is to say, principally and first of all, I recommend my Soul unto the hands of Almighty God that gave it to me and as for my body I recommend it to the Earth, to be buried in a Christian like and decent manner, at the discretion of my executors hereafter mentioned, nothing doubting but at the general resurrection I shall receive the same again by the Might power of God, and as for such worldly estate as it hath pleased Almighty God to bless me with in the world I give as follows:

    Imprimes, I give to James Blackerby my wife's son three sheep.

    Item, I give to Joseph Davis my wife's grandson seven sheep and as for the rest of my personal estate, such as my lands, negroes, stocks and all other tenements I give to my two daughters, viz: Mary Stamps and Elizabeth Dodson and their heirs forever, to be equally divided between the two, and it is my will that my land shant be sold as long as the wars continue.

    Item, I leave the rest of my estate to my loving wife Mary Rose during her widowhood or natural life.

    Item, I constitute, make, appoint and ordain my loving wife Mary Rose, Thomas Stamps, Thomas Dodson and William Thomas Sr. to be my sole executors of this my last will and testament, wills and legacies, bequests executed to me anyways before this time named, willed and bequeathed, ratifying and confirming this and no other to be my last will and testament.

    In witness whereunto I set my hand and seal this 18th day of November in the year our Lord God 1742.



    John Rose (seal)

    Witnessed by:
    Wm. Stonum
    Elenor (x) Chapman"

    -------------

    John married Mary LNU Bef 1701, (Virginia). Mary was born Abt 1682, Northumberland County, Virginia; died Aft 1742, Northumberland County, Virginia. [Group Sheet]


  8. 59.  Mary LNU was born Abt 1682, Northumberland County, Virginia; died Aft 1742, Northumberland County, Virginia.
    Children:
    1. Mary Rose was born Abt 1704, Northumberland County, Virginia.
    2. 29. Elizabeth Rose was born 0___ 1706, Richmond County, Virginia; died 0___ 1766, Fauquier County, Virginia.

  9. 62.  William Everett was born 15 Mar 1692, Richmond County, Virginia (son of Daniel Everett and Anne Elmore); died 0___ 1759, Richmond County, Virginia.

    Notes:

    24 Jul 2007


    Posted By: Doyleen Turner
    Email:
    Subject: William Everett b.1692, Virginia
    Post Date: February 07, 2001 at 07:24:52
    Message URL: http://genforum.genealogy.com/everett/messages/1281.html
    Forum: Everett Family Genealogy Forum
    Forum URL: http://genforum.genealogy.com/everett/


    I am seeking information about the parents of William Everett who was born March 15, 1692 in Richmond County, Virginia.

    William (my 6th great grandfather) was married to "Margaret" and they had eight known children: Sarah, Anne, Elizabeth, Lucrecy, Daniel, George, William, and Ruth.

    Does anyone know who William's parents were and who the immigrant Everett was for this line? THANKS Doyleen







    Birth:
    in Farnham Parish...

    William married Margaret LNU ~ 1715, (Virginia). Margaret was born (Richmond County, Virginia). [Group Sheet]


  10. 63.  Margaret LNU was born (Richmond County, Virginia).
    Children:
    1. 31. Sarah Everett was born 13 Apr 1729, Pittsylvania County, Virginia; died 0___ 1824, Halifax County, Virginia.


Generation: 7

  1. 112.  Charles Dodson, Sr. was born 0___ 1649, Essex County, Virginia; died 1705-1706, Richmond County, Virginia.

    Other Events:

    • Possessions: 0___ 1679; Old Rappahannock County, Virginia
    • Will: 11 Jan 1703, (Richmond County, Virginia)
    • Probate: 6 Feb 1705, Richmond County, Virginia

    Notes:

    Re: Charles Dodson Sr.'s pars

    Home: Surnames:Dodson Family Genealogy Forum

    Re: Charles Dodson Sr.'s pars
    Posted by: Jonelle
    Date: April 27, 2000 at 12:45:10

    In Reply to: Charles Dodson Sr.'s pars by Mike Williams of 2181


    Charles Dodson Sr. was born 1649, in Probably, Rappahannock Co., Va. married to Anne Elmore he died 6 Feb 1705, in Rappahannock Co., Va. His parents was Jessie Dodson and Judith Hagger. Jessie Dodson's Father was John Dods, who came over from England with Capt. John Smith.

    July 8, Charles Dodson (3) leased land in Old Rappahannock Co. Rappahannock Co became extinct in 1692 being divided into Essex and Richmond counties. Charles Dodson owned land in both bounties, but resided in North Farnham Parish, Richmond Co., Va.

    From 1680 to 1692 Charles Dodson acquired land which he and his sons proceeded to improved Chalres Dodson is found in many documents where he witnessed various documents and on several occasions he is named in Wills as executor. In a Will of John Lincoln dictated Dec 18, 1686, the comment was made in the affidavit of witnesses that the maker of the Will "would have no other but Charles Dodson as his executor although several insisted that he have his wife."

    During Charles Dodson's lifetime, he saw many new immigrants arriving in Virginia from England. By 1700 there were more than 80,000 person living in the tidewater region of Virginia.

    On July 8, Charles Dodson leased land in Old Rappahannock County.Rappahannock Co. became extinct in 1692 being divided into Essex and Richmond counties. Charles Dodson owned land in both counties but resided in North Farnham Parish, Richmond Co., Va. where he became a large land owner.


    I do have a lot more of information on the Dodsons. If you email me I can help you. I do have doc. on this information. Email me at Jonelle43@yahoo.com

    Jonelle

    *

    more ...

    Richmond County,VA Wills:02-095,


    "Will of Charles Dodson, dated 11 Jan 1702/3; pr. 6 Feb 1705

    In the name of God amen I Charles Dodson being sick and weake of body but in Sound and Good disposing memory praise be given to God for the same do make this my Last Will and Testament in manner and forme following that is to say first & principally I resigne my soul into the mercifull hands of almighty God my Creator assuredly hoping through the merritts of my blessed Saviour to obtaine Remission of all my sins and my body I Committ to the Earth whence it was taken to be Decently buryed by the Discretion of my Executrix herein after named and as for the worldly Goods and Estate the Lord hath Lent me I dispose thereof as followeth

    I Give and bequeath to my son

    Charles Dodson the plantation formeryly Called Coll Travers quarter with a hundred and fifty acres of Land to him and to the male heires Lawfulluy begotten of his body and if the abovesd Charles Dodson should Die without any male heire that then the Land should Returne to the next heire of the Dodson.

    Secondly.

    I give and bequeath to my son Thomas Dodson a plantacon seated in a neck formerly called the Rich neck with a hundred and Fifty acres of Land to him I the male heires Lawfully begotten of his own body forever and if the abovesd Thomas Dodson should dye without any male that then the Land Should Returne to the next heire of the Dodson -

    Thirdly.

    I Give and bequeath to my son Bartho: Richd. Dodson the plantation that Thomas Reeves liveth on knowne by the name of oake neck with one hundred and fifty acres of Land binding upon the Lan formerly belonging to Daniel Evarard from the head to the foot to him & the male heires Lawfully begotten of his owne body and if he shoud dye without male heires that then the Land to Returne to the heaire of the Dodson-

    Fourthly.

    I Give and bequeath to my son William Dodson the Plantation in the hickory neck with one humdred and fifty acres of Land to him and the male heires Lawfulluy begotten of his body and if no male heire appeare then to Returne to next heire of the Dodson the said Land to bind upon brother Bartho Richd Dodsons Land from the head to the foot -

    Fifthly.

    I give and bequesth to my son John Dodson two hundred acres of Land it being part of hickory neck and of Indian Cabin neck binding upon his brother William Dodson to him and male heires Lawfully begotten of his own body and if the abovesd John Dodson should die without any male heires that then the Land Returne to the next of the Dodson -

    Sixthly.

    I Give and bequeath to my son Lambert Dodson my new Dwelling plantation with the hundred acres of Land belonging to it to him and male heires Lawfully begotten of his body and if no male heire appeare that then the Land to Returne to the next of the Dodson

    Seventhly.

    I Give and bequeath to my Deare and Loving wife Anne Dodson and my daughters Anne Dodson and Elizabeth Dodson all my moveable Estate of what kind soever within and without to be Equally Divided between them.

    Eightly.

    My desire is that none of the Land out of the name might be sold Except one Brother selleth to another and if no male appeareth by none of my sons that then my Daughters my Inherritt the Land.

    Lastly.

    And all the Rest and Residue of my Estate Goods and Chattells not herein before bequeathed after my Debts and funrall Expenses discharged I do give and bequeath unto my Deare and Loving wife Ann Dodson whome I do make sole Exect:ex of this my Last Will and Testament Revoking all other will by me heretofore made

    In witness whereof I have hereunto sett my hand and seale the 11th of Jany one thousand seven hudnred two three


    (signed) Charles Dodson Senr. (Seal)"

    *

    "Until then, all we can say is that the parents of Charles Dodson were almost certainly NOT Jesse Dodson and Judith Hagar who supposedly married in 1645 in Jamestown. Unless new information is forth coming with actual documentation of some sort, this couple must be relegated to the annals of myth – along with Charles Dodson being the son of John Dods of Jamestown."

    "Following further rumors, the marriage between John Dodson’s son, Jesse Dodson and Judith Hagar is supposed to have occurred on May 7, 1645 in Jamestown. The problem with this information is that there appear to be no records whatsoever of Jamestown marriages that have survived. Furthermore, there is no record of Judith Hagar arriving in Jamestown, either. Nor is there any record of Jesse Dodson. This rumor has struck out altogether."

    end of comment

    Charles Dodson’s Estate Inventory

    Charles Dodson’s estate inventory was filed with the court on Oct. 17, 1706, as follows:

    Feather bed and bedstead and parcel of sheets and one blanket and one rugg – 0600
    One flock bed and paire of blankets one sheet and rug and bolster and bedstead – 0500
    One saw and six reep hooks and one paire of old pestells holsters and one old chest and one old bill book – 0200
    Eight chairs – 0800
    Two wooden chairs – 0100
    One chest of drawers and table – 1000
    Two chest – 0250
    One small table couch – 0150
    One warming pan two paire of tongs and one box iron – 0200
    One pair hilliards – 0250
    One super table cloth and 12 napkins – 0200
    Four old napkins and one old table cloth – 0050
    One feather bed curtains and valens one blankett one pair of sheets and two pillows – 1100
    A parcel of old books – 0150
    Ole looking glass and lantron? – 0050
    One old flock bed 2 blankets rug bolster and pillows – 0400
    2 spinning wheels – 0150
    3 pots 3 pothooks and 3 pot hangers one spit and one iron pestell – 0450
    99 weight of pewter – 0950
    One bellmettle pestle and mortar 0 0700
    7.5 pounds of brass – 0130
    One servant man 3 years and 8 months to serve – 2200
    One pare of small hilliards and two smoothing iron and two cutting knives and skewers – 0150
    One mare and two horses – 2400
    Parcel of old iron – 0100
    Pair of cart wheels – 0060
    Old crosscut saw – 0150
    One saddle and pillow or pillion – 0120
    3 cows and 3 years old – 1800
    One cow and calfe – 0500
    6 two yeare olde – 1200
    One steere of 5 years old – 0500
    2 barren cows and heifer and one calfe – 1400
    3 old sheep – 0300
    3 lambs – 0200
    Total 18780
    Signed John Rankin, William Smoot and Richard R. White (his mark)

    I absolutely love estate inventories, because they tell us exactly what was in the household and on the farm when the man died. Inventories included everything owned by the couple, because the man was presumed to own all property of any kind except for the wife’s clothes and any real estate deeded to her individually after they were married. The wife was entitled to one third of the value of the husband’s estate unless the husband provided for more. However, the estate’s real value was established by the sale of the inventory items, not by the inventory itself, so everything was inventoried prior to sale. In some cases, the widow was made an initial allocation so she and the children could simply survive.

    The feather bed clearly was the bed that Charles and Ann slept in, but it’s worth noting that there were no bedcurtains or valances which would have suggested a more upper-class household.

    There were three beds in the inventory, two of flock which meant a mattress of scraps of fabric and wool instead of feathers. However, Ann and Charles had 8 children and a servant. Obviously there was a lot of bed-sharing going on and not everyone had a bed. The servant may have slept in the barn or on straw in the kitchen.

    The spinning wheels certainly weren’t tools used by Charles and were obviously Ann’s.

    This photo of a woman with a spinning wheel was taken about 1920, but not a lot had changed in spinning wheel design in the past couple hundred years.

    The looking glass may have been a shared resource. Looking glasses were scarce and status symbols.

    I do wonder why there were no pots and pans, silverware, candle holders, etc. The absence of these items if very unusual for this time period – and let’s face it, you can’t live without candles and silverware and Charles Dodson, while he wasn’t rich, he certainly was not a poor man.

    end of commentary

    Life on the Northern Neck

    Life on the Northern Neck of Virginia at that time revolved around the planting, nurturing and harvesting of tobacco, a very labor intensive crop.

    Charles Dodson was very clearly a man with a great deal of initiative and drive, given that he started out in 1679 by working the land of Peter Elmore that he would never own, and by the time he died, 27 years later, he owned 900 acres.

    Ann’s life too would have revolved around crops, seasons and church. While church attendance was mandatory at the time, most people, especially women, didn’t need much encouragement to attend. Where the court sessions were an important social occasion for men, women didn’t usually attend court, and church provided that same type of camaraderie for women.

    Charles and Ann lived in, along or on Briery Swamp, a part of the Totuskey watershed. They paid for their land with tobacco, the traditionally accepted money in colonial Virginia.

    Ann’s husband did the normal male things of the day. He witnessed wills, witnessed deeds and attended court, occasionally serving as a juror. Charles apparently settled differences with people amicably, because for a very long time, he wasn’t sued and he didn’t sue anyone.

    He was highly thought of in the community, because in 1686/1687, when neighbor John Lincoln died, it was reported that John would “have none other than Charles Dodson” for his executor.

    end of comment

    Birth:
    Old Rappahannock, (now Essex County) Virginia

    Possessions:
    Charles first appears in Old Rappahannock County in 1679 in a lease type arrangement with Peter Elmore. Charles does not purchase his own land until 1686, so he clearly didn’t have funds until that time. Nor did Charles patent land, so apparently someone else took credit for his 50 acre headright.

    Charles married Anne LNU BY 1671, (England). Anne was born ~ 1654, England; died 1 Aug 1715, Richmond County, Virginia. [Group Sheet]


  2. 113.  Anne LNU was born ~ 1654, England; died 1 Aug 1715, Richmond County, Virginia.

    Other Events:

    • Probate: 4 Mar 1718

    Notes:

    We’ve now produced evidence that suggests Ann Dodson is not Ann Elmore. However, we still have no idea who Ann Dodson is.

    We also don’t know who Charles Dodson’s parents were, or where he came from either. We do know that there is no record of any Dodson family in the region before Charles first appears in the 1679 transaction between Charles Dodson and Peter Elmore.

    For all we know, Charles and Ann may have married in England, or wherever they were before they are found in Rappahannock County in 1679.

    By that time, Ann and Charles have at least one son, Charles Jr., have probably been married about 9 years and most likely have had about 4 children. We know that Charles Jr. lived to adulthood, and it’s safe to say that Thomas born in 1781 is the second son that lived, but we don’t know if any of the children born between Charles and Thomas survived.

    Can Ann Dodson Write?

    Ann witnesses four documents in 1693, 1694 and 1705. It appears that she signed her name, although that may simply be because the clerk did not mention that she could not write and signed with a mark. Given that her son, Charles Jr., also married an Ann, it’s difficult to discern which Ann was signing, although the ones where Charles Jr. is absent are much more likely to have been signed by Ann, wife of Charles Sr.

    If Ann is literate, it makes the probability that she was raised in England much more likely than being raised in early Virginia.

    Birth:
    There is absolutely no record to substantiate the claim that Ann was the daughter of Benjamin Dodson, or that there were any transactions between John Hill and Benjamin Dodson, or that John Hill even owned land in what would become Essex County.

    Died:
    in Farnham Parish...

    Children:
    1. Charles Joseph Dodson, Jr. was born 1672-1677; died 1 Aug 1775, Richmond County, Virginia.
    2. 56. Thomas Dodson, Sr. was born 15 May 1681, Richmond County, Virginia; died 21 Nov 1740, Richmond County, Virginia.
    3. Bartholomew Richard Dodson was born ~ 1683, (Richmond County) Virginia.
    4. William Dodson was born 0___ 1685, (Richmond County) Virginia; died 10 Aug 1744, North Carolina.
    5. John Dodson was born 1687-1693, Richmond County, Virginia; died 17 ___ 1780, Richmond County, Virginia.
    6. Lambeth Dodson was born 1689-1695, (Richmond County) Virginia.
    7. Elizabeth Dodson was born 0___ 1695, (Richmond County) Virginia; died 0___ 1727, Richmond County, Virginia.
    8. Anne Dodson was born 16 Jul 1715, (Richmond County) Virginia; died 0___ 1719, (Richmond County) Virginia.
    9. Mary Dodson was born 0___ 1719, (Richmond County) Virginia; died 0___ 1719, (Richmond County) Virginia.

  3. 114.  Thomas Durham, Sr. was born Bef 1649, Richmond County, Virginia; died 30 May 1715, Richmond County, Virginia.

    Other Events:

    • Alt Birth: 6 Mar 1661, Richmond County, Virginia
    • Alt Birth: 6 Mar 1661, Port Royal, Bermuda
    • Will: 11 Aug 1711, Richmond County, Virginia
    • Alt Death: Bef June 1, 1715
    • Probate: 1 Jun 1715, Richmond County, Virginia

    Notes:

    Thomas is NOT the son of Henry DURHAM of Bermuda...

    Posted By: Mrs. Gene Rooks
    Email: generooks@cfl.rr.com
    Subject:Thomas NOT son of Henry of Bermuda
    Post Date:December 13, 1998 at 19:01:23
    Message URL:http://genforum.genealogy.com/durham/messages/278.html
    Forum:Durham Family Genealogy Forum
    Forum URL:http://genforum.genealogy.com/durham/

    Sorry, guys, LDS records notwithstanding, Thomas DURHAM 1661/1715 of Richmond Co.VA married to Dorothy ??? is NOT the son of Gov. Henry DURHAM of Bermuda. I bought that story too, but couldn't prove it was the same Thomas. Finally I wrote Bermuda Archives, and received an abstract of a lawsuit filed in Bermuda in 1734 that definitely proved that the Thomas who was born to Gov. Hunt lived and died in Bermuda where he had a son "Richard Durham of Sandys tribe marriner Eldest son and heir of Thomas Durham Late of the same Gent: dec'd, who was the son of Henry Durham, Esq.

    " The suit was in regard to property in Bermuda lately in the possession of Judith DURHAM, Henry's wife. I would love to know also who the parents of our Thomas of Virginia were, but they weren't Henry and Judith Hunt DURHAM of Bermuda. I will say there is an outside chance there could be a collateral relationship, since the father of Henry DURHAM of Bermuda also named Thomas had other sons, who also may have had a son named Thomas, and of course there was trading, etc. between Bermuda and Virginia during that time, of which scant records were kept.. Incidentally, since these are our ancestors also, Jim, I'd be really pleased to hear from you about clues you have for the possible family for Dorothy and her sisters.

    Gene in Gotha.
    ______

    Richmond County,VA Wills,03-210,

    "Will of Thomas Durham, dated 4 Aug 1711; proved 1 June 1715

    to wife Dorothy, my plantation and lands for her natural life, and at her death plantation and lands to son Thomas Durham and Mary his wife provided he signs over 50 acres to my son John Durham or pay him 8,000 pounds tobacco and to daughter Mary Dodson, 1,500 pounds of tobacco. -grandson, Thomas Dodson.

    *

    Thomas Durham Sr
    Born about 6 Mar 1661 in Port Royal, Bermuda [uncertain]
    Son of Henry Durham and Judith Hunt
    Brother of Thomas Durham [half] and Esq Thomas Durham esq [half]
    Husband of Dorothy Smoot — married [date unknown] [location unknown]
    Husband of Dorothy Doreen Unknown — married [date unknown] [location unknown]
    Father of Richard Durham, Samuel Durham, Mary May (Durham) Dodson, Thomas Durham Jr and John Durham
    Died 30 May 1715 in Richmond County, Virginiamap
    Profile managers: John Schmeeckle private message [send private message], Jerry Murdock private message [send private message], and Cindy Jajuga private message [send private message]
    Durham-145 created 22 Apr 2011 | Last modified 31 Dec 2016
    This page has been accessed 2,668 times.

    Contents

    1 Disputed Parents and eldest son Richard
    2 Presumed Second Son Samuel
    3 Biography
    3.1 Second Wife's Origin
    3.2 Will
    4 Sources

    Disputed Parents and eldest son Richard

    It has often been assumed that Thomas was the son of Henry Durham and Judith Hunt, who married Feb. 14, 1660 in Port Royal, Carine, Bermuda. This couple did have a son Thomas who was baptized 6 Mar. 1661, the right age to be Thomas Durham of Richmond County.[1] Henry Durham was a mariner or sea captain. [2]

    However, per a 1998 genforum post: "I wrote Bermuda Archives, and received an abstract of a lawsuit filed in Bermuda in 1734 that definitely proved that the Thomas who was born to Gov. Hunt lived and died in Bermuda where he had a son "Richard Durham of Sandys tribe marriner Eldest son and heir of Thomas Durham Late of the same Gent: dec'd, who was the son of Henry Durham, Esq. The suit was in regard to property in Bermuda lately in the possession of Judith DURHAM, Henry's wife.[3]

    Whooever wrote the above quote assumes that because Thomas Durham was described as "late of" Sandys Tribe, Bermuda, that Thomas died there. That doesn't have to be the case. "Late of" can mean "moved away from." The father of Thomas Durham of Burmuda was a mariner, and the son of Thomas Durham of Bermuda was a mariner, which leads to the logical supposition that Thomas himself was a mariner. And of course mariners sailed to other places and sometimes had more than one residence. Thomas Durham could have promised his Bermuda property to his eldest son, and then set up a household in Virginia in order to eventually obtain land for his younger sons, while maintaining and occasionally visiting his Bermuda property (which was actually under the control of his widowed mother with her dower right).

    There is one important piece of evidence to support such a supposition. In Bermuda at the time it was forbidden to build boats or ships, because the Bermuda Company wanted all the settlers to grow tobacco. This means that mariners from Bermuda had to develop relationships with shipwrights and boatwrights to build and repair their ships and the boats that their ships carried. Thomas Durham of Richmond County, Virginia married the granddaughter of a boatwright. William Smoot was recruited by the Virginia Company in 1637 to settle in Virginia, and eventually was induced to relocate to Charles County, Maryland. In addition, there was a "Durham and Hall Shipping Co. 1702 Philadelphia ... sailing up and down the eastern seaboard, to England and to the Caribbean. The account of this shipping Company losing a ship in Lynn Heaven Inlet, VA, in 1702, can be read in the book by Don Shomette, called "Pirates on the Chesapeake Bay."[4] For further research: Michael Jarvis, In the Eye of All Trade: Bermuda, Bermudians, and the Maritime Atlantic World (2010). And to continue the boat-builder theme, there was the legendary Robert Durham, inventor of the "Durham Boats" that would later carry George Washington and his troops across the Delaware River in the successful Christmas Day attack at Trenton, New Jersey.[5]

    Biography

    It appears that Thomas Durham, by an unknown first wife, had sons Richard and Samuel. Thomas's son Thomas was referred to as the eldest son of wife Dorothy (but not Thomas's eldest) in both a 1707 land record and in Thomas's will (see below). Thomas presumably married Dorothy around 1685, as his daughter Mary (identified as Dorothy's eldest daughter) was born in 1686.

    Thomas Durham was in Richmond County, Virginia as early as 1686, when the baptism of his daughter Mary was recorded. The baptisms of sons Thomas (1690) and John (1698) also appear in the parish register.

    On 10 Mar. 1693/4 Thomas Durham witnessed the will of Elizabeth Grady (probated 4 Nov. 1702), who left all her land to Mary Smoot, daughter of William Smoot (the uncle of Thomas Durham's wife Dorothy), who was executor of the will. Other witnesses to the will were Richard Draper and John Rankin.[6] Mary Smoot would eventually marry Thomas Durham's son Thomas.

    Second Wife's Origin

    It is now known that Dorothy, wife of Thomas Durham and mother of his three youngest children, was the daughter of Mary (Smoot) Gilbert, youngest sister of William Smoot.[7]

    It was often speculated that Dorothy was a daughter of William Smoot Jr., who was actually Dorothy's maternal uncle. William Smoot Jr. conveyed property to Dorothy Durham in 1700 "with love and affection." Various records prove that Dorothy Durham, Thomazin Goodridge, and Alice Chinn were all sisters.[8] However, the women are only recorded by their married names. The maiden name has not been proved.[9][8]

    Sources

    ? Julia E. Mercer, Bermuda Settlers of the 17th Century: Genealogical Notes from Bermuda, p. 49.
    ? On p. 119 of Julia E. Mercer's Bermuda Settlers of the 17th Century: Genealogical Notes from Bermuda is a record that Henry Durham and others were allowed to fish for whales in 1676.
    ? Thomas NOT son of Henry of Bermuda.
    ? Ancestral Durham Research website, by Harry Muncey and Raymond Durham.
    ? History of the Durham Boat
    ? Byron K. Durham's Durham Family Heritage website, citing Wills of Richmond County, p. 9.
    ? See Dorothy's profile for sources.
    ? 8.0 8.1 Ule, Michelle Duval, compiler The Dodsons, Durhams, Roses and Nevilles. Spring, 2000, Michelle Ule's Website Author generously provided a PDF.
    ? Louer, Graham "William Smoot Was NOT the Father of Dorothy Durham" genforum post April 25, 2012, Web accessed May 25, 2014.
    ? Portions of the will are quoted at this 1998 genforum post by Gene Brooks. The majority of the will is included in a 1998 will by Michelle Ule, posted by her at this 1999 forum post. The entire will is quoted at Byron K. Durham's Durham Family Heritage website.
    See also:

    Williams, Mrs. Sherman, Compiler & Editor The Dodson (Dotson) Family of North Farnham Parish, Richmond County, Virginia: A History and Genealogy of Their Descendants. Two Volumes with index in Volume Two. Volume Two contains abstracts & transcripts of documents. (Easley, SC: Rev. Silas Emmett Lucas Jr.; Southern Historical Press, Inc., 1988) Call Number: CS 71 D648
    Durham, Keith Byron Descendants of David Milton Durham and Jane Coleman (with sources) accessed online 3/14/14

    *

    Will of Thomas Durham

    Will dated 4 Aug 1711; Probated 1 Jun 1715. Named wife Dorothy, children Thomas, John and Mary Durham., a grandson Thomas Dodson. [Richmond Co WB 3, p210][10]

    In the name of God Amen, I Thomas Durham of Northfarnham in the County of Richmond...

    Item. I give and Bequeath unto my Dear and Loving wife Dorothy Durham the use of my Plantations, together with all my Lands and Tenements with all and Every of their Appurtenances--Profits and Commoditys ----Belonging or appertaining for and During the ----of her natural Life and after her Decease if my Son Thomas Durham and Mary his wife do by some sufficient instrument in writing under their hands and seals and affording to due forme of Law Release and Acquitt all and singular their Right ,title and Interest in and unto Fifty acres of Land being the same Tract & Plantations which we had conveyed us by Mary Gilbert unto my son John Durham and his heirs or pay him the said: John Durham Eight Thousand Pounds of Tobacco in Lieu of His said Land and also pay unto my Daughter Mary Dodson Fifteen hundred pounds of Tobacco that then and upon this consideration-----aforesaid: I do give and bequeath unto my said son Thomas Durham and his heirs Lawfully Begotten and for want of such issue unto my son John Durham and his heirs Lawfully Begotten and for want of such issue unto my GrandSon Thomas Dodson and his heirs. But if my said son Thomas Durham doth refuse and will not release the said fifty acres of Land nor pay the Tobacco aforesaid: I do will and Bequeath the said Plantation whereon I now dwell with all my Lands unto my son John Durham and his heirs---

    Item. I give and Bequeath unto my Son John Durham Fifty acres of Land more or less being the Plantation with all the Tract and Parcell of Land that was Conveyed us by Mary Gilbert, to have and to hold the said Tract and Parcell of Land with the appurtainances unto my said son John Durham and his heirs Lawfully begotten and for want of such issue unto my GrandSon Thomas Dodson and his heirs-

    Item. I give and bequeath unto my Son John Durham one Feather Bed and Furniture, one Cow and calf, one Mare and Iron Pott, Two ____ Dishes and half a dozen Plates

    Item. I give and bequeath unto my Daughter Mary Dodson Five Thousand Pounds of Tobacco; Fifteen hundred Pounds of the same to be paid by my son Thomas Durham within Nine months after the Decise of my wife and Five hundred the Rest of the said Tobacco to be paid by my Son John Durham at the Decease of my Wife----

    Item. I give and Bequeath all the Residue of my Estate, Goods, Cattle and Chattells unto my wife Dorothy Durham for & During her widowhood, but if she doth Marry that _____ off my Personall Estate, Except what is herein given to John Durham shall be Equally Divided between my wife and my three Children, and I do make and Ordain my Dear & well beloved Wife Sole Executrix of this my Last Will & Testament---Rattifying and Confirming this & none other to be my Last Will & Testament. In Witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand & seal this Fourth Day of August in the year of our Lord, One Thousand Seven Hundred and Eleven.

    Signed, Sealed & Published and Declared in the presence of us-- Joan O Searles her mark, Arthur Kay his mark, Miles Walters Thomas Durham his mark (seal)

    Att. at a Court held for Richmond County ye first Day of June 1715 This Will was approved in open Court by the oaths of Arthur Key & Joan Searles ______ of the Witness or tthereto be on admitted to Recored...Tests M: Beckewith C.C.O."

    *

    Thomas Durham (before 1649-1715), A Governor’s Son?, 52 Ancestors #161
    Posted on May 20, 2017
    Thomas Durham’s land ultimately fell into Richmond county, on the peninsula of land known as the Northern Neck of Virginia.

    We know nothing about Thomas Durham’s early life, except it’s unlikely that he was born on the Northern Neck of Virginia. In 1652, in Northumberland County, part of which ultimately became Richmond County, all men had to sign an oath of loyalty, and there is no Durham name among the signers.

    The Northern Neck area was still inhabited by Indians at that time, and the region was not easily settled, although people were pushing into the area and carving out farmsteads – much to the chagrin of the Indians whose land they were settling upon.

    According to “A Tricentennial Portrait” by Robert Harper for the Richmond County, Tricentennial Commission:

    In September 1661, the area that would become Richmond County had its own version of warfare when Indians killed 3 men in retaliation for the killing of an Indian man in the spring. The situation escalated and for the next 5 years, raids ensued.

    In an unrelated, but threatening incident, the Dutch fleet appeared in the Rappahannock River in 1666. They engaged, and most of the men on the ship were killed. Then, on November 8th, 1666, the worst hurricane to hit Virginia in the 17th century arrived, destroying more than 10,000 buildings and hurling hail the size of eggs.

    In case you don’t know, hail the size of marbles descends at about 20 miles an hour, but hail the size of baseballs descends at the rate of over 100 miles an hour. A 100 mile an hour baseball sized piece of hail kills people as well as livestock and wildlife.

    A fort was erected at the head of Cat Point Creek to protect settlers within a 20 mile radius, which tells us there were few settlers. Fortunately, a treaty was reached with the Dutch before the fort came into use.

    In 1675, war with Indians continues, with 2 settlers being killed in Richmond County by Indians from Maryland. A retaliatory force of 30 men crossed the Potomac River into Maryland and killed Indian King and 10 warriors.

    On January 21, 1675/1676, a group of northern Indians went to war with the English and killed 36 people in Rappahannock County. Starting near Port Royal, the Indian warriors fanned out in a circle and destroyed everything English. Turning down the river valley, their objective was to kill 10 men for every Indian who had been killed.

    Small groups of planters met for protection and begged Governor Berkeley to send them a commissioned leader. Berkley wrote that no leader could be sent until the next Assembly meeting and ordered the residents to build a new fort at the head of the Rappahannock River (Cat Tail Creek.)

    Berkley’s idea was that the Indians would attack the fort in number and not harass the isolated farmers. In February of 1676/1677, the Governor sent an order that no more than 10 men could meet as a group due to fear of a general uprising against him. This act was the fuel that the Indians needed and a number of attacks were carried out on the small groups of settlers.

    Richmond County wasn’t very safe and was likely not a location one would choose to settle with a family. A decade later, things had calmed, the remnants of the Indians were gone, and births of many English families were being recorded in the Farnham Parish Church register.

    Thomas Durham’s Life

    I’ve rebuilt Thomas’s life, as best I can, by extracting the records from the early Virginia counties, beginning with the formation of York County in 1633 and for the next hundred years in Northumberland, Lancaster, Old Rappahannock and Richmond as they were formed from the original York County. Richmond and Essex were both formed in 1692 when old Rappahannock was dissolved and divided into half, with Richmond County being on the north of the Rappahannock River and Essex on the South.



    We don’t know where Thomas Durham came from, but we do know that the first record that includes Thomas is found in the Farnham Parish church register with the birth of his daughter, Mary, to Thomas and Dorothy Durham on June 5, 1686.

    Additional births attributed to Thomas and Dorothy were for son, Thomas on June 17, 1690 and son John on November 23, 1698.

    These records suggest that Thomas was already married to Dorothy who has been reported to be related to the Smoots by sometime in 1685, if not earlier. Dorothy’s history will be reviewed in a separate article.

    Farnham Parish was split into two when Old Rappahannock County was split into Richmond and Essex County, with Richmond County becoming North Farnham Parish and Essex County becoming South Farnham Parish.

    The North Farnham Parish register transcription, which includes the original Farnham Parish records, does still exist, but is fragmentary and known to be incomplete.

    Who is Elizabeth Grady?

    In a will written by Elizabeth Grady on March 10, 1693/94 and probated on Nov 4, 1702, Mary Smoot daughter of William Smoot is left all of Elizabeth Grady’s land. The executor of the estate is William Smoot, and the witnesses are Thomas Durham, Richard Draper and John Rankin.

    Court Order Book Page 184 July 1, 1702 – Will of Elizabeth Grady proved by oaths of John Rankin and Thomas Durham.

    This question of Elizabeth’s identity has further reaching implications than it appears, because the people involved are intertwined.

    Thomas Durham’s son, Thomas Durham, marries this same Mary Smoot about 1710. Furthermore, based on a 1700 transaction, Dorothy, wife of Thomas Durham is related to William Smoot in some fashion.

    Lastly, Thomas Durham and William Smoot appear to be neighbors and lifelong friends.

    To answer the question more directly, I have no idea who Elizabeth Grady is, nor why she would be leaving land to Mary Smoot – but tracking Elizabeth Grady and figuring out who she is and how she was connected might well lead to unraveling other mysteries involving the Smooth and Durham families.

    The 1700 Deed

    August 2, 1700 – Deed of gift. William Smoot Sr. of N. Farnham Parish Richmond Co. for consideration received and for the great love that I have and beare unto Dorothy Durham wife of Thomas Durham of same county and her children do give unto her and her children a 62 acre parcel of land bounded by Thomas Durham, branch of Morattico Creek, land of the same William Smoot Sr., land of Rowland Lawson, line of Mr. Grimes and line of Clare. If in case the said Dorothy Durham die that then the land shall come to Thomas Durham eldest son of the said Dorothy and in case that he die without issue that then the land shall come to John Durham second son of the said Dorothy and in case that he die without issue that the land shall come to Mary Durham eldest dau of the said Dorothy Durham and in case she shall happen to die without issue that then the land shall come to the fourth, fifth, sixth and c children of the same Dorothy, but in case of want of issue that the land shall descend to Ann Fox wife of William Fox of Lancaster Co., gent. Wit John Simmons, Thomas Mackey, ack Aug 7, 1700 Book 3 page 57

    Aug 2, 1700 – Power of attorney Jane Smoot wife of William Smoot Sr. having appointed Edward Jones my attorney to ack the above gift to Dorothy Durham and her children. Wit Thomas Mackey, Edmond Overton. Book 3 page 58

    Court Order Book Page 56, August 7, 1700 – Ordered that the deed for land ack in this court by William Smoot Sr unto Dorothy Durham, wife of Thomas Durham, be recorded.

    This deed is quite interesting and somewhat perplexing. Just to keep the players straight, William Smoot is the father of Mary Smoot, to whom Mary Grady left her land. Clearly there is a very close connection between William Smoot and Dorothy Durham.

    First, this deed names Dorothy’s living children that are documented in the North Farnham Parish registers. The deed was written in August 1700 and John Durham was born on November 23, 1698.

    This deed tells us that of Dorothy’s children, Mary is the eldest living daughter rand John and Thomas are the eldest living sons. Given John’s birth date, they have to be the only living sons. What we don’t know is whether or not the children referenced as 4th, 5th and 6th are living or are speculative in case they exist in the future.

    It’s certainly unlikely that between 1686 and 1700 and Dorothy only had 3 children. Six or 7, assuming they all lived until weaned, would be more normal. If the children 4-6 noted in the will, were living, they were assuredly females.

    Second, this deed tells us who the neighbors are, that Thomas Durham and William Smoot’s lands abut, and that they live on a branch of Morattico Creek.

    Third, who are Ann and William Fox? William Fox’s wife appears to be Anne Chinn, daughter of John Chinn and Alice who is suspected of being a Gilbert and who is Dorothy Durham’s sister.

    The following will from Lancaster County by Alice Stretchley indicates that Dorothy Durham is her sister and that Tomassin Marshall is as well.

    Abstracts of Lancaster County, Virginia Wills 1653-1800 by Ida J. Lee:

    Stretchley, Alice, wife of Jno. Stretchley of St. Mary’s White Chappell. 29 Aug. 1701. Rec. 8 Oct. 1701. Daus: Anne Fox the portion bequeathed her by Jno. Chinn, her father, and by Jno. Stretchley, her father-in-law; Catherine Heale. Sisters: Dorothy Durham and Tomassin Marshall. Son-in-law: Capt. Wm. Fox. Son: Rawleigh Chinn “all money in the hands of Mr. Jno. Pemberton, Mercht. of Liverpool.” Cousin: Mary Dodson. Error: Son, Rawleigh Chinn Wits: Jas. Taylor, Lewis Pugh, David Smith. W.B. 8, p. 106.

    Alice Stretchley appears to be Ann Fox’s mother who would have been married first to John Chinn and then to John Stretchley. So Ann Fox would have been Dorothy Durham’s niece.

    Fourth, why did William Smoot leave this land to Dorothy separately from her husband, meaning that Thomas Durham could not dispose of this land. This is outside the norms and customs of the day.

    How was William Smoot related to both Dorothy and Ann Fox, daughter of Alice Quinn Stretchy?

    Thomas Durham’s Great Age

    Court Order Book Page 475, Sept 7, 1699 – Ordered that Thomas Durham for the future be exempted from payment of leveys by reason of his great age.

    I checked the tithable language in the state of Virginia, and it clearly specifies who shall be taxed, and how, and allows for exemptions for people who were disabled and unable to support themselves, and for people who were aged. The state apparently allowed each county court to determine who was exempted. In other locations, I’ve seen men as young as 45, 55 and as old as 70 being exempted due to age, so I’m guessing that the age at exemption was more a combination of age plus ability to work than age alone.

    I would think it would be very unlikely that Thomas Durham was less than 50 years old with his age referred to as “great” so this would put his birth likely in 1649 or before.

    Men in colonial American typically married about the age of 25, which would have been in about 1674 if he were born in 1649. However, we don’t find Mary’s birth until 1686. Was Thomas not married until 1685 or so, or did he have a first wife we don’t know about, or was Dorothy significantly younger than Thomas, or was Thomas younger than age 50 when he was exempted from paying taxes?

    It’s also possible that Thomas Durham was an indentured servant and he was not able to marry until his indenture was complete.

    Court and Deeds

    The ebb and flow of life in colonial Virginia was marked by court sessions that were attended by nearly all men. Deeds were filed, orders made and drinking all around with camaraderie. Thomas Durham witnessed deeds and was found participating in the normal life of colonial planters.

    Multiple records indicate a very close relationship with William Smoot(e.)

    Court Order Book Page 218 Dec. 3, 1702 – Nonsuite is granted to Thomas Durham and Dorothy his wife for the nonappearance of William Smoote Jr. which is ordered to be paid with costs of suit.

    Deed Book March 3, 1704/5 – John Ingo and Martha (Matthew) his wife of Richmond Co. for 36 lb sterling sold to George Glascock of same a 100 acre plantation near the head of Moratico Creek that did formerly belong to John Ingo Sr. father of the same John Ingo and lately purchased of Capt. William Fanteleroy and Catherine his wife bounded by the house of John (blurred), the house of Thomas Durham, house of Edward Ryley, decd and the land of his brother James Ingo. Wit Wells Smoot, John Simmons Ack March 7, 1704. Book 3 page 174

    Deed Book Page 352-354 December 1704 – Between John Ingoe and Matthew (sic) his wife and George Glascock…plantation situate near head of Moratico Creek in Richmond County which did formerly belong to John Ingo Sr. father of ye said John Ingo and lately by him sealed with a plantacion together with a considerable quantity of land said John Ingo Sr. purchased of Capt., William Fauntleroy with as much of the said land as lyes within the said John Ingoes bounds beginning ta a marker hickory standing within the house of John Simsted and the said John Ingoes and running along ye line to a swamp issuing out of Miratico Creek hard by the house of Thomas Durham then up said swamp meeting with the line, then NW by the house of Edward Ryley decd then land of his brother James Ingo 100 acres more or less. Signed, John Ingo and Martha Ingo (mark) witness William Smoot and John Simson (mark)

    This deed confirmed again that the Durham land was along Moratico Creek.

    Court Order Book Page 18 December 6, 1704 – Charles Dodson Jr and Thomas Dodson and Thomas Durham summoned to court for not going to church for two months together.

    Court Order BookPage 34 February 7, 1704/05 – Peter Elmore, Thomas Dodson, Charles Dodson Jr. and Thomas Durham summoned to court to answer presentment of grand jury against them for not going to church for 2 months together and not appearing, ordered they be fined according to law and pay same with costs.

    The Dodsons, Durhams and Elmores were neighbors and apparently influenced one another, or at least there was comfort among neighbors and safe haven for resistance. Church attendance was mandatory in colonial Virginia.

    Court Order Book Page 68 September 5, 1705 – Power of attorney made by John Ingo to James Ingo proved by oaths of William (?) and Dorothy Durham and ordered to be recorded.

    The ? is probably William Smoot from other evidence. If so, once again, Dorothy Durham is found with William Smoot.

    biography contiued...

    *

    James Gilbert and the Depositions

    Richmond County Misc. Record Book (1699-1724)

    Page 26b Deposition Ann Kelly, aged 20 years or thereabouts, says that on last New Year’s Day, Thomas Durham, your deponent’s master, sent her to James Gilbert’s to desire him to come down to pipe it, and as your deponent and said James Gilbert were coming back, by John Mills his plantation, James Gilbert asked your deponent whether this old woman was at your deponent’s master’s house and your deponent answered, yes, she was, and said James Gilbert held up his 2 hand and said, God’s Curse Light upon that family naming John Mills and all his family and said that if it were not for John Mills and his wife, he and his wife would never have lived at variance as they did, and your deponent told said James Gilbert that it was his own fault, living so, and asked him why he had not fought away his chest and confound that will which he made, and the said James Gilbert said that John Mills and his family had robbed his chest so that they would not agree upon any means that he should fetch it away, and that they were ashamed of it, and the said James Gilbert said that there was a will made but swore by God that he knew not what was in it no more than I did, and your deponent asked said James Gilbert whether he was no sent for to sign his will, but said Gilbert answered, swearing by his God, that he did not sign it, and told your deponent that he had not the sense to make a will, and that John Mills was a rogue for making a false will and that made him and his wife live to discontentedly and further your deponent says that she saw said Gilbert last Feb. count 15 head of cattle for 40. Signed Nov. 2, 1704 by mark

    Page 27 Dorothy Durham aged about 41 years says that sometime before James Gilbert’s death, being in company of said Gilbert and William Smoote, amongst other discourse, she heard said Gilbert say to said Smoote that he did not know that there was any Resurrection or not, and that had made a will to John Mills, but that it signified nothing, and that your deponent did, several times, hear the said Gilbert say that John Mills was a rogue and that he nor any of his should ever be the better for what he had. Signed Nov. 2, 1704 – Dorothy (P her mark) Dureham

    The two depositions above were given in 1704. In 1707, Mary Gilbert, as a widow, was deeding and to Thomas Durham and Dorothy.

    26 Apr 1707 Richmond County, Virginia Deed Book 4, 1705-1708 page 109a-110a – This Indenture made the six and twentieth day of April anno Domini 1707 and in sixth year of the Reign of our Sovereign Lady Anne by the Grace of God of England, Scotland, France and Ireland Queene, Defender of the faith Between Mary Gilbert of the parish of North Farnham in the county of Richmond and Dominion of Virginia, Widdow of the one part, and Thomas Durham of North Farnham in the county of Richmond and Dominion aforesaid, Planter and Dorothy his wife of the other party. Witnesseth that the said Mary Gilbert for good and valuable consideration in hand payed the receipt whereof the said Mary doth hereby acknowledge and of every part and parcel thereof doth requitt consrate and discharge the said Thomas Durham and Dorothy his wife and theire heires by these presents do give grant, bargaine sole alienate entaile and confirme unto the said Thomas Durham and Dorothy his wife theire heirs and assignes a certain plantation tract or parcele of land scituate lying and being in the parish of North Ffarnham in the county of Richmond and Dominion of Virginia upon a Branch of Ffarnham in the county of Richmond and Dominion of Virginia upon a Branch of Ffarnham Creeke called and knowne by the name of the Buory (Briery) Swamp, containing by estimation fifty acres, now in the tenure and occupation of Walter WRIGHT and bounded as followeth: …corner along land of William Smoot… the said Mary Gilbert for her self, her heires, Exors. and Admns. doth covenant promise, grant and assign to the said Thomas Durham and Dorothy his wife and their heires and assignes In manner and form as followeth, That is to say, that the said Mary Gilbert att the time of the ensealing and delivery hereof hath true title, full power and lawful authority to grant and convey the said bargained land and premisses as aforesaid and allso from time to times and att all times hereafter …… doth hereby grant unto the said Thomas Durham and Dorothy his wife and their heires and assignes with all the rights members and appurtanances thereunto belonging or appurtaining without…..and do Execute and acknowledge any other or further deed or deeds which shall be advised, devised or required by the said Thomas Durham, Dorothy his wife or theire Counsel learned in the law or theire heires or assignes for the better and more sure settlement of all and singular of the premisses hereto granted and every part and parcle of the said land unto the said Thomas Durham and Dorothy his wife and theire heires and assignes forever, In Witness whereof the said Mary Gilbert have hereunto put her hand and seal the day and month and year above written. Signed, sealde and Delivered in the presence of: William Smoot, Mil. Walters Mary M. Gilbert (signed with mark) (seal) Recorded 15 May 1707, Teste: J. Sherlock (Supplement to the History of the Dodson-Dotson Family of Southwest Virginia. Compiled and edited by the Rev. Silas Emmett Lucas, Jr. N.p: the author, 1966., pp. 106-107)

    P 110a – William Smoote planter, Farnham Parish, consideration to Thomas Durham of same, planter, quit claim a certain plantation and tract or land situate in upon a branch of Farnham Creek called the Bryery Swamp and bounded (same description as deed between Mary Gilbert and Thomas Durham above) April 20, 1707 signed. Wit Anne Kelly and Mil. Waters

    (Note Anne Kelly is Thomas Durham’s indentured servant.)

    Court Order Book Page 299 Sept 3, 1707 – Mary Gilbert ack deed to Thomas Durham, ordered recorded.

    Court Order Book Page 299 Sept 3, 1707 – William Smoot ack release of right and title of parcel of land sold by Mary Gilbert to Thomas Durham and ordered to be recorded.

    I’ve grouped the information about James Gilbert together, because it becomes very important in the story of Dorothy, Thomas Durham’s wife.

    The Lay of the Land

    We have references to land off of a Branch of Farnham Creek and also Moratico Creek. You can see both of these on the 1859 Bucholtz Map, just below Toreskey and Corbin’s Creeks. Briery Swamp that I believe became Marshy Swamp appeared to be on Totuskey Creek, based on previous Dodson Deeds, and is shown such on this map, but these deeds refer to Briery Swamp off of Farnham Creek, so who knows exactly.



    This contemporary map shows Totuskey Creek, Farnham Creek and Morattico Creek. Thomas Dodson lived as far north as Rich Neck and we have Thomas Durham mentioned as far south as Morattico Creek. Both men owned multiple pieces of land that likely did not abut each other.



    On the map above, Rich Neck is at the top, then Totuskey Creek, then Farnham Creek near Sharps, and the lowest arrow is Morattico Creek. As you can see, these creeks have many small feeders across about half of the width of the peninsula.



    Today this area is dotted by cleared areas for farming, woodlands and small villages.

    The Scandal of Ann Kelly

    Ann Kelly’s indenture to Thomas Durham begins like normal in 1699 when she was determined to be 14 years old. The court determined her age so that the length of her indenture could be determined. In 1704, she gave her age to be 20, which would have put her birth in 1684. If she were 14 in 1699, then she would have been born in 1685.

    Court Order Book Page 406, June 7, 1699 – Ann Kelly servant to Thomas Durham being presented to this court to have inspection into her age is adjudged 14 years old and ordered to serve her master or his assigns according to act.

    However, by 1708, things had heated up quite a bit.

    Court Order Book Page 372, July 7, 1708 – Anne Kelly, servant to Thomas Durham, being brought before the court by her master for committing the sin of fornication and having a bastard child and said Anne refusing to confess who was the father of the child, the court have ordered she be committed to the county goale there to remaine until such time as she shall confess who is the true father of her child and it is also ordered that she serve her master or his assignes after her time by indenture custome or otherwise shall be fully expired according to law in compensation for the trouble of his house during the time of her childbirth.

    Court Order Book Page 372, July 7, 1708 – This day Dorothy Durham for an the behalf of her husband Thomas Durham confessed judgement to the church wardens of Northfarnham parish to the use of the parish for 500 pounds tobacco the same being the fine of Anne Kelly for committing the sin of fornication and having a bastard child which is ordered to be paid with costs.

    Court Order Book Page 4, March 2, 1708/9 – Anne Kelly came into court and made oath that Thomas Durham Jr. is the true father of 2 bastard children borne of her body in the time of her service with his father, Thomas Durham the elder. Upon motion of the Queen’s attorney ordered that Thomas Durham Jr be summoned to next court to enter into bond with security for the indemnification of the parish and what charge may acrew to the parish for or by reason of the children aforesaid.

    Questions and More Questions

    I have so many questions.

    Thomas Durham Jr. was born in 1690, so he was 17 when he impregnated Anne Kelly who was then 22 or 23, assuming the child was born in 1708. Given the timing of the second child’s birth, it’s certainly possible that the first child was born even earlier, as in 1706 which means Anne would have gotten pregnant as early as 1705 when Thomas was 15. Why was she protecting Thomas, even to her own detriment? Did she believe she would one day marry him? Or was she fearful? And if she was fearful, of whom? And why?

    Why did Dorothy step in “on behalf of her husband,” an extremely unusual move for a woman in colonial Virginia? Why didn’t Thomas Durham step in for himself, or sign a power of attorney? Instead, Dorothy rode all the way to the court house and appeared personally, instead of Thomas. This suggests a very strong woman defying her husband’s wishes. Why? Did she secretly know that Ann’s child was her grandchild? Or was it exactly the opposite? She had no idea and was appalled to make that discovery, which might explain why Thomas Dodson posted Ann’s bond for the second child.

    To their credit, between Dorothy Durham and Thomas Dodson, they did not allow Ann to go to jail for something she was only half responsible for, while the non-servant male child of the plantation owner went scot free. Thomas Dodson was, of course, Mary Durham’s husband and the fact that he posted Anne Kelly’s bond made her indentured to Thomas Dodson after her original indenture ended, according to court order. Mary Durham Dodson, Thomas’s wife, was the daughter of Thomas and Dorothy Durham.

    Oh, what a web we weave!

    Then, to add insult to injury, Thomas Durham Jr. married Mary Smoot (who had inherited Mary Grady’s land) about 1710. Ann Kelly was still serving her additional indentures for having two “bastard children” when Thomas married, given that the additional time to serve was typically 5 years, per child. She still had years to go. If Ann had any thought that she would one day marry Thomas Durham Jr., they were assuredly dashed by this point. Ann is left with two small children, serving additional time as a servant, and Thomas Durham Jr. marries the neighbor girl who inherited land. After Thomas Durham Jr. and Mary Smoot were married, he legally controlled her land.

    This isn’t the first or last time Thomas Durham Jr.’s character would be called into question.

    Constable

    Court Order Book Page 92, May 6, 1713 – Ordered Thomas Durham officiate as constable for this ensuing year in the roome and stead of Bartholomew Richard Dodson between Moratico and Farnham Creeks and that he repaire to some Justice to be sworn accordingly.

    There is no Jr. mentioned, so this looks to be Thomas Durham Sr. This further confirms the area where Thomas Durham was actually living.

    biography contiued...

    Thomas Durham’s Will

    In 1711, Thomas Durham wrote his will, but he didn’t pass away until in 1715.

    Thomas Durham’s will was dated August 4, 1711 and proved in court June 1, 1715.

    In the name of God Amen, I, Thomas Durham of Northfarnham in the County of Richmond being sick in Body but of sound and perfect Memory. Praise be given unto God therefore calling to Mind His Mortallity of my body and that it is appointed for all Men once to Die, Do make and Ordain this my Last Will & Testament, That is to say– Principally & first of all I Recommend my soul unto the hands of God that gave it and my Body to the Earth to be Buried in Christian and Decent manner at the Discretion of my Executors hereafter named; nothing Doubting but at the generall Resurrection I shall receive the same again by the mighty Power of God; And as touching such Worldly Estate wherewith it hath Pleased God to Bless me in this Life—–

    Item. I give and Bequeath unto my Dear & Loving wife Dorothy Durham the use of my Plantations, together with all my Lands & Tenements with all and Every of their Appurtenances–Proffits and Commoditys __________ Belonging or appertaining for & During the _____________ of her natural Life and after her Decease if my Son Thomas Durham and Mary his wife do by some sufficient Instrument in writing under their hands and seals and affording to due forme of Law Release and acquitt all and singular their Right, Title and Interest in and unto Fifty acres of Land being the same Tract & Plantation which we had conveyed us by Mary Gilbert unto my son John Durham and his heirs or pay him the said: John Durham Eight Thousand Pounds of Tobacco in Lieu of His said Land and also pay unto my Daughter Mary Dodson Fifteen hundred pounds of Tobacco that then and upon this consideration——-aforesaid: I do give and bequeath unto my said son Thomas Durham and his heirs Lawfully Begotten and for want of such issue unto my son John Durham and his heirs Lawfully Begotton and in _______ of such issue unto my GrandSon Thomas Dodson and his heirs, But if my said son Thomas Durham doth refuse and will not release the said fifty acres of Land nor pay the Tobacco aforesaid: I do will and Bequeath the said Plantation whereon I now dwell with all my Lands unto my son John Durham and his heirs—

    Item. I give and Bequeath unto my Son John Durham Fifty acres of Land more or less being the Plantation with all the Tract and Parcell of Land that was Conveyed us by Mary Gilbert, to have and to hold the said Tract and Parcell of Land with the appurtainances unto my said son John Durham and his heirs Lawfully begotten and for want of such issue unto my GrandSon Thomas Dodson and his heirs—

    Item. I give and bequeath unto my Son John Durham one Feather Bed and Furniture, one Cow and calf, one Mare and Iron Pott, Two ____ Dishes and half a dozen Plates

    Item I give and bequeath unto my Daughter Mary Dodson Five Thousand Pounds of Tobacco; Fifteen hundred Pounds of the same to be paid by my son Thomas Durham within Nine months after the Decise of my wife and Five hundred the Rest of the said Tobacco to be paid by my Son John Durham at the Decease of my Wife—-

    Item. I give and Bequeath all the Residue of my Estate, Goods, Cattle and Chattells unto my wife Dorothy Durham for & During her widowhood, but if she doth Marry that _____ off my Personall Estate, Except what is herein given to John Durham shall be Equally Divided between my wife and my three Children, and I do make and Ordain my Dear & well beloved Wife Sole Executrix of this my Last Will & Testament—Rattifying and Confirming this & none other to be my Last Will & Testament. In Witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand & seal this Fourth Day of August in the year of our Lord, One Thousand Seven Hundred and Eleven. Signed, Sealed & Published and Declared in the presence of us– Joan O Searles her mark, Arthur Kay his mark, Miles Walters Thomas Durham his mark (seal)

    Att. at a Court held for Richmond County ye first Day of June 1715 This Will was approved in open Court by the oaths of Arthur Key & Joan Searles ______ of the Witness or tthereto be on admitted to Recored…Tests M: Beckewith C.C.O.”

    Thomas Durham’s will entry in the will book looks like the clerk reproduced Thomas’s own mark.



    Does this mean that Thomas Durham could never write, or that he was simply too ill or old to sign his will? He didn’t pass away for another 4 years, so he certainly was not on his deathbed when he wrote his will in 1711, although he might have thought he was. He does say that he is “sick in body” but he apparently recovered enough to be appointed constable in 1713. Although there is no Jr. or Sr. mentioned, so the 1713 constable entry could have been for his son.

    And speaking of his son, Thomas Jr., Thomas Sr. left an inheritance only to the children “lawfully begotten” with his sons, excluding his grandchildren by Anne Kelly, if either of those children were still living. In that era, illegitimate children could not inherit from their father unless there was specific verbiage to the contrary.

    Thomas Durham, according to his will, apparently has two parcels of land – although the will is confusing and he only mentions the 50 acre parcel obtained from Mary Gilbert specifically. The second, referenced rather obliquely, must surely be the 62 acres that he is living on conveyed to Dorothy from William Smoot in 1700. The fact that Thomas Durham does not include this second piece specifically in his will is likely because William Smoot conveyed the land directly to Dorothy, omitting Thomas.

    As it turns out, which of his two sons obtained the land becomes irrelevant, because John died without issue in 1722.

    P 212 – Thomas Durham inventory July 6, 1715

    Dorothy Remarries

    We don’t know exactly when Thomas Durham died, but by the time his will was probated, which is typically within 90 days of death, Dorothy was remarried. This seems soon by today’s standards but wasn’t at all uncommon in colonial Virginia.

    The fact that Dorothy had remarried meant that she would only receive a child’s share of Thomas’s estate, one fourth, except for the land which he had already bequeathed to his children.

    Court Order Book Page 283, June 1, 1715 – Last will and testament of Thomas Durham decd presented into court by Dorothy Greenham, his executrix who made oath and proved by the oaths of Arthur Key and John Searles, two of the witnesses.

    Jeremiah Greenham, Dorothy Greenham, John Doyle and Richard Fowler came into court and ack bond for the said Dorothy Greenham admin for the estate of Thomas Durham, decd.

    Thomas Griffin, Thomas Glascock, William Downham and George Davenport or any 3 of them to appraise the estate of Thomas Durham, decd. Oath of appraisers to be sworn and also of Dorothy Greenham, the executrix, for her true discovery thereof.

    Thomas Durham’s Estate Inventory

    Court Order Book Page 62-63 – Jeremiah Greenham and Dorothy, his wife, John Boyle and Richard Fowler of Richmond Co. held and bound for 200 pounds currant money of Virginia condition that Dorothy Greenham executrix of last will of Thomas Durham decd to make a true and perfect inventory of estate of said decd. Signed Jeremiah Greenham, Dorothy Greenham her mark as a D, John Doyle and Richard Fowler

    Court Order Book Page 292 July 6, 1715 – Appraisement for estate of Thomas Durham decd returned and recorded.

    Thomas’s inventory was taken on June 27, as follows:

    One feather bed, bolster, 2 pillows and cafos? (cases?), 3 blankets and one rug, one par of cotton cheets, curtains, valances and bedstead – 6.0.0
    Rugs at that time meant bed rugs, which were wool and decorative and functioned as both a layer of warmth and decoration on top of colonial beds.

    One large table and form – 1.0.0
    A form was a type of bench.

    One small “ – 0.05.0
    Six wooden chairs and one flagg – 0.10.0
    One Bible and two old books – 0.05.0
    I sure would like to know the names of the books. It would tell us a lot about Thomas.

    One butter pott, ditto plate and pann – 0.02.06
    One brass candlestick and one iron pann – 0.01.0
    Just one candlestick?

    One bedstead – 0.05.0
    One pair small styl’ds (probably stillyards) – 0.02.06
    One looking glass – 0.01.03
    One Huckaback table cloth and one dozen of napkins – 1.11.06
    Huckaback was a type of course absorbent cotton or linen fabric typically used for making towels.

    One small old table cloth, 4 old cotton napkins and 2 linen towels, one sheet of the same cloth and one cotton sheet – 0.12.0
    Above Stairs

    One feather bed, bolster, curtains, valances, 1 rugg ? pair of blankets – 02.10.0
    One old couch bod an old blanket and a cadord? – 0.10.00
    One rug, two pillows and one bolster case – 0.15.00
    Three chests – 0.10.00
    In the Kitchin

    One flock bed and bolster, two blankets, one rug and bedstead – 01.0.0
    One old “, one blanket, one cadoro – 0.05.0
    One spinning sheel and hoop of cards – 0.10.00
    A parcel of old tubs – 0.05.00
    A parcel of iron work – 0.04.02
    Kitchin

    One large iron pott and hooks, qt 9 gal 4 ? p’s – 01.12.00
    Five small “with four pair of hooks qt 1345 at “ – 02.04.02
    Two pair of old pott racks – 0.02.00
    A pair of tongs, one spit – 0.08.0
    Two smoothing irons – 0.02.0
    One old musket and one old frying pann – 0.05.06
    If the musket was in the kitchen, it probably wasn’t for self-defense.

    One pofflo? – 0.05.00
    Two bags 1’b:6’l a and one old sadle 2’b:6’l, one old chest 1’b:6’l – 0.05.06
    Five hodgos? 8’b, two pailed, two piggins, one old tubb 5’l – 0.13.0
    A parcel of white salt a’l 2 bushels 2’l, one cart sadle and harness 1’d:6’l – 0.03.06
    35 of good pewter at 10’l pr p’d – 29 of old ditto at 6’l ? pd – 02.04.01
    Three dozen of pewter spoons at 6’b, 16 of wools at 9’l ? pd, one old sauce pann 2’d – 0.18.02
    Two cows and calves at 2 each, three yearlings at 15’l each, one bull at 3’l 10’s – 06.15.0
    Five cows at ? 15’s each, one steer 6 years old in 2’l 10’s, two heifers at ? each – 13.05.00
    Eight sheep at 6 each, one large mare at 3’l – 5.08.0
    A servant boy two years and 7 months to serve – 08.0.0
    Signed:

    Thomas Griffin, Thomas Glascock, George Davenport on June 27, 1715

    Apparently Anne Kelly long ago completed her indenture, or at least she is not listed as a servant in 1713. She would have been about 33 by this time.

    I love this inventory because it tells us where various items were located in the house. For example, we know that there is an upstairs, and it’s large enough for a bed that included curtains and valances, so no shoddy place to sleep.

    The main living quarters, downstairs, included a bed with all the trappings, a second bedstead, but perhaps without a mattress, 2 tables complete with tablecloths and napkins, chairs, butter molds, a looking glass, but only 1 candlestick.

    There’s another bed in the kitchen, maybe for the servant boy. It’s flock instead of a feather bed. Flock is a type of filling made of scraps and wool. The spinning wheel is in the kitchen too.

    I’m guessing this house had two rooms downstairs, one room “above the stairs,” and the kitchen which may or may not have been attached. There doesn’t seem to be any furniture for more rooms.

    There was no mention of tobacco or any farm implements associated with anything except livestock, although tobacco was mentioned in Thomas’s will, so he clearly farmed tobacco in 1711.

    Furthermore, there was no cart or wagon. There is only one horse and an old saddle. There are no pistols, which “gentlemen” would have had, and the old musket is in the kitchen. There is no women’s saddle either.

    Thomas Durham does not appear to be a wealthy man, yet he does have pewter and tablecloths.

    He does not own any slaves which was very common for plantation owners in that time and place.

    What I wouldn’t give for that Bible and the information it contained. We wouldn’t have to wonder who his parents were, or question his wife’s maiden name. We might even know who his grandparents were, and where they were from in England. I wonder what ever happened to that Bible.

    Guardian

    This looks like some tension might have existed between John, the youngest son, Thomas Jr., the eldest son and Dorothy along with her new husband, Jeremiah Greenham. Daughter Mary was already married to Thomas Dodson.

    Page 351, October 5, 1715 – This day John Durham by his petition prayed that his brother Thomas Durham might be admitted his guardian which was granted and said Thomas Durham gives security. Whereupon the said Thomas Durham together with John Harris and Thomas Elmore acknowledge their bond for the said Thomas Durham’s true performance of his guardianship.

    Judgement granted to Thomas Durham as guardian for his brother John Durham against Jeremiah Greenham and Dorothy his wife, executrix of the last will of (page 352) Thomas Durham, decd for 1 feather bed and furniture, 1 cow and calf, 1 mare, 1 iron pott, 2 pewter dishes and half a dozen of plates being legacies left him the said John Durham buy the said Thomas Durham, his late father, decd, in his last will and testament, which is ordered to be paid.

    Here, we find the source of the issue. John who was only 17, wanted his share of the estate, even though he would have still been living at home. This probably means that John went to live with Thomas…and took with him the bed, furniture, cow, calf, mare pewter and other items. Thomas obviously did not release the 50 acres to John.

    Dorothy probably argued that John, as yet underage, was yet living at home so not yet entitled to any of the estate until he came of age. Clearly, this was not settled and went through the court process, probably causing very hard feelings between Dorothy and both of her sons.

    Thomas Durham sells Land

    In 1723, Thomas Durham Jr. sells land which could have been his father’s to Thomas Dodson, his sister’s husband.

    Deed Book Page 240 Dec 4-10, 1723 – From Thomas Durham of Richmond County to Thomas Dodson Sr of same 5000 pounds tobacco parcel of 100 acres formerly belonging to Abraham Marshall bearing date of Nov 25th 1692 situate in Richmond Co and bounded by Charles Dodson, being part of the pat formerly granted to William Thatcher by the main branch of Toteskey. Signed Thomas and Mary Durham. Wit John Hill, William Walker, Jeremiah Greenham. Rec May 6, 1724 and Mary Durham appeared in court relinquished dower.

    Abraham Marshall is Dorothy Durham Greenham’s sister’s husband.

    In 1733, the 100 acres is sold to the Lyell family

    Deed Book Page 12, Lease and release, Dec 6-7, 1733 – From Thomas Dodson Sr. and Mary his wife and Thomas Dodson Jr. and Eliza his wife all of NFP to John’n Lyell of same in consideration of a negro woman to be delivered to said Dodson as soon as any comes to Virginia to be sold as the said Dodson Jr. wished about 130 acres in NFP and bounded by Charles Dodson by the main swamp of Totuskey. The other 30 acres of land is bounded by old Cone path formerly belonging to Daniel Oneal, a line of trees that divides the land of Mr. Spencer and the land of Thomas Dusin, corner oak formerly belonging to William Matthews, along Matthews line the land formerly belonging to John Jenly. Of the 130 acres, 100 acres formerly belonged to Abraham Marshall by a deed dates 25 9ber 1692 and from thence conveyed to Thomas Durham and by the said Durham sold to Thomas Dodson Sr. The other 30 acres was formerly sold by Thomas Dusin to Thomas Southern by deed dated 21 7ber 1687. Signed Thomas Dodson Sr. his mark T, Mary her mark M, Thomas Dodson Jr., Elizabeth her mark, wit Robert Reynolds and George Gibson and William Creel Rec April 1, 1734

    Deed Book Page 25, May 4 1734 _ From Jane Lawson, John Steptoe Jr. and Joanna his wife of Christchurch parish in Lancaster Co. to Robert Mitchell of St. Mary’s Whiteside in Lancaster 18,000 pounds tobacco and 50# and divers other causes 450 acres in North Farnham Parish bounded on west by a branch of Moratico that divides this land from the land of John Mills, Thomas Durham on the north side, Abraham Goad on the NE, William King and Mr. Anthony Sydnor on the east side, Isaac White on the south. Land part of a patent granted to Thomas Madison dated 1770 (sic) by him sold to Capt. John Purvis and by Purvis to John Ockley and by Ockley given by will to said Jean Lawson. Signed by all.

    Drunk at Church

    Court Order Book Page 11, Nov. 7, 1721 – Ordered sheriff to summon Thomas Durham of North Farnham Parish to answer presentment of the grand jury against him for coming to his parish church drunk on the 29th day of October last past.

    Apparently, Thomas Durham’s son, Thomas Jr., now age 31, was a bit rowdy or couldn’t hold his liquor, or both. Apparently now he’s attending church, but not sober. He obviously did not like to attend church. Perhaps his earlier escapades weren’t quite forgiven nor forgotten by parishioners.

    We’ll leave Thomas’s life and times on this rather humorous note. Well, it’s humorous if you weren’t there and are looking back from a perspective of nearly 200 years. Perhaps Thomas felt that showing up drunk was better than not showing up at all, a fineable offense, as we already know. Or perhaps Thomas had a drinking problem. Drinking alcoholic beverages during that time was a daily affair, especially if the water was suspect in terms of cleanliness – but drunk on Sunday morning to the point that he was actually fined?

    The Durham family seems determined to leave us with questions!

    The Persistent Rumor about Governor Henry Thomas Durham

    If you sign on to Ancestry or any other site and look at trees, you’ll find the persistent rumor that Thomas Durham is the son of Governor Henry Thomas Durham who had a son, Thomas, born about 1634.

    Unfortunately, there is not one shred of evidence to connect the two. Several trees also have the Governor passing away in 1694 in North Farnham Parish in Richmond County. I can assuredly tell you that there are absolutely NO records to corroborate this information.

    The one piece of evidence I did find was posted in 1999 on GenForum by Gene, as follows:

    Sorry, guys, LDS records notwithstanding, Thomas DURHAM 1661/1715 of Richmond Co.VA married to Dorothy ??? is NOT the son of Gov. Henry DURHAM of Bermuda. I bought that story too, but couldn’t prove it was the same Thomas.

    Finally, I wrote Bermuda Archives, and received an abstract of a lawsuit filed in Bermuda in 1734 that definitely proved that the Thomas who was born to Gov. Hunt lived and died in Bermuda where he had a son “Richard Durham of Sandys tribe marriner Eldest son and heir of Thomas Durham Late of the same Gent: dec’d, who was the son of Henry Durham, Esq.” The suit was in regard to property in Bermuda lately in the possession of Judith DURHAM, Henry’s wife. I would love to know also who the parents of our Thomas of Virginia were, but they weren’t Henry and Judith Hunt Durham of Bermuda. I will say there is an outside chance there could be a collateral relationship, since the father of Henry Durham of Bermuda also named Thomas had other sons, who also may have had a son named Thomas, and of course there was trading, etc. between Bermuda and Virginia during that time, of which scant records were kept. Gene in Gotha.

    What Gene didn’t mention is that Thomas is a very common first name.

    In case you’re having trouble with all the characters, I charted the relationships of Henry Durham, the Governor.



    I think we can put the rumor of Thomas Durham of Richmond County being the son of Henry Durham, the Governor of Bermuda, to bed. Furthermore, a Governor’s son would not show up penniless and not own land until 8 years after he was beyond “a great age,” according to court records.

    DNA

    I was unable to find any evidence in the Durham DNA project that any male Durham descendants of Thomas Durham had done the Y DNA testing. I was quite hopeful, because, needless to say, a match to a Durham from England would give us someplace to look for the origins of our Thomas.

    The Y chromosome is passed from father to son, with no admixture from the mother, so Thomas’s two sons, would have passed their Durham Y chromosome to their sons and so forth to the current generation of Durham men descended from Thomas.

    It appears that Thomas Durham’s son, John, died unmarried on September 23, 1722.

    Son Thomas Durham, Jr., aside from the illegitimate children he had with Anne Kelly, whose genders are unknown, according to the North Farnham Parish records had several children, as follows, with Mary Smoot:

    Durham, John son of Thomas and Mary Durham, Dec. 14, 1724/5 (sic)
    Durham, Mary daughter of Thomas and Mary Durham, May 14, 1728
    Durham, Susanna daughter of Thomas and Mary Durham, May 14, 1728
    Durham, Margaret and Dominick Newgent, Dec. 2, 1729 (identity of Margaret who is marrying is entirely unknown)
    Durham, Wilmoth daughter of Thomas and Mary Durham, May 21, 1730
    Durham, Kathrine daughter of Thomas and Mary Durham, March 18, 1731
    Durham, Millicent daughter of Thomas and Mary Durham, Aug. 4, 1734
    Durham, Willmoth Oct. 2, 1734 (death)
    Durham, Thomas Dec. 3, 1734 (death)
    Poor Mary – a new child born in August, a daughter dead two months later and her husband two months following that.

    These births and deaths leave us with Thomas Durham Jr. having only one known son, John, born in 1724. John is reported to have married Sarah Hightower and had three sons, Joshua Durham (1748-1816), Charnel Hightower Durham (1753-1836) and Daniel Durham (1777-1868). The births of both Joshua and Charnel are recorded in the North Farnham Parish records, but Daniel is not. I’m hopeful that a male Durham descends from one of these lines and has tested or is willing to Y DNA test at Family Tree DNA. If that’s you, please let me know. I have a testing scholarship for you!!!

    biography contiued...

    Summary

    I have this nagging feeling that we are missing the first half of Thomas Durham Sr.’s adult life.

    The first mention of the Durham surname is in 1686 with the birth of Thomas and Dorothy’s child, Mary. She may have been their first child born and she is the first recorded, but the records are known to be incomplete.

    In 1699, we find Thomas exempted from taxes due to his great age, but his wife, Dorothy, in 1704 says she’s about 41 years of age, which would put her birth year at about 1663.

    If Thomas was of “great age” in 1699, he would have been at least 50, if not 60 or older. In 1699, Dorothy would have been 37.

    Furthermore, Thomas Durham owns no land at all until in 1700 when William Smoot deeds 62 acres to Dorothy, omitting him in the deed, and then in 1707, Mary Gilbert adds another 50 acres.

    We know, based on Thomas’s will in 1711 he still owns two pieces of land, one of which is the 50 acre tract.

    However, there are some rather unusual things about Thomas. He never, not once, sits on a jury. In Virginia, at that time, I believe you had to be a white landowner to do so. That would likely mean he was not eligible until 1707. Either he or his son were appointed constable in 1713, which means they were respected and trusted within the community.

    In 1723, Thomas Durham Jr. sells 100 acres of land that belonged to his mother’s sister’s husband. However, there is no record of either Thomas Jr. or Thomas Sr. purchasing that land. Where Thomas Jr. obtained it is a mystery. If the 1692 notation in the deed refers to when Abraham Marshall sold the land to Thomas, it would have had to be Thomas Sr. because Thomas Jr. was still a child, born in 1690.

    In other words, there seems to have been some transactions that were handled by family that were never recorded at the courthouse.

    While we know quite a bit about the life of Thomas Durham from 1686 on, we know absolutely nothing about his life before that time. Was he perhaps an indentured servant, fulfilling his obligation before he could marry?

    He certainly did not come to the Northern Neck with any money, because he did not purchase land until 21 years after his presence is the area is first known. He never owned slaves which was very common for plantation owners, although he did have at least two indentured servants – one of which gave him two grandchildren.

    Thomas Durham Sr. remains, in very large part, a mystery.

    end of biography

    Alt Birth:
    (North Farnham Parish)

    Died:
    (North Farnham Parish)

    Thomas married Dorothy Smoot 168?, Richmond County, Virginia. Dorothy was born ~ 1663, Richmond County, Virginia; died Aft 1725, (Richmond County, Virginia). [Group Sheet]


  4. 115.  Dorothy Smoot was born ~ 1663, Richmond County, Virginia; died Aft 1725, (Richmond County, Virginia).

    Notes:

    Dorothy Durham (1663 - after 1725), No Shrinking Violet, 52 Ancestors #164

    Posted on June 10, 2017

    Dorothy, born in 1663, was the wife of Thomas Durham by sometime in 1685, because their daughter, Mary, was born on June 5, 1686 in what was then Rappahannock County, Virginia, now referred to as Old Rappahannock. We don’t know if Mary was Dorothy’s first child, but Mary was the first of Dorothy’s children recorded in the North Farnham Parish church records which are known to be incomplete.

    We also know that Dorothy had two more children that lived, Thomas Durham born on June 17, 1690 and John Durham on November 23, 1698. By that time, Richmond County had been formed and Rappahannock County was dissolved.

    Dorothy appears to be somewhat younger than Thomas Durham, her husband, who was probably born sometime before 1649 based on the fact that he was exempted from paying levies by the court in September of 1699 “by reason of his great age.” Dorothy was all of 36 years old at that time. It wasn’t uncommon for second wives to be significantly younger than their husbands and it looks like Thomas was probably at least 25+ years older than Dorothy, if not more.

    Thomas died before June 1, 1715 when his will was probated, leaving Dorothy with children still at home. Dorothy did what colonial wives did, she remarried quickly, in February 1715, before Thomas Durham’s will was probated. Probate of a will generally happened no later than 90 days after the person died although in this case, Thomas had obviously died sometime prior to February when Dorothy remarried. Someone had to manage the plantation, plant the crops, maintain tobacco which necessitated a lot of manual labor and TLC at just the right time, and harvest the tobacco when ripe. Dorothy married Jeremiah Greenham, a well-respected gentleman who had been involved with the family and neighborhood for years.

    Jeremiah Greenham died in 1753 and we know that his wife at the time was named Mary. Dorothy was last recorded in a document in 1725 and died sometime between then and 1753, a span of 28 years. Dorothy died between the ages of 62 and 90.

    It’s possible that Dorothy had passed away by January 13, 1726 when Jeremiah Greenham sold his Stafford County land to brothers Thomas Dodson and Greenham Dodson. No wife signed a release of dower, so we can’t tell if the lack of a signature was because Jeremiah was unmarried at the time, or it was an oversight. I think this at least suggests that Dorothy might have been deceased by this date.

    However, Dorothy was alive a year earlier on February 9, 1725 when Ann Chinn Fox Chichester, Dorothy’s niece who had no children wrote a will wherein she left “my suit of silk crape clothes and a suit of muslin head clothes, with apron, rufels and —“ to her Aunt Dorothy Greenham. Ann’s will was probated on December 10, 1729 but we can’t tell if Aunt Dorothy was alive to collect her suit of silk crepe.

    Clothes were expensive in colonial Virginia, and silk crepe, by whatever spelling, would have been a very nice gift that Aunt Dorothy surely would have appreciated.

    We don’t know when Dorothy died, but we do know that Jeremiah retained a close relationship with John Durham, Dorothy’s grandson through her son Thomas Durham. Jeremiah Greenham left John Durham his “Great Bible.” Sadly, Jeremiah had no children of his own.

    Dorothy Durham had two known sisters, Alice who married first to John Chinn and second to John Stretchly and Thomazin who married first to Abraham Marshall and second to William Goodridge. Dorothy could have had more siblings, but those are the only two mentioned in 1701 and 1725 wills.

    The oft-repeated story about Dorothy’s parents is that she is the daughter of William and Jane Smoot, but working with the records, I can tell you that I’m nearly positive that Dorothy is not William Smoot’s daughter, although she is clearly somehow related to William Smoot. I even have some idea about who Dorothy’s parents might have been, but there is no smoking gun yet today. Maybe in due time, utilizing advanced DNA methodologies. Or maybe someone’s “great Bible” will turn up on e-Bay or records from another location will be found. There is always hope!

    Colonial Northern Neck Virginia

    What was life like in the Northern Neck of Virginia when Dorothy would have lived there?

    This area was still suffering from Indian warfare in 1676 when Bacon’s Rebellion gained a foothold. Servants and slaves took the opportunity to escape. Plantations were burned, as was Jamestown, depicted in the engraving below.



    Armed men gathered, eager to fight and emotions ran high. In 1677, the Northern Neck settlers dared not venture from their plantations for fear of their lives. If Dorothy’s family lived in tidewater Virginia then, it would have been a frightening place. Dorothy would have been about 13 at that time.

    Militia units were formed and frontier patrols were maintained in this region until about 1700 to protect the families from Indian attack from hostile northern Indians. These patrols were reinstituted in 1704 across the Rappahannock River in Essex County. Plantations were distant from each other, and although the area was sparsely settled, it was still in many ways a frontier.

    Bacon’s Rebellion resulted in the courts removing the ability for men without land to have a vote. It would be more than 200 years before non-landowners recovered that right. Dorothy’s husband, Thomas Durham, wouldn’t have been able to vote until 1700, when William Smoot deeded land to Dorothy, if indeed Dorothy’s land would have been considered Thomas Durham’s land for purposes of voting. Furthermore, to sit on a jury, one had to be a landowner, so the lack of land was a handicap and detriment to Civil liberties we all take for granted today. Serving at court and voting was reserved for the more successful male residents, in essence creating a defacto class system. While Thomas and Dorothy don’t appear to be poor, based on Thomas’s estate inventory and the fact that they eventually owned land, they certainly had to work their way up the social and economic ladder.

    There is no record of Thomas Durham ever purchasing or patenting land although in 1723, Thomas Durham’s son, Thomas Jr. sells land that looks for all the world like it might have originally belonged to his father. If indeed this was Thomas Durham Sr.’s land, the deed was never filed at the courthouse, just passed down by hand.

    Deed Book Page 240 Dec 4-10, 1723 – From Thomas Durham of Richmond County to Thomas Dodson Sr. of same 5000 pounds tobacco parcel of 100 acres formerly belonging to Abraham Marshall bearing date of Nov. 25th 1692 situate in Richmond Co and bounded by Charles Dodson, being part of the pat formerly granted to William Thatcher by the main branch of Toteskey. Signed Thomas and Mary Durham. Wit John Hill, William Walker, Jeremiah Greenham. Recorded May 6, 1724 and Mary Durham appeared in court to relinquished dower.

    Abraham Marshall is Dorothy Durham’s sister’s husband. By 1723, Thomas Durham Sr. had died and Dorothy was married to Jeremiah Greenham.

    Thomas Durham Sr.’s will is confusing. He directly addressed the 50 acres of land deeded to him in 1707 by Mary Gilbert, but he also makes indirect reference to additional land in this statement:

    “If said Thomas Durham doth refuse and will not release the said 50 acres of land nor pay the tobacco aforesaid, I do will and bequeath the said plantation whereon I now dwell with all my lands unto my son John Durham and his heirs.”

    Was the land Thomas and Dorothy dwelt on the Abraham Marshall land of 100 acres or the 62 acres deeded by William Smoot? By all rights, Thomas should not have been willing the Smoot land, because Dorothy owned that land severally. However, I was never able to discover what happened to Dorothy’s 62 acres. Dorothy did not have a will.

    Unruly Virginia!

    Dorothy and Thomas Durham began their married life at what was economically, probably the worst time possible. Beginning in the early 1680s, too much tobacco caused a glut in the market and tobacco prices plummeted. Planters called for the Virginia government to limit planting and restore prosperity, and when that didn’t happen, plant cutting riots erupted. If the governor wouldn’t help them, then they would take matters into their own hands, literally.

    In May of 1682, rioting spread up and down the Rappahannock River and the Northern Neck peninsula, resulting in militias from other counties being called in to keep the peace. This was about the time that Dorothy and Thomas would have been courting and marrying.

    One burgess blamed the time of year and cider brewing for the riots, according to the History of Essex County, Virginia, by James Slaughter, stating that, “All plantations flowing with cider, drunk so unripe by our licentious inhabitants that they allow no time for its fermentation but in their brains.”

    According to Slaughter, half the tobacco crop was destroyed in Rappahannock County that summer and tensions ran high. Thankfully, tobacco prices rose in 1683 but the specter of “renewed rebellion hung over an unruly Virginia until the end of the century.”

    Unruly Virginians, indeed – but the specter of those angry frontiersmen brings a smile to my lips. Yep, those would be my ancestors.

    In 1684, a French visitor to Rappahannock County did us the favor of recording his travels and attendance at a wedding celebration, thus:

    “The Virginians eat almost no bread, seldom drink during meals, but they did nothing afterwards for the rest of the day and all night but drink, smoke, sing and dance. They had no wine. They drank beer, cider and punch, a mixture of beer, three jugs of brandy, three pounds of sugar and some nutmeg and cinnamon. Mix these well together and when the sugar has melted they drink it and while making away with the first, they prepare another bowl of it.”

    Anyone want to try that recipe?

    The Frenchman then reported that the next morning he “did not see one who could stand straight.” Guests spent the night at parties in colonial Virginia because travel was difficult. Probably also because people were highly intoxicated. Ladies slept on beds and men on the floor.

    The French visitor also mentioned that one “could not enter a house without being served venison. It is very good in pies, boiled and baked.” This tells us that hunting was an important part of the culture of colonial Virginia, and domestic livestock had not yet taken the place of wild game on the tables of the planters and their families.

    At least twice, the Rappahannock court sponsored county-wide parties. In 1683, the county declared a public feast to celebrate the birth of a son to King Charles II and in 1689, the birth of a Price of Wales in England.

    More than 100 gallons of “rum or other strong liquors with sugar proportionable” so that the party could “be done with all the expressions of joy this county is capable of” were ordered by the court and consumed – mostly on the north side of the Rappahannock River, now Richmond County, where court was in session at the time. I bet that was one very interesting court session!


    (Sir Walter) Raleigh’s First Pipe in England, an illustration in Fredrick William Fairholt’s Tobacco, its history and associations

    Tobacco smoking was also quite in vogue, according to our traveling Frenchman:

    “Large quantities of it are used in this country, besides what they sell. Everyone smokes while working and idling. I sometimes went to hear the sermon. Their churches are in the woods and when everyone has arrived the minister and all the others smoke before going in. The preaching over, they do the same thing before parting. They have seats for that purpose. It was here I saw that everyone smokes, men, women, girls and boys from the age of seven years.”

    I must say, I knew that adult men smoked tobacco as a social pastime, and to some extent, it doesn’t surprise me that some women smoked. However, I was taken aback to think about my 7-year- old ancestors, both boys and girls, smoking. It would be another 300 years before we understood how harmful that habit is, and how difficult to break once established. At that time, it was not only popular, tobacco smoking conveyed that one was of the upper class. Tobacco was also believed to have medicinal and curative properties.

    Education, if it happened at all, was a private matter. Public schools did not exist in this part of Virginia until after the Civil War, and most people could not read or write. In fact, according to Slaughter, Governor Berkley (1642-1677) said, “I thank God that there are no free schools nor printing, and I hope we shall not have these hundred years; for learning has brought disobedience and heresy and sects into the world, and printing has divulged them, and libels against the best government. God keep us from both.”

    Wealthy planters sent their sons to England to be properly educated, but the Durham family certainly did not fall into that category. Dorothy in her 1704 deposition where, among other things, she gave her age as “about 41 years,” signed with a “P” for her mark. Thomas Durham signed his will with a mark as well.

    The Deed

    In 1700, something quite unusual happened.

    William Smoot Sr. deeded land to Dorothy Durham in her own right, meaning the land was in her name only. Her husband could not sell it or otherwise control that land. This is an extremely unusual circumstance and begs the question of why. Unfortunately, any clue we might have is entirely mute.

    Richmond County VA Deed Book, August 2, 1700 – Deed of gift. William Smoot Sr. of N. Farnham Parish Richmond Co. for consideration received and for the great love that I have and beare unto Dorothy Durham wife of Thomas Durham of same county and her children do give unto her and her children a 62 acre parcel of land bounded by Thomas Durham, branch of Morattico Creek, land of the same William Smoot Sr., land of Rowland Lawson, line of Mr. Grimes and line of Clare. If in case the said Dorothy Durham die that then the land shall come to Thomas Durham eldest son of the said Dorothy and in case that he die without issue that then the land shall come to John Durham second son of the said Dorothy and in case that he die without issue that the land shall come to Mary Durham eldest dau of the said Dorothy Durham and in case she shall happen to die without issue that then the land shall come to the fourth, fifth, sixth and c children of the same Dorothy, but in case of want of issue that the land shall descend to Ann Fox wife of William Fox of Lancaster Co., gent. Wit John Simmons, Thomas Mackey, ack Aug 7, 1700 Book 3 page 57

    Aug 2, 1700 – Power of attorney Jane Smoot wife of William Smoot Sr. having appointed Edward Jones my attorney to ack the above gift to Dorothy Durham and her children. Wit Thomas Mackey, Edmond Overton. Book 3 page 58

    Court Order Book Page 56, August 7, 1700 – Ordered that the deed for land ack in this court by William Smoot Sr unto Dorothy Durham, wife of Thomas Durham, be recorded.

    It’s also obvious that somehow, William Smoot is related to Dorothy. Not only does he convey this land for “the great love that I beare unto Dorothy…and her children,” but he also reverts the land ownership to Anne Fox, who just happens to be Dorothy’s niece through sister Alice, if Dorothy dies without heirs.

    The Deposition

    James Gilbert died in 1704, having made a will in January 1701/02 leaving his entire estate to John Mills Jr., instead of his wife and family. James suffered from “fits,” as seizures were called at the time, and based on the 1704 depositions of various neighbors and (possibly) family members, he verbally revoked his will, but didn’t seem to believe that he needed to do so in writing, officially.

    Therefore, as you might imagine, there was quite a hullaballoo after his death regarding his will and estate.

    Dorothy Durham gave a deposition about the matter in 1704, which is how we discover her age. From the Richmond County, VA Miscellaneous Record Book, we find the following:

    Page 27 – Deposition. Dorothy Durham aged about 41 years says that sometime before James Gilbert’s death, being in company of said Gilbert and William Smoote, amongst other discourse, she heard said Gilbert say to said Smoote that he did not know that there was any Resurrection or not, and that had made a will to John Mills, but that it signified nothing, and that your deponent did, several times, hear the said Gilbert say that John Mills was a rogue and that he nor any of his should ever be the better for what he had. Signed Nov. 2, 1704 – Dorothy (P her mark) Dureham

    Furthermore, in 1707, after James Gilbert’s estate is (presumably) settled, Mary Gilbert, James Gilbert’s widow sells 50 acres of land to Dorothy and Thomas Durham, with William Smoot quit-claiming the deed.

    How are Dorothy, her sister Alice, William Smoot and Mary Gilbert related? We don’t know exactly, but we’ll discuss the various options and data in a separate article about Dorothy’s parents.

    Dorothy Was No Shrinking Violet

    Women don’t appear much in county records, except for an occasional release of dower rights when their husbands sold land. Even then, most women appointed a male as her power of attorney in order to release her dower right so she did not have to attend court in person.

    Dorothy was unique in a couple of ways. She not only owned land in her own right, she also personally appeared in court in a rather controversial case. I can just imagine Dorothy waltzing before the burgesses, in spite of the gasps of the assembled men because of her audacity, showing up in court like that…and taking care of business

    The drama that unfolds in 1708 casts Dorothy in quite a different light than any other colonial women I have ever encountered in the records.

    The drama didn’t begin as anything unusual. Ann Kelly’s indenture to Thomas Durham begins like normal in 1699 when she was determined to be 14 years old. The court determined Ann’s age so that the length of her indenture could be determined and so that she could be taxed appropriately. In 1704, Ann gave her age to be 20, which would have put her birth in 1684. If she were 14 in 1699, then she would have been born in 1685.

    Court Order Book Page 406, June 7, 1699 – Ann Kelly servant to Thomas Durham being presented to this court to have inspection into her age is adjudged 14 years old and ordered to serve her master or his assigns according to act.

    However, by 1708, nine years later, Anne was 23 and circumstances had changed.

    Court Order Book Page 372, July 7, 1708 – Anne Kelly, servant to Thomas Durham, being brought before the court by her master for committing the sin of fornication and having a bastard child and said Anne refusing to confess who was the father of the child, the court have ordered she be committed to the county goale there to remaine until such time as she shall confess who is the true father of her child and it is also ordered that she serve her master or his assignes after her time by indenture custome or otherwise shall be fully expired according to law in compensation for the trouble of his house during the time of her childbirth.

    Imagine how intimidating this must have been for Ann. Not only did all those men, dressed in their finery and powdered wigs “know what she had done,” they were pressuring her for the name of the child’s father. Ann, a servant with nothing of her own, probably dressed in hand-me-down clothes, if not rags, didn’t even have the right to direct her own body. Ann faced them down and stood firm, probably shaking with fear, even when sentenced to goale (jail.)

    Having none of this, Dorothy steps in.

    Court Order Book Page 372, July 7, 1708 – This day Dorothy Durham for on the behalf of her husband Thomas Durham confessed judgement to the church wardens of Northfarnham parish to the use of the parish for 500 pounds tobacco the same being the fine of Anne Kelly for committing the sin of fornication and having a bastard child which is ordered to be paid with costs.

    I can’t even begin to explain how unusual this was. Not only did Dorothy appear at court, of her own volition, she clearly defied her husband to do so. Not only that, but Dorothy apparently controlled some financial aspects of the household, because there seemed to be no doubt in anyone’s mind that Dorothy was capable and authorized to pay the 500 pounds of tobacco – even though Dorothy did say she was acting “on behalf of her husband.” In every other similar case, some male community member steps forward and posts bail, or not, but no female ever steps forward like Dorothy did.

    I’m convinced that posting bail, in most cases, wasn’t so much to help the poor woman who had the child as it was to retain the services of the woman and not be inconvenienced by her absence. In Dorothy’s case, we’ll never know what motivated her to attend court alone, step up in place of her husband AND pay the fine for Anne Kelly. But she did!

    Furthermore, in most cases, the female willingly named the child’s father. In this case, we do discover the name of the father the following March, and I wonder if Dorothy knew all along.

    Court Order Book Page 4, March 2, 1708/9 – Anne Kelly came into court and made oath that Thomas Durham Jr. is the true father of 2 bastard children borne of her body in the time of her service with his father, Thomas Durham the elder. Upon motion of the Queen’s attorney ordered that Thomas Durham Jr. be summoned to next court to enter into bond with security for the indemnification of the parish and what charge may acrew to the parish for or by reason of the children aforesaid.

    In March of 1708/09, Anne Kelly was dragged before the court a second time. This time, however, she named the father of the children – Thomas Durham Jr., the son of Dorothy and Thomas Durham Sr. While Thomas was summoned to post bond to the churchwardens so they would not incur future costs on behalf of the children, Thomas Jr. was not fined for fornication nor did he have to pay Anne Kelly’s fine for fornication and having a bastard child. Men were never fined, prosecuted for the sin of fornication, nor treated with or sentenced to “goale.” I guess those women somehow managed to get pregnant all by themselves!

    This time, it wasn’t Dorothy who paid Anne Kelly’s fees, nor Thomas Durham Sr. or Jr., who should have by all rights paid her fines – but Thomas Dodson who was married to Mary Durham, Dorothy’s daughter.

    No place in any of this does Thomas Durham Jr. step up – not once.

    I’m proud of Dorothy and her chutzpah in defiance of the social norms of the day and for her courage to do what was right, in spite of whatever the personal consequences.

    I can just hear the conversation:

    Dorothy: “Thomas Durham, if you won’t pay the fine for Anne Kelly, I’ll just go to court and do it myself.”

    Thomas: “Thou will, will thou?”

    Dorothy: “Indeed, I will.”

    Thomas: “I think not.”

    Dorothy: “The Hell I won’t. You watch.”

    Thomas: “Bet me? I forbid it.”

    Dorothy: “Bloody Hell. Hold my beer!”

    Thomas: “Dorothy, it’s not nice to swear.”

    Thomas:

    Dorothy, you go girl!!!

    Dorothy’s Children

    Dorothy had three children that lived and very likely many more that didn’t.

    All three of Dorothy’s children’s births are recorded in the North Farnham Parish Register.

    Daughter Mary Durham was born June 5, 1686 and married Thomas Dodson, the neighbor lad, on August 1, 1701. She would only have been 15 years old. Their first child, and Dorothy’s first grandchild, was George Dodson, born on October 31, 1702. With mother and baby both safe, the Durham and Dodson households were both celebrating!

    Son John Durham was born on November 23, 1698. John was somewhat of a challenging child. He may have been troubled by the death of his father in 1715, because in 1716, John and his brother, Thomas sued his mother, Dorothy, who had remarried to Jeremiah Greenham. Custody of John was awarded by the court to his brother, Thomas, and John’s share of the estate was distributed. What the heck does a teenage boy need with a bedstead? Regardless, John went to live with his brother Thomas, taking with him all of the items his father left him in the will. It could be argued that perhaps brother Thomas coveted some of those items along with brother John’s labor and hence, encouraged the suit against their mother. John never married and was dead by 1722.

    Son Thomas Durham was born on June 17, 1690 and died on December 3, 1734. He would have been 44 years old. He married Mary Smoot, daughter of William Smoot and wife Jane sometime around 1710, when his “bastard children” by Ann Kelly would only have been a couple years old and when Ann would still have been indentured to his father, probably serving her additional time for fornication with Thomas. Talk about awkward!

    1734 was a terrible year for Mary Smoot Durham, Thomas Durham Jr.’s wife. She gave birth to her youngest child, Millicent on August 4th, buried daughter Wilmoth, 4 years old on October 2nd and her husband, Thomas Durham (Jr.), died on December 3rd, leaving Mary with a 4-month-old baby and 8 other children, although it appears that daughter Margaret was already married by this time and some of the other children may have died.

    The Silent Spaces

    Understanding that women are typically married and fertile for about 24 years, and presuming all children live to the age of weaning, approximately 12 children are born to each woman before the days of birth control. If some children die at birth or before they are weaned, then more than a dozen children can be born.

    We know that Dorothy was born in 1663, so we can presume she would have begun having children about the time she married, with the first child arriving probably about 1684. Therefore, we have many spaces in which she probably had children that died and were buried at the Farnham Parish church in the old location, lost today, with only a general location known.



    In the cemetery in the now-lost churchyard, we would find several of Dorothy’s children born in about the following years:

    1684
    1688
    1692
    1694
    1696
    1700
    1702
    1704
    1706
    1708 possibly

    That’s an awful lot of babies to have died. Nine, maybe ten. Some may have lived long enough to smile, to play, even to talk and run in the warmth of the sunshine. Then they died, taking a piece of their mother’s heart with them. Every single one.

    Every child was buried in a tiny grave, probably with a small wooden cross. Each one had a name. Dorothy probably held each one as they died, cleaned their tiny body and dressed them in the best way she could afford.

    One baby girl was probably named Dorothy, her own namesake. Other baby girls would likely have been named Alice and Thomasin, after Dorothy’s sisters. Two more would have been named after her parents and two more after Thomas Durham’s parents as well.

    Dorothy probably visited the graveyard to tend the graves of her children, then to visit Thomas, for the duration of her life. She is probably buried beside them. Knowing in her heart she would be reunited with them one day is probably the only thing to relieve her grief, even a little, and only for a short time.

    Those children’s birthdays and death days are never forgotten, even if they are unspoken.

    Dorothy’s DNA

    Dorothy only had one daughter, Mary, that lived. Mitochondrial DNA is passed from mothers to both genders of their children, but only females pass it on. Dorothy’s mitochondrial DNA would have been passed through daughter Mary to her daughters, and so forth on to the current generation, where male children carry it as well.

    Mary Durham Dodson had the following daughters:

    Alice Dodson married William Creel about 1729. It’s unknown what happened to Alice Creel after her father, Thomas Dodson’s death in 1739.
    Mary Dodson was born in 1715 and married an Oldham by the time her father wrote his will in 1739. Nothing more is known of this line.
    It Dorothy’s mitochondrial DNA was passed on, it was through Mary, through one of these daughters.

    Dorothy’s and her two sisters both carried their mother’s mitochondrial DNA. Dorothy’s sister’s mitochondrial DNA was the same as hers, so we can look at descendants of Dorothy’s sisters who descend through all females to view Dorothy’s mitochondrial DNA.

    Sister Thomasin who married Abraham Marshall had only one known daughter, Mary, who married Alexander Campbell in 1708. I have not traced this family thoroughly, but what I have found shows only two male Campbell children. If this is the case, then Thomasin’s mitochondrial DNA is no more. Perhaps Mary Marshall did have additional children by Alexander Campbell and daughters would be discovered if the line was thoroughly researched.

    Dorothy’s sister Alice who married John Chinn had two daughters. Anne Chinn had no children, but Catherine Chinn married William Heale and had several, including daughters:

    Ellen Heale married David Ball
    Anne Heale
    Catherine Heale married John Canaday
    Sarah Heale married Lindsay Opie
    Elizabeth Heale married William Davenport and had 2 daughters, Judith Davenport born April 4, 1747 and Elizabeth Davenport born Dec. 27, 1749, both in Richmond County, Virginia. Nothing more is known about Judith or Elizabeth. Hopefully there are descendants through all females living today.

    The females who could have passed Dorothy or her sister’s mitochondrial DNA to currently living descendants are shown in the chart below. You can click to enlarge.



    If anyone (male or female) descends from these females through all females from Dorothy or her sisters to the current generation, I have a DNA testing scholarship for you through Family Tree DNA. You carry the mitochondrial DNA of Dorothy Durham and her mother, whoever she was. Perhaps you carry the answer to the secret of her mother’s identity too!

    end of commentary

    confused Thomas DURHAMs

    Posted By:Fredric Z. Saunders
    Email: fzsaund@ix.netcom.com
    Subject:confused Thomas DURHAM's
    Post Date:October 30, 2001 at 19:48:55
    Message URL:http://genforum.genealogy.com/durham/messages/2040.html
    Forum:Durham Family Genealogy Forum
    Forum URL:http://genforum.genealogy.com/durham/


    I think you are confusing Thomas DURHAM's. If I read what you are saying correctly, you are saying that William SMOOT was the father of Dorothy who married Thomas DURHAM, and that was the Thomas DURHAM he listed as his "son-in-law" in his 1716 will.

    Thomas DURHAM married Dorothy [surname unknown].

    They had a son Thomas DURHAM, Jr. born ca. 1690 who married Mary SMOOT [born 7 April 1693], daughter of William SMOOT, Sr. (of the 1716 will) and wife Jane.

    William SMOOT, Sr. who wrote the will was probably born in the late 1640s or early 1650s, and not much older than Dorothy, wife of Thomas DURHAM.

    http://home.netcom.com/~fzsaund/smoot.html

    end of message

    Birth:
    The oft-repeated story about Dorothy’s parents is that she is the daughter of William and Jane Smoot, but working with the records, I can tell you that I’m nearly positive that Dorothy is not William Smoot’s daughter, although she is clearly somehow related to William Smoot. I even have some idea about who Dorothy’s parents might have been, but there is no smoking gun yet today. Maybe in due time, utilizing advanced DNA methodologies. Or maybe someone’s “great Bible” will turn up on e-Bay or records from another location will be found. There is always hope!

    Notes:

    Married:
    (North Farnham Parish)

    Children:
    1. 57. Mary May Durham was born 5 Jun 1686, Richmond County, Virginia; died 21 Nov 1740, Richmond County, Virginia.
    2. Thomas Durham, Jr. was born 27 Jun 1690, Richmond County, Virginia; died 3 Dec 1734, Richmond County, Virginia.
    3. John Durham was born 23 Nov 1698, Richmond County, Virginia; died 8 May 1750.

  5. 124.  Daniel Everett was born 0___ 1670, Richmond County, Virginia (son of Thomas Everett and unnamed spouse); died 0___ 1693, Richmond County, Virginia.

    Notes:

    Birth:
    in Farnham Parish...

    Daniel married Anne Elmore (Virginia). Anne (daughter of Peter Elmore, I, The Immigrant and Jane LNU) was born 29 Aug 1674, Richmond County, Virginia; died 6 Oct 1725, Rappahannock County, Virginia. [Group Sheet]


  6. 125.  Anne Elmore was born 29 Aug 1674, Richmond County, Virginia (daughter of Peter Elmore, I, The Immigrant and Jane LNU); died 6 Oct 1725, Rappahannock County, Virginia.

    Notes:

    Birth:
    in North Farnham Parish...

    Died:
    in Farnham Parish...

    Children:
    1. 62. William Everett was born 15 Mar 1692, Richmond County, Virginia; died 0___ 1759, Richmond County, Virginia.


Generation: 8

  1. 248.  Thomas Everett (son of Charles Everett and unnamed spouse).

    Thomas — unnamed spouse. [Group Sheet]


  2. 249.  unnamed spouse
    Children:
    1. 124. Daniel Everett was born 0___ 1670, Richmond County, Virginia; died 0___ 1693, Richmond County, Virginia.

  3. 250.  Peter Elmore, I, The Immigrant was born 0___ 1627, England; died 0___ 1681, Richmond County, Virginia.

    Other Events:

    • Also Known As: Thomas Peterus "Peter" Elmore, I

    Notes:

    About Thomas Peterus "Peter" Elmore, I

    Sources: http://www.larkcom.us/ancestry/elmore/reports/Elmore%20Descendancy%20Chart.pdf

    born about 1627 in England, and died after 1681 in Virginia. He married JANE [last name unknown] about 1639. She was born about 1618 in Virginia.

    Children of PETER and JANE ELMORE are:

    THOMAS ELMORE, b. about 1642, Warboys Parish, Huntingdonshire, England.

    PETER ELMORE, b. about 1643, Richmond County, Virginia; d. 01 Dec 1725, Richmond County, Virginia. Ann Elmore, b. c1654, Richmond County, Virginia, d. 1 Aug 1715, North Farnham Parish, Richmond County, Virginia; m. Charles Dodson, in 1678, Richmond County, Virginia.

    Research Notes: There was a Peter Elmore living along Totasky Creek, Richmond County, Virginia who was the subject of a headright in 1657. He was born circa 1627 and died after 1681. This Peter, in all probability was the father of Peter Elmore born circa 1643. Peter2 outlived all his children but one and named all his grandchildren in his last will which was proved 5 October, 1726 in Richmond County, Virginia.

    Peter's oldest son Peter3 had five sons.

    The youngest was John Elmore born 1703 and died 1757. His will was proved 3 October, 1757 in Richmond County, Virginia.

    John had four sons and two daughters.

    One son George born 1722 and died 1792. He married in 1743 and had eight sons and one daughter.

    Peter1 may have had a brother named Fauntleroy, born about 1630, died after 1681, who had a son named Francis who married Anne Allen on 2 Dec 1677 in Richmond County, Virginia.

    For a more complete registry of his issue...http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/h/e/n/Lori-Henshaw-Bessemer/FILE/0023text.txt

    "Descendants of Peter Elmore"... http://www.larkcom.us/ancestry/elmore/reports/Elmore%20Descendancy%20Chart.pdf (WikiTree conflicts this data...DAH)

    *

    Died:
    Map & History of Richmond County, Virginia... http://bit.ly/1HHTZw6

    Peter married Jane LNU Virginia. Jane was born ~ 1618, Colony of Virginia; died Virginia. [Group Sheet]


  4. 251.  Jane LNU was born ~ 1618, Colony of Virginia; died Virginia.
    Children:
    1. Peter Elmore, II was born 0___ 1643, Farnham, Virginia; died 1 Dec 1725, Richmond County, Virginia.
    2. 125. Anne Elmore was born 29 Aug 1674, Richmond County, Virginia; died 6 Oct 1725, Rappahannock County, Virginia.
    3. Thomas Archer Elmore
    4. Francis Elmore